WorldWideScience

Sample records for deliverables activities involved

  1. Final measurement. Deliverable D5.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer, A.C.G.; Giessen, A.M. van der; Djurica, M.; Gruber, G.; Krengel, M.; Kokkinos, P.; Varvarigos, M.; Prusa, J.; Schulting, H.W.; Holzmann-Kaiser, U.; Schmoll, C.; Hatzakis, I.; Silva, F.M. da; Reymund, A.; Strebler, R.; Moreno, J.J.R.; Munoz, C.G.; Gheorghe, G.; Nikolopoulos, V.; Mavridis, T.; Bektas, O.; Yuce, E.; Volk, M.; Sterle, J.; Skarmeta, A.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable D5.3 presents the GEN6 Final Measurement. It describes the outputs, outcomes and impact of the GEN6 project, based on other project deliverables inputs of the pilot leaders of the active GEN6 pilots and the individual consortium partners. The final measurement aims to show the amoun

  2. Deliverable D2.4: Status of Dry Electrode Development Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, V.; Garcia Molina, G.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of dry electrode development activity within the WP2 is tobuild a dry electrode prototype for brain wave sensing that is comfortable for the user and provides sufficient signal quality. The electrodes are to be utilized in BCI applications, namely Steady-StateVisually Evoked Potential

  3. Deliverable D2.4: Status of Dry Electrode Development Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlovic, V.; Garcia Molina, G.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of dry electrode development activity within the WP2 is tobuild a dry electrode prototype for brain wave sensing that is comfortable for the user and provides sufficient signal quality. The electrodes are to be utilized in BCI applications, namely Steady-StateVisually Evoked Potential (S

  4. Wavetrain 2 : Deliverable 29

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crom, Izan Le; Pecher, Arthur; Parmeggiani, Stefano

    Deliverable 29 describes a newly proposed methodology to evaluate the power performances of wave (and tidal) energy converters. This methodology has been applied within the Wavetrain2 project to evaluate the production of two wave energy conversion plants: the Pico OWC Plant and the Wave Dragon...

  5. DELIVERANCE IN "ROBINSON CRUSOE"

    OpenAIRE

    湯浅, 恭子; ユアサ, キョウコ; Kyoko, Yuasa

    2003-01-01

    This paper first studies the concept of deliverance in "Robinson Crusoe," written by the 18th century English novelist, Daniel Defoe, in comparison with three Hebrew figures in the Bible and then refers to the author's two writing styles to examine the value of the novel for Japanese readers whose society is not based on a monotheistic god.

  6. Wavetrain 2 : Deliverable 28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chozas, Julia Fernandez

    This deliverable presents a selection of case studies on socio-economic aspects of wave energy, developed by Wavetrain2 partners SPOK and WavEC, that represent key areas of research during the WT2 period. More information and a few other case studies can be also found in the previous deliverables D...... Denmark (the Danish TSO) and counts with the interest and collaboration of the wave device developers Pelamis, Wave Dragon and Wavestar. The second case study assesses the macro-economic impact of the introduction of a 100MW farm in Portugal. An Input-Output model based on Leontief theory was developed...... to the case study of a 100MW farm of Pelamis devices installed in the coast of Portugal. A third case study refers to the application of the WavEC Techno-Economic Model for technology and project feasibility assessment to one particular wave energy technology. Due to confidential issues the results...

  7. Wavetrain 2 : Deliverable 28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chozas, Julia Fernandez

    Denmark (the Danish TSO) and counts with the interest and collaboration of the wave device developers Pelamis, Wave Dragon and Wavestar. The second case study assesses the macro-economic impact of the introduction of a 100MW farm in Portugal. An Input-Output model based on Leontief theory was developed...... (HMRC) and Hans C. Sorensen (SPOK). It included 3 main parts: a first introduction to microeconomics at project level, a second practical session on the use of economic model Retscreen and a final session introducing macro and socio-economic aspects.......This deliverable presents a selection of case studies on socio-economic aspects of wave energy, developed by Wavetrain2 partners SPOK and WavEC, that represent key areas of research during the WT2 period. More information and a few other case studies can be also found in the previous deliverables D...

  8. Involvement in Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gavin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1,096 adolescents participated in 123 focus groups regarding the perceived outcomes of their involvement in sports and physical activity (PA. The groups, segmented by grade level, sex, and school types, were conducted in both public and private high schools in Montreal, Quebec. We sought to understand, through the participants’ own words, their perception of the outcome matrix of involvement in sports and PA. Focus group questions emphasized changes that adolescents associated with such engagement. In particular, participants were asked how sports and PA might influence behaviors, emotional states, personal characteristics, and other outcomes. Twelve themes were identified in the responses: Positive Health and Physical Changes (18.5%, Activity-Related Positive Emotions (15.6%, and Personal Learning (11.3% were most prevalent in the discussions. A cluster of deeper personal changes thematically described as Self-Identity, Autonomy, and Positive Character Development accounted for another 16.5% of the responses. Relatively few commentaries emphasized negative effects (7.1%. Converting the proportions of qualitative data into a quantitative index allowed us to analyze potential differences in emphasis according to sex, age, and school type. Though a few significant findings emerged, the larger pattern was of a uniform perceptual map across the variables for this adolescent sample. Implications drawn from this investigation highlight the need to clearly articulate concrete pathways to positive nonphysical changes (e.g., mood states, autonomy, positive character development from engagements in sports and PA.

  9. EMPOWER. Deliverable no 7.1 Dissemination Plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwissen, M.; Fioreze, T.; Thomas, T.; Pickerden, C.; Hof, T.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable describes the general plan regarding all dissemination activities of the consortium partners and work packages during the project. This links directly to D7.4 where the realization of different dissemination activities will be reported.

  10. EMPOWER. Deliverable no 7.1 Dissemination Plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwissen, M.; Fioreze, T.; Thomas, T.; Pickerden, C.; Hof, T.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable describes the general plan regarding all dissemination activities of the consortium partners and work packages during the project. This links directly to D7.4 where the realization of different dissemination activities will be reported.

  11. [Self-deliverance or infanticide?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittner, Christian; Gehb, Iris; Püschel, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Self-deliverance by a woman in labour is nowadays a very rare event. The authors report the case of a 24-year-old primipara and a newborn of 49 cm length and 2484 g body weight with a complex pattern of injuries on the head, neck, shoulder and back who had breathed for at least 15 to 30 minutes after birth and died from massive craniocerebral trauma and lesions in the oral and cervical region. As one of the experts considered it possible that the skull fractures were exclusively due to the self-deliverance, the woman was acquitted of the charge of manslaughter. This hypothesis is critically discussed on the basis of the presumable course of the delivery and the literature.

  12. Deliverable 1.2.1 Market Analysis and Business Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2009-01-01

    Deliverable 1.2.1 - Market Analysis and Business Plan The main objective of this deliverable is to provide a short overview of 4 communities involved in the pilots, envisaged type of solutions and architectures to be deployed (chapter 2) and market analysis at regional level (chapter 3......) with related business cases. The Market analysis will provide an overview of market requirements, current status and opportunities for the pilot service that will be provided in the context of ISISEMD. This will be realised by performing detailed studies on various sources. Proposals for business modelling...

  13. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  14. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  15. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... of Horizontal Intertwining, Vertical Structuring and Horizontal Propagation the model consists of three phases, each considering different aspects of the nature of interdisciplinary activities. The theoretical modelling is inspired by work which focuses on the students abilities to concept formation in expanded...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  16. QUEST2: Sysdtem architecture deliverable set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-02-27

    This document contains the system architecture and related documents which were developed during the Preliminary Analysis/System Architecture phase of the Quality, Environmental, Safety T-racking System redesign (QUEST2) project. Each discreet document in this deliverable set applies to a analytic effort supporting the architectural model of QUEST2. The P+ methodology cites a list of P+ documents normally included in a ``typical`` system architecture. Some of these were deferred to the release development phase of the project. The documents included in this deliverable set represent the system architecture itself. Related to that architecture are some decision support documents which provided needed information for management reviews that occurred during April. Consequently, the deliverables in this set were logically grouped and provided to support customer requirements. The remaining System Architecture Phase deliverables will be provided as a ``Supporting Documents`` deliverable set for the first release.

  17. Ensuring on-time quality data management deliverables from global clinical data management teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Haque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing emphasis on off-site and off-shore clinical data management activities mandates a paramount need for adequate solutions geared toward on-time, quality deliverables. The author has been leading large teams that have been involved in successful global clinical data management endeavors. While each study scenario is unique and has to be approached as such, there are several elements in defining strategy and team structure in global clinical data management that can be applied universally. In this article, key roles, practices, and high-level procedures are laid out as a road map to ensure success with the model.

  18. D3.1 Deliverable. GDAR activity on Evaluation of biological active Formulates and strains for the biological control of replant disease

    OpenAIRE

    KAYMAK, Suat

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the GDAR activity on evaluation of biological active Formulates and strains for the biological control of apple replant disease. Eleven products were evaluated with a plant growth assay in pot using plantlets of MM104 rootstock to evaluate their effectivenes in controlling Phythophtora cactorum. The trial was perfotrmed with soil artificially inoculated with the pathogen.

  19. Deliverable 1.2.1 Market Analysis and Business Plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2009-01-01

    Deliverable 1.2.1 - Market Analysis and Business Plan The main objective of this deliverable is to provide a short overview of 4 communities involved in the pilots, envisaged type of solutions and architectures to be deployed (chapter 2) and market analysis at regional level (chapter 3......) with related business cases. The Market analysis will provide an overview of market requirements, current status and opportunities for the pilot service that will be provided in the context of ISISEMD. This will be realised by performing detailed studies on various sources. Proposals for business modelling...... and business cases (chapter 4) will rely on the concept of value chains. Value chains typically consist of several providers, which together produce a complex product or service....

  20. Skill Gap Analysis for Improved Skills and Quality Deliverables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun Koripadu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With a growing pressure in identifying the skilled resources in Clinical Data Management (CDM world of clinical research organizations, to provide the quality deliverables most of the CDM organizations are planning to improve the skills within the organization. In changing CDM landscape the ability to build, manage and leverage the skills of clinical data managers is very critical and important. Within CDM to proactively identify, analyze and address skill gaps for all the roles involved. In addition to domain skills, the evolving role of a clinical data manager demands diverse skill sets such as project management, six sigma, analytical, decision making, communication etc. This article proposes a methodology of skill gap analysis (SGA management as one of the potential solutions to the big skill challenge that CDM is gearing up for bridging the gap of skills. This would in turn strength the CDM capability, scalability, consistency across geographies along with improved productivity and quality of deliverables

  1. QUEST2: Release 1, SA/Release 1 supporting documents deliverable set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-02-27

    This document contains deliverables which reflect the last of the System Architecture phase analysis for the Quality, Environmental, Safety Tracking System redesign (QUEST2) project. These deliverables are focused on the final insights required to start functional design of the first QUEST2 release. They include the data definitions, conversion rules, standards for design and user interface, performance criteria, and rules to be followed during the prototyping activity described in the Project Management Plan.

  2. Supporting Active User Involvment in Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj

    1990-01-01

    in the development process. But prototyping does not automatically imply active user involvement! Thus a cooperative prototyping approach aiming at involving users actively and creatively in system design is proposed in this paper. The key point of the approach is to involve users in activities that closely couple......The term prototyping has in recent years become a buzzword in both research and practice of system design due to a number of claimed advantages of prototyping techniques over traditional specification techniques. In particular it is often stated that prototyping facilitates the users' involvement...... development of prototypes to early evaluation of prototypes in envisioned use situations. Having users involved in such activities creates new requirements for tool support. Tools that support direct manipulation of prototypes and simulation of behaviour have shown promise for cooperative prototyping...

  3. Pupils' involvement in ecological activities in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanišić Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological education gains an increasing importance in the moment when ecological crisis acquires increasingly larger proportions. Education is one of the most powerful social means in fighting problems and challenges of the future. This paper presents the results of the research referring to pupils' attitudes with respect to the activities they prefer to be involved in, the independent variables their readiness for involvement depends on, as well as the relation between the knowledge possessed by pupils and their readiness to be involved in ecological activities. Research was conducted on the sample of 284 pupils in the eighth grade of primary school in urban and rural area and polluted and unpolluted environment. The results indicate that pupils find more interesting the activities taking place in nature, those where they are immediate participants and those where they have a subjective feeling that they are doing something to protect the environment. Besides, the results show that girls from both samples and pupils from rural area are more ready to get involved in ecological activities. Living in polluted or unpolluted environment is not a statistically significant variable which would influence the readiness of pupils to get involved in these activities. As the most interesting result of this research, we consider the finding that a higher level of pupils' ecological knowledge and living in polluted environment do not guarantee higher readiness of pupils to get involved in the activities of environment protection.

  4. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...... then successfully applied to activity recognition, activity simulation and multi-target tracking. Our method compares favourably with respect to previously reported results using Hidden Markov Models and Relational Particle Filtering....

  5. Exploring Alternative Non-contact temperature measurements for 99Mo production facility NorthStar FY14 Activity 5, Deliverable 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-03-04

    We have conducted an experiment to explore an alternative non-contact method of measuring the Inconel target window temperature. This experiment involves using a standard color camera to observe the visible light emitted from the Inconel target window at high heat in order to estimate the window temperature. The safety limit to prevent target window failure is 700 °C and therefore we need a reliable and accurate method of measuring temperature especially in the range of 600 °C to 700 °C if it is to replace the IR camera. In this temperature range the window will emit a significant amount of black body radiation within the visible range and hence the idea of using a color camera. The goal is to see if the shift in window color (determined by the RBG pixel values of the camera) as the target window is heated to 700 °C can be calibrated to the temperature.The reasons for exploring this as an alternative to an IR are camera are: significant cost reduction and potentially less complicated to calibrate.

  6. Supporting Active User Involvment in Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj

    1990-01-01

    development of prototypes to early evaluation of prototypes in envisioned use situations. Having users involved in such activities creates new requirements for tool support. Tools that support direct manipulation of prototypes and simulation of behaviour have shown promise for cooperative prototyping...... activities. Examples of such tools are given and the ways that they support cooperative prototyping within various use domains are discussed.......The term prototyping has in recent years become a buzzword in both research and practice of system design due to a number of claimed advantages of prototyping techniques over traditional specification techniques. In particular it is often stated that prototyping facilitates the users' involvement...

  7. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.;

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were...

  8. Learning models of activities involving interacting objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose the LEMAIO multi-layer framework, which makes use of hierarchical abstraction to learn models for activities involving multiple interacting objects from time sequences of data concerning the individual objects. Experiments in the sea navigation domain yielded learned models that were t...

  9. In Silico Discovery of High Deliverable Capacity Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Martin, Richard; Simon, Cory; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend; Deem, Michael; Michael W. Deem Team; Maciej Haranczyk Team; Berend Smit Team

    2015-03-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are actively being explored as potential adsorbed natural gas storage materials for small vehicles. Experimental exploration of potential materials is limited by the throughput of synthetic chemistry. We here describe a computational methodology to complement and guide these experimental efforts. The method uses known chemical transformations in silico to identify MOFs with high methane deliverable capacity. The procedure explicitly considers synthesizability with geometric requirements on organic linkers. We efficiently search the composition and conformation space of organic linkers for nine MOF networks, finding 48 materials with higher predicted deliverable capacity (at 65 bar storage, 5.8 bar depletion, and 298 K) than MOF-5 in four of the nine networks. The best material has a predicted deliverable capacity 8% higher than that of MOF-5. US Department of Energy.

  10. RBSE: Product development team research activity deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The GHG Functions and Extensions to be added to the NASA Electronic Library System (NELS) 1.1 product are described. These functions will implement the 'output request' capability within the Object Browser. The functions will be implemented in two parts. The first part is a code to be added to the Object Browser (X version) to implement menus allowing the user to request that objects be copied to specific media, or that objects be downloaded to the user's system following a specific protocol, or that the object be printed to one of the printers attached to the host system. The second part is shell scripts which support the various menu selections. Additional scripts to support functions within the GHG shell (X version) will also be created along with the X version of the GHG Shell as initial capability for the 27 Mar. prototype. The scripts will be composed of C shell routines that will accept parameters (primary file pathways). Certain limitations in functionality will invoke Mail instead of Oracle Mail since that has yet to be delivered and the NELS invocation will default to the X-Windows version instead of the ASCII version.

  11. Load Composition Model Workflow (BPA TIP-371 Deliverable 1A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Cezar, Gustavo V.; /SLAC

    2017-07-17

    This project is funded under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Strategic Partnership Project (SPP) 17-005 between BPA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The project in a BPA Technology Improvement Project (TIP) that builds on and validates the Composite Load Model developed by the Western Electric Coordinating Council's (WECC) Load Modeling Task Force (LMTF). The composite load model is used by the WECC Modeling and Validation Work Group to study the stability and security of the western electricity interconnection. The work includes development of load composition data sets, collection of load disturbance data, and model development and validation. This work supports reliable and economic operation of the power system. This report was produced for Deliverable 1A of the BPA TIP-371 Project entitled \\TIP 371: Advancing the Load Composition Model". The deliverable documents the proposed work ow for the Composite Load Model, which provides the basis for the instrumentation, data acquisition, analysis and data dissemination activities addressed by later phases of the project.

  12. QUEST2: Release 1: Project plan deliverable set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-02-10

    This Project Management Plan combines the project management deliverables from the P+ methodology which are applicable to Release 1 of the QUEST2 work. This consolidation reflects discussions with WHC QA regarding an appropriate method for ensuring that P+ deliverables fulfill the intent of WHC-CM-3-10 and QR-19.

  13. Possibilities for a valorisation of geomorphologic research deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilhausen, M.; Götz, J.; Otto, J.-C.; Schrott, L.

    2009-04-01

    Many geomorphological studies focus on fundamental research questions in large parts, although there are lots of applied fields like landslide hazard assessment or water framework directive. As fundamental research is a common property, their outcomes should be more "open" and accessible to the public. This means that scientists have to find new ways presenting their results and outcomes besides publishing in scientific journals. This paper shows possibilities for a valorisation of geomorphologic research deliverables using print as well as digital media. Geotrails explain remarkable and exciting landscape features using information boards and become more and more popular and important for tourism in many parts of the world. With the growing interest in environmental change and outdoor activities, print media like field guides reach an increasing number of people. Field guides and Geotrails can be coupled in order to arise awareness about geomorphological landforms and to deliver more specific information on the site beyond the information given on the boards in the field. As field guides are designed for the general public they can be used for educational purposes as well. Today, this information can also be found in the internet offering virtual trips through landscapes using dynamic maps. Here, server side GIS technologies (WebGIS) using standardised interfaces provide new possibilities to show geomorphic data to the public and to share them with the scientific community. Furthermore, data formats like XML or KML are powerful tools for data exchange and can be used in interactive data viewers like Google Earth. We will present the Geotrail "Geomorphologischer Lehrpfad am Fuße der Zugspitze. Das Reintal - Eine Wanderung durch Raum und Zeit" (Bavarian Alps, Germany). Additionally, three geomorphologic WebGIS applications (Geomorphologic map Turtmanntal, Permafrostmap of Austria, Geomorphologic maps of Germany) will exemplify how geomorphologic information and

  14. Measuring psychological engagement in youth activity involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Heather L; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A; Gadbois, Shannon; Bowker, Anne; Findlay, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    Although psychological engagement (e.g., enjoyment, concentration) may be critical in fostering positive outcomes of youth activity participation, too few studies have been conducted to establish its role in development. Furthermore, an established measurement tool is lacking. In the current study, we evaluated a brief engagement measure with two Canadian samples of youth (Sample 1, N = 290, mean age = 16.9 years, 62% female; Sample 2, N = 1827, mean age = 13.1 years, 54% female). We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized structure of the model. We also assessed the measure's validity by testing relations between engagement and both perceived outcomes and positive features of activity settings. Psychological engagement was best captured by three latent cognitive, affective, and relational/spiritual factors and a second-order latent factor. Also, as anticipated, psychological engagement was associated with features of the activity setting and perceived impact.

  15. Check-up Measurement (update). Deliverable D5.22

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer, A.C.G.; Giessen, A.M.D. van der; Djurica, M.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable D5.22 presents the GEN6 check-up measurement. It describes the most prominent outcomes of the GEN6 project up to this point in time. The check-up measurement helps to focus the monitoring towards the most relevant achievements of the project, such that an efficient and well-targeted

  16. Women who win with words: Deliverance via persuasive communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Branch

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The Wise Woman of Abel Beth Maacah quells a rebellion (2 Sam. 20. Abigail, a beautiful and intelligent woman, rescues her household (1 Sam. 25. And the older sister of Moses, by tradition Miriam, saves her baby brother’s life (Ex. 2. These two women and a girl represent political saviours who facilitate the deliverance of a city, community, and an individual via persuasive words. As winners with words, these orators contribute dynamically to the biblical text by providing an alternative way of deliverance, one enabling it to come through a means other than the sword. Via perceptive persuasion, they guide those with whom they interact toward choosing life and the common good. This article takes a cross-disciplinary approach to the biblical text by looking at the persuasive communication techniques these two women and a girl employ so successfully.

  17. UMBRELLA Deliverable D 1.3 "Final Report"

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Raik; Benavent Rodríguez, Belén; Bootsman, Rob; Eickmann, Jonas; Engl, Wulf Albrecht; Gilsdorf, Peter; Jansen, Michel; Krahl, Simon; Krause, Thilo; Moormann, Andreas; Morales-España, Germán; Paeschke, Helmut; Ramirez Elizondo, Laura; Roald, Line; Rogge, Michael

    2015-01-01

     This deliverable summarizes the content of the FP7 project UMBRELLA. It describes the objectives and the results achieved by the end of the four project years. UMBRELLA is also cooperating with the related FP7 project iTesla, i.e. some public workshops are performed commonly, test environments are harmonized and a common proposal on potential development of future TSO rules is proposed.

  18. Summary of ST-MA deliverables for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cennini, E; Ninin, P; Nunes, R; Scibile, L; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

    2003-01-01

    The ST/MA group is responsible for the monitoring of the CERN Technical Infrastructure as well as the design, installation and maintenance of personnel protection system such as access control system, fire and gas leak detection, safety alarm monitoring systems and radiation monitoring systems (in collaboration with TIS). This paper provides an overview of the main projects and services managed in the group and outlines the scope, the organisation and the planning of the main deliverables for LHC.

  19. Gas Deliverability Model with Different Vertical Wells Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mucharam

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a gas deliverability computational model for single reservoir with multi wells. The questions of how long the gas delivery can be sustained and how to estimate the plateau time are discussed here. In order to answer such a question, in this case, a coupling method which consists of material balance method and gas flow equation method is developed by assuming no water influx in the reservoir. Given the rate and the minimum pressure of gas at the processing plant, the gas pressure at the wellhead and at the bottom hole can be obtained. From here, the estimation of the gas deliverability can be done. In this paper we obtain a computational method which gives direct computation for pressure drop from the processing plant to the wells, taking into account different well behavior. Here AOF technique is used for obtaining gas rate in each well. Further Tian & Adewumi correlation is applied for pressure drop model along vertical and horizontal pipes and Runge-Kutta method is chosen to compute the well head and bottom hole pressures in each well which then being used to estimate the plateau times. We obtain here direct computational scheme of gas deliverability from reservoir to processing plant for single reservoir with multi-wells properties. Computational results give different profiles (i.e. gas rate, plateau and production time, etc for each well. Further by selecting proper flow rate reduction, the flow distribution after plateau time to sustain the delivery is computed for each well.

  20. Assessment Report Sandia National Laboratories Fuel Cycle Technologies Quality Assurance Evaluation of FY15 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program activities are conducted in accordance with FCT Quality Assurance Program Document (FCT-QAPD) requirements. The FCT-QAPD interfaces with SNL approved Quality Assurance Program Description (SNL-QAPD) as explained in the Sandia National Laboratories QA Program Interface Document for FCT Activities (Interface Document). This plan describes SNL's FY16 assessment of SNL's FY15 FCT M2 milestone deliverable's compliance with program QA requirements, including SNL R&A requirements. The assessment is intended to confirm that SNL's FY15 milestone deliverables contain the appropriate authenticated review documentation and that there is a copy marked with SNL R&A numbers.

  1. THESEUS Deliverable ID2.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, Barbara; Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Ruol, Piero

    The present report gives an overview of the performed and planned physical model tests in WP2 of the EC THESEUS project. The general aim of WP2 is the development of innovative methods for mitigation of flooding and coastal erosion hazard in the context of increasing storminess and sea level rise....... The tested technologies are: - by reducing incident wave energy with a totally innovative solution, wave energy converters placed near-shore (WT 2.1, Part B), and with multi-purpose coastal defences characterised by low environmental impact, as artificial reefs (WT 2.2, Part C) and floating breakwaters (WT2...... with physical model testing, numerical modeling and selected prototype activities within a risk based approach. Throughout this process verifiable design methodology and best practices for innovative defences will be documented....

  2. THESEUS Deliverable ID2.4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanuttigh, Barbara; Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    The present report gives an overview of the performed and planned physical model tests in WP2 of the EC THESEUS project. The general aim of WP2 is the development of innovative methods for mitigation of flooding and coastal erosion hazard in the context of increasing storminess and sea level rise...... with physical model testing, numerical modeling and selected prototype activities within a risk based approach. Throughout this process verifiable design methodology and best practices for innovative defences will be documented........ The tested technologies are: - by reducing incident wave energy with a totally innovative solution, wave energy converters placed nearshore (WT 2.1, Part B), and with multi-purpose coastal defences characterised by low environmental impact, as artificial reefs (WT 2.2, Part C) and floating breakwaters (WT2...

  3. Operationalising active involvement in the EU water framework directive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Stuart Anthony Lewis; Fritsch, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    of actively involving non-state actors, which can be summarised as increasing the effectiveness of policy and improving its implementation. Criticising the emerging economic decision-making approach, we argue that economic analyses could result in a missed opportunity to capitalise on the potential benefits...... to comply with the statutory requirements of the Directive, but should strive for active involvement due to the potential for increasing the effectiveness of the Water Framework Directive and improving its implementation......We identify two key stages in the river basin planning process under the Water Framework Directive: the selection of instruments for a programme of measures to achieve the environmental targets, and disproportionate cost analysis to determine whether selected measures involve high costs. Some EU...

  4. Active-involvement principle in dental health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1985-01-01

    A basic problem in dental health education (DHE) is that the effect usually disappears shortly after the termination of a program. The purpose of the present study was to obtain long-term effect of a DHE-program by emphasizing the active involvement of the participants. The sample comprised...

  5. Adolescent Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Influences on Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Donna; Dyk, Patricia Hyjer; Jones, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Study examined adolescents' participation in sports, school, and community extracurricular activities to assess the influence of different involvement roles and adult support on leadership skills. The study found that males and females who perceived their adult support more positively had more positive perceptions of their leadership skills.…

  6. Activity Involvement in Aging Women: Career Pattern and Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, Carole Kovalic

    Some research has found that women's retirement from the labor force produces significant changes in their lives and requires further investigation. The effects of career pattern and retirement on activity involvement and life satisfaction for women who had been in the work force was investigated. Subjects were members of the Terman Study of the…

  7. Cost savings deliverables and criteria for the OST technology decision process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCown, A.

    1997-04-01

    This document has been prepared to assist focus area (FA) technical and management teams in understanding the cost savings deliverables associated with a technology system during its research and development (R and D) phases. It discusses the usefulness of cost analysis in the decision-making process, and asserts that the level of confidence and data quality of a cost analysis is proportional to the maturity of the technology system`s development life cycle. Suggestions of specific investment criteria or cost savings metrics that a FA might levy on individual research projects are made but the final form of these elements should be stipulated by the FA management based on their rationale for a successful technology development project. Also, cost savings deliverables for a single FA will be more detailed than those for management of the Office of Science and Technology (OST). For example, OST management may want an analysis of the overall return on investment for each FA, while the FA program manager may want this analysis and the return on investment metrics for each technology research activity the FA supports.

  8. Deliverable D2.1 - State of the Art in Tools for Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grube, Per-Pascal; Schmid, Klaus; Dolog, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    This deliverable provides a survey of creativity techniques that have been developed over time. It provides a reference model for characterizing them as a basis for selecting techniques that are particularly appropriate for the idSpace-project. The deliverable also surveys existing creativity tools...... and characterizes them in terms of underlying techniques. Finally, the deliverable describes requirements for the idSpace-environment and discusses to what extend it can benefit from existing tools....

  9. Landscape-scale learning: from lectures to professional deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follain, S.; Devaux, N.; Colin, F.

    2009-04-01

    Earth Science ingenieers (Master degree) need to be trained in multidisciplinary approaches but also to learn how to combine theoretical and practical knowledge. Nevertheless we notice it is not always easy to combine in a same lecture, theoretical and practical issues. In order to build bridges between these instructions we propose to student a new teaching unit: "Sustainability Diagnosis". Its originalities are i) to be couple to an other (theoretical) teaching unit dealing with landscape-scale learning ii) to be performed under a project mode and iii) to provide deliverables ordered by professional users, e.g. farmers, catchment managers. The landscape-scale learning is a classical learning period with lectures provided by specialists in various disciplines e.g. Soil Science, Hydrology, Agronomy, which focus on a common spatial scale, the landscape. It explicitly develops knowledge on energy and matter transfers between landscape components and explains potential effects of human-induced disturbances on both landscape and fluxes evolution. The deliverables for the farmer (chosen professional user) concern issues on his crop system sustainability. It requires a diagnosis in one hand on soil use and management potentialities and in another hand on environmental externalities (soil and water conservation) induced by the cropping system. The communication will present the work done by 14 students during this new teaching unit (Sustainability Diagnosis) of two weeks. This first attempt expertized a one square kilometer area located in Saint-Chinian vineyard region (South of France). This production area with guarantee of origin (AOC) has productivity constraints linked to landscape properties which directly impact farmer decisions. In the same time it has been shown that vineyard crop system induces water pollution by pesticides and increases soil degradation; in a sustainability perspective, these environmental impacts need to be reduced. The learning period was

  10. Deliverable D3 - Low- and Medium-beta linac

    CERN Document Server

    A. Facco, A. Balabin, R. Paparella, D. Zenere, INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova, Italy; D. Berkovits, J. Rodnizki, SOREQ, Yavne, Israel; J. L. Biarrotte, S. Bousson, A. Ponton, G. Olry, IPN Orsay, France; R. Duperrier, D. Uriot, CEA/Saclay, France; V. Zvyagintsev, TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada.

    The present document describes the Low- and Medium-beta section of the EURISOL DS Driver Accelerator. This section consists of a superconducting linac, based on Half-Wave (HWR) and SPOKE type resonators, preceded by a short, normal-conducting MEBT (Medium Energy Beam Transport) section that performs input beam matching. The scope of this linac is to bring the beams of H-, D+ and 3He++ produced by the Ion Injector (Deliverable D-5) to the energy and beam parameters required for injection in the superconducting High-beta linac (Deliverable D4-High beta linac). The present beam dynamics design reaches the goal of accelerating the required high current beams to the design energy (about 100 MeV/A, depending on the ion species), with minimum emittance growth and with low losses, using realistic and cost-effective, although innovative, technological solutions. The Low- and Medium-beta linac layout is described, together with the fundamental parameters and characteristics of its components and the system performanc...

  11. Deliverable D3 - Low- and Medium-beta linac

    CERN Document Server

    A. Facco, A. Balabin, R. Paparella, D. Zenere, INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova, Italy; D. Berkovits, J. Rodnizki, SOREQ, Yavne, Israel; J. L. Biarrotte, S. Bousson, A. Ponton, G. Olry, IPN Orsay, France; R. Duperrier, D. Uriot, CEA/Saclay, France; V. Zvyagintsev, TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada.

    The present document describes the Low- and Medium-beta section of the EURISOL DS Driver Accelerator. This section consists of a superconducting linac, based on Half-Wave (HWR) and SPOKE type resonators, preceded by a short, normal-conducting MEBT (Medium Energy Beam Transport) section that performs input beam matching. The scope of this linac is to bring the beams of H-, D+ and 3He++ produced by the Ion Injector (Deliverable D-5) to the energy and beam parameters required for injection in the superconducting High-beta linac (Deliverable D4-High beta linac). The present beam dynamics design reaches the goal of accelerating the required high current beams to the design energy (about 100 MeV/A, depending on the ion species), with minimum emittance growth and with low losses, using realistic and cost-effective, although innovative, technological solutions. The Low- and Medium-beta linac layout is described, together with the fundamental parameters and characteristics of its components and the system performance.

  12. Project deliverables - a waste of time or a chance for knowledge transfer and dissemination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Deliverables are a common tool to measure a distinct output of a project. They should be meaningful in terms of the project's objectives and are normally constituted by e.g. a written report or document, a developed tool or software, an organized training or conference. They can be scientific or technical. The number of deliverables must be reasonable and commensurate to the project and its content. Deliverables as contractual obligations are often time consuming and often seen as a waste of "research" time, as one more administrative task without any use. However, deliverables are needed to verify the progress of a project and to convince the sponsor that the project is going in the right direction and the money well-invested. The presentation will deal with the question on how to use a deliverable in a profitable way for the project and what are the possibilities of use.

  13. Active stream segregation specifically involves the left human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deike, Susann; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2010-06-14

    An important aspect of auditory scene analysis is the sequential grouping of similar sounds into one "auditory stream" while keeping competing streams separate. In the present low-noise fMRI study we presented sequences of alternating high-pitch (A) and low-pitch (B) complex harmonic tones using acoustic parameters that allow the perception of either two separate streams or one alternating stream. However, the subjects were instructed to actively and continuously segregate the A from the B stream. This was controlled by the additional instruction to listen for rare level deviants only in the low-pitch stream. Compared to the control condition in which only one non-separable stream was presented the active segregation of the A from the B stream led to a selective increase of activation in the left auditory cortex (AC). Together with a similar finding from a previous study using a different acoustic cue for streaming, namely timbre, this suggests that the left auditory cortex plays a dominant role in active sequential stream segregation. However, we found cue differences within the left AC: Whereas in the posterior areas, including the planum temporale, activation increased for both acoustic cues, the anterior areas, including Heschl's gyrus, are only involved in stream segregation based on pitch.

  14. Preliminary Collider Baseline Parameters: Deliverable D1.1

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)430609

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable provides a preliminary specification of the layout and target operation parameters for the FCC-hh hadron collider concept. They serve as starting point for the studies in all work packages. The goal of the FCC hadron collider is to provide proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. The machine is compatible with ion beam operation. Assuming a nominal dipole field of 16 T, such a machine is based on a perimeter of 100 km. The machine is designed to accommodate two main proton experiments that are operated simultaneously. The machine delivers a peak luminosity of 5-30 x 1034 cm-2s-1. The layout allows for two additional special-purpose experiments.

  15. Deliverability on the interstate natural gas pipeline system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Deliverability on the Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline System examines the capability of the national pipeline grid to transport natural gas to various US markets. The report quantifies the capacity levels and utilization rates of major interstate pipeline companies in 1996 and the changes since 1990, as well as changes in markets and end-use consumption patterns. It also discusses the effects of proposed capacity expansions on capacity levels. The report consists of five chapters, several appendices, and a glossary. Chapter 1 discusses some of the operational and regulatory features of the US interstate pipeline system and how they affect overall system design, system utilization, and capacity expansions. Chapter 2 looks at how the exploration, development, and production of natural gas within North America is linked to the national pipeline grid. Chapter 3 examines the capability of the interstate natural gas pipeline network to link production areas to market areas, on the basis of capacity and usage levels along 10 corridors. The chapter also examines capacity expansions that have occurred since 1990 along each corridor and the potential impact of proposed new capacity. Chapter 4 discusses the last step in the transportation chain, that is, deliverability to the ultimate end user. Flow patterns into and out of each market region are discussed, as well as the movement of natural gas between States in each region. Chapter 5 examines how shippers reserve interstate pipeline capacity in the current transportation marketplace and how pipeline companies are handling the secondary market for short-term unused capacity. Four appendices provide supporting data and additional detail on the methodology used to estimate capacity. 32 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Should Ecosystem Management Involve Active Control of Species Abundances?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E. Essington

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We review four case studies in which there is a risk of extinction or severe reduction in highly valued species if we ignore either, or both, of two ecosystem control options. “Symptomatic control” implies direct control of extinction risk through direct harvesting or culling of competitors and predators. “Systemic control” implies treating the causes of the problem that led to an unnaturally high abundance in the first place. We demonstrate, with a discussion of historically observed population trends, how surprising trophic interactions can emerge as a result of alterations to a system. Simulation models were developed for two of the case studies as aids to adaptive policy design, to expose possible abundance changes caused by trophic interactions and to highlight key uncertainties about possible responses to ecosystem management policies involving active intervention to control abundances. With reasonable parameter values, these models predict a wide range of possible responses given available data, but do indicate a good chance that active control would reverse declines and reverse extinction risks. We find that controlling seal (Phoca vitulina populations in the Georgia Strait increases juvenile survival rates of commercial salmon (Oncorhynchus spp. species, but that commensurate increases in hake populations from decreased seal predation could be a compensatory source of predation on juvenile salmon. We also show that wolf (Canis lupus control and moose (Alces alces harvest bring about a recovery in caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations, where simple habitat protection policies fail to recover caribou before wolf predation causes severe declines. The results help address a common problem in disturbed ecosystems, where controlling extinction risks can mean choosing between active control of species abundance or establishing policies of protection, and allowing threatened species to recover naturally.

  17. Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (VERAM), Joint D41/D43 deliverable of GLOBEMEN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Zwegers, Arian; Vesterager, Johan

    2003-01-01

    . The emphasis in this deliverable is to define an architectural framework, which will be a body of knowledge that supports future practical work in the area of global engineering and manufacturing in enterprise networks, supported by methodologies/guidelines. This document is organised as follows: - A first......This document, D412/D43 Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (VERAM), is a result of the merging of the two main deliverables of work package 4 of the IMS GLOBEMEN project: D41 Reference Architecture (deliverable D412 for the European GLOBEMEN project) and D43 VME Guidelines....... IMS Globemen is an inter-regional project aiming to develop methods, tools and architectures to support inter-enterprise operations in one-of-kind industries, in different lifecycle phases. This deliverable describes an architectural framework VERAM including a description/elaboration of its elements...

  18. FY2004 Progress Summary and FY2005 Program Plan Statement of Work and Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2006-01-23

    FY2004 progress summary and FY2005 program plan statement of work and deliverables for development of high average power diode-pumped solid state lasers, and complementary technologies for applications in energy and defense.

  19. STUDY OF LYSINE AND ALANINE DELIVERANCE THROUGH POLYPYRROLE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitasari Suratman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electropolymerization processes of pyrrole and the usage of polypyrrole membrane as lysine and alanine deliverance have been studied by cyclic voltammetry technique. Polypyrrole membrane was prepared by electropolymerization processes of pyrrole in water based solvent containing sodium perchlorate as supporting electrolyte. Electropolymerization processes were carried out within potential range of 0-1100 mV vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode and at the scanning rate of 100 mV/s. In this study, lysine and alanine have been used as molecules which could easily be loaded on and released from polypyrrole membrane. The presence of lysine or alanine during electropolymerization process reduced the rate of electropolymerization of polypyrrole. In lysine or alanine transfer processes into polypyrrole membrane, the interaction between polypyrrole and lysine or alanine showed by the curve of E½ oxidation in respect of - log C. It proved that the E½ oxidation shifted to more positive potential showed by the increasing of concentration of lysine or alanine. Beside that, voltammetric responses of lysine and alanine transfered into polypyrrole membrane were found to be Nernstian. The results indicated that polypyrrole could be used as a sensor of lysine and alanine.   Keywords: Electropolymerization, polypyrrole membrane, voltammetry technique

  20. Deliverable D2.3 - System Architecture and Technical Specifications: MITIGATE

    OpenAIRE

    Polemi, Nineta; Papastergiou, Spyros; Karantjias, Athanassios; Drosos, Nikos; Gouvas, Panagiotis; Duzha, Armend; Bianchi, Manuel; Campana, Flavio; Erler, Timo; Schauer, Stefan; Mouratidis, Haris; Pavlidis, Michalis; Rekleitis, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    This deliverable reflects the outcomes of task T2.5 and provides details regarding the high level architecture of the MITIGATE risk management system. More specifically, this deliverable provides information regarding the various components that comprise the high level architecture and elaborates on the interdependencies between them. Per each component a specific analysis is performed regarding the offered functionalities and the component-interactions that are required. MITIGATE envisages t...

  1. Consumer involvement in research projects: the activities of research funders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Máire; Entwistle, Vikki

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports findings from a postal questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews with UK funders of health-related research that explored whether, why and how they promote consumer involvement in research projects. Many UK funders of health-related research are adopting a policy of promoting consumer involvement in research projects. Telephone interviews revealed they have several reasons for doing so, and that they vary in the ways they encourage and support researchers to involve consumers. For some, descriptions of consumer involvement in a research proposal are important for project funding decisions. They recognized a need for flexibility when assessing consumer involvement in different contexts. We suggest that funders should continue to work to clarify what they consider to be the parameters of acceptability in terms of consumer involvement and ensure that 'flexible' criteria are fairly applied. Researchers should be aware of particular funders' views when applying for project funding.

  2. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of…

  3. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of…

  4. 101 Activities for Building More Effective School-Community Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Dorothy; Mattox, Beverly

    This booklet contains a collection of more than 100 activities designed to promote school-home and school-community relations. Activities are organized into seven categories: (1) communicating word from home to school, (2) people to people, (3) educational events, (4) volunteers--hands on in the classroom, (5) utilizing community resources, (6)…

  5. Adaptive interpretation of gas well deliverability tests with generating data of the IPR curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V. L.; Phuong, Nguyen T. H.; Krainov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers topical issues of improving accuracy of estimated parameters given by data obtained from gas well deliverability tests, decreasing test time, and reducing gas emissions into the atmosphere. The aim of the research is to develop the method of adaptive interpretation of gas well deliverability tests with a resulting IPR curve and using a technique of generating data, which allows taking into account additional a priori information, improving accuracy of determining formation pressure and flow coefficients, reducing test time. The present research is based on the previous theoretical and practical findings in the spheres of gas well deliverability tests, systems analysis, system identification, function optimization and linear algebra. To test the method, the authors used the field data of deliverability tests of two wells, run in the Urengoy gas and condensate field, Tyumen Oblast. The authors suggest the method of adaptive interpretation of gas well deliverability tests with the resulting IPR curve and the possibility of generating data of bottomhole pressure and a flow rate at different test stages. The suggested method allows defining the estimates of the formation pressure and flow coefficients, optimal in terms of preassigned measures of quality, and setting the adequate number of test stages in the course of well testing. The case study of IPR curve data processing has indicated that adaptive interpretation provides more accurate estimates on the formation pressure and flow coefficients, as well as reduces the number of test stages.

  6. SiteChar. Characterisation of European CO2 storage. Deliverable D8.2. Trust building and raising public awareness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Pol, M.; Mastop, E.A. [ECN Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaiser, M.; Zimmer, R. [Unabhaengiges Institut fuer Umweltfragen UfU, Berlin (Germany); Shackley, S.; Mabon, L.; Howell, R. [Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage SCCS, Edinburg, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    At local level, public support has proven crucial to the implementation of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) demonstration projects. Whereas no method exists to guarantee public acceptability of any project, a constructive stakeholder and community engagement process does increase the likelihood thereof. This deliverable is a follow-up to deliverable D8.1 'Social site characterisation'. Social site characterisation can be used as an instrument to explore, plan and evaluate a process of active and constructive local stakeholder and citizen engagement in a prospective CCS project as a parallel activity to technical site characterisation. It serves as an analytical tool to describe the local social circumstances in the area and to design and evaluate stakeholder and community engagement efforts with the aims of building trust and raising public awareness. Using results from the social site characterisation of the area, the present deliverable focuses on the second purpose. It presents results from public engagement activities designed to raise public awareness and inform public opinion of a prospective CCS site in Poland (onshore) and the UK (offshore): focus conferences. Furthermore, by initiating an enhanced cooperation in planning of new storage sites between project developers, authorities and the local public, focus conferences aim to serve as a 'hinge' between social site characterisation as a research effort and application to real-life project settings. The focus conferences are part of a range of public engagement activities including the setup of public information websites on generic and site-specific CCS, information meetings. A second survey eventually shall evaluate the results of the public engagement activities. The aim of the focus conferences was to raise public awareness and assist public opinion forming processes of a prospective CCS site in Poland (onshore) and the UK (offshore). At the same time, it aimed to present and test a

  7. The establishment of a new deliverability equation considering threshold pressure gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lezhong; Li Xiangfang; He Dongbo; Xu Hanbing

    2009-01-01

    The flowing mechanism of a low permeability gas reservoir is different from a conventional gas reservoir, espe-cially for that with higher irreducible water saturation the threshold pressure gradient exists. At present, in all the deliverability equation, the additional pressure drop caused by the threshold pressure gradient is viewed as constant, but this method has big error in the practical application. Based on the non-Darcy steady flow equation, the limited integral of the additional pressure drop is solved in this paper and it is realized that the additional pressure drop is not a constant but has something to do with production data, and a new deliverability equation is derived, with the relevant processing method for modified isochronal test data. The new deliverability equation turns out to be practical through onsite applica-tion.

  8. Computational Design of Metal-Organic Frameworks with High Methane Deliverable Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Martin, Richard; Simon, Cory; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend; Deem, Michael; Deem Team; Haranczyk Team; Smit Team

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a rapidly emerging class of nanoporous materials with largely tunable chemistry and diverse applications in gas storage, gas purification, catalysis, etc. Intensive efforts are being made to develop new MOFs with desirable properties both experimentally and computationally in the past decades. To guide experimental synthesis with limited throughput, we develop a computational methodology to explore MOFs with high methane deliverable capacity. This de novo design procedure applies known chemical reactions, considers synthesizability and geometric requirements of organic linkers, and evolves a population of MOFs with desirable property efficiently. We identify about 500 MOFs with higher deliverable capacity than MOF-5 in 10 networks. We also investigate the relationship between deliverable capacity and internal surface area of MOFs. This methodology can be extended to MOFs with multiple types of linkers and multiple SBUs. DE-FG02- 12ER16362.

  9. Particle emissions from laboratory activities involving carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Li-Ming; Tsai, Candace S.-J.; Heitbrink, William A.; Dunn, Kevin H.; Topmiller, Jennifer; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2017-08-01

    This site study was conducted in a chemical laboratory to evaluate nanomaterial emissions from 20-30-nm-diameter bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during product development activities. Direct-reading instruments were used to monitor the tasks in real time, and airborne particles were collected using various methods to characterize released nanomaterials using electron microscopy and elemental carbon (EC) analyses. CNT clusters and a few high-aspect-ratio particles were identified as being released from some activities. The EC concentration (0.87 μg/m3) at the source of probe sonication was found to be higher than other activities including weighing, mixing, centrifugation, coating, and cutting. Various sampling methods all indicated different levels of CNTs from the activities; however, the sonication process was found to release the highest amounts of CNTs. It can be cautiously concluded that the task of probe sonication possibly released nanomaterials into the laboratory and posed a risk of surface contamination. Based on these results, the sonication of CNT suspension should be covered or conducted inside a ventilated enclosure with proper filtration or a glovebox to minimize the potential of exposure.

  10. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves...

  11. Dopamine is involved in food-anticipatory activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Tian-Ya; Qu, Wei-Min; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2012-10-01

    When food is available during a restricted and predictable time of the day, mammals exhibit food-anticipatory activity (FAA), an increase in locomotor activity preceding the presentation of food. Although many studies have attempted to locate the food-entrainable circadian oscillator in the central nervous system, the pathways that mediate food entrainment are a matter of controversy. The present study was designed to determine the role of dopaminergic and histaminergic systems on FAA. Mice were given access to food for 2 h (ZT12-ZT14), and FAA was defined as the locomotor activity that occurred 2 h before the availability of food. Dopamine D(1) receptor (R), D(2)R, and histamine H(1)R-specific antagonists were used to clarify the role of dopamine and histamine receptors in FAA induced by food restriction (FR). FAA was monitored by infrared locomotor activity sensors. Mice were sacrificed at ZT12 on the 14th day of FR, and monoamine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The results showed that pretreatment with the D(1)R antagonist SCH23390 at 1, 3, or 10 µg/kg significantly reduced FAA by 19% (p antagonist raclopride at 22, 67, or 200 µg/kg significantly reduced FAA by 16% (p dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum and midbrain were significantly increased during FAA, even with the pretreatment of D(1)R and D(2)R antagonists. However, pretreatment with pyrilamine at 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg did not significantly reduce FAA, although it reduced the locomotor activity during the dark period in ad libitum mice. These results strongly indicate that the dopaminergic system plays an essential role in the FAA in mice.

  12. Proposals for risk management in environments with activities involving nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Renato Balbão Andrade

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The handling of nanomaterials presents enormous challenges for risk management in research and production of new materials. However, data on the impacts of these new materials on human health and the environment need to be expanded. Several efforts have been made to mitigate the hardships and offer guidelines for the management of risks associated with nanomaterials. This article aims to provide a broad and comparing view of the main proposals in the literature. The methodology was systematic analysis encompassing 17 proposed risk management with nanomaterials. The results indicate that, although there is no consensus on the metrics used to characterize the risks of na-nomaterials, the adoption of the Precautionary Principle, the control banding approach and stakeholder involvement stands out among the documents analyzed.

  13. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Tanida

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb. We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  14. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  15. Improving the driving practices of pizza deliverers: Response generalization and moderating effects of driving history

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Timothy D.; Geller, E. Scott

    1991-01-01

    A practical intervention program, targeting the safety belt use of pizza deliverers at two stores, increased significantly the use of both safety belts (143% above baseline) and turn signals (25% above baseline). Control subjects (i.e., pizza deliverers at a third no-intervention store and patrons driving to the pizza stores) showed no changes in belt or turn signal use over the course of 7-month study. The intervention program was staggered across two pizza stores and consisted of a group me...

  16. Capabilities and costs for ancillary services provision by wind power plants. Deliverable D 3.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faiella, Mariano; Hennig, Tobias; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio;

    This report is the deliverable of the third work package of the REserviceS project and describes the technical options and related costs for the provision of ancillary services specifically from wind energy technologies. It is focused on the set of ancillary services defined in the previous work...... package 2, shown in table 1 below. The information from this deliverable will be used as input to the case studies in subsequent work packages, which are expected to provide additional insights to the actual provision of ancillary services in transmission and distribution networks....

  17. WRKY Transcription Factors Involved in Activation of SA Biosynthesis Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bol John F

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased defense against a variety of pathogens in plants is achieved through activation of a mechanism known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The broad-spectrum resistance brought about by SAR is mediated through salicylic acid (SA. An important step in SA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate through the action of isochorismate synthase, encoded by the ICS1 gene. Also AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE 3 (PBS3 plays an important role in SA metabolism, as pbs3 mutants accumulate drastically reduced levels of SA-glucoside, a putative storage form of SA. Bioinformatics analysis previously performed by us identified WRKY28 and WRKY46 as possible regulators of ICS1 and PBS3. Results Expression studies with ICS1 promoter::β-glucuronidase (GUS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts cotransfected with 35S::WRKY28 showed that over expression of WRKY28 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression. Moreover, qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the endogenous ICS1 and PBS3 genes were highly expressed in protoplasts overexpressing WRKY28 or WRKY46, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indentified potential WRKY28 binding sites in the ICS1 promoter, positioned -445 and -460 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Mutation of these sites in protoplast transactivation assays showed that these binding sites are functionally important for activation of the ICS1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with haemagglutinin-epitope-tagged WRKY28 showed that the region of the ICS1 promoter containing the binding sites at -445 and -460 was highly enriched in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Conclusions The results obtained here confirm results from our multiple microarray co-expression analyses indicating that WRKY28 and WRKY46 are transcriptional activators of ICS1 and PBS3, respectively, and support this in silico screening as a powerful tool for identifying new components of stress

  18. Hemolysis-induced lethality involves inflammasome activation by heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Fabianno F; Alves, Letícia S; Rodrigues, Danielle; Fernandez, Patricia L; de Oliveira, Rosane B; Golenbock, Douglas T; Zamboni, Dario S; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2014-09-30

    The increase of extracellular heme is a hallmark of hemolysis or extensive cell damage. Heme has prooxidant, cytotoxic, and inflammatory effects, playing a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria, sepsis, and sickle cell disease. However, the mechanisms by which heme is sensed by innate immune cells contributing to these diseases are not fully characterized. We found that heme, but not porphyrins without iron, activated LPS-primed macrophages promoting the processing of IL-1β dependent on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). The activation of NLRP3 by heme required spleen tyrosine kinase, NADPH oxidase-2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and K(+) efflux, whereas it was independent of heme internalization, lysosomal damage, ATP release, the purinergic receptor P2X7, and cell death. Importantly, our results indicated the participation of macrophages, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and IL-1R in the lethality caused by sterile hemolysis. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways affected by heme in innate immune cells might prove useful to identify new therapeutic targets for diseases that have heme release.

  19. The iTREN-2030 reference scenario until 2030. Deliverable D4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorello, Davide; De Stasio, Claudia; Koehler, Jonathan; Kraft, Markus; Netwon, Sean; Purwanto, Joko; Schade, Burkhard; Schade, Wolfgang; Szimba, Eckhard

    2009-07-01

    The basic objective of iTREN-2030 is to extend the forecasting and assessment capabilities of the TRANS-TOOLS transport model to the new policy issues arising from the technology, environment and energy fields. This is achieved by couplin the TRANS-TOOLS model with three other models, ASTRA, POLES and TREMOVE covering these new policy issues. The TRANS-TOOLS transport network model has been developed to constitute the reference tool for supporting transport policy in the EU and currently is being developed in several European projects. The scenario set-up to be developed in iTREN-2030 has been modified, so that the projects develops a reference scenario and an integrated scenario. For the reference scenario, the three other modelling tools are harmonised with TRANS-TOOLS and made consistent with each other. This results in a coherent scenario for Europe until 2030 for technology, transport, energy, environment and economic development. The integrated scenario will consider the changing framework conditions until 2030, inparticular the policy pressure coming from climate policy and the increasing scarcity of fossil fuels as well as the impact of the financial and economic crisis. Within the iTREN-2030 project, the overall objective of Work Package 4 (WP4) producing tis deliverable is to develop the reference scenario for the quantitative projections using the four modelling tools involved in the project. The main aims of WP4 are to (a) define a consistent framework for using the different tools in an integrated way; (b) calibrate models with exchanged input to a coherent joint reference; (c) implement external input from WP3 and running models for projections; (d) produce output procedures and templates to facilitate assessment in WP5.

  20. FAMILY INVOLVEMENT ACTIVITIES AT PRESCHOOL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS: CASE OF DENIZLI PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya GÜLAY OGELMAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate family involvement activities at preschool educational institutions in province of Denizli. 25 female teachers working at preschool educational institutions under Ministry of National Education in city centre of Denizli were included in the study. The results revealed that while a great majority of 32 family involvement activities included in the questionnaire (parents' corner, posters, education board, communication board, brochures, booklets, periodicals-newspapers, newsletters, correspondences, photographs, phone/ internet calls, video/tape records, conferences, home visits, article box, request box, parents' libraries, family involvement to non-classroom activities, diaries, family involvement into management and decision-making process, group meeting weren’t performed, 11 activities were implemented. While 4 of 11 activities were performed by all teachers, there were teachers who didn't perform 7 family involvement activities (parents' meetings, individual interview, development reports, collective files, involvement to classroom activities, invitation of parents to the school in special occasions, activities held at home. Considering the reasons why twenty two family involvement activities were not performed; lack of space, time and possibilities was the most frequent reason. Home visits took place on the top among family involvement activities the teachers had difficulties at most. The individual interviews were among activities conducted by the teachers in the easiest/ comfortable way.

  1. Predicting involvement in prison gang activity: street gang membership, social and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jane L; Alleyne, Emma; Mozova, Katarina; James, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether street gang membership, psychological factors, and social factors such as preprison experiences could predict young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Data were collected via individual interviews with 188 young offenders held in a Young Offenders Institution in the United Kingdom. Results showed that psychological factors such as the value individuals attached to social status, a social dominance orientation, and antiauthority attitudes were important in predicting young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Further important predictors included preimprisonment events such as levels of threat, levels of individual delinquency, and levels of involvement in group crime. Longer current sentences also predicted involvement in prison gang activity. However, street gang membership was not an important predictor of involvement in prison gang activity. These findings have implications for identifying prisoners involved in prison gang activity and for considering the role of psychological factors and group processes in gang research.

  2. Deliverable 1.2.7: Cross-cultural benefit segmentation of consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.J.; Onwezen, M.C.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Zimmermann, K.L.; Berg, van den I.; Jasiulewicz, A.; Guardia, M.D.; Guerrero, L.

    2010-01-01

    The present report, deliverable D.1.2.7, gives a final view of the work done in ISAFruit Work Package (WP) 1.2. Average Europe fruit consumption is below the recommended level and moreover the consumption level is still decreasing in Europe. A large survey was carried out in four European countries

  3. Campaigns and Awareness Raising Strategies in Traffic Safety (CAST). Deliverable 0.5: Quality assurance report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, D. & Hoekstra, T.

    2010-01-01

    This deliverable describes the quality assurance process and its results. More specifically, the individual requirements and outcomes of the quality assurance process are reported. Furthermore, the implementation of the guidelines that were drawn up in advance are discussed. (Author/publisher)

  4. Discrepancies between selected Pareto optimal plans and final deliverable plans in radiotherapy multi-criteria optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyroudi, Archonteia; Petersson, Kristoffer; Ghandour, Sarah; Pachoud, Marc; Matzinger, Oscar; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2016-08-01

    Multi-criteria optimization provides decision makers with a range of clinical choices through Pareto plans that can be explored during real time navigation and then converted into deliverable plans. Our study shows that dosimetric differences can arise between the two steps, which could compromise the clinical choices made during navigation.

  5. Fluctuations and predictability of wind and hydropower. Deliverable 2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, Gregor; Holttinen, H.; Söder, L.

    2004-01-01

    The report forms the deliverable D2.1 of the EU supported project Wind Power Integration in a Liberalised Electricity Market (WILMAR). The handling and generation of the necessary wind and hydro time series for the project’s power system planningsimulation model is described. The wind power and t...

  6. Monitoring framework and description of indicators. Deliverable D5.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer, A.C.G.; Giessen, A.M. van der; Munck, S.G.E. de; Poel, M.A.; Smets, R.C.J.

    2012-01-01

    This deliverable describes the monitoring framework that will be used to monitor and evaluate the GEN6 project and its nine pilots. The main topics are IPv6 uptake and governance, as described by the EC. Monitoring and evaluation will be done during the course of the project. This report describes t

  7. Deliverable 1.2.7: Cross-cultural benefit segmentation of consumers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.J.; Onwezen, M.C.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Zimmermann, K.L.; Berg, van den I.; Jasiulewicz, A.; Guardia, M.D.; Guerrero, L.

    2010-01-01

    The present report, deliverable D.1.2.7, gives a final view of the work done in ISAFruit Work Package (WP) 1.2. Average Europe fruit consumption is below the recommended level and moreover the consumption level is still decreasing in Europe. A large survey was carried out in four European countries

  8. Multivariate time series analysis of SafetyNet data. SafetyNet, Building the European Road Safety Observatory, Workpackage 7, Deliverable 7.7.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.J.F. Bijleveld, F.D. & Bergel, R.

    2009-01-01

    This deliverable provides an application of theories and methods documented in Deliverables 7.4 and 7.5 of work package 7 of the SafetyNet project. In this deliverable, use of select analysis techniques is demonstrated through real world road safety analysis problems, using aggregate data which may

  9. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  10. Ego Strength Development of Adolescents Involved in Adult-Sponsored Structured Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Carol A.; Li, Xaioming; Blackshire, Shana L.; Wilfong, Juanita J.

    2005-01-01

    A psychosocial conception of ego strengths is presented in relation to adolescent involvement in adult-sponsored structured youth activities. Five-hundred and seventeen high school students completed measures on their involvement in structured activities and on 8 ego strengths. Gender, age, and SES were controlled in a MANCOVA procedure and it was…

  11. Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Special Education: Selected Activities for Preschool Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Betty Clark

    The manual is designed to provide special education preschool teachers with a guide for parent involvement activities. The guide presents 32 activities divided into three topical areas: (1) communicating with parents (orientation packet, newsletter, school-home notebook, bulletin board for parents); (2) resource activities (field trips, home…

  12. A qualitative investigation into the so-called ministry of deliverance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Janse van Rensburg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the book“The occult debate” (Janse van Rensburg, 1999 it has become clear that epistemological views on occultism within the reformed tradition have drastically diverged. During the General Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church in 2007, the report of the Algemene Taakspan vir Leer en Aktuele Sake (ATLASon a ministry of deliverance denied the existence of the devil and claimed that it would be un-scientific to embark on an empirical research in this regard, because of the impossibility to verify information gathered in this manner. However, it is the hypothesis of this article that qualitative information could assist in attaining a clearer under-standing of the need for a ministry of deliverance. In this article the methodology of the qualitative research is explained and the narratives of participants are revealed. Thereafter the respon-ses of the participants are evaluated.

  13. Data needs and computational requirements for ST decision making. Internal deliverable ID6.2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Rémy; Tournebise, Pascal; Perkin, Samuel

    at the interfaces between the short-term operation planning and real-time decision making process. Adhering to the title of the task, the various chapters in the deliverable discusses the exogenous factors, i.e., load forecasting, component failure rates and influence of weather and renewable energy sources......The objective of this deliverable is to present the requirements for adapting available tools/models and identifying data needs for probabilistic reliability analysis and optimal decision-making in the short-term decision making process. It will serve as a basis for the next tasks of GARPUR work...... written by several partners, two of them being European TSOs, and the four other being academic partners. Special attention has been paid to address every topic in short-term decision making process as considered within GARPUR, and so that no important issue has been forgotten in the grey zones...

  14. Deliverable 2.2.1 Use Scenarios in the Pilot Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2010-01-01

    and usage scenarios of service bundles to be implemented in the ISISEMD Pilot platform in each of the four regions during the pilot. The services/sub functions are presented as workflows and also described by presenting how the Graphical User Interface will be organized and designed thus reflecting how......Deliverable 2.2.1 - Use scenarios in the pilot services During the first phase of ISISEMD project (WP1) the user requirements analysis phase, mainly D1.1.1, has proposed a list of services organized in three groups (bundles as in Dow) and classified as mandatory or not mandatory and leading...... to different user scenarios. Afterwards services were analyzed, broken down in sub-functions. The outcome of this process represent a further input document guiding to identify and adapt the more suitable product and solution enabled to provide these required services. Deliverable D.2.2.1 describes guidance...

  15. Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (VERAM), Joint D41/D43 deliverable of GLOBEMEN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Zwegers, Arian; Vesterager, Johan

    2003-01-01

    introduction to the document is given in Chapter 1. - Chapter 2 introduces a vision for collaborative commerce and positions this deliverable in the overall context of the GLOBEMEN project and the GLOBEMEN vision in particular. - Chapter 3 describes the basic concepts applied in GLOBEMEN. This includes “one-of-a-kind-production......”, the concept of the Virtual Enterprise (VE) and the Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture (VERA) developed in GLOBEMEN. - In Chapter 4 a so-called life history example is presented to give a possible scenario about how an enterprise network could evolve over time, and to point out the need for preparing....... IMS Globemen is an inter-regional project aiming to develop methods, tools and architectures to support inter-enterprise operations in one-of-kind industries, in different lifecycle phases. This deliverable describes an architectural framework VERAM including a description/elaboration of its elements...

  16. Guidelines for Inter-Enterprise Management (IEM), GLOBEMEN Deliverable D23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Vesterager, Johan

    2002-01-01

    to the Virtual Enterprise concept of GLOBEMEN as well as introducing different types of partnership and information needs related to each of these. - Chapter 4 gives a description of a Vision and Business Environment for OKP This section starts with a description of the holistic vision of how an OKP enterprise......This document is a deliverable of Work package 2 of the IMS Globemen (GMN) project: D23 Guidelines for Inter-Enterprise Management (IEM). IMS Globemen is an inter-regional project aiming to develop methods, tools and architectures to support inter-enterprise operations in one-of-kind industries...... (Specification). Correspondingly, this report operates as input for further generalisation over the lifecycle in D43: Guidelines for Virtual Manufacturing Enterprise. The main objective of the deliverable is to describe guidelines how companies may operate in an inter-enterprise environment supported by C-Project...

  17. 16 CFR 1031.5 - Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commission involvement in the development of voluntary safety standards for consumer products: (a) The... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities. 1031.5 Section 1031.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT...

  18. Autonomous motivation: involvement in physical activity, and perceived sport competence: structural and mediator models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagøien, Tor Egil; Halvari, Hallgeir

    2005-02-01

    Students in upper secondary school (N = 231, M = 16.6 yr., SD = 1.6) were tested on involvement in physical activity, perceived sport competence, using the Perceived Competence Scale of Harter, and motivational regulation on the Self-regulation Questionnaire of Ryan and Connell. Correlations were positive among involvement in physical activity, autonomous motivation, and perceived sport competence. A hypothetical model indicated that autonomous motivation mediates the relation between perceived sport competence and involvement in physical activity. Although LISREL analysis supported this mediation, the best model fit of the data supported a structural model with involvement in physical activity (R2 = .63) to mediate between autonomous motivation and perceived competence (R2 = .47). Results are interpreted and discussed in terms of self-determination theory.

  19. 78 FR 57818 - Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1031 Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  20. Deliverable 1.2.7: Cross-cultural benefit segmentation of consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Reinders, M.J.; Onwezen, M.C.; Sijtsema, S.J.; Zimmermann, K.L.; Berg, van den, Aad; Jasiulewicz, A.; Guardia, M.D.; Guerrero, L.

    2010-01-01

    The present report, deliverable D.1.2.7, gives a final view of the work done in ISAFruit Work Package (WP) 1.2. Average Europe fruit consumption is below the recommended level and moreover the consumption level is still decreasing in Europe. A large survey was carried out in four European countries that consisted of questions regarding the importance consumers attach to food related benefits in general and for specific situations, personal orientations of the consumers, personal characteristi...

  1. Identification of preferred dipole design options and cost estimates: Deliverable D5.2

    CERN Document Server

    Tommasini, Davide

    2017-01-01

    This document contains a description of the preferred 16 Tesla dipole magnet baseline design with its expected performances. The document also includes an analysis of the individual merits and risks of the different, initial design options and gives a justification for the selection of the baseline design. The deliverable includes expected field levels, field errors and a cost estimate, which serve as input for the arc design consolidation.

  2. Deliverable D4.1. Report on Background Risk Management/Assessment Systems Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    König, Sandra; Kollmitzer, Christian; Latzenhofer, Martin; Schauer, Stefan; Gouvas, Panagiotis; Drosos, Nikos; Mouratidis, Haris; Pavlidis, Michalis; Rekleitis, Evangelos; Krantjias, Thanos; Papastergiou, Spyros; Patsakis, Constantinos; Polemi, Nieta; Glykos, Stamatios

    2016-01-01

    The scope of the current deliverable is to elaborate on the modifications that are needed in order to realize the MITIGATE platform. The purpose of the platform is to offer sophisticated services regarding cyber risk assessment, threat mitigation and simulation. . The risk assessment functionality aims to quantify the risks that derive from the various cyber vulnerabilities associated with specific assets that participate in a supply chain service. While, the mitigation and simulation functio...

  3. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:25059979

  4. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyoung Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1 the experience of psychological benefits, 2 the creation of social support, and 3 the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging.

  5. Intermediate Technical Review Report : Deliverable D0.4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian; Svendsen, Brian Møller;

    This report provides a coprehensivi overview of the activities of the Mediterranean Virtual Univeristy Project from the contract start for December 2005. It provides a review of the achievements so far and a discussion of issues currently being adressed along with remedial actions. The report als...

  6. Elucidating pharmacodynamic interaction of silver nanoparticle - topical deliverable antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurugan, G.; Seshagiri Rao, J. V. L. N.; Dhanaraju, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    In order to exploit the potential benefits of antimicrobial combination therapy, we need a better understanding of the circumstances under which pharmacodynamic interactions expected. In this study, Pharmacodynamic interactions between silver nanoparticle (SNP) and topical antibiotics such as Cefazolin (CEF), Mupirocin (MUP), Gentamycin (GEN), Neomycin (NEO), Tetracycline (TET), Vancomycin (VAN) were investigated using the MIC test, Combination assay followed by Fractional Inhibitory concentration Index and Agar well diffusion method. SNP + MUP, SNP + NEO, SNP + VAN combinations showed Synergism (SN) and SNP + CEF, SNP + GEN, SNP + TET showed Partial synergism (PS) against Staphylococcus aureus. Four combinations (SNP + CEF, SNP + MUP, SNP + GEN, SNP + VAN) showed SN, SNP + TET showed PS and Indifferent effect (ID) were observed for SNP + NEO against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. SN was observed for SNP + CEF, SNP + GEN, SNP + NEO, SNP + TET and SNP + MUP showed ID, SNP + VAN showed PS against Escherichia coli. In addition, we elucidated the possible mechanism involved in the pharmacodynamic interaction between SNP-topical antibiotics by increased ROS level, membrane damage following protein release, K+ leakage and biofilm inhibition. Thus, our findings support that conjugation of the SNP with topical antibiotics have great potential in the topical formulation when treating complex resistant bacterial infections and where there is a need of more concentration to kill pathogenic bacteria.

  7. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... misconduct. 13.5 Section 13.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The Administrator will refer cases of suspected criminal activity or misconduct to the EPA Office of Inspector...

  8. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  9. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  10. SiteChar. Characterisation of European CO2 storage. Deliverable 8.4. Quantitative social site characterisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Mastop, E.A. [ECN Policy Studies, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kaiser, M.; Zimmer, R. [Unabhaengiges Institut fuer Umweltfragen UfU, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    This report describes the results of the last stage of the in-depth social site characterisation activities at two prospective CCS sites as part of the SiteChar project: a CCS onshore site and a CCS offshore site. The onshore site is the Zalecze and Zuchlow site application (Poland - WP5) and the offshore site is the North Sea Moray Firth site (UK - WP3). This deliverable describes the results from a repeated quantitative measurement of local awareness, knowledge, and perceptions of CCS at both sites using representative surveys. For comparison and discussion of all SiteChar WP8 results we refer to the final summary report D8.5. The 2nd survey showed some interesting results. First of all, awareness of CCS was still very low. While in the UK around half of the respondents had at least heard of local plans for CCS, in Poland this was only 21%. It seems that awareness in the UK was mostly induced by specific plans in the area that were abandoned in the course of the SiteChar project. Second, it seems that on the whole the local publics were rather positive about CCS. Most respondents expected a positive impact of CCS on the region. In the UK, arguments for that were mainly economic, while in Poland arguments were mainly related to environmental concerns. Although there are some worries about risks of leakage, especially at the onshore site in Poland, people think that authorities will properly regulate CCS and monitor the safety of CCS. Expectations were mostly that it would be good for the country and that it will help reach international targets for CO2 reduction and buy time to develop renewable energy. Respondents seemed uncertain about the costs of using CCS and whether the technique is ready for widespread use. Especially in Poland people seemed to agree that CCS is essential for tackling climate change. Most differences between the two sites may be attributed to the proximity of the site to the local community. The Polish site is onshore and therefore much

  11. Deliverable d6.1SME and Stakeholder Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagtmann, Maria Anne; Afroz Alam, Sama; Baird, Alf

    2009-01-01

    . The study was based on stakeholder views obtained from an internet-based questionnaire [2] and combined them with findings from literature. The key themes of the questionnaire were: o The types of education used in the responding organisations o The relevance of potential education offering types to SMEs.......g., the experiences with e-learning in other projects and content and format analysis of face-to-face, blended and pure e-educational offerings of other universities and private sector providers, such as, e.g.Lloyd's Register. Thinking about the current competencies and educational development policies of maritime...... firms and organisations, almost 50% of of the surveyed companies and organisations motivated their employees to participate in part-time education offerings or university business courses.  Respondents indicated that they were willing to give employees 1-3 weeks per year to pursue such activities...

  12. Overview of magnet design options: Deliverable D5.1

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069265; Toral, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the design options for 16 T superconducting dipole magnets for the FCC hadron collider explored in the frame of the activities of WP5. All options have been considered under comparable assumptions and managed using the same tools to ensure a correct judgement and comparison of their relevant pros and cons. Three baseline design configurations have been explored: 1) block-coils, 2) cosine-theta and 3) common-coils. A fourth option, the canted cosine-theta, has been initiated by Swiss (PSI, not part of EuroCirCol) and US (LBNL, EuroCirCol partner) laboratories. The studies show that, adopting a reference margin to the load line of 14 % and with reasonable assumptions on the conductor performance, the total amount of conductor needed for the entire collider is between 7.5 and 10 ktons. depending on the option. The cosine-theta uses less conductor and the canted cosine-theta uses the largest amount. The characterisation of the magnet design options is complete and the work to finalize and ...

  13. Activities involving aeronautical, space science, and technology support for minority institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report addressed the activities with which the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity (ICBO) was involved over the past 12 months. ICBO was involved in the design and development of a CARES Student Tracking System Software (CARES). Cares is intended to provide an effective means of maintaining relevant current and historical information on NASA-funded students through a range of educational program initiatives. ICBP was extensively involved in the formation of a minority university consortium amd implementation of collaborative research activities by the consortium as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth/Earth Observing System. ICBO was involved in the formation of an HBCU/MI Consortium to facilitate technology transfer efforts to the small and minority business community in their respective regions.

  14. Involvement of Ca2+ Activated Cl- Channel Ano6 in Platelet Activation and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxing Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The ubiquitously expressed Ca2+ Activated Cl- Channel Ano6 participates in the stimulation of cell membrane scrambling. Defective Ano6 underlies the Scott syndrome, an inherited bleeding disorder with impaired scrambling of plasma membrane phospholipids. At least in theory, the bleeding disorder of Scott syndrome may result from impaired platelet function. Activators of platelets include thrombin and collagen related peptide (CRP, which trigger increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, degranulation, integrin activation, as well as cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the cell membrane. The present study thus explored whether Ano6 modifies activation-induced alterations of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, degranulation (P-selectin exposure, integrin activation, phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface and platelet volume. Methods: Platelets from mice lacking Ano6 (ano6-/- were compared to platelets from corresponding wild-type mice (ano6+/+. [Ca2+]i was estimated from Fluo-3 fluorescence, ROS from DCFDA fluorescence, degranulation from P-selectin abundance, integrin activation from αIIbβ3-integrin abundance, phosphatidylserine abundance from annexin-V-binding, and cell volume from forward scatter. Results: Platelet number in blood was slightly higher in ano6-/- mice than in ano6+/+ mice. Without activation [Ca2+]i and volume were similar in ano6-/- and ano6+/+ platelets as well as ROS abundance, P-selectin abundance, αIIbβ3 integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure were negligible in both genotypes. Thrombin (0.01 U/ml and CRP (2 or 5 µg/ml increased [Ca2+]i, ROS abundance, platelet degranulation, αIIbβ3 integrin activation, and triggered annexin-V-binding as well as cell shrinkage, all effects less pronounced in ano6-/- than in ano6+/+ platelets. Conclusions: Genetic knockout of Ano6 blunts thrombin- and CRP-induced activation and apoptosis

  15. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household's Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household's health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women's personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions.

  16. Active serine involved in the stabilization of the active site loop in the Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Svendsen, A.; Langberg, H.;

    1998-01-01

    reveal that the hinges of the active site lid are more flexible in the wild-type Hll than in S146A. In contrast, larger fluctuations are observed in the middle region of the active site loop in S 146A than in Hll. These findings reveal that the single mutation (S146A) of the active site serine leads......We have investigated the binding properties of and dynamics in Humicola lanuginosa lipase (HII) and the inactive mutant S146A (active Ser146 substituted with Ala) using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, respectively. Hll and S146A show significantly different binding......, whereas only small changes are observed for I-Ill suggesting that the active site Lid in the latter opens more easily and hence more lipase molecules are bound to the liposomes. These observations are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent essential dynamics analyses. The results...

  17. Go-Lab Deliverable D1.4 Go-Lab classroom scenarios handbook

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable presents the Go-Lab scenarios handbook. This handbook offers six different scenarios that are meant to help teachers design ILSs. Each scenario represents a specific pedagogical method within the overall Go-Lab inquiry approach. The six Go-Lab inquiry scenarios are labelled as follows:• The basic scenario • The jigsaw approach • Six changing hats • Learning by critiquing • Structured controversy • Find the mistakeIn a later stage, when a suitable modelling tool has been found...

  18. Deliverable 3.3.2 Specification of tests and test groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth; Mitseva, Anelia; Harpur, Jill

    2009-01-01

    for them. This will be done via integrating intelligent scalable ICT services which will be tested for a period of 12 months under realistic conditions. Offering the services could not be complete without evaluating quality of life improvement, user acceptance and user satisfaction with a representative......Deliverable 3.3.2: Specification of tests and test groups One of the main goals of the ISISEMD project is to offer innovative ICT services to improve the quality of life of elderly persons with cognitive problems or mild dementia and their informal and formal caregivers who provide every day care...

  19. MITIGATE - Deliverable D2.2 - Evidence-driven maritime supply chain risk assessment approach

    OpenAIRE

    Polemi, Nineta; Papastergiou, Spyridon; Karantzias, Athanassios; Georgiakodis, Fotios; Patsakis, Constantinos; Ntrigkogias, Christos; Schauer, Stefan; Latzenhofer, Martin; König, Sandra; Göllner, Johannes; Buhl, Reiner; FIEDLER, Ralf; Bosse, Claudia; Mouratidis, Haris; Pavlidis, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Deliverable 2.2 reports the outcomes of tasks T2.3 “Specifications of Mathematical Instruments, Risk and Assurance Models” and T2.4 “Evidence-Driven Maritime Supply Chain Risk Assessment (g-MSRA) Specifications” of work package WP2. The document identifies three methodologies and frameworks; viz. Secure Tropos, AECID and MEDUSA, that are deemed relevant to the project and provided input in the formulation of the MITIGATE methodology or can be exploited in the implementation phase of the MITIG...

  20. Active Involvement of End Users When Developing Web-Based Mental Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, Derek; van Bruinessen, Inge; Noordman, Janneke; Friele, Roland; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Although many web-based mental health interventions are being released, the actual uptake by end users is limited. The marginal level of engagement of end users when developing these interventions is recognized as an important cause for uptake problems. In this paper, we offer our perceptive on how to improve user engagement. By doing so, we aim to stimulate a discourse on user involvement within the field of online mental health interventions. We shortly describe three different methods (the expert-driven method, intervention mapping, and scrum) that were currently used to develop web-based health interventions. We will focus to what extent the end user was involved in the developmental phase, and what the additional challenges were. In the final paragraph, lessons learned are summarized, and recommendations provided. Every method seems to have its trade-off: if end users are highly involved, availability of end users and means become problematic. If end users are less actively involved, the product may be less appropriate for the end user. Other challenges to consider are the funding of the more active role of technological companies, and the time it takes to process the results of shorter development cycles. Thinking about user-centered design and carefully planning, the involvement of end users should become standard in the field of web-based (mental) health. When deciding on the level of user involvement, one should balance the need for input from users with the availability of resources such as time and funding.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF STUDENTS’ INVOLVEMENT IN EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana DUMITRASCU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to demonstrate the influence of students’ involvement in extracurricular activities on the development of skills and competencies by means of the factorial analysis. This research is untertaken by means of the questionnaire method, where 728 respondents from five Romanian universities where questionned. The data is analysed through the statistical programme SPSS. Due to the factorial analysis certain influences of the extracurricular activities on the organisational skills, social competencies, communication skills and integration ability are highlighted.

  2. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Hijazi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  3. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. PMID:28280516

  4. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Mohamad Ali; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  6. Regrouping: organized activity involvement and social adjustment across the transition to high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy M; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Arola, Nicole T

    2013-01-01

    Although organized activities (OAs) have been established as important contexts of development, limited work has examined the role of OAs across the high school transition in buffering adolescents' social adjustment by providing opportunities for visibility and peer affiliation. The transition to high school is characterized by numerous changes and OAs may provide an important setting for establishing and maintaining peer relationships during this tumultuous time. This study included 151 8th grade U.S. students (58% male) who were assessed across the transition to high school (spring of 8th and 9th grade). Continuous involvement in academic activities across the transition and becoming involved (i.e., initiation) in community/service activities following the transition was associated with fewer depressive symptoms in the spring of 9th grade. Continuous involvement in sports and initiation of academic activities was associated with having more friendships. In addition, links between OAs and loneliness were only evident among females. There appear to be significant social benefits for OA involvement.

  7. Leisure Activity and Caregiver Involvement in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Iulia; Hartley, Sigan L.; Handen, Benjamin L.; Bulova, Peter D.; Tumuluru, Rameshwari V.; Devenny, Darlynne A.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Lao, Patrick J.; Christian, Bradley, T.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined leisure activity and its association with caregiver involvement (i.e., residence and time spent with primary caregiver) in 62 middle-aged and older adults with Down syndrome (aged 30-53 years). Findings indicated that middle-aged and older adults with Down syndrome frequently participated in social and passive leisure…

  8. Extracurricular Activity and Parental Involvement Predict Positive Outcomes in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.; Case, Emily

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore if parental involvement and extracurricular activity participation could predict well-being and academic competence in elementary school children. Seventy-two children (mean age = 10.9 years, SD = 0.85) and their parents participated. Results revealed that parental pressure and support, when paired with…

  9. Premature aging in mice activates a systemic metabolic response involving autophagy induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Mariño (Guillermo); A.P. Ugalde (Alejandro); N. Salvador-Montoliu (Natalia); I. Varela (Ignacio); P.M. Quirós (Pedro); J. Cadiñanos (Juan); I. van der Pluijm (Ingrid); J.M.P. Freije (José); C. López-Otín (Carlos)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAutophagy is a highly regulated intracellular process involved in the turnover of most cellular constituents and in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. It is well-established that the basal autophagic activity of living cells decreases with age, thus contributing to the accumulation

  10. Active involvement of people with intellectual disabilities in health research - A structured literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankena, T.K.; Naaldenberg, J.; Cardol, M.; Linehan, C.; Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Actively involving people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in health research, also known as inclusive health research, is increasingly popular. Currently, insight into experiences of this type of research is scarce. To gain insight into this topic, a structured literature review was conducted

  11. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  12. Structure and activity of lacustrine sediment bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Silva Martins, Gilberto Jorge; Terada, Akihiko; Ribeiro, Daniel C;

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the bacterial community structure in sediments is essential to better design restoration strategies for eutrophied lakes. In this regard, the aim of this study was to quantify the abundance and activity of bacteria involved in nutrient and iron cycling in sediments from four Azorean ...

  13. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jamie I; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-30

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation.

  14. Personal Involvement with Learning Disability Children: Activities Groups Can Do for Personal Involvement with Learning Disability Children thru Movement Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth I.

    Described are perceptual motor activities in the areas of coordination, agility, strength, balance, and endurance for use with learning disabled children. Provided are a rationale for movement education and definitions of 10 terms such as laterality and endurance. A sequence of activities is provided for the following skills: ball bouncing, rope…

  15. THE EXTERNAL FACTORS OF STUDENTS’ INVOLVEMENT IN SPEAKING ACTIVITY AT SMP PROGRESIF BUMI SHALAWAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Nurul Haikal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is conducted to know what factors that influence the students’ involvement in speaking activity in order to practice their speaking skill and what strategies that the teacher used to encourage those external factors. This research uses descriptive qualitative method. There are two instruments used for this research, namely, class observation and interview. Based on the results of class observation and interview, the researcher concludes that teacher factor gives the greatest impact on students’ involvement and the appropriate strategies can support those external factors.

  16. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required.

  17. SU-E-T-597: Influence of Smoothing Parameters on Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, D; Sharma, S; Gandhi, A; Subramani, V; Sharma, D; Kumar, P; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2012-06-01

    To study the impact of different smoothing parameters on IMRT plan quality and deliverabilityMethods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma cervix were chosen. Planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) i.e. bladder and rectum were contoured. In each case, five different dynamic IMRT plans with 6MV photon beam were created in eclipse TPS for Varian 2300C/D linear accelerator. During optimization, dose volume constraints and priorities were kept constant and smoothing parameters were varied as follows: 10/5, 40/30 (TPS default value), 80/60, 100/80 and 200/150 in x/y direction. Total dose was 5040cGy in 28 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose. Plan quality was analyzed by means of coverage index (CI=PTV covered by prescription dose/PTV), OAR mean doses and total monitor units (MUs) required to deliver a plan. In each case, deliverability of treatment plans were verified with I'matriXX ion-chamber array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement criteria. The CI values were 0.9435±0.032, 0.9418±0.034, 0.9380±0.041, 0.9330±0.047 and 0.8681±0.072 for 10/5, 40/30, 80/60, 100/80 and 200/150 in x/y direction. PTV dose maximum decreases with the increase of smoothing parameters and values were 5724.38±106.08 5723.30±131.60, 5708.44±1 16.74, 5697.92±116.82 and 5587.50±189.50cGy. The bladder mean doses were 4027.46±630.40, 3821.62±420.62, 3819.58±427.08, 3813.42±435.02 and 3814.78±438.0cGy. Rectum mean doses were 3839.88±466.02, 3835.52±473.18, 3837.52±472.88, 3839.10±471.20 and 3918.94±469.76cGy. Similarly, Total MUs were 1588±205, 1573±214, 1513±274, 1456±335 and 1219±68. Gamma pass rate increases with the increase of smoothing parameters and values were 99.16±0.21%, 99.07±0.19%, 99.24±0.28%, 99.29±0.29% and 99.75±0.15%. When smoothing parameters decreased below TPS default value, plan quality increases, but deliverability decreases. If smoothing parameters

  18. Definition of a Bidirectional Activity-Dependent Pathway Involving BDNF and Narp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Mariga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the cardinal features of neural development and adult plasticity is the contribution of activity-dependent signaling pathways. However, the interrelationships between different activity-dependent genes are not well understood. The immediate early gene neuronal-activity-regulated pentraxin (NPTX2 or Narp encodes a protein that has been associated with excitatory synaptogenesis, AMPA receptor aggregation, and the onset of critical periods. Here, we show that Narp is a direct transcriptional target of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, another highly regulated activity-dependent gene involved in synaptic plasticity. Unexpectedly, Narp is bidirectionally regulated by BDNF. Acute BDNF withdrawal results in downregulation of Narp, whereas transcription of Narp is greatly enhanced by BDNF. Furthermore, our results show that BDNF directly regulates Narp to mediate glutamatergic transmission and mossy fiber plasticity. Hence, Narp serves as a significant epistatic target of BDNF to regulate synaptic plasticity during periods of dynamic activity.

  19. Isolation of genes (nif/hup cosmids) involved in hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities in Rhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, S S; Graham, L A; Maier, R J

    1985-03-01

    Recombinant cosmids containing a Rhizobium japonicum gene involved in both hydrogenase (Hup) and nitrogenase (Nif) activities were isolated. An R. japonicum gene bank utilizing broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 was conjugated into Hup- Nif- R. japonicum strain SR139. Transconjugants containing the nif/hup cosmid were identified by their resistance to tetracycline (Tcr) and ability to grow chemoautotrophically (Aut+) with hydrogen. All Tcr Aut+ transconjugants possessed high levels of H2 uptake activity, as determined amperometrically. Moreover, all Hup+ transconjugants tested possessed the ability to reduce acetylene (Nif+) in soybean nodules. Cosmid DNAs from 19 Hup+ transconjugants were transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. When the cosmids were restricted with EcoRI, 15 of the 19 cosmids had a restriction pattern with 13.2-, 4.0-, 3.0-, and 2.5-kilobase DNA fragments. Six E. coli transformants containing the nif/hup cosmids were conjugated with strain SR139. All strain SR139 transconjugants were Hup+ Nif+. Moreover, one nif/hup cosmid was transferred to 15 other R. japonicum Hup- mutants. Hup+ transconjugants of six of the Hup- mutants appeared at a frequency of 1.0, whereas the transconjugants of the other nine mutants remained Hup-. These results indicate that the nif/hup gene cosmids contain a gene involved in both nitrogenase and hydrogenase activities and at least one and perhaps other hup genes which are exclusively involved in H2 uptake activity.

  20. Premature aging in mice activates a systemic metabolic response involving autophagy induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Ugalde, Alejandro P; Salvador-Montoliu, Natalia; Varela, Ignacio; Quirós, Pedro M; Cadiñanos, Juan; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Freije, José M P; López-Otín, Carlos

    2008-07-15

    Autophagy is a highly regulated intracellular process involved in the turnover of most cellular constituents and in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. It is well-established that the basal autophagic activity of living cells decreases with age, thus contributing to the accumulation of damaged macromolecules during aging. Conversely, the activity of this catabolic pathway is required for lifespan extension in animal models such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. In this work, we describe the unexpected finding that Zmpste24-null mice, which show accelerated aging and are a reliable model of human Hutchinson-Gilford progeria, exhibit an extensive basal activation of autophagy instead of the characteristic decline in this process occurring during normal aging. We also show that this autophagic increase is associated with a series of changes in lipid and glucose metabolic pathways, which resemble those occurring in diverse situations reported to prolong lifespan. These Zmpste24(-/-) mice metabolic alterations are also linked to substantial changes in circulating blood parameters, such as leptin, glucose, insulin or adiponectin which in turn lead to peripheral LKB1-AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition. On the basis of these results, we propose that nuclear abnormalities causing premature aging in Zmpste24(-/-) mice trigger a metabolic response involving the activation of autophagy. However, the chronic activation of this catabolic pathway may turn an originally intended pro-survival strategy into a pro-aging mechanism and could contribute to the systemic degeneration and weakening observed in these progeroid mice.

  1. Barriers to involvement in physical activities of persons with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2016-03-01

    Participating in physical activities could be essential for reducing the multiple risk factors for health problems that persons with severe mental illness (SMI) may suffer. However, people with SMI are significantly less active than the general population. To develop knowledge about factors related to the perceived barriers hindering this population's participation in physical activities and the benefits this participation would have, a study was conducted in Israel with 86 people with mental illness living in community mental health facilities prior to their participation in a health promotion program. A mixed method was implemented and included: a scale designed to measure participants' perceptions of the barriers to and benefits of involvement in physical activities; instruments focusing on bio-psycho-social factors that may affect the level of barriers experienced; and personal interviews. The findings revealed high ranking for accessibility barriers hindering the participation in physical activities. Bio-psycho-social factors stemming from the participants' mental health, such as level of depression, were correlated with higher ranking of accessibility barriers. Bio-psycho-social factors reflecting positive mental health and health, such as positive appraisal of body weight, were correlated with lower ranking of accessibility barriers. Other barriers may include organizational and broader systemic barriers in the mental health facilities where the participants reside. These findings illuminate the need to consider the unique challenges that persons with mental illness may face in any attempt to advance their involvement in physical activity.

  2. Landsat maps (phase V, deliverable 60), ASTER maps (phase V, deliverable 62), ASTER_DEM maps (phase V, deliverable 63), and spectral remote sensing in support of PRISM-II mineral resource assessment project, Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverables 61 and 64): Chapter E in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.; Knepper, Daniel H.; Horton, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Multispectral satellite data acquired by the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM), Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensors were processed and interpreted in support of the PRISM-II project (Second Projet de Renforcement Institutionnel du Secteur Minier de la Republique Islamique de Mauritanie). This report and accompanying maps constitute project deliverables 60–64. All digital data for use in Geographic Information System (GIS) and image processing software will be included in the GIS deliverable 92. Image maps in PDF format of the processed Landsat and ASTER scenes are referenced in the appendixes.

  3. College/school of pharmacy affiliation and community pharmacies' involvement in public health activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Salisa C; Mount, Jeanine; Watcharadamrongkun, Suntaree

    2009-11-12

    To examine the relationship between pharmacy college/school affiliation and community pharmacies' involvement in immunization and emergency preparedness activities. Telephone interviews were completed with 1,704 community pharmacies randomly sampled from 17 states to determine the pharmacies' involvement in immunization promotion, vaccine distribution, in-house immunization delivery, and health emergency preparedness and response, affiliation with college/school of pharmacy, and selected pharmacy and public health-related characteristics. Pharmacy college/school-affiliated community pharmacies were more likely than non-affiliated pharmacies to participate in immunization and emergency preparedness when controlling for pharmacy characteristics. College/school affiliation generally became nonsignificant, however, when public health-related characteristics were included in the analysis. Affiliation with a college/school of pharmacy was related to community pharmacies' involvement in immunization and emergency preparedness.

  4. Understanding affluent adolescent adjustment: The interplay of parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, and organized activity involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Edin T; Bohnert, Amy M; Travers, Lea V

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relations between affluent adolescent adjustment and culturally salient factors within parent-child relationship and extracurricular domain. Bootstrapping techniques evaluated mediated effects among parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, intensity of organized activity (OA) involvement, and adolescent adjustment (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms, life satisfaction) within a sample of 10th graders and their parents (n = 88 parent-child pairs) from four high schools in affluent communities. Findings indicated that adolescents with more perfectionistic parents perceived more parental pressure and experienced poorer adjustment. Results also demonstrated that affluent adolescents who perceived more parental pressure were more intensely involved in OAs, but that higher OA intensity was linked to better adjustment. Findings highlight the importance of considering parental perfectionism when understanding adolescent behaviors and psychological outcomes, confirm the negative direct effects of parental pressure on adjustment, and corroborate prior research dispelling that highly intense OA involvement is linked to adolescent maladjustment.

  5. Suppression of pancreatic carcinoma growth by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ involves angiogenesis inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Dong; Xing-Peng Wang; Kai Wu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the possible actions and mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a ligand-activated transcription factor, in pancreatic carcinogenesis,especially in angiogenesis.METHODS: Expressions of PPARγ and retinoid acid receptor (RXRα) were examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with immunocytochemical staining. Pancreatic carcinoma cells, PANC-1,were treated either with 9-cis-RA, a ligand of RXRα,or with 15-deoxy-Δ12,14 prostaglandin J2(15d-PGJ2), a ligand of PPARγ, or both. Antiproliferative effect was evaluated by cell viability using methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay. A pancreatic carcinoma xenograft tumor model of nude mice was established by inoculating PANC-1 cells subcutaneously. Rosiglitazone, a specific ligand of PPARγ, was administered via water drinking in experimental group of nude mice. After 75 d, all mice were sacrificed. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumor tissue was examined with immunohistochemical staining. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in PANC-1 cells, which were treated with 15d-PGJ2 or 9-cis-RA at variousconcentrations or different duration, was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of Rosiglitazone on changes of microvascular density (MVD) and VEGF expression were investigated in xenograft tumor tissue. Neovasculature was detected with immunohistochemistry staining labeled with anti-Ⅳ collagen antibody, and indicated by MVD.RESULTS: RT-PCR and immunocytochemical staining showed that PPARγ and RXRα were expressed in PANC-1 cells at both transcription level and translation level. MTT assay demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2, 9-cis-RA and their combination inhibited the growth of PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. 9-cis-RA had a combined inhibiting action with 15d-PGJ2 on the growth of pancreatic carcinoma. In vivo studies revealed that Rosiglitazone significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic carcinoma

  6. Active Involvement of End Users When Developing Web-Based Mental Health Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek de Beurs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough many web-based mental health interventions are being released, the actual uptake by end users is limited. The marginal level of engagement of end users when developing these interventions is recognized as an important cause for uptake problems. In this paper, we offer our perceptive on how to improve user engagement. By doing so, we aim to stimulate a discourse on user involvement within the field of online mental health interventions.MethodsWe shortly describe three different methods (the expert-driven method, intervention mapping, and scrum that were currently used to develop web-based health interventions. We will focus to what extent the end user was involved in the developmental phase, and what the additional challenges were. In the final paragraph, lessons learned are summarized, and recommendations provided.ResultsEvery method seems to have its trade-off: if end users are highly involved, availability of end users and means become problematic. If end users are less actively involved, the product may be less appropriate for the end user. Other challenges to consider are the funding of the more active role of technological companies, and the time it takes to process the results of shorter development cycles.ConclusionThinking about user-centered design and carefully planning, the involvement of end users should become standard in the field of web-based (mental health. When deciding on the level of user involvement, one should balance the need for input from users with the availability of resources such as time and funding.

  7. OSSMETER D3.2 – Report on Source Code Activity Metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinju, J.J.; Shahi, A.

    2014-01-01

    This deliverable is part of WP3: Source Code Quality and Activity Analysis. It provides descriptions and initial prototypes of the tools that are needed for source code activity analysis. It builds upon the Deliverable 3.1 where infra-structure and a domain analysis have been investigated for Source

  8. Constitutively activated ERK sensitizes cancer cells to doxorubicin: Involvement of p53-EGFR-ERK pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RATNA KUMARI; SURBHI CHOUHAN; SNAHLATA SINGH; RISHI RAJ CHHIPA; AMRENDRA KUMAR AJAY; MANOJ KUMAR BHAT

    2017-03-01

    The tumour suppressor gene p53 is mutated in approximately 50% of the human cancers. p53 is involved in genotoxicstress-induced cellular responses. The role of EGFR and ERK in DNA-damage-induced apoptosis is well known. Weinvestigated the involvement of activation of ERK signalling as a consequence of non-functional p53, in sensitivity ofcells to doxorubicin. We performed cell survival assays in cancer cell lines with varying p53 status: MCF-7 (wild-typep53, WTp53), MDA MB-468 (mutant p53, MUTp53), H1299 (absence of p53, NULLp53) and an isogenic cell lineMCF-7As (WTp53 abrogated). Our results indicate that enhanced chemosensitivity of cells lacking wild-type p53function is because of elevated levels of EGFR which activates ERK. Additionally, we noted that independent of p53status, pERK contributes to doxorubicin-induced cell death.

  9. Carbohydrate in the mouth enhances activation of brain circuitry involved in motor performance and sensory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Clare E; Byblow, Winston D; Stinear, Cathy M; Gant, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of carbohydrate in the human mouth has been associated with the facilitation of motor output and improvements in physical performance. Oral receptors have been identified as a potential mode of afferent transduction for this novel form of nutrient signalling that is distinct from taste. In the current study oral exposure to carbohydrate was combined with a motor task in a neuroimaging environment to identify areas of the brain involved in this phenomenon. A mouth-rinsing protocol was conducted whilst carbohydrate (CHO) and taste-matched placebo (PLA) solutions were delivered and recovered from the mouths of 10 healthy volunteers within a double-blind, counterbalanced design. This protocol eliminates post-oral factors and controls for the perceptual qualities of solutions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was used to identify cortical areas responsive to oral carbohydrate during rest and activity phases of a hand-grip motor task. Mean blood-oxygen-level dependent signal change experienced in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was larger for CHO compared with PLA during the motor task when contrasted with a control condition. Areas of activation associated with CHO exclusively were observed over the primary taste cortex and regions involved in visual perception. Regions in the limbic system associated with reward were also significantly more active with CHO. This is the first demonstration that oral carbohydrate signalling can increase activation within the primary sensorimotor cortex during physical activity and enhance activation of neural networks involved in sensory perception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms involved in VPAC receptors activation and regulation: lessons from pharmacological and mutagenesis studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid eLanger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available VIP plays diverse and important role in human physiology and physiopathology and their receptors constitute potential targets for the treatment of several diseases such as neurodegenerative disorder, asthma, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the two VIP receptors, VPAC1 and VPAC2, with respect to mechanisms involved in receptor activation, G protein coupling, signaling, regulation and oligomerization.

  11. The influence of motivational involvement in physical activity level improving using formative evaluation procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The current work was planned to build up an original motivational involvement, based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory, to improving physical activity in disadvantaged adolescents. The theoretical structure has three main issues: social context (perceived independence, perceived social sustain, input and enjoyment); cognitive mediators (perceived option and self-efficacy); and motivational course (intrinsic motivation, commitment and positive self-concept). ...

  12. Activity and recovery cycles of National Rugby League matches involving higher and lower ranked teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of ladder position on ball-in-play and recovery periods in elite National Rugby League (NRL) competitive matches. Video recordings of 192 NRL matches and 18 NRL finals matches played over 2 competitive seasons were coded for activity and recovery cycles. Time when the ball was continuously in play was considered activity, whereas any stoppages during the match (e.g., for scrums, penalties, line drop outs, tries, and video referee decisions) were considered recovery. In comparison to matches involving lower standard teams, there was a greater proportion (effect size [ES] = 0.37-0.67) of long duration (>91 seconds) and a smaller proportion (ES = 0.49-0.68) of short duration (<45 seconds) ball-in-play periods when Top 4 teams were competing against other Top 4 teams. No meaningful differences were found between teams of different ladder positions for the proportion of short (ES = 0.04-0.16) and long (ES = 0.06-0.28) recovery periods. In comparison to fixture matches involving the top 4 teams, finals matches had a smaller proportion (ES = 0.56) of long duration activity periods, and a greater proportion (ES = 0.54) of short duration activity periods. Only small differences were found between finals matches and matches involving the Top 4 teams for the proportion of short (ES = 0.42) and long (ES = 0.41) recovery periods. These findings suggest that the competitive advantage of the best NRL teams is closely linked to their ability to maintain a higher playing intensity than less successful teams. Furthermore, long ball-in-play periods in high-standard fixture matches (i.e., involving the top 4 teams) ensure that players are adequately prepared for the ball-in-play demands of finals matches.

  13. Implementation scenarios and further research priorities regarding forgiving and self-explaining roads. IN-SAFETY Workpackage 5: Implementation priorities and policy recommendations, Deliverable 5.3.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macharis, C. Verbeke, A. Brucker, K. de Gelová, E. Weinberger, J. & Vašek, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this deliverable a multi-actor multi-criteria analysis (MAMCA) is performed for the strategic evaluation of a number of innovative systems contributing to the creation of a more forgiving and self-explaining road environment. This deliverable also formulates a number of guidelines aimed at making

  14. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant differentially activates the three complement pathways with major involvement of the alternative pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Esin; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Al(OH)3 is the most common adjuvant in human vaccines, but its mode of action remains poorly understood. Complement involvement in the adjuvant properties of Al(OH)3 has been suggested in several reports together with a depot effect. It is here confirmed that Al(OH)3 treatment of serum depletes complement components and activates the complement system. We show that complement activation by Al(OH)3 involves the three major pathways by monitoring complement components in Al(OH)3-treated serum and in Al(OH)3-containing precipitates. Al(OH)3 activation of complement results in deposition of C3 cleavage products and membrane attack complex (MAC) and in generation of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Complement activation was time dependent and inhibited by chelation with EDTA but not EGTA+Mg(2+). We thus confirm that Al(OH)3 activates the complement system and show that the alternative pathway is of major importance.

  15. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant differentially activates the three complement pathways with major involvement of the alternative pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin Güven

    Full Text Available Al(OH3 is the most common adjuvant in human vaccines, but its mode of action remains poorly understood. Complement involvement in the adjuvant properties of Al(OH3 has been suggested in several reports together with a depot effect. It is here confirmed that Al(OH3 treatment of serum depletes complement components and activates the complement system. We show that complement activation by Al(OH3 involves the three major pathways by monitoring complement components in Al(OH3-treated serum and in Al(OH3-containing precipitates. Al(OH3 activation of complement results in deposition of C3 cleavage products and membrane attack complex (MAC and in generation of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Complement activation was time dependent and inhibited by chelation with EDTA but not EGTA+Mg(2+. We thus confirm that Al(OH3 activates the complement system and show that the alternative pathway is of major importance.

  16. Aluminum Hydroxide Adjuvant Differentially Activates the Three Complement Pathways with Major Involvement of the Alternative Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Esin; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Al(OH)3 is the most common adjuvant in human vaccines, but its mode of action remains poorly understood. Complement involvement in the adjuvant properties of Al(OH)3 has been suggested in several reports together with a depot effect. It is here confirmed that Al(OH)3 treatment of serum depletes complement components and activates the complement system. We show that complement activation by Al(OH)3 involves the three major pathways by monitoring complement components in Al(OH)3-treated serum and in Al(OH)3-containing precipitates. Al(OH)3 activation of complement results in deposition of C3 cleavage products and membrane attack complex (MAC) and in generation of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Complement activation was time dependent and inhibited by chelation with EDTA but not EGTA+Mg2+. We thus confirm that Al(OH)3 activates the complement system and show that the alternative pathway is of major importance. PMID:24040248

  17. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, G. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Shaprio, R.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Abdelwahab, I.F. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  18. Use of mass-media and active involvement in a national dental health campaign in Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a Dental Health Mass-Media Campaign directed at 5-7-yr-old children and their mothers. It aimed at increasing knowledge and awareness of dental health by making use of three different components: inserts in women's magazines; television commercial; material ...... that future national health education campaigns combine the mass-media approach to increase health awareness with active involvement activities to stimulate behavioural changes.......This paper describes the evaluation of a Dental Health Mass-Media Campaign directed at 5-7-yr-old children and their mothers. It aimed at increasing knowledge and awareness of dental health by making use of three different components: inserts in women's magazines; television commercial; material......, distinguished from the other two components by demanding an active involvement of the participants, had the largest impact. The television commercial, merely demanding a passive involvement of the participants, was less well remembered, and the magazine insert had the lowest recollection. It is suggested...

  19. Involvement of serotonin 2A receptor activation in modulating medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala neuronal activation during novelty-exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervig, Mona El-Sayed; Jensen, Nadja Cecilie Hvid; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo

    2017-01-01

    -field arena affects medial PFC activation and basolateral amygdala (BLA) reactivity. We used c-Fos immunoreactivity (IR) as a marker of neuronal activation and stereological quantification for obtaining the total number of c-Fos-IR neurons as a measure of regional activation. We further examined the impact...... of 5-HT2AR blockade on the striatal-projecting BLA neurons. Systemic administration of ketanserin (0.5 mg/kg) prior to novel open-field exposure resulted in reduced total numbers of c-Fos-IR cells in dorsomedial PFC areas and the BLA. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the relative time......-treated animals, upholding its involvement in modulating averseness. Ketanserin did not affect the number of activated striatal-projecting BLA neurons (measured by number of Cholera Toxin b (CTb) retrograde labelled neurons also being c-Fos-IR) following CTb injection in the ventral striatum. These results...

  20. Beyond participation: the association between school extracurricular activities and involvement in violence across generations of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D

    2012-03-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study explores how the relationship between extracurricular activities and youth violence varies by type of extracurricular activity profile (sports alone, non-sports alone, and a combination of sports and non-sports) and by generations of immigration (first, second, and third-plus). The sample is composed of 9.3% (n = 1,233) first-generation youth, 15.7% (n = 2,080) second generation, and 74.9% (n = 9,923) third-plus generation. The results reveal that adolescents from the third-plus generation (i.e., non-immigrant youth) who participate in non-sports alone or sports plus non-sports have lower odds of involvement in violence than adolescents from the same generation who do not participate in extracurricular activities. However, for first- and second-generation adolescents, participation in extracurricular activities is associated with higher rather than lower odds of violence compared to their non-participating counterparts. These findings challenge the viewpoint that participation in mainstream extracurricular activities as afforded by US schools is equally beneficial for all youth. They also call for additional research that explores why immigrant youth are less likely than non-immigrant youth to gain violence-reducing benefits when they participate in extracurricular activities.

  1. Cholinesterase Activity in Health Workers Involved in Handling and Spraying of Organophosphorous Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Madaan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent era of agricultural boon is partially the result of extensive use of insecticides and pesticides. But these compounds also have potential to significantly alter the ecosystem and can cause acute poisonings as well as long term detrimental health effects in humans. These compounds can cause toxicity through all routes of exposure. They exert their effect mainly by the inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AC hE, which functions by removing acetylcholine (AC h from its postsynaptic receptors. Aims and Objectives: Human exposure to Organophosphorous (OP pesticides can develop lowered cholinesterase levels. The aim of the present study was to estimate the plasma levels of AC hE in personnel involved in handling of these compounds, during the period of active spraying operations. Methodology: The present study was conducted on 38 subjects working as Multipurpose Health Workers (MPHW GROUP-1 and Field Workers (FW GROUP-2 involved in the actual spraying of the insecticides, in District Rohtak, Haryana, India to see the effect of exposure to OP insecticides. Plasma cholinesterase activity was measured by a kinetic method based on hydrolysis of butrylthiocholine. The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical package (SPSS version 5.0. Results and interpretation: The mean cholinesterase activity in group-2 was lower by 27.76% than that in group-1 and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05. The workers involved in actual spraying of the insecticides had a more marked reduction in the levels of Plasma AC hE, compared to the workers involved only in the handling of the insecticides indicating that this group is at a bigger risk.

  2. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mohd. Sani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test and thermal (hot plate test models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P<0.05 antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO donor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS, methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway, or their combination also caused significant (P<0.05 change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway.

  3. Evidence that intramolecular interactions are involved in masking the activation domain of transcriptional activator Leu3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Hu, Y; Zheng, F; Zhou, K; Kohlhaw, G B

    1997-08-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulates the expression of genes involved in branched chain amino acid biosynthesis and in ammonia assimilation. It is modulated by alpha-isopropylmalate, an intermediate in leucine biosynthesis. In the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate, Leu3p is a transcriptional activator. In the absence of the signal molecule, the activation domain is masked, and Leu3p acts as a repressor. The recent discovery that Leu3p retains its regulatory properties when expressed in mammalian cells (Guo, H., and Kohlhaw, G. B. (1996) FEBS Lett. 390, 191-195) suggests that masking and unmasking of the activation domain occur without the participation of auxiliary proteins. Here we present experimental support for this notion and address the mechanism of masking. We show that modulation of Leu3p is exceedingly sensitive to mutations in the activation domain. An activation domain double mutant (D872N/D874N; designated Leu3-dd) was constructed that has the characteristics of a permanently masked activator. Using separately expressed segments containing either the DNA binding domain-middle region or the activation domain of wild type Leu3p (or Leu3-dd) in a modified yeast two-hybrid system, we provide direct evidence for alpha-isopropylmalate-dependent interaction between these segments. Finally, we use the phenotype of Leu3-dd-containing cells (slow growth in the absence of added leucine) to select for suppressor mutations that map to the middle region of Leu3-dd. The properties of nine such suppressors further support the idea that masking is an intramolecular process and suggest a means for mapping the surface involved in masking.

  4. Acoustic input and efferent activity regulate the expression of molecules involved in cochlear micromechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica eLamas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromotile activity in auditory outer hair cells (OHCs is essential for sound amplification. It relies on the highly specialized membrane motor protein prestin, and its interactions with the cytoskeleton. It is believed that the expression of prestin and related molecules involved in OHC electromotility may be dynamically regulated by signals from the acoustic environment. However little is known about the nature of such signals and how they affect the expression of molecules involved in electromotility in OHCs. We show evidence that prestin oligomerization is regulated, both at short and relatively long term, by acoustic input and descending efferent activity originating in the cortex, likely acting in concert. Unilateral removal of the middle ear ossicular chain reduces levels of trimeric prestin, particularly in the cochlea from the side of the lesion, whereas monomeric and dimeric forms are maintained or even increased in particular in the contralateral side, as shown in Western blots. Unilateral removal of the auditory cortex (AC, which likely causes an imbalance in descending efferent activity on the cochlea, also reduces levels of trimeric and tetrameric forms of prestin in the side ipsilateral to the lesion, whereas in the contralateral side prestin remains unaffected, or even increased in the case of trimeric and tetrameric forms. As far as efferent inputs are concerned, unilateral ablation of the AC up-regulates the expression of α10 nAChR transcripts in the cochlea. Limited, unbalanced efferent activity after unilateral AC removal, also affects prestin and β-actin mRNA levels. These findings support that the concerted action of acoustic and efferent inputs to the cochlea is needed to regulate the expression of major molecules involved in OHC electromotility, both at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  5. A Quantitative Study into the Information Technology Project Portfolio Practice: The Impact on Information Technology Project Deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation applied the quantitative approach to the data gathered from online survey questionnaires regarding the three objects: Information Technology (IT) Portfolio Management, IT-Business Alignment, and IT Project Deliverables. By studying this data, this dissertation uncovered the underlying relationships that exist between the…

  6. Summary of FY 17 Assessments Sandia National Laboratories: Evaluation of FY16 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2017-03-01

    This report is the milestone deliverable M4FT-17SN111102091 “Summary of Assessments Performed FY17 by SNL QA POC” for work package FT-17SN11110209 titled “Quality Assurance – SNL”. This report summarizes the FY17 assessment performed on Fuel Cycle Technologies / Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition efforts.

  7. FUZZY COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF GAS-WELL DELIVERABILITY%气井产能的模糊综合评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋红梅

    2009-01-01

    Gas-well deliverability, as a dynamic performance parameter, is one of the important index for gas well evaluation.The prediction model for gas-well deliverability is established according to deliverability evaluation of logging data and comprehensive evaluation of fuzzy multiobjectives decision in fuzzy mathematics.Establishing Bayes discriminant function to the classified gas wells, making return judgement to them and verifying through cases can provide theory foundation for gas-well deliverability evaluation plan.%气井产能作为一个表示动态特征的参数,是气井评价的重要指标之一.依据测井数据进行产能评价,采用模糊数学中的模糊多目标决策综合评判建立了气井产能评价模型,通过对已分好类的气井建立贝叶斯判别函数,对其进行回判,并且通过实例进行验证,为气井产能评价方案提供了理论依据.

  8. A Quantitative Study into the Information Technology Project Portfolio Practice: The Impact on Information Technology Project Deliverables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation applied the quantitative approach to the data gathered from online survey questionnaires regarding the three objects: Information Technology (IT) Portfolio Management, IT-Business Alignment, and IT Project Deliverables. By studying this data, this dissertation uncovered the underlying relationships that exist between the…

  9. Guidelines for Inter-Enterprise Management (IEM), GLOBEMEN Deliverable D23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Vesterager, Johan

    2002-01-01

    This document is a deliverable of Work package 2 of the IMS Globemen (GMN) project: D23 Guidelines for Inter-Enterprise Management (IEM). IMS Globemen is an inter-regional project aiming to develop methods, tools and architectures to support inter-enterprise operations in one-of-kind industries...... itself to operate in a dynamic inter-enterprise environment such as a virtual enterprise. The list should be seen as checklist to go through, cowering mainly issues relevant when selecting partners and configuring virtual enterprise from an inter-enterprise management point of view. - Chapter 6...... Description of the solution, C-Project Describes the solution developed as a part of GLOBEMEN to partially support inter-enterprise management as described in the vision. The solution, C-Project, is a software application that supports collaborative project (hence the name C-project). - Chapter 7 contain...

  10. From Field Work to Deliverables. Experiences on the Tin House Courtyard Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello Caballero, L.; Mezzino, D.; Federman, A.; Santana Quintero, M.

    2017-08-01

    The Tin House Courtyard is a property of the National Capital Commission (NCC) in Ottawa, Canada. The site is located within the `Mile of History', a historical route running from Parliament Hill to the Governor General's residence. Currently, existing assets are under intervention works that include several preservation and renewal actions. Within the broader project, one of the tasks before construction works started was the documentation of the set of facades. The Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) at Carleton University in Ottawa was commissioned by NCC to conduct the recording of the area. This paper describes the process undertaken from field work to the final deliverable to the client, as well as the issues faced in between. Nowadays, up to date surveying technologies have revolutionized the methodologies for cultural heritage documentation. In this regard, the recording strategy employed encompassed the use of photogrammetry, laser scanner, total station, as well as different pre and post processing software in order to generate the desired outcomes.

  11. CO2-emission trading and green markets for renewable electricity. Wilmar - deliverable 4.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma-Dicke, N.; Morthorst, Poul Erik; Ravn, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    This report is Deliverable 4.1 of the EU project “Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets” (WILMAR) and describes the application of two policy instruments, Tradable Emissions Permits (TEP’s) and Tradable Green Certificates (TGC’s) forelectricity produced from renewable energy...... generation may change the situation from earning money to losing money despite the increasing spot price. Heavy restrictions on emissions penalise thefossil-fuelled technologies significantly, and the associated increase in the spot price need not compensate for this. Therefore, a market of TEP’s is expected...... to have a significant influence on the electricity spot price. However, the expected pricelevel of TEP’s are met with great uncertainty and a study of a number of economical studies shows a price span between zero and 270 USD per ton of CO2 depending on the participation or non-participation of countries...

  12. Anticancer activities of pterostilbene-isothiocyanate conjugate in breast cancer cells: involvement of PPARγ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Nikhil

    Full Text Available Trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxystilbene (PTER, a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, preferentially induces certain cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and could thus have a role in cancer chemoprevention. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-dependent transcription factor whose activation results in growth arrest and/or apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Here we investigated the potential of PTER-isothiocyanate (ITC conjugate, a novel class of hybrid compound (PTER-ITC synthesized by appending an ITC moiety to the PTER backbone, to induce apoptotic cell death in hormone-dependent (MCF-7 and -independent (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and to elucidate PPARγ involvement in PTER-ITC action. Our results showed that when pre-treated with PPARγ antagonists or PPARγ siRNA, both breast cancer cell lines suppressed PTER-ITC-induced apoptosis, as determined by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and cleaved caspase-9 expression. Furthermore, PTER-ITC significantly increased PPARγ mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner and modulated expression of PPARγ-related genes in both breast cancer cell lines. This increase in PPARγ activity was prevented by a PPARγ-specific inhibitor, in support of our hypothesis that PTER-ITC can act as a PPARγ activator. PTER-ITC-mediated upregulation of PPARγ was counteracted by co-incubation with p38 MAPK or JNK inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in PTER-ITC action. Molecular docking analysis further suggested that PTER-ITC interacted with 5 polar and 8 non-polar residues within the PPARγ ligand-binding pocket, which are reported to be critical for its activity. Collectively, our observations suggest potential applications for PTER-ITC in breast cancer prevention and treatment through modulation of the PPARγ activation pathway.

  13. Predicting deliverability of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using aperture complexity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younge, Kelly C; Roberts, Don; Janes, Lindsay A; Anderson, Carlos; Moran, Jean M; Matuszak, Martha M

    2016-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of an aperture complexity metric for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans to predict plan delivery accuracy. We developed a complexity analysis tool as a plug-in script to Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system. This script reports the modulation of plans, arcs, and individual control points for VMAT plans using a previously developed complexity metric. The calculated complexities are compared to that of 649 VMAT plans previously treated at our institution from 2013 to mid-2015. We used the VMAT quality assurance (QA) results from the 649 treated plans, plus 62 plans that failed pretreatment QA, to validate the ability of the complexity metric to predict plan deliverability. We used a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine an appropriate complexity threshold value above which a plan should be considered for reoptimization before it moves further through our planning workflow. The average complexity metric for the 649 treated plans analyzed with the script was 0.132 mm-1 with a standard deviation of 0.036 mm-1. We found that when using a threshold complexity value of 0.180 mm-1, the true positive rate for correctly identifying plans that failed QA was 44%, and the false-positive rate was 7%. Used clinically with this threshold, the script can identify overly modulated plans and thus prevent a significant portion of QA failures. Reducing VMAT plan complexity has a number of important clinical benefits, including improving plan deliverability and reducing treatment time. Use of the complexity metric during both the planning and QA processes can reduce the number of QA failures and improve the quality of VMAT plans used for treatment.

  14. Improving the driving practices of pizza deliverers: Response generalization and moderating effects of driving history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, T D; Geller, E S

    1991-01-01

    A practical intervention program, targeting the safety belt use of pizza deliverers at two stores, increased significantly the use of both safety belts (143% above baseline) and turn signals (25% above baseline). Control subjects (i.e., pizza deliverers at a third no-intervention store and patrons driving to the pizza stores) showed no changes in belt or turn signal use over the course of 7-month study. The intervention program was staggered across two pizza stores and consisted of a group meeting wherein employees discussed the value of safety belts, received feedback regarding their low safety belt use, offered suggestions for increasing their belt use, and made a personal commitment to buckle up by signing buckle-up promise cards. Subsequently, employee-designed buckle-up reminder signs were placed in the pizza stores. By linking license plate numbers to individual driving records, we examined certain aspects of driving history as moderators of pre- and postintervention belt use. Although baseline belt use was significantly lower for drivers with one or more driving demerits or accidents in the previous 5 years, after the intervention these risk groups increased their belt use significantly and at the same rate as drivers with no demerits or accidents. Whereas baseline belt use was similar for younger (under 25) and older (25 or older) drivers, younger drivers were markedly more influenced by the intervention than were older drivers. Individual variation in belt use during baseline, intervention, and follow-up phases indicated that some drivers require more effective and costly intervention programs to motivate their safe driving practices.

  15. Involvement of Ca2+-activated K+ Channels in Receptor-Regulated Sperm Motility in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Previous voltage-clamp studies have demonstrated the modulation of sperm Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes by angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ)and extracellular ATP via AT1 receptor and P2U receptor, respectively. In the presentstudy, we investigated the involvement of KCa channels in receptor-regulated spermmotility of the rat using a computer-aided sperm analysis system, HTM-IVOS, in con-junction with Ca2+-mobilizing agents, receptor agonists/antagonists and KCa channelsblockers.The percentage of motile sperm was increased by ionomycin (0. 5 μmol/L), whichcould be inhibited by K+ channel blockers, tetraethylammonium (TEA 1 μmol/L ) orcharybdotoxin (ChTX, 300 nmol/L) indicating the presence of KCa channels. AngⅡ, at low concentration, 10 nmol/L, was found to increase motility, however, athigher concentration, 1 μmol/L, percentage of motility was found to be suppressed.Both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of Ang Ⅱ could be reversed by losartan, aspecific antagonist of AT 1 receptors, but not AT 2 antagonist PD123177, indicating theinvolvement of AT1 but not AT2 receptor in mediating both effects. ChTX also abol-ished both stimulatory and inhibitory effects of Ang H, suggesting the involvement ofKCa channels. The percentage of motility was also enhanced by extracellular ATP, afactor known to be involved in sperm activation. The ATP-enhanced sperm motilitywas mimicked by UTP , and inhibited by ChTX and reactive blue, an antagonist of P2receptor, indicating the involvement of both P2U and KCa channels. RT-PCR studywas also conducted to confirm the expression of KCa channels, AT1 receptors and P2Ureceptor, but not AT2 receptor, in rat caudal epididymal sperm. The present findingssuggest an important role of KCa channels in the regulation of sperm motility by AT1and P 2U receptors.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on bacteria involved in oral malodour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdea, L; Kulik, E M; Hauser-Gerspach, I; Ramseier, A M; Filippi, A; Waltimo, T

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin-producing strain Streptococcus salivarius K12 against several bacteria involved in halitosis. The inhibitory activity of S. salivarius K12 against Solobacterium moorei CCUG39336, four clinical S. moorei isolates, Atopobium parvulum ATCC33793 and Eubacterium sulci ATCC35585 was examined by a deferred antagonism test. Eubacterium saburreum ATCC33271 and Parvimonas micra ATCC33270, which have been tested in previous studies, served as positive controls, and the Gram-negative strain Bacteroides fragilis ZIB2800 served as a negative control. Additionally, the occurrence of resistance in S. moorei CCUG39336 to S. salivarius K12 was analysed by either direct plating or by passage of S. moorei CCUG39336 on chloroform-inactived S. salivarius K12-containing agar plates. S. salivarius K12 suppressed the growth of all Gram-positive bacteria tested, but the extent to which the bacteria were inhibited varied. E. sulci ATCC35585 was the most sensitive strain, while all five S. moorei isolates were inhibited to a lesser extent. Natural resistance seems to be very low in S. moorei CCUG39336, and there was only a slight decrease in sensitivity after exposure to S. salivarius K12 over 10 passages. Our studies demonstrate that S. salivarius K12 has antimicrobial activity against bacteria involved in halitosis. This strain might be an interesting and valuable candidate for the development of an antimicrobial therapy for halitosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteroides gingivalis antigens and bone resorbing activity in root surface fractions of periodontally involved teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patters, M.R.; Landsberg, R.L.; Johansson, L.A.; Trummel, C.L.; Robertson, P.R. (Department of Periodontology, University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.)

    1982-01-01

    Bone resorbing activity and the presence of antigens of Bacteroides gingivalis were assessed in plaque, calculus, cementum, and dentin obtained from roots of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis. Each fraction was obtained by scaling the root surface. The fraction were extracted by stirring and sonication, and the soluble centrifuged, sterilized, dialyzed, and adjusted to equivalent protein concentrations. Cementum and dentin extracts from impacted teeth were prepared similarly and served as controls. Stimulation of bone resorption by each extract was assessed in organ cultures of fetal rat bones by measurement of release of previously-incorporated /sup 45/Ca from the bone into the medium. In some groups of teeth, calculus and cementum were treated with acid prior to scaling. Citric acid washes were recovered and dialyzed. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess the extracts for the presence of antigens reactive with an antiserum to B. gingivalis. Significant stimulation of bone resorption was found in all calculus and periodontally-involved cementum preparations. ELISA showed significant levels of B.gingivalis antigens in plaque, calculus, and cementum of periodontally-involved teeth, but not in involved dentin nor in cementum or dentin of impact teeth. Treatment with citric acid removed essentially all B.gingivalis antigens from cementum but not calculus. The results suggest that substances which stimulate bone resorption and substances which react with B. gingivalis antiserum are present in surface plaque, calculus, and cementum or periodontally-involved teeth. These substances are not present in cementum and dentin of impacted teeth nor in dentin of periodontally-involved teeth. Treatment by both scaling and citric demineralization will remove most of these substances from cementum of teeth previously exposed to periodontitis.

  18. Involvement of TACE in colon inflammation: a novel mechanism of regulation via SIRT-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoranjan; Mohapatra, Jogeswar; Wagh, Akshaya; Patel, Hiren M; Pandey, Dheerendra; Kadam, Shekhar; Argade, Anil; Deshpande, Shrikalp S; Shah, Gourang B; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-03-01

    TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) processes the membrane TNF-α to release the bioactive soluble TNF-α. Several evidences suggest the involvement of TNF-α and TACE in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-3, an endogenous inhibitor of TACE, is positively associated with silent information regulator (SIRT)-1. We aimed to study the expression of TACE, TIMP-3 and SIRT-1 at different stages of colitis and how TACE is regulated in response to SIRT-1 activation. Acute colitis was induced by 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 5days and levels of cytokines and mRNA expression of TACE, TIMP-3 and SIRT-1 were measured in colon at different time intervals. Next, the effect of SIRT-1 activator (resveratrol) or a selective TACE inhibitor (compound 11p) treatment was evaluated. Elevated levels of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-17 were observed during DSS exposure phase which restored to the normal level after DSS removal. A significant increase in TACE and suppression in TIMP-3 and SIRT-1 mRNA level was observed during DSS exposure phase which reverts back to normal towards the remission phase. Treatment with resveratrol significantly elevated SIRT-1 and TIMP-3 and suppressed TACE mRNA expression and was associated with amelioration of disease. Furthermore, treatment with selective TACE inhibitor significantly suppressed body weight loss, disease activity index, colonic myeloperoxidase activity and the elevated levels of cytokines after DSS challenge. These results strongly emphasize the involvement of TACE in colon inflammation and inhibition of TACE directly or indirectly via SIRT-1 activation ameliorates colitis.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury Involves the Nitration-mediated Activation of RhoA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Kangath, Archana; Gross, Christine; Pardo, Daniel; Sharma, Shruti; Jezierska-Drutel, Agnieszka; Patel, Vijay; Snead, Connie; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander; Fulton, David; Catravas, John D.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by increased endothelial hyperpermeability. Protein nitration is involved in the endothelial barrier dysfunction in LPS-exposed mice. However, the nitrated proteins involved in this process have not been identified. The activation of the small GTPase RhoA is a critical event in the barrier disruption associated with LPS. Thus, in this study we evaluated the possible role of RhoA nitration in this process. Mass spectroscopy identified a single nitration site, located at Tyr34 in RhoA. Tyr34 is located within the switch I region adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site. Utilizing this structure, we developed a peptide designated NipR1 (nitration inhibitory peptide for RhoA 1) to shield Tyr34 against nitration. TAT-fused NipR1 attenuated RhoA nitration and barrier disruption in LPS-challenged human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Further, treatment of mice with NipR1 attenuated vessel leakage and inflammatory cell infiltration and preserved lung function in a mouse model of ALI. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the mechanism by which Tyr34 nitration stimulates RhoA activity was through a decrease in GDP binding to the protein caused by a conformational change within a region of Switch I, mimicking the conformational shift observed when RhoA is bound to a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Stopped flow kinetic analysis was used to confirm this prediction. Thus, we have identified a new mechanism of nitration-mediated RhoA activation involved in LPS-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and show the potential utility of “shielding” peptides to prevent RhoA nitration in the management of ALI. PMID:24398689

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury involves the nitration-mediated activation of RhoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Kangath, Archana; Gross, Christine; Pardo, Daniel; Sharma, Shruti; Jezierska-Drutel, Agnieszka; Patel, Vijay; Snead, Connie; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander; Fulton, David; Catravas, John D; Black, Stephen M

    2014-02-21

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by increased endothelial hyperpermeability. Protein nitration is involved in the endothelial barrier dysfunction in LPS-exposed mice. However, the nitrated proteins involved in this process have not been identified. The activation of the small GTPase RhoA is a critical event in the barrier disruption associated with LPS. Thus, in this study we evaluated the possible role of RhoA nitration in this process. Mass spectroscopy identified a single nitration site, located at Tyr(34) in RhoA. Tyr(34) is located within the switch I region adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site. Utilizing this structure, we developed a peptide designated NipR1 (nitration inhibitory peptide for RhoA 1) to shield Tyr(34) against nitration. TAT-fused NipR1 attenuated RhoA nitration and barrier disruption in LPS-challenged human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Further, treatment of mice with NipR1 attenuated vessel leakage and inflammatory cell infiltration and preserved lung function in a mouse model of ALI. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the mechanism by which Tyr(34) nitration stimulates RhoA activity was through a decrease in GDP binding to the protein caused by a conformational change within a region of Switch I, mimicking the conformational shift observed when RhoA is bound to a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Stopped flow kinetic analysis was used to confirm this prediction. Thus, we have identified a new mechanism of nitration-mediated RhoA activation involved in LPS-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and show the potential utility of "shielding" peptides to prevent RhoA nitration in the management of ALI.

  1. Involvement of multiple elements in FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of FGF19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    The intestinal endocrine hormone human fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is involved in the regulation of not only hepatic bile acid metabolism but also carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the present study, bile acid/farnesoid X receptor (FXR) responsiveness in the FGF19 promoter region was investigated by a reporter assay using the human colon carcinoma cell line LS174T. The assay revealed the presence of bile acid/FXR-responsive elements in the 5'-flanking region up to 8.8 kb of FGF19. Deletion analysis indicated that regions from -1866 to -1833, from -1427 to -1353, and from -75 to +262 were involved in FXR responsiveness. Four, four, and two consecutive half-sites of nuclear receptors were observed in the three regions, respectively. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer binding in these three regions. EMSA and reporter assays using mutated constructs indicated that the nuclear receptor IR1, ER2, and DR8 motifs in the 5'-flanking region were involved in FXR responsiveness of FGF19. Lithocholic acid (LCA) (10 μM), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (10 μM), or GW4064 (0.1 μM) treatment increased reporter activity in a construct including the three motifs under FXR-expressing conditions whereas LCA and not CDCA or GW4064 treatment increased the reporter activity under pregnane X receptor (PXR)-expressing conditions. These results suggest that FGF19 is transcriptionally activated through multiple FXR-responsive elements in the promoter region.

  2. Zymomonas mobilis Levan is Involved in Metalloproteinases Activation in Healing of Wounded and Burned Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sturzoiu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Healing of burn tissue is a complete process involving reepitelization, granulation tissue formation and extracellular matrix remodeling. Thermal injury produces profound systemic changes, such as oligemic shock, anemia, renal failure and metabolic disorders. This causes direct tissue damages: inflammation and infection reactions. The tissue lesion also leads to increased oxidative stress in cells, as it has been observed by the low activity of endogenous antioxidant enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems. In this context, tissue matrix metalloproteinases (MMP plays a key role in normal physiology of conjunctive tissue during its development, morphogenesis or wound healing, having an irregular activity and being involved in the patho-physiological processes. The analysis of biological samples, MMP profiles contribute to the characterization of some processes involving tissue remodeling, processes related to wound or burn healing, possibly to the development of new therapies. In this context we studied the proliferative effect of levan, a polysaccharide produced by Gram negative bacteria, Zymomonas mobilis, a microorganism that plays an important role in modern biotechnology to produce substances of great interest in biotechnology, food industry or in biomedicine. Our studies focused on analysis of tissue MMPs profiles from Wistar rats with lesions caused by mechanic processes on skin (wounds and thermal (burn, treated by hallotherapy inCacica and Dej salt mines, before and after the treatment with levan. The results indicate that levan, a natural polysaccharide produced by wild type Z. mobilis NCIB 11163, as well as other bacterial strains, seems to have real value in the management of wounds and burns, applied individually or in combination with natural or artificial haloteraphy. The way that levan participates in the healing process is unknown, probably by activating the tissue metalloproteinases.

  3. Longitudinal relationships between perceived stress, exercise self-regulation and exercise involvement among physically active adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Markus; Lindwall, Magnus; Brand, Serge; Lang, Christin; Elliot, Catherine; Pühse, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Stress exposure may undermine exercisers' capability to self-regulate their exercise behaviour. This longitudinal study examined the interplay between perceived stress, exercise self-regulation (assessment of action and coping planning) and participation in vigorous exercise in vocational students. Moreover, this study examined whether high exercise self-regulation moderates the assumed negative relationship between stress and exercise. A sample of 580 physically active vocational students ([Formula: see text] ± s 17.8 ± 1.3 years, 33.8% girls) was assessed. All participants completed two identical validated questionnaires assessing stress, exercise self-regulation and exercise with a span of 10 months in between survey completion periods. The cross-sectional analyses show that high exercise self-regulation attenuated the assumed negative relationship between stress and exercise. In the longitudinal analyses, however, only a non-significant trend was found. Significant longitudinal relationships existed between exercise self-regulation and exercise involvement. Latent difference score models revealed that a drop in the exercise self-regulation was associated with a concurrent decrease in exercise participation. Cross-lagged panel analyses showed that high exercise self-regulation levels positively predicted exercise behaviour, but an inverse relationship was not supported. The findings suggested that higher exercise self-regulation levels were positively associated with future exercise involvement in currently active adolescents. While partial support was found that exercise self-regulation moderated the influence of stress on exercise, the findings demonstrated that higher exercise self-regulation levels had a positive impact on future exercise involvement in already active individuals.

  4. Helminth 2-Cys peroxiredoxin drives Th2 responses through a mechanism involving alternatively activated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Sheila; Stack, Colin M.; O'Neill, Sandra M.; Sayed, Ahmed A.; Williams, David L.; Dalton, John P.

    2008-01-01

    During helminth infections, alternatively activated macrophages (AAMacs) are key to promoting Th2 responses and suppressing Th1-driven inflammatory pathology. Th2 cytokines IL-4 and/or IL-13 are believed to be important in the induction and activation of AAMacs. Using murine models for the helminth infections caused by Fasciola hepatica (Fh) and Schistosoma mansoni (Sm), we show that a secreted antioxidant, peroxiredoxin (Prx), induces alternative activation of macrophages. These activated, Ym1-expressing macrophages enhanced the secretion of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 from naive CD4+ T cells. Administration of recombinant FhPrx and SmPrx to wild-type and IL-4−/− and IL-13−/− mice induced the production of AAMacs. In addition, Prx stimulated the expression of markers of AAMacs (particularly, Ym1) in vitro, and therefore can act independently of IL-4/IL-13 signaling. The immunomodulatory property of Prx is not due to its antioxidant activity, as an inactive recombinant variant with active site Cys residues replaced by Gly could also induce AAMacs and Th2 responses. Immunization of mice with recombinant Prx or passive transfer of anti-Prx antibodies prior to infection with Fh not only blocked the induction of AAMacs but also the development of parasite-specific Th2 responses. We propose that Prx activates macrophages as an initial step in the induction of Th2 responses by helminth parasites and is thereby a novel pathogen-associated molecular pattern.—Donnelly, S., Stack, C. M., O'Neill, S. M., Sayed, A. A., Williams, D. L., Dalton, J. P. Helminth 2-Cys peroxiredoxin drives Th2 responses through a mechanism involving alternatively activated macrophages. PMID:18708590

  5. Inhibition of fast axonal transport by pathogenic SOD1 involves activation of p38 MAP kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo A Morfini

    Full Text Available Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS.

  6. Involvement of mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange in intestinal pacemaking activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Joo Kim; Jae Yeoul Jun; Insuk So; Ki Whan Kim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells that generate slow waves in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We have aimed to investigate the involvement of mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange in intestinal pacemaking activity in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal.METHODS: Enzymatic digestions were used todissociate ICCs from the small intestine of a mouse. The whole-cell patch-clamp configuration was used to record membrane currents (voltage clamp) and potentials (current clamp) from cultured ICCs.RESULTS: Clonazepam and CGP37157 inhibited the pacemaking activity of ICCs in a dose-dependent manner.Clonazepam from 20 to 60 μmol/L and CGP37157 from 10 to 30 μmol/L effectively inhibited Ca2+ efflux from mitochondria in pacemaking activity of ICCs. The IC50S of clonazepam and CGP37157 were 37.1 and 18.2 μmol/L, respectively. The addition of 20 μmol/L NiCl2 to the internal solution caused a "wax and wane" phenomenon of pacemaking activity of ICCs.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchange has an important role in intestinal pacemaking activity.

  7. Involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil activation and the development of acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, H K; Arcaroli, J; Kupfner, J; Shenkar, R; Penninger, J M; Sasaki, T; Yang, K Y; Park, J S; Abraham, E

    2001-12-01

    Activated neutrophils contribute to the development and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K) and the downstream serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B have a central role in modulating neutrophil function, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and apoptosis. In the present study, we found that exposure of neutrophils to endotoxin resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, activation of NF-kappaB, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha through PI3-K-dependent pathways. In vivo, endotoxin administration to mice resulted in activation of PI3-K and Akt in neutrophils that accumulated in the lungs. The severity of endotoxemia-induced ALI was significantly diminished in mice lacking the p110gamma catalytic subunit of PI3-K. In PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice, lung edema, neutrophil recruitment, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, and pulmonary levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after endotoxemia as compared with PI3-Kgamma(+/+) controls. Among neutrophils that did accumulate in the lungs of the PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice after endotoxin administration, activation of NF-kappaB and expression of proinflammatory cytokines was diminished compared with levels present in lung neutrophils from PI3-Kgamma(+/+) mice. These results show that PI3-K, and particularly PI3-Kgamma, occupies a central position in regulating endotoxin-induced neutrophil activation, including that involved in ALI.

  8. Histamine and spontaneous motor activity: biphasic changes, receptors involved and participation of the striatal dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatto, S; Nasello, A G; Bernardi, M M

    1998-01-01

    The time- and dose-related effects of exogenous histamine on spontaneous motor activity and receptors involved were evaluated in male rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of histamine (5.4 and 54.3 nmol) produced a biphasic effect with initial transitory hypoactivity and later hyperactivity expressed by locomotion frequency in an open-field. The rearing frequencies were only reduced by all doses of histamine used. The histamine-induced hypoactivity was inhibited by the H3-antagonist thioperamide and was also induced by the H3-agonist N-alpha-methylhistamine. The histamine-induced hyperactivity phase was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. The H2-antagonist ranitidine increased locomotion and rearing frequencies. The participation of other neurotransmitters in the persistent hypokinetic effect induced by 135.8 nmol of histamine was determined by HPLC in the striatum and hypothalamus as counter-proof. A decreased DOPAC/DA ratio was observed only in the striatum. In the hypothalamus, low levels of 5HT were detected, probably not correlated with motor activity. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the exogenous histamine-induced hypoactivity response is probably due to activation of H3-receptors as heteroreceptors reducing the activity of the striatal dopaminergic system. This effect can partially overlap with the expression of the hyperactivity induced by H1-receptor activation. The participation of H2-receptors requires further investigation.

  9. Changes in the activities of enzymes involved in the degradation of butylbenzyl phthalate by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Soon-Seok; Kim, Hyoun-Young; Ka, Jong-Ok; Song, Hong-Gyu

    2012-02-01

    Degradation of butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) by the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and the activities of some degrading enzymes were examined in two different media containing 100 mg/l of the compound. P. ostreatus pregrown for 7 days in complex YMG medium was able to completely degrade BBP within an additional 24 h but degraded only 35 mg/l of BBP in 5 days of incubation in minimal medium. Fungal cell mass in the culture in YMG medium was higher in the presence than in the absence of BBP. The esterase activity of the fungal culture in YMG medium was higher than that in minimal medium and increased with the addition of BBP. On the contrary, laccase activity was higher in minimal medium and it did not increase upon the addition of BBP. General peroxidase activity increased for a few days after the addition of BBP to both media. The degradation of BBP and its metabolites by P. ostreatus thus may be attributed mostly to esterase rather than lignin-degrading laccase. In addition, the activities of the enzymes involved in BBP degradation and their changes varied significantly in the different media and culture conditions.

  10. The benefits of in-group contact through physical activity involvement for health and well-being among Korean immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyoung Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study is designed to examine the benefits of physical activity involvement with members of the same ethnic group. For this study, Korean immigrants who were members of Korean physical activity clubs such as badminton and tennis were selected as participants. Using a constructive grounded theory methodology, three themes were identified as benefits of physical activity involvement: (1 the experience of psychological well-being, (2 the creation of a unique cultural world, and (3 the facilitation of physical activity involvement. The findings of this study suggest that Korean immigrant participants gained various social, cultural, and psychological benefits by engaging in activities with other Korean immigrants.

  11. The benefits of in-group contact through physical activity involvement for health and well-being among Korean immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Heo, Jinmoo; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is designed to examine the benefits of physical activity involvement with members of the same ethnic group. For this study, Korean immigrants who were members of Korean physical activity clubs such as badminton and tennis were selected as participants. Using a constructive grounded theory methodology, three themes were identified as benefits of physical activity involvement: (1) the experience of psychological well-being, (2) the creation of a unique cultural world, and (3) the facilitation of physical activity involvement. The findings of this study suggest that Korean immigrant participants gained various social, cultural, and psychological benefits by engaging in activities with other Korean immigrants. PMID:24875239

  12. Ginsenosides stimulated the proliferation of mouse spermatogonia involving activation of protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-lei ZHANG; Kai-ming WANG; Cai-qiao ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ginsenosides on proliferation of type A spermatogonia was investigated in 7-day-old mice.Spermatogonia were characterized by c-kit expression and cell proliferation was assessed by immunocytochemical demonstration of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA).After 72-h culture,Sertoli cells formed a confluent monolayer to which numerous spermatogonial colonies attached.Spermatogonia were positive for c-kit staining and showed high proliferating activity by PCNA expression.Ginsenosides (1.0~10 μg/ml) significantly stimulated proliferation of spermatogonia.Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) elicited proliferation of spermatogonia at 10-8 to 107 mol/L and the PKC inhibitor H7 inhibited this effect.Likewise,ginsenosides-stimulated spermatogonial proliferation was suppressed by combined treatment of H7.These results indicate that the proliferating effect ofginsenosides on mouse type A spermatogonia might be mediated by a mechanism involving the PKC signal transduction pathway.

  13. Activation of an AMP-activated protein kinase is involved in post-diapause development of Artemia franciscana encysted embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Jie-Qiong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysts of Artemia can remain in a dormant state for long periods with a very low metabolic rate, and only resume their development with the approach of favorable conditions. The post-diapause development is a very complicated process involving a variety of metabolic and biochemical events. However, the intrinsic mechanisms that regulate this process are unclear. Results Herein we report the specific activation of an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the post-diapause developmental process of Artemia. Using a phospho-AMPKα antibody, AMPK was shown to be phosphorylated in the post-diapause developmental process. Results of kinase assay analysis showed that this phosphorylation is essential for AMPK activation. Using whole-mount immunohistochemistry, phosphorylated AMPK was shown to be predominantly located in the ectoderm of the early developed embryos in a ring shape; however, the location and shape of the activation region changed as development proceeded. Additionally, Western blotting analysis on different portions of the cyst extracts showed that phosphorylated AMPKα localized to the nuclei and this location was not affected by intracellular pH. Confocal microscopy analysis of immunofluorescent stained cyst nuclei further showed that AMPKα localized to the nuclei when activated. Moreover, cellular AMP, ADP, and ATP levels in developing cysts were determined by HPLC, and the results showed that the activation of Artemia AMPK may not be associated with cellular AMP:ATP ratios, suggesting other pathways for regulation of Artemia AMPK activity. Conclusion Together, we report evidence demonstrating the activation of AMPK in Artemia developing cysts and present an argument for its role in the development-related gene expression and energy control in certain cells during post-diapause development of Artemia.

  14. NRF2 activation is involved in ozonated human serum upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecorelli, Alessandra [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Child Neuropsychiatry Unit, University Hospital, AOUS, Siena (Italy); Bocci, Velio [Department of Physiology, University of Siena (Italy); Acquaviva, Alessandra [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Belmonte, Giuseppe [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Siena (Italy); Gardi, Concetta [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Virgili, Fabio [INRAN, Rome (Italy); Ciccoli, Lucia [Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena (Italy); Valacchi, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.valacchi@unife.it [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara (Italy); Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    During the last decade, it has been shown that the activation of NRF2 and the binding to electrophile-responsive element (EpREs), stimulates the expression of a great number of genes responsible for the synthesis of phase I and phase II proteins, including antioxidants enzymes and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This critical cell response occurs in cardiovascular, degenerative and chronic infective diseases aggravated by a chronic oxidative stress. In our previous reports we have shown that ozonated plasma is able to up-regulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells. In the present work we investigated a candidate mechanism involved in this process. After treatment with increasing doses of ozonated serum (20, 40 and 80 μg/mL O{sub 3} per mL of serum), a clear dose dependent activation of NRF2 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1) was observed. This effect was also present when cells were treated with serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or serum and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE). Moreover, the treatment with ozonated serum was associated with a dose-dependent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases (p38), not directly involved in NRF2 activation. These data, provide a new insight on the mechanism responsible for the induction of HO-1 expression by ozonated serum in the endothelium, and have a practical importance as an expedient approach to the treatment of patients with both effective orthodox drugs and ozonated autohemotherapy, targeted to the restoration of redox homeostasis. - Highlights: ► Endothelial HO1 is upregulated by ozonated plasma ► This activation is induced by NRF2 and it is ERK independent. ► 4HNE and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are the main molecules involved in this process. ► Ozonated plasma induced a hormetic effect ► Combination of orthodox medicine and ozonated plasma can be a useful treatment.

  15. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  16. Transmitting Sport Values: The Importance of Parental Involvement in Children’s Sport Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danioni, Francesca; Barni, Daniela; Rosnati, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The transmission of positive values between parents and children is generally considered to be the hallmark of successful socialization. As this issue has been widely discussed but surprisingly little researched - especially with reference to core sport values - in this study we aimed to: 1) analyze adolescent athletes’ acceptance of the sport values their parents want to transmit to them (i.e., parental socialization values) and 2) examine the relationship between parental involvement in children’s sportive activity and adolescents’ acceptance of their parents’ socialization values. One hundred and seventy-two Italian adolescents (48.3% male, 51.7% female) who regularly practice team sports were asked to fill out a questionnaire which included the Youth Sport Values Questionnaire – 2 and the Parental Involvement in Sport Questionnaire. The dyadic correlations revealed that young athletes are in general willing to accept their parents’ socialization values in regards to sport. Moreover, from the relative weight analysis (a relatively new data analysis strategy), it emerged that parental involvement characterized by praise and understanding is the most important predictor of adolescents’ willingness to accept their parents’ sport values. Implications of these results and further expansion of the study are discussed. PMID:28344676

  17. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pereira Beserra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit.

  18. Polyamines and transglutaminase activity are involved in compatible and self-incompatible pollination of Citrus grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Alessandra; Antognoni, Fabiana; Iorio, Rosa Anna; Distefano, Gaetano; Las Casas, Giuseppina; La Malfa, Stefano; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Del Duca, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    Pollination of pummelo (Citrus grandis L. Osbeck) pistils has been studied in planta by adding compatible and self-incompatible (SI) pollen to the stigma surface. The pollen germination has been monitored inside the pistil by fluorescent microscopy showing SI altered morphologies with irregular depositions of callose in the tube walls, and heavy callose depositions in enlarged tips. The polyamine (PA) content as free, perchloric acid (PCA)-soluble and -insoluble fractions and transglutaminase (TGase) activity have been analyzed in order to deepen their possible involvement in the progamic phase of plant reproduction. The conjugated PAs in PCA-soluble fraction were definitely higher than the free and the PCA-insoluble forms, in both compatible and SI pollinated pistils. In pistils, pollination caused an early decrease of free PAs and increase of the bound forms. The SI pollination, showed highest values of PCA-soluble and -insoluble PAs with a maximum in concomitance with the pollen tube arrest. As TGase mediates some of the effects of PAs by covalently binding them to proteins, its activity, never checked before in Citrus, was examined with two different assays. In addition, the presence of glutamyl-PAs confirmed the enzyme assay data and excluded the possibility of a misinterpretation. The SI pollination caused an increase in TGase activity, whereas the compatible pollination caused its decrease. Similarly to bound PAs, the glutamyl-PAs and the enzyme activity peaked in the SI pollinated pistils in concomitance with the observed block of the pollen tube growth, suggesting an involvement of TGase in SI response.

  19. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  20. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation.

  1. Differences between Depressed and Non-Depressed Residents of Nursing Homes on Measures of Daily Activity Involvement and Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Judith E.; Mathieu, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined how depressed and nondepressed nursing home residents differed on measures of frequency of daily activity involvement and accompanying affect. Interviews indicated the groups differed significantly on frequency of activity involvement and affect. Depressed subjects spent large portions of time watching television. Nondepressed…

  2. ACUMEN deliverable D5.4 – Consequences of Indicators. Effects on the users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Larsen, Birger; Schneider, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    As funding and evaluation are presented to the researcher as part of the same package, control of the assessment of ‘quality’ and ‘impact’ (in their many guises) in an evaluation can be improved by actively involving the individual researcher. However, encouraging researchers to document their ac...... their activities with bibliometrics means it is important to understand the ethical implications of this type of self-evaluation....

  3. Anticonvulsant activity of Dorema ammoniacum gum: evidence for the involvement of benzodiazepines and opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalian, Manijeh; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ahadi, Samira; Shojaii, Asie

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the anticonvulsant activity and possible mechanism of action of an aqueous solution of Dorema ammoniacum gum (DAG) which has been used traditionally in the treatment of convulsions. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of DAG was examined using the pentylentetrazole (PTZ) model in mice. Thirty male albino mice were divided randomly and equally to 5 groups, and pretreated with normal saline, diazepam, or various doses of DAG (500, 700, and 1000 mg/kg, i.p.), prior to the injection of PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.). The latency and duration of seizures were recorded 30 min after PTZ injection. Pretreatments with naloxone and flumazenil in different groups were studied to further clarify the mechanisms of the anticonvulsant action. Phytochemical screening and thin layer chromatography (TLC) fingerprinting of ammoniacum gum was also determined. DAG showed significant anticonvulsant activity at all doses used. The gum delayed both the onset and the duration of seizures induced by PTZ. Treatment with flumazenil before DAG (700 mg/kg) inhibited the effect of gum on seizure duration and latency to some extent and administration of naloxone before DAG also significantly inhibited changes in latency and duration of seizure produced by DAG. The percentage inhibition was greater with naloxone than with flumazenil. This study showed that DAG had significant anticonvulsant activity in PTZ-induced seizures, and GABAergic and opioid systems may be involved. More studies are needed to further investigate its detailed mechanism. PMID:28255314

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimaa E Ali

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shimaa E; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A A; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4-24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp.

  6. Neuronal processes involved in subjective feeling emergence: oscillatory activity during an emotional monitoring task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Glauser, Elise S; Scherer, Klaus R

    2008-06-01

    Subjective feeling, defined as the conscious experience of emotion and measured by self-report, is generally used as a manipulation check in studying emotional processes, rather than being the primary focus of research. In this paper, we report a first investigation into the processes involved in the emergence of a subjective feeling. We hypothesized that the oscillatory brain activity presumed to underlie the emergence of a subjective feeling can be measured by electroencephalographic (EEG) frequency band activity, similar to what has been shown in the literature for the conscious representation of objects. Emotional reactions were induced in participants using static visual stimuli. Episodes for which participants reported a subjective feeling were compared to those that did not lead to a conscious emotional experience, in order to identify potential differences between these two kinds of reactions at the oscillatory level. Discrete wavelet transforms of the EEG signal in gamma (31-63 Hz) and beta (15-31 Hz) bands showed significant differences between these two types of reactions. In addition, whereas beta band activities were widely distributed, differences in gamma band activity were predominantly observed in the frontal and prefrontal regions. The results are interpreted and discussed in terms of the complexity of the processes required to perform the affective monitoring task. It is suggested that future work on coherent mental representation of multimodal reaction patterns leading to the emergence of conscious emotional experience should include modifications in the time window examined and an extension of the frequency range to be considered.

  7. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  8. Determination of dehydrogenase activities involved in D-glucose oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Sainz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane bound dehydrogenases (membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH, D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains. Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites (GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the A. malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h, which coincided with glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of G. oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition.Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter were

  9. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  10. Eph receptors are involved in the activity-dependent synaptic wiring in the mouse cerebellar cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cesa

    Full Text Available Eph receptor tyrosine kinases are involved in many cellular processes. In the developing brain, they act as migratory and cell adhesive cues while in the adult brain they regulate dendritic spine plasticity. Here we show a new role for Eph receptor signalling in the cerebellar cortex. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are innervated by two different excitatory inputs. The climbing fibres contact the proximal dendritic domain of Purkinje cells, where synapse and spine density is low; the parallel fibres contact the distal dendritic domain, where synapse and spine density is high. Interestingly, Purkinje cells have the intrinsic ability to generate a high number of spines over their entire dendritic arborisations, which can be innervated by the parallel fibres. However, the climbing fibre input continuously exerts an activity-dependent repression on parallel fibre synapses, thus confining them to the distal Purkinje cell dendritic domain. Such repression persists after Eph receptor activation, but is overridden by Eph receptor inhibition with EphA4/Fc in neonatal cultured cerebellar slices as well as mature acute cerebellar slices, following in vivo infusion of the EphA4/Fc inhibitor and in EphB receptor-deficient mice. When electrical activity is blocked in vivo by tetrodotoxin leading to a high spine density in Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, stimulation of Eph receptor activation recapitulates the spine repressive effects of climbing fibres. These results suggest that Eph receptor signalling mediates the repression of spine proliferation induced by climbing fibre activity in Purkinje cell proximal dendrites. Such repression is necessary to maintain the correct architecture of the cerebellar cortex.

  11. Involvement of BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in leukotriene B4-induced neutrophil degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Eric; Thompson, Charles; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-03-15

    One of the important biological activities of human neutrophils is degranulation, which can be induced by leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we investigated the intracellular signaling events involved in neutrophil degranulation mediated by the high affinity LTB4 receptor, BLT1. Peripheral blood neutrophils as well as the promyeloid PLB-985 cell line, stably transfected with BLT1 cDNA and differentiated into a neutrophil-like cell phenotype, were used throughout this study. LTB4-induced enzyme release was inhibited by 50-80% when cells were pretreated with the pharmacological inhibitors of endocytosis sucrose, Con A and NH4Cl. In addition, transient transfection with a dominant negative form of dynamin (K44A) resulted in approximately 70% inhibition of ligand-induced degranulation. Pretreating neutrophils or BLT1-expressing PLB-985 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1 resulted in a 30-60% inhibition in BLT1-mediated degranulation. Yes kinase, but not c-Src, Fgr, Hck, or Lyn, was found to exhibit up-regulated kinase activity after LTB4 stimulation. Moreover, BLT1 endocytosis was found to be necessary for Yes kinase activation in neutrophils. LTB4-induced degranulation was also sensitive to inhibition of PI3K. In contrast, it was not affected by inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase MEK kinase, the Janus kinases, or the receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Taken together, our results suggest an essential role for BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in LTB4-mediated degranulation of human neutrophils.

  12. ACUMEN deliverable D5.4 – Consequences of Indicators. Effects on the users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Larsen, Birger; Schneider, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    As funding and evaluation are presented to the researcher as part of the same package, control of the assessment of ‘quality’ and ‘impact’ (in their many guises) in an evaluation can be improved by actively involving the individual researcher. However, encouraging researchers to document their ac......As funding and evaluation are presented to the researcher as part of the same package, control of the assessment of ‘quality’ and ‘impact’ (in their many guises) in an evaluation can be improved by actively involving the individual researcher. However, encouraging researchers to document...... their activities with bibliometrics means it is important to understand the ethical implications of this type of self-evaluation....

  13. Humor Appreciation Involves Parametric and Synchronized Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2016-10-18

    Humor perception is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human societies. In theories of humor perception, three factors, non-seriousness, social context, and incongruity, have been implicated in humor. In another theory, however, elaboration and reinterpretation of contexts are considered to play a role in eliciting humor. Although the neural correlates of humor appreciation have been investigated using neuroimaging methods, only a few studies have conducted such experiments under natural conditions. In the present study, two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments, using a comedy movie as a stimulus, were conducted to investigate the neural correlates of humor under natural conditions. The subjects' brain activity was measured while watching and enjoying a movie. In experiment 1, a parametric analysis showed that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and hippocampus/amygdala had a positive relationship with the subjective rating of funniness. In experiment 2, intersubject correlation was analyzed to investigate synchronized activity across all participants. Signal synchronization that paralleled increased funniness ratings was observed in the MPFC and hippocampus. Thus, it appears that both parametric and synchronized activity in the MPFC and hippocampus are important during humor appreciation. The present study has revealed the brain regions that are predominantly involved in humor sensation under natural condition. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Astragaloside IV enhances diabetic wound healing involving upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Huang, Ping; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Lu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Liangcheng; Liu, Yunjun; Yin, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active compounds extracted from Astragali Radix, has been used experimentally for its potent antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. In this study, we further investigate the potential efficacy of AS-IV on impaired wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. A full-thickness skin wound was produced on the back of diabetic mice and treated with AS-IV or vehicle topically. Our results showed that AS-IV application promoted diabetic wound repair with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting augmented reepithelialization. AS-IV enhanced the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of AS-IV on matrix synthesis. AS-IV also improved the new blood vessel formation in wound tissue with increased numbers of endothelial cells and enhanced expression of VEGF and vWF. Moreover, the beneficial effect of AS-IV was related to the development of polarized alternatively activated macrophages, which involved in resolution of inflammation and facilitation of wound repair. All together, these findings suggest that AS-IV may play a potential effect on maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of diabetic wound healing.

  15. Protein receptor for activated C kinase 1 is involved in morphine reward in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, L; Su, L; Xie, Y; Liu, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z

    2009-07-07

    Opiate addiction is associated with upregulation of cAMP signaling in the brain. cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), a nuclear transcription factor, is a downstream component of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway, which has been shown to regulate different physiological and psychological responses of drug addiction. RACK1, the protein receptor for activated C kinase 1, is a multifunctional scaffolding protein known to be a key regulator of various signaling cascades in the CNS. RACK1 functions specifically in integrin mediated activation of ERK cascade and targets active ERK. We examined if RACK1 is involved in the mechanism of drug addiction by regulating CREB in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Several expressions were observed. Chronic administration of morphine made the expression of RACK1 and CREB mRNA increase in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was strongly positive in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus of morphine-treated mice brain, especially the pyramidal neurons in the DG of the hippocampus. Using the small interfering RNA technology, we determined that the expression of CREB mRNA was decreased in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of morphine-treated mice. The expression of RACK1 and CREB protein was negative in CA1, CA3 and DG of hippocampus. These findings suggest that morphine reward can influence the expression of RACK1 in mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex through regulating CREB transcription.

  16. Involvement in sports clubs and informal sport activities of primary and secondary school children in Liechtenstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Kühnis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sport involvement among children and adolescents has been a central field of research in sport science since years. This paper documents the participation of 11- to 15-year-olds in sport clubs and informal sport activities in Liechtenstein and examines possible gender- and age-specific differences. The analysis is based on four cross-sectional studies from 2004 to 2015 and includes the data of 1’262 children in primary (5th grade and secondary (7th and 9th grades school. According to our findings sports and exercise are considered to be one of the main leisure-time activities for all school levels (irrespective of gender. The percentage of fully sport-abstinent adolescents by 11- and 13-year-olds is about 5 %; by 15-year-olds is around 10 %. The culmination of sports club membership (with current 84.7 % appears to be at the age of 11 (5th grade. After the switch to secondary school the sports club commitment tends to decrease, while the high attendance of the informal sport activities (>85 % shows relatively stable age development. In contrast to other child and youth studies, our data indicates a levelling tendency and dissolution of classic gender differences not only in sports club commitment but also in informal sports among girls and boys.

  17. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaorong Yang; Ping Sun; Huaping Qin; Rui Wang; Ye Wang; Ruihong Shi; Xin Zhao; Ce Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are involved in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, a systematic observation or analysis of the role of these various MAPK pathways in excitotoxicity processes does not exist. The present study further evaluated the role and contribution of three MAPK pathways extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK in an NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity model using MAPK-specific inhibitor. Results demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 and/or p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 inhibited NMDA-induced reduction in cell viability, as well as reduced NMDA-induced lactate dehydrogenase leakage and reactive oxygen species production. However, PD98059, an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, did not influence this model. Results demonstrated an involvement of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase, in NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity in cortical neurons.

  18. Activation of GPR15 and its involvement in the biological effects of smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõks, Sulev; Kõks, Gea

    2017-06-01

    Smoking is one of the most significant modifiable environmental risk factors for many diseases. Smoking causes excessive mortality worldwide. Despite decades of long research, there has not been a clear understanding regarding the molecular mechanism that makes smoking harmful to health. Some recent studies have found that smoking influences most significantly the expression and methylation of GPR15. GPR15 is an orphan receptor that is involved in the regulation of the innate immunity and the T-cell trafficking in the intestinal epithelium. Further studies have confirmed that GPR15 is very strongly involved in smoking and smoking-induced molecular changes. Therefore, the altered expression and epigenetic regulation of GPR15 could have a significant role in the health impact of smoking. Impact statement The review describes an orphan receptor GPR15 that has recently been found to be influenced by smoking. This makes GPR15 very sensitive and adequate biomarker for smoking and smoking studies. Also, activation of GPR15 by smoking could help to explain its effects on health.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.parolaro@uninsubria.it [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Massi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  1. Getting involved in international development activities: UK initiatives and hidden benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseborough, Jackie; Godbolt, Shane; Grant, Maria J

    2015-03-01

    Jackie Cheeseborough and Shane Godbolt describe the role that UK health information professionals have in global health and in supporting colleagues from developing countries to continue to develop as a provision. They give an overview of a range of organisations working to improve access to health information in developing countries and in particular Sub-Saharan Africa including Book Aid International, HIFA, INASP, ITOCA, Phi, TALC, THET and Research4Life. Even in a recession, many UK health librarians are choosing to get involved in international development activities in low-resource countries by volunteering, and discovering hidden benefits for their own organisations, and their own continuing professional development. © 2015 Health Libraries Journal.

  2. [Perception of fathers as for their involvement in activities with their children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Mara Regina Santos; Bueno, Maria Emilia Nunes; Ribeiro, Juliane Portella

    2014-03-01

    This is an exploratory, descriptive study with a quantitative approach and the aim to identzfy the perception of fathers regarding their children's needs; strategies used by fathers to get closer to their children as well as to analyze the influence of household chores and children's education in their fathers' lives. Study subjects were 92 men with six-year-old children, residing in the city of Rio Grande, state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS). The results revealed fathers who are more engaged in activities with their children, valuing confidence, safety, as well as proximity to family as children's main needs, having prioritized the progress children make as well as attention to listening and conversation. Children's education does not aggregate more problems than they imagined, managing to plan life the way they seek to. These findings show that, in the sample studied, fathers have been able to develop more affectionate actions aimed at being more involved with their children.

  3. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  4. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu Hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-09-16

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI(+)] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI(+)]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI(+)] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases.

  5. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    KAUST Repository

    Rodrigo, María J.

    2013-09-04

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly ?-citraurin (3-hydroxy-?-apo-8?-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of ?-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in ?-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7?,8? double bond in zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin, confrming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7?,8? double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. The Author 2013.

  6. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  7. Involvement of ER stress and activation of apoptotic pathways in fisetin induced cytotoxicity in human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Deeba N; Lall, Rahul K; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Haidar, Omar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of malignant melanoma remains poor in spite of recent advances in therapeutic strategies for the deadly disease. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid is currently being investigated for its growth inhibitory properties in various cancer models. We previously showed that fisetin inhibited melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we evaluated the molecular basis of fisetin induced cytotoxicity in metastatic human melanoma cells. Fisetin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in highly aggressive A375 and 451Lu human melanoma cells, as revealed by up-regulation of ER stress markers including IRE1α, XBP1s, ATF4 and GRP78. Time course analysis indicated that the ER stress was associated with activation of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Fisetin treated 2-D melanoma cultures displayed autophagic response concomitant with induction of apoptosis. Prolonged treatment (16days) with fisetin in a 3-D reconstituted melanoma model resulted in inhibition of melanoma progression with significant apoptosis, as evidenced by increased staining of cleaved Caspase-3 in the treated constructs. However, no difference in the expression of autophagic marker LC-3 was noted between treated and control groups. Fisetin treatment to 2-D melanoma cultures resulted in phosphorylation and activation of the multifunctional AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including autophagy and apoptosis. Silencing of AMPK failed to prevent cell death indicating that fisetin induced cytotoxicity is mediated through both AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Taken together, our studies confirm apoptosis as the primary mechanism through which fisetin inhibits melanoma cell growth and that activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways contributes to fisetin induced cytotoxicity.

  8. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Miriam; Vega, Hugo; Trainer, Alison H; Hou, Fajian; Sakai, Norio; Luque, Ricardo; Kayserili, Hülya; Basaran, Seher; Skovby, Flemming; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Uzielli, Maria L Giovannucci; Schnur, Rhonda E; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Chang, Susan; Blair, Edward; Hurst, Jane A; Forzano, Francesca; Meins, Moritz; Simola, Kalle O J; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Schultz, Roger A; McDaniel, Lisa D; Ozono, Keiichi; Inui, Koji; Zou, Hui; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2008-07-15

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia (RBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with growth retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and limb reduction. Cellular alterations in RBS include lack of cohesion at the heterochromatic regions around centromeres and the long arm of the Y chromosome, reduced growth capacity, and hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. RBS is caused by mutations in ESCO2, which encodes a protein belonging to the highly conserved Eco1/Ctf7 family of acetyltransferases that is involved in regulating sister chromatid cohesion. We identified 10 new mutations expanding the number to 26 known ESCO2 mutations. We observed that these mutations result in complete or partial loss of the acetyltransferase domain except for the only missense mutation that occurs in this domain (c.1615T>G, W539G). To investigate the mechanism underlying RBS, we analyzed ESCO2 mutations for their effect on enzymatic activity and cellular phenotype. We found that ESCO2 W539G results in loss of autoacetyltransferase activity. The cellular phenotype produced by this mutation causes cohesion defects, proliferation capacity reduction and mitomycin C sensitivity equivalent to those produced by frameshift and nonsense mutations associated with decreased levels of mRNA and absence of protein. We found decreased proliferation capacity in RBS cell lines associated with cell death, but not with increased cell cycle duration, which could be a factor in the development of phocomelia and cleft palate in RBS. In summary, we provide the first evidence that loss of acetyltransferase activity contributes to the pathogenesis of RBS, underscoring the essential role of the enzymatic activity of the Eco1p family of proteins.

  9. Antidepressant-like effect of creatine in mice involves dopaminergic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Machado, Daniele G; Capra, Juliano C; Jacinto, Jardel; Bettio, Luis Eb; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-11-01

    Creatine has been shown to play a significant role in health and disease. However, studies concerning its effect on mood are scarce. This study investigated the effect of creatine (p.o.) in the tail suspension test, a predictive test of antidepressant activity. Creatine reduced the immobility time in the tail suspension test (0.1-1000 mg/kg, male and female mice), without affecting locomotor activity. Furthermore, the involvement of the dopaminergic system in creatine-induced antidepressant-like effect in male mice in the tail suspension test was investigated. The anti-immobility effect of creatine (1 mg/kg) was prevented by the pre-treatment of mice with haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) route, non-selective dopamine receptor antagonist), (R)-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH23390; 0.05 mg/kg, subcutaneous (s.c.) route, dopamine D₁ receptor antagonist) and sulpiride (50 mg/kg, i.p., dopamine D₂ receptor antagonist). Creatine (0.01 mg/kg, sub-effective dose) in combination with sub-effective doses of (1-phenyl-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine) hydrochloride (SKF38393; 0.1 mg/kg, s.c., dopamine D₁ receptor agonist), apomorphine (0.5 µg/kg, i.p., preferential dopamine D₂ receptor agonist) or bupropion (1 mg/kg, p.o., dopamine reuptake inhibitor with subtle activity on noradrenergic reuptake) reduced the immobility time in the tail suspension test as compared with either drug alone. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of creatine is likely mediated by an activation of dopamine D₁ and D₂ receptors.

  10. Guidance on a better integration of aquaculture, fisheries, and other activities in the coastal zone: from tools to practical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelzenmüller, V.; Schulze, T.; Gimpel, A.; Bartelings, H.; Bello, E.; Bergh, O.; Bolman, B.; Caetano, M.; Davaasuren, N.; Fabi, G.; Ferreira, J.G.; Gault, J.; Gramolini, R.; Grati, F.; Hamon, K.G.; Jak, R.G.; Kopke, K.; Laurans, M.; Mäkinen, T.; O’Donnell, V.; O’Hagan, A.M.; O’Mahony, C.; Oostenbrugge, van H.; Ramos, J.; Saurel, C.; Sell, A.L.; Silvo, K.; Sinschek, K.; Soma, K.; Stenberg, C.; Taylor, N.; Vale, C.; Vasquez, F.; Verner-Jeffreys, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    This guidance document provides a comprehensive assessment of the conflicts and synergies between fisheries, aquaculture and other activities in the coastal zone in six COEXIST case study areas. It forms deliverable D5.2 of the COEXIST project and synthesises deliverable D5.1, which provides a more

  11. Guidance on a better integration of aquaculture, fisheries, and other activities in the coastal zone: from tools to practical examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelzenmüller, V.; Schulze, T.; Gimpel, A.; Bartelings, H.; Bello, E.; Bergh, O.; Bolman, B.; Caetano, M.; Davaasuren, N.; Fabi, G.; Ferreira, J.G.; Gault, J.; Gramolini, R.; Grati, F.; Hamon, K.G.; Jak, R.G.; Kopke, K.; Laurans, M.; Mäkinen, T.; O’Donnell, V.; O’Hagan, A.M.; O’Mahony, C.; Oostenbrugge, van H.; Ramos, J.; Saurel, C.; Sell, A.L.; Silvo, K.; Sinschek, K.; Soma, K.; Stenberg, C.; Taylor, N.; Vale, C.; Vasquez, F.; Verner-Jeffreys, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    This guidance document provides a comprehensive assessment of the conflicts and synergies between fisheries, aquaculture and other activities in the coastal zone in six COEXIST case study areas. It forms deliverable D5.2 of the COEXIST project and synthesises deliverable D5.1, which provides a more

  12. Rethinking the Business Model in Construction by the Use of Off-Site System Deliverance: Case of the Shaft Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian; Hvam, Lars

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a set of insights to be used in the development of business models for off-site system deliveries contributing to the development of Off-Site Manufacturing practices (OSM). The theoretical offset for discussing the development of business models is the blue ocean strategy...... in the constant pursue of value creation and cost reduction. On the basis of that system deliverances represent a promising strategy in the future development and application of off-site manufacturing practices. The application of system deliveries is however demanding as it represents a fundamental shift...... in the existing design and production practices. More specifically the development of system deliveries requires: (1) an explicit market focus, enabling the achievement of economy of scale, (2) a coordinated and coherent development around the system deliverance focusing on its internal and external modularity...

  13. CaMKKβ is involved in AMP-activated protein kinase activation by baicalin in LKB1 deficient cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays an important role in mediating energy metabolism and is controlled mainly by two upstream kinases, LKB1 or Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ. Previously, we found that baicalin, one of the major flavonoids in a traditional Chinese herb medicine, Scutellaria baicalensis, protects against the development of hepatic steatosis in rats feeding with a high-fat diet by the activation of AMPK, but, the underlying mechanism for AMPK activation is unknown. Here we show that in two LKB1-deficient cells, HeLa and A549 cells, baicalin activates AMPK by α Thr-172 phosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of its downstream target, acetyl CoA carboxylase, at Ser-79, to a similar degree as does in HepG2 cells (that express LKB1. Pharmacologic inhibition of CaMKKβ by its selective inhibitor STO-609 markedly inhibits baicalin-induced AMPK activation in both HeLa and HepG2 cells, indicating that CaMKKβ is the responsible AMPK kinase. We also show that treatment of baicalin causes a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i, although the maximal level of [Ca(2+](i is lower in HepG2 cells compared to HeLa cells. Chelation of intracellular free Ca(2+ by EDTA and EGTA, or depletion of intracellular Ca(2+ stores by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin abrogates baicalin-induced activation of AMPK in HeLa cells. Neither cellular ATP nor the production of reactive oxygen species is altered by baicalin. Finally, in HeLa cells, baicalin treatment no longer decreases intracellular lipid accumulation caused by oleic acid after inhibition of CaMKKβ by STO-609. These results demonstrate that a potential Ca(2+/CaMKKβ dependent pathway is involved in the activation of AMPK by baicalin and suggest that CaMKKβ likely acts as an upstream kinase of AMPK in response to baicalin.

  14. Distal hinge of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 involves its latency transition and specificities toward serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaltiel Shmuel

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 spontaneously converts from an inhibitory into a latent form. Specificity of PAI-1 is mainly determined by its reactive site (Arg346-Met347, which interacts with serine residue of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA with concomitant formation of SDS-stable complex. Other sites may also play roles in determining the specificity of PAI-1 toward serine proteases. Results To understand more about the role of distal hinge for PAI-1 specificities towards serine proteases and for its conformational transition, wild type PAI-1 and its mutants were expressed in baculovirus system. WtPAI-1 was found to be about 12 fold more active than the fibrosarcoma PAI-1. Single site mutants within the Asp355-Arg356-Pro357 segment of PAI-1 yield guanidine activatable inhibitors (a that can still form SDS stable complexes with tPA and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, and (b that have inhibition rate constants towards plasminogen activators which resemble those of the fibrosarcoma inhibitor. More importantly, latency conversion rate of these mutants was found to be ~3–4 fold faster than that of wtPAI-1. We also tested if Glu351 is important for serine protease specificity. The functional stability of wtPAI-1, Glu351Ala, Glu351Arg was about 18 ± 5, 90 ± 8 and 14 ± 3 minutes, respectively, which correlated well with both their corresponding specific activities (84 ± 15 U/ug, 112 ± 18 U/ug and 68 ± 9 U/ug, respectively and amount of SDS-stable complex formed with tPA after denatured by Guanidine-HCl and dialyzed against 50 mM sodium acetate at 4°C. The second-order rate constants of inhibition for uPA, plasmin and thrombin by Glu351Ala and Glu351Arg were increased about 2–10 folds compared to wtPAI-1, but there was no change for tPA. Conclusion The Asp355-Pro357 segment and Glu351 in distal hinge are involved in maintaining the inhibitory conformation of PAI-1. Glu351 is a specificity

  15. Adolescents’ Sense of Community and Involvement in Playground Activities: Panacea to Ameliorate Social Vices and Delinquencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwagbemiga Paul Agboola

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified defects in the physical environments in which they interact and play, which has resulted in a decline the expected values initiated in both the social, physical and psychological developments. The role of playground in the development of adolescent’s health, moral and social standard has attracted lower interest in the recent time. The adolescent sense of community relates to a positive experience in the community open space setting such as playground and social well-being with their peers in general. Over time, little efforts have been initiated by the researchers towards these phenomena. This current study fills the gap by examining the adolescents’ sense of community through a quantitative survey via appraisal of the quality of community playground, emotional connection and effects of their participation in playground activities on ameliorating the delinquents’ behavior and social vices. Completed survey questionnaires retrieved from a total number of 69 purposive respondents who are adolescents from three towns and analyzed through relative importance index (RII via Likert scale. Results from the analysis indicated that adolescents’ positive attitudinal changes and reduction in social vices and delinquent’s behavior could be achieved through their involvements in quality and well-equipped playgrounds. Similarly, the significant role of sense of community in enhancing adolescent social participation in playground activities contributes to a major role in increasing their social well-being and togetherness. Thus, the study recommends appropriate future planning, design, and management of neighborhood playgrounds in Nigeria.

  16. Characterization of a specific arabinosyltransferase activity involved in mycobacterial arabinan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnobis, Shampa; Zhang, Jian; Angala, Shiva K; Amin, Anita G; McNeil, Michael R; Crick, Dean C; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2006-07-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis strains that contain inactivated EmbA or EmbB proteins are unable to synthesize terminal Arabeta1-->2Araalpha1-->5(Arabeta1-->2Araalpha1-->3)Araalpha1-->5Araalpha1-->(Ara(6)) motif in the cell wall polysaccharide arabinogalactan. Instead, the mutants contain a linear Arabeta1-->2Araalpha1-->5Araalpha1-->5Araalpha1-->(Ara(4)) motif, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the synthesis or transfer of the disaccharide Arabeta1-->2Araalpha1--> to an internal 5-linked Ara. Therefore, we synthesized a linear Arabeta1-->2Araalpha1-->5Araalpha1-->5Araalpha1-->5Araalpha1--> with an octyl aglycon as an arabinosyl acceptor in cell-free assays. A facile assay was developed using the chemically synthesized glycan, membrane, and particulate cell wall as the enzyme source, and 5-phosphoribose diphosphate pR[(14)C]pp as the arabinose donor. The results unequivocally show that two arabinofuranosyl residues were added at the tertiary -->5Araalpha1--> of the synthetic glycan. This activity was undetectable in strains of M. smegmatis where embB or embA had been genetically disrupted. Normal activity could be restored only in the presence of both EmbA and EmbB proteins.

  17. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu Cao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria.

  18. Nisin and lysostaphin activity against preformed biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus involved in bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceotto-Vigoder, H; Marques, S L S; Santos, I N S; Alves, M D B; Barrias, E S; Potter, A; Alviano, D S; Bastos, M C F

    2016-07-01

    The biofilm produced by Staphylococcus aureus isolates involved in clinical or subclinical bovine mastitis and the activity of nisin and lysostaphin against the preformed biofilm produced by these strains were investigated. Eighteen strains were tested and all produced biofilm. Eight strains with distinct biofilm composition were selected for the antimicrobial activity assays. The minimal inhibitory concentration of each bacteriocin was determined against the planktonic cells and ranged from 15·6 to 500 μg ml(-1) for nisin, and from 3·9 to 50 μg ml(-1) , for lysostaphin. Lysostaphin treatment (0·4 μg ml(-1) ) for 4 h caused a strong Staph. aureus 4181 biofilm detachment and death of the majority of the sessile cells, while nisin treatment (100 μg ml(-1) ) for the same time caused only a great reduction in cell viability. Additionally, combination of both bacteriocins for 4 h resulted in significant death of the sessile cells but no biofilm detachment. The treatment with lysostaphin alone or in combination with nisin was effective in killing most biofilm sessile cells. The action of lysostaphin, either alone or in combination with nisin, against established staphylococcal biofilm may represent an alternative to bovine mastitis control. However, the duration of the treatment should be considered for its application so that the best effectiveness can be achieved. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Association of father involvement and neighborhood quality with kindergartners' physical activity: a multilevel structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W; Foley, John T

    2008-01-01

    Examine the effects of father-child involvement and neighborhood characteristics with young children's physical activity (PA) within a multilevel framework. Cross-sectional analysis of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort 1998. Nationally representative sample. Data were available for 10,694 kindergartners (5-6 years; 5240 girls) living in 1053 neighborhoods. Parental report of child's PA level, father characteristics (e.g., time spent with child, age, education, socioeconomic status, hours worked), family time spent doing sports/ activities together, and neighborhood quality (e.g., safety, presence of crime violence, garbage). Child weight status, motor skills, ethnicity, and television viewing were used as covariates. Multilevel structural equation modeling with children nested within neighborhoods. At the child level father-child time and family time doing sports together were positively associated with children's PA. At the neighborhood level parental perception of a neighborhood's safety for children to play outside fully mediated the effect of neighborhood quality on children's PA. Overall 19.1% and 7.6% of the variance in PA was explained at the child and neighborhood levels, respectively. Family-based interventions for PA should consider father-child time, with this contributing to a child's overall PA level. Further, neighborhood quality is an important predictor of PA only to the extent by which parents perceive it to be unsafe for their child to play outdoors.

  20. Tuning ethylene gas adsorption via metal node modulation: Cu-MOF-74 for a high ethylene deliverable capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yijun; Zhang, Lin; Weston, Mitchell H; Morris, William; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2017-08-17

    M-MOF-74s were examined for potential applications in ethylene abatement and/or storage/delivery. Due to labile binding resulting from a Jahn-Teller distortion, Cu-MOF-74 exhibits a gradual initial uptake that, in turn, translates into the highest deliverable capacity among the MOFs examined (3.6 mmol g(-1)). In contrast, Co-MOF-74 is the most promising candidate for ethylene abatement due to the sharp uptake at low pressure.

  1. An editorial approach: Mike Nelson’s corridors and The Deliverance and The Patience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hughes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay contrasts the contemporary British artist Mike Nelson’s approach to constructing his large, multi-room installations with his approach to editing the numerous artist books that he has produced since 2000. This comparison reveals several compositional symmetries between the two, namely pertaining to narrative non-linearity and meta-fictionality. The logic of montage is shown to similarly underscore both the books and the installations. This essay argues that the corridors connecting the different rooms of Nelson’s installations function in a similar way to the logic of montage: they play an integral role as the support that binds the structure of the installation (its multiple rooms together as a whole. This essay argues that the corridor is the primary viewing framework of the installation for the viewer, and that this vantage point is significant because the necessarily partial vision of the installation from the space of the corridor demonstrates the logic of installation art more broadly. I conclude by mapping the key compositional elements of Nelson’s artist books onto his installations, taking the 2001 work The Deliverance and The Patience as a case study, to show that the books do not exemplify the artwork as with traditional exhibition catalogues, but rather parallel it. That is, a structural continuity is established between these two facets of his work.

  2. Mastitis and fertility in cattle - possible involvement of inflammation or immune activation in embryonic mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter J; Soto, Paolete; Natzke, Roger P

    2004-04-01

    Causes for pre-implantation embryo loss, which can be as high as 50% or more of fertilized embryos, are multifactorial and largely undescribed. Studies in cattle using mastitis as a model indicate that one cause of early embryonic loss is infectious disease or activation of immune responses at sites outside the reproductive tract. Infection of the mammary gland in dairy cattle is associated with a reduction in pregnancy rate (proportion of inseminated cows that become pregnant) and an increase in the number of inseminations required to establish pregnancy. Also, intravenous challenge with bacterial peptidoglycan and polysaccharide at approximately days 3-5 after breeding reduced subsequent pregnancy rate in sheep that had been previously immunized against the same material. The mechanism by which extrauterine activation of immune and inflammatory responses leads to embryonic loss is not clear although cytokines probably play a crucial role. Effects could be exerted at the level of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, ovary, reproductive tract or embryo. Interferon (IFN)-alpha, for example, which can reduce pregnancy rate in cattle when injected around 13-19 days after breeding, increases body temperature, inhibits secretion of luteinizing hormone, and reduces circulating concentrations of progesterone. Other cytokines or products of cytokine activation could cause embryonic loss by causing hyperthermia (as elevated temperature blocks oocyte function and embryonic development), exerting toxic effects on the corpus luteum [for example, IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and prostaglandin F(2alpha)], stimulating endometrial prostaglandin synthesis [TNF-alpha and interleukin(IL)-1beta], reducing endometrial cell proliferation (IL-1beta), and interfering with oocyte maturation and embryonic development (TNF-alpha, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin F(2alpha)). Although largely neglected by reproductive immunologists, study of the involvement of the immune

  3. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K+ intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K+ excretion in the face of changes in dietary K+ intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K+ diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K+-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K+ diet decreased and high-K+ diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr44/Thr48/Thr53) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser383/Ser325). The effect of the low-K+ diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K+ diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K+ diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K+-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K+ increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K+ diet. PMID:24761002

  4. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K(+) intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2014-06-15

    Modulation of Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K(+) excretion in the face of changes in dietary K(+) intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K(+) diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K(+)-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K(+) diet decreased and high-K(+) diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr(44)/Thr(48)/Thr(53)) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser(383)/Ser(325)). The effect of the low-K(+) diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K(+) diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K(+) diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K(+)-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K(+) increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K(+) diet. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Do Public Involvement Activities in Biomedical Research and Innovation Recruit Representatively? A Systematic Qualitative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Jonas; Hainz, Tobias; Hirschberg, Irene; Bossert, Sabine; Strech, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Public involvement activities (PIAs) may contribute to the governance of ethically challenging biomedical research and innovation by informing, consulting with and engaging the public in developments and decision-making processes. For PIAs to capture a population's preferences (e.g. on issues in whole genome sequencing, biobanks or genome editing), a central methodological requirement is to involve a sufficiently representative subgroup of the general public. While the existing literature focusses on theoretical and normative aspects of 'representation', this study assesses empirically how such considerations are implemented in practice. It evaluates how PIA reports describe representation objectives, the recruitment process and levels of representation achieved. PIA reports were included from a systematic literature search if they directly reported a PIA conducted in a relevant discipline such as genomics, biobanks, biotechnology or others. PIA reports were analyzed with thematic text analysis. The text analysis was guided by an assessment matrix based on PIA-specific guidelines and frameworks. We included 46 relevant reports, most focusing on issues in genomics. 27 reports (59%) explicitly described representation objectives, though mostly without adjusting eligibility criteria and recruiting methods to the specific objective. 11 reports (24%) explicitly reported to have achieved the intended representation; the rest either reported failure or were silent on this issue. Representation of study samples in PIAs in biomedical research and innovation is currently not reported systematically. Improved reporting on representation would not only improve the validity and value of PIAs, but could also contribute to PIA results being used more often in relevant policy and decision-making processes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  7. A mass spectrometric method to determine activities of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Kaori [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Samejima, Keijiro, E-mail: samejima-kj@igakuken.or.jp [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takao, Koichi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Josai University, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0295 (Japan); Kohda, Kohfuku [Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Musashino University, 1-1-20 Shinmachi, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 202-8585 (Japan); Hiramatsu, Kyoko; Kawakita, Masao [Department of Molecular Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6 Kami-kitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds in polyamine catabolic pathway were determined by a column-free ESI-TOF MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup 1}- and N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine were determined by a column-free ESI-MS/MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was applied to determine activities of APAO, SMO, and SSAT in the pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay method contained stable isotope-labeled natural substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is applicable to biological samples containing natural substrate and product. - Abstract: An analytical method for the determination of three polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) and five acetylpolyamines [N{sup 1}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 1}AcSpd), N{sup 8}-acetylspermidine (N{sup 8}AcSpd), N{sup 1}-acetylspermine, N{sup 1},N{sup 8}-diacetylspermidine, and N{sup 1},N{sup 12}-diacetylspermine] involved in the polyamine catabolic pathway has been developed using a hybrid tandem mass spectrometer. Heptafluorobutyryl (HFB) derivatives of these compounds and respective internal standards labeled with stable isotopes were analyzed simultaneously by TOF MS, based on peak areas appearing at appropriate m/z values. The isomers, N{sup 1}AcSpd and N{sup 8}AcSpd were determined from their fragment ions, the acetylamidopropyl and acetylamidobutyl groups, respectively, using MS/MS with {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 1}AcSpd and {sup 13}C{sub 2}-N{sup 8}AcSpd which have the {sup 13}C{sub 2}-acetyl group as an internal standard. The TOF MS method was successfully applied to measure the activity of enzymes involved in polyamine catabolic pathways, namely N{sup 1}-acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), spermine oxidase (SMO), and spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SSAT). The following natural substrates and products labeled with stable isotopes considering the application to biological samples were identified; for APAO, [4,9,12-{sup 15}N{sub 3}]-N{sup 1}-acetylspermine and [1,4,8-{sup 15}N{sub 3

  8. Evidence for the Involvement of p38 MAPK Activation in Barnacle Larval Settlement

    KAUST Repository

    He, Li-Sheng

    2012-10-24

    The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK) from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts.

  9. PRESS40: a project for involving students in active seismic risk mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, Carla; Contessi, Elisa; Rosa Girardi, Maria

    2016-04-01

    To memorialize the anniversary of the 1976 Friuli earthquake, the Istituto Statale di Istruzione Superiore "Magrini Marchetti" in Gemona del Friuli (NE Italy), with the collaboration of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), has promoted the PRESS40 Project (Prevenzione Sismica nella Scuola a 40 anni dal terremoto del Friuli, that in English sounds like "Seismic Prevention at School 40 years later the Friuli earthquake"). The project has developed in the 2015-2016 school year, starting from the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake, and it aims to disseminate historical memory, seismic culture and awareness of seismic safety in the young generations, too often unconscious of past experiences, as recent seismic hazard perception tests have demonstrated. The basic idea of the PRESS40 Project is to involve the students in experimental activities to be active part of the seismic mitigation process. The Project is divided into two main parts, the first one in which students learn-receive knowledge from researchers, and the second one in which they teach-bring knowledge to younger students. In the first part of the project, 75 students of the "Magrini Marchetti" school acquired new geophysical data, covering the 23 municipalities from which they come from. These municipalities represent a wide area affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake. In each locality a significant site was examined, represented by a school area. At least, 127 measurements of ambient noise have been acquired. Data processing and interpretation of all the results are still going on, under the supervision of OGS researchers.The second part of the project is planned for the early spring, when the students will present the results of geophysical survey to the younger ones of the monitored schools and to the citizens in occasion of events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake.

  10. Evidence for the involvement of p38 MAPK activation in barnacle larval settlement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Sheng He

    Full Text Available The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts.

  11. Deregulated Cdk5 Activity Is Involved in Inducing Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Varsha; Skuntz, Susan; Pant, Harish C.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most devastating chronic neurodegenerative disease in adults, causes dementia and eventually, death of the affected individuals. Clinically, AD is characterized as late-onset, age-dependent cognitive decline due to loss of neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The pathologic corollary of these symptoms is the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Senile plaques are formed due to accumulation of oligomeric amyloid beta (Aβ) forming fibrillary plaques. This occurs due to the amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by various secretases. On the other hand, neurofibrillary tangles are formed due to hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeleton proteins like tau and neurofilament. Both are hyperphosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5) and are part of the paired helical filament (PHF), an integral part of neurofibrillary tangles. Unlike other cyclin-dependent kinases, Cdk5 plays a very important role in the neuronal development. Cdk5 gets activated by its neuronal activators p35 and p39. Upon stress, p35 and p39 are cleaved by calpain resulting in truncated products as p25 and p29. Association of Cdk5/p25 is longer and uncontrolled causing aberrant hyperphosphorylation of various substrates of Cdk5 like APP, tau and neurofilament, leading to neurodegenerative pathology like AD. Additionally recent evidence has shown increased levels of p25, Aβ, hyperactivity of Cdk5, phosphorylated tau and neurofilament in human AD brains. This review briefly describes the above-mentioned aspects of involvement of Cdk5 in the pathology of AD and at the end summarizes the advances in Cdk5 as a therapeutic target. PMID:23142263

  12. Cocaine-mediated microglial activation involves the ER stress-autophagy axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liao, Ke; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Yang, Lu; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse leads to neuroinflammation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. Autophagy plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the possible functional link between cocaine and autophagy has not been explored before. Herein, we demonstrate that cocaine exposure induced autophagy in both BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells as demonstrated by a dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy-signature proteins such as BECN1/Beclin 1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B. These findings were validated wherein cocaine treatment of BV-2 cells resulted in increased formation of puncta in cells expressing either endogenous MAP1LC3B or overexpressing GFP-MAP1LC3B. Specificity of cocaine-induced autophagy was confirmed by treating cells with inhibitors of autophagy (3-MA and wortmannin). Intriguingly, cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of 2 ER stress pathways (EIF2AK3- and ERN1-dependent), as evidenced by the ability of the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal to ameliorate cocaine-induced autophagy. In vivo validation of these findings demonstrated increased expression of BECN1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B-II proteins in cocaine-treated mouse brains compared to untreated animals. Increased autophagy contributes to cocaine-mediated activation of microglia since pretreatment of cells with wortmannin resulted in decreased expression and release of inflammatory factors (TNF, IL1B, IL6, and CCL2) in microglial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure results in induction of autophagy that is closely linked with neuroinflammation. Targeting autophagic proteins could thus be considered as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cocaine-related neuroinflammation diseases.

  13. Activation of Holliday junction recognizing protein involved in the chromosomal stability and immortality of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tatsuya; Sato, Nagato; Hayama, Satoshi; Yamabuki, Takumi; Ito, Tomoo; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Daigo, Yataro

    2007-09-15

    We identified a novel gene HJURP (Holliday junction-recognizing protein) whose activation seemed to play a pivotal role in the immortality of cancer cells. HJURP was considered a possible downstream target for ataxia telangiectasia mutated signaling, and its expression was increased by DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). HJURP was involved in the homologous recombination pathway in the DSB repair process through interaction with hMSH5 and NBS1, which is a part of the MRN protein complex. HJURP formed nuclear foci in cells at S phase and those subjected to DNA damage. In vitro assays implied that HJURP bound directly to the Holliday junction and rDNA arrays. Treatment of cancer cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against HJURP caused abnormal chromosomal fusions and led to genomic instability and senescence. In addition, HJURP overexpression was observed in a majority of lung cancers and was associated with poor prognosis as well. We suggest that HJURP is an indispensable factor for chromosomal stability in immortalized cancer cells and is a potential novel therapeutic target for the development of anticancer drugs.

  14. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles’ heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  15. Residual NADPH Oxidase Activity and Isolated Lung Involvement in X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

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    Maria J. Gutierrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is characterized by inherited immune defects resulting from mutations in the NADPH oxidase complex genes. The X-linked type of CGD is caused by defects in the CYBB gene that encodes gp91-phox, a fundamental component of the NADPH oxidase complex. This mutation originates the most common and severe form of CGD, which typically has absence of NADPH oxidase function and aggressive multisystemic infections. We present the case of a 9-year-old child with a rare CYBB mutation that preserves some NADPH oxidase activity, resulting in an atypical mild form of X-linked CGD with isolated lung involvement. Although the clinical picture and partially preserved oxidase function suggested an autosomal recessive form of CGD, genetic testing demonstrated a mutation in the exon 3 of CYBB gene (c.252 G>A, p.Ala84Ala, an uncommon X-linked CGD variant that affects splicing. Atypical presentation and diagnostic difficulties are discussed. This case highlights that the diagnosis of mild forms of X-linked CGD caused by rare CYBB mutations and partially preserved NADPH function should be considered early in the evaluation of atypical and recurrent lung infections.

  16. Current practice of public involvement activities in biomedical research and innovation: a systematic qualitative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Lander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A recent report from the British Nuffield Council on Bioethics associated 'emerging biotechnologies' with a threefold challenge: 1 uncertainty about outcomes, 2 diverse public views on the values and implications attached to biotechnologies and 3 the possibility of creating radical changes regarding societal relations and practices. To address these challenges, leading international institutions stress the need for public involvement activities (PIAs. The objective of this study was to assess the state of PIA reports in the field of biomedical research. METHODS: PIA reports were identified via a systematic literature search. Thematic text analysis was employed for data extraction. RESULTS: After filtering, 35 public consultation and 11 public participation studies were included in this review. Analysis and synthesis of all 46 PIA studies resulted in 6 distinguishable PIA objectives and 37 corresponding PIA methods. Reports of outcome translation and PIA evaluation were found in 9 and 10 studies respectively (20% and 22%. The paper presents qualitative details. DISCUSSION: The state of PIAs on biomedical research and innovation is characterized by a broad range of methods and awkward variation in the wording of objectives. Better comparability of PIAs might improve the translation of PIA findings into further policy development. PIA-specific reporting guidelines would help in this regard. The modest level of translation efforts is another pointer to the "deliberation to policy gap". The results of this review could inform the design of new PIAs and future efforts to improve PIA comparability and outcome translation.

  17. Exit of Plasmodium sporozoites from oocysts is an active process that involves the circumsporozoite protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium sporozoites develop within oocysts residing in the mosquito midgut. Mature sporozoites exit the oocysts, enter the hemolymph, and invade the salivary glands. The circumsporozoite (CS protein is the major surface protein of salivary gland and oocyst sporozoites. It is also found on the oocyst plasma membrane and on the inner surface of the oocyst capsule. CS protein contains a conserved motif of positively charged amino acids: region II-plus, which has been implicated in the initial stages of sporozoite invasion of hepatocytes. We investigated the function of region II-plus by generating mutant parasites in which the region had been substituted with alanines. Mutant parasites produced normal numbers of sporozoites in the oocysts, but the sporozoites were unable to exit the oocysts. In in vitro as well, there was a profound delay, upon trypsin treatment, in the release of mutant sporozoites from oocysts. We conclude that the exit of sporozoites from oocysts is an active process that involves the region II-plus of CS protein. In addition, the mutant sporozoites were not infective to young rats. These findings provide a new target for developing reagents that interfere with the transmission of malaria.

  18. Postnatal changes of local neuronal circuits involved in activation of jaw-closing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomio; Nakamura, Shiro; Takamatsu, Junichi; Tokita, Kenichi; Gemba, Akiko; Nakayama, Kiyomi

    2007-04-01

    Feeding behaviour in mammals changes from suckling to mastication during postnatal development and the neuronal circuits controlling feeding behaviour should change in parallel to the development of orofacial structures. In this review we discuss the location of excitatory premotor neurons for jaw-closing motoneurons (JCMNs) and postnatal changes of excitatory synaptic transmission from the supratrigeminal region (SupV) to JCMNs. We show that neurons located in SupV and the reticular formation dorsal to the facial nucleus most likely excite JCMNs. Excitatory inputs from SupV to JCMNs are mediated by activation of glutamate and glycine receptors in neonatal rats, whereas glycinergic inputs from SupV to JCMNs become inhibitory with age. We also show that the incidence of post-spike afterdepolarization increases during postnatal development, whereas the amplitude and half-duration of the medium-duration afterhyperpolarization decrease with age. Such postnatal changes in synaptic transmission from SupV to JCMNs and membrane properties of JCMNs might be involved in the transition from suckling to mastication.

  19. Current practice of public involvement activities in biomedical research and innovation: a systematic qualitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Jonas; Hainz, Tobias; Hirschberg, Irene; Strech, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A recent report from the British Nuffield Council on Bioethics associated 'emerging biotechnologies' with a threefold challenge: 1) uncertainty about outcomes, 2) diverse public views on the values and implications attached to biotechnologies and 3) the possibility of creating radical changes regarding societal relations and practices. To address these challenges, leading international institutions stress the need for public involvement activities (PIAs). The objective of this study was to assess the state of PIA reports in the field of biomedical research. PIA reports were identified via a systematic literature search. Thematic text analysis was employed for data extraction. After filtering, 35 public consultation and 11 public participation studies were included in this review. Analysis and synthesis of all 46 PIA studies resulted in 6 distinguishable PIA objectives and 37 corresponding PIA methods. Reports of outcome translation and PIA evaluation were found in 9 and 10 studies respectively (20% and 22%). The paper presents qualitative details. The state of PIAs on biomedical research and innovation is characterized by a broad range of methods and awkward variation in the wording of objectives. Better comparability of PIAs might improve the translation of PIA findings into further policy development. PIA-specific reporting guidelines would help in this regard. The modest level of translation efforts is another pointer to the "deliberation to policy gap". The results of this review could inform the design of new PIAs and future efforts to improve PIA comparability and outcome translation.

  20. Signalling pathways involved in the activation of dendritic cells by layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Qin, Lili; Zhu, Di; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Shilong

    2010-02-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles are attractive as potential drug vectors for the targeting not only of tissues, but also of intracellular organelles, and particularly the acidic endolysosomes created after cell endocytosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of LDH nanoparticles designed as vectors to activate dendritic cells (DCs), as measured by various cellular functions. The study also explored the possible signaling pathway through which the LDH nanoparticles exerted their effects on the cellular functions of DCs. First, LDH nanoparticles with different ratios of Mg(OH)(2) to Al(OH)(3) (1:1, 2:1 and 3:1, called R1, R2 and R3 respectively) were optimized and had a hydrodynamic diameter of 57 nm with a zeta potential of +35 mV. Then, the efficient endocytosis of the optimized LDH nanoparticles by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The effect of R1, R2 and R3 on the expression of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12) and the co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class II) in MDDCs was examined. The exposure of R1 caused a dose-dependent increase in the expression of TNF-alpha, IL-12, CD86 and CD40, while R2 and R3 did not up-regulate these cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules. Migration assays showed that R1 could increase the migration capacity of DCs to CCL21 and up-regulate the expression of CCR7. Furthermore, we found that R1 significantly increased the NF-kappaB expression in the nucleus (in a dose-dependent manner) and promoted the degradation of total IkappaBalpha levels, indicating that the NF-kappaB signaling pathway might involve in an R1-induced DC activation. Our results suggested that LDH nanoparticles, in the future, may function as a useful vector for ex vivo engineering to promote vaccine delivery in immune cells.

  1. Parasympathetic activation is involved in reducing epileptiform discharges when listening to Mozart music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Chiang, Ching-Tai; Lee, Mei-Wen; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    discharges in children with epilepsy. The majority of these patients showed an increase in parasympathetic tone during music exposure. Our results suggested that Mozart music stimuli induced parasympathetic activation which may be involved in the effect of music in reducing epileptiform discharges and the recurrence rate of seizures. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Activated Rho kinase mediates diabetes-induced elevation of vascular arginase activation and contributes to impaired corpora cavernosa relaxation: possible involvement of p38 MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, Haroldo A; Nunes, Kenia P; Yao, Lin; Liao, James K; Webb, R Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, R William

    2013-06-01

    Activated RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) has been implicated in diabetes-induced erectile dysfunction. Earlier studies have demonstrated involvement of ROCK pathway in the activation of arginase in endothelial cells. However, signaling pathways activated by ROCK in the penis remain unclear. We tested whether ROCK and p38 MAPK are involved in the elevation of arginase activity and subsequent impairment of corpora cavernosal (CC) relaxation in diabetes. Eight weeks after streptozotocin-induced diabetes, vascular functional studies, arginase activity assay, and protein expression of RhoA, ROCK, phospho-p38 MAPK, p38 MAPK, phospho-MYPT-1(Thr850), MYPT-1 and arginase levels were assessed in CC tissues from nondiabetic wild type (WT), diabetic (D) WT (WT + D), partial ROCK 2(+/-) knockout (KO), and ROCK 2(+/-) KO + D mice. The expression of RhoA, ROCK 1 and 2, phosphorylation of MYPT-1(Thr850) and p38 MAPK, arginase activity/expression, endothelial- and nitrergic-dependent relaxation of CC was assayed. Diabetes significantly reduced maximum relaxation (Emax ) to both endothelium-dependent acetylcholine (WT + D: Emax; 61 ± 4% vs. WT: Emax; 75 ± 2%) and nitrergic nerve stimulation. These effects were associated with increased expression of active RhoA, ROCK 2, phospho-MYPT-1(Thr850), phospho-p38 MAPK, arginase II, and activity of corporal arginase (1.6-fold) in WT diabetic CC. However, this impairment in CC of WT + D mice was absent in heterozygous ROCK 2(+/-) KO + D mice for acetylcholine (Emax : 80 ± 5%) and attenuated for nitrergic nerve-induced relaxation. CC of ROCK 2(+/-) KO + D mice showed much less ROCK activity, did not exhibit p38 MAPK activation, and had reduced arginase activity and arginase II expression. These findings indicate that ROCK 2 mediates diabetes-induced elevation of arginase activity. Additionally, pretreatment of WT diabetic CC with inhibitors of arginase (ABH) or p38 MAPK (SB203580) partially prevented impairment of ACh- and nitrergic nerve

  3. Residues involved in the pore-forming activity of the Clostridium perfringens iota toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Oliver; Maier, Elke; Waltenberger, Eva; Mazuet, Christelle; Benz, Roland; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin that is organized into enzyme (Ia) and binding (Ib) components. Ib forms channels in lipid bilayers and mediates the transport of Ia into the target cells. Here we show that Ib residues 334-359 contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues forming two amphipathic β-strands involved in membrane insertion and channel formation. This stretch of amino acids shows remarkable structural and functional analogies with the β-pore-forming domain of C. perfringens epsilon toxin. Several mutations within the two amphipathic β-strands affected pore formation, single-channel conductance and ion selectivity (S339E-S341E, Q345H N346E) confirming their involvement in channel formation. F454 of Ib corresponds to the Φ-clamp F427 of anthrax protective antigen and F428 of C2II binary toxins. The mutation F454A resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity and strong increase in single-channel conductance (500 pS as compared with 85 pS in 1 M KCl) with a slight decrease in cation selectivity, indicating that the Φ-clamp is highly conserved and crucial for binary toxin activity. In contrast, the mutants Q367D, N430D, L443E had no or only minor effects on Ib properties, while T360I, T360A and T360W caused a dramatic effect on ion selectivity and single-channel conductance, indicating gross disturbance of the oligomer structure. This suggests that, at least in the iota toxin family, T360 has a structural role in the pore organization. Moreover, introduction of charged residues within the channel (S339E-S341E) or in the vestibule (Q367D, N430D and L443E) had virtually no effect on chloroquine or Ia binding, whereas F454A, T360I, T360A and T360W strongly decreased the chloroquine and Ia affinity to Ib. These results support that distinct residues within the vestibule interact with chloroquine and Ia or are responsible for channel structure, while the channel lining amino acids play a less important role.

  4. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  5. Rural Schooling in Georgia: The Experiences of a Minority Community Service Organization Involved in Local School Decision-Making Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Cynthia Louise Altman

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study was a descriptive case study of a minority community service organization whose members were actively involved in local school decision-making and activities in a rural Northeast Georgia community. Rural schools face unique challenges in light of current educational trends. To address the challenges, rural schools must…

  6. Antifungal Activity of Apple Cider Vinegar on Candida Species Involved in Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Ana Carolina Loureiro Gama; de Castro, Ricardo Dias; de Araújo Oliveira, Julyana; de Oliveira Lima, Edeltrudes

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity of apple cider vinegar on Candida spp. involved in denture stomatitis. The microdilution technique was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of apple cider vinegar containing 4% maleic acid, and nystatin (control). Further tests of microbial kinetics and inhibition of adherence to acrylic resin were performed testing different concentrations (MIC, MICx2, MICx4) of the products at time intervals of 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes. A roughness meter was used to measure the changes in surface roughness; color change of the acrylic resin specimens exposed to the test products in different concentrations and time intervals were also evaluated. Apple cider vinegar (4%) showed MIC of 2500 μg/ml and MFC of 2500, 5000, and 10,000 μg/ml depending on the strain tested. Nystatin showed MIC of 3.125 μg/ml and strain-dependent MFC values ranging from 3.125 to 12.5 μg/ml. The microbial kinetic assay showed a statistical difference between apple cider vinegar and nystatin (p cider vinegar showed fungicidal effect at MICx4, whereas nystatin maintained its fungistatic effect. Apple cider vinegar showed greater inhibition of adherence (p cider vinegar did not significantly alter the surface roughness of the acrylic resin specimens compared to nystatin (p > 0.05), and both had no influence on their color. Apple cider vinegar showed antifungal properties against Candida spp., thus representing a possible therapeutic alternative for patients with denture stomatitis. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Active involvement of people with intellectual disabilities in health research - A structured literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankena, Tessa Kim; Naaldenberg, Jenneken; Cardol, Mieke; Linehan, Christine; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny

    2015-01-01

    Actively involving people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in health research, also known as inclusive health research, is increasingly popular. Currently, insight into experiences of this type of research is scarce. To gain insight into this topic, a structured literature review was conducted focussing on (1) existing theories, (2) inclusive methods, (3) added value and (4) barriers and facilitators. Literature published between January 2000 and January 2014 was included covering keywords related to ID and inclusive health research. Searches were performed in Pubmed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, resulting in 26 included papers. Papers were quality assessed and analysed using qualitative data analysis software. Four theories were often simultaneously addressed: participatory research, emancipatory research, inclusive research and Arnstein's ladder. Barriers and facilitators could be divided into preparing, undertaking and finalising phases of research. Authors indicated that their motivation to conduct inclusive health research was based on demands by policy and funding bodies or was based on ethical considerations (i.e., ethical notions and giving people with ID a voice). Upon completion, authors perceived increased quality and validity of their research and several benefits for stakeholders (i.e., people with ID, researchers and healthcare professionals). Overall, there was consistency in their perception of the most important aspects of inclusive health research. Based on the analysis of included papers, four recommendations of inclusive health research with people with ID were found. Inclusive health research should be: (1) tailoring to the specific study; (2) anticipating all stakeholders; (3) considering its added value; and (4) providing insight into its process.

  8. Mothers' and fathers' involvement with school-age children's care and academic activities in Navajo Indian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ziarat; Anziano, Michael C

    2008-04-01

    This exploratory study examined mothers' and fathers' reports of time involvement in their school-age children's care and academic activities. The study also explored the relationship between parents' socioeconomic status (SES) variables (age, education, income, work hours, and length of marriage) and their relative involvement with children. Mother and father dyads from 34 two-parent Navajo (Diné) Indian families with a second- or third-grade child participated in the study. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed that mothers invested significantly more time in children's care on demand and academic activities than fathers, but the differences in maternal and paternal perceptions of time involvement in routine care were not significant. The gender of the child did not influence the amount of time parents invested in children's care and academic activities. Mothers' involvement with children was not related to any of the SES variables. Fathers' involvement was significantly associated with work hours and length of marriage, and work hours produced significant interaction with fathers' involvement with children. Findings are discussed in light of gender role differences in parental involvement with children within Navajo families.

  9. Correlation of Pulmonary Involvement with Serum Anti-CCP Antibodies and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songül Çilda¤

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lung involvement substantially increases the morbidity and mortality rates in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, thus, the early detection of lung involvement is essential for proper management. Several recent reports revealed that anti-CCP is an important parameter in the early diagnosis of RA and is closely related with the extraarticular manifestations of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between serum anti-CCP antibodies and disease activity score-28 (DAS28, using the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ in patients with RA, whose pulmonary involvement was detected by computed tomography (CT. Methods: According to the high-resolution CT findings, the patients were divided into two groups - with pulmonary involvement (24 patients, and without a pulmonary disease (25 patients. Results: Statistically significant association was not found between pulmonary involvement and anti-CCP antibodies. There was no significant correlation between pulmonary involvement and disease activity evaluated by the HAQ. Conclusion: The disease activity determined by the DAS28 was significantly negatively correlated with pulmonary involvement (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2010; 48: 142-5

  10. Dexamethasone enhances necrosis-like neuronal death in ischemic rat hippocampus involving μ-calpain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2014-11-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia (TFI) leads to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell death which is aggravated by glucocorticoids (GC). It is unknown how GC affect apoptosis and necrosis in cerebral ischemia. We therefore investigated the co-localization of activated caspase-3 (casp-3) with apoptosis- and necrosis-like cell death morphologies in CA1 of rats treated with dexamethasone prior to TFI (DPTI). In addition, apoptosis- (casp-9, casp-3, casp-3-cleaved PARP and cleaved α-spectrin 145/150 and 120kDa) and necrosis-related (calpain-specific casp-9 cleavage, μ-calpain upregulation and cleaved α-spectrin 145/150kDa) cell death mechanisms were investigated by Western blot analysis. DPTI expedited CA1 neuronal death from day 4 to day 1 and increased the magnitude of CA1 neuronal death from 66.2% to 91.3% at day 7. Furthermore, DPTI decreased the overall (days 1-7) percentage of dying neurons displaying apoptosis-like morphology from 4.7% to 0.3% and, conversely, increased the percentage of neurons with necrosis-like morphology from 95.3% to 99.7%. In animals subjected to TFI without dexamethasone (ischemia-only), 7.4% of all dying CA1 neurons were casp-3-immunoreactive (IR), of which 3.1% co-localized with apoptosis-like and 4.3% with necrosis-like changes. By contrast, DPTI decreased the percentage of dying neurons with casp-3 IR to 1.4%, of which 0.3% co-localized with apoptosis-like changes and 1.1% with necrosis-like changes. Western blot analysis from DPTI animals showed a significant elevation of μ-calpain, a calpain-produced necrosis-related casp-9 fragment (25kDa) and cleavage of α-spectrin into 145/150kDa fragments at day 4, whereas in ischemia-only animals a significant increase of casp-3-cleaved PARP, cleavage of α-spectrin into 145/150 and 120kDa fragments was detected at day 7. We conclude that DPTI, in addition to augmenting and expediting CA1 neuronal death, causes a shift from apoptosis-like cell death to necrosis involving μ-calpain activation.

  11. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L.; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool, 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as “low” or “middle” had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as “high” were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music. PMID:25431978

  12. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2015-05-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music.

  13. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  14. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  15. Enhancing Information Usefulness by Line Managers’ Involvement in Cross-Unit Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Rodgers, Waymond

    2011-01-01

    of line managers’ prior involvement with Corporate Audit using Throughput Modeling. This model allows us to understand how line managers’ cross-unit involvement influenced the way they process information received from Corporate Audit. Our results show that managers’ cross-unit involvement positively...... influences their assessment of information from Corporate Audit in a way that influences their propensity to use information from that unit. The results indicate that cross-unit involvement is more than an effective means of transmitting information – it can also be used as a means of building boundary......Organization and management scholars have long advocated that efficient use of information is critical for firms to compete successfully in the modern marketplace. This study examines whether the use of managerial cross-unit involvement in an organization enhances managers’ propensity to use useful...

  16. The theory of active involvement: processes underlying interventions that engage adolescents in message planning and/or production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of increased risk taking, and recent intervention strategies have included adolescents planning or producing antirisk messages for their peers. Although these projects may generate enthusiasm, we know little about message planning or production as a strategy for changing adolescent decision-making and behavior. This article articulates the Theory of Active Involvement (TAI) to describe and explain the processes through which these active involvement interventions influence adolescents. TAI is based on social cognitive theory's notion of self-regulation and examines multiple perspective taking and activating the self-reflection processes. The theory specifically describes the process of cognitive changes experienced by participants in active involvement interventions. The sequence is conceptualized as starting when engagement with the intervention (arousal and involvement) produces skill and knowledge gains (immediate outcomes) that lead to reflection (perceived discrepancy) and then other cognitions (expectancies, norms, intentions), with the ultimate outcome being behavior change. Engaging the target audience in a process of self-reflection is conceptualized as the crucial ingredient for meaningful and sustainable change in cognitions and behavior. This article provides valuable insight into how active involvement strategies function and how to best design these interventions, particularly those targeting adolescents.

  17. The link between high-fat meals and postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII possibly involves kallikrein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L F; Marckmann, P; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2000-01-01

    Contrary to low-fat meals, high-fat meals are known to cause postprandial factor VII (FVII) activation, but the mechanism is unknown. To study the postprandial FVII activation in detail, 18 young men consumed in randomized order high-fat or low-fat test meals. Fasting and non-fasting blood samples...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may activate prokallikrein. Neither plasma triglycerides nor kallikrein and activated FVII were statistically associated. This may suggest that additional factors are involved in the postprandial FVII activation. No clear evidence for a role of tissue factor expression...

  18. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44 - a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eSchaefer; Franziska eRumpel; Abdolkarim eSadrieh; Martin eReimann; Claudia eDenke

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to expla...

  19. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44 - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. FMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product.

  20. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Rumpel, Franziska; Sadrieh, Abdolkarim; Reimann, Martin; Denke, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. fMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product.

  1. Male Involvement in Child Care Activities: A Review of the Literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    cultural stereotypes and harmonization of customary and common laws. (Afr J Reprod ... and men's gender roles and advocated for men to take more .... In Botswana, the current data ..... data collection and analysis of male involvement in.

  2. We decide what we eat: Active involvement of students in developing school health policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Bruun

    2003-01-01

    The article explores different forms of participation related to youngs people's involvement in among other nutrition projects. Furthermore, the notion of action-oriented knowledge is discussed on the basis of a model.......The article explores different forms of participation related to youngs people's involvement in among other nutrition projects. Furthermore, the notion of action-oriented knowledge is discussed on the basis of a model....

  3. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk and Neuropathic Pain: Involvement in the Modulation of Motor Activity in the Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Zakir; Unno, Shumpei; Ando, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yuji; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2017-09-26

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) is a debilitating condition. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the development of neuropathic pain. Recently, glial cells have been shown to play a key pathogenetic role. Nerve injury leads to an immune response near the site of injury. Satellite glial cells are activated in the peripheral ganglia. Various neural and immune mediators, released at the central terminals of primary afferents, lead to the sensitization of postsynaptic neurons and the activation of glia. The activated glia, in turn, release pro-inflammatory factors, further sensitizing the neurons, and resulting in central sensitization. Recently, we observed the involvement of glia in the alteration of orofacial motor activity in NOP. Microglia and astroglia were activated in the trigeminal sensory and motor nuclei, in parallel with altered motor functions and a decreased pain threshold. A microglial blocker attenuated the reduction in pain threshold, reduced the number of activated microglia, and restored motor activity. We also found an involvement of the astroglial glutamate-glutamine shuttle in the trigeminal motor nucleus in the alteration of the jaw reflex. Neuron-glia crosstalk thus plays an important role in the development of pain and altered motor activity in NOP.

  4. Supplement to ACUMEN deliverable 5.4a: Description and comparison of indicators in Google Scholar and Web of Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Larsen, Birger; Schneider, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We collected publication and citation data in two databases to investigate the extent performance of author-level indicators are effected by choice of database, the stability of indicators across databases and ultimately to illustrate how differences in the computed indicators change our perception...... of individual researchers. In this report we begin by comparing database coverage, coverage at seniority and gender-level and then the performance of four basic indicators computed in both databases. In the main deliverable 5.4a, we investigate in a cluster analysis the performance of our previously identified...

  5. A disease activity score for ENT involvement in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Pero, Marcos Martinez; Chaudhry, Afzal; Rasmussen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Accurate assessment of disease activity in patients with otorhinolaryngological manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) (ENT/GPA) is necessary for treatment decisions and clinical trials. We have designed a disease activity score (ENT/GPA DAS) for this purpose....

  6. Individual differences in dispositional mindfulness and brain activity involved in reappraisal of emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Ormel, Johan; Aleman, Andre

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of negative emotion through reappraisal has been shown to induce increased prefrontal activity and decreased amygdala activity. Individual differences in dispositional mindfulness reflect differences in typical recognition, detachment and regulation of current experience, thought to a

  7. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 27. Biogas Construction Plan in Segoroyoso Village Yogyakarta Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesmana, Surya Budi; Putra, Sri Atmaja [Muhammadiyah University of Yogyakarta, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2011-10-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara (WNT) and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. To achieve the CASINDO objective seven Technical Working Groups have been established with the aim to conduct the technical activities under the various work packages and to produce the agreed deliverables. This report presents results from Technical Working Group IV on Renewable Energy project development. Its main aims were: To identify suitable non-hydro RE projects that can be developed in the province; To conduct an energy needs assessment in a selected location; To develop a business plan for a proposed solution to the identified main energy problem of the target community; To identify potential investors; To construct the project.

  8. Conditions of Dance in Morocco : Interviews and observations of Adults and Children involved in Dance activities in Marrakech

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to deepen our knowledge about dance in general and about dance activities for children in particular, in Morocco. Consequently, we attempted to gain insight and understanding of the social and political premises to dance in this context. We further intended to study how children were involved in dance activities. A qualitative study was carried out during a stay of eight weeks in Marrakech. Data was mainly collected through participant observations in the...

  9. Strategies for Effective Faculty Involvement in Online Activities Aimed at Promoting Critical Thinking and Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razzak, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Highly-traditional education systems that mainly offer what is known as "direct instruction" usually result in graduates with a surface approach to learning rather than a deep one. What is meant by deep-learning is learning that involves critical analysis, the linking of ideas and concepts, creative problem solving, and application…

  10. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant differentially activates the three complement pathways with major involvement of the alternative pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güven, Esin; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga

    2013-01-01

    Al(OH)3 is the most common adjuvant in human vaccines, but its mode of action remains poorly understood. Complement involvement in the adjuvant properties of Al(OH)3 has been suggested in several reports together with a depot effect. It is here confirmed that Al(OH)3 treatment of serum depletes c...

  11. Strategies for Effective Faculty Involvement in Online Activities Aimed at Promoting Critical Thinking and Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razzak, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Highly-traditional education systems that mainly offer what is known as "direct instruction" usually result in graduates with a surface approach to learning rather than a deep one. What is meant by deep-learning is learning that involves critical analysis, the linking of ideas and concepts, creative problem solving, and application…

  12. Dilemmas of involvement in land management – Comparing an active (Dutch) and a passive (German) approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, Hartmann; Spit, Tejo

    2015-01-01

    What is the role of spatial planners in urban development? Planners can be very involved in the realization of the land-use plans or they can take a more passive role in development processes. Which role they take depends on the particular institutional arrangements for land management in each count

  13. Neural networks involved in adolescent reward processing: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Merav H; Jedd, Kelly; Luciana, Monica

    2015-11-15

    Behavioral responses to, and the neural processing of, rewards change dramatically during adolescence and may contribute to observed increases in risk-taking during this developmental period. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest differences between adolescents and adults in neural activation during reward processing, but findings are contradictory, and effects have been found in non-predicted directions. The current study uses an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach for quantitative meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies to: (1) confirm the network of brain regions involved in adolescents' reward processing, (2) identify regions involved in specific stages (anticipation, outcome) and valence (positive, negative) of reward processing, and (3) identify differences in activation likelihood between adolescent and adult reward-related brain activation. Results reveal a subcortical network of brain regions involved in adolescent reward processing similar to that found in adults with major hubs including the ventral and dorsal striatum, insula, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Contrast analyses find that adolescents exhibit greater likelihood of activation in the insula while processing anticipation relative to outcome and greater likelihood of activation in the putamen and amygdala during outcome relative to anticipation. While processing positive compared to negative valence, adolescents show increased likelihood for activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and ventral striatum. Contrasting adolescent reward processing with the existing ALE of adult reward processing reveals increased likelihood for activation in limbic, frontolimbic, and striatal regions in adolescents compared with adults. Unlike adolescents, adults also activate executive control regions of the frontal and parietal lobes. These findings support hypothesized elevations in motivated activity during adolescence.

  14. Expectations of Rock Music Consumption for Entertainment and Information Relative to the Active Involvement of the User.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouner, Donna; Noyes, Amy

    Before examining potentially negative effects of rock music on adolescents, it is necessary to demonstrate links between adolescent motivations for consuming rock music and active involvement relative to that use and also to consider how much rock listeners rely on rock music as a source for information about values, beliefs, and social…

  15. 30 CFR 57.4660 - Work in shafts, raises, or winzes and other activities involving hazard areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work in shafts, raises, or winzes and other activities involving hazard areas. 57.4660 Section 57.4660 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... non-fire-retardant wood. Thawing pipes electrically, except with heat tape More than 10 pounds...

  16. Parental Involvement in School Activities and Reading Literacy: Findings and Implications from PIRLS 2011 Data. Policy Brief No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Klemencic, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief presents evidence demonstrating a positive association between parental involvement in school activities and student performance in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. This association, which was evident in most of the 54 education systems analyzed, indicates that students enrolled in schools with…

  17. High inorganic triphosphatase activities in bacteria and mammalian cells: identification of the enzymes involved.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Kohn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPP(i is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPP(i but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. CONCLUSIONS AND GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPP(i in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPP(i, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca(2+, thereby interfering with Ca(2+ signaling.

  18. Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Birgitte; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Nielsen, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting....

  19. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordillo, M.; Vega, H.; Trainer, A.H.;

    2008-01-01

    on enzymatic activity and cellular phenotype. We found that ESCO2 W539G results in loss of autoacetyltransferase activity. The cellular phenotype produced by this mutation causes cohesion defects, proliferation capacity reduction and mitomycin C sensitivity equivalent to those produced by frameshift...

  20. Optical Topography of Evoked Brain Activity during Mental Tasks Involving Whole Number Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Students start to memorize arithmetic facts from early elementary school mathematics activities. Their fluency or lack of fluency with these facts could affect their efforts as they carry out mental calculations as adults. This study investigated participants' levels of brain activation and possible reasons for these levels as they solved…

  1. Teacher-Involved Conversations with Young Children during Small Group Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Tonia; Dangel, Julie Rainer

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the conversations of two preschool teachers with two- and three-year-old children during small-group activity settings in two high-quality child development centers. Using interviews, observations and videotaping of small-group activities, the conversations are characterized in terms of the kind and function of…

  2. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts.

  3. H2O2-Activated Up-Regulation of Glutathione in Arabidopsis Involves Induction of Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Cysteine Synthesis in the Chloroplast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guillaume Queval; Dorothée Thominet; Hélène Vanacker; Myroslawa Miginiac-Maslow; Bertrand Gakière; Graham Noctor

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione is a key player in cellular redox homeostasis and, therefore, in the response to H2O2, but the factors regulating oxidation-activated glutathione synthesis are still unclear. We investigated H2O2-induced glutathione synthesis in a conditional Arabidopsis catalase-deficient mutant (cat2). Plants were grown from seed at elevated CO2 for 5 weeks, then transferred to air in either short-day or long-day conditions. Compared to cat2 at elevated CO2 or wild-type plants in any condition, transfer of cat2 to air in both photoperiods caused measurable oxidation of the leaf glutathione pool within hours. Oxidation continued on subsequent days and was accompanied by accumulation of glutathione. This effect was stronger in cat2 transferred to air in short days, and was not linked to appreciable increases in the extractable activities of or transcripts encoding enzymes involved in the committed pathway of glutathione synthesis. In contrast, it was accompanied by increases in serine, O-acetylserine, and cysteine. These changes in metabolites were accompanied by induction of genes encoding adenosine phosphosulfate reductase (APR), particularly APR3, as well as a specific serine acetyltransferase gene (SAT2.1) encoding a chloroplastic SAT. Marked induction of these genes was only observed in cat2 transferred to air in short-day conditions, where cysteine and glutathione accumulation was most dramatic. Unlike other SAT genes, which showed negligible induction in cat2, the relative abundance of APR and SAT2.1 transcripts was closely correlated with marker transcripts for H2O2 signaling. Together, the data underline the importance of cysteine synthesis in oxidant-induced up-regulation of glutathione synthesis and suggest that the chloroplast makes an important contribution to cysteine production under these circumstances.

  4. Involvement of lipid rafts in adhesion-induced activation of Met and EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ying-Che

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion has been shown to induce activation of certain growth factor receptors in a ligand-independent manner. However, the mechanism for such activation remains obscure. Methods Human epidermal carcinoma A431 cells were used as a model to examine the mechanism for adhesion-induced activation of hepatocyte growth factor receptor Met and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. The cells were suspended and replated on culture dishes under various conditions. The phosphorylation of Met at Y1234/1235 and EGFR at Y1173 were used as indicators for their activation. The distribution of the receptors and lipid rafts on the plasma membrane were visualized by confocal fluorescent microscopy and total internal reflection microscopy. Results We demonstrate that Met and EGFR are constitutively activated in A431 cells, which confers proliferative and invasive potentials to the cells. The ligand-independent activation of Met and EGFR in A431 cells relies on cell adhesion to a substratum, but is independent of cell spreading, extracellular matrix proteins, and substratum stiffness. This adhesion-induced activation of Met and EGFR cannot be attributed to Src activation, production of reactive oxygen species, and the integrity of the cytoskeleton. In addition, we demonstrate that Met and EGFR are independently activated upon cell adhesion. However, partial depletion of Met and EGFR prevents their activation upon cell adhesion, suggesting that overexpression of the receptors is a prerequisite for their self-activation upon cell adhesion. Although Met and EGFR are largely distributed in 0.04% Triton-insoluble fractions (i.e. raft fraction, their activated forms are detected mainly in 0.04% Triton-soluble fractions (i.e. non-raft fraction. Upon cell adhesion, lipid rafts are accumulated at the cell surface close to the cell-substratum interface, while Met and EGFR are mostly excluded from the membrane enriched by lipid rafts. Conclusions

  5. Activation of Hepatic Lipase Expression by Oleic Acid: Possible Involvement of USF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrie J. M. Verhoeven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression mainly through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs, but how monounsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression is poorly understood. In HepG2 cells, oleate supplementation has been shown to increase secretion of hepatic lipase (HL. We hypothesized that oleate affects HL gene expression at the transcriptional level. To test this, we studied the effect of oleate on HL promoter activity using HepG2 cells and the proximal HL promoter region (700 bp. Oleate increased HL expression and promoter activity 1.3–2.1 fold and reduced SREBP activity by 50%. Downregulation of SREBP activity by incubation with cholesterol+25-hydroxycholesterol had no effect on HL promoter activity. Overexpression of SREBP2, but not SREBP1, reduced HL promoter activity, which was effected mainly through the USF1 binding site at -307/-312. Oleate increased the nuclear abundance of USF1 protein 2.7 ± 0.6 fold, while USF1 levels were reduced by SREBP2 overexpression. We conclude that oleate increases HL gene expression via USF1. USF1 may be an additional fatty acid sensor in liver cells.

  6. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  7. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies.

  8. Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity Year End Report (Final Deliverable)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-11-09

    The Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity (Southwest CEEO) has been in existence since October 1996 at Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute's (TVI) South Valley Campus. The Special Project was comprised of three objectives: (1) Increasing the number of Hispanics in careers related to the environment by improving education and job training opportunities; (2) Strengthening the infrastructure of Hispanic businesses and building their capacity to participate in environmental clean-up activities and potential technology commercialization; and (3) Increasing the Hispanic community's understanding of and participation in environmental protection through improved access to information and outreach activities, paying attention to cultural and linguistic issues. The Southwest CEEO has been successful in each of the above objective areas and continues to provide valuable services to TVI and the community. The Southwest CEEO has developed a scholarship/mentorship program involving business and industry, community organizations, and TVI faculty that will be replicated by other student mentorship programs. The Southwest CEEO has awarded approximately $50,000 over the two-year program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office. The Southwest CEEO has also developed a K-12 partnership with Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) to enhance environmental education for students and professional development for teachers. Incorporated into these student activities are experimental learning opportunities and curriculum development and/or enhancement. The Southwest CEEO has worked closely with the TVI Small Business Development Center (SBDC) to support Hispanic businesses in technology partnership activities. The Southwest CEEO in partnership the TVI SBDC has provided a large business forum and business workshops. In addition, the Southwest CEEO has developed a Technology Transfer Model that will be expanded in the future to a

  9. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan); Niwa, Koichi [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Hattori, Yuichi [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Inanami, Osamu, E-mail: inanami@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  10. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes.

  11. Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in albuminuria induced inflammasome activation in renal proximal tubular cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fang

    Full Text Available Albuminuria contributes to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Although it has been demonstrated that ongoing albuminuria leads to tubular injury manifested by the overexpression of numerous proinflammatory cytokines, the mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that the inflammasome activation which has been recognized as one of the cornerstones of intracellular surveillance system was associated with the severity of albuminuria in the renal biopsies specimens. In vitro, bovine serum albumin (BSA could also induce the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the cultured kidney epithelial cells (NRK-52E. Since there was a significant overlap of NLRP3 with the ER marker calreticulin, the ER stress provoked by BSA seemed to play a crucial role in the activation of inflammasome. Here, we demonstrated that the chemical chaperone taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA which was proved to be an enhancer for the adaptive capacity of ER could attenuate the inflammasome activation induced by albuminuria not only in vitro but also in diabetic nephropathy. Taken together, these data suggested that ER stress seemed to play an important role in albuminuria-induced inflammasome activation, elimination of ER stress via TUDCA might hold promise as a novel avenue for preventing inflammasome activation ameliorating kidney epithelial cells injury induced by albuminuria.

  12. Telmisartan prevention of LPS-induced microglia activation involves M2 microglia polarization via CaMKKβ-dependent AMPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Xu, Yazhou; Wang, Yurong; Wang, Yunjie; He, Ling; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Zhangjian; Liao, Hong; Li, Jia; Saavedra, Juan M; Zhang, Luyong; Pang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Brain inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric and neurological diseases. During brain inflammation, microglia cells are activated, producing neurotoxic molecules and neurotrophic factors depending on their pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes. It has been demonstrated that Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) ameliorate brain inflammation and reduce M1 microglia activation. The ARB telmisartan suppresses glutamate-induced upregulation of inflammatory genes in cultured primary neurons. We wished to clarify whether telmisartan, in addition, prevents microglia activation through polarization to an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. We found that telmisartan promoted M2 polarization and reduced M1 polarization in LPS-stimulated BV2 and primary microglia cells, effects partially dependent on PPARγ activation. The promoting effects of telmisartan on M2 polarization, were attenuated by an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor or AMPK knockdown, indicating that AMPK activation participates on telmisartan effects. Moreover, in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells, telmisartan enhancement of M2 gene expression was prevented by the inhibitor STO-609 and siRNA of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ), an upstream kinase of AMPK. Furthermore, telmisartan enhanced brain AMPK activation and M2 gene expression in a mouse model of LPS-induced neuroinflammation. In addition, telmisartan reduced the LPS-induced sickness behavior in this in vivo model, and this effect was prevented by prior administration of an AMPK inhibitor. Our results indicate that telmisartan can be considered as a novel AMPK activator, suppressing microglia activation by promoting M2 polarization. Telmisartan may provide a novel, safe therapeutic approach to treat brain disorders associated with enhanced inflammation.

  13. Involvement of CD244 in regulating CD4+ T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfen Yang

    Full Text Available CD244 (2B4 is a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family of immune cell receptors and it plays an important role in modulating NK cell and CD8(+ T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CD244/2B4 on CD4(+ T cells from active TB patients and latent infection individuals. Active TB patients had significantly elevated CD244/2B4 expression on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells compared with latent infection individuals. The frequencies of CD244/2B4-expressing antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in retreatment active TB patients than in new active TB patients. Compared with CD244/2B4-dull and -middle CD4(+ T cells, CD244/2B4-bright CD4(+ T cell subset had significantly reduced expression of IFN-γ, suggesting that CD244/2B4 expression may modulate IFN-γ production in M. tuberculosis antigen-responsive CD4(+ T cells. Activation of CD244/2B4 signaling by cross-linking led to significantly decreased production of IFN-γ. Blockage of CD244/2B4 signaling pathway of T cells from patients with active TB resulted in significantly increased production of IFN-γ, compared with isotype antibody control. In conclusion, CD244/2B4 signaling pathway has an inhibitory role on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell function.

  14. Anticonvulsant activity of Citrus aurantium blossom essential oil (neroli): involvment of the GABAergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanchi, Taravat; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Asgarpanah, Jinous

    2014-11-01

    Citrus aurantium L. blossoms are an important medicinal plant part in Iran and some other countries. It is used in traditional medicine as an antiseizure and anticonvulsant natural agent. Early in vitro research of the anticonvulsant activity of the blossom extracts were done but there has been no investigation focused on the blossom essential oil and its anticonvulsant activity. The anticonvulsant activity of the essential oil of C. aurantium blossoms (neroli) was investigated. The anticonvulsant activity of neroli was assessed in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsion by i.v. and i.p. methods and maximal electroshock (MES) in mice, with diazepam as the standard drug. While mechanistic studies were conducted using flumazenil, a GABA A-benzodiazepine receptor complex site antagonist. Neroli produced protection against clonic by i.v adminiatration of PTZ at 20 and 40 mg/kg, compared with protection with benzodiazepine. The mean onset and percentage protection against convulsion in neroli-treated mice were reduced by flumazenil. Intraperitonaeal PTZ also decreased the latency of clonic seizure in the neroli (40 mg/kg) treated group. We also showed that neroli (20 and 40 mg/kg), exhibited inhibition of the tonic convulsion induced by MES and decreased the mortality rate. Neroli was analyzed by GC and GC-MS and twenty three constituents, representing 91.0 % of the chromatographical oil were identified. The major components of neroli were characterized as linalool (28.5%), linalyl acetate (19.6%), nerolidol (9.1%) E,E-farnesol (9.1%), α-terpineol (4.9%) and limonene (4.6%) which might be responsible for the anticonvulsant activity. The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have anticonvulsant activity which supports the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of seizure.

  15. No evidence for a putative involvement of platelet-activating factor in systemic lupus erythematosus without active nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Denizot

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Platelet-activating factor (PAF seems to be implicated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients with associated renal diseases.Aims: In this study, we ensured the role of PAF in SLE patients without renal complications.

  16. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation.

  17. Participant and Public Involvement in Refining a Peer-Volunteering Active Aging Intervention: Project ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withall, Janet; Thompson, Janice L; Fox, Kenneth R; Davis, Mark; Gray, Selena; de Koning, Jolanthe; Lloyd, Liz; Parkhurst, Graham; Stathi, Afroditi

    2016-12-07

    Evidence for the health benefits of a physically active lifestyle among older adults is strong, yet only a small proportion of older people meet physical activity recommendations. A synthesis of evidence identified "best bet" approaches, and this study sought guidance from end-user representatives and stakeholders to refine one of these, a peer-volunteering active aging intervention. Focus groups with 28 older adults and four professional volunteer managers were conducted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 9 older volunteers. Framework analysis was used to gauge participants' views on the ACE intervention. Motives for engaging in community groups and activities were almost entirely social. Barriers to participation were lack of someone to attend with, lack of confidence, fear of exclusion or "cliquiness" in established groups, bad weather, transport issues, inaccessibility of activities, ambivalence, and older adults being "set in their ways". Motives for volunteering included "something to do," avoiding loneliness, the need to feel needed, enjoyment, and altruism. Challenges included negative events between volunteer and recipient of volunteering support, childcare commitments, and high volunteering workload. Peer-volunteering approaches have great potential for promotion of active aging. The systematic multistakeholder approach adopted in this study led to important refinements of the original ACE intervention. The findings provide guidance for active aging community initiatives highlighting the importance of effective recruitment strategies and of tackling major barriers including lack of motivation, confidence, and readiness to change; transport issues; security concerns and cost; activity availability; and lack of social support. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  18. Synchronized network activity in developing rat hippocampus involves regional hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Roland A.; Galindo, Rafael; Mameli, Manuel; Gonzalez-Vega, Rebeca; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Tallie Z. Baram

    2005-01-01

    The principal form of synchronized network activity in neonatal hippocampus consists of low frequency ‘giant depolarizing potentials’ (GDPs). Whereas contribution of both GABA and glutamate to their generation has been demonstrated, full understanding of the mechanisms underlying these synchronized activity bursts remains incomplete. A contribution of the h-current, conducted by HCN channels, to GDPs has been a topic of substantial interest. Here we focus on HCN1, the prevalent HCN channel is...

  19. IL-37 Confers Protection against Mycobacterial Infection Involving Suppressing Inflammation and Modulating T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; He, Xin; Ji, Qun; Bai, Wenjuan; Chen, Hao; Chen, Jianxia; Peng, Wenxia; Liu, Siyu; Liu, Zhonghua; Ge, Baoxue

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-37 (IL-37), a novel member of the IL-1 family, plays fundamental immunosuppressive roles by broadly reducing both innate inflammation and acquired immunity, but whether it is involved in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB) has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis demonstrated an association of the genetic variant rs3811047 of IL-37 with TB susceptibility. In line with previous report, a significant elevated IL-37 abundance in the sera and increased expression of IL-37 protein in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were observed in TB patients in comparison to healthy controls. Moreover, release of IL-37 were detected in either macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or the lung of BCG-infected mice, concurrent with reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, BCG-infected IL-37-Tg mice manifested with reduced mycobacterial burden and tissue damage in the lung, accompanied by higher frequency of Th1 cell and less frequencies of regulatory T cells and Th17 cells in the spleen. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that IL-37 conferred resistance to Mtb infection possibly involving suppressing detrimental inflammation and modulating T cell responses. These findings implicated that IL-37 may be employed as a new molecular target for the therapy and diagnosis of TB. PMID:28076390

  20. Clinical and psychological aspects of adolescent involvement in extremist and terrorist activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshevsky D.S.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the clinical and psychological aspects of including minors in terrorist and extremist activities. In the historical perspective, it was traced how the views on the role of mental disorders in the genesis of such crimes changed. It is shown that terrorist and extremist activity must be viewed as a complex multi-factor phenomenon, in which socio-psychological components play a leading role. It is noted that the psychopathological process can act as a prerequisite for inclusion in such radical groups. Psychoanalytic, sociological, cognitive approaches, theories of social learning and the concept of diffuse ego-identity making attempts to explain the mechanisms of terrorist and extremist activity in minors are analyzed. The problem of insufficient study of the influence of the Internet and social networks on the formation of readiness for admission to adolescents in radical organizations is posed.

  1. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44. NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections.

  2. Facilitation handlings induce increase in electromyographic activity of muscles involved in head control of cerebral palsy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anelise de Saldanha; do Pinho, Alexandre Severo; Grazziotin Dos Santos, Camila; Pagnussat, Aline de Souza

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic (EMG) activation of the main cervical muscles involved in the head control during two postures widely used for the facilitation of head control in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). A crossover trial involving 31 children with clinical diagnosis of CP and spastic quadriplegia was conducted. Electromyography was used to measure muscular activity in randomized postures. Three positions were at rest: (a) lateral decubitus, (b) ventral decubitus on the floor and (c) ventral decubitus on the wedge. Handlings for facilitating the head control were performed using the hip joint as key point of control in two postures: (a) lateral decubitus and (b) ventral decubitus on wedge. All children underwent standardized handlings, performed by the same researcher with experience in the neurodevelopmental treatment. EMG signal was recorded from muscles involved in the head control (paraspinal and sternocleidomastoid muscles) in sagittal, frontal and transverse planes, at the fourth cervical vertebra (C4), tenth thoracic vertebra (T10) and sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) levels. The results showed a significant increase in muscle activation when handling was performed in the lateral decubitus at C4 (Pcontrol, as evaluated by the activity of cervical and upper trunk muscles. Handling performed in lateral decubitus may induce a slightly better facilitation of head control. These findings contribute to evidence-based physiotherapy practice for the rehabilitation of severely spastic quadriplegic CP children.

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy in the Twitcher Mouse Involves the Activation of Axonal Caspase 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Infantile Krabbe disease results in the accumulation of lipid-raft-associated galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, demyelination, neurodegeneration and premature death. Recently, axonopathy has been depicted as a contributing factor in the progression of neurodegeneration in the Twitcher mouse, a bona fide mouse model of Krabbe disease. Analysis of the temporal-expression profile of MBP (myelin basic protein isoforms showed unexpected increases of the 14, 17 and 18.5 kDa isoforms in the sciatic nerve of 1-week-old Twitcher mice, suggesting an abnormal regulation of the myelination process during early postnatal life in this mutant. Our studies showed an elevated activation of the pro-apoptotic protease caspase 3 in sciatic nerves of 15- and 30-day-old Twitcher mice, in parallel with increasing demyelination. Interestingly, while active caspase 3 was clearly contained in peripheral axons at all ages, we found no evidence of caspase accumulation in the soma of corresponding mutant spinal cord motor neurons. Furthermore, active caspase 3 was found not only in unmyelinated axons, but also in myelinated axons of the mutant sciatic nerve. These results suggest that axonal caspase activation occurs before demyelination and following a dying-back pattern. Finally, we showed that psychosine was sufficient to activate caspase 3 in motor neuronal cells in vitro in the absence of myelinating glia. Taken together, these findings indicate that degenerating mechanisms actively and specifically mediate axonal dysfunction in Krabbe disease and support the idea that psychosine is a pathogenic sphingolipid sufficient to cause axonal defects independently of demyelination.

  4. Peripheral neuropathy in the Twitcher mouse involves the activation of axonal caspase 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto R Bongarzone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Infantile Krabbe disease results in the accumulation of lipid-raft-associated galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, demyelination, neurodegeneration and premature death. Recently, axonopathy has been depicted as a contributing factor in the progression of neurodegeneration in the Twitcher mouse, a bona fide mouse model of Krabbe disease. Analysis of the temporal-expression profile of MBP (myelin basic protein isoforms showed unexpected increases of the 14, 17 and 18.5 kDa isoforms in the sciatic nerve of 1-week-old Twitcher mice, suggesting an abnormal regulation of the myelination process during early postnatal life in this mutant. Our studies showed an elevated activation of the pro-apoptotic protease caspase 3 in sciatic nerves of 15- and 30-day-old Twitcher mice, in parallel with increasing demyelination. Interestingly, while active caspase 3 was clearly contained in peripheral axons at all ages, we found no evidence of caspase accumulation in the soma of corresponding mutant spinal cord motor neurons. Furthermore, active caspase 3 was found not only in unmyelinated axons, but also in myelinated axons of the mutant sciatic nerve. These results suggest that axonal caspase activation occurs before demyelination and following a dying-back pattern. Finally, we showed that psychosine was sufficient to activate caspase 3 in motor neuronal cells in vitro in the absence of myelinating glia. Taken together, these findings indicate that degenerating mechanisms actively and specifically mediate axonal dysfunction in Krabbe disease and support the idea that psychosine is a pathogenic sphingolipid sufficient to cause axonal defects independently of demyelination.

  5. Involving the public in general practice in an urban district: levels and type of activity and perceptions of obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ian

    2000-07-01

    This paper reports on a study of the level and type of activity used to involve the public in general practice in a city district in the north of England. The association of these activities with features of the general practice organisation and environment were studied. Service providers' perceptions of obstacles were also studied. Data were collected in a survey of all general practice organisations in the district using a postal questionnaire completed by a practice manager. Interviews were conducted with health service managers responsible for primary care development in the district. The study showed that the district had a good track record for innovation in primary care development and in giving emphasis to developing public involvement. However, it also showed that it was difficult to translate policy rhetoric into practical initiatives at the general practice level without evidence of models of best practice, and with limited resources. The survey had a high response of over 84%. It showed that levels of activity were low across the district and only a small minority of general practice teams had undertaken a range of activities to involve the public. The socio-economic environment did not appear to be a factor, but small practices (one or two partners and/or practice population under 3000) were much less likely to develop activities. Pressures of existing workload, lack of resources and public apathy were given as among the main obstacles by survey respondents. The study indicates the challenges faced by Primary Care Groups in developing strands of public involvement. Primary care teams need a clear strategic framework, models of best practice, and adequate resources to manage, change and develop initiatives.

  6. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin. PMID:3355517

  7. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-02-15

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is believed that these residues are located in the active site of avidin and take part in the binding of biotin.

  8. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 2, Developing a Pan-European In-depth Accident Investigation Network: Deliverable 2.3: Training package including training manual and Draft Protocols.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagerlind, H. Armstrong, J. Atala, D. Dodson, E. Talbot, R. Hill, J. Roynard, M. Martensen, H. Jänsch, M. Margaritis, D. Ocampo Sanchez, A. Peez, J. Ferrer, A. Elslande, P. van Perrin, C. Hermitte, T. Giustiniani, G. & Davidse, R.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable is intended to collate the DaCoTA training manual and draft protocols for in-depth road accident investigations in Europe. This deliverable aims at producing a document that will be used in the training of new and previously experienced teams in the realm of in depth accident data c

  9. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W; Burnham, W McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-06-08

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy.

  10. Peroxiredoxin-3 Is Involved in Bactericidal Activity through the Regulation of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sena; Wi, Sae Mi; Min, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prdx3) is a mitochondrial protein of the thioredoxin family of antioxidant peroxidases and is the principal peroxidase responsible for metabolizing mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide. Recent reports have shown that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) contribute to macrophage-mediated bactericidal activity in response to Toll-like receptors. Herein, we investigated the functional effect of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity. The mitochondrial localization of Prdx3 in HEK293T cells was confirmed by cell fractionation and confocal microscopy analyses. To investigate the functional role of Prdx3 in bactericidal activity, Prdx3-knockdown (Prdx3KD) THP-1 cells were generated. The mROS levels in Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly higher than those in control THP-1 cells. Moreover, the mROS levels were markedly increased in response to lipopolysaccharide. Notably, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection assay revealed that the Prdx3KD THP-1 cells were significantly resistant to S. Typhimurium infection, as compared with control THP-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Prdx3 is functionally important in bactericidal activity through the regulation of mROS. PMID:28035213

  11. The ability of thapsigargin and thapsigargicin to activate cells involved in the inflammatory response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, H; Christensen, S B; Foreman, J C;

    1985-01-01

    The ability of thapsigargin and thapsigargicin to activate mast cells and leukocytes has been investigated. The thapsigargin-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells was found to be dependent on the concentration of thapsigargin, the purity of the mast cell preparations, and the n...

  12. Fantasy Activity and the Televiewing Event: Considerations for an Information Processing Construct of Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindlof, Thomas R.

    The similarities between television viewing and fantasy activity (daydreaming, reverie, mind-wandering, internal dialogue) more than warrant the building of a theoretical construct, especially in the context of recent empirical research on television viewing consequences. A construct of the television viewing process, based on cognitive theories…

  13. Listening and Speaking to Help Students Become Involved Listeners and Active Speakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DingAiyun

    2004-01-01

    This paper intends to reveal the potential obstacles that may hinder students from understanding a listening text, to discuss the right procedures and techniques that a teacher should adopt in class and to suggest some post-listening activities that can be turned into oral practice.

  14. A Multi-Institutional Examination of the Relationships between High School Activity Involvement and Leadership Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Jon C.; Velez, Jonathan J.; Foor, Ryan M.; Birkenholz, Robert J.; Foster, Daniel D.; Wolf, Kattlyn J.; Epps, Rebekah B.

    2014-01-01

    Developing leaders is vital to the future of our nation. As institutions of higher education address the need for leadership through courses and experiences, there is a need to recognize and acknowledge the potential impact of high school activity participation on leadership development. This descriptive-correlational study surveyed first-time…

  15. [Activity involvement and extraversion as predictors of psychological wellbeing in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Laura; Dumitrache, Cristina G; Rubio-Herrera, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between extraversion and wellbeing has been discussed in the literature, however, the impact that this trait has on the wellbeing of older people has been studied to a lesser extent. The relationship between extraversion, participation in activities and psychological wellbeing in older people is analysed in this study. The sample comprised 139 individuals over 55 years from rural and urban areas of the province of Granada who completed the extraversion subscale of the NEO-FFI and the Ryff Scales of the Psychological Wellbeing, as well as responding to questions that evaluated their social participation. A greater social participation was found in rural areas and among women. The activities more frequently performed by the participants were educational and religious activities, walking, everyday chores, crafts, and home improvements. A low positive correlation between extraversion and wellbeing was observed. The multiple regression analysis revealed that extraversion explained 19.9% of the variance in psychological wellbeing, which increased to 25.3% when social participation, gender, and the origin of the sample were considered. Psychological wellbeing appears to be associated with personality traits, such as extraversion. In addition this personality trait is linked to the number and type of activities the elderly perform which also contributes to wellbeing in old age. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Families and School Personnel Involved in a Literacy and Physical Activity Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James A.; Richardson, Maurine V.; Sacks, Mary Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    A traditional part of American education has been to include the families in the educational process of their children. The needs and complexities of today's families and classrooms have never been greater. Programs and activities used with families, and school interactions 10 to 15 years ago are not effective for today's complex families and…

  17. GBA2-encoded β-glucosidase activity is involved in the inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Loberto

    Full Text Available Current anti-inflammatory strategies for the treatment of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF are limited; thus, there is continued interest in identifying additional molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Given the emerging role of sphingolipids (SLs in various respiratory disorders, including CF, drugs that selectively target the enzymes associated with SL metabolism are under development. Miglustat, a well-characterized iminosugar-based inhibitor of β-glucosidase 2 (GBA2, has shown promise in CF treatment because it reduces the inflammatory response to infection by P. aeruginosa and restores F508del-CFTR chloride channel activity. This study aimed to probe the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory activity of miglustat by examining specifically the role of GBA2 following the infection of CF bronchial epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa. We also report the anti-inflammatory activity of another potent inhibitor of GBA2 activity, namely N-(5-adamantane-1-yl-methoxypentyl-deoxynojirimycin (Genz-529648. In CF bronchial cells, inhibition of GBA2 by miglustat or Genz-529648 significantly reduced the induction of IL-8 mRNA levels and protein release following infection by P. aeruginosa. Hence, the present data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of miglustat and Genz-529648 are likely exerted through inhibition of GBA2.

  18. Dexamethasone enhances necrosis-like neuronal death in ischemic rat hippocampus involving μ-calpain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia (TFI) leads to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell death which is aggravated by glucocorticoids (GC). It is unknown how GC affect apoptosis and necrosis in cerebral ischemia. We therefore investigated the co-localization of activated caspase-3 (casp-3) with apoptosis- and ...

  19. Activation of hepatic lipase expression by oleic acid: possible involvement of USF1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Deursen (Diederik); M. van Leeuwen (Marije); D. Akdogan (Deniz); H. Adams (Hadie); H. Jansen (Hans); A.J.M. Verhoeven (Adrie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPolyunsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression mainly through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), but how monounsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression is poorly understood. In HepG2 cells, oleate supplemen

  20. School-based extracurricular activity involvement and adolescent self-esteem: a growth-curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A; Hagewen, Kellie J

    2011-05-01

    Research on adolescent self-esteem indicates that adolescence is a time in which individuals experience important changes in their physical, cognitive, and social identities. Prior research suggests that there is a positive relationship between an adolescent's participation in structured extracurricular activities and well-being in a variety of domains, and some research indicates that these relationships may be dependent on the type of activities in which adolescents participate. Building on previous research, a growth-curve analysis was utilized to examine self-esteem trajectories from adolescence (age 14) to young adulthood (age 26). Using 3 waves of data from National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 5,399; 47.8% male), the analysis estimated a hierarchical growth-curve model emphasizing the effects of age and type of school-based extracurricular activity portfolio, including sports and school clubs, on self-esteem. The results indicated that age had a linear relationship with self-esteem over time. Changes in both the initial level of self-esteem and the growth of self-esteem over time were significantly influenced by the type of extracurricular activity portfolio. The findings were consistent across race and sex. The results support the utility of examining the longitudinal impact of portfolio type on well-being outcomes.

  1. School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.; Hagewen, Kellie J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on adolescent self-esteem indicates that adolescence is a time in which individuals experience important changes in their physical, cognitive, and social identities. Prior research suggests that there is a positive relationship between an adolescent's participation in structured extracurricular activities and well-being in a variety of…

  2. The Development of Spatial Skills through Interventions Involving Block Building Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Beth M.; Andrews, Nicole; Schindler, Holly; Kersh, Joanne E.; Samper, Alexandra; Copley, Juanita

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of block-building interventions to develop spatial-reasoning skills in kindergartners. Two intervention conditions and a control condition were included to determine, first, whether the block building activities themselves benefited children's spatial skills, and secondly, whether a story context further improved…

  3. In vitro activity of aminosterols against yeasts involved in blood stream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhanout, Kamel; Djouhri, Lamia; Vidal, Nicolas; Brunel, Jean Michel; Piarroux, Renaud; Ranque, Stéphane

    2011-02-01

    Squalamine and other aminosterols have demonstrated interesting antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial isolates and a limited number of reference yeast strains. We aimed to test whether squalamine and a synthetic aminosterol derivative (ASD) display any in vitro activity comparable to currently available systemic antifungals, an acceptable safety index, as well as to provide insights into their mechanism of action. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of squalamine, ASD and available antifungals were determined against 21 yeast isolates that were recovered from cases of fungemia. Remarkably, homogeneous MICs ranging from 8-16 mg/L and from 1-2 mg/L were noted for squalamine and ASD, respectively, as opposes the heterogeneous in vitro activity of available systemic antifungals. Aminosterols induced haemolysis, a surrogate for toxic effects to mammalian cells, at concentrations high above their MICs. In time-kill studies, killing was as fast with ASD as with amphotericin B. Both aminosterols induced a time-dependent disruption of yeast membrane, as evidenced by gradual increase of ATP efflux. In conclusion, our preliminary data indicate that aminosterols have the potential to be further developed as antifungals. Additional work is warranted to assess their toxicity and activity in experimental models.

  4. Ethanol Effects Involve Non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response Activation in Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Tapia, Elisabet; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved intracellular signaling pathway that controls transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis related genes. Ethanol stress has been recently described as an activator of the UPR response in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but very little is known about the causes of this activation. Although some authors ensure that the UPR is triggered by the unfolded proteins generated by ethanol in the cell, there are studies which demonstrate that protein denaturation occurs at higher ethanol concentrations than those used to trigger the UPR. Here, we studied UPR after ethanol stress by three different approaches and we concluded that unfolded proteins do not accumulate in the ER under. We also ruled out inositol depletion as an alternative mechanism to activate the UPR under ethanol stress discarding that ethanol effects on the cell decreased inositol levels by different methods. All these data suggest that ethanol, at relatively low concentrations, does not cause unfolded proteins in the yeasts and UPR activation is likely due to other unknown mechanism related with a restructuring of ER membrane due to the effect of ethanol. PMID:28326077

  5. The amrG1 gene is involved in the activation of acetate in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN; Hong; R.; Gerstmeir; S.; Schnicke; B.J.; Eikmanns

    2005-01-01

    During growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum on acetate as its carbon and energy source, the expression of the pta-ack operon is induced, coding for the acetate-activating enzymes, which are phosphotransacetylase (PTA) and acetate kinase (AK). By transposon rescue, we identified the two genes amrG1 and amrG2 found in the deregulated transposon mutant C. glutamicum G25. The amrG1 gene (NCBI-accession: AF532964) has a size of 732 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 243 amino acids and apparently is partially responsible for the regulation of acetate metabolism in C. glutamicum. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutant and an overexpressing strain of amrG1 in the C. glutamicum ATCC13032 wildtype. The strains were then analyzed with respect to their enzyme activities of PTA and AK during growth on glucose, acetate and glucose or acetate alone as carbon sources. Compared to the parental strain, the amrG1 deletion mutant showed higher specific AK and PTA activities during growth on glucose but showed the same high specific activities of AK and PTA on medium containing acetate plus glucose and on medium containing acetate. In contrast to the gene deletion, overexpression of the amrG1 gene in C. glutamicum 13032 had the adverse regulatory effect. These results indicate that the amrG1 gene encodes a repressor or co-repressor of the pta-ack operon.

  6. School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.; Hagewen, Kellie J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on adolescent self-esteem indicates that adolescence is a time in which individuals experience important changes in their physical, cognitive, and social identities. Prior research suggests that there is a positive relationship between an adolescent's participation in structured extracurricular activities and well-being in a variety of…

  7. Marketing Informal Education Institutions in Israel: The Centrality of Customers' Active Involvement in Service Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2004-01-01

    The current paper outlines a unique marketing perspective that prevails in some informal education institutions in Israel parallel with "traditional modes of marketing", such as promotion, public relations and the like. Based on a case study research in five community centres, a service development based on active participation of the…

  8. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which basal ganglia neurons express acquired activities during and after behavioral learning, selective dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists were applied while recording the activity of striatal neurons in monkeys performing behavioral tasks. In experiment 1, a monkey was trained to associate a click sound with a drop of reward water. DA receptor antagonists were administered by micropressure using a stainless steel injection cannula (300 microm ID) through which a Teflon-coated tungsten wire for recording neuronal activity had been threaded. Responses to sound by tonically active neurons (TANs), a class of neurons in the primate striatum, were recorded through a tungsten wire electrode during the application of either D1- or D2-class DA receptor antagonists (total volume one of the surrounding barrels. SCH23390 (10 mM, pH 4.5) and (-)-sulpiride (10 mM, pH 4.5) were used. The effects of iontophoresis of both D1- and D2-class antagonists were examined in 40 TANs. Of 40 TANs from which recordings were made, responses were suppressed exclusively by the D2-class antagonist in 19 TANs, exclusively by the D1-class antagonist in 3 TANs, and by both D1- and D2-class antagonists in 7 TANs. When 0.9% NaCl, saline, was applied by pressure (<1 microl) or by iontophoresis (<30 nA) as a control, neither the background discharge rates nor the responses of TANs were significantly influenced. Background discharge rate of TANs was also not affected by D1- or D2-class antagonists applied by either micropressure injection or iontophoresis. It was concluded that the nigrostriatal DA system enables TANs to express learned activity primarily through D2-class and partly through D1-class receptor-mediated mechanisms in the striatum.

  9. Oncogene activation in human benign tumors of the skin (keratoacanthomas): Is HRAS involved in differentiation as well as proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corominas, M.; Kamino, Hideko; Leon, J.; Pellicer, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-08-01

    In vitro DNA amplification followed by oligonucleotide mismatch hybridization was used to study the frequency of HRAS mutations in the benign self-regressing skin tumors keratoacanthomas and in squamous cell carcinomas. The authors used freshly obtained keratoacanthomas as well as Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from both types of tumors. DNA from 50 samples of each tumor type was analyzed for activating mutations involving codons 12 and 61. A relatively high percentage (30%) of HRAS mutations was found in the keratoacanthomas compared with 13% in the squamous cell carcinomas. The most frequent mutation identified is the A{center dot}T-to-T{center dot}A transversion in the second position of codon 61. The present findings demonstrate the involvement of the HRAS oncogene in human benign tumors. Moreover, they indicate that an activated HRAS oncogene is not sufficient to maintain a neoplastic phenotype and argue against a role of HRAS in the progression of skin tumorigenesis.

  10. Involvement of activation of NADPH oxidase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in renal cell injury induced by zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yoshiko; Kawai, Yoshiko; Kohda, Yuka; Gemba, Munekazu

    2005-05-01

    Zinc is employed as a supplement; however, zinc-related nephropathy is not generally known. In this study, we investigated zinc-induced renal cell injury using a pig kidney-derived cultured renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK(1), with proximal kidney tubule-like features, and examined the involvement of free radicals and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the cell injury. The LLC-PK(1) cells showed early uptake of zinc (30 microM), and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an index of cell injury, was observed 24 hr after uptake. Three hours after zinc exposure, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased. An antioxidant, N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPPD), inhibited a zinc-related increase in ROS generation and zinc-induced renal cell injury. An NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), inhibited a zinc-related increase in ROS generation and cell injury. We investigated translocation from the cytosol fraction of the p67(phox) subunit, which is involved in the activation of NADPH oxidase, to the membrane fraction, and translocation was induced 3 hr after zinc exposure. We examined the involvement of ERK1/2 in the deterioration of zinc-induced renal cell injury, and the association between ERK1/2 and an increase in ROS generation. Six hours after zinc exposure, the activation (phosphorylation) of ERK1/2 was observed. An antioxidant, DPPD, inhibited the zinc-related activation of ERK1/2. An MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) inhibitor, U0126, almost completely inhibited zinc-related cell injury (the release of LDH), but did not influence ROS generation. These results suggest that early intracellular uptake of zinc by LLC-PK(1) cells causes the activation of NADPH oxidase, and that ROS generation by the activation of the enzyme leads to the deterioration of renal cell injury via the activation of ERK1/2.

  11. QUANTITATIVE STUDY ON THE INVOLVEMENT OF BRICOLAGE COMPANIES IN SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai-Cosmin FANARU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the influence of social responsibility actions of the main bricolage companies doing business in Romania on their value, and mutually the impact these activities have on various social sectors. CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility is a concept related to the contribution that companies need to have to the development of modern society. Over time, this contribution has been theorized by many different schools of thought. "Responsible" initiatives of companies have been named by a variety of terms: corporate citizenship, corporate philanthropy, corporate societal marketing, community affairs, community development etc. Consequently, currently, to demonstrate that it is "socially responsible", a company must understand the principles of CSR that are internationally promoted and regularly report about the integration of these principles in its activities.

  12. QUANTITATIVE STUDY ON THE INVOLVEMENT OF BRICOLAGE COMPANIES IN SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai-Cosmin FANARU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the influence of social responsibility actions of the main bricolage companies doing business in Romania on their value, and mutually the impact these activities have on various social sectors. CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility is a concept related to the contribution that companies need to have to the development of modern society. Over time, this contribution has been theorized by many different schools of thought. "Responsible" initiatives of companies have been named by a variety of terms: corporate citizenship, corporate philanthropy, corporate societal marketing, community affairs, community development etc. Consequently, currently, to demonstrate that it is "socially responsible", a company must understand the principles of CSR that are internationally promoted and regularly report about the integration of these principles in its activities.

  13. Isolation of a gene that is involved in Campylobacter jejuni 81116 cytotoxin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiyan; Fry, Benjamin N; Coloe, Peter J

    2007-02-01

    Cytotoxin fractions were isolated from Campylobacter jejuni 81116 and semi-purified by size-exclusion liquid chromatography. The fraction showing the strongest toxicity was injected into mice to produce antiserum. The antiserum was used to screen a C. jejuni 81116 cosmid library. Nine genes were identified in overlapping cosmid inserts that induced reactivity with the antiserum. One of these genes showed high similarity to a periplasmic protein of unknown function and its isogenic mutant showed decreased toxicity compared to the C. jejuni 81116 wild type. This gene contains a Gram-negative bacterial RTX toxin-activating protein C signature, which suggests it may play a role in C. jejuni 81116 cytotoxin activation.

  14. Sexual attitudes and activities in women with borderline personality disorder involved in romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Sébastien; Godbout, Natacha; Sabourin, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Women with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) are prone to have sexual relationship difficulties and dysfunctional attitudes toward sexuality. A sample of 34 heterosexual couples composed of women meeting BPD criteria was compared to a sample of dating or married women from the general population. A short form of the Sexual Activities and Attitudes Questionnaire (SAAQ) was used to measure six types of sexual attitudes. Women diagnosed with BPD did not differ from controls on the frequency of three types of sexual activities in the last year but their subjective sexual experiences differed: they showed stronger negative attitudes, felt sexually pressured by their partners, and expressed ambivalence toward sexuality. Regression analyses suggest that anxious attachment mediates the association between BPD and feeling pressured to engage in sex.

  15. Factors involved in the regulation of a ligninase activity in Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faison, B.D.; Kikr, T.K.

    1985-02-01

    The regulation of an H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-dependent ligninolytic activity was examined in the wood decay fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The ligninase appears in cultures upon limitation of nitrogen or carbohydrate and is suppressed by excess nutrients, by cycloheximide, or by culture agitation. Activity is increased by idiophasic exposure of cultures to 100% O/sub 2/. Elevated levels of ligninase and in some cases, of extracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production are detected after brief incubation of cultures with lignins or lignin substructure models, with the secondary metabolite veratryl alcohol, or with other related compounds. It is concluded that lignin degradation (lignin to CO/sub 2/) by this organism is regulated in part at the level of the ligninase, which is apparently inducible by its substrates or their degradation products. 29 references.

  16. An Initial Investigation of Sexual Minority Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Toomey, Russell B.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual minority youth are at risk for negative school-based experiences and poor academic outcomes. Yet, little is known about their experiences in positive school-based contexts. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1,214 sexual minority and 11,427 heterosexual participants), this study compared participation rates in, predictors of, and outcomes associated with three types of school-based extracurricular activities - sports, arts, and school clubs - by sexual orientat...

  17. 'Co-active coaching' could help HIV patients. New type of counseling involves goal-setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, M; Blumenthal, E

    2001-08-01

    A counseling technique that takes an action-oriented approach to helping people make major life changes, much used by business executives and other professionals in recent years, now appears to offer some value to HIV patients. Co-active coaching could be a solution to mild depression and inertia for some HIV-infected patients who have difficulty making decisions about how to spend a life-time living with the disease.

  18. Involvements of chloride ion in decolorization of Acid Orange 7 by activated peroxydisulfate or peroxymonosulfate oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wang; Shiying Yang; Liang Shan; Rui Niu; Xueting Shao

    2011-01-01

    The effects of chloride anion (C1-) (up to 1.0 mol/L) on the decolorization of a model compound,azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7),by sulfate radical (SO4-*) based-peroxydisulfate (PS) or peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation under various activated conditions (UV254 nm/PS,Thermal (70℃/PS,UV254 nm/PMS,Co2+/PMS) were investigated.Methanol and NH4+ were used as quenching reagents to determine the contributions of active chlorine species (dichloride radical (Cl2-*) and hypochlorous acid (HClO)).The results indicated that the effects of Cl- on the reaction mechanism were different under various activated conditions.For UV/PS and Thermal/PS,the inhibition tendency became more clear as the Cl-concentration increased,probably due to the reaction between Cl- and SO4-* and the generation of Cl2-* or HClO.For UV/PMS,Cl- did not exhibit inhibition when the concentration was below 0.1 mol/L.As Cl-concentration reached to 1.0 mol/L,the decolorization rate of AO7 was,however,accelerated,possibly because PMS directly reacts with C1- to form HC1O.For Co2+/PMS,Cl- exhibited a significant inhibiting effect even at low concentration (≤ 0.01 mol/L).When Cl- concentration exceeded 0.1 mol/L,the activation of PMS by Co2+ was almost completely inhibited.Under this condition,HClO maybe played a major role in decolorization of AO7.The results implicated that chloride ion is an important factor in SO4-*-based degradation of organic contamination in chloride-containing water.

  19. Studies on the biotin-binding site of avidin. Tryptophan residues involved in the active site.

    OpenAIRE

    Gitlin, G; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1988-01-01

    Egg-white avidin was modified with the tryptophan-specific reagent 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide. The complete loss of biotin-binding activity was achieved upon modification of an average of one tryptophan residue per avidin subunit. The identity of the modified residues was determined by isolating the relevant tryptic and chymotryptic peptides from CNBr-cleaved avidin fragments. The results demonstrate that Trp-70 and Trp-110 are modified in approximately equivalent proportions. It is beli...

  20. Effects of three types of physical activity on reduction of metabolic parameters involved in cardiovascular risk

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović-Oggiano Gordana; Damjanov Vlasta; Vučić Vesna; Debeljak-Martačić Jasmina; Pavlović Mirjana; Glibetić Marija

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of three different types of physical activity on reduction of the metabolic parameters mainly responsible for cardiovascular diseases. This prospective-intervention study was performed at the 'ČIGOTA' Thyroid Institute on Mt. Zlatibor (Serbia) between August 2004 and June 2006. Sixty-eight overweight/obese patients aged 40-70 years with hyperlipidemia were divided into three groups according to their weight and overall health. The progra...

  1. Administrator Interest is Perceived to Encourage Faculty and Librarian Involvement in Open Access Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Eamon C. Tewell

    2014-01-01

    A Review of: Reinsfelder, T.L., & Anderson, J.A. (2013). Observations and perceptions of academic administrator influence on open access initiatives. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 39(6): 481-487. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2013.08.014 Abstract Objective – To better understand the roles and influence of senior-level academic administrators, such as provosts, on open access (OA) activities at the institutional level, including whether librarians perform these activit...

  2. Estrogen receptor-mediated transcription involves the activation of multiple kinase pathways in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sara; Rainville, Jennifer; Zhao, Xing; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Pfaff, Donald; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    While many physiological effects of estrogens (E) are due to regulation of gene transcription by liganded estrogen receptors (ERs), several effects are also mediated, at least in part, by rapid non-genomic actions of E. Though the relative importance of rapid versus genomic effects in the central nervous system is controversial, we showed previously that membrane-limited effects of E, initiated by an estradiol bovine serum albumin conjugate (E2-BSA), could potentiate transcriptional effects of 17β-estradiol from an estrogen response element (ERE)-reporter in neuroblastoma cells. Here, using specific inhibitors and activators in a pharmacological approach, we show that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, dependent on a Gαq coupled receptor signaling are important in this transcriptional potentiation. We further demonstrate, using ERα phospho-deficient mutants, that E2-BSA mediated phosphorylation of ERα is one mechanism to potentiate transcription from an ERE reporter construct. This study provides a possible mechanism by which signaling from the membrane is coupled to transcription in the nucleus, providing an integrated view of hormone signaling in the brain.

  3. Involvement of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkawy, Ahmed H; Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Morris, David L

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there are several studies supporting the role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system in cancer. The association of uPA to its receptor triggers the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. This process is regulated by the uPA inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2). Plasmin promotes degradation of basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM) components as well as activation of ECM latent matrix metalloproteases. Degradation and remodeling of the surrounding tissues is crucial in the early steps of tumor progression by facilitating expansion of the tumor mass, release of tumor growth factors, activation of cytokines as well as induction of tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Hence, many tumors showed a correlation between uPA system component levels and tumor aggressiveness and survival. Therefore, this review summarizes the structure of the uPA system, its contribution to cancer progression, and the clinical relevance of uPA family members in cancer diagnosis. In addition, the review evaluates the significance of uPA system in the development of cancer-targeted therapies.

  4. Involvement of Activated Cdc42 Kinase1 in Colitis and Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chaolan; Zhao, Xinmei; Gu, Hongxiang; Huang, Liyun; Zhou, Sanxi; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-12-07

    BACKGROUND Activated Cdc42 kinase1 (ACK1) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase which is critical for cell survival, proliferation, and migration. Genomic amplification of ACK1 has been reported in multiple human cancers. We aimed to investigate ACK1 protein expression in colorectal mucosa with inflammation and neoplasm, and to evaluate its correlation with disease activity and severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 250 individuals who underwent total colonoscopy were collected randomly from January 2007 to May 2013 in Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, China. Colorectal mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained by endoscopy from 78 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 22 with Crohn's disease (CD), 20 with infectious colitis, 26 with non-IBD and noninfectious colitis, 16 with sporadic adenomas, 4 with dysplasia-associated lesions or masses, 10 with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), 4 with UC-related CRC, 10 with hyperplastic polyps, and 60 without colonic abnormalities. ACK1 protein levels were determined immunohistochemically. The correlations of ACK1 expression with disease activity and severity were also evaluated. RESULTS Significantly increased ACK1 expression was observed in epithelial cells of colorectal mucosa with inflammation and dysplasia compared to controls (P0.05). CONCLUSIONS ACK1 protein is increased extensively in colitis and colorectal dysplasia. ACK1 overexpression may play a role in colorectal inflammation and neoplasms.

  5. Production of lysophosphatidic acid in blister fluid: involvement of a lysophospholipase D activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Gres, Sandra; Fanguin, Madie; Cariven, Clotilde; Fauvel, Josette; Perret, Bertrand; Chap, Hugues; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien

    2005-09-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is present in abundance in serum resulting from platelet activation and is also found in other biological fluids. LPA controls numerous cellular responses and plays a role in specific functions such as wound healing, especially in the skin. Nevertheless, its presence in the skin has never been investigated. Since re-epithelialization occurs after blister rupture, we tested the presence of endogenous LPA in blister fluid and investigated a possible mechanism for its biosynthesis and biological functions. Using a radioenzymatic assay, LPA was detected in 33 blister fluids originating from 24 bullous dermatoses, and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In parallel, blister fluids contained a lysophospholipase D (LPLD) activity but no detectable phospholipase A2 activity. The expressions of the LPLD autotaxin (ATX) and of LPA1-receptor (LPA1-R) were greatly increased in blister skin when compared with normal skin. Finally, LPA was found to have a positive effect on the migration of cultured keratinocytes. These results show that LPA is present in blister fluid synthesized by the LPLD ATX. Due to its ability to enhance keratinocyte migration, LPA in blister fluid could, via the LPA1-R, play an important role in re-epithelialization occurring after blister rupture.

  6. Involvement of Fungal Pectin Methylesterase Activity in the Interaction Between Fusarium graminearum and Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, Luca; Castiglioni, Carla; Paccanaro, Maria Chiara; Janni, Michela; Schäfer, Wilhelm; D'Ovidio, Renato; Favaron, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The genome of Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight of wheat, contains two putative pectin methylesterase (PME)-encoding genes. However, when grown in liquid culture containing pectin, F. graminearum produces only a single PME, which was purified and identified. Its encoding gene, expressed during wheat spike infection, was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. Two Δpme mutant strains lacked PME activity but were still able to grow on highly methyl-esterified pectin even though their polygalacturonase (PG) activity showed a reduced capacity to depolymerize this substrate. The enzymatic assays performed with purified F. graminearum PG and PME demonstrated an increase in PG activity in the presence of PME on highly methyl-esterified pectin. The virulence of the mutant strains was tested on Triticum aestivum and Triticum durum spikes, and a significant reduction in the percentage of symptomatic spikelets was observed between 7 and 12 days postinfection compared with wild type, demonstrating that the F. graminearum PME contributes to fungal virulence on wheat by promoting spike colonization in the initial and middle stages of infection. In contrast, transgenic wheat plants with increased levels of pectin methyl esterification did not show any increase in resistance to the Δpme mutant, indicating that the infectivity of the fungus relies only to a certain degree on pectin degradation.

  7. Expression and activation of Daphnia pulex Caspase-3 are involved in regulation of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qiaoqiong; Zhang, Mengmeng; Cao, Xiao; Xu, Shanliang; Wang, Danli; Zhao, Yunlong

    2017-11-15

    Death-mediating proteases such as Caspases have been implicated in aging. Remarkably, active Caspase-3 can trigger widespread damage and degeneration, playing a key role in causing cell death. In order to explore the relationship between Caspase-3 and aging in Daphnia pulex, we cloned and analyzed the full-length cDNA sequence of its Caspase-3 gene. Both mRNA expression and activity of D. pulex Caspase-3 increased with age. Moreover, different forms of Caspase-3 appeared with aging. The expression of casp3-L was higher and decreased with age, while that of casp3-S was weak and increased with age, consistent with the trend in Caspase-3 activity. Mhc mRNA expression declined over time and was negatively correlated with age and Caspase-3. In situ hybridization results showed that Caspase-3 mRNA was expressed in different growth and reproduction stages, and its expression levels in embryos and larva were lower than that in adult D. pulex. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of Caspase-3 in the form of zymogens with a molecular weight of ~36kDa. Overall, this study explored age-associated gene regulation to provide a basis for the molecular mechanism of D. pulex reproductive conversion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relations of proliferative activities of gastric carcinoma cells to lymphatic involvement, venous invasion and prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴云飞; 徐惠绵; 陈峻青

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was to evaluate bivariate bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd)/DNA flow cytometric analysis in detection of gastric carcinoma and to study the relations of cellular BrdUrd labeling indices (LI), G2/M-phase fraction(G2/MPF) and DNA ploidy pattern to lymphatic involvement, venous invasion and prognosis.Methods Fresh tumor samples from 60 patients with gastric carcinoma were analyzed by bivariate BrdUrd/DNA flow cytometry. The results were correlated with lymphatic vessel invasion, lymphatic node metastasis, the number of matastatic lymphatic nodes, and venous invasion. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a fluorescent probe for total cellular DNA, and a monoclonal antibody against BrdUrd was used as a probe for BrdUrd incorporated into DNA. Fluorescent-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was used as a second antibody. S-phase fractions were measured by in vitro BrdUrd labeling, and DNA ploidy and G2/MPF were also measured. Comparison of survival was performed with the log-rank test, the Chi-square test for qualitative data, and Student's t test for quantu data. Results BrdUrd LI and G2/MPF values were significantly higher in tumors with lymphatic vessel invasion than in those without invasion respectively (P<0.01); the patients who had tumors with lymphatic vessel invasion showed a significantly poor prognosis (P<0.01). Both BrdUrd LI and G2/MPF values were significantly higher in tumors with lymphatic node metastasis than in those without metastasis (P<0.01). A statistical significant difference was noted in the 5-year survival rates between the patients with lymph node metastasis and those without metastasis. Compared with diploid carcinoma, the incidence of lymph node metastasis was significantly higher in aneuploid carcinoma (P<0.05), and the patients with aneuploid carcinoma showed a significantly poor prognosis (P<0.05). BrdUrd LI was significantly higher in patients with more than 5 metastatic lymph nodes than those with 1-4 metastatic lymph nodes (P<0

  9. Using sculpturing during speech therapy sessions in order to involve a child with ASD in joint activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova L.I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders often have particular hardships in participating in joint activities with an adult. This makes interventions more problematic and draws back the achievement of planned educational goals. At the early stages of speech therapy, the important goal of individual sessions with the majority of children with autism spectrum disorders is not speech development in itself but developing motivation for joint activities. To ensure successful interaction between an educator and a child, different techniques can be used, including those that are not typical for speech therapy sessions, for example, sculpturing as a preferred activity with enjoyable sensory input. The article describes tips for developing rapport with children with autistic disorders, and a strategy for involving them in joint activities and further development of their speech.

  10. Involvement of glutamate 97 in ion influx through photo-activated channelrhodopsin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Saki; Sugiyama, Yuka; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu

    2013-01-01

    The light absorption of a channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is followed by conformational changes to the molecule, which allows the channel structure to become permeable to cations. Previously, a single point mutation in ChR2, which replaces glutamate residue 97 with a nonpolar alanine (E97A), was found to attenuate the photocurrent, suggesting that the E97 residue is involved in ion flux regulation. Here, the significance of E97 and its counterpart ChR1 (E136) were extensively studied by mutagenesis, whereby we replaced these glutamates with aspartate (D), glutamine (Q) or arginine (R). We found that the charge at this position strongly influences ion permeation and that the photocurrents were attenuated in the order of ChR2>E97D≈E97Q>E97R. We observed similar results with our chimeric/synthetic/artificial construct, ChR-wide receiver (ChRWR), which contains the first to fifth transmembrane helices of ChR1. The E-to-Q or E-to-R mutations, but not the E-to-D mutation, strongly retarded the sensitivity to the Gd(3+)-dependent blocking of the ChR1 or ChR2 channels. Our results suggest that the glutamate residue at this position lies in the outer pore, where it interacts with a cation to facilitate dehydration, and that this residue is the primary binding target of Gd(3+).

  11. The gastroprotective effect of menthol: involvement of anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Leite Rozza

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg or menthol (50 mg/kg and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70 and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, glutathione reductase (GR and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  12. The gastroprotective effect of menthol: involvement of anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozza, Ariane Leite; Meira de Faria, Felipe; Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg) or menthol (50 mg/kg) and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  13. Spiroketal formation and modification in avermectin biosynthesis involves a dual activity of AveC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Zhao, Qunfei; Yu, Futao; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhuhua; Wang, Yinyan; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Wen

    2013-01-30

    Avermectins (AVEs), which are widely used for the treatment of agricultural parasitic diseases, belong to a family of 6,6-spiroketal moiety-containing, macrolide natural products. AVE biosynthesis is known to employ a type I polyketide synthase (PKS) system to assemble the molecular skeleton for further functionalization. It remains unknown how and when spiroketal formation proceeds, particularly regarding the role of AveC, a unique protein in the pathway that shares no sequence homology to any enzyme of known function. Here, we report the unprecedented, dual function of AveC by correlating its activity with spiroketal formation and modification during the AVE biosynthetic process. The findings in this study were supported by characterizing extremely unstable intermediates, products and their spontaneous derivative products from the simplified chemical profile and by comparative analysis of in vitro biotransformations and in vivo complementations mediated by AveC and MeiC (the counterpart in biosynthesizing the naturally occurring, AVE-like meilingmycins). AveC catalyzes the stereospecific spiroketalization of a dihydroxy-ketone polyketide intermediate and the optional dehydration to determine the regiospecific saturation characteristics of spiroketal diversity. These reactions take place between the closures of the hexene ring and 16-membered macrolide and the formation of the hexahydrobenzofuran unit. MeiC can replace the spirocyclase activity of AveC, but it lacks the independent dehydratase activity. Elucidation of the generality and specificity of AveC-type proteins allows for the rationalization of previously published results that were not completely understood, suggesting that enzyme-mediated spiroketal formation was initially underestimated, but is, in fact, widespread in nature for the control of stereoselectivity.

  14. Regulation of ERK1/2 activity by ghrelin-activated growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1A involves a PLC/PKCɛ pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseaux, Delphine; Le Gallic, Lionel; Ryan, Joanne; Oiry, Catherine; Gagne, Didier; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a) is a G-protein coupled receptor, involved in the biological actions of ghrelin by triggering inositol phosphates and calcium intracellular second messengers. It has also been reported that ghrelin could activate the 44- and 42-kDa extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2) in different cell lines, but it is not clear whether this regulation is GHSR-1a dependent or not. To provide direct evidence for the coupling of GHSR-1a to ERK1/2 activation, this pathway has been studied in a heterologous expression system. Thus, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells we showed that ghrelin induced, via the human GHSR-1a, a transient and dose-dep endent activation of ERK1/2 leading to activation of the transcriptional factor Elk1. We then investigated the precise mechanisms involved in GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation using various specific inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants and found that internalization of GHSR-1a was not necessary. Our results also indicate that phospholipase C (PLC) was involved in GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation, however, pathways like tyrosine kinases, including Src, and phosphoinositide 3-kinases were not found to be involved. GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation was abolished both by a general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, Gö6983, and by PKC depletion using overnight pretreatment with phorbol ester. Moreover, the calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, and the inhibitor of conventional PKCs, Gö6976, had no effect on the GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation, suggesting the involvement of novel PKC isoforms (ɛ, δ), but not conventional or atypical PKCs. Further analyses suggest that PKCɛ is required for the activation of ERK1/2. Taken together, these data suggest that ghrelin, through GHSR-1a, activates the Elk1 transcriptional factor and ERK1/2 by a PLC- and PKCɛ-dependent pathway. PMID:16582936

  15. Adolescent pathways to adulthood drinking: sport activity involvement is not necessarily risky or protective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Stephen C; Vida, Mina; Eccles, Jacquelynne S

    2008-05-01

    Use pattern-centered methods to examine how adolescents' alcohol use and sports activities are related both to childhood sport and problem behavior and to heavy drinking in early adulthood. The data used in this study come from four waves of the Michigan Study of Adolescent Life Transitions (MSALT) that began in 1983, when participants were approximately age 12, and continued into early adulthood, when participants were approximately age 28. Sixty per cent of the approximately 1000 MSALT youth living in south-eastern Michigan were females and 97% were European American. Approximately 28% of one or both parents held at least a college degree, and 45% held a high school diploma or lower. Pattern-centered analyses revealed that the relation between adolescent sport activity and age 28 heavy alcohol use obtained primarily for sport participants who were also using more than the average amount of alcohol and other drugs at age 18. Similarly, children who were characterized by relatively high levels of sport participation, aggression and other problem behavior at age 12 were more likely than expected by chance to become sport participants who used more than the average amount of alcohol and other drugs at age 18. The results indicate that childhood problem behavior and adolescent sport participation can, but do not necessarily, presage heavy drinking in adulthood and that pattern-centered analytical techniques are useful for revealing such theoretically generated predictions.

  16. Acclimation of microalgae to wastewater environments involves increased oxidative stress tolerance activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osundeko, Olumayowa; Dean, Andrew P; Davies, Helena; Pittman, Jon K

    2014-10-01

    A wastewater environment can be particularly toxic to eukaryotic microalgae. Microalgae can adapt to these conditions but the specific mechanisms that allow strains to tolerate wastewater environments are unclear. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the ability to acclimate microalgae to tolerate wastewater is an innate or species-specific characteristic. Six different species of microalgae (Chlamydomonas debaryana, Chlorella luteoviridis, Chlorella vulgaris, Desmodesmus intermedius, Hindakia tetrachotoma and Parachlorella kessleri) that had never previously been exposed to wastewater conditions were acclimated over an 8-week period in secondary-treated municipal wastewater. With the exception of C. debaryana, acclimation to wastewater resulted in significantly higher growth rate and biomass productivity. With the exception of C. vulgaris, total chlorophyll content was significantly increased in all acclimated strains, while all acclimated strains showed significantly increased photosynthetic activity. The ability of strains to acclimate was species-specific, with two species, C. luteoviridis and P. kessleri, able to acclimate more efficiently to the stress than C. debaryana and D. intermedius. Metabolic fingerprinting of the acclimated and non-acclimated microalgae using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was able to differentiate strains on the basis of metabolic responses to the stress. In particular, strains exhibiting greater stress response and altered accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates could be distinguished. The acclimation to wastewater tolerance was correlated with higher accumulation of carotenoid pigments and increased ascorbate peroxidase activity.

  17. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving MTORC2 Signaling Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhifeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Wang, Ying; Ren, Jiafa; Dai, Yifan; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies showed the correlation between the deficiency of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), however, the role and mechanisms for n-3 PUFAs in protecting against kidney fibrosis remain obscure. In this study, NRK-49F cells, a rat kidney interstitial fibroblast cell line, were stimulated with TGFβ1. A Caenorhabditis elegans fat-1 transgenic mouse model in which n-3 PUFAs are endogenously produced from n-6 PUFAs owing to the expression of n-3 fatty acid desaturase were deployed. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one member of n-3 PUFAs family, could suppress TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation at a dose and time dependent manner. Additionally, DHA could largely inhibit TGFβ1-stimulated Akt but not S6 or Smad3 phosphorylation at a time dependent manner. To decipher the role for n-3 PUFAs in protecting against kidney fibrosis, fat-1 transgenic mice were operated with unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO). Compared to the wild types, fat-1 transgenics developed much less kidney fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation accompanied by less p-Akt (Ser473), p-Akt (Thr308), p-S6 and p-Smad3 in kidney tissues at day 7 after UUO. Thus, n-3 PUFAs can attenuate fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis, which may be associated with the inhibition of mTORC2 signaling. PMID:28393852

  18. Effects of three types of physical activity on reduction of metabolic parameters involved in cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović-Oggiano Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of three different types of physical activity on reduction of the metabolic parameters mainly responsible for cardiovascular diseases. This prospective-intervention study was performed at the 'ČIGOTA' Thyroid Institute on Mt. Zlatibor (Serbia between August 2004 and June 2006. Sixty-eight overweight/obese patients aged 40-70 years with hyperlipidemia were divided into three groups according to their weight and overall health. The program of physical workout included: group I - fast walking; group II - gymnastic exercises and specially chosen exercises in the swimming pool; and group III - combined physical training of higher intensity and greater length. All patients were also on a special reduced diet of 1000 kcal per day, the AHA step-2 diet. We monitored the body mass index, body composition, glucose, cholesterol (total, LDL-, and HDL-, and triglycerides before, during, and after the intervention. After 2 and particularly 12 weeks of intervention, a significant improvement of all metabolic parameters was achieved in all three groups of patients. Although most patients completed the study with normal values of all parameters, the most desirable results were achieved in group III (combined exercises with an average energy expenditure of 900 kcal per day. Our research indicates that a specially conceived program of physical activity and diet intervention resulted in significant reduction of cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. GM1 ganglioside is involved in epigenetic activation loci of neuronal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Tzang; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yu, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids that are most abundant in the nerve tissues. The quantity and expression pattern of gangliosides in brain change drastically throughout development and are mainly regulated through stage-specific expression of glycosyltransferase (ganglioside synthase) genes. We previously demonstrated that acetylation of histones H3 and H4 on the N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase I (GalNAcT, GA2/GM2/GD2/GT2-synthase) gene promoter resulted in recruitment of trans-activation factors. In addition, we reported that epigenetic activation of the GalNAcT gene was also detected as accompanied by an apparent induction of neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells responding to an exogenous supplement of ganglioside GM1. Here, we present evidence supporting the concept that nuclear GM1 is associated with gene regulation in neuronal cells. We found that nuclear GM1 binds acetylated histones on the promoters of the GalNAcT and NeuroD1 genes in differentiated neurons. Our study demonstrates for the first time that GM1 interacts with chromatin via acetylated histones at the nuclear periphery of neuronal cells. PMID:26498762

  20. Randomized comparison of deliverability and in-hospital complications in implantation of BxSonic(R), Express(R), and Flexmaster(R) coronary stents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Leif; Galløe, Anders; Thayssen, Per;

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To compare deliverability and in-hospital complications in implantation of BxSonic(R), Express(R), and Flexmaster(R) coronary stents in a randomized multicenter trial in five Danish interventional centres. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with planned stenting of at least one stenotic lesion i...

  1. Identification of road user related risk factors, Deliverable 5.1 of the H2020 project SafetyCube (Safety CaUsation, Benefits and Efficiency).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filtness, A. & Papadimitriou, E. (Eds.) Leskovšek, B. Focant, N. Martensen, H. Sgarra, V. Usami, D.S. Soteropoulos, A. Stadlbauer, S. Theofilatos, A. Yannis, G. Ziakopoulos, A. Diamandouros, K. Durso, C. Goldenbeld, C. Loenis, B. Schermers, G. Petegem, J.-H. van Elvik, R. Hesjevoll, I.S. Quigley, C. & Papazikou, E.

    2017-01-01

    The present Deliverable (D5.1) describes the identification and evaluation of infrastructure related risk factors. It outlines the results of Task 5.1 of WP5 of SafetyCube, which aimed to identify and evaluate infrastructure related risk factors and related road safety problems by (i) presenting a

  2. Police Enforcement Policy and Programmes on European Roads (PEPPER). Deliverable 4a: Good practice in data, data collection and data use for monitoring and evaluating Traffic Law Enforcement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. Bernhoft, I.M. Erke, A. Ewert, U. Kallberg, V.-P. & Skladana, P.

    2008-01-01

    This report is the Deliverable of task 4.3a of the PEPPER project. It describes the good practice requirements regarding data, data collection and data use for monitoring and evaluating Traffic Law Enforcement (TLE). The aim is that, eventually, individual police forces/countries put the identified

  3. Attenuation of ground-borne vibration affecting residents near railway. Lines Deliverable 2.1: Exposure response relationships and factors influencing these relationships (Work Package WP1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.A.; Vos, H.; Koopman, A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present deliverable is to describe and assess reported health impacts of vibration among residents living near railway lines, in particular the response to freight trains. To this end, first a state of the art overview is given of the results from all field studies reported so f

  4. In-vehicle and site-based observations of vehicles and cyclists. A small-scale ND study in the Netherlands. PROLOGUE Deliverable D3.4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoph, M.; Nes, N. van; Pauwelussen, J.J.A.; Mansvelders, R.; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Hoedemaeker, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the project PROLOGUE (PROmoting real Life Observations for Gaining Understanding of road user behaviour in Europe) is to explore the feasibility and usefulness of a large-scale European naturalistic driving observation study. The work described in this deliverable focused on th

  5. Risk of injury by driving with alcohol and other drugs. Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines DRUID, Deliverable 2.3.5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hels, T. Bernhoft, I.M. Lyckegaard, A. Houwing, S. Hagenzieker, M.P. Legrand, S.-A. Isalberti, C. Van der Linden, T. & Verstraete, A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this deliverable is to assess the risk of driving with alcohol, illicit drugs and medicines in various European countries. In total nine countries participated in the study on relative risk of serious injury/fatality while positive for psychoactive substances. Six countries contribu

  6. Multilevel modelling and time series analysis in traffic safety research : methodology. SafetyNet, Building the European Road Safety Observatory, Workpackage 7, Deliverable 7.4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, C. Brandstaetter, C. Bergel, R. Cherfi, M. Bijleveld, F. Commandeur, J.J.F. Blois, C. de Dupont, E. Gatscha, M. Martensen, H. Papadimitriou, E. Vanlaar, W. & Yannis, G.

    2007-01-01

    This deliverable gives the theoretical background for the two families of analyses, multilevel and time series analysis. For each technique the objectives, detailed model formulation, and assumptions are described and subsequently the technique is illustrated with an empirical example relevant to

  7. Multilevel modelling and time series analysis in traffic safety research : manual. SafetyNet, Building the European Road Safety Observatory, Workpackage 7, Deliverable 7.5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermann, A. Antoniou, C. Bergel, R. Berends, E. Bijleveld, F. Brandstätter, C. Cherfi, M. Blois, C. de Dupont, E. Gatscha, M. Martensen, H. Papadimitriou, E. & Yannis, G.

    2007-01-01

    This deliverable contains the manual to support the methodology report in D7.4, where the theoretical background for multilevel and time series analyses is given. For each technique described in the methodology report, this manual presents the instructions to fit the models on the basis of user

  8. Griflola frondosa (GF) produces significant antidepressant effects involving AMPA receptor activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hongkun; Ran, Pengzhan; Sun, Lijuan; Hu, Weihong; Li, Hongliang; Xiao, Chunjie; Zhu, Keming; Du, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Griflola frondosa (Fr) S.F. Gray (Meripilaceae) (GF) is a medical mushroom, and its regulation of the immune system is of interest for the treatment of mood disorders. α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors are the central mediator for the treatment of depression. This study examines the antidepressant effects of GF and the role of AMPA in these antidepressant effects. The CD-1 mice were fed with GF- or Pleurotus ostreatus [(Jacq.: Fr) Kumm (Pleurotaceae)] (PO)-containing food for 1 day or 5 days. The antidepressant effects was determined in the tail suspension test (TST), forced swim test (FST), and open field test (OFT). The involvement of AMPA receptors was determined by the application of the AMPA-specific blocker GYKI 52466. Treatments with 20%, 33% or 50% of GF-containing food significantly decreased the immobility time (63.6, 56.9, and 52.0% in TST; and 50.8, 43.2, and 38.2% in FST) after 1 day and (62.3, 51.8, and 52.8% in TST; and 49.5, 45.1, and 40.3% in FST) after 5 days. GF-containing food did not cause hyperactive effects in the OFT. The antidepressant effects of the 33% of GF-containing food (down-to 51.3% in 1-day TST and 46.8% in 5-day FST) were significantly stronger than that of the 33% of PO-containing food (down-to 85.5% in 1-day TST and 82.0% in 5-day FST). AMPA-specific blocker GYKI 52466 was able to block the antidepressant effects of the GF-containing food. GF demonstrated the potential as a safe medical food supplement for the patient with depression.

  9. Data needs and computational requirements for asset management decision making. Internal deliverable ID5.2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catrinu-Renstrom, Maria; Clement, Rémy; Tournebise, Pascal

    The objective of this deliverable is to present the requirements for adapting available tools/models and identifying data needs for reliability analysis and optimal decision-making for asset management decision making process. It will serve as a basis for the next tasks of GARPUR work package 5...... addressing to the requirements of RMAC criterion developed in work package 2. The report has been written by several partners, three of them being European TSOs, and the three other being academic partners. Special attention has been paid to address every topic in asset management decision making process...... decision making process, as described in work package 2. Some advanced models exist in scientific literature to characterize the spatio-temporal variation and correlations of relevant factors. Some of these models have been proposed in academia, and offer improved representation with respect to those...

  10. Activation of Akt by advanced glycation end products (AGEs: involvement of IGF-1 receptor and caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jung Yang

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, which in turn facilitates the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs. AGEs activate signaling proteins such as Src, Akt and ERK1/2. However, the mechanisms by which AGEs activate these kinases remain unclear. We examined the effect of AGEs on Akt activation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Addition of AGEs to 3T3-L1 cells activated Akt in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The AGEs-stimulated Akt activation was blocked by a PI3-kinase inhibitor LY 294002, Src inhibitor PP2, an antioxidant NAC, superoxide scavenger Tiron, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(PH oxidase inhibitor DPI, suggesting the involvement of Src and NAD(PH oxidase in the activation of PI3-kinase-Akt pathway by AGEs. AGEs-stimulated Src tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by NAC, suggesting that Src is downstream of NAD(PH oxidase. The AGEs-stimulated Akt activity was sensitive to Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R kinase inhibitor AG1024. Furthermore, AGEs induced phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptorβsubunit (IGF-1Rβ on Tyr1135/1136, which was sensitive to PP2, indicating that AGEs stimulate Akt activity by transactivating IGF-1 receptor. In addition, the AGEs-stimulated Akt activation was attenuated by β-methylcyclodextrin that abolishes the structure of caveolae, and by lowering caveolin-1 (Cav-1 levels with siRNAs. Furthermore, addition of AGEs enhanced the interaction of phospho-Cav-1 with IGF-1Rβ and transfection of 3T3-L1 cells with Cav-1 Y14F mutants inhibited the activation of Akt by AGEs. These results suggest that AGEs activate NAD(PH oxidase and Src which in turn phosphorylates IGF-1 receptor and Cav-1 leading to activation of IGF-1 receptor and the downstream Akt in 3T3-L1 cells. AGEs treatment promoted the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and addition of AG1024, LY 294002 or Akt inhibitor attenuated the promoting effect of AGEs on adipogenesis, suggesting that IGF-1

  11. Severity of nicotine dependence modulates cue-induced brain activity in regions involved in motor preparation and imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Michael N; Bühler, Mira; Klein, Sabine; Zimmermann, Ulrich; Mann, Karl; Heinz, Andreas; Braus, Dieter F

    2006-03-01

    In nicotine-dependent subjects, cues related to smoking elicit activity in brain regions linked to attention, memory, emotion and motivation. Cue-induced brain activation is associated with self-reported craving but further correlates are widely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate whether brain activity elicited by smoking cues increases with severity of nicotine dependence and intensity of cue-elicited craving. Ten healthy male smokers whose degree of nicotine dependence ranged from absent to severe were investigated. Visual smoking cues and neutral stimuli were presented in a block design during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Using multiple linear regression analysis, the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to smoking cues was correlated with severity of nicotine dependence assessed with the Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and with cue-induced craving. Significant positive correlations between the BOLD activity and FTND scores were found in brain areas related to visuospatial attention (anterior cingulate cortex, parietal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus and cuneus) and in regions involved in motor preparation and imagery (primary and premotor cortex, supplementary motor area). Intensity of cue-induced craving was significantly associated with greater BOLD activation in mesocorticolimbic areas engaged in incentive motivation and in brain regions related to episodic memory. Our study suggests that severity of nicotine dependence and intensity of craving are independently associated with cue-induced brain activation in separate neuronal networks. The observed association between severity of dependence and brain activity in regions involved in allocation of attention, motor preparation and imagery might reflect preparation of automated drug taking behavior thereby facilitating cue-induced relapse.

  12. Extracurricular activities in young applicants' résumés: what are the motives behind their involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Applicants use résumés to demonstrate their knowledge, skills, abilities, and other personal characteristics (KSAOs) to recruiters, through education and job-related or non-job-related experiences. But research suggests that the situation for young applicants is especially competitive, since they increasingly enter the labour market with similar educational credentials and limited job-related experience. They may thus use non-job-related experiences, such as participation in extracurricular activities (ECAs) during their studies, to demonstrate KSAOs to recruiters, but also to add distinction and value to their credentials. ECAs may therefore become more important in the selection of young applicants. Yet few studies have undertaken a comprehensive and systematic analysis of the relationships students have with these activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent students' involvement in ECAs is due to internal (e.g., passion) or external (e.g., résumé-building) motives, and what factors influence these motives. Results from a study with 197 students suggest that students engage in ECAs mainly out of internal motives. But external motives are stronger for activities started closer to entering the labour market, for students active in associative or volunteering activities (as compared to sports or artistic activities), and for students holding leadership positions in their activities. Our results suggest that labour market pressure may be a key component of applicants' involvement in ECAs. Also, organizations and recruiters may want to consider that students tend not to engage in ECAs purely out of internal motives, but also to add value to their credentials and match employers' expectations. The authors thank Anna Ambrosetti for her help with the data collection.

  13. Antiproliferative Activity of Crocin Involves Targeting of Microtubules in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hire, Rupali R.; Srivastava, Shalini; Davis, Melissa B.; Kumar Konreddy, Ananda; Panda, Dulal

    2017-01-01

    Crocin, a component of saffron spice, is known to have an anticancer activity. However, the targets of crocin are not known. In this study, crocin was found to inhibit the proliferation of HCC70, HCC1806, HeLa and CCD1059sk cells by targeting microtubules. Crocin depolymerized both the interphase and mitotic microtubules of different cancer cells, inhibited mitosis and induced multipolar spindle formation in these cells. In vitro, crocin inhibited the assembly of pure tubulin as well as the assembly of microtubule-associated protein rich tubulin. Electron microscopic analysis showed that crocin inhibited microtubule assembly while it induced aggregation of tubulin at higher concentrations. Crocin co-eluted with tubulin suggesting that it binds to tubulin. Vinblastine inhibited the binding of crocin to tubulin while podophyllotoxin did not inhibit the crocin binding indicating that crocin binds at the vinblastine site on tubulin. The results suggested that crocin inhibited cell proliferation mainly by disrupting the microtubule network. PMID:28337976

  14. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol.

  15. Administrator Interest is Perceived to Encourage Faculty and Librarian Involvement in Open Access Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamon C. Tewell

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Reinsfelder, T.L., & Anderson, J.A. (2013. Observations and perceptions of academic administrator influence on open access initiatives. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 39(6: 481-487. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2013.08.014 Abstract Objective – To better understand the roles and influence of senior-level academic administrators, such as provosts, on open access (OA activities at the institutional level, including whether librarians perform these activities regardless of administrative interest. Design – Web-based survey questionnaire combined with multiple regression analysis. Settings – The research was conducted online using surveys emailed to potential participants at not-for-profit public and private academic institutions in the United States with a FTE of greater than 1000. Subjects – Academic library directors at selected colleges and universities. Methods – Using directory information from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES and filtering institutions according to not-for-profit status, size, and special focus, a survey sample of 1135 colleges and universities was obtained. Library websites were used to acquire contact information for library directors. In summer 2012 the 43-item survey questionnaire was distributed to respondents online using Qualtrics. The four primary variables were each comprised of multiple questionnaire items and validated using factor analysis, and the data was explored using multiple regression. Main Results – The survey received 298 respondents for a 26% response rate, though the number of incomplete responses is not stated. Among four stakeholder groups (faculty, publishers, librarians, and senior academic administrators, library directors perceived librarians as having the greatest influence in regards to the adoption of open access (mean = .7056, followed by faculty (.3792, administrators (.1881, and publishers as having a negative impact (–.3684. A positive

  16. From (Un)Willingness to InvolveMENt: Development of a Successful Study Brand for Recruitment of Diverse MSM to a Longitudinal HIV Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M; Williams, Victoria A; Shapiro, Eve T; Sanchez, Travis; Rosenberg, Eli S; Fenimore, Vincent L; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2013-11-21

    HIV continues to be a major concern among MSM, yet Black MSM have not been enrolled in HIV research studies in proportionate numbers to White MSM. We developed an HIV prevention research brand strategy for MSM. Questionnaires and focus groups were conducted with 54 participants. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were performed and qualitative data were transcribed and content analyzed to identify common themes. Formative research results indicated that younger Black MSM (18-29 years) were less likely to think about joining prevention studies compared to older (≥30 years) Black MSM (x(2) = 5.92, P = 0.015). Qualitative and quantitative results indicate four prominent themes related to brand development: (1) communication sources (message deliverer), (2) message (impact of public health messaging on perceptions of HIV research), (3) intended audience (underlying issues that influence personal relevance of HIV research), and (4) communication channels (reaching intended audiences). The findings highlight the importance of behavioral communication translational research to effectively engage hard-to-reach populations. Despite reservations, MSM in our formative study expressed a need for active involvement and greater education to facilitate their engagement in HIV prevention research. Thus, the brand concept of "InvolveMENt" emerged.

  17. Peroxidase activity and involvement in the oxidative stress response of roseobacter denitrificans truncated hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaya Wang

    Full Text Available Roseobacter denitrificans is a member of the widespread marine Roseobacter genus. We report the first characterization of a truncated hemoglobin from R. denitrificans (Rd. trHb that was purified in the heme-bound form from heterologous expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Rd. trHb exhibits predominantly alpha-helical secondary structure and absorbs light at 412, 538 and 572 nm. The phylogenetic classification suggests that Rd. trHb falls into group II trHbs, whereas sequence alignments indicate that it shares certain important heme pocket residues with group I trHbs in addition to those of group II trHbs. The resonance Raman spectra indicate that the isolated Rd. trHb contains a ferric heme that is mostly 6-coordinate low-spin and that the heme of the ferrous form displays a mixture of 5- and 6-coordinate states. Two Fe-His stretching modes were detected, notably one at 248 cm-1, which has been reported in peroxidases and some flavohemoglobins that contain an Fe-His-Asp (or Glu catalytic triad, but was never reported before in a trHb. We show that Rd. trHb exhibits a significant peroxidase activity with a (kcat/Km value three orders of magnitude higher than that of bovine Hb and only one order lower than that of horseradish peroxidase. This enzymatic activity is pH-dependent with a pKa value ~6.8. Homology modeling suggests that residues known to be important for interactions with heme-bound ligands in group II trHbs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus subtilis are pointing toward to heme in Rd. trHb. Genomic organization and gene expression profiles imply possible functions for detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in vivo. Altogether, Rd. trHb exhibits some distinctive features and appears equipped to help the bacterium to cope with reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and/or to operate redox biochemistry.

  18. Calmodulin Involvement in Stress-Activated Nuclear Localization of Albumin in JB6 Epithelial Cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Thomas J.; Negash, Sewite; Smallwood, Heather S.; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Thrall, Brian D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-06-15

    We report that in response to oxidative stress, albumin is translocated to the nucleus where it binds in concert with known transcription factors to an antioxidant response element (ARE), which controls the expression of glutathione-S-transferase and other antioxidant enzymes, functioning to mediate adaptive cellular responses. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this adaptive cell response, we have identified linkages between calcium signaling and the nuclear translocation of albumin in JB6 epithelial cells. Under resting conditions, albumin and the calcium regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), co-immunoprecipitate using antibodies against either protein, indicating a tight association. Calcium activation of CaM disrupts the association between CaM and albumin, suggesting that transient increases in cytosolic calcium levels function to mobilize intracellular albumin to facilitate its translocation into the nucleus. Likewise, nuclear translocation of albumin is induced by exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide or a phorbol ester, indicating a functional linkage between reactive oxygen species, calcium, and PKC-signaling pathways. Inclusion of an antioxidant enzyme (i.e., superoxide dismutase) blocks nuclear translocation, suggesting that the oxidation of sensitive proteins functions to coordinate the adaptive cellular response. These results suggest that elevated calcium transients, and associated increases in reactive oxygen species, contribute to adaptive cellular responses through the mobilization and nuclear translocation of cellular albumin to mediate the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant responsive elements.

  19. Microwave synthesis, spectral, thermal, and antimicrobial activities of some transition metal complexes involving 5-bromosalicylaldehyde moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra K. Jain

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The coordination complexes of Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II derived from 5-bromosalicylidene-3,4-dimethylaniline (BSMA and 5-bromosalicylidene-3,4-dichloroaniline (BSCA have been synthesized by conventional as well as microwave methods. These compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, molar conductance, electronic spectra, 1H-NMR, FAB-mass, ESR, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and thermal analysis. The complexes are coloured and stable in air. Analytical data revealed that all the complexes exhibited 1:2 (metal: ligand ratio with coordination number 4 or 6. IR data shows that the ligand coordinates with the metal ions in a bidentate manner through the phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. FAB-mass and thermal data show degradation pattern of the complexes. Solid state electrical conductivity studies reflect semiconducting nature of the complexes. The Schiff base and metal complexes show a good activity against the Gram-positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria; Escherichia coli and fungi Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans.

  20. Betacoronavirus Adaptation to Humans Involved Progressive Loss of Hemagglutinin-Esterase Lectin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkers, Mark J G; Lang, Yifei; Feitsma, Louris J; Hulswit, Ruben J G; de Poot, Stefanie A H; van Vliet, Arno L W; Margine, Irina; de Groot-Mijnes, Jolanda D F; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Langereis, Martijn A; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2017-03-08

    Human beta1-coronavirus (β1CoV) OC43 emerged relatively recently through a single zoonotic introduction. Like related animal β1CoVs, OC43 uses 9-O-acetylated sialic acid as receptor determinant. β1CoV receptor binding is typically controlled by attachment/fusion spike protein S and receptor-binding/receptor-destroying hemagglutinin-esterase protein HE. We show that following OC43's introduction into humans, HE-mediated receptor binding was selected against and ultimately lost through progressive accumulation of mutations in the HE lectin domain. Consequently, virion-associated receptor-destroying activity toward multivalent glycoconjugates was reduced and altered such that some clustered receptor populations are no longer cleaved. Loss of HE lectin function was also observed for another respiratory human coronavirus, HKU1. This thus appears to be an adaptation to the sialoglycome of the human respiratory tract and for replication in human airways. The findings suggest that the dynamics of virion-glycan interactions contribute to host tropism. Our observations are relevant also to other human respiratory viruses of zoonotic origin, particularly influenza A virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. IL-33 accelerates cutaneous wound healing involved in upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui; Li, Xiangyong; Hu, Shilian; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Baohong; Gu, Hongbiao; Ni, Qian; Zhang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Fang

    2013-12-01

    IL-33 is a recently recognized member of the IL-1 family and has been best identified as a potent inducer of Th2-type immune responses. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that IL-33 also represents an important mediator of mucosal healing and epithelial restoration and repair. In this study, we further explore the potential effect of IL-33 in cutaneous wound healing. A full-thickness skin wound was generated on the back of mice and treated with IL-33 or vehicle intraperitoneally. Our results revealed that the levels of IL-33 mRNA and protein were significantly enhanced in incisional wound skin. Meantime, administration of IL-33 obviously accelerated wound healing with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting enhanced reepithelialization. IL-33 upregulation also promoted the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of IL-33 on matrix synthesis. Furthermore, IL-33 facilitated the development of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in incisional wound tissue, which closely related to resolution of inflammation and promotion of wound repair. Taken together, these findings suggest that IL-33 may play a pivotal role in maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of normal wound healing.

  2. Environmental parameters altered by climate change affect the activity of soil microorganisms involved in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Itziar; Epelde, Lur; Garbisu, Carlos

    2017-09-15

    Bioremediation, based on the use of microorganisms to break down pollutants, can be very effective at reducing soil pollution. But the climate change we are now experiencing is bound to have an impact on bioremediation performance, since the activity and degrading abilities of soil microorganisms are dependent on a series of environmental parameters which are themselves being altered by climate change, such as soil temperature, moisture, amount of root exudates, etc. Many climate-induced effects on soil microorganisms occur indirectly through changes in plant growth and physiology derived from increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures, the alteration of precipitation patterns, etc., with a concomitant effect on rhizoremediation performance (i.e. the plant-assisted microbial degradation of pollutants in the rhizosphere). But these effects are extremely complex and mediated by processes such as acclimation and adaptation. Besides, soil microorganisms form complex networks of interactions with a myriad of organisms from many taxonomic groups which will also be affected by climate change, further complicating data interpretation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The mix of laws involved in the activity of the companies in the aerospace field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian Virgil BALUTA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The life of companies, including the aerospace companies, depends on the business cycle. The paper presents the trends of law in ascending and descending period of the business cycle. A point of the paper is the separation of military and civil law in aerospace, public and private law, national and corporate security systems. Also the laws to be apply in relation with public authorities, private organizations, citizens are approched. In the paper are included some keys for interpretation such as the hierarchy of social values. In modern times, the humans life, rights and property must be the main protected values. The paper shows the methods to be accepted for the analyse/analysis of law in aerospace field: logical analysis, hystorical method, comparative method, social research, experimental method. In the aerospace field each of them has some particularities. The classification of laws depending of economic impact in the aerospace field is an other section. There are presented implications on cost, income, receipts, payments, duration of the activities, other restrictions.

  4. Anti-Candida activity of geraniol involves disruption of cell membrane integrity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y; Khan, L A; Manzoor, N

    2016-09-01

    Candidiasis is a major problem in immunocompromised patients. Candida, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, is a major health concern today as conventional drugs are highly toxic with undesirable side effects. Their fungistatic nature is responsible for drug resistance in continuously evolving strains. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene alcohol, is a component of several plant essential oils. In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the antifungal activity of geraniol at the cell membrane level in three Candida species. With an MIC of 30-130μg/mL, this natural compound was fungicidal at concentrations 2×MIC. There was complete suppression of fungal growth at MIC values (growth curves) and encouragingly geraniol is non-toxic even at the concentrations approaching 5×MIC (hemolysis assay). Exposed cells showed altered morphology, wherein the cells appeared either broken or shrivelled up (SEM studies). Significant reduction was seen in ergosterol levels at sub-MIC and glucose-induced H(+) efflux at concentrations>MIC values. Our results suggest that geraniol disrupts cell membrane integrity by interfering with ergosterol biosynthesis and inhibiting the very crucial PM-ATPase. It may hence be used in the management and treatment of both superficial and invasive candidiasis but further studies are required to elaborate its mode of action.

  5. Collaborative modelling for active involvement of stakeholders in urban flood risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Evers

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to enhance the role of local stakeholders in dealing with urban floods. The concept is based on the DIANE-CM project (Decentralised Integrated Analysis and Enhancement of Awareness through Collaborative Modelling and Management of Flood Risk of the 2nd ERANET CRUE funding initiative. The main objective of the project was to develop and test an advanced methodology for enhancing the resilience of local communities to flooding. Through collaborative modelling, a social learning process was initiated that enhances the social capacity of the stakeholders due to the interaction process. The other aim of the project was to better understand how data from hazard and vulnerability analyses and improved maps, as well as from the near real-time flood prediction, can be used to initiate a public dialogue (i.e. collaborative mapping and planning activities in order to carry out more informed and shared decision-making processes and to enhance flood risk awareness. The concept of collaborative modelling was applied in two case studies: (1 the Cranbrook catchment in the UK, with focus on pluvial flooding; and (2 the Alster catchment in Germany, with focus on fluvial flooding. As a result of the interactive and social learning process, supported by sociotechnical instruments, an understanding of flood risk was developed amongst the stakeholders and alternatives for flood risk management for the respective case study area were jointly developed and ranked as a basis for further planning and management.

  6. Immunological identification of candidate proteins involved in regulating active shape changes of outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, M; Zimmermann, U; Köpschall, I; Rohbock, K; Jüngling, S; Zenner, H P

    1995-06-01

    By employing immunological methods, it has been demonstrated that myosin, myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) proteins in outer hair cells (OHC) are immunologically different from isoforms in platelets, smooth muscle and heart muscle, and are probably more related to isoforms found in red blood cells (RBC). Moreover, proteins related to band 3 protein (b3p) and protein 4.1 (p 4.1), ankyrin as well as fodrin and spectrin, but not glycophorin, have been identified in isolated OHCs. Both OHCs and RBC differ from other motile non-muscle cells in their lack of smooth muscle isoforms of actin, their common high levels of spectrin-, ankyrin- and band 3-like proteins, as well as the expression of the 80 kDa protein 4.1 isoform. The data support the notion that motility of OHC may be based upon regulation of the b3p/p 4.1/ankyrin complex, and thus may be reminiscent to the active shape changes in RBC.

  7. Hydralazine-induced vasodilation involves opening of high conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Lone; Nielsen-Kudsk, J E; Gruhn, N

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether high conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK(Ca)) are mediating the vasodilator action of hydralazine. In isolated porcine coronary arteries, hydralazine (1-300 microM), like the K+ channel opener levcromakalim, preferentially relaxed...... contractions induced by K+ (20 mM) compared with K+ (80 mM). In addition, concentration-relaxation curves for hydralazine (pD2 = 5.38 +/- 0.06; Emax = 85.9 +/- 3.6%) were shifted 10-fold to the right by the BK(Ca) blockers tetraethylammonium (1 mM) and iberiotoxin (0.1 microM). In contrast, nimodipine (a Ca2......+-entry blocker), relaxed contractions induced by K+ (20 mM) and K+ (80 mM) equally and nimodipine-induced relaxations were neither antagonized by tetraethylammonium nor by iberiotoxin. In isolated perfused rat hearts, hydralazine (1 microM) increased coronary flow by 28.8 +/- 2.7%. Iberiotoxin (0.1 micro...

  8. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Taichiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Norio; Asato, Ryo; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light-induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus-dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics.

  9. Phytochemicals from Ruta graveolens Activate TAS2R Bitter Taste Receptors and TRP Channels Involved in Gustation and Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mancuso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ruta graveolens (rue is a spontaneous plant in the Mediterranean area with a strong aroma and a very intense bitter taste, used in gastronomy and in folk medicine. From the leaves, stems and fruits of rue, we isolated rutin, rutamarin, three furanocoumarins, two quinolinic alkaloids, a dicoumarin and two long chain ketones. Bitter taste and chemesthetic properties have been evaluated by in vitro assays with twenty receptors of the TAS2R family and four TRP ion channels involved in gustation and nociception. Among the alkaloids, skimmianine was active as a specific agonist of T2R14, whereas kokusaginin did not activate any of the tested receptors. The furanocoumarins activates TAS2R10, 14, and 49 with different degrees of selectivity, as well as the TRPA1 somatosensory ion channel. Rutamarin is an agonist of TRPM5 and TRPV1 and a strong antagonist of TRPM8 ion channels.

  10. DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

  11. Phytochemicals from Ruta graveolens Activate TAS2R Bitter Taste Receptors and TRP Channels Involved in Gustation and Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Giuseppe; Borgonovo, Gigliola; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Bassoli, Angela

    2015-10-16

    Ruta graveolens (rue) is a spontaneous plant in the Mediterranean area with a strong aroma and a very intense bitter taste, used in gastronomy and in folk medicine. From the leaves, stems and fruits of rue, we isolated rutin, rutamarin, three furanocoumarins, two quinolinic alkaloids, a dicoumarin and two long chain ketones. Bitter taste and chemesthetic properties have been evaluated by in vitro assays with twenty receptors of the TAS2R family and four TRP ion channels involved in gustation and nociception. Among the alkaloids, skimmianine was active as a specific agonist of T2R14, whereas kokusaginin did not activate any of the tested receptors. The furanocoumarins activates TAS2R10, 14, and 49 with different degrees of selectivity, as well as the TRPA1 somatosensory ion channel. Rutamarin is an agonist of TRPM5 and TRPV1 and a strong antagonist of TRPM8 ion channels.

  12. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signalling pathway in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert-Gangneux F.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about signalling in Toxoplasma gondii, but it is likely that protein kinases might play a key role in the parasite proliferation, differentiation and probably invasion. We previously characterized Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinases in T. gondii lysates. In this study, cultured cells were tested for their susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection after tachyzoite pretreatment with drugs interfering with AMP kinase activation pathways. Protein kinases inhibitors, i.e. genistein, R031-8220 and PD098059, reduced tachyzoite infectivity by 38 ± 4.5 %, 85.5 ± 9 % and 56 ± 10 %, respectively. Conversely, protein kinases activators, i.e. bombesin and PMA, markedly increased infectivity (by 202 ± 37 % and 258 ± 14 %, respectively. These results suggest that signalling pathways involving PKC and AAAP kinases play a role in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma.

  13. A novel PRD I and TG binding activity involved in virus-induced transcription of IFN-A genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génin, P; Bragança, J; Darracq, N; Doly, J; Civas, A

    1995-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the inducible elements of the mouse interferon A4 and A11 gene promoters (IE-A4 and IE-A11) by transient transfection experiments, DNase 1 footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays resulted in identification of a virus-induced binding activity suggested to be involved in NDV-induced activation of transcription of these genes. The virus-induced factor, termed VIF, is activated early by contact of virions with cells. It specifically recognizes the PRD I-like domain shared by both inducible elements, as well as the TG-like domain of IE-A4. This factor, distinct from the IRF-1, IRF-2 and the alpha F1 binding proteins and presenting a different affinity pattern from that of the TG protein, is proposed as a candidate for IFN-type I gene regulation. Images PMID:8559665

  14. Cytotoxic cell involvement in human cutaneous leishmaniasis: assessments in active disease, under therapy and after clinical cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, C F; Ferraz, R; Pimentel, M I F; Lyra, M R; Schubach, A O; Da-Cruz, A M; Bertho, A L

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an important public health issue worldwide. The control of Leishmania infection depends on cellular immune mechanisms, and the inflammatory response may contribute to pathogenesis. A beneficial role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes has been proposed; nevertheless, other studies suggest a cytotoxic role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes involved in tissue damage, showing controversial role of these cells. The goal of the current study was to understand the immunopathology of CL and determine the profile of cytotoxic cells--such as CD4(+) T, natural killer and natural killer T cells--that might be involved in triggering immunological mechanisms, and may lead to cure or disease progression. The frequencies of cytotoxic cell populations in peripheral blood, obtained from patients with active disease, during treatment and after clinical healing, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cytotoxicity could not be related to a deleterious role in Leishmania braziliensis infection, as patients with active CL showed similar percentages of degranulation to healthy individuals (HI). Cured patients exhibited a lower percentage of degranulating cells, which may be due to a downregulation of the immune response. The understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in CL and the commitment of cytotoxic cells enables improvements in therapeutic strategies.

  15. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year′s experience of a multi-disciplinary group′s activity

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    Raffaele Scala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients′ clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma. It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice.

  16. Changes in Physical Activity Involvement and Attitude to Physical Activity in a 16-Year Follow-Up Study among the Elderly

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    Mäkilä Päivi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied changes of physical activity among noninstitutionalized 65 years and older persons over a sixteen-year follow-up period. The focus of our interest was on changes in involvement, frequency, intensity, and various modes of physical activity. Furthermore, we studied changes in perceived importance, motives for, and obstacles to participation in physical activity. The results showed that the proportion of those reporting less frequent and intensive activities increased. Men were more active than women over the follow-up time (in 1988 =.015, in 1996 =.007, in 2004 =.001. The biggest difference at the end of the followup between men and women was found in participation in supervised exercise classes (39% and 14%, resp.. Most popular forms of physical activity were walking and calisthenics at home. Men undertook more modes of physical activity than women. The importance of physical activity declined during the followup in both gender groups but more among women than men. The most common obstacles to physical activity were poor health and lack of interest. The promotion of health maintained it's place as the most important reason for physical activity over the follow-up period.

  17. A Computational Model of a Descending Mechanosensory Pathway Involved in Active Tactile Sensing.

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    Jan M Ache

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many animals, including humans, rely on active tactile sensing to explore the environment and negotiate obstacles, especially in the dark. Here, we model a descending neural pathway that mediates short-latency proprioceptive information from a tactile sensor on the head to thoracic neural networks. We studied the nocturnal stick insect Carausius morosus, a model organism for the study of adaptive locomotion, including tactually mediated reaching movements. Like mammals, insects need to move their tactile sensors for probing the environment. Cues about sensor position and motion are therefore crucial for the spatial localization of tactile contacts and the coordination of fast, adaptive motor responses. Our model explains how proprioceptive information about motion and position of the antennae, the main tactile sensors in insects, can be encoded by a single type of mechanosensory afferents. Moreover, it explains how this information is integrated and mediated to thoracic neural networks by a diverse population of descending interneurons (DINs. First, we quantified responses of a DIN population to changes in antennal position, motion and direction of movement. Using principal component (PC analysis, we find that only two PCs account for a large fraction of the variance in the DIN response properties. We call the two-dimensional space spanned by these PCs 'coding-space' because it captures essential features of the entire DIN population. Second, we model the mechanoreceptive input elements of this descending pathway, a population of proprioceptive mechanosensory hairs monitoring deflection of the antennal joints. Finally, we propose a computational framework that can model the response properties of all important DIN types, using the hair field model as its only input. This DIN model is validated by comparison of tuning characteristics, and by mapping the modelled neurons into the two-dimensional coding-space of the real DIN population. This

  18. A pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease involves small CAG-repeated RNAs with neurotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Porta, Silvia; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Mateu-Huertas, Elisabet; Pantano, Lorena; Ferrer, Isidre; Guzmán, Manuel; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The abnormally extended polyglutamine in the HTT protein encoded by the CAG repeats has toxic effects. Here, we provide evidence to support that the mutant HTT CAG repeats interfere with cell viability at the RNA level. In human neuronal cells, expanded HTT exon-1 mRNA with CAG repeat lengths above the threshold for complete penetrance (40 or greater) induced cell death and increased levels of small CAG-repeated RNAs (sCAGs), of ≈21 nucleotides in a Dicer-dependent manner. The severity of the toxic effect of HTT mRNA and sCAG generation correlated with CAG expansion length. Small RNAs obtained from cells expressing mutant HTT and from HD human brains significantly decreased neuronal viability, in an Ago2-dependent mechanism. In both cases, the use of anti-miRs specific for sCAGs efficiently blocked the toxic effect, supporting a key role of sCAGs in HTT-mediated toxicity. Luciferase-reporter assays showed that expanded HTT silences the expression of CTG-containing genes that are down-regulated in HD. These results suggest a possible link between HD and sCAG expression with an aberrant activation of the siRNA/miRNA gene silencing machinery, which may trigger a detrimental response. The identification of the specific cellular processes affected by sCAGs may provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD, offering opportunities to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  19. The Beyond Einstein Explorers' Program (BEEP) Getting Astronomers Involved in Afterschool Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Anita; Barbier, B.; Mitchell, S.; Lochner, J.

    2006-12-01

    There is tremendous potential for astronomers to engage afterschool programs in their local areas. Afterschool programs reach a diverse population of students and allow for learning experiences different from those in a classroom. We offer an astronomy afterschool program that scientists can easily adopt, adapt, and run in their local areas. BEEP is targeted at middle school students and introduces basic astronomical tools and the Universe beyond the solar system. The primary goal of the program is to spark curiosity and excitement about the Universe in both program leaders (who often don’t have a science background) and students. A promising model for training leaders and maintaining oversight of the programs is to have a team consisting of a scientist and 1-2 astronomy graduate students partnering with local afterschool program(s). BEEP’s structure is flexible enough to be split into modules and run in a variety of settings, from “astronomy days” to summer camps to year-long afterschool programming. We also welcome the opportunity to work with astronomers running this program to add new modules. This program was developed in close collaboration with afterschool programs in the Washington, DC area. The sessions were developed by adapting well-tested existing formal education materials and activities for the afterschool environment. The program was piloted in summer 2006 and evaluations showed that it was successful and met our primary goal of engaging the students (and preparing the leaders). We are currently refining this program to reflect feedback from the pilot, and it will be ready for wider dissemination by summer 2007.

  20. A Computational Model of a Descending Mechanosensory Pathway Involved in Active Tactile Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ache, Jan M; Dürr, Volker

    2015-07-01

    Many animals, including humans, rely on active tactile sensing to explore the environment and negotiate obstacles, especially in the dark. Here, we model a descending neural pathway that mediates short-latency proprioceptive information from a tactile sensor on the head to thoracic neural networks. We studied the nocturnal stick insect Carausius morosus, a model organism for the study of adaptive locomotion, including tactually mediated reaching movements. Like mammals, insects need to move their tactile sensors for probing the environment. Cues about sensor position and motion are therefore crucial for the spatial localization of tactile contacts and the coordination of fast, adaptive motor responses. Our model explains how proprioceptive information about motion and position of the antennae, the main tactile sensors in insects, can be encoded by a single type of mechanosensory afferents. Moreover, it explains how this information is integrated and mediated to thoracic neural networks by a diverse population of descending interneurons (DINs). First, we quantified responses of a DIN population to changes in antennal position, motion and direction of movement. Using principal component (PC) analysis, we find that only two PCs account for a large fraction of the variance in the DIN response properties. We call the two-dimensional space spanned by these PCs 'coding-space' because it captures essential features of the entire DIN population. Second, we model the mechanoreceptive input elements of this descending pathway, a population of proprioceptive mechanosensory hairs monitoring deflection of the antennal joints. Finally, we propose a computational framework that can model the response properties of all important DIN types, using the hair field model as its only input. This DIN model is validated by comparison of tuning characteristics, and by mapping the modelled neurons into the two-dimensional coding-space of the real DIN population. This reveals the versatility

  1. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is a sympathoadrenal neurotransmitter involved in catecholamine regulation and glucohomeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelink, Carol; Tjurmina, Olga; Damadzic, Ruslan; Young, W Scott; Weihe, Eberhard; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Eiden, Lee E

    2002-01-08

    The adrenal gland is important for homeostatic responses to metabolic stress: hypoglycemia stimulates the splanchnic nerve, epinephrine is released from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, and compensatory glucogenesis ensues. Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter mediating catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Accumulating evidence suggests that a secretin-related neuropeptide also may function as a transmitter at the adrenomedullary synapse. Costaining with highly specific antibodies against the secretin-related neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) revealed that PACAP is found in nerve terminals at all mouse adrenomedullary cholinergic synapses. Mice with a targeted deletion of the PACAP gene had otherwise normal cholinergic innervation and morphology of the adrenal medulla, normal adrenal catecholamine and blood glucose levels, and an intact initial catecholamine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. However, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was more profound and longer-lasting in PACAP knock-outs, and was associated with a dose-related lethality absent in wild-type mice. Failure of PACAP-deficient mice to adequately counterregulate plasma glucose levels could be accounted for by impaired long-term secretion of epinephrine, secondary to a lack of induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, normally occurring after insulin hypoglycemia in wild-type mice, and a consequent depletion of adrenomedullary epinephrine stores. Thus, PACAP is needed to couple epinephrine biosynthesis to secretion during metabolic stress. PACAP appears to function as an "emergency response" cotransmitter in the sympathoadrenal axis, where the primary secretory response is controlled by a classical neurotransmitter but sustained under paraphysiological conditions by a neuropeptide.

  2. Oncogenic activation of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase fusion protein, Tpr-Met, involves exclusion from the endocytic degradative pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, H H L; Peschard, P; Lin, T; Naujokas, M A; Zuo, D; Park, M

    2007-11-01

    Multiple mechanisms of dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are observed in human cancers. In addition to gain-of-function, loss of negative regulation also contributes to oncogenic activation of RTKs. Negative regulation of many RTKs involves their internalization and degradation in the lysosome, a process regulated through ubiquitination. RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation, are no longer transmembrane proteins, and are predicted to escape lysosomal degradation. To test this, we used the Tpr-Met oncogene, generated following chromosomal translocation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met). Unlike Met, Tpr-Met is localized in the cytoplasm and also lacks the binding site for Cbl ubiquitin ligases. We determined whether subcellular localization of Tpr-Met, and/or loss of its Cbl-binding site, is important for oncogenic activity. Presence of a Cbl-binding site and ubiquitination of cytosolic Tpr-Met oncoproteins does not alter their transforming activity. In contrast, plasma membrane targeting allows Tpr-Met to enter the endocytic pathway, and Tpr-Met transforming activity as well as protein stability are decreased in a Cbl-dependent manner. We show that transformation by Tpr-Met is in part dependent on its ability to escape normal downregulatory mechanisms. This provides a paradigm for many RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation.

  3. Identification of residues involved in nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933 from helicobacter pyloriby site-directed mutagenesis

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    Ye Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a well-known bacterial pathogen involved in the development of peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and other forms of gastric cancer. Evidence has suggested that certain strain-specific genes in the plasticity region may play key roles in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases. Therefore there is considerable interest in the strain-specific genes located in the plasticity regions of H. pylori. JHP933 is encoded by the gene in the plasticity region of H. pylori strain J99. Recently, the crystal structure of JHP933 has confirmed it as a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase superfamily protein and a putative active site has been proposed. However, no evidence from direct functional assay has been presented to confirm the active site and little is known about the functional mechanism of JHP933. Here, through superimposition with Cid1/NTP complex structures, we modelled the complex structures of JHP933 with different NTPs. Based on the models and using rational site-directed mutagenesis combined with enzymatic activity assays, we confirm the active site and identify several residues important for the nucleotidyl transferring function of JHP933. Furthermore, mutations of these active site residues result in the abolishment of the nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933. This work provides preliminary insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiological role in H. pylori infection of JHP933 as a novel NTase superfamily protein.

  4. Understanding Scientists' Involvement in Education--Their Interests, Activities, and Needs: Research Results from the ReSciPE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, H.; Hunter, A.; Laursen, S.; Melton, G.

    2006-12-01

    The involvement of scientists in education has been cited by national leaders as essential for strengthening US science education at the K-12 and higher levels. While many individuals and groups have developed expertise in designing and implementing programs that engage scientists with students or teachers, there is little research evidence that helps us understand what motivates or discourages scientists from such involvement, the benefits and costs to them of participating, and the barriers they face that must be addressed to involve them effectively. The ReSciPE Project (Resources for Scientists in Partnership with Education) has offered a workshop on "Scientific Inquiry in the K-12 Classroom" to over 300 scientists and science educators across the US. These workshops have reached a wide audience of science professionals who undertake activities in science education, whether individual or institution-based work, for work or as a volunteer. The project aims to help these "education-engaged scientists" pursue their education work more effectively, but has also drawn on this group as a research sample for an evaluation-with-research study to investigate scientists' involvement in education. Pre- and post-surveys have enabled us to characterize the demographics of the participants and measure their self-reported knowledge and learning about education, especially inquiry-based science. Follow- up interviews have provided insight into their education activities, motivations, interests, difficulties, and needs. We will report on recent research findings from this study and place them in context of national needs and efforts to engage scientists in education.

  5. Characterization of a dual-active enzyme, DcpA, involved in cyclic diguanosine monophosphate turnover in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Indra Mani; Prakash, Sunita; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    We have reported previously that the long-term survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis is facilitated by a dual-active enzyme MSDGC-1 (renamed DcpA), which controls the cellular turnover of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Most mycobacterial species possess at least a single copy of a DcpA orthologue that is highly conserved in terms of sequence similarity and domain architecture. Here, we show that DcpA exists in monomeric and dimeric forms. The dimerization of DcpA is due to non-covalent interactions between two protomers that are arranged in a parallel orientation. The dimer shows both synthesis and hydrolysis activities, whereas the monomer shows only hydrolysis activity. In addition, we have shown that DcpA is associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and exhibits heterogeneous cellular localization with a predominance at the cell poles. Finally, we have also shown that DcpA is involved in the change in cell length and colony morphology of M. smegmatis. Taken together, our study provides additional evidence about the role of the bifunctional protein involved in c-di-GMP signalling in M. smegmatis.

  6. Activating transcription factor 4 is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributing to vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiao-Hui; Chang, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Li, Yu-Lin; Teng, Xu; Zhu, Yi; Du, Jie; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-09-01

    Our previous work reported that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-mediated apoptosis was activated during vascular calcification (VC). Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor in osteoblastogenesis and ERS-induced apoptosis. However, whether ATF4 is involved in ERS-mediated apoptosis contributing to VC remains unclear. In the present study, in vivo VC was induced in rats by administering vitamin D3 plus nicotine. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro was induced by incubation in calcifying media containing β-glycerophosphate and CaCl2. ERS inhibitors taurine or 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuated ERS and VSMC apoptosis in calcified rat arteries, reduced calcification and retarded the VSMC contractile phenotype transforming into an osteoblast-like phenotype in vivo. Inhibition of ERS retarded the VSMC phenotypic transition into an osteoblast-like cell phenotype and reduced VSMC calcification and apoptosis in vitro. Interestingly, ATF4 was activated in calcified aortas and calcified VSMCs in vitro. ATF4 knockdown attenuated ERS-induced apoptosis in calcified VSMCs. ATF4 deficiency blocked VSMC calcification and negatively regulated the osteoblast phenotypic transition of VSMCs in vitro. Our results demonstrate that ATF4 was involved at least in part in the process of ERS-mediated apoptosis contributing to VC.

  7. Modulation of Pineal Melatonin Synthesis by Glutamate Involves Paracrine Interactions between Pinealocytes and Astrocytes through NF-κB Activation

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    Darine Villela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The glutamatergic modulation of melatonin synthesis is well known, along with the importance of astrocytes in mediating glutamatergic signaling in the central nervous system. Pinealocytes and astrocytes are the main cell types in the pineal gland. The objective of this work was to investigate the interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes as a part of the glutamate inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis. Rat pinealocytes isolated or in coculture with astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence of norepinephrine, and the melatonin content, was quantified. The expression of glutamate receptors, the intracellular calcium content and the NF-κB activation were analyzed in astrocytes and pinealocytes. TNF-α's possible mediation of the effect of glutamate was also investigated. The results showed that glutamate's inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis involves interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes, possibly through the release of TNF-α. Moreover, the activation of the astrocytic NF-κB seems to be a necessary step. In astrocytes and pinealocytes, AMPA, NMDA, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were observed, as well as the intracellular calcium elevation. In conclusion, there is evidence that the modulation of melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through the activation of the astrocytic NF-κB transcription factor and possibly by subsequent TNF-α release.

  8. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  9. De novo sequencing of Hypericum perforatum transcriptome to identify potential genes involved in the biosynthesis of active metabolites.

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    Miao He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort is a medicinal plant with pharmacological properties that are antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, anti-cancer, and antibacterial. Its major active metabolites are hypericins, hyperforins, and melatonin. However, little genetic information is available for this species, especially that concerning the biosynthetic pathways for active ingredients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using de novo transcriptome analysis, we obtained 59,184 unigenes covering the entire life cycle of these plants. In all, 40,813 unigenes (68.86% were annotated and 2,359 were assigned to secondary metabolic pathways. Among them, 260 unigenes are involved in the production of hypericin, hyperforin, and melatonin. Another 2,291 unigenes are classified as potential Type III polyketide synthase. Our BlastX search against the AGRIS database reveals 1,772 unigenes that are homologous to 47 known Arabidopsis transcription factor families. Further analysis shows that 10.61% (6,277 of these unigenes contain 7,643 SSRs. CONCLUSION: We have identified a set of putative genes involved in several secondary metabolism pathways, especially those related to the synthesis of its active ingredients. Our results will serve as an important platform for public information about gene expression, genomics, and functional genomics in H. perforatum.

  10. Helicobacter pylori-induced activation of β-catenin involves low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and Dishevelled

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    Lendeckel Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori resides in the stomach of about fifty percent of the world's population and represents a risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers and, in rare cases, gastric cancer. Alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway have been described in almost every human cancer disease, due to the regulation of target genes being involved in cell cycle control, differentiation, cell migration or stem cell control. Our study aimed to elucidate the role of proximal Wnt signaling components low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 and Dishevelled (Dvl in the activation of β-catenin early after infection of gastric epithelial cells with H. pylori. Results Infection of gastric epithelial NCI-N87 cells with H. pylori induces rapid phosphorylation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway co-receptor LRP6 independent of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA or vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA. However, bacteria lacking a functional type 4 secretion system (T4SS failed to induce LRP6 phosphorylation. Further, we identified proteins of the Dvl family, namely Dvl2 and Dvl3, which are involved in LRP6 phosphorylation. H. pylori-induced nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and its transcriptional activation, and expression of Wnt target genes are strongly reduced in stable knockdown cell lines deficient for LRP6, Dvl2 or Dvl3. Conclusion We analysed the H. pylori-induced activation of Wnt-signaling factors and demonstrate for the first time that the canonical Wnt-signaling proteins LRP6 and Dvl2 and Dvl3 are involved in the regulation of β-catenin.

  11. Thioredoxin is involved in endothelial cell extracellular transglutaminase 2 activation mediated by celiac disease patient IgA.

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    Cristina Antonella Nadalutti

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the role of thioredoxin (TRX, a novel regulator of extracellular transglutaminase 2 (TG2, in celiac patients IgA (CD IgA mediated TG2 enzymatic activation. METHODS: TG2 enzymatic activity was evaluated in endothelial cells (HUVECs under different experimental conditions by ELISA and Western blotting. Extracellular TG2 expression was studied by ELISA and immunofluorescence. TRX was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Serum immunoglobulins class A from healthy subjects (H IgA were used as controls. Extracellular TG2 enzymatic activity was inhibited by R281. PX12, a TRX inhibitor, was also employed in the present study. RESULTS: We have found that in HUVECs CD IgA is able to induce the activation of extracellular TG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Particularly, we noted that the extracellular modulation of TG2 activity mediated by CD IgA occurred only under reducing conditions, also needed to maintain antibody binding. Furthermore, CD IgA-treated HUVECs were characterized by a slightly augmented TG2 surface expression which was independent from extracellular TG2 activation. We also observed that HUVECs cultured in the presence of CD IgA evinced decreased TRX surface expression, coupled with increased secretion of the protein into the culture medium. Intriguingly, inhibition of TRX after CD IgA treatment was able to overcome most of the CD IgA-mediated effects including the TG2 extracellular transamidase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether our findings suggest that in endothelial cells CD IgA mediate the constitutive activation of extracellular TG2 by a mechanism involving the redox sensor protein TRX.

  12. MicroRNA-122 down-regulation is involved in phenobarbital-mediated activation of the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Shindo, Sawako; Yoshida, Takemi; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the transcription of target genes, including CYP2B and 3A. Phenobarbital activates CAR, at least in part, in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. However, the precise mechanisms underlying phenobarbital activation of AMPK are still unclear. In the present study, it was demonstrated that phenobarbital administration to mice decreases hepatic miR-122, a liver-enriched microRNA involved in both hepatic differentiation and function. The time-course change in the phenobarbital-mediated down-regulation of miR-122 was inversely correlated with AMPK activation. Phenobarbital decreased primary miR-122 to approximately 25% of the basal level as early as 1 h and suppressed transactivity of mir-122 promoter in HuH-7 cells, suggesting that the down-regulation occurred at the transcriptional level. AMPK activation by metformin or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribonucleoside had no evident effect on miR-122 levels. An inhibitory RNA specific for miR-122 increased activated AMPK and CAR-mediated trancactivation of the phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module in HepG2 cells. Conversely, the reporter activity induced by the ectopic CAR was almost completely suppressed by co-transfection with the miR-122 mimic RNA. GFP-tagged CAR was expressed in the cytoplasm in addition to the nucleus in the majority of HuH-7 cells in which miR-122 was highly expressed. Co-transfection of the mimic or the inhibitor RNA for miR-122 further increased or decreased, respectively, the number of cells that expressed GFP-CAR in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these results suggest that phenobarbital-mediated down-regulation of miR-122 is an early and important event in the AMPK-dependent CAR activation and transactivation of its target genes.

  13. Participation needs of older adults having disabilities and receiving home care: met needs mainly concern daily activities, while unmet needs mostly involve social activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Pier-Luc; Larivière, Nadine; Desrosiers, Johanne; Voyer, Philippe; Champoux, Nathalie; Carbonneau, Hélène; Carrier, Annie; Levasseur, Mélanie

    2015-08-01

    Participation is a key determinant of successful aging and enables older adults to stay in their homes and be integrated into the community. Assessing participation needs involves identifying restrictions in the accomplishment of daily and social activities. Although meeting participation needs involves older adults, their caregivers and healthcare providers, little is known about their respective viewpoints. This study thus explored the participation needs of older adults having disabilities as perceived by the older adults themselves, their caregivers and healthcare providers. A qualitative multiple case study consisted of conducting 33 semi-structured interviews in eleven triads, each composed of an older adult, his/her caregiver and a healthcare provider recruited in a Health and Social Services Centre (HSSC) in Québec, Canada. Interview transcripts and reviews of clinical records were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics based on thematic saliency analysis methods. Aged 66 to 88 years, five older adults had physical disabilities, five had mild cognitive impairment and one had psychological problems, leading to moderate to severe functional decline. Caregivers and healthcare providers were mainly women, respectively retired spouses and various professionals with four to 32 years of clinical experience. Participation needs reported by each triad included all domains of participation. Needs related to daily activities, such as personal care, nutrition, and housing, were generally met. Regarding social activities, few needs were met by various resources in the community and were generally limited to personal responsibilities, including making decisions and managing budgets, and some community life activities, such as going shopping. Unmet needs were mainly related to social activities, involving leisure, other community life activities and interpersonal relationships, and some daily activities, including fitness and mobility. This study

  14. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  15. Extent of liver resection modulates the activation of transcription factors and the production of cytokines involved in liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular events involved in liver regeneration following subtotal hepatectomy (SH) as previous studies have largely focused on partial hepatectomy (PH).METHODS: Male Wistar rats were subjected to 70% PH or 90% SH, respectively, and sacrificed at different times after surgery. Untreated and sham-operated animals served as controls. Serum and liver samples were obtained to investigate liver function, apoptosis (TUNEL assay) and transcription factors (NF-κB, Stat3; ELISA) or cytokines (HGF, TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-α, TGF-β; quantitative RT-PCR) involved in liver regeneration. RESULTS: Serum levels of ALT and AST in animals with 70% PH differed significantly from sham-operated and control animals. We found that the peak concentration 12 h after surgery returned to control levels 7 d after surgery. LDH was increased only at 12 h after 70% PH compared to sham. Bilirubin showed no differences between the sham and 70% resection. After PH, early NF-κB activation was detected 12 h after surgery (313.21 ± 17.22 ng/mL), while there was no activation after SH (125.22 ± 44.36 ng/mL) compared to controls (111.43 ± 32.68 ng/mL) at this time point. In SH, however, NF-κB activation was delayed until 24 h (475.56 ± 144.29 ng/mL). Star3 activation was similar in both groups. These findings correlated with suppressed and delayed induction of regenerative genes after SH (i.e. TNF-α 24 h postoperatively: 2375 ± 1220 in 70% and 88±31 in 90%; IL-6 12 h postoperatively: 2547 ± 441 in 70% and 173 ± 82 in 90%). TUNEL staining revealed elevated apoptosis rates in SH (0.44% at 24 h; 0.63% at 7 d) compared to PH (0.27% at 24 h; 0.15% at 7 d). CONCLUSION: The molecular events involved in liver regeneration are significantly influenced by the extent of resection as SH leads to suppression and delay of liver regeneration compared to PH, which is associated with delayed activation of NF-κB and suppression of proregenerative cytokines.

  16. Oxygen-glucose deprivation promotes gliogenesis and microglia activation in organotypic hippocampal slice culture: involvement of metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemka-Nałęcz, Małgorzata; Stanaszek, Luiza; Zalewska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures are used as an alternative model for studying molecular mechanism(s) of neurogenesis after combined oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) mimicking ischemic conditions. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of OGD on stem/progenitor cells proliferation and/or differentiation in the hippocampus. Our attention was primarily focused on the relationship between neurogenesis-associated processes and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Cell proliferation was detected by using BrdU incorporation. Newly generated BrdU (+) cells were identified by labeling with specific cell markers. In order to check the activity and localization of MMPs we conducted in situ zymography in conjunction with immunohistochemistry. In our experimental conditions OGD-insult followed by 24 h of recovery caused the damage of neuronal cells in CA1. At 1 week cell death appears all over the hippocampus. We found that expected stimulation of endogenous neurogenesis fails as a source of compensation for the lost neurons in OGD-treated cultures. The modulation of culture microenvironment after ischemia favors the dominant proliferation of glial cells expressed by the enhancement of newly-generated oligodendrocyte progenitors. In addition, during our study we also detected some BrdU labeled nuclei encapsulated by GFAP positive processes. However, the majority of BrdU positive cells expressed microglial specific stain, particularly pronounced in CA1area. The OGD-promoted responses involved activation of metalloproteinases, which matches the progression of gliogenesis. On the other hand, the high activity of MMPs associated with microglial cells implicate their involvement in the mechanism participating in OGD-induced cell damage.

  17. Transcriptional activator Cat8 is involved in regulation of xylose alcoholic fermentation in the thermotolerant yeast Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchala, Justyna; Kurylenko, Olena O; Soontorngun, Nitnipa; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2017-02-28

    Efficient xylose alcoholic fermentation is one of the key to a successful lignocellulosic ethanol production. However, regulation of this process in the native xylose-fermenting yeasts is poorly understood. In this work, we paid attention to the transcriptional factor Cat8 and its possible role in xylose alcoholic fermentation in Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, organism, which does not metabolize xylose, gene CAT8 encodes a Zn-cluster transcriptional activator necessary for expression of genes involved in gluconeogenesis, respiration, glyoxylic cycle and ethanol utilization. Xylose is a carbon source that could be fermented to ethanol and simultaneously could be used in gluconeogenesis for hexose synthesis. This potentially suggests involvement of CAT8 in xylose metabolism. Here, the role of CAT8 homolog in the natural xylose-fermenting thermotolerant yeast O. polymorpha was characterized. The CAT8 ortholog was identified in O. polymorpha genome and deleted both in the wild-type strain and in advanced ethanol producer from xylose. Constructed cat8Δ strain isolated from wild strain showed diminished growth on glycerol, ethanol and xylose as well as diminished respiration on the last substrate. At the same time, cat8Δ mutant isolated from the best available O. polymorpha ethanol producer showed only visible defect in growth on ethanol. CAT8 deletant was characterized by activated transcription of genes XYL3, DAS1 and RPE1 and slight increase in the activity of several enzymes involved in xylose metabolism and alcoholic fermentation. Ethanol production from xylose in cat8Δ mutants in the background of wild-type strain and the best available ethanol producer from xylose increased for 50 and 30%, respectively. The maximal titer of ethanol during xylose fermentation was 12.5 g ethanol/L at 45 °C. Deletion of CAT8 did not change ethanol production from glucose. Gene CAT8 was also overexpressed under control of the strong constitutive

  18. Involvement of Vacuolar Sequestration and Active Transport in Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Hop Iso-α-Acids▿ † ¶

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelwood, Lucie A.; Walsh, Michael C.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop α-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-α-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-α-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-α-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-α-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-α-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-α-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-α-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-α-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators. PMID:19915041

  19. EFFECT OF ELECTRO0-SCALP ACUPUNCTURE ON GLUCOSE METABOLISM OF THE CEREBRAL REGIONS INVOLVING MENTAL ACTIVITY IN HEAL THY PEOPLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong(黄泳); Win Moe Htut; LI Dong-jiang(李东江); TANG An-wu(唐安戊); LI Qiu-shi(李求实)

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of electro-scalp acupuncture on glucose metabolism of cerebral regions involving mental activity in healthy people. Methods: A total of 6 cases of volunteer healthy subjects (3 males and 3 females) ranging in age from 22 to 36 years were subjected to this study. Changes of cerebral glucose metabolism before and after electro-scalp acupuncture were observed by using positron emission tomography (PET) and semi-quantifying analysis method. Electro-scalp acupuncture stimulation (50 Hz, 2 mA) of Middle Line of Vertex (Dingzhongxian,顶中线,MS5), Middle Line of Forehead (Ezhongxian, 额中线,MS1) and bilateral Lateral Line 1 of Forehead (Epangyixian,额旁一线,MS2) was administered for 30 minutes. Then cerebral regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen and their average glucose metabolism levels (radioactivity of 18 fluorine deoxyglucose ) were analyzed. Results:After administration of electro-scalp acupuncture, the glucose metabolism levels in bilateral frontal lobes and bilateral caudate nuclei, left cingulate gyrus and right cerebellum increased significantly in comparison with those of pre-stimulation (P<0.05). Conclusion:Electro-scalp acupuncture of MS1, MS2 and MS5 can increase the glucose metabolism of certain cerebral regions involving in mental activity in healthy subjects.

  20. Involvement of vacuolar sequestration and active transport in tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hop iso-alpha-acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelwood, Lucie A; Walsh, Michael C; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop alpha-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-alpha-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-alpha-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-alpha-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-alpha-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-alpha-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-alpha-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-alpha-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-alpha-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators.

  1. Involving children in cooking activities: A potential strategy for directing food choices toward novel foods containing vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allirot, Xavier; da Quinta, Noelia; Chokupermal, Krithika; Urdaneta, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Involving children in cooking has been suggested as a strategy to improve dietary habits in childhood. Interventions in schools including cooking, gardening and tasting activities have showed promising results. Several cross-sectional surveys demonstrated associations between frequency of involvement in food preparation and better diet quality. However, experimental studies confirming the beneficial effect of cooking on food choices in children are missing from the literature. The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of involving children in cooking on their willingness to taste novel foods, food intake, liking and hunger. A between-subject experiment was conducted with 137 children between 7 and 11 years old. 69 children (COOK group) participated in the preparation of three unfamiliar foods containing vegetables: apple/beetroot juice, zucchini tortilla sandwich and spinach cookies. 68 children (CONTROL group) participated, instead, in a creative workshop. Afterwards, the children were invited to choose, for an afternoon snack, between three familiar vs. unfamiliar foods: orange vs. apple/beetroot juice, potato vs. zucchini tortilla sandwich and chocolate vs. spinach cookie. The mean number of unfamiliar foods chosen per child was higher in the COOK vs. CONTROL group (P = 0.037). The overall willingness to taste the unfamiliar foods was also higher in the COOK group (P = 0.011). The liking for the whole afternoon snack (P = 0.034), for 2 of 3 unfamiliar foods and for 1 of 3 familiar foods was higher in the COOK group (P food intake and hunger/satiety scores. This study demonstrated that involving children in cooking can increase their willingness to taste novel foods and direct food choices towards foods containing vegetables.

  2. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  3. Involvement of PKA, PKC, and Ca2+ in LPS-activated expression of the chicken lysozyme gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenhard, P; Goethe, R; Phi-van, L

    2001-04-01

    The lysozyme gene is activated in myelomonocytic HD11 cells in response to LPS. In this study, we described the involvement of LPS-activated signal transduction pathways in activation of the lysozyme gene. Pre-treatment of HD 11 cells with H-89, H-7, TMB-8, or KN-93 resulted in inhibition of the LPS-enhanced lysozyme expression, suggesting that PKA, PKC, and Ca2+-dependent protein kinases participate in the LPS activation. CaMKII seems to be required for the processing of lysozyme transcripts. TPA and calcium ionophore A23187, when separately added to HD11 cells, stimulated the lysozyme expression effectively, and forskolin was ineffective. It is interesting that simultaneous treatment of cells with forskolin and calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in a potentiated increase in lysozyme mRNA expression, indicating a synergistic cooperation of PKA and Ca2+. This synergistic effect of PKA and Ca2+ was observed on the expression of a stably integrated CAT construct, controlled by the lysozyme promoter and the -6.1-kb enhancer containing binding sites for C/EBP and NF-kappaB/Rel. Therefore, we discussed the role of C/EBPbeta(NF-M), CREB, and NF-kappaB/Rel as possible targets for phosphorylation mediated by PKA, PKC, and Ca2+.

  4. Acrolein activates cell survival and apoptotic death responses involving the endoplasmic reticulum in A549 lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanel, André; Pallepati, Pragathi; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Morin, Patrick; Averill-Bates, Diana A

    2014-05-01

    Acrolein, a highly reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, is a product of endogenous lipid peroxidation. It is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that is generated mainly by smoke, overheated cooking oil and vehicle exhaust. Acrolein damages cellular proteins, which could lead to accumulation of aberrantly-folded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This study determines the mechanisms involved in acrolein-induced apoptosis mediated by the ER and possible links with the ER stress response in human A549 lung cells. The exposure of cells to acrolein (15-50μM) for shorter times of 15 to 30min activated several ER stress markers. These included the ER chaperone protein BiP and the three ER sensors: (i) the survival/rescue molecules protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) were phosphorylated; (ii) cleavage of activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) occurred, and (iii) inositol-requiring protein-1 alpha (IRE1α) was phosphorylated. Acrolein (25-50μM) caused apoptotic cell death mediated by the ER after 2h, which was characterised by the induction of CHOP and activation of ER proteases calpain and caspase-4. Calpain and caspase-7 were the initiating factors for caspase-4 activation in acrolein-induced apoptosis. These results increase our knowledge about cellular responses to acrolein in lung cells, which have implications for human health.

  5. S-Nitrosylation of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 involves its activation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xian-Liang; Liu, Dong-Hai; Zhang, Gong-Liang; Hu, Shu-Qun; Chen, Yu-Guo; Xu, Tie

    2015-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2) in cerebral ischemia is involved in the modulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type (NMDA) glutamate receptor activity and Ca(2+) dynamics, resulting in ischemic neuron death ultimately. A number of reports indicate that PYK2 is a redox sensitive kinase that must be activated by an estrogen-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of PYK2 activation remains incompletely illustrated. Accumulating attention is focused on nitric oxide (NO, a free radical) which plays a critical role in cellular signal transduction through stimulus-coupled S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues. Here we reported that PYK2 over-expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells was S-nitrosylated (forming SNO-PYK2) by reacting with GSNO, an exogenous NO donor, at one critical cysteine residue (Cys534) with a biotin switch assay. Moreover, our results showed that S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of PYK2 over-expressed in SH-SY5Y cells was significantly increased after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We further investigated whether the activation (phosphorylation) of PYK2 was associated with S-nitrosylation following SH-SY5Y cells OGD. Our results showed that the cysteine534 residue (site of S-nitrosylation) mutant PYK2 over-expressed in SH-SY5Y cells diminished S-nitrosylation of PYK2 and inhibited its phosphorylation induced by OGD. In addition, overexpression of the mutant PYK2 protein could prevent nuclear accumulation and abrogate neuronal cell death compared to wild type PYK2 in SH-SY5Y cells induced by OGD. These data suggest that the activation of PYK2 following OGD may be modulated by S-nitrosylation, which provides a new avenue for stroke therapy by targeting the post-translational modification machinery.

  6. Endothelial cell permeability during hantavirus infection involves factor XII-dependent increased activation of the kallikrein-kinin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L Taylor

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS. We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII, prekallikrein (PK, and high molecular weight kininogen (HK plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK. Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS, we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation

  7. Dietary patterns, involvement in physical activity and body mass index of Romanian adults having cardio-vascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Maria Lotrean

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Promotion of a healthy diet, an active lifestyle and appropriate body weight are important components of cardio-vascular disease prevention and control. This study aimed to assess several dietary patterns, involvement in physical activity and body mass index (BMI of Romanian adults hospitalized because of diagnoses of cardio-vascular diseases (CVD. The study was performed in 2014 in 1 hospital setting from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. It involved 80 adult patients (45 to 78 years old hospitalized with diagnoses of CVD. Anonymous questionnaire assessing several lifestyle related behaviours were filled in by the participants; based on their weight and height, the BMI was calculated. The results show that 76.2% of the participants recognize the role of consumption of fruits and vegetables for cardio-vascular diseases prevention and control, but only 5% meet the recommendations of eating at least 5 portions of fruits and vegetables (around 400 g daily. The majority of the subjects know that the consumption of animal fat increases the risk for cardio-vascular diseases, but, only one out of two patients declared their constant preoccupation for avoiding products rich in saturated fatty acids, such as animal fat, high fat dairy products and high fat meat. Around 80% of the participants know the risk of obesity for cardio-vascular diseases, but 81.2% have a BMI higher than 25. A percentage of 60% of the patients declared that they received general information from health care professionals about diet, physical activity and cardio-vascular disease prevention, while one quarter followed an educational program for this issue and only one out of ten patients followed a personalized program for loosing weight. Comprehensive educational and counselling programs for promoting healthy nutrition and achievement of an appropriate body weight are needed for Romanian adults having CVD

  8. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemelli, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gemelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Gottardi 100, 41125 Modena (Italy); Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  9. From (UnWillingness to InvolveMENt: Development of a Successful Study Brand for Recruitment of Diverse MSM to a Longitudinal HIV Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Frew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. HIV continues to be a major concern among MSM, yet Black MSM have not been enrolled in HIV research studies in proportionate numbers to White MSM. We developed an HIV prevention research brand strategy for MSM. Methods. Questionnaires and focus groups were conducted with 54 participants. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were performed and qualitative data were transcribed and content analyzed to identify common themes. Results. Formative research results indicated that younger Black MSM (18–29 years were less likely to think about joining prevention studies compared to older (≥30 years Black MSM (x2=5.92, P=0.015. Qualitative and quantitative results indicate four prominent themes related to brand development: (1 communication sources (message deliverer, (2 message (impact of public health messaging on perceptions of HIV research, (3 intended audience (underlying issues that influence personal relevance of HIV research, and (4 communication channels (reaching intended audiences. Conclusion. The findings highlight the importance of behavioral communication translational research to effectively engage hard-to-reach populations. Despite reservations, MSM in our formative study expressed a need for active involvement and greater education to facilitate their engagement in HIV prevention research. Thus, the brand concept of “InvolveMENt” emerged.

  10. Involvement of transcription factor activator protein-2α in doxazosin-induced HeLa cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu GAN; Dong-xing ZHU; Li-ping YANG; Ru-shi LIU; Feng YAN; Jian ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the pro-apoptotic effects of α- 1-adrenergic inhibitor doxazosin in HeLa cells and the potential involvement of transcription factor activator pro-tein-2α (AP-2α) in doxazosin-indueed apoptosis. Methods:The HeLa cells were exposed to various concentrations of doxazosin for 16 h. Apoptosis was detected using a DNA fragmentation assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, and flow cytometric analysis. The expression of AP-2α and caspase-3 was detected by relative quan-titative RT-PCR and Western blot assays, respectively. After the respective trans-fections of the HeLa cells with AP-2α overexpressing constructs and an antisense oligonucleotide against AP-2α, apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric analysis, and the expression of AP-2α and easpase-3 was detected by relative quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot assays. The colorimetric assay was per-formed to detect the caspase-3 activity. Results:Treatment with various concen-trations of doxazosin for 16 h increased the apoptotic rate and total cell death rate of the HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner and upregulated the expression of AP-2α and caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. A dose-dependent increase was observed in the caspase-3 activity. Overexpressing AP-2α led to the in-creased rate of doxazosin-induced apoptosis and the total cell death, whereas doxazosin-induced apoptosis and the total cell death in HeLa cells decreased by antisense AP-2α. Furthermore, overexpressing AP-2α increased the expression and activity of caspase-3, whereas antisense AP-2α in part abolished the increased effects of doxazosin on caspase-3 expression and activity. Conclusion:Doxazosin induces apoptosis in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner, and transcription factor AP-2α is functionally involved in doxazosin-induced HeLa cell apoptosis.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixandru, Brînduşa-Elena; Drăcea, Nicoleta Olguţa; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Drăgulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Luminiţa; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species.

  12. Is the Wnt/β-catenin pathway involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of glucocorticoids in spinal cord injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libro, Rosaliana; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-09-28

    The Wnt canonical or the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has been implicated in the regulation of several physiopathological pathways such as inflammation. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are administered widely to treat inflammation in several diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the Wnt canonical pathway is involved in experimental SCI and whether it is implicated in the anti-inflammatory activity of two different GCs: the methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS), considered the standard treatment for acute SCI, and mometasone furoate (MF), mainly administered for the treatment of airway and skin diseases. Experimental SCI was induced in mice by surgical spinal cord compression at the T6-T7 level. Then, mice were treated with MPSS (6 mg/kg) or MF (0.1 mg/kg) for 7 days until they were killed. Both GCs were found to modulate the Wnt canonical pathway, but in particular, the MF treatment was shown to restore completely the downregulated pathway in SCI. The MF treatment also significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, a Wnt target gene with anti-inflammatory properties, compared with MPSS, and it also inhibited the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Here, we suggest that MF has more efficacy than MPSS in inhibiting inflammation in an SCI experimental model and we propose the β-catenin/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ axis as the mechanism by which MF exerts these beneficial effects.

  13. Retinal cell death induced by TRPV1 activation involves NMDA signaling and upregulation of nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonelli, Mauro; Martins, Daniel O; Britto, Luiz R G

    2013-04-01

    The activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel (TRPV1) has been correlated with oxidative and nitrosative stress and cell death in the nervous system. Our previous results indicate that TRPV1 activation in the adult retina can lead to constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent protein nitration and apoptosis. In this report, we have investigated the potential effects of TRPV1 channel activation on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and function, and the putative participation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in retinal TRPV1-induced protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Intravitreal injections of the classical TRPV1 agonist capsaicin up-regulated the protein expression of the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms. Using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate for nitric oxide (NO) imaging, we found that capsaicin also increased the production of NO in retinal blood vessels. Processes and perikarya of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina were found in the vicinity of nNOS-positive neurons, but those two proteins did not colocalize. Retinal explants exposed to capsaicin presented high protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and cell death, which were observed in the inner nuclear and plexiform layers and in ganglion cells. This effect was partially blocked by AP-5, a NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, but not by CNQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist. These data support a potential role for TRPV1 channels in physiopathological retinal processes mediated by NO, which at least in part involve glutamate release.

  14. Potent cardioprotective effect of the 4-anilinoquinazoline derivative PD153035: involvement of mitochondrial K(ATP channel activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata A Cavalheiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of the 4-anilinoquinazoline derivative PD153035 on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion and mitochondrial function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Perfused rat hearts and cardiac HL-1 cells were used to determine cardioprotective effects of PD153035. Isolated rat heart mitochondria were studied to uncover mechanisms of cardioprotection. Nanomolar doses of PD153035 strongly protect against heart and cardiomyocyte damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion and cyanide/aglycemia. PD153035 did not alter oxidative phosphorylation, nor directly prevent Ca(2+ induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition. The protective effect of PD153035 on HL-1 cells was also independent of AKT phosphorylation state. Interestingly, PD153035 activated K(+ transport in isolated mitochondria, in a manner prevented by ATP and 5-hydroxydecanoate, inhibitors of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+ channels (mitoK(ATP. 5-Hydroxydecanoate also inhibited the cardioprotective effect of PD153035 in cardiac HL-1 cells, demonstrating that this protection is dependent on mitoK(ATP activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that PD153035 is a potent cardioprotective compound and acts in a mechanism involving mitoK(ATP activation.

  15. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-04-07

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases.

  16. ASTROGLIOSIS INVOLVES ACTIVATION OF RIG-LIKE SIGNALING IN THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Minkiewicz, Julia; Wang, Xiaoliang; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Carlos; German, Ramon; Marcillo, Alex E.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Keane, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces a glial response in which astrocytes become activated and produce inflammatory mediators. The molecular basis for regulation of glial-innate immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, we examined the activation of retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-like receptors (RLRs) and their involvement in regulating inflammation following SCI. We show that astrocytes express two intracellular RLRs: RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). SCI and stretch injury of cultured astrocytes stimulated RLR signaling as determined by phosphorylation of IRF3 leading to production of type I interferons (IFNs). RLR signaling stimulation with synthetic RNA resulted in RLR activation, phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin, two hallmarks of reactive astrocytes. Moreover, mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (MUL1), an RLR inhibitor, decreased production of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin following RIG-I signaling stimulation. Our findings identify a role for RLR signaling and type I IFN in regulating astrocyte innate immune responses after SCI. PMID:22161971

  17. Possible Involvement of TLRs and Hemichannels in Stress-Induced CNS Dysfunction via Mastocytes, and Glia Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Aguirre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system (CNS, mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca2+ influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

  18. A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Project Management: A Model for Active Participation and Involvement: Insights from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam A. Hussein

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates and evaluates the effectiveness of a blended learning approach to create a meaningful learning environment. We use the term blended learning approach in this paper to refer to the use of multiple or hybrid instructional methods that emphasize the role of learners as contributors to the learning process rather than recipients of learning. Contribution to learning is attained by using in class gaming as pathways that ensure active involvement of learners. Using a blended learning approach is important in order to be able to address different learning styles of the target group. The approach was also important in order to be able to demonstrate different types of challenges, issues and competences needed in project management. Student evaluations of the course confirmed that the use of multiple learning methods and, in particular, in class gaming was beneficial and contributed to a meaningful learning experience.

  19. Involvement of regions of the 4th and 7th chromosomes in the open-field activity of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Y; Martin, B; Venault, P; Chapouthier, G

    1995-09-01

    Reactivity to a new environment was studied in mice, using an open-field procedure in two strains, C57BL/6By and ABP/Le, the F1 populations and the intercrosses F2 and backcross segregating populations. The analysis of the behavioral traits: peripheral and central activities, leaning, rearing and defecation in the parental strains made it possible to show that the ABP/Le strain was more reactive than C57BL/6By. In addition, the study of segregating, for four phenotypic markers, in F2 and backcross populations strongly suggested that two autosomal regions were involved in the control of open-field behavior: one in chromosomal region comprising the b locus on chromosome 4 and one in chromosomal region comprising the p locus on chromosome 7.

  20. [Role of the fatty acids in ovarian functions: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and adipokines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, J; Froment, P; Ramé, C; Pierre, P; Coyral-Castel, S; Chabrolle, C

    2008-12-01

    The impact of nutrition and energy reserves on the reproductive functions is known for a very long time. However, the metabolic factors involved in the interactions between nutrition and reproduction are still poorly understood. These factors may be hormones or nutrients (glucose, protein and fatty acids). However, it remains to determine whether these factors act directly or indirectly on the reproductive tissues. In this issue, we briefly summarize the impact of fatty acids on the development of ovarian follicles, oocyte and embryo. We then discuss the current hypotheses about the mechanisms of action of these fatty acids on the ovarian functions. We describe more particularly the role of some receptors of fatty acids, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPAR) and Liver X Receptors (LXR) and two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin on ovarian cells.

  1. Involvement of dopamine receptors in binge methamphetamine-induced activation of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Beauvais

    Full Text Available Single large doses of methamphetamine (METH cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in rodent striata. The dopamine D(1 receptor appears to be involved in these METH-mediated stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate if dopamine D(1 and D(2 receptors are involved in ER and mitochondrial stresses caused by single-day METH binges in the rat striatum. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 4 injections of 10 mg/kg of METH alone or in combination with a putative D(1 or D(2 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 or raclopride, respectively, given 30 min prior to each METH injection. Rats were euthanized at various timepoints afterwards. Striatal tissues were used in quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses. We found that binge METH injections caused increased expression of the pro-survival genes, BiP/GRP-78 and P58(IPK, in a SCH23390-sensitive manner. METH also caused up-regulation of ER-stress genes, Atf2, Atf3, Atf4, CHOP/Gadd153 and Gadd34. The expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs was increased after METH injections. SCH23390 completely blocked induction in all analyzed ER stress-related proteins that included ATF3, ATF4, CHOP/Gadd153, HSPs and caspase-12. The dopamine D(2-like antagonist, raclopride, exerted small to moderate inhibitory influence on some METH-induced changes in ER stress proteins. Importantly, METH caused decreases in the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, but increases in the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bax, Bad and cytochrome c, in a SCH23390-sensitive fashion. In contrast, raclopride provided only small inhibition of METH-induced changes in mitochondrial proteins. These findings indicate that METH-induced activation of striatal ER and mitochondrial stress pathways might be more related to activation of SCH23390-sensitive receptors.

  2. Involvement of dopamine receptors in binge methamphetamine-induced activation of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Genevieve; Atwell, Kenisha; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2011-01-01

    Single large doses of methamphetamine (METH) cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in rodent striata. The dopamine D(1) receptor appears to be involved in these METH-mediated stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate if dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors are involved in ER and mitochondrial stresses caused by single-day METH binges in the rat striatum. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received 4 injections of 10 mg/kg of METH alone or in combination with a putative D(1) or D(2) receptor antagonist, SCH23390 or raclopride, respectively, given 30 min prior to each METH injection. Rats were euthanized at various timepoints afterwards. Striatal tissues were used in quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses. We found that binge METH injections caused increased expression of the pro-survival genes, BiP/GRP-78 and P58(IPK), in a SCH23390-sensitive manner. METH also caused up-regulation of ER-stress genes, Atf2, Atf3, Atf4, CHOP/Gadd153 and Gadd34. The expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) was increased after METH injections. SCH23390 completely blocked induction in all analyzed ER stress-related proteins that included ATF3, ATF4, CHOP/Gadd153, HSPs and caspase-12. The dopamine D(2)-like antagonist, raclopride, exerted small to moderate inhibitory influence on some METH-induced changes in ER stress proteins. Importantly, METH caused decreases in the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, but increases in the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bax, Bad and cytochrome c, in a SCH23390-sensitive fashion. In contrast, raclopride provided only small inhibition of METH-induced changes in mitochondrial proteins. These findings indicate that METH-induced activation of striatal ER and mitochondrial stress pathways might be more related to activation of SCH23390-sensitive receptors.

  3. Handbook of efficient recommandations: Public Deliverable D6.4, PRIMA collaborative project, EU 7th Framework Programme, contract no. 212345

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, B.C.; Laplana, R.; Raley, M.; Baqueiro, O.; Kopeva, D.; Hautdidier, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Deliverable 6.4 “Handbook of efficient recommendations” deals with the main methodological developments in the context of screening, scoping and Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) developed and discussed in PRIMA. The main topics of this handbook deal with key aspects of the methodological enhancement of Impact Assessment within the context of experiences in Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment. Key research is linked to the questions abou...

  4. Overview of resulting tools, guidelines, and instruments. IN-SAFETY Workpackage 3: New models, tools and guidelines for road safety assessment, Deliverable 3.4.

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, A. Bald, S. Benz, T. & Gaitanidou, E. (eds.)

    2009-01-01

    Road safety will most probably be influenced by introducing Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) or Intelligent Vehicle Safety Systems (IVSS). The effects of these systems on road safety can be assessed in different ways. This document gives a short overview of methodologies which allow for assessing road safety effects (Chapter 2), This Deliverable gives an overview of the outcome of work package 3 of IN-SAFETY. Two methodologies have basically been applied: • simulation model • risk an...

  5. NO is involved in spermidine-induced drought tolerance in white clover via activation of antioxidant enzymes and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dandan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhou; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Yan; Li, Yaping; He, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Xinquan; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Linkai; Yan, Yanhong

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a key signaling molecule, can be induced by polyamines (PAs), which play an important role in improving drought tolerance in plants. This study was to further investigate the role of NO in spermidine (Spd)-induced drought tolerance associated with antioxidant defense in leaves of white clover (Trifolium repens) under drought stress induced by -0.3 MPa polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) solution. A hydroponic growth method was used for cultivating plants in a controlled growth chamber for 30-33 days until the second leaves were fully expanded. Two relative independent experiments were carried out in our study. One is that exogenous application of Spd or an NO donor (sodium nitroprusside (SNP)) significantly improved drought tolerance in whole plants, as demonstrated by better phenotypic appearance, increased relative water content (RWC), and decreased electrolyte leakage (EL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in leaves as compared to untreated plants. For another detached leaf experiment, PEG induced an increase in the generation of NO in cells and significantly improved activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). These responses could be blocked by pre-treatment with a Spd biosynthetic inhibitor, dicyclohexyl amine (DCHA), and then reversed by application of exogenous Spd. Meanwhile, PEG induced up-regulation of activities and gene transcript levels of corresponding antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) to varying degrees, while these effects were partially blocked by pre-treatment with DCHA, the scavenger of NO, the inhibitors of NR or NOS. In addition, Spd-induced antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression also could be effectively inhibited by an NO scavenger as well as inhibitors of NR and NOS. These findings suggest that both Spd and NO can enhance drought tolerance. Spd was involved in drought stress-activated NR and NOS

  6. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  7. Involvement of the monoaminergic system in the antidepressant-like activity of chromium chloride in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, A; Siwek, A; Wolak, M; Pochwat, B; Szewczyk, B; Opoka, W; Poleszak, E; Nowak, G

    2013-08-01

    Bio-metal chromium(III) is a crucial microelement for the proper functioning of living organisms. Previous preclinical and clinical studies reported its potential antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of antidepressants and noradrenergic and dopaminergic receptor antagonists on chromium chloride (CrCl₃) activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and rats. Imipramine (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) and reboxetine (5 mg/kg) but not bupropion (1 mg/kg), administered jointly with CrCl₃ at a dose of 6 mg/kg, reduced the immobility time in the FST in mice. The reduction of the immobility time induced by the active dose (12 mg/kg) of CrCl₃ was completely abolished by propranolol (2 mg/kg, β-adrenoceptor antagonist), SCH 23390 (0.5 mg/kg, a dopamine D₁ receptor antagonist), and partially by prazosin (1 mg/kg, an α₁-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, an α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist) and sulpiryd (50 mg/kg, a dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor antagonist) administration. The locomotor activity was significantly reduced by CrCl₃ + reboxetine treatment, which did not influence the reboxetine enhancement of the antidepressant-like effect of CrCl₃ in the FST. Moreover, CrCl₃ at a dose of 32 mg/kg (although not at 12 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility and enhanced the climbing (but not swimming) time in the FST in rats, which indicates the involvement of the noradrenergic pathway in this effect. The present study indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of chromium in the FST is dependent (although to a different extent) on the noradrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonin systems.

  8. Abscisic acid activates a Ca2+-calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase involved in antioxidant defense in maize leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shucheng Xu

    2010-01-01

     The role of a calcium-dependent and calmodulin(CaM)stimulated protein kinase in abscisic acid(ABA)-induced antioxidant defense was determined in leaves of maize (Zea mays).In-gel kinase assays showed that treatments with ABA or H2O2 induced the activation of a 49-kDa protein kinase and a 52-kDa protein kinase significantly.Furthermore,we showed that the 52-kDa protein kinase has the characteristics of CaM-stimulating activity and is sensitive to calcium-CaM-dependent protein kinase Ⅱ (CaMK Ⅱ)inhibitor KN-93 or CaM antagonist W-7.Treatments with ABA or H2O2 not only induced the acti vation of the 52-kDa protein kinase,but also enhanced the total activities of the antioxidant enzymes,including catalase,ascorbate peroxidase,glutathione reductase,and superoxide dismutase.Such enhancements were blocked by pretreatment with a CaMK inhibitor and a reactive oxygen species(ROS)inhibitor or scavenger.Pretreatment with the CaMK inhibitor also substantially arrested the ABA-induced H2O2 production.Kinase activity enhancements induced by ABA were attenuated by pretreatment with an ROS inhibitor or scavenger.These results suggest that the 52-kDa CaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defense and that cross-talk between CaMK and H2O2 plays a pivotal role in ABA signaling.We infer that CaMK acts both upstream and downstream of H2O2,but mainly acts between ABA and H2O2 in ABA-induced antioxidant-defensive signaling.

  9. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Induces Apoptosis via a Mitochondrial-dependent Pathway Not Involving Its GTPase-activating Protein Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Biswanath; Yang, Jianqi; Huang, Jie; Askeland, Ryan W.; Bera, Soumen; Fisher, Rory A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) is a member of a family of proteins called RGS proteins, which function as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Gα subunits. Given the role of RGS6 as a G protein GAP, the link between G protein activation and cancer, and a reduction of cancer risk in humans expressing a RGS6 SNP leading to its increased translation, we hypothesized that RGS6 might function to inhibit growth of cancer cells. Here, we show a marked down-regulation of RGS6 in human mammary ductal epithelial cells that correlates with the progression of their transformation. RGS6 exhibited impressive antiproliferative actions in breast cancer cells, including inhibition of cell growth and colony formation and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by mechanisms independent of p53. RGS6 activated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis involving regulation of Bax/Bcl-2, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), cytochrome c release, activation of caspases-3 and -9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. RGS6 promoted loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS). RGS6-induced caspase activation and loss of ΔΨm was mediated by ROS, suggesting an amplification loop in which ROS provided a feed forward signal to induce MOMP, caspase activation, and cell death. Loss of RGS6 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts dramatically impaired doxorubicin-induced growth suppression and apoptosis. Surprisingly, RGS6-induced apoptosis in both breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts does not require its GAP activity toward G proteins. This work demonstrates a novel signaling action of RGS6 in cell death pathways and identifies it as a possible therapeutic target for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:21041304

  10. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent pathway not involving its GTPase-activating protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Biswanath; Yang, Jianqi; Huang, Jie; Askeland, Ryan W; Bera, Soumen; Fisher, Rory A

    2011-01-14

    Regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) is a member of a family of proteins called RGS proteins, which function as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Gα subunits. Given the role of RGS6 as a G protein GAP, the link between G protein activation and cancer, and a reduction of cancer risk in humans expressing a RGS6 SNP leading to its increased translation, we hypothesized that RGS6 might function to inhibit growth of cancer cells. Here, we show a marked down-regulation of RGS6 in human mammary ductal epithelial cells that correlates with the progression of their transformation. RGS6 exhibited impressive antiproliferative actions in breast cancer cells, including inhibition of cell growth and colony formation and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by mechanisms independent of p53. RGS6 activated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis involving regulation of Bax/Bcl-2, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), cytochrome c release, activation of caspases-3 and -9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. RGS6 promoted loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) and increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS). RGS6-induced caspase activation and loss of ΔΨ(m) was mediated by ROS, suggesting an amplification loop in which ROS provided a feed forward signal to induce MOMP, caspase activation, and cell death. Loss of RGS6 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts dramatically impaired doxorubicin-induced growth suppression and apoptosis. Surprisingly, RGS6-induced apoptosis in both breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts does not require its GAP activity toward G proteins. This work demonstrates a novel signaling action of RGS6 in cell death pathways and identifies it as a possible therapeutic target for treatment of breast cancer.

  11. Allowing Students to Select Deliverables for Peer Review: Analysis of a Free-Selection Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Lagkas, Thomas; Demetriadis, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the benefits and limitations of a “free-selection” peer assignment protocol by comparing them to the widely implemented “assigned-pair” protocol. The primary motivation was to circumvent the issues that often appear to the instructors implementing peer review activities with pre...

  12. Involvement of tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mina; Nagai, Taku; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2006-11-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, catalyzes the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. In the present study, we investigated the role of the tPA-plasmin system in depolarization-evoked dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus, respectively, of mice, by using in vivo microdialysis. Microinjection of either tPA or plasmin significantly potentiated 40 mM KCl-induced DA release without affecting basal DA levels. In contrast, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 dose-dependently reduced 60 mM KCl-induced DA release. The 60 mM KCl-evoked DA release in the NAc was markedly diminished in tPA-deficient (tPA-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, although basal DA levels did not differ between the two groups. Microinjections of either exogenous tPA (100 ng) or plasmin (100 ng) into the NAc of tPA-/-mice restored 60 mM KCl-induced DA release, as observed in wild-type mice. In contrast, there was no difference in either basal or 60 mM KCl-induced ACh release in the hippocampus between wild-type and tPA-/-mice. Our findings suggest that the tPA-plasmin system is involved in the regulation of depolarization-evoked DA release in the NAc.

  13. De novo assembly and analysis of Cassia obtusifolia seed transcriptome to identify genes involved in the biosynthesis of active metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zubi; Song, Tao; Zhu, Qiankun; Wang, Wanjun; Zhou, Jiayu; Liao, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA library generated from seeds of Cassia obtusifolia was sequenced using Illumina/Solexa platform. More than 12,968,231 high quality reads were generated, and have been deposited in NCBI SRA (SRR 1012912). A total of 40,102 unigenes (>200 bp) were obtained with an average sequence length of 681 bp by de novo assembly. About 34,089 (85%) unique sequences were annotated and 8694 of the unique sequences were assigned to specific metabolic pathways by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Among them, 131 unigenes, which are involved in the biosynthesis and (or) regulation of anthraquinone, carotenoid, flavonoid, and lipid, the 4 best known active metabolites, were identified from cDNA library. In addition, three lipid transfer proteins were obtained, which may contribute to the lipid molecules transporting between biological membranes. Meanwhile, 30 cytochrome P450, 12 SAM-dependent methyltransferases, and 12 UDP-glucosyltransferase unigenes were identified, which could also be responsible for the biosynthesis of active metabolites.

  14. Neural networks involved in mathematical thinking: evidence from linear and non-linear analysis of electroencephalographic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheloyannis, Sifis; Sakkalis, Vagelis; Vourkas, Michalis; Stam, Cornelis J; Simos, Panagiotis G

    2005-01-20

    Using linear and non-linear methods, electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were measured at various brain regions to provide information regarding patterns of local and coordinated activity during performance of three arithmetic tasks (number comparison, single-digit multiplication, and two-digit multiplication) and two control tasks that did not require arithmetic operations. It was hypothesized that these measures would reveal the engagement of local and increasingly complex cortical networks as a function of task specificity and complexity. Results indicated regionally increased neuronal signalling as a function of task complexity at frontal, temporal and parietal brain regions, although more robust task-related changes in EEG-indices of activation were derived over the left hemisphere. Both linear and non-linear indices of synchronization among EEG signals recorded from over different brain regions were consistent with the notion of more "local" processing for the number comparison task. Conversely, multiplication tasks were associated with a widespread pattern of distant signal synchronizations, which could potentially indicate increased demands for neural networks cooperation during performance of tasks that involve a greater number of cognitive operations.

  15. Muscovy duck reovirus infection rapidly activates host innate immune signaling and induces an effective antiviral immune response involving critical interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhilong; Luo, Guifeng; Wang, Quanxi; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yifan; Wei, Haitao; Wu, Baocheng; Huang, Shile; Chen, Ji-Long

    2015-02-25

    Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV) is a highly pathogenic virus in waterfowl and causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry worldwide. Because the host innate immunity plays a key role in defending against virus invasion, more and more attentions have been paid to the immune response triggered by viral infection. Here we found that the genomic RNA of MDRV was able to rapidly induce the production of interferons (IFNs) in host. Mechanistically, MDRV infection induced robust expression of IFNs in host mainly through RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, we observed that silencing VISA expression in 293T cells could significantly inhibit the secretion of IFNs. Remarkably, the production of IFNs was reduced by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB or knocking down the expression of IRF-7. Furthermore, our study showed that treatment of 293T cells and Muscovy duck embryo fibroblasts with IFNs markedly impaired MDRV replication, suggesting that these IFNs play an important role in antiviral response during the MDRV infection. Importantly, we also detected the induced expression of RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and type I IFN in Muscovy ducks infected with MDRV at different time points post infection. The results from in vivo studies were consistent with those in 293T cells infected with MDRV. Taken together, our findings reveal that the host can resist MDRV invasion by activating innate immune response involving RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3-dependent signaling pathways that govern IFN production.

  16. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue. PMID:26412401

  17. HIF-1 regulates iron homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans by activation and inhibition of genes involved in iron uptake and storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Joshua Romney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans ftn-1 and ftn-2, which encode the iron-storage protein ferritin, are transcriptionally inhibited during iron deficiency in intestine. Intestinal specific transcription is dependent on binding of ELT-2 to GATA binding sites in an iron-dependent enhancer (IDE located in ftn-1 and ftn-2 promoters, but the mechanism for iron regulation is unknown. Here, we identify HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor -1 as a negative regulator of ferritin transcription. HIF-1 binds to hypoxia-response elements (HREs in the IDE in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of hif-1 by RNA interference blocks transcriptional inhibition of ftn-1 and ftn-2 reporters, and ftn-1 and ftn-2 mRNAs are not regulated in a hif-1 null strain during iron deficiency. An IDE is also present in smf-3 encoding a protein homologous to mammalian divalent metal transporter-1. Unlike the ftn-1 IDE, the smf-3 IDE is required for HIF-1-dependent transcriptional activation of smf-3 during iron deficiency. We show that hif-1 null worms grown under iron limiting conditions are developmentally delayed and that depletion of FTN-1 and FTN-2 rescues this phenotype. These data show that HIF-1 regulates intestinal iron homeostasis during iron deficiency by activating and inhibiting genes involved in iron uptake and storage.

  18. Transcription factor CP2 is involved in activating mBMP4 in mouse mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chae, Ji Hyung; Kim, Beom Sue; Han, Su Youne; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Yang, Sung-Il; Kim, Chul Geun

    2004-06-30

    CP2 is a member of a family of transcription factors that regulate genes involved in events from early development to terminal differentiation. In an effort to understand how it selects its target genes we carried out a database search, and located several CP2 binding motifs in the promoter region of bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4). BMP4 is a key regulator of cell fate and body patterning throughout development. For the CP2 binding motifs in BMP4 promoter region to be relevant in vivo, CP2 and BMP4 should be expressed together. We found that CP2b and CP2c, two potent transcriptional activators, are expressed in a manner similar to BMP4 during osteoblast differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells. In in vitro assays, the CP2 proteins bound to two CP2 binding motifs (-715 to -676 and -147 to -118) in the BMP4 promoter, and luciferase reporter assays indicated that this binding was essential for transcription of BMP4 during osteoblast differentiation. Taken together, our data indicate that CP2b and CP2c play important roles during bone development by activating BMP4 transcription.

  19. Activation of Manganese Oxidants with Bisulfite for Enhanced Oxidation of Organic Contaminants: The Involvement of Mn(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Guan, Xiaohong; Fang, Jingyun; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2015-10-20

    MnO4(-) was activated by HSO3(-), resulting in a process that oxidizes organic contaminants at extraordinarily high rates. The permanganate/bisulfite (PM/BS) process oxidized phenol, ciprofloxacin, and methyl blue at pHini 5.0 with rates (kobs ≈ 60-150 s(-1)) that were 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than those measured for permanganate alone, and ∼5 to 7 orders of magnitude faster than conventional advanced oxidation processes for water treatment. Oxidation of phenol was fastest at pH 4.0, but still effective at pH 7.0, and only slightly slower when performed in tap water. A smaller, but still considerable (∼3 orders of magnitude) increase in oxidation rates of methyl blue was observed with MnO2 activated by HSO3(-) (MO/BS). The above results, time-resolved spectroscopy of manganese species under various conditions, stoichiometric analysis of pH changes, and the effect of pyrophosphate on UV absorbance spectra suggest that the reactive intermediate(s) responsible for the extremely rapid oxidation of organic contaminants in the PM/BS process involve manganese(III) species with minimal stabilization by complexation. The PM/BS process may lead to a new category of advanced oxidation technologies based on contaminant oxidation by reactive manganese(III) species, rather than hydroxyl and sulfate radicals.

  20. Cold activation of serum complement in patients with chronic hepatitis C: study on activating pathway and involvement of IgG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Y

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been documented that the serum complement activities measured by hemolytic assay (CH50 are decreased after storage of sera at a low temperature in some patients with chronic hepatitis C. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon has not been identified yet. Here, we tried to elucidate factors involved in the cold activation of complement (CAC. To clarify what pathway is activated in CAC, we measured complement cleavage products after cold storage of sera. C4d increased significantly after 12 h-storage at cold temperatures in 5 CAC (+ sera compared with 5 CAC (- (P < 0.01 and 3 control sera (P < 0.05, while Bb did not increase in any of the groups. In order to determine whether IgG or IgG complex is necessary for CAC, 8 CAC (+ sera were incubated with Protein G Sepharose gel beads, and all of them retained hemolytic activities to some extent after cold storage. Column chromatography through Superose 6HR of CAC-positive serum identified the fractions containing molecules that induced CAC in normal serum, which were depleted by treatment with protein G Sepharose. In conclusion, CAC in hepatitis C seems to occur via a classical or lectin pathway, and the IgG complex produced in hepatitis C virus infection may be an important factor in inducing CAC, a common extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C.

  1. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  2. Antimanic-like activity of candesartan in mice: Possible involvement of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Gomes, Júlia Ariana; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Berk, Michael; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Budni, Josiane; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) triggers pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory mechanisms which are involved in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Candesartan (CDS) is an AT1 receptor antagonist with potential neuroprotective properties. Herein we investigated CDS effects against oxidative, neurotrophic inflammatory and cognitive effects of amphetamine (AMPH)-induced mania. In the reversal protocol adult mice were given AMPH 2 mg/kg i.p. or saline and between days 8 and 14 received CDS 0.1, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg orally, lithium (Li) 47.5 mg/kg i.p., or saline. In the prevention treatment, mice were pretreated with CDS, Li or saline prior to AMPH. Locomotor activity and working memory performance were assessed. Glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and TNF-α levels were evaluated in the hippocampus (HC) and cerebellar vermis (CV). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK-3beta) levels were measured in the HC. CDS and Li prevented and reversed the AMPH-induced increases in locomotor activity. Only CDS prevented and reversed AMPH-induced working memory deficits. CDS prevented AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC and CV), TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. Li prevented alterations in BDNF and phospho-Ser9-GSK3beta. CDS reversed AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC), TNF-α (CV) and BDNF levels. Li reversed AMPH-induced alterations in TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. CDS is effective in reversing and preventing AMPH-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations, providing a rationale for the design of clinical trials investigating CDS׳s possible therapeutic effects.

  3. Transcriptional activation of multiple operons involved in para-nitrophenol degradation by Pseudomonas sp. Strain WBC-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Jiang, Xuan; Chao, Hongjun; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain WBC-3 utilizes para-nitrophenol (PNP) as a sole carbon and energy source. The genes involved in PNP degradation are organized in the following three operons: pnpA, pnpB, and pnpCDEFG. How the expression of the genes is regulated is unknown. In this study, an LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) is identified to activate the expression of the genes in response to the specific inducer PNP. While the LTTR coding gene pnpR was found to be not physically linked to any of the three catabolic operons, it was shown to be essential for the growth of strain WBC-3 on PNP. Furthermore, PnpR positively regulated its own expression, which is different from the function of classical LTTRs. A regulatory binding site (RBS) with a 17-bp imperfect palindromic sequence (GTT-N11-AAC) was identified in all pnpA, pnpB, pnpC, and pnpR promoters. Through electrophoretic mobility shift assays and mutagenic analyses, this motif was proven to be necessary for PnpR binding. This consensus motif is centered at positions approximately -55 bp relative to the four transcriptional start sites (TSSs). RBS integrity was required for both high-affinity PnpR binding and transcriptional activation of pnpA, pnpB, and pnpR. However, this integrity was essential only for high-affinity PnpR binding to the promoter of pnpCDEFG and not for its activation. Intriguingly, unlike other LTTRs studied, no changes in lengths of the PnpR binding regions of the pnpA and pnpB promoters were observed after the addition of the inducer PNP in DNase I footprinting.

  4. Cardiac myostatin upregulation occurs immediately after myocardial ischemia and is involved in skeletal muscle activation of atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillero, Estibaliz; Akashi, Hirokazu; Wang, Catherine; Najjar, Marc; Ji, Ruiping; Kennel, Peter J; Sweeney, H Lee; Schulze, Paul C; George, Isaac

    2015-01-30

    Myostatin (MSTN), a negative regulator of muscle growth and size, is increased after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) but timing of upregulation after injury is not known. In this study, we investigated the timing of the MSTN/AKT/p38 pathway activation in heart and skeletal muscle after AMI, as well as the potential effect of cardiac injury-related MSTN endocrine signaling on skeletal muscle and other circulating growth factors. Coronary artery ligation was performed in C57BL/6 mice at age 8 weeks to induce AMI. Mice were sacrificed at different time points (10 m, 1 h, 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 months and 2 months) after surgery (n=3 per time point, n=18 total). Cardiac and circulating MSTN upregulation occurred as early as 10 min after AMI. Two months after AMI, increased cardiac MSTN/SMAD2,3 and p38 together with decreased IGF-1/AKT signaling suggest an anti-hypertrophic profile. In skeletal muscle, an absence of local MSTN increase was accompanied by increased MSTN-dependent SMAD2,3 signaling, suggestive of paracrine effects due to cardiac-derived MSTN. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the skeletal muscle was also evident. Serum from 24h post-MI mice effectively induced a MSTN-dependent increase in atrogin1 and MuRF1. Our study shows that cardiac MTSN activation occurs rapidly after cardiac ischemia and may be involved in peripheral protein degradation in the skeletal muscle by activating atrogin1 and MuRF1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Autophagy activation is involved in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy'--induced neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsun Li

    Full Text Available Autophagic (type II cell death, characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of cells, has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy is an illicit drug causing long-term neurotoxicity in the brain. Apoptotic (type I and necrotic (type III cell death have been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, while the role of autophagy in MDMA-elicited neurotoxicity has not been investigated. The present study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and contribution of autophagy to neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons challenged with MDMA. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3; an autophagic marker using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Here, we demonstrate that MDMA exposure induced monodansylcadaverine (MDC- and LC3B-densely stained autophagosome formation and increased conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, coinciding with the neurodegenerative phase of MDMA challenge. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA pretreatment significantly attenuated MDMA-induced autophagosome accumulation, LC3B-II expression, and ameliorated MDMA-triggered neurite damage and neuronal death. In contrast, enhanced autophagy flux by rapamycin or impaired autophagosome clearance by bafilomycin A1 led to more autophagosome accumulation in neurons and aggravated neurite degeneration, indicating that excessive autophagosome accumulation contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, MDMA induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and its downstream unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1, suggesting the AMPK/ULK1 signaling pathway might be involved in MDMA-induced autophagy activation.

  6. Daxx from Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is involved in activation of NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Muting; Tang, Junliang; Liang, Qianhui; Zhu, Guohua; Li, Haoyang; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Death domain-associated factor 6 (Daxx) is a Fas-binding protein that mediates the activation of Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and Fas-induced apoptosis. In this study, a crustacean Daxx (LvDaxx) was firstly cloned and identified from Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The LvDaxx cDNA was 2644 bp in length with an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2217 bp. Sequence analysis indicated that LvDaxx contained a single Daxx domain and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and shared a similarity with Drosophila melanogaster Daxx. LvDaxx was a nuclear-localized protein that was expressed highest in hemocytes and could be up-regulated in pathogen- and stimulant-challenge shrimps. LvDaxx could activate the artificial promoter containing an NF-κB binding site and the promoters of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) ie1 gene and arthropod antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), suggesting LvDaxx could be involved in the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Knock-down of LvDaxx in vivo resulted in down-regulation of shrimp AMPs and reduction of WSSV copies in tissues. Furthermore, suppression of LvDaxx significantly decreased the mortality of WSSV-infected shrimps, but increased the mortality of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus-infected shrimps. Thus, these suggested that LvDaxx could play a role in the innate immunity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus in L. vannamei, while in the antiviral response, LvDaxx may be hijacked by WSSV and play a complex role in WSSV pathogenesis.

  7. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 is involved in cell growth and survival of human rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qualman Stephen J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stat3 has been classified as a proto-oncogene and constitutive Stat3 signaling appears to be involved in oncogenesis of human cancers. However, whether constitutive Stat3 signaling plays a role in the survival and growth of osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, and soft-tissue sarcomas is still unclear. Methods To examine whether Stat3 is activated in osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas and other soft-tissue sarcomas we analyzed sarcoma tissue microarray slides and sarcoma cell lines using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, respectively, with a phospho-specific Stat3 antibody. To examine whether the activated Stat3 pathway is important for sarcoma cell growth and survival, adenovirus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule inhibitor (termed STA-21 were used to inhibit constitutive Stat3 signaling in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of Stat3 phosphorylation. Cell viability was determined by MTT assays and induction of apoptosis was analyzed by western blotting using antibodies that specifically recognize cleaved caspases-3, 8, and 9. Results Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in 19% (21/113 of osteosarcoma, 27% (17/64 of rhabdomyosarcoma, and 15% (22/151 of other soft-tissue sarcoma tissues as well as in sarcoma cell lines. Expression of the dominant-negative Stat3 and treatment of STA-21 inhibited cell viability and growth and induced apoptosis through caspases 3, 8 and 9 pathways in human sarcoma cell lines expressing elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Stat3 phosphorylation is elevated in human rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcomas and soft-tissue sarcomas. Furthermore, the activated Stat3 pathway is important for cell growth and survival of human sarcoma cells.

  8. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes.

  9. LBNL deliverable to the Tricarb carbon sequestration partnership: Final report on experimental and numerical modeling activities for the Newark Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pester, Nick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Saldi, Giuseppe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beyer, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Knauss, Kevin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-09-04

    This report presents findings for hydrological and chemical characteristics and processes relevant to large-scale geologic CO2 sequestration in the Newark Basin of southern New York and northern New Jersey. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the Tri-Carb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration — comprising Sandia Technologies, LLC; Conrad Geoscience; and Schlumberger Carbon Services.

  10. T-antigen binding lectin with antibacterial activity from marine invertebrate, sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra): Possible involvement in differential recognition of bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gowda, N.M.; Goswami, U.; Khan, M.I.

    glycoconjugates of bacteria are involved in lectin induction. HSL showed strong broad spectrum antibacterial activity against both grampositive and gram-negative bacteria. Under in vitro conditions, purified HSL mediate agglutination of the test bacteria...

  11. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Project. Management plan (Deliverable No. 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-05-31

    This Project Management Plan establishes the organization and procedures by which the Memphis Medium-Btu Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant will be managed and defines the responsibilities and functions of project participants. This plan should not be construed as modifying contract provisions or documents in any way. It applies mainly to Phase I activities; the conceptual design and development of the demonstration plant. Plans for Phases II and III will be prepared before these phases are initiated. This management plan is intended to be a working document to be revised as the needs of the project dictate. The looseleaf format will facilitate changes by making it possible to add and remove pages.

  12. Report on Stakeholder Evaluation of Aquatic Resources. Deliverable 5.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Phuong; Lund, Søren; Banta, Gary Thomas

    The present report on stakeholder evaluation of highland aquatic resources provides an overview of completed research activities undertaken within the HighARCS project on the value ascribed by users, local communities and stakeholders to functions, goods and services (including non-use values......) derived from the aquatic resources in the Northern and Central of Vietnam. The perceived impact of factors such as environmental degradation, changing demand for goods and services and modified highland aquatic resources management practices on these values has also been assessed....

  13. Allowing Students to Select Deliverables for Peer Review: Analysis of a Free-Selection Protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Lagkas, Thomas; Demetriadis, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the benefits and limitations of a “free-selection” peer assignment protocol by comparing them to the widely implemented “assigned-pair” protocol. The primary motivation was to circumvent the issues that often appear to the instructors implementing peer review activities with p......-Selection, where students were able to explore and select peer work for review. Result analysis showed a very strong tendency in favor of the Free-Selection students regarding both domain specific (conceptual) and domain-general (reviewing) knowledge....

  14. Demonstration and Dialogue: Mediation in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management. Deliverable D10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark; Sundqvist, Goeran (Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Lidberg, Maria; Soneryd, Linda (Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-10-15

    This report analyses mediation and mediators in Swedish nuclear waste management. Mediation is about establishing agreement and building common knowledge. It is argued that demonstrations and dialogue are the two prominent approaches to mediation in Swedish nuclear waste management. Mediation through demonstration is about showing, displaying, and pointing out a path to safe disposal for inspection. It implies a strict division between demonstrator and audience. Mediation through dialogue on the other hand, is about collective acknowledgements of uncertainty and suspensions of judgement creating room for broader discussion. In Sweden, it is the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) that is tasked with finding a method and a site for the final disposal of the nation's nuclear waste. Two different legislative frameworks cover this process. In accordance with the Act on Nuclear Activities, SKB is required to demonstrate the safety of its planned nuclear waste management system to the government, while in respect of the Swedish Environmental Code, they are obliged to organize consultations with the public. How SKB combines these requirements is the main question under investigation in this report in relation to materials deriving from three empirical settings: 1) SKB's safety analyses, 2) SKB's public consultation activities and 3) the 'dialogue projects', initiated by other actors than SKB broadening the public arena for discussion. In conclusion, an attempt is made to characterise the long-term interplay of demonstration and dialogue in Swedish nuclear waste management

  15. Hyperforin inhibits Akt1 kinase activity and promotes caspase-mediated apoptosis involving Bad and Noxa activation in human myeloid tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Merhi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The natural phloroglucinol hyperforin HF displays anti-inflammatory and anti-tumoral properties of potential pharmacological interest. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells abnormally proliferate and escape apoptosis. Herein, the effects and mechanisms of purified HF on AML cell dysfunction were investigated in AML cell lines defining distinct AML subfamilies and primary AML cells cultured ex vivo. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: HF inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner the growth of AML cell lines (U937, OCI-AML3, NB4, HL-60 by inducing apoptosis as evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 population, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. HF also induced apoptosis in primary AML blasts, whereas normal blood cells were not affected. The apoptotic process in U937 cells was accompanied by downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Noxa, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of procaspases and cleavage of the caspase substrate PARP-1. The general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the caspase-9- and -3-specific inhibitors, but not caspase-8 inhibitor, significantly attenuated apoptosis. HF-mediated apoptosis was associated with dephosphorylation of active Akt1 (at Ser(473 and Akt1 substrate Bad (at Ser(136 which activates Bad pro-apoptotic function. HF supppressed the kinase activity of Akt1, and combined treatment with the allosteric Akt1 inhibitor Akt-I-VIII significantly enhanced apoptosis of U937 cells. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide new evidence that HF's pro-apoptotic effect in AML cells involved inhibition of Akt1 signaling, mitochondria and Bcl-2 members dysfunctions, and activation of procaspases -9/-3. Combined interruption of mitochondrial and Akt1 pathways by HF may have implications for AML treatment.

  16. Focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in chondrocyte activation by the 29-kDa amino-terminal fibronectin fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, Takefumi; Valbracht, Jean; Alsalameh, Saifeddin; Lotz, Martin

    2002-01-11

    The 29-kDa amino-terminal fibronectin fragment (FN-f) has a potent chondrolytic effect and is thought to be involved in cartilage degradation in arthritis. However, little is known about signal transduction pathways that are activated by FN-f. Here we demonstrated that FN-f induced nitric oxide (NO) production from human articular chondrocytes. Expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and NO production were observed at 6 and 48 h after FN-f treatment, respectively. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA up-regulation was stimulated by FN-f in human chondrocytes. To address the possibility that FN-f-induced NO release is mediated by IL-1beta production, the effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was determined. IL-1ra partially inhibited FN-f-induced NO release although it almost completely inhibited IL-1beta-induced NO release. Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase was induced transiently by FN-f treatment. Blocking antibodies to alpha(5) or beta(1) integrin and Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptides did not inhibit FN-f-induced NO production. PP2, a Src family kinase inhibitor, or cytochalasin D, which selectively disrupts the network of actin filaments, inhibited both FAK phosphorylation and NO production induced by FN-f, but the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin had no effect. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) showed activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK. High concentrations of SB203580, which inhibit both JNK and p38 MAPK, and PD98059 a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2 that blocks ERK activation, inhibited FN-f induced NO production. These data suggest that focal adhesion kinase and MAPK mediate FN-f induced activation of human articular chondrocytes.

  17. Manual on the Socrobust tool and recent experiences with using Socrobust. Deliverable 1 of Create Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poti, B.M. [CERIS-CNR, Rome (Italy); Mourik, R.; Raven, R.P.J.M.; Feenstra, C.F.J. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Jolivet, E. [IAE, Toulouse (France); Alcantud Torrent, A.; Schaefer, B. [EcoInstitute, Barcelona (Spain); Bauknecht, D.; Brohmann, B.; Fritsche, U.R. [OEKO Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Fucsko, J. [Hungarian Environmental Economics Center MAKK, Budapest (Hungary); Heiskanen, E. [NCRC (Finland); Hodson, M. [Centre for Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures SURF, Manchester (United Kingdom); Maack, M.H. [INE (Ireland); Oniszk-Poplawska, A. [Institute for Renewable Energy IEO, Warszawa (Poland)

    2007-06-15

    This first task entailed familiarising the consortium with the original Socrobust tool. The project Socrobust incorporated twenty years of Science and Technology Studies literature into a reflexive method for anticipating future stakeholders reactions to innovation by making explicit the innovator's assumptions build into the design of an innovation. The method needed to be flexible to adapt to a variety of situation and be useful for managers. A standard (consultancy) process was developed, composed by a tool-kit and a protocol for interaction with managers. The Socrobust tool consists of four steps with each different tools. The original Socrobust is a method of assessment based on one stakeholder in the relevant position of managing an innovation project. It was aimed at reflection and learning and less aimed at action and implementation. The WP1 report is an introduction to the original Socrobust toolkit and a critical review of its suitability to measure, promote and support social acceptance of innovative RES and RUE technologies. In general it can be stated that the existing steps and most of the instruments of the original Socrobust toolkit can be maintained, but that additions and small alterations need to be made if the tool is to function as a tool that assists multiple relevant stakeholders simultaneously instead of only the direct developers or innovators. In addition, the Socrobust instruments need additions and alterations to function as a toolkit that can measure societal robustness and create a platform to involve relevant stakeholders in the process of developing a socially robust product. The above briefly discussed results and recommendations are the starting point for the consortium's efforts in WP3, where Socrobust will be developed into a new toolkit and methodology for Create Acceptance (Cultural Influences on Renewable Energy Acceptance and Tools for the development of communication strategies to promotE ACCEPTANCE among key actor

  18. Propolis modulates miRNAs involved in TLR-4 pathway, NF-κB activation, cytokine production and in the bactericidal activity of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Bruno J; Santiago, Karina B; Cardoso, Eliza O; Freire, Paula P; Carvalho, Robson F; Golim, Marjorie A; Sforcin, José M

    2016-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells, essential for recognition and presentation of pathogens to T cells. Propolis, a resinous material produced by bees from various plants, exhibits numerous biological properties, highlighting its immunomodulatory action. Here, we assayed the effects of propolis on the maturation and function of human DCs. DCs were generated from human monocytes and incubated with propolis and LPS. NF-κB and cytokines production were determined by ELISA. microRNA's expression was analysed by RT-qPCR and cell markers detection by flow cytometry. Colony-forming units were obtained to assess the bactericidal activity of propolis-treated DCs. Propolis activated DCs in the presence of LPS, inducing NF-kB, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 production. The inhibition of hsa-miR-148a and hsa-miR-148b abolished the inhibitory effects on HLA-DR and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The increased expression of hsa-miR-155 may be correlated to the increase in TLR-4 and CD86 expression, maintaining LPS-induced expression of HLA-DR and CD40. Such parameters may be involved in the increased bactericidal activity of DCs against Streptococcus mutans. Propolis modulated the maturation and function of DCs and may be useful in the initial steps of the immune response, providing a novel approach to the development of DC-based strategies and for the discovery of new immunomodulators. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. UPWIND Metrology, Deliverable D 1A2.1, List of measurement Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    as convincing field tests have not confirmed the actual improvement, the industry will not invest much to change the turbine design. This is an example that clarifies why the development of wind energy is hindered by metrology problems (measurement problems). Other examples are in the fields of: - Warranty...... activity. The problem is especially relevant for the following areas: Production related - Power performance testing especially in wind farms - Testing of turbine improvements in the order of several percent - Testing of aerodynamic codes - Testing of turbine response to effects such as turbulence...... and shear Load related - Mechanical load measurements in farms aimed at verification of aero elastic codes. (blade root moments, yaw moments, tower foot moments etc.) Wind related - Measurement of wake effects and wind resources inside wind farms - Measurements of inter farm effects (regarding velocity...

  20. Curcuma purpurascens BI. rhizome accelerates rat excisional wound healing: involvement of Hsp70/Bax proteins, antioxidant defense, and angiogenesis activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhollahi, Elham; Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Zahedifard, Maryam; Tayeby, Faezeh; Awang, Khalijah; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curcuma purpurascens BI. is a member of Zingiberaceae family. The purpose of this study is to investigate the wound healing properties of hexane extract of C. purpurascens rhizome (HECP) against excisional wound healing in rats. Materials and methods Twenty four rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: A) negative control (blank placebo, acacia gum), B) low dose of HECP, C) high dose of HECP, and D) positive control, with 6 rats in each group. Full-thickness incisions (approximately 2.00 cm) were made on the neck area of each rat. Groups 1–4 were treated two-times a day for 20 days with blank placebo, HECP (100 mg/kg), HECP (200 mg/kg), and intrasite gel as a positive control, respectively. After 20 days, hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome stainings were employed to investigate the histopathological alterations. Protein expressions of Bax and Hsp70 were examined in the wound tissues using immunohistochemistry analysis. In addition, levels of enzymatic antioxidants and malondialdehyde representing lipid peroxidation were measured in wound tissue homogenates. Results Macroscopic evaluation of wounds showed conspicuous elevation in wound contraction after topical administration of HECP at both doses. Moreover, histopathological analysis revealed noteworthy reduction in the scar width correlated with the enhanced collagen content and fibroblast cells, accompanied by a reduction of inflammatory cells in the granulation tissues. At the molecular level, HECP facilitates wound-healing process by downregulating Bax and upregulating Hsp70 protein at the wound site. The formation of new blood vessel was observed in Masson’s trichrome staining of wounds treated with HECP (100 and 200 mg/kg). In addition, HECP administration caused a significant surge in enzymatic antioxidant activities and a decline in lipid peroxidation. Conclusion These findings suggested that HECP accelerated wound-healing process in rats via antioxidant activity, angiogenesis