WorldWideScience

Sample records for deliver large thermal

  1. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  2. Compressor-less Hydrogen Transmission Pipelines Deliver Large-scale Stranded Renewable Energy at Competitive Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W Leighty; J Holloway; R Merer; B Somerday; C San Marchi; G Keith; D White

    2006-01-01

    We assume a transmission-constrained world, where large new wind plants and other renewable energies must pay all transmission costs for delivering their energy to distant markets. We modeled a 1,000 MW (1 GW) (name plate) wind plant in the large wind resource of the North America Great Plains, delivering exclusively hydrogen fuel, via a new gaseous hydrogen (GH2) pipeline, to an urban market at least 300 km distant. All renewable electric energy output would be converted, at the source, to hydrogen, via 100 bar output electrolyzers, directly feeding the GH2 transmission pipeline without costly compressor stations at inlet or at midline. The new GH2 pipeline is an alternative to new electric transmission lines. We investigate whether the pipeline would provide valuable energy storage. We present a simple model by which we estimate the cost of wind-source hydrogen fuel delivered to the distant city gate in year 2010, at GW scale. Ammonia, synthetic hydrocarbons, and other substances may also be attractive renewable-source energy carriers, storage media, and fuels; they are not considered in this paper. (authors)

  3. Thermal convection for large Prandtl numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2001-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Bénard theory by Grossmann and Lohse [J. Fluid Mech. 407, 27 (2000)] is extended towards very large Prandtl numbers Pr. The Nusselt number Nu is found here to be independent of Pr. However, for fixed Rayleigh numbers Ra a maximum in the Nu(Pr) dependence is predicted. We moreover offer

  4. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  5. Large format lithium ion pouch cell full thermal characterisation for improved electric vehicle thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Thomas; Barai, Anup; Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Guo, Yue; McGordon, Andrew; Marco, James

    2017-08-01

    It is crucial to maintain temperature homogeneity in lithium ion batteries in order to prevent adverse voltage distributions and differential ageing within the cell. As such, the thermal behaviour of a large-format 20 Ah lithium iron phosphate pouch cell is investigated over a wide range of ambient temperatures and C rates during both charging and discharging. Whilst previous studies have only considered one surface, this article presents experimental results, which characterise both surfaces of the cell exposed to similar thermal media and boundary conditions, allowing for thermal gradients in-plane and perpendicular to the stack to be quantified. Temperature gradients, caused by self-heating, are found to increase with increasing C rate and decreasing temperature to such an extent that 13.4 ± 0.7% capacity can be extracted using a 10C discharge compared to a 0.5C discharge, both at -10 °C ambient temperature. The former condition causes an 18.8 ± 1.1 °C in plane gradient and a 19.7 ± 0.8 °C thermal gradient perpendicular to the stack, which results in large current density distributions and local state of charge differences within the cell. The implications of these thermal and electrical inhomogeneities on ageing and battery pack design for the automotive industry are discussed.

  6. European research school on large scale solar thermal – SHINE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bales, Chris; Forteza, Pau Joan Cortés; Furbo, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Heat Integration NEtwork (SHINE) is a European research school in which 13 PhD students in solar thermal technologies are funded by the EU Marie-Curie program. It has five PhD course modules as well as workshops and seminars dedicated to PhD students both within the project as well...... as outside of it. The SHINE research activities focus on large solar heating systems and new applications: on district heating, industrial processes and new storage systems. The scope of this paper is on systems for district heating for which there are five PhD students, three at universities and two...

  7. Thermal activation of dislocations in large scale obstacle bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Capolungo, Laurent; McDowell, David L.; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Dislocation dynamics simulations have been used extensively to predict hardening caused by dislocation-obstacle interactions, including irradiation defect hardening in the athermal case. Incorporating the role of thermal energy on these interactions is possible with a framework provided by harmonic transition state theory (HTST) enabling direct access to thermally activated reaction rates using the Arrhenius equation, including rates of dislocation-obstacle bypass processes. Moving beyond unit dislocation-defect reactions to a representative environment containing a large number of defects requires coarse-graining the activation energy barriers of a population of obstacles into an effective energy barrier that accurately represents the large scale collective process. The work presented here investigates the relationship between unit dislocation-defect bypass processes and the distribution of activation energy barriers calculated for ensemble bypass processes. A significant difference between these cases is observed, which is attributed to the inherent cooperative nature of dislocation bypass processes. In addition to the dislocation-defect interaction, the morphology of the dislocation segments pinned to the defects play an important role on the activation energies for bypass. A phenomenological model for activation energy stress dependence is shown to describe well the effect of a distribution of activation energies, and a probabilistic activation energy model incorporating the stress distribution in a material is presented.

  8. Pilot Field Test of Electrokinetically-Delivered and Thermally Activated Persulfate (EKTAP) for Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carrol, D. M.; Head, N.; Chowdhury, A. I.; Inglis, A.; Garcia, A. N.; Reynolds, D. A.; Hayman, J.; Hogberg, D.; Austrins, L. M.; Sidebottom, A.; Auger, M.; Eimers, J.; Gerhard, J.

    2017-12-01

    Remediation of low-permeability soils that are contaminated with chlorinated solvents is challenging. In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) with persulfate is promising, however, the delivery of the oxidant by hydraulic gradient is limited in low-permeability soils. Electrokinetic (EK) enhanced transport of amendments has shown the potential to overcome these limitations. In particular, the combined technology of EK-delivered and thermally activated persulfate (EKTAP) has been recently demonstrated in the laboratory as promising in these challenging environments (Chowdhury A. I. (2016) Hydraulic and Electrokinetic Delivery of Remediants for In-situ Remediation. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository, Paper 4135). This study presents the first pilot field test to evaluate EKTAP to enhance the distribution and effectiveness of persulfate in clayey soil. The pilot field test was conducted at a contaminated site formerly occupied by a chlorinated solvent production facility. In the EK transport phase, 925 L of 40 g/L persulfate was injected over 57 days, during which 9A of direct current (DC) was applied between two electrodes spaced 3 m apart. In the subsequent heating phase, 10A of alternate current (AC) was applied across the same electrodes for an additional 70 days. Extensive sampling of soil and groundwater in this EKTAP cell were compared to those from two parallel control cells, one with EK only and one with no electrodes. Results indicated that EK can significantly increase transport rates of persulfate in clayey soil. Persulfate activation primarily occurred in the period of DC application, indicating that the natural reduction capacity of the clay soil had a significant impact on persulfate decomposition. Temperature mapping indicated that AC current was able to increase soil temperatures, validating the EKTAP concept. Degradation of chlorinated compounds, in particular, 1-2, dichloroethane (1,2- DCA), was observed to be substantial in areas of persulfate

  9. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of a thermal mixing tee in order to assess the thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galpin, J.; Simoneau, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, we perform a Large Eddy Simulation of a mixing tee, for which experimental thermal statistics are available. → A special methodology has been set up for comparing properly the fluctuations with the experiment. → A comparison between the Smagorinsky and the structure-function sub-grid scale model is achieved out. → Slight better predictions are obtained with the structure-function model. → The possibility to reduce the computational domain by prescribing synthetic turbulence at the inlet is tested. First results are encouraging and underline the advantage of considering this technique instead of a standard noise at the entrance of the domain. - Abstract: The present paper deals with thermal fatigue phenomenon, and more particularly with the numerical simulation using Large Eddy Simulation technique of a mixing tee, for which experimental thermal statistics are available. The sensitivity to the sub-grid scale closure is first evaluated by comparing the experimental statistics with the numerical results obtained via both the Smagorinsky and the structure-function models. Because of a difference of temporal resolution between the experiment and the simulation, the direct comparison of the fluctuations is not possible. Therefore, a methodology based on filtering the numerical results is proposed in order to achieve a proper comparison. The comparison of the numerical results with the experiment suggests that slight better predictions are obtained with the structure-function model even if the dependency of the results to the sub-grid scale model is low. Then, the possibility to reduce the fluid computational domain by prescribing synthetic turbulence at the inlet is tested. First results are encouraging and underline the advantage of considering this technique instead of a standard noise at the entrance of the domain. All the simulations are conducted with the commercial CFD code STAR-CD.

  11. Characteristics of large thermal energy storage systems in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowski, Ryszard

    2017-11-01

    In District Heating Systems (DHS) there are significant fluctuations in demand for heat by consumers during both the heating and the summer seasons. These variations are considered primarily in the 24-hour time horizon. These problems are aggravated further if the DHS is supplied by a CHP plant, because fluctuations in heat demand adversely affect to a significant degree the stable production of electricity at high overall efficiency. Therefore, introducing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) would be highly recommended on these grounds alone. The characteristics of Large (i.e. over 10 000 m3) TES in operation in Poland are presented. Information is given regarding new projects (currently in design or construction) that apply TES technology in DHS in Poland. The paper looks at the methodology used in Poland to select the TES system for a particular DHS, i.e., procedure for calculating capacity of the TES tank and the system to prevent water stored in the tank from absorbing oxygen from atmospheric air. Implementation of TES in DHS is treated as a recommended technology in the Polish District Heating sector. This technology offers great opportunities to improve the operating conditions of DHS, cutting energy production costs and emissions of pollutants to the atmosphere.

  12. Corrugated paraffin nanocomposite films as large stroke thermal actuators and self-activating thermal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copic, Davor; Hart, A John

    2015-04-22

    High performance active materials are of rapidly growing interest for applications including soft robotics, microfluidic systems, and morphing composites. In particular, paraffin wax has been used to actuate miniature pumps, solenoid valves, and composite fibers, yet its deployment is typically limited by the need for external volume constraint. We demonstrate that compact, high-performance paraffin actuators can be made by confining paraffin within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films. This large-stroke vertical actuation is enabled by strong capillary interaction between paraffin and CNTs and by engineering the CNT morphology by mechanical compression before capillary-driven infiltration of the molten paraffin. The maximum actuation strain of the corrugated CNT-paraffin films (∼0.02-0.2) is comparable to natural muscle, yet the maximum stress is limited to ∼10 kPa by collapse of the CNT network. We also show how a CNT-paraffin film can serve as a self-activating thermal interface that closes a gap when it is heated. These new CNT-paraffin film actuators could be produced by large-area CNT growth, infiltration, and lamination methods, and are attractive for use in miniature systems due to their self-contained design.

  13. Sandia Laboratories in-house activities in support of solar thermal large power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The development of thermal energy storage subsystems for solar thermal large power applications is described. The emphasis is on characterizing the behavior of molten nitrate salts with regard to thermal decomposition, environmental interactions, and corrosion. Electrochemical techniques to determine the ionic species in the melt and for use in real time studies of corrosion are also briefly discussed.

  14. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Winiarski, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carmichael, Robert T. [Cadeo Group, Washington D. C. (United States); Mayhorn, Ebony T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fisher, Andrew R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  15. Very large thermal rectification in bulk composites consisting partly of icosahedral quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Tsunehiro

    2014-01-01

    The bulk thermal rectifiers usable at a high temperature above 300 K were developed by making full use of the unusual electron thermal conductivity of icosahedral quasicrystals. The unusual electron thermal conductivity was caused by a synergy effect of quasiperiodicity and by a narrow pseudogap at the Fermi level. The rectification ratio, defined by TRR = |J large |/|J small |, reached vary large values exceeding 2.0. This significant thermal rectification would lead to new practical applications for the heat management. (paper)

  16. Thermal radiation from large bolides and impact plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetsov, V.; Shuvalov, V.

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulations of the impacts of asteroids and comets from 20 m to 3 km in diameter have been carried out and thermal radiation fluxes on the ground and luminous efficiencies of the impacts have been calculated. It was assumed that the cosmic objects have no strength, deform, fragment, and vaporize in the atmosphere. After the impact on the ground, formation of craters and plumes was simulated taking into account internal friction of destroyed rocks and a wake formed in the atmosphere. The equations of radiative transfer, added to the equations of gas dynamics, were used in the approximation of radiative heat diffusion or, if the Rosseland optical depth of a radiating volume of gas and vapor was less than unity, in the approximation of volume emission. Radiation fluxes on the Earth's surface were calculated by integrating the equation of radiative transfer along rays passing through a luminous area. Direct thermal radiation from fireballs and impact plumes produced by asteroids and comets larger than 50 m in diameter is dangerous for people, animals, plants, economic objects. Forest fires can be ignited on the ground within a radius of roughly 1000 times the body's diameter (for diameters of the order or smaller than 1 km), 50-m-diameter bodies can ignite forest fires within a radius of up to 40 km and 3-km asteroids - within 1700 km.

  17. Prediction of Thermal Environment in a Large Space Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jung Yoon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the thermal environment of large space buildings such as stadiums can vary depending on the location of the stands, it is important to divide them into different zones and evaluate their thermal environment separately. The thermal environment can be evaluated using physical values measured with the sensors, but the occupant density of the stadium stands is high, which limits the locations available to install the sensors. As a method to resolve the limitations of installing the sensors, we propose a method to predict the thermal environment of each zone in a large space. We set six key thermal factors affecting the thermal environment in a large space to be predicted factors (indoor air temperature, mean radiant temperature, and clothing and the fixed factors (air velocity, metabolic rate, and relative humidity. Using artificial neural network (ANN models and the outdoor air temperature and the surface temperature of the interior walls around the stands as input data, we developed a method to predict the three thermal factors. Learning and verification datasets were established using STAR CCM+ (2016.10, Siemens PLM software, Plano, TX, USA. An analysis of each model’s prediction results showed that the prediction accuracy increased with the number of learning data points. The thermal environment evaluation process developed in this study can be used to control heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC facilities in each zone in a large space building with sufficient learning by ANN models at the building testing or the evaluation stage.

  18. Effect of thermal contact resistances on fast charging of large format lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yonghuang; Saw, Lip Huat; Shi, Yixiang; Somasundaram, Karthik; Tay, Andrew A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of thermal contact resistance on thermal performance of large format lithium ion batteries. • The effect of temperature gradient on electrochemical performance of large format batteries during fast charging. • The thermal performance of lithium ion battery utilizing pulse charging protocol. • Suggestions on battery geometry design optimization to improve thermal performance. - Abstract: A two dimensional electrochemical thermal model is developed on the cross-plane of a laminate stack plate pouch lithium ion battery to study the thermal performance of large format batteries. The effect of thermal contact resistance is taken into consideration, and is found to greatly increase the maximum temperature and temperature gradient of the battery. The resulting large temperature gradient would induce in-cell non-uniformity of charging-discharging current and state of health. Simply increasing the cooling intensity is inadequate to reduce the maximum temperature and narrow down the temperature difference due to the poor cross-plane thermal conductivity. Pulse charging protocol does not help to mitigate the temperature difference on the bias of same total charging time, because of larger time-averaged heat generation rate than constant current charging. Suggestions on battery geometry optimizations for both prismatic/pouch battery and cylindrical battery are proposed to reduce the maximum temperature and mitigate the temperature gradient within the lithium ion battery

  19. A central solar-industrial waste heat heating system with large scale borehole thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, F.; Yang, X.; Xu, L.; Torrens, I.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new research of seasonal thermal storage is introduced. This study aims to maximize the utilization of renewable energy source and industrial waste heat (IWH) for urban district heating systems in both heating and non-heating seasons through the use of large-scale seasonal thermal

  20. PERSPECTIVE TECHNOLOGIES OF THERMAL HARDENING OF LARGE-SIZE ARTICLES OF TWO-PHASE TITANIUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Fedulov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the development and industrial assimilation of the fundamentally new methods of thermal strengthening of large articles out of hardenable titanic alloys.

  1. Thermal test of the insulation structure for LH 2 tank by using the large experimental apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, S.; Onishi, K.; Konshima, N.; Nishigaki, K.

    Conceptual designs of large mass LH 2 (liquid hydrogen) storage systems, whose capacity is 50,000 m3, have been studied in the Japanese hydrogen project, World Energy Network (WE-NET) [K. Fukuda, in: WE-NET Hydrogen Energy Symposium, 1999, P1-P41]. This study has concluded that their thermal insulation structures for the huge LH 2 tanks should be developed. Their actual insulation structures comprise not only the insulation material but also reinforced members and joints. To evaluate their thermal performance correctly, a large test specimen including reinforced members and joints will be necessary. After verifying the thermal performance of a developed large experimental apparatus [S. Kamiya, Cryogenics 40 (1) (2000) 35] for measuring the thermal conductance of various insulation structures, we tested two specimens, a vacuum multilayer insulation (MLI) with a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) support and a vacuum solid insulation (microtherm ®) with joints. The thermal background test for verifying the thermal design of the experimental apparatus showed that the background heat leak is 0.1 W, small enough to satisfy apparatus performance requirement. The thermal conductance measurements of specimens also showed that thermal heat fluxes of MLI with a GFRP support and microtherm ® are 8 and 5.4 W/m2, respectively.

  2. Vanadium Dioxide as a Natural Disordered Metamaterial: Perfect Thermal Emission and Large Broadband Negative Differential Thermal Emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Kats

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally demonstrate that a thin (approximately 150-nm film of vanadium dioxide (VO_{2} deposited on sapphire has an anomalous thermal emittance profile when heated, which arises because of the optical interaction between the film and the substrate when the VO_{2} is at an intermediate state of its insulator-metal transition (IMT. Within the IMT region, the VO_{2} film comprises nanoscale islands of the metal and dielectric phases and can thus be viewed as a natural, disordered metamaterial. This structure displays “perfect” blackbodylike thermal emissivity over a narrow wavelength range (approximately 40  cm^{-1}, surpassing the emissivity of our black-soot reference. We observe large broadband negative differential thermal emittance over a >10 °C range: Upon heating, the VO_{2}-sapphire structure emits less thermal radiation and appears colder on an infrared camera. Our experimental approach allows for a direct measurement and extraction of wavelength- and temperature-dependent thermal emittance. We anticipate that emissivity engineering with thin-film geometries comprising VO_{2} and other thermochromic materials will find applications in infrared camouflage, thermal regulation, and infrared tagging and labeling.

  3. The thermal evolution of large water-rich asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Castillo, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Water and heat played a significant role in the formation and evolution of large main belt asteroids, including 1 Ceres, 2 Pallas, and 24 Themis, for which there is now evidence of surficial water ice (Rivkin & Emery, ACM 2008). Shape measurements indicate some differentiation of Ceres’ interior, which, in combination with geophysical modeling, may indicate compositional layering in a core made up of anhydrous and hydrated silicate and a water ice mantle (Castillo-Rogez & McCord, in press, Icarus). We extend these interior models now to other large, possibly water-rich main belt asteroids, namely Pallas, at mean radius 272 km, and the Themis family parent body, at mean radius 150 km. The purpose of this study is to compare geophysical models against available constraints on the physical properties of these objects and to offer constraints on the origin of these objects. Pallas is the largest B-type asteroid. Its surface of hydrated minerals and recent constraint on its density, 2.4-2.8 g/cm3, seems to imply that water strongly affected its evolution (Schmidt et al., in press, Science). 24 Themis is the largest member of the Themis family that now counts about 580 members, including some of the main belt comets. The large member 90 Antiope has a density of about 1.2 g/cm3, while 24 Themis has a density of about 2.7 +/-1.3 g/cm3. The apparent contrast in the densities and spectral properties of the Themis family members may reflect a compositional layering in the original parent body. In the absence of tidal heating and with little accretional heat, the evolution of these small water-rich objects is a function of their initial composition and temperature. The latter depends on the location of formation (in the inner or outer solar system) and most importantly on the time and duration of accretion, which determines the amount of short-lived radioisotopes available for early internal activity. New accretional models suggest that planetesimals grew rapidly throughout

  4. NST: Thermal Modeling for a Large Aperture Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Roy

    2011-05-01

    Late in the 1990s the Dutch Open Telescope demonstrated that internal seeing in open, large aperture solar telescopes can be controlled by flushing air across the primary mirror and other telescope structures exposed to sunlight. In that system natural wind provides a uniform air temperature throughout the imaging volume, while efficiently sweeping heated air away from the optics and mechanical structure. Big Bear Solar Observatory's New Solar Telescope (NST) was designed to realize that same performance in an enclosed system by using both natural wind through the dome and forced air circulation around the primary mirror to provide the uniform air temperatures required within the telescope volume. The NST is housed in a conventional, ventilated dome with a circular opening, in place of the standard dome slit, that allows sunlight to fall only on an aperture stop and the primary mirror. The primary mirror is housed deep inside a cylindrical cell with only minimal openings in the side at the level of the mirror. To date, the forced air and cooling systems designed for the NST primary mirror have not been implemented, yet the telescope regularly produces solar images indicative of the absence of mirror seeing. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of the NST primary mirror system along with measurements of air flows within the dome, around the telescope structure, and internal to the mirror cell are used to explain the origin of this seemingly incongruent result. The CFD analysis is also extended to hypothetical systems of various scales. We will discuss the results of these investigations.

  5. Above and below boiling thermal loading strategies for large waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    A simplified repository thermal model was developed with the Mathcad computer code which indicates that large waste packages may be compatible with both above and below boiling repository thermal loading strategies. Minimum spent fuel decay time of at least 20 to 30 years was shown to be important for both thermal loading strategies. Constant isothermal boundary conditions are assumed at the ground surface (296 K) and 305 meters below the water table (309.7 K) with a uniform temperature change of 1.55 10 -2 K/meter. Homogeneous tuff properties are assumed: conductivity (2.1 watt/m-k); density (2.22 gm/cm 3 ); and thermal capacitance (2.17 joule/cm 3 K). Based on these properties, the tuff thermal diffusion coefficient is 9.68 x 10 -7 m 2 /sec

  6. Thermal interaction in crusted melt jets with large-scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Sotome, Fuminori; Ishikawa, Michio [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally observe thermal interaction which would be capable of triggering due to entrainment, or entrapment in crusted melt jets with `large-scale structure`. The present experiment was carried out by dropping molten zinc and molten tin of 100 grams, of which mass was sufficient to generate large-scale structures of melt jets. The experimental results show that the thermal interaction of entrapment type occurs in molten-zinc jets with rare probability, and the thermal interaction of entrainment type occurs in molten tin jets with high probability. The difference of thermal interaction between molten zinc and molten tin may attribute to differences of kinematic viscosity and melting point between them. (author)

  7. Periodic large-amplitude thermal oscillations occurring in a buoyant plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Reactor events such as N-1 loop operation in conjunction with a leaky check valve in the down loop can cause flow to be convected back into the reactor outlet nozzle/piping region and to be back-flushed into the reactor outlet plenum. The preceding results in a temperature difference between pipe inflow and plenum. This temperature difference causes buoyancy forces which if large enough can cause: a pipe backflow and recirculation loop; and a thermal plume in the plenum. Both phenomena are being studied because they can produce undesirable pipe, nozzle and plenum wall thermal distributions, and hence undesirable thermal stresses. This paper discusses some features of the plume

  8. Thermal anchoring of wires in large scale superconducting coil test experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Dipak; Sharma, A.N.; Prasad, Upendra; Khristi, Yohan; Varmora, Pankaj; Doshi, Kalpesh; Pradhan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We addressed how thermal anchoring in large scale coil test is different compare to small cryogenic apparatus? • We did precise estimation of thermal anchoring length at 77 K and 4.2 K heat sink in large scale superconducting coil test experiment. • We addressed, the quality of anchoring without covering entire wires using Kapton/Teflon tape. • We obtained excellent results in temperature measurement without using GE Varnish by doubling estimated anchoring length. -- Abstract: Effective and precise thermal anchoring of wires in cryogenic experiment is mandatory to measure temperature in milikelvin accuracy and to avoid unnecessary cooling power due to additional heat conduction from room temperature (RT) to operating temperature (OT) through potential, field, displacement and stress measurement instrumentation wires. Instrumentation wires used in large scale superconducting coil test experiments are different compare to cryogenic apparatus in terms of unique construction and overall diameter/area due to errorless measurement in large time-varying magnetic field compare to small cryogenic apparatus, often shielded wires are used. Hence, along with other variables, anchoring techniques and required thermal anchoring length are entirely different in this experiment compare to cryogenic apparatus. In present paper, estimation of thermal anchoring length of five different types of instrumentation wires used in coils test campaign at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India has been discussed and some temperature measurement results of coils test campaign have been presented

  9. Large quantity production of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes by mechano-thermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Fitzgerald, J.D.; Chadderton, L.; Williams, J.S.; Campbell, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Nanotube materials including carbon and boron nitride have excellent properties compared with bulk materials. The seamless graphene cylinders with a high length to diameter ratio make them as superstrong fibers. A high amount of hydrogen can be stored into nanotubes as future clean fuel source. Theses applications require large quantity of nanotubes materials. However, nanotube production in large quantity, fully controlled quality and low costs remains challenges for most popular synthesis methods such as arc discharge, laser heating and catalytic chemical decomposition. Discovery of new synthesis methods is still crucial for future industrial application. The new low-temperature mechano-thermal process discovered by the current author provides an opportunity to develop a commercial method for bulk production. This mechano-thermal process consists of a mechanical ball milling and a thermal annealing processes. Using this method, both carbon and boron nitride nanotubes were produced. I will present the mechano-thermal method as the new bulk production technique in the conference. The lecture will summarise main results obtained. In the case of carbon nanotubes, different nanosized structures including multi-walled nanotubes, nanocells, and nanoparticles have been produced in a graphite sample using a mechano-thermal process, consisting of I mechanical milling at room temperature for up to 150 hours and subsequent thermal annealing at 1400 deg C. Metal particles have played an important catalytic effect on the formation of different tubular structures. While defect structure of the milled graphite appears to be responsible for the formation of small tubes. It is found that the mechanical treatment of graphite powder produces a disordered and microporous structure, which provides nucleation sites for nanotubes as well as free carbon atoms. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes appear to grow via growth of the (002) layers during thermal annealing. In the case of BN

  10. Thermal analysis of the large close packed amplifiers in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.L.; Mannell, G.T.

    1995-05-01

    Flashlamp pumping of the large aperture multi-segment NIF amplifiers will result in large amounts of energy being deposited as heat in the amplifier components. The magnitude of the heating and the nonuniform distribution result in a delay time between shots due to wavefront distortion and steering error. A NEF requirement is that the thermal wavefront recovery must occur in less than six hours. The principal cause of long-term wavefront distortion is the thermal gradient produced in the slab as heat diffuses from the edge cladding into the pumped volume. Thermal equilibrium is established through conduction, convection, and exchange of thermal radiation. Radiative exchange between glass components, such as flashlamps, blast shields, and laser slabs is especially effective because of the large surface areas of these components and the high emissivity of the glass. Free convection within the amplifier enclosure is also important but is on the order of a 10 to 20% effect compared to radiation for the major surfaces. To evaluate the NIF design, the amplifier was modeled to calculate the thermal response of a single laser element. The amplifier is cooled by flowing room-temperature air or nitrogen through the flashlamp cassettes. Active cooling of the flashlamps and blast shields serves two purposes; the energy deposited in these components can be removed before it is transferred to the amplifier optical components, and the cooled blast shield provides a large area heat sink for removal of the residual heat from the laser slabs. Approximately 50 to 60% of the flashlamp energy is deposited in the flashlamps and blast shields. Thus, cooling the flashlamp cassette is a very effective method for removing a substantial fraction of the energy without disturbing the optical elements of the system. Preliminary thermal analysis indicates that active cooling with flow rates of 10 CFM per flashlamp is sufficient to meet the six hour thermal equilibrium requirement

  11. Thermal power generation projects ``Large Scale Solar Heating``; EU-Thermie-Projekte ``Large Scale Solar Heating``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuebler, R.; Fisch, M.N. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum Energie-, Gebaeude- und Solartechnik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of this project is the preparation of the ``Large-Scale Solar Heating`` programme for an Europe-wide development of subject technology. The following demonstration programme was judged well by the experts but was not immediately (1996) accepted for financial subsidies. In November 1997 the EU-commission provided 1,5 million ECU which allowed the realisation of an updated project proposal. By mid 1997 a small project was approved, that had been requested under the lead of Chalmes Industriteteknik (CIT) in Sweden and is mainly carried out for the transfer of technology. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieses Vorhabens ist die Vorbereitung eines Schwerpunktprogramms `Large Scale Solar Heating`, mit dem die Technologie europaweit weiterentwickelt werden sollte. Das daraus entwickelte Demonstrationsprogramm wurde von den Gutachtern positiv bewertet, konnte jedoch nicht auf Anhieb (1996) in die Foerderung aufgenommen werden. Im November 1997 wurden von der EU-Kommission dann kurzfristig noch 1,5 Mio ECU an Foerderung bewilligt, mit denen ein aktualisierter Projektvorschlag realisiert werden kann. Bereits Mitte 1997 wurde ein kleineres Vorhaben bewilligt, das unter Federfuehrung von Chalmers Industriteknik (CIT) in Schweden beantragt worden war und das vor allem dem Technologietransfer dient. (orig.)

  12. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  13. The testing of thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes using a large block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.; Wilder, D.G.; Blink, J.A.; Blair, S.C.; Buscheck, T.A.; Chesnut, D.A.; Glassley, W.E.; Lee, K.; Roberts, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The radioactive decay heat from nuclear waste packages may, depending on the thermal load, create coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the near-field environment of a repository. A group of tests on a large block (LBT) are planned to provide a timely opportunity to test and calibrate some of the TMHC model concepts. The LBT is advantageous for testing and verifying model concepts because the boundary conditions are controlled, and the block can be characterized before and after the experiment. A block of Topopah Spring tuff of about 3 x 3 x 4.5 m will be sawed and isolated at Fran Ridge, Nevada Test Site. Small blocks of the rock adjacent to the large block will be collected for laboratory testing of some individual thermal-mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes. A constant load of about 4 MPa will be applied to the top and sides of the large block. The sides will be sealed with moisture and thermal barriers. The large block will be heated with one heater in each borehole and guard heaters on the sides so that a dry-out zone and a condensate zone will exist simultaneously. Temperature, moisture content, pore pressure, chemical composition, stress and displacement will be measured throughout the block during the heating and cool-down phases. The results from the experiments on small blocks and the tests on the large block will provide a better understanding of some concepts of the coupled TMHC processes

  14. Thermal Stress FE Analysis of Large-scale Gas Holder Under Sunshine Temperature Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyu; Yang, Ranxia; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The temperature field and thermal stress of Man type gas holder is simulated by using the theory of sunshine temperature field based on ASHRAE clear-sky model and the finite element method. The distribution of surface temperature and thermal stress of gas holder under the given sunshine condition is obtained. The results show that the thermal stress caused by sunshine can be identified as one of the important factors for the failure of local cracked oil leakage which happens on the sunny side before on the shady side. Therefore, it is of great importance to consider the sunshine thermal load in the stress analysis, design and operation of large-scale steel structures such as the gas holder.

  15. Design of an amplifier model accounting for thermal effect in fully aperiodic large pitch fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragni, K.; Molardi, C.; Poli, F.; Dauliat, R.; Leconte, B.; Darwich, D.; du Jeu, R.; Malleville, M. A.; Jamier, R.; Selleri, S.; Roy, P.; Cucinotta, A.

    2018-02-01

    Yb-doped Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) have triggered a significant power scaling into fiber-based lasers. However thermally-induced effects, like mode instability, can compromise the output beam quality. PCF design with improved Higher Order Mode (HOM) delocalization and effective thermal resilience can contain the problem. In particular, Fully- Aperiodic Large-Pitch Fibers (FA-LPFs) have shown interesting properties in terms of resilience to thermal effects. In this paper the performances of a Yb-doped FA-LPF amplifier are experimentally and numerically investigated. Modal properties and gain competition between Fundamental Mode (FM) and first HOM have been calculated, in presence of thermal effects. The main doped fiber characteristics have been derived by comparison between experimental and numerical results.

  16. Coupled large-eddy simulation of thermal mixing in a T-junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloeren, D.; Laurien, E.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzing thermal fatigue due to thermal mixing in T-junctions is part of the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. Results of two large-eddy simulations of mixing flow in a T-junction with coupled and adiabatic boundary condition are presented and compared. The temperature difference is set to 100 K, which leads to strong stratification of the flow. The main and the branch pipe intersect horizontally in this simulation. The flow is characterized by steady wavy pattern of stratification and temperature distribution. The coupled solution approach shows highly reduced temperature fluctuations in the near wall region due to thermal inertia of the wall. A conjugate heat transfer approach is necessary in order to simulate unsteady heat transfer accurately for large inlet temperature differences. (author)

  17. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sperduti, A. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi n. 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN–Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [INFN–LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-01-21

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a {sup 241}Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} to 1000 cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  18. Power Generation from a Radiative Thermal Source Using a Large-Area Infrared Rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Joshua; Kadlec, Emil A.; Jarecki, Robert L.; Starbuck, Andrew; Howell, Stephen; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul S.

    2018-05-01

    Electrical power generation from a moderate-temperature thermal source by means of direct conversion of infrared radiation is important and highly desirable for energy harvesting from waste heat and micropower applications. Here, we demonstrate direct rectified power generation from an unbiased large-area nanoantenna-coupled tunnel diode rectifier called a rectenna. Using a vacuum radiometric measurement technique with irradiation from a temperature-stabilized thermal source, a generated power density of 8 nW /cm2 is observed at a source temperature of 450 °C for the unbiased rectenna across an optimized load resistance. The optimized load resistance for the peak power generation for each temperature coincides with the tunnel diode resistance at zero bias and corresponds to the impedance matching condition for a rectifying antenna. Current-voltage measurements of a thermally illuminated large-area rectenna show current zero crossing shifts into the second quadrant indicating rectification. Photon-assisted tunneling in the unbiased rectenna is modeled as the mechanism for the large short-circuit photocurrents observed where the photon energy serves as an effective bias across the tunnel junction. The measured current and voltage across the load resistor as a function of the thermal source temperature represents direct current electrical power generation.

  19. Large eddy simulation on thermal fluid mixing in a T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick; Kulenovic, R.; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst fuer Kernenergie und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2014-11-15

    High cycle thermal fatigue damage caused in piping systems is an important problem encountered in the context of nuclear safety and lifetime management of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The T-junction piping system present in the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) is more vulnerable to thermal fatigue cracking. In this numerical study, thermal mixing of fluids at temperature difference (?T) of 117 K between the mixing fluids is analyzed. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed with conjugate heat transfer between the fluid and structure. LES is performed based on the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at University of Stuttgart. The results show an intense turbulent mixing of fluids downstream of T-junction. Amplitude of temperature fluctuations near the wall region and its corresponding frequency distribution is analyzed. LES is performed using commercial CFD software ANSYS CFX 14.0.

  20. Fast Thermal Runaway Detection for Lithium-Ion Cells in Large Scale Traction Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Koch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal runaway of single cells within a large scale lithium-ion battery is a well-known risk that can lead to critical situations if no counter measures are taken in today’s lithium-ion traction batteries for battery electric vehicles (BEVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs. The United Nations have published a draft global technical regulation on electric vehicle safety (GTR EVS describing a safety feature to warn passengers in case of a thermal runaway. Fast and reliable detection of faulty cells undergoing thermal runaway within the lithium-ion battery is therefore a key factor in battery designs for comprehensive passenger safety. A set of various possible sensors has been chosen based on the determined cell thermal runaway impact. These sensors have been tested in different sized battery setups and compared with respect to their ability of fast and reliable thermal runaway detection and their feasibility for traction batteries.

  1. A 3D thermal runaway propagation model for a large format lithium ion battery module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xuning; Lu, Languang; Ouyang, Minggao; Li, Jiangqiu; He, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D thermal runaway (TR) propagation model is built for a large format lithium ion battery module. The 3D TR propagation model is built based on the energy balance equation. Empirical equations are utilized to simplify the calculation of the chemical kinetics for TR, whereas equivalent thermal resistant layer is employed to simplify the heat transfer through the thin thermal layer. The 3D TR propagation model is validated by experiment and can provide beneficial discussions on the mechanisms of TR propagation. According to the modeling analysis of the 3D model, the TR propagation can be delayed or prevented through: 1) increasing the TR triggering temperature; 2) reducing the total electric energy released during TR; 3) enhancing the heat dissipation level; 4) adding extra thermal resistant layer between adjacent batteries. The TR propagation is successfully prevented in the model and validated by experiment. The model with 3D temperature distribution provides a beneficial tool for researchers to study the TR propagation mechanisms and for engineers to design a safer battery pack. - Highlights: • A 3D thermal runaway (TR) propagation model for Li-ion battery pack is built. • The 3D TR propagation model can fit experimental results well. • Temperature distributions during TR propagation are presented using the 3D model. • Modeling analysis provides solutions for the prevention of TR propagation. • Quantified solutions to prevent TR propagation in battery pack are discussed.

  2. Dynamic, large-deflection, inelastic and thermal stress analysis by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisler, W.E.; Stricklin, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element theory and computer program have been developed for predicting the dynamic, large displacement, inelastic and thermal response of stiffened and layered structures. The dependence of material properties on temperature is explicitly accounted for and any arbitrary, transient mechanical or thermal load history is allowed. The shell may have internal or external stiffeners and be constructed with up to three layers. The equations of motion are developed by using the pseudo force approach to represent all nonlinearities and are then solved by using either the Houbolt method or central differences. Moderately large rotations are allowed. The program is based on an incremental theory of plasticity using the Von Mises yield condition and associated flow rule. The post yield or work-hardening behavior is idealized with either the isotropic hardening or mechanical sublayer models. Two models are utilized since it has been found through comparison with experimental results that isotropic hardening is best for simple loading conditions while the mechanical sublayer model is better for reverse and cyclic loading. Strain-rate effects are also accounted for in the program by using a power-law type model based on the strain rate. The dependence of material properties on temperature is taken into account in the pseudo forces. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal coefficient of expansion, the yield stress, and the entire stress strain curve are treated as functions of the applied temperature. Containment vessels subjected to transient and shock-type mechanical and thermal loads have been analyzed

  3. Subsurface thermal behaviour of tissue mimics embedded with large blood vessels during plasmonic photo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Narasimhan, Arunn; Das, Sarit K; Sengupta, Soujit; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the subsurface thermal behaviour of a tissue phantom embedded with large blood vessels (LBVs) when exposed to near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The effect of the addition of nanoparticles to irradiated tissue on the thermal sink behaviour of LBVs was also studied. Experiments were performed on a tissue phantom embedded with a simulated blood vessel of 2.2 mm outer diameter (OD)/1.6 mm inner diameter (ID) with a blood flow rate of 10 mL/min. Type I collagen from bovine tendon and agar gel were used as tissue. Two different nanoparticles, gold mesoflowers (AuMS) and graphene nanostructures, were synthesised and characterised. Energy equations incorporating a laser source term based on multiple scattering theories were solved using finite element-based commercial software. The rise in temperature upon NIR irradiation was seen to vary according to the position of the blood vessel and presence of nanoparticles. While the maximum rise in temperature was about 10 °C for bare tissue, it was 19 °C for tissue embedded with gold nanostructures and 38 °C for graphene-embedded tissues. The axial temperature distribution predicted by computational simulation matched the experimental observations. A different subsurface temperature distribution has been obtained for different tissue vascular network models. The position of LBVs must be known in order to achieve optimal tissue necrosis. The simulation described here helps in predicting subsurface temperature distributions within tissues during plasmonic photo-thermal therapy so that the risks of damage and complications associated with in vivo experiments and therapy may be avoided.

  4. Spring-like motion caused large anisotropic thermal expansion in nonporous M(eim)2 (M = Zn, Cd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanning; Liu, Chenxi; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jun; Xing, Xianran

    2017-09-20

    Two nonporous coordination polymers were found to possess large anisotropic thermal expansion, which was derived from the flexible structures. A "spring-like" thermal motion was proposed to illustrate the mechanism. Compound Cd(eim) 2 (eim = 2-ethylimidazole) possesses large linear and reversible thermal expansion properties and the emission intensity shows a linear decrease with temperature, making it a candidate for thermo-responsive materials.

  5. Thermal large Eddy simulations and experiments in the framework of non-isothermal blowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study thermal large-eddy simulations and to determine the nonisothermal blowing impact on a turbulent boundary layer. An experimental study is also carried out in order to complete and validate simulation results. In a first time, we developed a turbulent inlet condition for the velocity and the temperature, which is necessary for the blowing simulations.We studied the asymptotic behavior of the velocity, the temperature and the thermal turbulent fluxes in a large-eddy simulation point of view. We then considered dynamics models for the eddy-diffusivity and we simulated a turbulent channel flow with imposed temperature, imposed flux and adiabatic walls. The numerical and experimental study of blowing permitted to obtain to the modifications of a thermal turbulent boundary layer with the blowing rate. We observed the consequences of the blowing on mean and rms profiles of velocity and temperature but also on velocity-velocity and velocity-temperature correlations. Moreover, we noticed an increase of the turbulent structures in the boundary layer with blowing. (author)

  6. Formation and Thermal Stability of Large Precipitates and Oxides in Titanium and Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Xiao-jun; WOO Dae-hee; WANG Xin-hua; LEE Hae-geon

    2008-01-01

    As-cast CC slabs of microalloyed steels are prone to surface and sub-surface cracking. Precipitation phenomena in-itiated during solidification reduce ductility at high temperature. The unidirectional solidification unit is employed to sim-ulate the solidification process during continuous casting. Precipitation behavior and thermal stability are systemati-cally investigated. Samples of adding titanium and niobium to steels have been examined using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It has been found that the addition of titanium and niobium to high-strength low-alloyed (HSLA) steel resuited in undesirable large precipitation in the steels, i. e. , precipitation of large precipitates with various morphologies. The composition of the large precipitates has been determined. The effect of cooling rate on (Ti, Nb)(C, N) precipitate formation is investigated. With increasing the cooling rate, titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C, N) precipitates are transformed to niobium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitates. The thermal stability of these large precipitates and oxides have been assessed by carrying out various heat treatments such as holding and quenching from temperature at 800 and 1 200 ℃. It has been found that titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 1 200 ℃ and niobi-um-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 800 ℃. After reheating at 1 200 ℃ for 1 h, (Ca, Mn)S and TiN are precipitated from Ca-Al oxide. However, during reheating at 800 ℃ for 1 h, Ca-Al-Ti oxide in specimens was stable. The thermodynamic calculation of simulating the thermal process is employed. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  8. Large scale solar thermal power for the European Union{exclamation_point}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-06-01

    Southern Europe, on the edge of the sunbelt, represents the ideal location for solar thermal generated power. Last year. SAWIE reported on the THESEUS project, a proposed 50 MWe solar thermal power plant for Frangokastello, southern Crete, which was submitted for support under the European Union`s THERMIE Programme. Funding was approved for the design phase for this innovative power plant, the first large-scale SEGS-style plant on European soil, at the end of last year. However, the THERMIE Programme also provided support for another Southern European plant, proposed by Colon Solar for Huelva in Southern Spain. Whilst hurdles remain to be overcome before both plants are built and commissioned, there is an excellent chance that by the start of the new Millennium, the solar collectors from these two plants could be generating over half a million MWh of energy a year. SAWIE compares the two projects. (author)

  9. Research on simulation of supercritical steam turbine system in large thermal power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongyang

    2018-04-01

    In order to improve the stability and safety of supercritical steam turbine system operation in large thermal power station, the body of the steam turbine is modeled in this paper. And in accordance with the hierarchical modeling idea, the steam turbine body model, condensing system model, deaeration system model and regenerative system model are combined to build a simulation model of steam turbine system according to the connection relationship of each subsystem of steam turbine. Finally, the correctness of the model is verified by design and operation data of the 600MW supercritical unit. The results show that the maximum simulation error of the model is 2.15%, which meets the requirements of the engineering. This research provides a platform for the research on the variable operating conditions of the turbine system, and lays a foundation for the construction of the whole plant model of the thermal power plant.

  10. Modeling of electromagnetic and thermal diffusion in a large pure aluminum stabilized superconductor under quench

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Low temperature composite superconductors stabilized with extra large cross-section pure aluminum are currently in use for the Large Helical Device in Japan, modern big detectors such as ATLAS at CERN, and other large magnets. In these types of magnet systems, the rated average current density is not high and the peak field in a region of interest is about 2-4 T. Aluminum stabilized superconductors result in high stability margins and relatively long quench times. Appropriate quench analyses, both for longitudinal and transverse propagation, have to take into account a rather slow diffusion of current from the superconductor into the thick aluminum stabilizer. An exact approach to modeling of the current diffusion would be based on directly solving the Maxwell's equations in parallel with thermal diffusion and conduction relations. However, from a practical point of view, such an approach should be extremely time consuming due to obvious restrictions of computation capacity. At the same time, there exist cert...

  11. Large scale atomistic approaches to thermal transport and phonon scattering in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana

    2012-02-01

    Decreasing the thermal conductivity of bulk materials by nanostructuring and dimensionality reduction, or by introducing some amount of disorder represents a promising strategy in the search for efficient thermoelectric materials [1]. For example, considerable improvements of the thermoelectric efficiency in nanowires with surface roughness [2], superlattices [3] and nanocomposites [4] have been attributed to a significantly reduced thermal conductivity. In order to accurately describe thermal transport processes in complex nanostructured materials and directly compare with experiments, the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can account for both anharmonic and disorder effects in large samples is highly desirable. We will first summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the standard atomistic approaches to thermal transport (molecular dynamics [5], Boltzmann transport equation [6] and Green's function approach [7]) . We will then focus on the methods based on the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, that are computationally too demanding, at present, to treat large scale systems and thus to investigate realistic materials. We will present a Monte Carlo method [8] to solve the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation [9], that enables computation of the thermal conductivity of ordered and disordered systems with a number of atoms up to an order of magnitude larger than feasible with straightforward integration. We will present a comparison between exact and Monte Carlo Boltzmann transport results for small SiGe nanostructures and then use the Monte Carlo method to analyze the thermal properties of realistic SiGe nanostructured materials. This work is done in collaboration with Davide Donadio, Francois Gygi, and Giulia Galli from UC Davis.[4pt] [1] See e.g. A. J. Minnich, M. S. Dresselhaus, Z. F. Ren, and G. Chen, Energy Environ. Sci. 2, 466 (2009).[0pt] [2] A. I. Hochbaum et al, Nature 451, 163 (2008).[0pt

  12. Suppression of the Thermal Decomposition Reaction of Forest Combustible Materials in Large-Area Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Zhdanova, A. O.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2018-05-01

    Experimental investigations on the characteristic time of suppression of the thermal decomposition reaction of typical forest combustible materials (aspen twigs, birch leaves, spruce needles, pine chips, and a mixture of these materials) and the volume of water required for this purpose have been performed for model fire hotbeds of different areas: SFCM = 0.0003-0.007 m2 and SFCM = 0.045-0.245 m2. In the experiments, aerosol water flows with droplets of size 0.01-0.25 mm were used for the spraying of model fire hotbeds, and the density of spraying was 0.02 L/(m2·s). It was established that the characteristics of suppression of a fire by an aerosol water flow are mainly determined by the sizes of the droplets in this flow. Prognostic estimates of changes in the dispersivity of a droplet cloud, formed from large (as large as 0.5 L) "drops" (water agglomerates) thrown down from a height, have been made. It is shown that these changes can influence the conditions and characteristics of suppression of a forest fire. Dependences, allowing one to forecast the characteristics of suppression of the thermal decomposition of forest combustible materials with the use of large water agglomerates thrown down from an aircraft and aerosol clouds formed from these agglomerates in the process of their movement to the earth, are presented.

  13. Suppression of the Thermal Decomposition Reaction of Forest Combustible Materials in Large-Area Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, R. S.; Zhdanova, A. O.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    Experimental investigations on the characteristic time of suppression of the thermal decomposition reaction of typical forest combustible materials (aspen twigs, birch leaves, spruce needles, pine chips, and a mixture of these materials) and the volume of water required for this purpose have been performed for model fire hotbeds of different areas: SFCM = 0.0003-0.007 m2 and SFCM = 0.045-0.245 m2. In the experiments, aerosol water flows with droplets of size 0.01-0.25 mm were used for the spraying of model fire hotbeds, and the density of spraying was 0.02 L/(m2·s). It was established that the characteristics of suppression of a fire by an aerosol water flow are mainly determined by the sizes of the droplets in this flow. Prognostic estimates of changes in the dispersivity of a droplet cloud, formed from large (as large as 0.5 L) "drops" (water agglomerates) thrown down from a height, have been made. It is shown that these changes can influence the conditions and characteristics of suppression of a forest fire. Dependences, allowing one to forecast the characteristics of suppression of the thermal decomposition of forest combustible materials with the use of large water agglomerates thrown down from an aircraft and aerosol clouds formed from these agglomerates in the process of their movement to the earth, are presented.

  14. RESOURCE SAVING TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS OF LARGE-SIZE DIE THERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Glazkov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The given paper presents a development of a technological process pertaining to hardening large-size parts made of die steel. The proposed process applies a water-air mixture instead of a conventional hardening medium that is industrial oil.While developing this new technological process it has been necessary to solve the following problems: reduction of thermal treatment duration, reduction of power resource expense (natural gas and mineral oil, elimination of fire danger and increase of process ecological efficiency. 

  15. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethe, Martin; Rubi, J. Miguel; Fita, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  16. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethe, Martin, E-mail: martingoethe@ub.edu; Rubi, J. Miguel [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  17. Thermal System Analysis and Optimization of Large-Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongguang Fu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As an important solution to issues regarding peak load and renewable energy resources on grids, large-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES power generation technology has recently become a popular research topic in the area of large-scale industrial energy storage. At present, the combination of high-expansion ratio turbines with advanced gas turbine technology is an important breakthrough in energy storage technology. In this study, a new gas turbine power generation system is coupled with current CAES technology. Moreover, a thermodynamic cycle system is optimized by calculating for the parameters of a thermodynamic system. Results show that the thermal efficiency of the new system increases by at least 5% over that of the existing system.

  18. Large Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Systems for Thermal Engineering Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIlroy, Hugh M. Jr.; McEligot, Donald M.; Becker, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    In recent international collaboration, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (UE) have developed large MIR flow systems which are ideal for joint graduate student education and research. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The MIR technique is not new itself; others employed it earlier. The innovation of these MIR systems is their large size relative to previous experiments, yielding improved spatial and temporal resolution. This article will discuss the benefits of the technique, characteristics of the systems and some examples of their applications to complex situations. Typically their experiments have provided new fundamental understanding plus benchmark data for assessment and validation of computational thermal fluid dynamic codes.

  19. The use of large area silicon sensors for thermal neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.L.; Swanson, F.; Kesselman, M.

    1994-01-01

    The use of large area planar silicon detectors coupled with gadolinium foils has been investigated to develop a thermal neutron detector having a large area-efficiency (Aε) product. Noise levels due to high detector capacitance limit the size of silicon detectors that can be utilized. Calculations using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, have been made to determine the variation of intrinsic detection efficiency as a function of the discriminator threshold level required to eliminate the detector noise. Measurements of the noise levels for planar silicon detectors of various resistivities (400, 3000 and 5000 Ω cm) have been made and the optimal detector area-efficiency products have been determined. The response of a Si-Gd-Si sandwich detector with areas between 1 cm 2 and 10.5 cm 2 is presented and the effects of the detector capacitance and reverse current are discussed. ((orig.))

  20. The use of large area silicon sensors for thermal neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, R.L. (Research and Development Center, Mail Stop: A01-26, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY 11714 (United States)); Swanson, F. (Research and Development Center, Mail Stop: A01-26, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY 11714 (United States)); Kesselman, M. (Research and Development Center, Mail Stop: A01-26, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage, NY 11714 (United States))

    1994-12-30

    The use of large area planar silicon detectors coupled with gadolinium foils has been investigated to develop a thermal neutron detector having a large area-efficiency (A[epsilon]) product. Noise levels due to high detector capacitance limit the size of silicon detectors that can be utilized. Calculations using the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, have been made to determine the variation of intrinsic detection efficiency as a function of the discriminator threshold level required to eliminate the detector noise. Measurements of the noise levels for planar silicon detectors of various resistivities (400, 3000 and 5000 [Omega] cm) have been made and the optimal detector area-efficiency products have been determined. The response of a Si-Gd-Si sandwich detector with areas between 1 cm[sup 2] and 10.5 cm[sup 2] is presented and the effects of the detector capacitance and reverse current are discussed. ((orig.))

  1. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Abbie N.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA) graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400–1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700–800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000–1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput. PMID:28793326

  2. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Theodosiou

    Full Text Available This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF. Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400-1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700-800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000-1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput.

  3. Large displacement spring-like electro-mechanical thermal actuators with insulator constraint beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J. K.; Fu, Y. Q.; Flewitt, A. J.; Spearing, S. M.; Fleck, N. A.; Milne, W. I.

    2005-07-01

    A number of in-plane spring-like micro-electro-thermal-actuators with large displacements were proposed. The devices take the advantage of the large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients between the conductive arms and the insulator clamping beams. The constraint beams in one type (the spring) of these devices are horizontally positioned to restrict the expansion of the active arms in the x-direction, and to produce a displacement in the y-direction only. In other two types of actuators (the deflector and the contractor), the constraint beams are positioned parallel to the active arms. When the constraint beams are on the inside of the active arms, the actuator produces an outward deflection in the y-direction. When they are on the outside of the active arms, the actuator produces an inward contraction. Analytical model and finite element analysis were used to simulate the performances. It showed that at a constant temperature, analytical model is sufficient to predict the displacement of these devices. The displacements are all proportional to the temperature and the number of the chevron sections. A two-mask process is under development to fabricate these devices, using Si3N4 as the insulator beams, and electroplated Ni as the conductive beams.

  4. Thermography During Thermal Test of the Gaia Deployable Sunshield Assembly Qualification Model in the ESTEC Large Space Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R.; Broussely, M.; Edwards, G.; Robinson, D.; Cozzani, A.; Casarosa, G.

    2012-07-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and The European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) have performed for the first time successful surface temperature measurements using infrared thermal imaging in the ESTEC Large Space Simulator (LSS) under vacuum and with the Sun Simulator (SUSI) switched on during thermal qualification tests of the GAIA Deployable Sunshield Assembly (DSA). The thermal imager temperature measurements, with radiosity model corrections, show good agreement with thermocouple readings on well characterised regions of the spacecraft. In addition, the thermal imaging measurements identified potentially misleading thermocouple temperature readings and provided qualitative real-time observations of the thermal and spatial evolution of surface structure changes and heat dissipation during hot test loadings, which may yield additional thermal and physical measurement information through further research.

  5. Application of large-eddy simulation to pressurized thermal shock: Assessment of the accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, M.S.; Komen, E.M.J.; Hoehne, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We compare large-eddy simulation with experiment on the single-phase pressurized thermal shock problem. → Three test cases are considered, they cover entire range of mixing patterns. → The accuracy of the flow mixing in the reactor pressure vessel is assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. - Abstract: Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) is identified as one of the safety issues where Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can bring real benefits. The turbulence modeling may impact overall accuracy of the calculated thermal loads on the vessel walls, therefore advanced methods for turbulent flows are required. The feasibility and mesh resolution of LES for single-phase PTS are assessed earlier in a companion paper. The current investigation deals with the accuracy of LES approach with respect to the experiment. Experimental data from the Rossendorf Coolant Mixing (ROCOM) facility is used as a basis for validation. Three test cases with different flow rates are considered. They correspond to a buoyancy-driven, a momentum-driven, and a transitional coolant mixing pattern in the downcomer. Time- and frequency-domain analysis are employed for comparison of the numerical and experimental data. The investigation shows a good qualitative prediction of the bulk flow patterns. The fluctuations are modeled correctly. A conservative estimate of the temperature drop near the wall can be obtained from the numerical results with safety factor of 1.1-1.3. In general, the current LES gives a realistic and reliable description of the considered coolant mixing experiments. The accuracy of the prediction is definitely improved with respect to earlier CFD simulations.

  6. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  7. Efficient Geometry and Data Handling for Large-Scale Monte Carlo - Thermal-Hydraulics Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard

    2014-06-01

    Detailed coupling of thermal-hydraulics calculations to Monte Carlo reactor criticality calculations requires each axial layer of each fuel pin to be defined separately in the input to the Monte Carlo code in order to assign to each volume the temperature according to the result of the TH calculation, and if the volume contains coolant, also the density of the coolant. This leads to huge input files for even small systems. In this paper a methodology for dynamical assignment of temperatures with respect to cross section data is demonstrated to overcome this problem. The method is implemented in MCNP5. The method is verified for an infinite lattice with 3x3 BWR-type fuel pins with fuel, cladding and moderator/coolant explicitly modeled. For each pin 60 axial zones are considered with different temperatures and coolant densities. The results of the axial power distribution per fuel pin are compared to a standard MCNP5 run in which all 9x60 cells for fuel, cladding and coolant are explicitly defined and their respective temperatures determined from the TH calculation. Full agreement is obtained. For large-scale application the method is demonstrated for an infinite lattice with 17x17 PWR-type fuel assemblies with 25 rods replaced by guide tubes. Again all geometrical detailed is retained. The method was used in a procedure for coupled Monte Carlo and thermal-hydraulics iterations. Using an optimised iteration technique, convergence was obtained in 11 iteration steps.

  8. Thermal Stability of Ultrafine Grained Pure Copper Prepared by Large Strain Extrusion Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangxian Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine grained (UFG pure copper chips with improved material strength have been successfully prepared by large strain extrusion machining (LSEM. However, the thermal stability of the UFG chips has been a key characteristic that has restricted their use in practical applications. To understand the influence of annealing temperature and annealing time on their microstructures and mechanical properties, the UFG chips were subjected to isochronous and isothermal annealing treatments as well as Vickers hardness tests in the present study. From the results, we found that the UFG chips maintain high hardness when annealing at temperatures up to 160 °C but begin to exhibit a reduction in their hardness while the annealing temperature reached above 200 °C. When annealed at 280 °C for 10–240 min, the grain size increased slightly and reached a stable value of 2 µm with an increase in annealing time and with a decrease in the hardness of the chips. These results indicated that UFG pure copper chips have good thermal stability at temperatures below 160 °C.

  9. Unexpected low thermal conductivity and large power factor in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhang; Tong, Zhou; Sihang, Liang; Junzhi, Cao; Xiang, Yuan; Yanwen, Liu; Yao, Shen; Qisi, Wang; Jun, Zhao; Zhongqin, Yang; Faxian, Xiu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics has long been considered as a promising way of power generation for the next decades. So far, extensive efforts have been devoted to the search of ideal thermoelectric materials, which require both high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. Recently, the emerging Dirac semimetal Cd3As2, a three-dimensional analogue of graphene, has been reported to host ultra-high mobility and good electrical conductivity as metals. Here, we report the observation of unexpected low thermal conductivity in Cd3As2, one order of magnitude lower than the conventional metals or semimetals with a similar electrical conductivity, despite the semimetal band structure and high electron mobility. The power factor also reaches a large value of 1.58 mW·m-1·K-2 at room temperature and remains non-saturated up to 400 K. Corroborating with the first-principles calculations, we find that the thermoelectric performance can be well-modulated by the carrier concentration in a wide range. This work demonstrates the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 as a potential candidate of thermoelectric materials. Project supported by the National Young 1000 Talent Plan China, the Pujiang Talent Plan in Shanghai, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61322407 and 11474058), the Fund for Fostering Talents in Basic Science of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. J1103204), and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921803).

  10. Measurements of indoor thermal environment and energy analysis in a large space building in typical seasons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen; Zou, Zhijun; Li, Meiling; Wang, Xin; Huang, Wugang; Yang, Jiangang [University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Li, Wei; Xiao, Xueqin [Shanghai International Gymnastics Stadium, Shanghai (China)

    2007-05-15

    Shanghai International Gymnastics Stadium is the selected object for site-measurement. The site-measurements have been carried out during summer, winter, and the transitional seasons. Their indoor thermal environments were controlled by continuous air-conditioning, intermittent air-conditioning and natural ventilation, respectively. The site-measurement includes outdoor environment (the weather conditions and peripheral hallway), indoor air temperature distribution (the occupant zone temperature, radial temperature near upper openings and the vertical temperature distributions, etc.), and the heat balance of air-conditioning system, etc. It is found that temperature stratification in winter with air-conditioning is most obvious. The maximum difference of vertical temperature is 15{sup o}C in winter. The second largest one is 12{sup o}C in summer, and less than 2{sup o}C in the transitional season. The results of measurements indicate that it is different in the characteristics on energy saving of upper openings during the different seasons. With heat balance measurements, it is discovered that the roof load and ventilated and infiltrated load account for larger percentages in terms of cooling and heating load. In this paper, many discussions on the results of site measurements show some characteristics and regulations of indoor thermal environment in large space building. (author)

  11. Thermal analysis of large diameter container (LDC) with alternate loadings of KE Basin sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILDON, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    A thermal analysis was performed to determine temperature distribution and hydrogen generation for a Large Diameter Container (LDC) having a two layer load configuration made up of a lower layer, consisting of sludge from the weasel pit, and an upper layer, consisting of the KE Basin canister sludge. For each alternate loading, the response of the LDC during shipping and storage in a T Plant cell was determined. Results for various alternate loadings were compared to the base case previously reported in SNF--9955 [Crea, 2002], 4 identical batches each with 60% floor, 40% canister sludge. Results for various cases are summarized in Table 5 and transient histories for each case are contained in figures as noted in the table. The thermal response and hydrogen generation rate of the base case bounds all alternate loadings except the third alternate loading, where 0.8 m 3 of canister sludge is loaded on the top of 1.2 m 3 of weasel pit sludge. For this case, the peak sludge temperature exceeded 100 C during shipping after 6.8 days (Note: sludge boiling does not occur in any case because the LDC pressurizes during transport and interstitial water is never saturated)

  12. A compact system for large-area thermal nanoimprint lithography using smart stamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, R H; Hansen, O; Kristensen, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a simple apparatus for thermal nanoimprint lithography. In this work, the stamp is designed to significantly reduce the requirements for pressure application on the external imprint system. By MEMS-based processing, an air cavity inside the stamp is created, and the required pressure for successful imprint is reduced. Additionally, the stamp is capable of performing controlled demolding after imprint. Due to the complexity of the stamp, a compact and cost-effective imprint apparatus can be constructed. The design and fabrication of the advanced stamp as well as the simple imprint equipment is presented. Test imprints of micrometer- and nanometer-scale structures are performed and characterized with respect to uniformity across a large area (35 mm radius). State-of-the-art uniformity for µm-scale features is demonstrated

  13. Bistable out-of-plane stress-mismatched thermally actuated bilayer devices with large deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goessling, B A; Lucas, T M; Moiseeva, E V; Aebersold, J W; Harnett, C K

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore microfabricated bistable actuators released as thin films from a silicon wafer. The actuators are based on a serpentine design where two cantilevers are coupled at the tips by a thin-film bar. These devices are parameterized by two lengths: cantilever length and the length of the coupling bar. These two dimensions are systematically varied to study the effect of design parameters on bistability. The three-dimensional devices have extremely large deflection (hundreds of microns rather than tens of microns for most planar microactuators of similar size) and are thermally actuated out of the plane of the wafer by applying a bias across either the left or right side of the serpentine. The bistability of these devices is evaluated using electron and optical microscopy. Potential applications include non-volatile mechanical memory, optical shutters, and reconfigurable antenna elements

  14. Growth of large aluminum nitride single crystals with thermal-gradient control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondokov, Robert T; Rao, Shailaja P; Gibb, Shawn Robert; Schowalter, Leo J

    2015-05-12

    In various embodiments, non-zero thermal gradients are formed within a growth chamber both substantially parallel and substantially perpendicular to the growth direction during formation of semiconductor crystals, where the ratio of the two thermal gradients (parallel to perpendicular) is less than 10, by, e.g., arrangement of thermal shields outside of the growth chamber.

  15. Thermal performance assessment of a large aperture concentrating collector in an industrial application in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Clare; Pino, Alan; Cardemil, José Miguel; Escobar, Rodrigo

    2017-06-01

    The application of solar thermal energy to meet the heat demands of the food and beverage processing industry in Chile has huge potential. This paper presents an assessment of the first large aperture trough collector installed in Latin America. The collector preheats water for a boiler in a juice-concentrating factory, 100 km north of Santiago. An analysis of the system for a day in November indicates the system was not able to utilize the heat generated, resulting in rapid de- and refocusing of the collector and problems with sensor calibration. An analysis of a day in March indicates the tracking algorithm has not correctly aligned the collector with the sun's position. An investigation into the design document reveals that the meteorological data underestimates the actual irradiation values by 40%, resulting in an oversized system given the actual conditions. To increase the energy gain in the system it is proposed to increase the working pressure from the current value of 1.5bar to up to 5bar, which could increase the system utilization from 41% to 65% and reduce the dumped energy to near zero. The simulation results with actual weather data and a fixed inlet temperature indicate the annual solar fraction could increase from the design value of 8.1% to 31.8% with a working pressure of 5 bar. The plant presents multiple opportunities for improvement not only to the performance of the plant but also in the design and installation of solar thermal systems in Chile in the future.

  16. Fabrication of epoxy composites with large-pore sized mesoporous silica and investigation of their thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Norihiro; Kiba, Shosuke; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2012-02-01

    We fabricate epoxy composites with low thermal expansion by using mesoporous silica particles with a large pore diameter (around 10 nm) as inorganic fillers. From a simple calculation, almost all the mesopores are estimated to be completely filled with the epoxy polymer. The coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CTE) values of the obtained epoxy composites proportionally decrease with the increase of the mesoporous silica content.

  17. Thermal properties of a large-bore cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet for a hybrid magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, M.; Hamajima, T.; Itou, T.; Sakuraba, J.; Nishijima, G.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2010-01-01

    A cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet with a 360 mm room temperature bore has been developed for a hybrid magnet. The superconducting magnet cooled by four Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers has been designed to generate a magnetic field of 10 T. Since superconducting wires composed of coils were subjected to large hoop stress over 150 MPa and Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires particularly showed a low mechanical strength due to those brittle property, Nb 3 Sn wires strengthened by NbTi-filaments were developed for the cryocooled superconducting magnet. We have already reported that the hybrid magnet could generate the resultant magnetic field of 27.5 T by adding 8.5 T from the superconducting magnet and 19 T from a water-cooled Bitter resistive magnet, after the water-cooled resistive magnet was inserted into the 360 mm room temperature bore of the cryocooled superconducting magnet. When the hybrid magnet generated the field of 27.5 T, it achieved the high magnetic-force field (B x ∂Bz/∂z) of 4500 T 2 /m, which was useful for magneto-science in high fields such as materials levitation research. In this paper, we particularly focus on the cause that the cryocooled superconducting magnet was limited to generate the designed magnetic field of 10 T in the hybrid magnet operation. As a result, it was found that there existed mainly two causes as the limitation of the magnetic field generation. One was a decrease of thermal conductive passes due to exfoliation from the coil bobbin of the cooling flange. The other was large AC loss due to both a thick Nb 3 Sn layer and its large diameter formed on Nb-barrier component in Nb 3 Sn wires.

  18. Adaptive Management of Environmental Flows: Using Irrigation Infrastructure to Deliver Environmental Benefits During a Large Hypoxic Blackwater Event in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Robyn J.; Kopf, R. Keller; McCasker, Nicole; Howitt, Julia A.; Conallin, John; Wooden, Ian; Baumgartner, Lee

    2018-03-01

    Widespread flooding in south-eastern Australia in 2010 resulted in a hypoxic (low dissolved oxygen, DO) blackwater (high dissolved carbon) event affecting 1800 kilometres of the Murray-Darling Basin. There was concern that prolonged low DO would result in death of aquatic biota. Australian federal and state governments and local stakeholders collaborated to create refuge areas by releasing water with higher DO from irrigation canals via regulating structures (known as `irrigation canal escapes') into rivers in the Edward-Wakool system. To determine if these environmental flows resulted in good environmental outcomes in rivers affected by hypoxic blackwater, we evaluated (1) water chemistry data collected before, during and after the intervention, from river reaches upstream and downstream of the three irrigation canal escapes used to deliver the environmental flows, (2) fish assemblage surveys undertaken before and after the blackwater event, and (3) reports of fish kills from fisheries officers and local citizens. The environmental flows had positive outcomes; mean DO increased by 1-2 mg L-1 for at least 40 km downstream of two escapes, and there were fewer days when DO was below the sub-lethal threshold of 4 mg L-1 and the lethal threshold of 2 mg L-1 at which fish are known to become stressed or die, respectively. There were no fish deaths in reaches receiving environmental flows, whereas fish deaths were reported elsewhere throughout the system. This study demonstrates that adaptive management of environmental flows can occur through collaboration and the timely provision of monitoring results and local knowledge.

  19. Auxiliary System Load Schemes in Large Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzle, I.; Bosnjak, D.; Pandzic, H.

    2010-01-01

    Uninterrupted auxiliary system power supply in large power plants is a key factor for normal operation, transient states, start-ups and shutdowns and particularly during fault conditions. Therefore, there are many challenges in designing the main electrical system as well as the auxiliary systems power supply. Depending upon the type of fuel used and the environmental control system required, a thermal power plant may consume as much as 10% of its total generation for auxiliary power, while a nuclear power plant may require only 4 - 6% auxiliaries. In general, the larger the power generating plant, the higher the voltage selected for the AC auxiliary electric system. Most stations in the 75 to 500 MW range utilize 4,2 kV as the base auxiliary system voltage. Large generating stations 500 - 1000 MW and more use voltage levels of 6,9 kV and more. Some single dedicated loads such as electric driven boiler feed pumps are supplied ba a 13,8 kV bus. While designing the auxiliary electric system, the following areas must be considered: motor starting requirements, voltage regulation requirements, short-circuit duty requirements, economic considerations, reliability and alternate sources. Auxiliary power supply can't be completely generalized and each situation should be studied on its own merits to determine the optimal solution. Naturally, nuclear power plants have more reliability requirements and safety design criteria. Main coolant-pump power supply and continuity of service to other vital loads deserve special attention. This paper presents an overview of some up-to-date power plant auxiliary load system concepts. The main types of auxiliary loads are described and the electric diagrams of the modern auxiliary system supply concepts are given. Various alternative sources of auxiliary electrical supply are considered, the advantages and disadvantages of these are compared and proposals are made for high voltage distribution systems around the thermal and nuclear plant

  20. Constant load supports attenuating shocks and vibrations for networks of pipes submitted to large thermal dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisecaru, Ilie; Panait; Adrian; Serban, Viorel; Ciocan, George; Androne, Marian; Florea, Ioana; State, Elena

    2004-01-01

    Full text: To avoid some drawbacks in the classical supports employed currently in networks of pipes it was conceived, designed, built and experimentally tested a new type of constant load supports which attenuate largely the shocks and vibrations for networks of pipes subjected to large thermal dilatation. These supports are particularly needed for solving the severe problems of the vibrations in networks of pipes in thermoelectric stations, nuclear power plants, or heavy water production plants. These supports allow building networks of new types, more reliable and of lower cost. The new type of support was developed on the basis of a number of patents protected by OSIM. It has a simple structure, ensures a secure functioning without blocking or other kinds of failures and is resistant to a very large variety of stresses. The new type of support of constant load avoids the drawbacks in classical supports i.e. the stress/deformation diagram is practically independent of stress level. The characteristic of the support is geometrically non-linear and presents a plateau with a small slope over a rather large deformation range which results from a serially mounted structure of sandwiches the deformation of which is controlled by a system of deforming central and peripheral pieces. The new supports of constant load, called SERB-PIPE, present a controlled elasticity and a high degree of damping as the package of elastic blades (the sandwich structure) is made of two sub-packages with relative movements what ensure the attenuation of the shocks and vibrations produced by the fluid flow within the pipes and or by seismic motions. By contrast with classical supports, the new supports have a simple structure and a high reliability. Breakdown under stress leading to severe changes in the stress distribution in pipe networks, which could generate overloads in pipes and over-loading in other supports, cannot occur. One can also mention that these supports can be built in a

  1. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  2. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable large-pore mesoporous nanocrystallineanatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermokhina, Natalia I.; Nevinskiy, Vitaly A.; Manorik, Piotr A.; Ilyin, Vladimir G. [L.V. Pisarzhevskiy Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Prospekt Nauki, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Novichenko, Viktor N.; Shcherbatiuk, Mykola M.; Klymchuk, Dmitro O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2Tereshchenkivska St., 01601, Kyiv (Ukraine); Tsyba, Mykola M. [Institute for Sorption and Problems of Endoecology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 Naumov St., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Puziy, Alexander M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Problems of Endoecology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 Naumov St., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    Thermally stable mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} with a pure anatase structure was obtained by sol–gel synthesis (in combination with hydrothermal treatment) using titanium tetrabutoxide and dibenzo-18-crown-6 as a structure-directing agent in presence of surfactant and/or La{sup 3+} ions additives. Nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} demonstrates various textures with a well-defined spherical morphology (micro- and nanospheres), a crystallite size of no greater than 10 nm (XRD), and a narrow pore size distribution. Spherical particles of micrometer scale in the presence of La{sup 3+} ions do not form. TiO{sub 2} calcined (at 500 °C) after hydrothermal treatment (at 175 °C) has a significantly more developed porous structure as compared with TiO{sub 2} which was not treated hydrothermally. For example, specific surface area amounts 137 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 69 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, pore volume 0.98 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} and 0.21 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, pore diameter 17.5 nm and 12.5 nm respectively for samples hydrothermally treated and not treated. - Graphical abstract: Large-pore mesoporous nanocristalline anatase. Highlights: ► Large-pore mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} was obtained by sol–gel synthesis. ► Crown ether was used as template in presence of surfactant and/or La{sup 3+} ions. ► Anatase (crystalline size<11 nm) is the only crystalline phase present in TiO{sub 2}. ► TiO{sub 2} shows well-defined homogeneous spherical morphology (micro- and nano-spheres)

  3. Zone modelling of the thermal performances of a large-scale bloom reheating furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Jenkins, Joana; Ward, John; Broughton, Jonathan; Heeley, Andy

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and comparison of a two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) mathematical models, based on the zone method of radiation analysis, to simulate the thermal performances of a large bloom reheating furnace. The modelling approach adopted in the current paper differs from previous work since it takes into account the net radiation interchanges between the top and bottom firing sections of the furnace and also allows for enthalpy exchange due to the flows of combustion products between these sections. The models were initially validated at two different furnace throughput rates using experimental and plant's model data supplied by Tata Steel. The results to-date demonstrated that the model predictions are in good agreement with measured heating profiles of the blooms encountered in the actual furnace. It was also found no significant differences between the predictions from the 2D and 3D models. Following the validation, the 2D model was then used to assess the impact of the furnace responses to changing throughput rate. It was found that the potential furnace response to changing throughput rate influences the settling time of the furnace to the next steady state operation. Overall the current work demonstrates the feasibility and practicality of zone modelling and its potential for incorporation into a model based furnace control system. - Highlights: ► 2D and 3D zone models of large-scale bloom reheating furnace. ► The models were validated with experimental and plant model data. ► Examine the transient furnace response to changing the furnace throughput rates. ► No significant differences found between the predictions from the 2D and 3D models.

  4. Large-eddy simulations of mechanical and thermal processes within boundary layer of the Graciosa Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, G.; Collis, S. M.; Ghate, V. P.

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical experiments are performed to explore the mechanical and thermal impacts of Graciosa Island on the sampling of oceanic airflow and cloud evolution. Ideal and real configurations of flow and terrain are planned using high-resolution, large-eddy resolving (e.g., Δ cold-pool formation upstream of an ideal two-kilometer island, with von Kármán like vortices propagation downstream. Although the peak height of Graciosa is less than half kilometer, the Azores island chain has a mountain over 2 km, which may be leading to more complex flow patterns when simulations are extended to a larger domain. Preliminary idealized low-resolution moist simulations indicate that the cloud field is impacted due to the presence of the island. Longer simulations that are performed to capture diurnal evolution of island boundary layer show distinct land/sea breeze formations under quiescent flow conditions. Further numerical experiments are planned to extend moist simulations to include realistic atmospheric profiles and observations of surface fluxes coupled with radiative effects. This work is intended to produce a useful simulation framework coupled with instruments to guide airborne and ground sampling strategies during the ACE-ENA field campaign which is aimed to better characterize marine boundary layer clouds.

  5. Cessations and reversals of the large-scale circulation in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental study of cessations and reversals of the large-scale circulation (LSC) in turbulent thermal convection in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio (Gamma) 1/2 . It is found that cessations and reversals of the LSC occur in Gamma = 1/2 geometry an order-of-magnitude more frequently than they do in Gamma=1 cells, and that after a cessation the LSC is most likely to restart in the opposite direction, i.e., reversals of the LSC are the most probable cessation events. This contrasts sharply to the finding in Gamma=1 geometry and implies that cessations in the two geometries are governed by different dynamics. It is found that the occurrence of reversals is a Poisson process and that a stronger rebound of the flow strength after a reversal or cessation leads to a longer period of stability of the LSC. Several properties of reversals and cessations in this system are found to be statistically similar to those of geomagnetic reversals. A direct measurement of the velocity field reveals that a cessation corresponds to a momentary decoherence of the LSC.

  6. An adaptive control application in a large thermal combined power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocaarslan, Ilhan; Cam, Ertugrul

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive controller was applied to a 765 MW large thermal power plant to decrease operating costs, increase quality of generated electricity and satisfy environmental concerns. Since power plants may present several operating problems such as disturbances and severe effects at operating points, design of their controllers needs to be carried out adequately. For these reasons, first, a reduced mathematical model was developed under Computer Aided Analysis and Design Package for Control (CADACS), so that the results of the experimental model have briefly been discussed. Second, conventional PID and adaptive controllers were designed and implemented under the real-time environment of the CADACS software. Additionally, the design of the adaptive model-reference and conventional PID controllers used in the power plant for real-time control were theoretically presented. All processes were realized in real-time. Due to safety restrictions, a direct connection to the sensors and actuators of the plant was not allowed. Instead a coupling to the control system was realized. This offers, in addition, the usage of the supervisory functions of an industrial process computer system. Application of the controllers indicated that the proposed adaptive controller has better performances for rise and settling times of electrical power, and enthalpy outputs than the conventional PID controller does

  7. Thermal management for high-capacity large format Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Kepler, Keith Douglas; Pannala, Sreekanth; Allu, Srikanth

    2017-05-30

    A lithium ion battery includes a cathode in electrical and thermal connection with a cathode current collector. The cathode current collector has an electrode tab. A separator is provided. An anode is in electrical and thermal connection with an anode current collector. The anode current collector has an electrode tab. At least one of the cathode current collector and the anode current collector comprises a thermal tab for heat transfer with the at least one current collector. The thermal tab is separated from the electrode tab. A method of operating a battery is also disclosed.

  8. Anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN with large deviations from the traditional 1 /T law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huimin; Hu, Ming

    2017-05-01

    Efficient heat dissipation, which is featured by high thermal conductivity, is one of the crucial issues for the reliability and stability of nanodevices. However, due to the generally fast 1 /T decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase, the efficiency of heat dissipation quickly drops down at an elevated temperature caused by the increase of work load in electronic devices. To this end, pursuing semiconductor materials that possess large thermal conductivity at high temperature, i.e., slower decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase than the traditional κ ˜1 /T relation, is extremely important to the development of disruptive nanoelectronics. Recently, monolayer gallium nitride (GaN) with a planar honeycomb structure emerges as a promising new two-dimensional material with great potential for applications in nano- and optoelectronics. Here, we report that, despite the commonly established 1 /T relation of thermal conductivity in plenty of materials, monolayer GaN exhibits anomalous behavior that the thermal conductivity almost decreases linearly over a wide temperature range above 300 K, deviating largely from the traditional κ ˜1 /T law. The thermal conductivity at high temperature is much larger than the expected thermal conductivity that follows the general κ ˜1 /T trend, which would be beneficial for applications of monolayer GaN in nano- and optoelectronics in terms of efficient heat dissipation. We perform detailed analysis on the mechanisms underlying the anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN in the framework of Boltzmann transport theory and further get insight from the view of electronic structure. Beyond that, we also propose two required conditions for materials that would exhibit similar anomalous temperature dependence of thermal conductivity: large difference in atom mass (huge phonon band gap) and electronegativity (LO-TO splitting due to strong polarization of bond). Our

  9. Hydrogenation of Penta-Graphene Leads to Unexpected Large Improvement in Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Zhang, Teng; Wohlwend, Jennifer L; Roy, Ajit K; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-06-08

    Penta-graphene (PG) has been identified as a novel two-dimensional (2D) material with an intrinsic bandgap, which makes it especially promising for electronics applications. In this work, we use first-principles lattice dynamics and iterative solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) to determine the thermal conductivity of PG and its more stable derivative, hydrogenated penta-graphene (HPG). As a comparison, we also studied the effect of hydrogenation on graphene thermal conductivity. In contrast to hydrogenation of graphene, which leads to a dramatic decrease in thermal conductivity, HPG shows a notable increase in thermal conductivity, which is much higher than that of PG. Considering the necessity of using the same thickness when comparing thermal conductivity values of different 2D materials, hydrogenation leads to a 63% reduction in thermal conductivity for graphene, while it results in a 76% increase for PG. The high thermal conductivity of HPG makes it more thermally conductive than most other semiconducting 2D materials, such as the transition metal chalcogenides. Our detailed analyses show that the primary reason for the counterintuitive hydrogenation-induced thermal conductivity enhancement is the weaker bond anharmonicity in HPG than PG. This leads to weaker phonon scattering after hydrogenation, despite the increase in the phonon scattering phase space. The high thermal conductivity of HPG may inspire intensive research around HPG and other derivatives of PG as potential materials for future nanoelectronic devices. The fundamental physics understood from this study may open up a new strategy to engineer thermal transport properties of other 2D materials by controlling bond anharmonicity via functionalization.

  10. Thermal effect-resilient design of large mode area double-cladding Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Johansen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of different large mode area fibers have been numerically analyzed. A simple but accurate model has been applied to obtain the refractive index change in the fiber cross-section, and a full-vector modal solver base...

  11. Mechanical and thermal behavior of a prototype support structure for a large silicon vertex detector (BCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulderink, H.; Michels, N.; Joestlein, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Bottom Collider Detector (BCD) has been proposed as a device to study large numbers of events containing B mesons. To identify secondary vertices in hadronic events it will employ the most ambitious silicon strip tracking detector proposed to-date. This report will discuss results from measurements on a first mechanical/thermal model of the vertex detector support structure. The model that was built and used for the studies described here is made of brass. Brass was used because it is readily available and easily assembled by soft soldering, and, for appropriate thicknesses, it will behave similarly to the beryllium that will be used in the actual detector. The trough was built to full scale with the reinforcement webbing and the cooling channels in place. There were no detector modules in place. We plan, however, to install modules in the trough in the future. The purpose of the model was to address two concerns that have arisen about the proposed structure of the detector. The first is whether or not the trough will be stable enough. The trough must be very light in weight yet have a high degree of rigidity. Because of the 3m length of the detector there is question as to the stiffness of the proposed trough. The main concern is that there will sagging or movement of the trough in the middle region. The second problem is the heat load. There will be a great deal of heat generated by the electronics attached to the detector modules. So the question arises as to whether or not the silicon detectors can be kept cool enough so that when the actual experiment is run the readings will be valid. The heat may also induce motion by differential expansion of support components. 26 figs

  12. Large eddy simulation of a T-Junction with upstream elbow: The role of Dean vortices in thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunstall, R.; Laurence, D.; Prosser, R.; Skillen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A T-Junction with an upstream bend is studied using wall-resolved LES and POD. • The bend generates Dean vortices which remain prominent downstream of the junction. • Dean vortex swirl-switching results in an unsteady secondary flow about the pipe axis. • This provides a further mechanism for near-wall temperature fluctuations. • Upstream bends can have a crucial role in T-Junction thermal fatigue problems. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of fluids in a T-Junction can generate oscillating thermal stresses in pipe walls, which may lead to high cycle thermal fatigue. This thermal stripping problem is an important safety issue in nuclear plant thermal-hydraulic systems, since it can lead to unexpected failure of the pipe material. Here, we carry out a large eddy simulation (LES) of a T-Junction with an upstream bend and use proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to identify the dominant structures in the flow. The bend generates an unsteady secondary flow about the pipe axis, known as Dean vortex swirl-switching. This provides an additional mechanism for low-frequency near-wall temperature fluctuations downstream of the T-Junction, over those that would be produced by mixing in the same T-Junction with straight inlets. The paper highlights the important role of neighbouring pipe bends in T-Junction thermal fatigue problems and the need to include them when using CFD as a predictive tool.

  13. Large thermal conductivity reduction induced by La/O vacancies in the thermoelectric LaCoO3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Li, Fang; Xu, Luxiang; Sui, Yu; Wang, Xianjie; Su, Wenhui; Liu, Xiaoyang

    2011-05-16

    A series of compact La/O-vacant La(1-x)CoO(3-y) compounds were prepared by a cold high-pressure procedure, and their thermoelectric (TE) properties were investigated. Compared with the ion-substituted hole-type LaCoO(3) systems (e.g., La(1-x)Sr(x)CoO(3)), the thermal conduction of La(1-x)CoO(3-y) is noticeably reduced by the La/O vacancies, whereas the electric transport is less influenced, which results in an efficient ZT enhancement. We demonstrate that the large thermal conductivity reduction originates from the strong point-defect scattering, and La(1-x)CoO(3-y) can be rationalized as a partially filled solid solution: La(1-x)◻(x)CoO(3-y)◻(y), where ◻ denotes a vacancy. Such intrinsic thermal conductivity suppression provides an effective pathway for the design of better TE materials.

  14. User's manual for computer code SOLTES-1 (simulator of large thermal energy systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fewell, M.E.; Grandjean, N.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Edenburn, M.W.

    1978-09-01

    SOLTES simulates the steady-state response of thermal energy systems to time-varying data such as weather and loads. Thermal energy system models of both simple and complex systems can easily be modularly constructed from a library of routines. These routines mathematically model solar collectors, pumps, switches, thermal energy storage, thermal boilers, auxiliary boilers, heat exchangers, extraction turbines, extraction turbine/generators, condensers, regenerative heaters, air conditioners, heating and cooling of buildings, process vapor, etc.; SOLTES also allows user-supplied routines. The analyst need only specify fluid names to obtain readout of property data for heat-transfer fluids and constants that characterize power-cycle working fluids from a fluid property data bank. A load management capability allows SOLTES to simulate total energy systems that simultaneously follow heat and power loads and demands. Generalized energy accounting is available, and values for system performance parameters may be automatically determined by SOLTES. Because of its modularity and flexibility, SOLTES can be used to simulate a wide variety of thermal energy systems such as solar power/total energy, fossil fuel power plants/total energy, nuclear power plants/total energy, solar energy heating and cooling, geothermal energy, and solar hot water heaters

  15. Aquifer thermal energy storage - A feasibility study for large scale demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, W. V.; Supkow, D. J.

    Engineering procedures necessary for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), based on studies of the Magothy Aquifer on Long Island, NY, are presented, with chilled winter water pumped into the aquifer and reclaimed in summer months for air conditioning. The choice of aquifer involves necessary volume, flow rate, efficiency of thermal recovery, and avoidance of conflict with other users; utilization depends on choice of appropriate piping, heat exchangers, and well construction to prevent degradation of the aquifer. The methods employed to probe the Magothy for suitability are described, including drilling an asymmetric well cluster for observation, and 48 hr pumping and 8 hr recovery. Transmissivity was found to vary from 8,000 to 29,000 sq ft/day. A doublet well was then drilled and water withdrawn, chilled, and returned. Later withdrawal indicated a 46% thermal recovery, with computer models projecting 80% with additional cycling. The study verified the feasibility of ATES, which can be expanded with additional demand.

  16. Experiment and numerical analysis of the NPP pressurizer auxiliary spray line submitted to large thermal shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couterot, C.; Geyer, P.; Proix, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    The pressurizer auxiliary spray line of PWR nuclear power plants may be submitted to severe temperature transients during upset conditions: a 325 deg C cold thermal shock in one second is followed by a 200 deg C hot thermal shock. For such transients, the RCC-M French design code rules that prevent the ratcheting deformation hazard are not respected for the components with thickness transition. Consequently, Electricite de France has realized twenty thermal cycles under pressure on a representative mock-up. During these tests, many temperature, strain and diametral variations were measured. No significant ratcheting deformation was detected on all components, except on the 6'' x 2'' x 6'' T-piece, where a weak progressive diameter increase was observed during a few cycles. Moreover, computations of a 2'' socket welding were made with the non linear kinematic hardening Chaboche model which also showed a weak progressive deformation behaviour. (authors). 7 figs., 7 refs

  17. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco; Giomi, Folco; Babbini, Simone; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mcquaid, Christopher D.; Porri, Francesca; Cannicci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  18. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2014-11-18

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. Ultrahigh lattice thermal conductivity in topological semimetal TaN caused by a large acoustic-optical gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, San-Dong; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2018-03-01

    Topological semimetals may have potential applications such as in topological qubits, spintronics and quantum computations. Efficient heat dissipation is a key factor for the reliability and stability of topological semimetal-based nano-electronics devices, which is closely related to high thermal conductivity. In this work, the elastic properties and lattice thermal conductivity of TaN are investigated using first-principles calculations and the linearized phonon Boltzmann equation within the single-mode relaxation time approximation. According to the calculated bulk modulus, shear modulus and C 44, TaN can be regarded as a potential incompressible and hard material. The room-temperature lattice thermal conductivity is predicted to be 838.62 W~m-1~K^{-1} along the a axis and 1080.40 W~m-1~K^{-1} along the c axis, showing very strong anisotropy. It is found that the lattice thermal conductivity of TaN is several tens of times higher than other topological semimetals, such as TaAs, MoP and ZrTe, which is due to the very longer phonon lifetimes for TaN than other topological semimetals. The very different atomic masses of Ta and N atoms lead to a very large acoustic-optical band gap, and then prohibit the scattering between acoustic and optical phonon modes, which gives rise to very long phonon lifetimes. Calculated results show that isotope scattering has little effect on lattice thermal conductivity, and that phonons with mean free paths larger than 20 (80) μm along the c direction at 300 K have little contribution to the total lattice thermal conductivity. This work implies that TaN-based nano-electronics devices may be more stable and reliable due to efficient heat dissipation, and motivates further experimental works to study lattice thermal conductivity of TaN.

  20. Ultrahigh lattice thermal conductivity in topological semimetal TaN caused by a large acoustic-optical gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, San-Dong; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2018-03-14

    Topological semimetals may have potential applications such as in topological qubits, spintronics and quantum computations. Efficient heat dissipation is a key factor for the reliability and stability of topological semimetal-based nano-electronics devices, which is closely related to high thermal conductivity. In this work, the elastic properties and lattice thermal conductivity of TaN are investigated using first-principles calculations and the linearized phonon Boltzmann equation within the single-mode relaxation time approximation. According to the calculated bulk modulus, shear modulus and C 44 , TaN can be regarded as a potential incompressible and hard material. The room-temperature lattice thermal conductivity is predicted to be 838.62 [Formula: see text] along the a axis and 1080.40 [Formula: see text] along the c axis, showing very strong anisotropy. It is found that the lattice thermal conductivity of TaN is several tens of times higher than other topological semimetals, such as TaAs, MoP and ZrTe, which is due to the very longer phonon lifetimes for TaN than other topological semimetals. The very different atomic masses of Ta and N atoms lead to a very large acoustic-optical band gap, and then prohibit the scattering between acoustic and optical phonon modes, which gives rise to very long phonon lifetimes. Calculated results show that isotope scattering has little effect on lattice thermal conductivity, and that phonons with mean free paths larger than 20 (80) [Formula: see text] along the c direction at 300 K have little contribution to the total lattice thermal conductivity. This work implies that TaN-based nano-electronics devices may be more stable and reliable due to efficient heat dissipation, and motivates further experimental works to study lattice thermal conductivity of TaN.

  1. Treatment time reduction for large thermal lesions by using a multiple 1D ultrasound phased array system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.-L.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Yen, J.-Y.; Lin, W.-L.

    2003-01-01

    To generate large thermal lesions in ultrasound thermal therapy, cooling intermissions are usually introduced during the treatment to prevent near-field heating, which leads to a long treatment time. A possible strategy to shorten the total treatment time is to eliminate the cooling intermissions. In this study, the two methods, power optimization and acoustic window enlargement, for reducing power accumulation in the near field are combined to investigate the feasibility of continuously heating a large target region (maximally 3.2 x 3.2 x 3.2 cm 3 ). A multiple 1D ultrasound phased array system generates the foci to scan the target region. Simulations show that the target region can be successfully heated without cooling and no near-field heating occurs. Moreover, due to the fact that there is no cooling time during the heating sessions, the total treatment time is significantly reduced to only several minutes, compared to the existing several hours

  2. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    OpenAIRE

    Barrena Gómez, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 °C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large compo...

  3. Forced transport of thermal energy in magmatic and phreatomagmatic large volume ignimbrites: Paleomagnetic evidence from the Colli Albani volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolese, Matteo; Giordano, Guido; Cifelli, Francesca; Winkler, Aldo; Mattei, Massimo

    2017-11-01

    Few studies have detailed the thermal architecture of large-volume pyroclastic density current deposits, although such work has a clear importance for understanding the dynamics of eruptions of this magnitude. Here we examine the temperature of emplacement of large-volume caldera-forming ignimbrites related to magmatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions at the Colli Albani volcano, Italy, by using thermal remanent magnetization analysis on both lithic and juvenile clasts. Results show that all the magmatic ignimbrites were deposited at high temperature, between the maximum blocking temperature of the magnetic carrier (600-630 °C) and the glass transition temperature (about 710 °C). Temperature estimations for the phreatomagmatic ignimbrite range between 200 and 400 °C, with most of the clasts emplaced between 200 and 320 °C. Because all the investigated ignimbrites, magmatic and phreatomagmatic, share similar magma composition, volume and mobility, we attribute the temperature difference to magma-water interaction, highlighting its pronounced impact on thermal dissipation, even in large-volume eruptions. The homogeneity of the deposit temperature of each ignimbrite across its areal extent, which is maintained across topographic barriers, suggests that these systems are thermodynamically isolated from the external environment for several tens of kilometers. Based on these findings, we propose that these large-volume ignimbrites are dominated by the mass flux, which forces the lateral transport of mass, momentum, and thermal energy for distances up to tens of kilometers away from the vent. We conclude that spatial variation of the emplacement temperature can be used as a proxy for determining the degree of forced-convection flow.

  4. A study on the characteristics of the decay heat removal capacity for a large thermal rated LMR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, J. H.; Kim, E. K.; Kim, S. O.

    2003-01-01

    The design characteristics and the decay heat removal capacity according to the type of DHR (Decay Heat Removal) system in LMR are quantitatively analyzed, and the general relationship between the rated core thermal power and decay heat removal capacity is created in this study. Based on these analyses results, a feasibility of designing a larger thermal rating KALIMER plant is investigated in view of decay heat removal capacity, and DRC (Direct Reactor Cooling) type DHR system which rejects heat from the reactor pool to air is proper to satisfy the decay heat removal capacity for a large thermal rating plant above 1,000 MWth. Some defects, however, including the heat loss under normal plant operation and the lack of reliance associated with system operation should be resolved in order to adopt the total passive concept. Therefore, the new concept of DHR system for a larger thermal rating KALIMER design, named as PDRC (passive decay heat removal circuit), is established in this study. In the newly established concept of PDRC, the Na-Na heat exchanger is located above the sodium cold pool and is prevented from the direct sodium contact during normal operation. This total passive feature has the superiority in the aspect of the minimizing the normal heat loss and the increasing the operation reliance of DHR system by removing either any operator action or any external operation signal associated with system operation. From this study, it is confirmed that the new concept of PDRC is useful to the designing of a large thermal rating power plant of KALIMER-600 in view of decay heat removal capability

  5. Fracture appraisal of large scale glass block under various realistic thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, F.; Vernaz, E.; Saint-Gaudens, M.

    1982-06-01

    Fracturing of nuclear waste glass caused primarily by thermal and residual stresses during cooling increases the potential leaching surface area and the number of small particles. A theoretical study shows that it is possible to calculate the stresses created but it is difficult to evaluate the state of fracture. Theoretical results are completed by an experimental study with inactive industrial scale glass blocks. The critical stages of its thermal history are simulated and the total surface area of the pieces is measured by comparison of leaching rate of the fractured glass with known samples in the same conditions. Quenching due to water impact, air cooling in a storage fit and experimental reassembly of fractured glass by re-heating are examined

  6. Simulation of the Thermal Response of Externally Cooled Ordnance Engulfed in Large Aviation Fuel Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    400j.GE T (Io 1Q0 .(MELT ViH N- T ?A( 11 3 7( 2,( 1 TBEFORE AVG TEMP(OF) L] SIDE INTERFACE TE.M1P CALCULATE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY CALCULATION | L... ISTE a AVG TEMP EXPLOSIVE SIDE OF INTERFACE AE-0 SLIU INT 00726 ENERGY GENERATED IS. (INT).LT. T •ELT(EXPL) T 0 EI"E’rNG I CALCULATE NEWl TEMP WIlTH

  7. An overview of modeling methods for thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures for reactor safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2010-10-01

    Thermal mixing and stratification phenomena play major roles in the safety of reactor systems with large enclosures, such as containment safety in current fleet of LWRs, long-term passive containment cooling in Gen III+ plants including AP-1000 and ESBWR, the cold and hot pool mixing in pool type sodium cooled fast reactor systems (SFR), and reactor cavity cooling system behavior in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), etc. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, 0-D steady state models (heat transfer correlations), 0-D lumped parameter based transient models, 1-D physical-based coarse grain models, and 3-D CFD models are available. Current major system analysis codes either have no models or only 0-D models for thermal stratification and mixing, which can only give highly approximate results for simple cases. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries. Due to prohibitive computational expenses for long transients in very large volumes, 3-D CFD simulations remain impractical for system analyses. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, UC Berkeley developed 1-D models basing on Zuber’s hierarchical two-tiered scaling analysis (HTTSA) method where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. This paper will present an overview on important thermal mixing and stratification phenomena in large enclosures for different reactors, major modeling methods and their advantages and limits, potential paths to improve simulation capability and reduce analysis uncertainty in this area for advanced reactor system analysis tools.

  8. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  9. Large-k exciton dynamics in GaN epilayers: Nonthermal and thermal regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinattieri, Anna; Bogani, Franco; Cavigli, Lucia; Manzi, Donatella; Gurioli, Massimo; Feltin, Eric; Carlin, Jean-François; Martin, Denis; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation performed at low temperature (T<50 K) concerning the exciton dynamics in GaN epilayers grown on c-plane sapphire substrates, focusing on the exciton formation and the transition from the nonthermal to the thermal regime. The time-resolved kinetics of longitudinal-optical-phonon replicas is used to address the energy relaxation in the excitonic band. From picosecond time-resolved spectra, we bring evidence for a long lasting nonthermal excitonic distribution, which accounts for the first 50 ps. Such a behavior is confirmed in different experimental conditions when both nonresonant and resonant excitations are used. At low excitation power density, the exciton formation and their subsequent thermalization are dominated by impurity scattering rather than by acoustic phonon scattering. The estimate of the average energy of the excitons as a function of delay after the excitation pulse provides information on the relaxation time, which describes the evolution of the exciton population to the thermal regime.

  10. Automation and Upgrade of Thermal System for Large 38-Year Young Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Environment Simulator (SES) facility has been improved by the upgrade of its thermal control hardware and software. This paper describes the preliminary design process, funding constraints, and the proposed enhancements as well as the installation details, the testing difficulties, and the overall benefits realized from this upgrade. The preliminary design process was discussed in a paper presented in October 1996 and will be recapped in this paper to provide background and comparison to actual product. Structuring the procurement process to match the funding constraints allowed Goddard to enhance its capabilities in an environment of reduced budgets. The installation of the new system into a location that has been occupied for over 38-years was one of the driving design factors for the size of the equipment. The installation was completed on-time and under budget. The tuning of the automatic sequences for the new thermal system to the existing shroud system required more time and ultimately presented some setbacks to the vendor and the final completion of the system. However, the end product and its benefits to Goddard's thermal vacuum test portfolio will carry the usefulness of this facility well into the next century.

  11. Automation and Upgrade of Thermal System for Large 38-Year-Young Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew T.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Environment Simulator (SES) facility has been improved by the upgrade of its thermal control hardware and software. This paper describes the preliminary design process, funding constraints, and the proposed enhancements as well as the installation details, the testing difficulties, and the overall benefits realized from this upgrade. The preliminary design process was discussed in a paper presented in October 1996 and will be recapped in this paper to provide background and comparison to actual product. Structuring the procurement process to match the funding constraints allowed Goddard to enhance its capabilities in an environment of reduced budgets. The installation of the new system into a location that has been occupied for over 38 years was one of the driving design factors for the size of the equipment. The installation was completed on time and under budget. The tuning of the automatic sequences for the new thermal system to the existing shroud system required more time and ultimately presented some setbacks to the vendor and the final completion of the system. However, the end product and its benefits to Goddard's thermal vacuum test portfolio will carry the usefulness of this facility well into the next century.

  12. Energy beyond food: foraging theory informs time spent in thermals by a large soaring bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L C Shepard

    Full Text Available Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus. Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered.

  13. Thermal tests of large recirculation cooling installations for nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balunov, B. F.; Lychakov, V. D.; Il'in, V. A.; Shcheglov, A. A.; Maslov, O. P.; Rasskazova, N. A.; Rakhimov, R. Z.; Boyarov, R. A.

    2017-11-01

    The article presents the results from thermal tests of some recirculation installations for cooling air in nuclear power plant premises, including the volume under the containment. The cooling effect in such installations is produced by pumping water through their heat-transfer tubes. Air from the cooled room is blown by a fan through a bundle of transversely finned tubes and is removed to the same room after having been cooled. The finning of tubes used in the tested installations was made of Grade 08Kh18N10T and Grade 08Kh18N10 stainless steels or Grade AD1 aluminum. Steel fins were attached to the tube over their entire length by means of high-frequency welding. Aluminum fins were extruded on a lathe from the external tube sheath into which a steel tube had preliminarily been placed. Although the fin extrusion operation was accompanied by pressing the sheath inner part to the steel tube, tight contact between them over the entire surface was not fully achieved. In view of this, the air gap's thermal resistance coefficient was introduced in calculating the heat transfer between the heat-transferring media. The air gap average thickness was determined from the test results taking into account the gap variation with temperature due to different linear expansion coefficients of steel and aluminum. These tests, which are part of the acceptance tests of the considered installations, were carried out at the NPO TsKTI test facility and were mainly aimed at checking if the obtained thermal characteristics were consistent with the values calculated according to the standard recommendations with introduction, if necessary, of modifications to those recommendations.

  14. Large-scale thermal-shock experiments with clad and unclad steel cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Flaw behavior trends associated with pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) loading of pressurized-water-reactor pressure vessels have been under investigation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for nearly 20 years. During that time, twelve thermal-shock experiments with thick-walled (152 mm) steel cylinders were conducted as a part of the investigations. The first eight experiments were conducted with unclad cylinders initially containing shallow (8--19 mm) two-dimensional and semicircular inner-surface flaws. These experiments demonstrated, in good agreement with linear elastic fracture mechanics, crack initiation and arrest, a series of initiation/arrest events with deep penetration of the wall, long crack jumps, arrest with the stress intensity factor (K I ) increasing with crack depth, extensive surface extension of an initially short and shallow (semicircular) flaw, and warm prestressing with K I ≤ 0. The remaining four experiments were conducted with clad cylinders containing initially shallow (19--24 mm) semielliptical subclad and surface flaws at the inner surface. In the first of these experiments one of six equally spaced (60 degrees) open-quotes identicalclose quotes subclad flaws extended nearly the length of the cylinder (1,220 mm) beneath the cladding (no crack extension into the cladding) and nearly 50% of the wall, radially. For the final experiment, four of the semielliptical subclad flaws that had not propagated previously were converted to surface flaws, and they experienced extensive extension beneath the cladding with no cracking of the cladding. Information from this series of thermal-shock experiments is being used in the evaluation of the PTS issue

  15. A compact system for large-area thermal nanoimprint lithography using smart stamps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Haugstrup; Hansen, Ole; Kristensen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    We present a simple apparatus for thermal nanoimprint lithography. In this work, the stamp is designed to significantly reduce the requirements for pressure application on the external imprint system. By MEMS-based processing, an air cavity inside the stamp is created, and the required pressure...... for successful imprint is reduced. Additionally, the stamp is capable of performing controlled demolding after imprint. Due to the complexity of the stamp, a compact and cost-effective imprint apparatus can be constructed. The design and fabrication of the advanced stamp as well as the simple imprint equipment...

  16. Large-scale magnetic fields, curvature fluctuations, and the thermal history of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    It is shown that gravitating magnetic fields affect the evolution of curvature perturbations in a way that is reminiscent of a pristine nonadiabatic pressure fluctuation. The gauge-invariant evolution of curvature perturbations is used to constrain the magnetic power spectrum. Depending on the essential features of the thermodynamic history of the Universe, the explicit derivation of the bound is modified. The theoretical uncertainty in the constraints on the magnetic energy spectrum is assessed by comparing the results obtained in the case of the conventional thermal history with the estimates stemming from less conventional (but phenomenologically allowed) post-inflationary evolutions

  17. Combined electrochemical, heat generation, and thermal model for large prismatic lithium-ion batteries in real-time applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohammed; Sweity, Haitham; Fleckenstein, Matthias; Habibi, Saeid

    2017-08-01

    Real-time prediction of the battery's core temperature and terminal voltage is very crucial for an accurate battery management system. In this paper, a combined electrochemical, heat generation, and thermal model is developed for large prismatic cells. The proposed model consists of three sub-models, an electrochemical model, heat generation model, and thermal model which are coupled together in an iterative fashion through physicochemical temperature dependent parameters. The proposed parameterization cycles identify the sub-models' parameters separately by exciting the battery under isothermal and non-isothermal operating conditions. The proposed combined model structure shows accurate terminal voltage and core temperature prediction at various operating conditions while maintaining a simple mathematical structure, making it ideal for real-time BMS applications. Finally, the model is validated against both isothermal and non-isothermal drive cycles, covering a broad range of C-rates, and temperature ranges [-25 °C to 45 °C].

  18. Largely enhanced thermal and mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites via incorporating C60@graphene nanocarbon hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ping’an; Liu, Lina; Yu, Youming; Huang, Guobo; Guo, Qipeng

    2013-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been achieved to create advanced polymer nanocomposites using nanocarbons including fullerene (C 60 ) and graphene, it remains a major challenge to effectively disperse them in a polymer matrix and to fully exert their extraordinary properties. Here we report a novel approach to fabricate the C 60 @graphene nanocarbon hybrid (C 60 : ∼47.9 wt%, graphene: ∼35.1%) via three-step reactions. The presence of C 60 on a graphene sheet surface can effectively prevent the aggregation of the latter which in turn helps the dispersion of the former in a polymer matrix during melt-processing. C 60 @graphene is found to be uniformly dispersed in a polypropylene (PP) matrix. Compared with pristine C 60 or graphene, C 60 @graphene further improves the thermal stability and mechanical properties of PP. The incorporation of 2.0 wt% C 60 @graphene (relative to PP) can remarkably increase the initial degradation temperature by around 59 ° C and simultaneously enhance the tensile strength and Young’s modulus by 67% and 76%, respectively, all of which are higher than those of corresponding PP/C 60 (graphene) nanocomposites. These significant performance improvements are mainly due to the free-radical-trapping effect of C 60 , and the thermal barrier and reinforcing effects of graphene nanosheets as well as the effective stress load transfer. This work provides a new methodology to design multifunctional nanohybrids for creating advanced materials. (paper)

  19. Transient thermal analysis for radioactive liquid mixing operations in a large-scaled tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Smith, F. G. III

    2014-01-01

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on radioactive liquid temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the high-level radioactive materials stored in Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing longshaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%

  20. An Electro-thermal MEMS Gripper with Large Tip Opening and Holding Force: Design and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J. KHAZAAI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a novel MEMS gripper that is driven electro-thermally by a new V-shape actuator (VSA and a set of modified Guckel U-shape actuators (mUSA. The modification of the angle between the hot and cold arms in the mUSA facilitates unidirectional in-plane displacement causing the opening of the gripper. This configuration distinguishes the MEMS gripper from others in its ability to generate larger tip displacement and greater holding force. The metallic structures allow for a low operating voltage and low overall power consumption. A tip opening of 173.4 μm has been measured at the operating voltage of 1 V with consuming power of 0.85 W. MetalMUMPs is employed to fabricate the device, in which electroplated nickel is used as the structural material.

  1. Testing and evaluation of large-area heliostats for solar thermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J.W.; Houser, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Two heliostats representing the state-of-the-art in glass-metal designs for central receiver (and photovoltaic tracking) applications were tested and evaluated at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1986 to 1992. These heliostats have collection areas of 148 and 200 m{sup 2} and represent low-cost designs for heliostats that employ glass-metal mirrors. The evaluation encompassed the performance and operational characteristics of the heliostats, and examined heliostat beam quality, the effect of elevated winds on beam quality, heliostat drives and controls, mirror module reflectance and durability, and the overall operational and maintenance characteristics of the two heliostats. A comprehensive presentation of the results of these and other tests is presented. The results are prefaced by a review of the development (in the United States) of heliostat technology.

  2. Using Large-Scale Cooperative Control to Manage Operational Uncertainties for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaxa-Rozen, M.; Rostampour, V.; Kwakkel, J. H.; Bloemendal, M.

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) technology can help reduce the demand of energy for heating and cooling in buildings, and has become a popular option for larger buildings in northern Europe. However, the larger-scale deployment of this technology has evidenced some issues of concern for policymakers; in particular, recent research shows that operational uncertainties contribute to inefficient outcomes under current planning methods for ATES. For instance, systems in the Netherlands typically use less than half of their permitted pumping volume on an annual basis. This overcapacity gives users more flexibility to operate their systems in response to the uncertainties which drive building energy demand; these include short-term operational factors such as weather and occupancy, and longer-term, deeply uncertain factors such as changes in climate and aquifer conditions over the lifespan of the buildings. However, as allocated subsurface volume remains unused, this situation limits the adoption of the technology in dense areas. Previous work using coupled agent-based/geohydrological simulation has shown that the cooperative operation of neighbouring ATES systems can support more efficient spatial planning, by dynamically managing thermal interactions in response to uncertain operating conditions. An idealized case study with centralized ATES control thus showed significant improvements in the energy savings which could obtained per unit of allocated subsurface volume, without degrading the recovery performance of systems. This work will extend this cooperative approach for a realistic case study of ATES planning in the city of Utrecht, in the Netherlands. This case was previously simulated under different scenarios for individual ATES operation. The poster will compare these results with a cooperative case under which neighbouring systems can coordinate their operation to manage interactions. Furthermore, a cooperative game-theoretical framework will be

  3. Large scale permeability test of the granite in the stipa mine and thermal conductivity test. Technical project report No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstroem, L.; Stills, H.

    1978-03-01

    The investigated properties of the granite bedrock at Stripa may be summarized as follows: The permeability is very low, 0.4 x 10 -10 m/s, and independent of the pressure gradient. The permeability is reduced by 50 percent at a temperature increase from +10 0 C to +35 0 C. The thermal conductivity was determined in situ to be about 4 W/m 0 C which largely agrees with laboratory determinations. The effective porosity was determined to be 0.012 percent. 12 figs

  4. Large-volume excitation of air, argon, nitrogen and combustible mixtures by thermal jets produced by nanosecond spark discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sergey; Hayashi, Jun; Salmon, Arthur; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents experimental observations of strong expanding thermal jets following the application of nanosecond spark discharges. These jets propagate in a toroidal shape perpendicular to the interelectrode axis, with high velocities of up to 30 m s-1 and over distances of the order of a cm. Their propagation length is much larger than the thermal expansion region produced by the conventional millisecond sparks used in car engine ignition, thus greatly improving the volumetric excitation of gas mixtures. The shape and velocity of the jets is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of the electrodes. In addition, their spatial extent is found to increase with the number of nanosecond sparks and with the discharge voltage, and to decrease slightly with the pressure between 1 and 7 atm at constant applied voltage. Finally, this thermal jet phenomenon is observed in experiments conducted with many types of gas mixtures, including air, nitrogen, argon, and combustible CH4/air mixtures. This makes nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges particularly attractive for aerodynamic flow control or plasma-assisted combustion because of their ability to excite large volumes of gas, typically about 100 times the volume of the discharge.

  5. Evaluation of thermal stress in the anode chamber wall of a large volume magnetic bucket ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Russell; Horiike, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Ohara, Yoshihiro

    1984-02-01

    Thermal stress analysis was performed on the plasma chamber of the Large Volume Magnetic Multipole Bucket Ion Source (LVB) designed for use on the JT-60 NBI system. The energy absorbed by the walls of the plasma chambers of neutral beam injectors is of the order of 1% of the accelerator electrical drain power. A previous study indicates that a moderately high heat flux, of about 600W/cm 2 , is concentrated on the magnetic field cusp lines during normal full power operation. Abnormal arc discharges during conditioning of a stainless steel LVB produced localized melting of the stainless steel at several locations near the cusps lines. The power contained in abnormal arc discharges (arc spots) was estimated from the observed melting. Thermal stress analysis was performed numerically on representative sections of the copper LVB design for both stable and abnormal arc discharge conditions. Results show that this chamber should not fail due to thermal fatigue stesses arising from normal arc discharges. However, fatigue failure may occur after several hundred to a few thousand arc spots of 30mS duration at any one location. Limited arc discharge operation of the copper bucket was performed to partially verify the chamber's durability. (author)

  6. Mount Protects Thin-Walled Glass or Ceramic Tubes from Large Thermal and Vibration Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michael; Schmidt, Stephen; Marsh. James; Dahya, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The design allows for the low-stress mounting of fragile objects, like thin walled glass, by using particular ways of compensating, isolating, or releasing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) differences between the mounted object and the mount itself. This mount profile is lower than true full kinematic mounting. Also, this approach enables accurate positioning of the component for electrical and optical interfaces. It avoids the higher and unpredictable stress issues that often result from potting the object. The mount has been built and tested to space-flight specifications, and has been used for fiber-optic, optical, and electrical interfaces for a spaceflight mission. This mount design is often metal and is slightly larger than the object to be mounted. The objects are optical or optical/electrical, and optical and/or electrical interfaces are required from the top and bottom. This requires the mount to be open at both ends, and for the object s position to be controlled. Thin inside inserts at the top and bottom contact the housing at defined lips, or edges, and hold the fragile object in the mount. The inserts can be customized to mimic the outer surface of the object, which further reduces stress. The inserts have the opposite CTE of the housing material, partially compensating for the CTE difference that causes thermal stress. A spring washer is inserted at one end to compensate for more CTE difference and to hold the object against the location edge of the mount for any optical position requirements. The spring also ensures that any fiber-optic or optic interface, which often requires some pressure to ensure a good interface, does not overstress the fragile object. The insert thickness, material, and spring washer size can be traded against each other to optimize the mount and stresses for various thermal and vibration load ranges and other mounting requirements. The alternate design uses two separate, unique features to reduce stress and hold the

  7. A large amount synthesis of nanopowder using modulated induction thermal plasmas synchronized with intermittent feeding of raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y; Tsuke, T; Guo, W; Uesugi, Y; Ishijima, T; Watanabe, S; Nakamura, K

    2012-01-01

    A large amount synthesis method for titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanopowder is proposed by direct evaporation of titanium powders using Ar-O 2 pulse-modulated induction thermal plasma (PMITP). To realize a large amount synthesis of nanopowder, the PMITP method was combined with the intermittent and heavy load feeding of raw material powder, as well as the quenching gas injection. The intermittent powder feeding was synchronized with the modulation of the coil current sustaining the PMITP for complete evaporation of the injected powder. Synthesized particles by the developed method were analyzed by FE-SEM and XRD. Results indicated that the synthesized particles by the 20-kW PMITP with a heavy loading rate of 12.3 g min −1 had a similar particle size distribution with the mean diameter about 40 nm to those with light loading of 4.2 g min −1 .

  8. A progress report for the large block test of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.; Wilder, D.G.; Blink, J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a progress report on the Large Block Test (LBT) project. The purpose of the LBT is to study some of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the near field of a nuclear waste repository under controlled boundary conditions. To do so, a large block of Topopah Spring tuff will be heated from within for about 4 to 6 months, then cooled down for about the same duration. Instruments to measure temperature, moisture content, stress, displacement, and chemical changes will be installed in three directions in the block. Meanwhile, laboratory tests will be conducted on small blocks to investigate individual thermal-mechanical, thermal-hydrological, and thermal-chemical processes. The fractures in the large block will be characterized from five exposed surfaces. The minerals on fracture surfaces will be studied before and after the test. The results from the LBT will be useful for testing and building confidence in models that will be used to predict TMHC processes in a repository. The boundary conditions to be controlled on the block include zero moisture flux and zero heat flux on the sides, constant temperature on the top, and constant stress on the outside surfaces of the block. To control these boundary conditions, a load-retaining frame is required. A 3 x 3 x 4.5 m block of Topopah Spring tuff has been isolated on the outcrop at Fran Ridge, Nevada Test Site. Pre-test model calculations indicate that a permeability of at least 10 -15 m 2 is required so that a dryout zone can be created within a practical time frame when the block is heated from within. Neutron logging was conducted in some of the vertical holes to estimate the initial moisture content of the block. It was found that about 60 to 80% of the pore volume of the block is saturated with water. Cores from the vertical holes have been used to map the fractures and to determine the properties of the rock. A current schedule is included in the report

  9. Large-Scale Nanophotonic Solar Selective Absorbers for High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Liu, Baoan; Ni, Yizhou; Liew, Kaiyang Kevin; Sze, Jeff; Chen, Shuo; Shen, Sheng

    2015-08-19

    An omnidirectional nanophotonic solar selective absorber is fabricated on a large scale using a template-stripping method. The nanopyramid nickel structure achieves an average absorptance of 95% at a wavelength range below 1.3 μm and a low emittance less than 10% at wavelength >2.5 μm. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.I.; Meike, A.; Chuu, Y.J.; Sawvel, A.; Lin, W.

    1999-07-01

    Transport of bacteria is investigated as part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain Tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures, cultured, and injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C and to 60 C at the top and bottom of the block. Samples were collected from boreholes located approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant microbes also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time until the heater was deactivated. Negative indications in the collection holes after the heater was deactivated support the supposition that these bacteria were the species that were injected. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the collection boreholes suggests no pattern to the migration of bacteria through the block. The relationship between bacterial migration and the movement of water is not yet understood. These observations indicate the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting. The implications for colloid transport need to be reviewed.

  11. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.I.; Meike, A.; Chuu, Y.J.; Sawvel, A.; Lin, W.

    1999-01-01

    Transport of bacteria is investigated as part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain Tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures, cultured, and injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C and to 60 C at the top and bottom of the block. Samples were collected from boreholes located approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant microbes also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time until the heater was deactivated. Negative indications in the collection holes after the heater was deactivated support the supposition that these bacteria were the species that were injected. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the collection boreholes suggests no pattern to the migration of bacteria through the block. The relationship between bacterial migration and the movement of water is not yet understood. These observations indicate the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting. The implications for colloid transport need to be reviewed

  12. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Güdel, Manuel [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Rupen, Michael, E-mail: jrv@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  13. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  14. Multi-Sensing system for outdoor thermal monitoring: Application to large scale civil engineering components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Manceau, Jean-Luc; Perez, Laetitia; Bourquin, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Aging of transport infrastructures combined with traffic and climatic solicitations contribute to the reduction of their performances. To address and quantify the resilience of civil engineering structure, investigations on robust, fast and efficient methods are required. Among research works carried out at IFSTTAR, methods for long term monitoring face an increasing demand. Such works take benefits of this last decade technological progresses in ICT domain. The present study follows the ISTIMES European project [1], which aimed at demonstrate the ability of different electromagnetic sensing techniques, processing methods and ICT architecture, to be used for long term monitoring of critical transport infrastructures. Thanks to this project a multi-sensing techniques system, able to date and synchronize measurements carried out by infrared thermography coupled with various measurements data (i.e. weather parameters), have been designed, developed and implemented on real site [2]. Among experiments carried out on real transport infrastructure, it has been shown, for the "Musmesci" bridge deck (Italy), that by using infrared thermal image sequence with weather measurements during sevral days it was possible to develop analysis methods able to produce qualitative and quantitative data [3]. In the present study, added functionalities were designed and added to the "IrLAW" system in order to reach full autonomy in term of power supply, very long term measurement capability (at least 1 year) and automated data base feeding. The surveyed civil engineering structures consist in two concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T weight each. One of the two beams was damage by high energy mechanical impact at the IFSTTAR falling rocks test station facilities located in the French Alpes [4]. The system is composed of one IR uncooled microbolometric camera (FLIR SC325) with a 320X240 Focal Plane Array detector in band III, a weather station VAISALA WXT520, a GPS, a failover power supply

  15. Large-scale Wind Power integration in a Hydro-Thermal Power Market

    OpenAIRE

    Trøtscher, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This master thesis describes a quadratic programming model used to calculate the spot prices in an efficient multi-area power market. The model has been adapted to Northern Europe, with focus on Denmark West and the integration of large quantities of wind power. In the model, demand and supply of electricity are equated, at an hourly time resolution, to find the spot price in each area. Historical load values are used to represent demand which is assumed to be completely inelastic. Supply i...

  16. Large eddy simulation on thermal mixing of fluids in a T-junction with conjugate heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • LES of fluid mixing in a T-junction at ΔT = 117 K and 123 K is performed. • Dynamical thermal stratification flow behavior downstream of T-junction. • Temperature fluctuations have maximum amplitudes of about 3.4–5.6% of ΔT. • High amplitude fluctuations occur near stratification layer in the mixing region. • Energy of temperature fluctuations mainly contained in the range 0.1–3 Hz. - Abstract: High cycle thermal fatigue failure in a nuclear power plant T-junction piping system may be caused by near-wall temperature fluctuations due to thermal mixing of hot and cold fluid streams. In the present study, thermal mixing at temperature differences (ΔT) of 117 K and 123 K between the mixing fluids is numerically investigated using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method with the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS CFX 14.0. LES results from the study are validated with experimental data obtained from Fluid–Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at the Materials Testing Institute (MPA), University of Stuttgart. Mass flow rate ratios (main/branch) in both cases are 4 and 6, respectively. LES results in both cases show that there is incomplete mixing of fluids and within three diameters downstream of T-junction, the mixing results in a dynamical thermal stratification flow behavior, which is maintained throughout the computational domain. Mean temperature predictions by LES show good agreement with the experimental data, whereas the root mean square (RMS) temperature fluctuations are over or understated at a few positions. The temperature fluctuations have amplitudes ranging from 0.09 to 5.6% of ΔT between the mixing fluids. Incomplete mixing of fluids and relatively lower amplitude of temperature fluctuations are mainly due to lower Reynolds number of 3670 in the cold fluid coming from the branch pipe along with buoyancy effects in the flow due to higher inflow temperature in the main pipe.

  17. Investigation of bacterial transport in the large-block test, a thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring Tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C. I.; Chuu, Y. J.; Lin, W.; Meike, A.; Sawvel, A.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the transport of bacteria in a large, thermally perturbed block of Topopah Spring tuff. The study was part of the Large-Block Test (LBT), thermochemical and physical studies conducted on a 10 ft x 10 ft x 14 ft block of volcanic tuff excavated on 5 of 6 sides out of Fran Ridge, Nevada. Two bacterial species, Bacillus subtilis and Arthrobacter oxydans, were isolated from the Yucca Mountain tuff. Natural mutants that can grow under the simultaneous presence of the two antibiotics, streptomycin and rifampicin, were selected from these species by laboratory procedures. The double-drug-resistant mutants, which could be thus distinguished from the indigenous species, were injected into the five heater boreholes of the large block hours before heating was initiated. The temperature, as measured 5 cm above one of the heater boreholes, rose slowly and steadily over a matter of months to a maximum of 142 C. Samples (cotton cloths inserted the length of the hole, glass fiber swabs, and filter papers) were collected from the boreholes that were approximately 5 ft below the injection points. Double-drug-resistant bacteria were found in the collection boreholes nine months after injection. Surprisingly, they also appeared in the heater boreholes where the temperature had been sustainably high throughout the test. These bacteria appear to be the species that were injected. The number of double-drug-resistant bacteria that were identified in the collection boreholes increased with time. An apparent homogeneous distribution among the observation boreholes and heater boreholes suggests that a random motion could be the pattern that the bacteria migrated in the block. These observations indicated the possibility of rapid bacterial transport in a thermally perturbed geologic setting

  18. Phase transitions and transport in anisotropic superconductors with large thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Fluctuation effects in conventional superconductors such as broadening of phase transitions and flux creep tend to be very small primarily because of the large coherence lengths. Thus mean field theory, with only small fluctuation corrections, usually provides an adequate description of these systems. Regimes in which fluctuation effects cause qualitatively different physics are very difficult to study as they typically occur in very small regions of the phase diagram or, in transport, require measuring extremely small voltages. In striking contrast, in the high temperature cuprate superconductors a combination of factors - short coherence lengths, anisotropy and higher temperatures - make fluctuation effects many orders of magnitude larger. The current understanding of transport and phase transitions in the cuprate superconductors-particularly YBCO and BSCCO-is reviewed. New results are presented on the two-dimensional regimes and 2D-3D crossover in the strongly anisotropic case of BSCCO. The emphasis is on pinning and vortex glass behavior

  19. Delivering migrant workers' remittances

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Roger

    2004-01-01

    As globalization has led to ever higher levels of labour mobility, so the volume of funds remitted to their families by workers employed in countries far distant from their homes has increased by leaps and bounds. The total volume of such transfers currently amounts to over $100 billion per annum, the greater part of which flows from economically advanced regions in the West and North to developing countries in the East and South. Delivering those funds swiftly, reliably and cheaply to relati...

  20. Development of a large area thermal neutron detector based on a scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, the development and construction of a detector prototype based on wavelength shifting fiber in combination with a scintillator has been investigated and optimized. This development aims at an alternative for large area neutron detectors based on "3He detectors, which was the main construction in the past. After the study of the components and assemblies, such as: the scintillator, the wavelength-shifting-fibers and available photomultiplier tubes, the construction of the first prototype module begun. The neutron converter was selected as a "6LiF/ZnS scintillator, which produces a big light yield per absorbed neutron. The prototype itself is square and has an edge length of 30 cm in combination with two orthogonal layers of crossed wavelength-shifting-fibers. The top fiber layer, which is closer to the "6LiF/ZnS top scintillator produces the x-coordinates and the lower layer produces the y-coordinates for each event. In the prototype, MSJ-fibers from the company Kuraray were used with 1 mm diameter and spacing in the top layer of 1.5 mm and 1 mm in the lower layer. Due to the orthogonal arrangement of the wires in the two layers, one may identify where the neutron was absorbed in the scintillator and produced the light yield. In order to reduce the light loss of the absorbed photons inside the fibers, a bending radius of greater than 20 mm was used and achieved by warming up the fibers to 80 C during the bending process. The increased temperature reduces the crack formation in the fibers which increases the light loss. At this time it is expected that a photomultiplier from Hamamatsu with 256 individual pixels for readout will be used. This H9500 flat panel photomultiplier has the advantage of readout of all fibers of the prototype in one photomultiplier housing. In combination with integrated readout electronics one can minimize the homogeneity/gain differences of the photocathode pixels, the different light loss in each fiber, and the gain

  1. Moduli dynamics as a predictive tool for thermal maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills at large N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takeshi [Department of Physics, Shizuoka University,836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky,Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Shiba, Shotaro [Maskawa Institute for Science and Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University,Kamigamo-Motoyama, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Wiseman, Toby [Theoretical Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Withers, Benjamin [Mathematical Sciences and STAG Research Centre, University of Southampton,Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-09

    Maximally supersymmetric (p+1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory at large N and finite temperature, with possibly compact spatial directions, has a rich phase structure. Strongly coupled phases may have holographic descriptions as black branes in various string duality frames, or there may be no gravity dual. In this paper we provide tools in the gauge theory which give a simple and unified picture of the various strongly coupled phases, and transitions between them. Building on our previous work we consider the effective theory describing the moduli of the gauge theory, which can be computed precisely when it is weakly coupled far out on the Coulomb branch. Whilst for perturbation theory naive extrapolation from weak coupling to strong gives little information, for this moduli theory naive extrapolation from its weakly to its strongly coupled regime appears to encode a surprising amount of information about the various strongly coupled phases. We argue it encodes not only the parametric form of thermodynamic quantities for these strongly coupled phases, but also certain transcendental factors with a geometric origin, and allows one to deduce transitions between the phases. We emphasise it also gives predictions for the behaviour of other observables in these phases.

  2. {sup 10}B multi-grid proportional gas counters for large area thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, K. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bigault, T. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Birch, J. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Buffet, J. C.; Correa, J. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Hall-Wilton, R. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Hultman, L. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Höglund, C. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Guérard, B., E-mail: guerard@ill.fr [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Jensen, J. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Khaplanov, A. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Kirstein, O. [Linköping University, SE-581, 83 Linköping (Sweden); Piscitelli, F.; Van Esch, P. [ILL, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Vettier, C. [ESS, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2013-08-21

    {sup 3}He was a popular material in neutrons detectors until its availability dropped drastically in 2008. The development of techniques based on alternative convertors is now of high priority for neutron research institutes. Thin films of {sup 10}B or {sup 10}B{sub 4}C have been used in gas proportional counters to detect neutrons, but until now, only for small or medium sensitive area. We present here the multi-grid design, introduced at the ILL and developed in collaboration with ESS for LAN (large area neutron) detectors. Typically thirty {sup 10}B{sub 4}C films of 1 μm thickness are used to convert neutrons into ionizing particles which are subsequently detected in a proportional gas counter. The principle and the fabrication of the multi-grid are described and some preliminary results obtained with a prototype of 200 cm×8 cm are reported; a detection efficiency of 48% has been measured at 2.5 Å with a monochromatic neutron beam line, showing the good potential of this new technique.

  3. Moduli dynamics as a predictive tool for thermal maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills at large N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Takeshi; Shiba, Shotaro; Wiseman, Toby; Withers, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Maximally supersymmetric (p+1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory at large N and finite temperature, with possibly compact spatial directions, has a rich phase structure. Strongly coupled phases may have holographic descriptions as black branes in various string duality frames, or there may be no gravity dual. In this paper we provide tools in the gauge theory which give a simple and unified picture of the various strongly coupled phases, and transitions between them. Building on our previous work we consider the effective theory describing the moduli of the gauge theory, which can be computed precisely when it is weakly coupled far out on the Coulomb branch. Whilst for perturbation theory naive extrapolation from weak coupling to strong gives little information, for this moduli theory naive extrapolation from its weakly to its strongly coupled regime appears to encode a surprising amount of information about the various strongly coupled phases. We argue it encodes not only the parametric form of thermodynamic quantities for these strongly coupled phases, but also certain transcendental factors with a geometric origin, and allows one to deduce transitions between the phases. We emphasise it also gives predictions for the behaviour of other observables in these phases.

  4. Large-scale uniform ZnO tetrapods on catalyst free glass substrate by thermal evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsultany, Forat H., E-mail: foratusm@gmail.com [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hassan, Z. [Institute of Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Ahmed, Naser M. [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigate the growth of ZnO-Ts on glass substrate by thermal evaporation method. • Glass substrate without any catalyst or a seed layer. • The morphology was controlled by adjusting the temperature of the material and the substrate. • Glass substrate was placed vertically in the quartz tube. - Abstract: Here, we report for the first time the catalyst-free growth of large-scale uniform shape and size ZnO tetrapods on a glass substrate via thermal evaporation method. Three-dimensional networks of ZnO tetrapods have needle–wire junctions, an average leg length of 2.1–2.6 μm, and a diameter of 35–240 nm. The morphology and structure of ZnO tetrapods were investigated by controlling the preparation temperature of each of the Zn powder and the glass substrate under O{sub 2} and Ar gases. Studies were carried out on ZnO tetrapods using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer, and a photoluminescence. The results showed that the sample grow in the hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferentially oriented along (002) direction, good crystallinity and high transmittance. The band gap value is about 3.27 eV. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibits a very sharp peak at 378 nm and a weak broad green emission.

  5. Large negative thermal expansion provided by metal-organic framework MOF-5: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Cong; Sun, Ying; Shi, Kewen; Deng, Sihao; Lu, Huiqing

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties and negative thermal expansion (NTE) behavior of metal-organic framework MOF-5 are investigated within the quasi-harmonic approximation, by using density functional theory. For nanoporous MOF-5, the temperature dependence of bulk modulus increases with increasing temperature, indicating that the resistance to compression is enhanced gradually. The large NTE behavior is obtained, which agrees reasonably with the experimental data. From the Grüneisen parameter as a function of temperature, it can be found that low-frequency phonons are closely associated with the NTE of MOF-5. The corresponding vibrational modes can be viewed as the results of local deformations (translation, rotation, twisting) of BDC (1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) linker and zinc clusters. The lowest-frequency phonon mode (the transverse motion of carboxylate groups and benzene ring, zinc clusters being as rigid units) is confirmed to be most responsible for thermal contraction. - Highlights: • The related thermodynamic properties and NTE behavior of MOF-5 are investigated by first principles. • Contrary to other inorganic NTE materials, bulk modulus of MOF-5 increases on heating. • The low-frequency phonons are closely associated with the NTE of MOF-5. • The NTE-contributing vibrational modes are elucidated clearly.

  6. Lithography-Free Fabrication of Large Area Subwavelength Antireflection Structures Using Thermally Dewetted Pt/Pd Alloy Etch Mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Jeong-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have demonstrated lithography-free, simple, and large area fabrication method for subwavelength antireflection structures (SAS to achieve low reflectance of silicon (Si surface. Thin film of Pt/Pd alloy on a Si substrate is melted and agglomerated into hemispheric nanodots by thermal dewetting process, and the array of the nanodots is used as etch mask for reactive ion etching (RIE to form SAS on the Si surface. Two critical parameters, the temperature of thermal dewetting processes and the duration of RIE, have been experimentally studied to achieve very low reflectance from SAS. All the SAS have well-tapered shapes that the refractive index may be changed continuously and monotonously in the direction of incident light. In the wavelength range from 350 to 1800 nm, the measured reflectance of the fabricated SAS averages out to 5%. Especially in the wavelength range from 550 to 650 nm, which falls within visible light, the measured reflectance is under 0.01%.

  7. Large negative thermal expansion provided by metal-organic framework MOF-5: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei, E-mail: leiw@buaa.edu.cn; Wang, Cong, E-mail: congwang@buaa.edu.cn; Sun, Ying; Shi, Kewen; Deng, Sihao; Lu, Huiqing

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties and negative thermal expansion (NTE) behavior of metal-organic framework MOF-5 are investigated within the quasi-harmonic approximation, by using density functional theory. For nanoporous MOF-5, the temperature dependence of bulk modulus increases with increasing temperature, indicating that the resistance to compression is enhanced gradually. The large NTE behavior is obtained, which agrees reasonably with the experimental data. From the Grüneisen parameter as a function of temperature, it can be found that low-frequency phonons are closely associated with the NTE of MOF-5. The corresponding vibrational modes can be viewed as the results of local deformations (translation, rotation, twisting) of BDC (1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) linker and zinc clusters. The lowest-frequency phonon mode (the transverse motion of carboxylate groups and benzene ring, zinc clusters being as rigid units) is confirmed to be most responsible for thermal contraction. - Highlights: • The related thermodynamic properties and NTE behavior of MOF-5 are investigated by first principles. • Contrary to other inorganic NTE materials, bulk modulus of MOF-5 increases on heating. • The low-frequency phonons are closely associated with the NTE of MOF-5. • The NTE-contributing vibrational modes are elucidated clearly.

  8. Large solid-angle polarisation analysis at thermal neutron wavelengths using a sup 3 He spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Heil, W; Cywinski, R; Humblot, H; Ritter, C; Roberts, T W; Stewart, J R

    2002-01-01

    The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarised sup 3 He opens up the possibility of polarising neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons. In this paper we describe the first large solid-angle polarisation analysis measurement using a sup 3 He neutron spin filter at thermal neutron wavelengths (lambda=2.5 A). This experiment was performed on the two-axis diffractometer D1B at the Institut Laue-Langevin using a banana-shaped filter cell (530 cm sup 3 ) filled with sup 3 He gas with a polarisation of P=52% at a pressure of 2.7 bar. A comparison is made with a previous measurement on D7 using a cold neutron beam on the same sample, i.e. amorphous ErY sub 6 Ni sub 3. Using uniaxial polarisation analysis both the nuclear and magnetic cross-sections could be extracted over the range of scattering-vectors [0.5<=Q(A sup - sup 1)<=3.5]. The results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the D7-data, whe...

  9. A systematic approach for electrochemical-thermal modelling of a large format lithium-ion battery for electric vehicle application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Genieser, Ronny; Worwood, Daniel; Barai, Anup; Marco, James; Jennings, Paul

    2018-04-01

    A 1D electrochemical-thermal model is developed to characterise the behaviour of a 53 Ah large format pouch cell with LiNixMnyCo1-x-yO2 (NMC) chemistry over a wide range of operating conditions, including: continuous charge (0.5C-2C), continuous discharge (0.5C-5C) and operation of the battery within an electric vehicle (EV) over an urban drive-cycle (WLTP Class 3) and for a high performance EV being driven under track racing conditions. The 1D model of one electrode pair is combined with a 3D thermal model of a cell to capture the temperature distribution at the cell scale. Performance of the model is validated for an ambient temperature range of 5 °C-45 °C. Results highlight that battery performance is highly dependent on ambient temperature. By decreasing the ambient temperature from 45 °C to 5 °C, the available energy drops by 17.1% and 7.8% under 0.5C and 5C discharge respectively. Moreover, the corresponding power loss is found to be: 5.23% under the race cycle as compared with 7.57% under the WLTP drive cycle. Formulation of the model is supported by a comprehensive set of experiments, for quantifying key parameters and for model validation. The full parameter-set for the model is provided ensuring the model is a valuable resource to underpin further research.

  10. Helicity, membrane incorporation, orientation and thermal stability of the large conductance mechanosensitive ion channel from E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkin, I. T.; Sukharev, S. I.; Blount, P.; Kung, C.; Brunger, A. T.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present structural studies on the large conductance mechanosensitive ion channel (MscL) from E. coli in detergent micelles and lipid vesicles. Both transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicate that the protein is highly helical in detergents as well as liposomes. The secondary structure of the proteins was shown to be highly resistant towards denaturation (25-95 degrees C) based on an ellipticity thermal profile. Amide H+/D+ exchange was shown to be extensive (ca. 66%), implying that two thirds of the protein are water accessible. MscL, reconstituted in oriented lipid bilayers, was shown to possess a net bilayer orientation using dichroic ratios measured by attenuated total-reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Here, we present and discuss this initial set of structural data on this new family of ion-channel proteins.

  11. The effects of season and sand mining activities on thermal regime and water quality in a large shallow tropical lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharip, Zati; Zaki, Ahmad Taqiyuddin Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Thermal structure and water quality in a large and shallow lake in Malaysia were studied between January 2012 and June 2013 in order to understand variations in relation to water level fluctuations and in-stream mining activities. Environmental variables, namely temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, pH, electrical conductivity, chlorophyll-A and transparency, were measured using a multi-parameter probe and a Secchi disk. Measurements of environmental variables were performed at 0.1 m intervals from the surface to the bottom of the lake during the dry and wet seasons. High water level and strong solar radiation increased temperature stratification. River discharges during the wet season, and unsustainable sand mining activities led to an increased turbidity exceeding 100 NTU, and reduced transparency, which changed the temperature variation and subsequently altered the water quality pattern.

  12. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Diez, Sergio; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Tackmann, Kerstin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gerboles, Marta; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Ullan, Miguel [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-01-15

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  13. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Diez, Sergio; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Tackmann, Kerstin; Gerboles, Marta; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Ullan, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  14. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, R.; Canovas, C.; Sanchez, A.

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 deg. C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 deg. C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process

  15. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by thermal plasma in large scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawale, A.B.; Kanhe, N.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Patil, K.R. [Center for Materials Characterizations, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Hommi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Reddy, V.R.; Gupta, A. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore Centre, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India); Kale, B.B. [Center for Materials for Electronics Technology, Department of Information Technology, Government of India, Panchawati, Off Pashan Road, Pune 411008 (India); Bhoraskar, S.V. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Mathe, V.L., E-mail: vlmathe@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Das, A.K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-12-14

    The paper reports the large scale synthesis of nanoparticles of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} using thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation method. The yield of formation was found to be around 15 g h{sup -1}. The magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, synthesized at different reactor powers, were investigated in view of studying the effect of operating parameters of plasma reactor on the structural reorganization leading to the different cation distribution. The values of saturation magnetization, coercivity and remanent magnetization were found to be influenced by input power in thermal plasma. Although the increase in saturation magnetization was marginal (61 emu g{sup -1} to 70 emu g{sup -1}) with increasing plasma power; a significant increase in the coercivity (552 Oe to 849 Oe) and remanent magnetization (16 emu g{sup -1} to 26 emu g{sup -1}) were also noticed. The Moessbauer spectra showed mixed spinel structure and canted spin order for the as synthesized nanoparticles. The detailed analysis of cation distribution using the Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy leads to the conclusion that the sample synthesized at an optimized power shows the different site selective states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid synthesis method for synthesizing magnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average particle size ranges between 25 and 40 nm; as revealed by the FESEM analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties are influenced by different operating parameters.

  16. Delivering the right dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, A

    2004-01-01

    For treatment with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), delivering the correct amount of energy to the patient is critical. This paper describes a novel design of sensor based on the pyroelectric principle for monitoring the output power from HIFU transducers of the type used for tissue ablation. The sensor is intended to be minimally perturbing to the ultrasound field, so that it can remain in the ultrasound field throughout treatment and provide a constant monitor of ultrasound power. The main advantages of the technique are: power can be measured or monitored without dismantling the HIFU system, thus reducing equipment downtime; power can be measured immediately before or during every patient treatment, thus ensuring accurate dosimetry; power can be measured at the output levels used for treatment (whereas a radiation force balance may be damaged by overheating); the method uses components which are robust and simple to use compared to radiation force balances or hydrophone scanning systems

  17. 1000th magnet delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On Monday 20 February members of the AT Department marked the delivery of the 1000th superconducting dipole magnet to CERN. Only 232 more of the dipole magnets are needed for the LHC. The 35 tonne-dipoles are 15 meters long and are being manufactured by three companies: Babcock Noell Nuclear in Germany (which finished its contract in November 2005), Ansaldo Superconduttori in Italy and Alstom-Jeumont in France. "The production is proceeding well and we expect to be complete in October as previously foreseen," said Lucio Rossi, Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group (AT-MAS). In total, 1650 main magnets are needed for the LHC, of which 1300 have been delivered.

  18. 1000th magnet delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On Monday 20 February members of the AT Department marked the delivery of the 1000th superconducting dipole magnet to CERN. Only 232 more of the dipole magnets are needed for the LHC. The 35-tonne-dipoles are 15 meters long and are being manufactured by three companies: Babcock Noell Nuclear in Germany (which completed its contract in November 2005), Ansaldo Superconduttori in Italy and Alstom-Jeumont in France. 'The production is proceeding well and we expect to be complete in October as foreseen,' said Lucio Rossi, Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group (AT-MAS). In total, 1650 main magnets are needed for the LHC, of which 1300 have already been delivered.

  19. Suitability of thermal plasmas for large-area bacteria inactivation on temperature-sensitive surfaces – first results with Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulc, M; Schein, S; Schaup, J; Zimmermann, S; Schein, J

    2017-01-01

    The application of thermal plasma for large-area bacteria inactivation on temperature-sensitive surfaces is not a common one. Nonetheless, there are thermal plasma generators which offer a high sheath homogeneity and have proven to be suitable for treatment of thermally sensitive materials in the past. To investigate the suitability of such plasmas, agar dishes plated with endospores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus have been treated with a long arc plasma generator called LARGE. The achieved results have been compared with a commercially available non-thermal plasma generator. A significant inactivation of the endospores could be observed only after 60 s of treatment with the thermal plasma source. This was not possible with the non-thermal generator. Moreover, no temperature damage or increase of the specimen could be detected. An attempt to determine the main agents responsible for the microbicidal effects have been made – the influence of plasma gas composition, discharge current and treatment time has been investigated. Significant improvements in the disinfection rates after adding small amounts of nitrogen to the plasma gas could be observed. A first discussion regarding the suitability of thermal plasmas for bacteria inactivation has been given. (paper)

  20. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, 1 July 1976--30 September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the biophysical and thermal relationships between large ectotherms and their aquatic environment. Data are reported from laboratory and field studies on alligators, turtles, and fish. Mathematical models of the effect of body size and physical characteristics on temperature regulation of ectotherms and of thermal stress in aquatic organisms were developed. Results are included of field studies on the physiological and behavioral adjustments of turtles in response to changes in water temperature produced by thermal effluents in PAR Pond at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

  1. Technical basis and programmatic requirements for large block testing of coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wunan.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains the technical basis and programmatic requirements for a scientific investigation plan that governs tests on a large block of tuff for understanding the coupled thermal- mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes. This study is part of the field testing described in Section 8.3.4.2.4.4.1 of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain Project. The first, and most important objective is to understand the coupled TMHC processes in order to develop models that will predict the performance of a nuclear waste repository. The block and fracture properties (including hydrology and geochemistry) can be well characterized from at least five exposed surfaces, and the block can be dismantled for post-test examinations. The second objective is to provide preliminary data for development of models that will predict the quality and quantity of water in the near-field environment of a repository over the current 10,000 year regulatory period of radioactive decay. The third objective is to develop and evaluate the various measurement systems and techniques that will later be employed in the Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (EBSFT)

  2. VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF DG TAU'S RADIO JET: A HIGHLY COLLIMATED THERMAL OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, C.; Mutel, R. L.; Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52240 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Ray, T. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Section, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Skinner, S. L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. C. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    The active young protostar DG Tau has an extended jet that has been well studied at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. We report sensitive new Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations of the core and jet between 5 GHz and 8 GHz. Our high angular resolution observation at 8 GHz clearly shows an unpolarized inner jet with a size of 42 AU (0.''35) extending along a position angle similar to the optical-X ray outer jet. Using our nearly coeval 2012 VLA observations, we find a spectral index {alpha} = +0.46 {+-} 0.05, which combined with the lack of polarization is consistent with bremsstrahlung (free-free) emission, with no evidence for a non-thermal coronal component. By identifying the end of the radio jet as the optical depth unity surface, and calculating the resulting emission measure, we find that our radio results are in agreement with previous optical line studies of electron density and consequent mass-loss rate. We also detect a weak radio knot at 5 GHz located 7'' from the base of the jet, coincident with the inner radio knot detected by Rodriguez et al. in 2009 but at lower surface brightness. We interpret this as due to expansion of post-shock ionized gas in the three years between observations.

  3. Thermal energy harvesting for large-scale applications using MWCNT-grafted glass fibers and polycarbonate-MWCNT nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzounis, L., E-mail: ltzounis@physics.auth.gr [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtzstraße 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrolo (Greece); Liebscher, M.; Stamm, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden, Germany and Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtzstraße 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Mäder, E.; Pötschke, P. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Logothetidis, S., E-mail: logot@auth.gr [Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-02-17

    materials and PC/MWCNT nanocomposites are ideal candidates for large-scale thermal energy harvesting. However, the thermoelectric values are still too low for commercial applications and in the future could be enhanced as will be discussed in this work.

  4. Thermal energy harvesting for large-scale applications using MWCNT-grafted glass fibers and polycarbonate-MWCNT nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzounis, L.; Liebscher, M.; Stamm, M.; Mäder, E.; Pötschke, P.; Logothetidis, S.

    2015-01-01

    and PC/MWCNT nanocomposites are ideal candidates for large-scale thermal energy harvesting. However, the thermoelectric values are still too low for commercial applications and in the future could be enhanced as will be discussed in this work

  5. Development of an Advanced Two-Dimensional Thermal Model for Large size Lithium-ion Pouch Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samba, Ahmadou; Omar, Noshin; Gualous, Hamid; Firouz, Youssef; Van den Bossche, Peter; Van Mierlo, Joeri; Boubekeur, Tala Ighil

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a LiFePO4/graphite lithium-ion pouch cell with a rated capacity of 45Ah has been used and a two dimensional thermal model is developed to predict the cell temperature distribution over the surface of the battery, this model requires less input parameters and still has high accuracy. The used input parameters are the heat generation and thermal properties. The ANSYS FLUENT software has been used to solve the models. In addition, a new estimation tool has been developed for estimation of the thermal model parameters. Furthermore, the thermal behavior of the proposed battery has been investigated at different environmental conditions as well as during the abuse conditions. Thermal runaway is investigated in depth by the model

  6. Effect of power history on the shape and the thermal stress of a large sapphire crystal during the Kyropoulos process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tran Phu; Chuang, Hsiao-Tsun; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Hu, Chieh

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of the power history on the shape of a sapphire crystal and the thermal stress during the Kyropoulos process are numerically investigated. The simulation results show that the thermal stress is strongly dependent on the power history. The thermal stress distributions in the crystal for all growth stages produced with different power histories are also studied. The results show that high von Mises stress regions are found close to the seed of the crystal, the highly curved crystal surface and the crystal-melt interface. The maximum thermal stress, which occurs at the crystal-melt interface, increases significantly in value as the crystal expands at the crown. After this, there is reduction in the maximum thermal stress as the crystal lengthens. There is a remarkable enhancement in the maximum von Mises stress when the crystal-melt interface is close to the bottom of the crucible. There are two obvious peaks in the maximum Von Mises stress, at the end of the crown stage and in the final stage, when cracking defects can form. To alleviate this problem, different power histories are considered in order to optimize the process to produce the lowest thermal stress in the crystal. The optimal power history is found to produce a significant reduction in the thermal stress in the crown stage.

  7. Do sex, body size and reproductive condition influence the thermal preferences of a large lizard? A study in Tupinambis merianae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchetto, Nicolas Rodolfo; Naretto, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Body temperature is a key factor in physiological processes, influencing lizard performances; and life history traits are expected to generate variability of thermal preferences in different individuals. Gender, body size and reproductive condition may impose specific requirements on preferred body temperatures. If these three factors have different physiological functions and thermal requirements, then the preferred temperature may represent a compromise that optimizes these physiological functions. Therefore, the body temperatures that lizards select in a controlled environment may reflect a temperature that maximizes their physiological needs. The tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae is one of the largest lizards in South America and has wide ontogenetic variation in body size and sexual dimorphism. In the present study we evaluate intraspecific variability of thermal preferences of T. merianae. We determined the selected body temperature and the rate at which males and females attain their selected temperature, in relation to body size and reproductive condition. We also compared the behavior in the thermal gradient between males and females and between reproductive condition of individuals. Our study show that T. merianae selected body temperature within a narrow range of temperatures variation in the laboratory thermal gradient, with 36.24±1.49°C being the preferred temperature. We observed no significant differences between sex, body size and reproductive condition in thermal preferences. Accordingly, we suggest that the evaluated categories of T. merianae have similar thermal requirements. Males showed higher rates to obtain heat than females and reproductive females, higher rates than non-reproductive ones females. Moreover, males and reproductive females showed a more dynamic behavior in the thermal gradient. Therefore, even though they achieve the same selected temperature, they do it differentially. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of Future Thermal Comforts in a Tropical Megacity Using Coupling of Energy Balance Model and Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueishi, T.; Yucel, M.; Ashie, Y.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Inagaki, A.; Darmanto, N. S.; Nakayoshi, M.; Kanda, M.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, temperature in urban areas continue to rise as an effect of climate change and urbanization. Specifically, Asian megacities are projected to expand rapidly resulting to serious in the future atmospheric environment. Thus, detailed analysis of urban meteorology for Asian megacities is needed to prescribe optimum against these negative climate modifications. A building-resolving large eddy simulation (LES) coupled with an energy balance model is conducted for a highly urbanized district in central Jakarta on typical daytime hours. Five cases were considered; case 1 utilizes present urban scenario and four cases representing different urban configurations in 2050. The future configurations were based on representative concentration pathways (RCP) and shared socio-economic pathways (SSP). Building height maps and land use maps of simulation domains are shown in the attached figure (top). Case 1 3 focuses on the difference of future scenarios. Case 1 represents current climatic and urban conditions, case 2 and 3 was an idealized future represented by RCP2.6/SSP1 and RCP8.5/SSP3, respectively. More complex urban morphology was applied in case 4, vegetation and building area were changed in case 5. Meteorological inputs and anthropogenic heat emission (AHE) were calculated using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (Varquez et al [2017]). Sensible and latent heat flux from surfaces were calculated using an energy balance model (Ashie et al [2011]), with considers multi-reflection, evapotranspiration and evaporation. The results of energy balance model (shown in the middle line of figure), in addition to WRF outputs, were used as input into the PArallelized LES Model (PALM) (Raasch et al [2001]). From standard new effective temperature (SET*) which included the effects of temperature, wind speed, humidity and radiation, thermal comfort in urban area was evaluated. SET* contours at 1 m height are shown in the bottom line of the figure. Extreme climate

  9. Chromium–niobium co-doped vanadium dioxide films: Large temperature coefficient of resistance and practically no thermal hysteresis of the metal–insulator transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Miyazaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of chromium (Cr and niobium (Nb co-doping on the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR and the thermal hysteresis of the metal–insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2 films. We determined the TCR and thermal-hysteresis-width diagram of the V1−x−yCrxNbyO2 films by electrical-transport measurements and we found that the doping conditions x ≳ y and x + y ≥ 0.1 are appropriate for simultaneously realizing a large TCR value and an absence of thermal hysteresis in the films. By using these findings, we developed a V0.90Cr0.06Nb0.04O2 film grown on a TiO2-buffered SiO2/Si substrate that showed practically no thermal hysteresis while retaining a large TCR of 11.9%/K. This study has potential applications in the development of VO2-based uncooled bolometers.

  10. Large sensitivity in land carbon storage due to geographical and temporal variation in the thermal response of photosynthetic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Lina M; Medlyn, Belinda E; Huntingford, Chris; Oliver, Rebecca J; Clark, Douglas B; Sitch, Stephen; Zelazowski, Przemyslaw; Kattge, Jens; Harper, Anna B; Cox, Peter M

    2018-06-01

    Plant temperature responses vary geographically, reflecting thermally contrasting habitats and long-term species adaptations to their climate of origin. Plants also can acclimate to fast temporal changes in temperature regime to mitigate stress. Although plant photosynthetic responses are known to acclimate to temperature, many global models used to predict future vegetation and climate-carbon interactions do not include this process. We quantify the global and regional impacts of biogeographical variability and thermal acclimation of temperature response of photosynthetic capacity on the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle between 1860 and 2100 within a coupled climate-carbon cycle model, that emulates 22 global climate models. Results indicate that inclusion of biogeographical variation in photosynthetic temperature response is most important for present-day and future C uptake, with increasing importance of thermal acclimation under future warming. Accounting for both effects narrows the range of predictions of the simulated global land C storage in 2100 across climate projections (29% and 43% globally and in the tropics, respectively). Contrary to earlier studies, our results suggest that thermal acclimation of photosynthetic capacity makes tropical and temperate C less vulnerable to warming, but reduces the warming-induced C uptake in the boreal region under elevated CO 2 . © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Growth of wrinkle-free graphene on texture-controlled platinum films and thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Kyung; Kwak, Jinsung; Park, Soon-Dong; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kim, Se-Yang; Jung, Minbok; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Kibog; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Sung-Dae; Park, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Su; Hong, Suk-Kyoung; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2015-01-27

    Growth of large-scale patterned, wrinkle-free graphene and the gentle transfer technique without further damage are most important requirements for the practical use of graphene. Here we report the growth of wrinkle-free, strictly uniform monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition on a platinum (Pt) substrate with texture-controlled giant grains and the thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene onto arbitrary substrates. The designed Pt surfaces with limited numbers of grain boundaries and improved surface perfectness as well as small thermal expansion coefficient difference to graphene provide a venue for uniform growth of monolayer graphene with wrinkle-free characteristic. The thermal-assisted transfer technique allows the complete transfer of large-scale patterned graphene films onto arbitrary substrates without any ripples, tears, or folds. The transferred graphene shows high crystalline quality with an average carrier mobility of ∼ 5500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, this transfer technique shows a high tolerance to variations in types and morphologies of underlying substrates.

  12. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R; Beaumont, O; Failleau, G; Hay, B; Plumeri, S

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m 3 ) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  13. Development of an air flow calorimeter prototype for the measurement of thermal power released by large radioactive waste packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razouk, R.; Beaumont, O.; Failleau, G.; Hay, B.; Plumeri, S.

    2018-03-01

    The estimation and control of the thermal power released by the radioactive waste packages are a key parameter in the management of radioactive waste geological repository sites. In the framework of the European project "Metrology for decommissioning nuclear facilities," the French National Agency of Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA) collaborates with Laboratoire National de Métrologie et D'essais in order to measure the thermal power up to 500 W of typical real size radioactive waste packages (of at least 0.175 m3) with an uncertainty better than 5% by using a measurement method traceable to the international system of units. One of the selected metrological approaches is based on the principles of air flow calorimetry. This paper describes in detail the development of the air flow calorimeter prototype as well as the design of a radioactive waste package simulator used for its calibration. Results obtained from the calibration of the calorimeter and from the determination of thermal powers are presented here with an investigation of the measurement uncertainties.

  14. Optical and thermal performance of large-size parabolic-trough solar collectors from outdoor experiments: A test method and a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela, Loreto; López-Martín, Rafael; Zarza, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an outdoor test method to evaluate the optical and thermal performance of parabolic-trough collectors of large size (length ≥ 100 m), similar to those currently installed in solar thermal power plants. Optical performance in line-focus collectors is defined by three parameters, peak-optical efficiency and longitudinal and transversal incidence angle modifiers. In parabolic-troughs, the transversal incidence angle modifier is usually assumed equal to 1, and the incidence angle modifier is referred to the longitudinal incidence angle modifier, which is a factor less than or equal to 1 and must be quantified. These measurements are performed by operating the collector at low fluid temperatures for reducing heat losses. Thermal performance is measured during tests at various operating temperatures, which are defined within the working temperature range of the solar field, and for the condition of maximum optical response. Heat losses are measured from both the experiments performed to measure the overall efficiency and the experiments done by operating the collector to ensure that absorber pipes are not exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The set of parameters describing the performance of a parabolic-trough collector of large size has been measured following the test procedures proposed and explained in the article. - Highlights: • Outdoor test procedures of parabolic-trough solar collector (PTC) of large size working at high temperature are described. • Optical performance measured with cold fluid temperature and thermal performance measured in the complete temperature range. • Experimental data obtained in the testing of a PTC prototype are explained

  15. Validation of Effective Models for Simulation of Thermal Stratification and Mixing Induced by Steam Injection into a Large Pool of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Effective Heat Source (EHS and Effective Momentum Source (EMS models have been proposed to predict the development of thermal stratification and mixing during a steam injection into a large pool of water. These effective models are implemented in GOTHIC software and validated against the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-21 tests and the PPOOLEX MIX-01 test. First, the EHS model is validated against STB-20 test which shows the development of thermal stratification. Different numerical schemes and grid resolutions have been tested. A 48×114 grid with second order scheme is sufficient to capture the vertical temperature distribution in the pool. Next, the EHS and EMS models are validated against STB-21 test. Effective momentum is estimated based on the water level oscillations in the blowdown pipe. An effective momentum selected within the experimental measurement uncertainty can reproduce the mixing details. Finally, the EHS-EMS models are validated against MIX-01 test which has improved space and time resolution of temperature measurements inside the blowdown pipe. Excellent agreement in averaged pool temperature and water level in the pool between the experiment and simulation has been achieved. The development of thermal stratification in the pool is also well captured in the simulation as well as the thermal behavior of the pool during the mixing phase.

  16. Experimental and modeling analysis of thermal runaway propagation over the large format energy storage battery module with Li_4Ti_5O_1_2 anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Peifeng; Ping, Ping; Li, Ke; Chen, Haodong; Wang, Qingsong; Wen, Jennifer; Sun, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The heat generation and gas production of four main thermal-chemical reactions are detected. • The fire-impingement takes an unordinary thermal runaway propagation for battery module. • There is a “smoldering period” before the explosion of lithium ion battery module. • Semenov and Frank-Kamenetskii models are used to analysis and predict the onset of runaway. - Abstract: Insight of the thermal characteristics and potential flame spread over lithium-ion battery (LIB) modules is important for designing battery thermal management system and fire protection measures. Such thermal characteristics and potential flame spread are also dependent on the different anode and cathode materials as well as the electrolyte. In the present study, thermal behavior and flame propagation over seven 50 A h Li(Ni_1_/_3Mn_1_/_3Co_1_/_3)O_2/Li_4Ti_5O_1_2 large format LIBs arranged in rhombus and parallel layouts were investigated by directly heating one of the battery units. Such batteries have already been used commercially for energy storage while relatively little is known about its safety features in connection with potential runaway caused fire and explosion hazards. It was found in the present heating tests that fire-impingement resulted in elevated temperatures in the immediate vicinity of the LIBs that were in the range of between 200 °C and 900 °C. Such temperature aggravated thermal runaway (TR) propagation, resulting in rapid temperature rise within the battery module and even explosions after 20 min of “smoldering period”. The thermal runaway and subsequent fire and explosion observed in the heating test was attributed to the violent reduction of the cathode material which coexisted with the electrolyte when the temperature exceeded 260 °C. Separate laboratory tests, which measured the heat and gases generation from samples of the anode and cathode materials using C80 calorimeter, provided insight of the physical-chemistry processes inside the

  17. Large-scale thermal convection of viscous fluids in a faulted system: 3D test case for numerical codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Cacace, Mauro; Fischer, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to simple homogeneous 1D and 2D systems, no appropriate analytical solutions exist to test onset of thermal convection against numerical models of complex 3D systems that account for variable fluid density and viscosity as well as permeability heterogeneity (e.g. presence of faults). Owing to the importance of thermal convection for the transport of energy and minerals, the development of a benchmark test for density/viscosity driven flow is crucial to ensure that the applied numerical models accurately simulate the physical processes at hands. The presented study proposes a 3D test case for the simulation of thermal convection in a faulted system that accounts for temperature dependent fluid density and viscosity. The linear stability analysis recently developed by Malkovsky and Magri (2016) is used to estimate the critical Rayleigh number above which thermal convection of viscous fluids is triggered. The numerical simulations are carried out using the finite element technique. OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012) and Moose (Gaston et al., 2009) results are compared to those obtained using the commercial software FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014) to test the ability of widely applied codes in matching both the critical Rayleigh number and the dynamical features of convective processes. The methodology and Rayleigh expressions given in this study can be applied to any numerical model that deals with 3D geothermal processes in faulted basins as by example the Tiberas Basin (Magri et al., 2016). References Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B., 2012. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental

  18. Studying the urban thermal environment under a human-biometeorological point of view: The case of a large coastal metropolitan city, Athens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katavoutas, George; Georgiou, Giorgos K.; Asimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal environment in modern cities has become potentially unfavorable and harmful for its residents, as a result of urbanization and industrialization. Exposure to these extreme thermal conditions increases the heat stress of people in cities considerably. In this context, the present study aims to investigate the urban thermal environment of the large coastal metropolitan city of Athens, in a human-biometeorologically significant way, utilizing the thermo-physiological assessment index PET. The analysis was based on three hour measurements derived from three-year datasets (2006-2009), at 12 monitoring sites located in the urban complex of Athens, on its boundaries and beyond them. The differences of PET values have been investigated in order to attribute urban and exurban thermal characteristics to the considered sites. The frequency and spatial distribution of PET as well as the urban/rural differences of PET have also been analyzed. Finally, a trend analysis has been applied in order to detect possible PET trends by employing long-term recording data (1985-2008). In terms of thermal human-biometeorological conditions, the analysis reveals that among the considered stations, those located inside the urban complex and the industrialized area present urban thermal characteristics, regardless the fact that they are installed either in a park and on a hill or at an open field. The spatial distribution of PET, at 0200 LST, shows a difference of about 3 to 4 °C, on the main axis of the city (SSW-NNE) in the summer period, while the difference exceeds 2.5 °C in the winter period. In general, cooler (less warm) thermal perception is observed at the north/northeast sites of the city as well as at the areas beyond the eastern boundaries of it. The PET differences between urban and rural sites hold a positive sign, except of those at 0500 LST and at 0800 LST. The highest differences are noted at 1400 LST and the most intense of them is noticed in the summer period

  19. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    The information given in this document is divided into two parts. In part I the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials delivered by Members up to 31 December 1965 in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D. Part III contains information about materials which had not been delivered by 31 December but which had been allocated, in accordance with Article XI. F. 1 of the Statute, to approved Agency projects for which project arrangements were in force on that date

  20. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The information given in this document is divided into two parts. In part I the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials delivered by Members up to 31 December 1964 in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D. Part II contains information about materials which had not been delivered by 31 December but which had been allocated, in accordance with Article XI. F. 1 of the Statute, to approved Agency projects for which project arrangements were in force on that date

  1. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    The information given in this document is divided into two parts. In part I the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials delivered by Members up to 30 June 1968 in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX,D. Part II contains information about materials which had not been delivered by 30 June 1968 but which had been allocated, in accordance with Article XI.F.I of the Statute, to approved Agency projects for which project arrangements were in force on that date

  2. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  3. Development of design technology on thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundle. 4. Large paralleled simulation by the advanced two-fluid model code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misawa, Takeharu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) has been developed. For thermal design of FLWR, it is necessary to develop analytical method to predict boiling transition of FLWR. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing three-dimensional two-fluid model analysis code ACE-3D, which adopts boundary fitted coordinate system to simulate complex shape channel flow. In this paper, as a part of development of ACE-3D to apply to rod bundle analysis, introduction of parallelization to ACE-3D and assessments of ACE-3D are shown. In analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle, even two-fluid model requires large number of computational cost, which exceeds upper limit of memory amount of 1 CPU. Therefore, parallelization was introduced to ACE-3D to divide data amount for analysis of large-scale domain among large number of CPUs, and it is confirmed that analysis of large-scale domain such as a rod bundle can be performed by parallel computation with keeping parallel computation performance even using large number of CPUs. ACE-3D adopts two-phase flow models, some of which are dependent upon channel geometry. Therefore, analyses in the domains, which simulate individual subchannel and 37 rod bundle, are performed, and compared with experiments. It is confirmed that the results obtained by both analyses using ACE-3D show agreement with past experimental result qualitatively. (author)

  4. High-Quality Large-Magnification Polymer Lens from Needle Moving Technique and Thermal Assisted Moldless Fabrication Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratthasart Amarit

    Full Text Available The need of mobile microscope is escalating as well as the demand of high quality optical components in low price. We report here a novel needle moving technique to fabricate milli-size lens together with thermal assist moldless method. Our proposed protocol is able to create a high tensile strength structure of the lens and its base which is beneficial for exploiting in convertinga smart phone to be a digital microscope. We observe that no bubble trapped in a lens when this technique is performed which can overcome a challenge problem found in a typical dropping technique. We demonstrate the symmetry, smoothness and micron-scale resolution of the fabricated structure. This proposed technique is promising to serve as high quality control mass production without any expensive equipment required.

  5. Reduction of ion thermal diffusivity associated with the transition of the radial electric field in neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the large helical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K; Funaba, H; Kado, S; Narihara, K; Tanaka, K; Takeiri, Y; Nakamura, Y; Ohyabu, N; Yamazaki, K; Yokoyama, M; Murakami, S; Ashikawa, N; deVries, P C; Emoto, M; Goto, M; Idei, H; Ikeda, K; Inagaki, S; Inoue, N; Isobe, M; Itoh, K; Kaneko, O; Kawahata, K; Khlopenkov, K; Komori, A; Kubo, S; Kumazawa, R; Liang, Y; Masuzaki, S; Minami, T; Miyazawa, J; Morisaki, T; Morita, S; Mutoh, T; Muto, S; Nagayama, Y; Nakanishi, H; Nishimura, K; Noda, N; Notake, T; Kobuchi, T; Ohdachi, S; Ohkubo, K; Oka, Y; Osakabe, M; Ozaki, T; Pavlichenko, R O; Peterson, B J; Sagara, A; Saito, K; Sakakibara, S; Sakamoto, R; Sanuki, H; Sasao, H; Sasao, M; Sato, K; Sato, M; Seki, T; Shimozuma, T; Shoji, M; Suzuki, H; Sudo, S; Tamura, N; Toi, K; Tokuzawa, T; Torii, Y; Tsumori, K; Yamamoto, T; Yamada, H; Yamada, I; Yamaguchi, S; Yamamoto, S; Yoshimura, Y; Watanabe, K Y; Watari, T; Hamada, Y; Motojima, O; Fujiwara, M

    2001-06-04

    Recent large helical device experiments revealed that the transition from ion root to electron root occurred for the first time in neutral-beam-heated discharges, where no nonthermal electrons exist. The measured values of the radial electric field were found to be in qualitative agreement with those estimated by neoclassical theory. A clear reduction of ion thermal diffusivity was observed after the mode transition from ion root to electron root as predicted by neoclassical theory when the neoclassical ion loss is more dominant than the anomalous ion loss.

  6. LOW PRESSURE CARBURIZING IN A LARGE-CHAMBER DEVICE FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE AND PRECISION THERMAL TREATMENT OF PARTS OF MECHANICAL GEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Wołowiec-Korecka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of research of a short-pulse low pressure carburizing technology developed for a new large-chamber furnace for high-performance and precision thermal treatment of parts of mechanical gear. Sections of the article discuss the novel constructions of the device in which parts being carburized flow in a stream, as well as the low-pressure carburizing experiment. The method has been found to yield uniform, even and repeatable carburized layers on typical gear used in automotive industry.

  7. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a)), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  8. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials delivered by Members up to 30 June 1969 in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  9. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to 30 June 1975, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  10. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to 31 March 1974, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  11. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to the end of 1970, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  12. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to the end of 1972, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  13. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to the end of 1971, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  14. The shared and unique values of optical, fluorescence, thermal and microwave satellite data for estimating large-scale crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale crop monitoring and yield estimation are important for both scientific research and practical applications. Satellite remote sensing provides an effective means for regional and global cropland monitoring, particularly in data-sparse regions that lack reliable ground observations and rep...

  15. Developing a semi/automated protocol to post-process large volume, High-resolution airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery for urban waste heat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mir Mustafizur

    In collaboration with The City of Calgary 2011 Sustainability Direction and as part of the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) project, the focus of this research is to develop a semi/automated 'protocol' to post-process large volumes of high-resolution (H-res) airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to enable accurate urban waste heat mapping. HEAT is a free GeoWeb service, designed to help Calgary residents improve their home energy efficiency by visualizing the amount and location of waste heat leaving their homes and communities, as easily as clicking on their house in Google Maps. HEAT metrics are derived from 43 flight lines of TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) data acquired on May 13--14, 2012 at night (11:00 pm--5:00 am) over The City of Calgary, Alberta (˜825 km 2) at a 50 cm spatial resolution and 0.05°C thermal resolution. At present, the only way to generate a large area, high-spatial resolution TIR scene is to acquire separate airborne flight lines and mosaic them together. However, the ambient sensed temperature within, and between flight lines naturally changes during acquisition (due to varying atmospheric and local micro-climate conditions), resulting in mosaicked images with different temperatures for the same scene components (e.g. roads, buildings), and mosaic join-lines arbitrarily bisect many thousands of homes. In combination these effects result in reduced utility and classification accuracy including, poorly defined HEAT Metrics, inaccurate hotspot detection and raw imagery that are difficult to interpret. In an effort to minimize these effects, three new semi/automated post-processing algorithms (the protocol) are described, which are then used to generate a 43 flight line mosaic of TABI-1800 data from which accurate Calgary waste heat maps and HEAT metrics can be generated. These algorithms (presented as four peer-reviewed papers)---are: (a) Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN)---used to mitigate the microclimatic

  16. Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

    1976-08-31

    The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

  17. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  18. Hydropower's role in delivering sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinbilek, D.; Seelos, K.; Taylor, R.

    2005-01-01

    equipment within existing infrastructure; this can extend the operating life by a further 30 to 50 years. Small-scale, decentralised development has been responsible for bringing light and power to remote communities. Such schemes have catalysed local commercial diversification and prosperity. The lower investment demand of smaller schemes has enabled private sector involvement through independent power production. Typically smaller schemes become grid connected if the power system is accessible, as this increases the security of supply. Furthermore, schemes at remote sites can assist transmission system stability. A further important role of smaller scale hydro is the recovery of energy at water infrastructure developed for other purposes. In many countries, large schemes play a significant role in national and regional supply security due to the flexibility of storage reservoirs and independence from fuel price fluctuations. Hydro also integrates well with other generation technologies, with its flexibility enabling thermal plants to operate steadily (saving fuel and reducing emissions). In addition, its responsiveness permits the back-up of the intermittent renewables. The question of storage is clearly a major issue in balancing supply and demand. Hydro reservoirs and pump-storage schemes offer security in the stability and reliability of power systems; they can absorb power when there is an excess and follow load demand instantaneously. A major challenge is that 'support' and 'storage' services are rarely understood and encouraged in the market-driven arena. The main arguments against hydropower concern its social impacts, such as land transformation, displacement of people, and environmental changes, i.e. fauna, flora, sedimentation and water quality. The social and environmental impacts can, however, be mitigated by taking appropriate steps according to established codes of good practice. As a tool for this purpose, the hydropower sector has recently developed and

  19. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The information given in this document is divided into two parts. In part I the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials delivered up to 30 September 1962 by Member States in compliance with requests the Agency has made under Article IX. D. Part II contains information about materials which have not yet been delivered but which have been allocated, in accordance with Article XI. F. 1 of the Statute, to approved Agency projects for which project agreements were in force on 30 September 1962. Reports on subsequent deliveries of materials and revised information about allocated but undelivered materials will be issued from time to time

  20. Large-area compatible fabrication and encapsulation of inkjet-printed humidity sensors on flexible foils with integrated thermal compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina-Lopez, F; Quintero, A Vásquez; Mattana, G; Briand, D; De Rooij, N F

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the simultaneous fabrication of ambient relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors arrays, inkjet-printed on flexible substrates and subsequently encapsulated at foil level. These sensors are based on planar interdigitated capacitors with an inkjet-printed sensing layer and meander-shaped resistors. Their combination allows the compensation of the RH signals variations at different temperatures. The whole fabrication of the system is carried out at foil level and involves the utilization of additive methods such as inkjet-printing and electrodeposition. Electrodeposition of the printed lines resulted in an improvement of the thermoresistors. The sensors have been characterized and their performances analyzed. The encapsulation layer does not modify the performances of the sensors in terms of sensitivity or response time. This work demonstrates the potential of inkjet-printing in the large-area fabrication of light-weight and cost-efficient gas sensors on flexible substrates. (paper)

  1. New insights into properties of large-N holographic thermal QCD at finite gauge coupling at (the non-conformal/next-to) leading order in N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil, Karunava; Misra, Aalok

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that large-N thermal QCD laboratories like strongly coupled QGP (sQGP) require not only a large 't Hooft coupling but also a finite gauge coupling (Natsuume, String theory and quark-gluon plasma. arXiv:hep-ph/0701201, 2007). Unlike almost all top-down holographic models in the literature, holographic large-N thermal QCD models, based on this assumption, therefore necessarily require addressing this limit from M-theory. This was initiated in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) which presented a local M-theory uplift of the string theoretic dual of large-N thermal QCD-like theories at finite gauge/string coupling of Mia et al. (Nucl. Phys. B 839:187, arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) (g s largely address the following two non-trivial issues pertaining to the same. First, up to LO in N (the number of D3-branes), by calculating the temperature dependence of the thermal (and electrical) conductivity and the consequent deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law, upon comparison with Garg et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103:096402, 2009), we show that, remarkably, the results qualitatively mimic a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger liquid with impurities. Second, by looking at, respectively, the scalar, vector, and tensor modes of metric perturbations and using the prescription of Kovtun and Starinets (Phys. Rev. D 72:086009, arXiv:hep-th/0506184, 2005) for constructing appropriate gauge-invariant perturbations, we obtain the non-conformal corrections to the conformal results (but at finite g s ), respectively, for the speed of sound, the shear mode diffusion constant, and the shear viscosity η (and (η)/(s)). The new insight gained is that it turns out

  2. New insights into properties of large-N holographic thermal QCD at finite gauge coupling at (the non-conformal/next-to) leading order in N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sil, Karunava; Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India)

    2016-11-15

    It is believed that large-N thermal QCD laboratories like strongly coupled QGP (sQGP) require not only a large 't Hooft coupling but also a finite gauge coupling (Natsuume, String theory and quark-gluon plasma. arXiv:hep-ph/0701201, 2007). Unlike almost all top-down holographic models in the literature, holographic large-N thermal QCD models, based on this assumption, therefore necessarily require addressing this limit from M-theory. This was initiated in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) which presented a local M-theory uplift of the string theoretic dual of large-N thermal QCD-like theories at finite gauge/string coupling of Mia et al. (Nucl. Phys. B 839:187, arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) (g{sub s} largely address the following two non-trivial issues pertaining to the same. First, up to LO in N (the number of D3-branes), by calculating the temperature dependence of the thermal (and electrical) conductivity and the consequent deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law, upon comparison with Garg et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103:096402, 2009), we show that, remarkably, the results qualitatively mimic a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger liquid with impurities. Second, by looking at, respectively, the scalar, vector, and tensor modes of metric perturbations and using the prescription of Kovtun and Starinets (Phys. Rev. D 72:086009, arXiv:hep-th/0506184, 2005) for constructing appropriate gauge-invariant perturbations, we obtain the non-conformal corrections to the conformal results (but at finite g{sub s}), respectively, for the speed of sound, the shear mode diffusion constant, and the shear viscosity η (and (η)/(s)). The new insight gained is that it

  3. Vacuum-thermal-evaporation: the route for roll-to-roll production of large-area organic electronic circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D M

    2015-01-01

    Surprisingly little consideration is apparently being given to vacuum-evaporation as the route for the roll-to-roll (R2R) production of large-area organic electronic circuits. While considerable progress has been made by combining silicon lithographic approaches with solution processing, it is not obvious that these will be compatible with a low-cost, high-speed R2R process. Most efforts at achieving this ambition are directed at conventional solution printing approaches such as inkjet and gravure. This is surprising considering that vacuum-evaporation of organic semiconductors (OSCs) is already used commercially in the production of organic light emitting diode displays. Beginning from a discussion of the materials and geometrical parameters determining transistor performance and drawing on results from numerous publications, this review makes a case for vacuum-evaporation as an enabler of R2R organic circuit production. The potential of the vacuum route is benchmarked against solution approaches and found to be highly competitive. For example, evaporated small molecules tend to have higher mobility than printed OSCs. High resolution metal patterning on plastic films is already a low-cost commercial process for high-volume packaging applications. Similarly, solvent-free flash-evaporation and polymerization of thin films on plastic substrates is also a high-volume commercial process and has been shown capable of producing robust gate dielectrics. Reports of basic logic circuit elements produced in a vacuum R2R environment are reviewed and shown to be superior to all-solution printing approaches. Finally, the main issues that need to be resolved in order to fully develop the vacuum route to R2R circuit production are highlighted. (paper)

  4. Impact of Tab Location on Large Format Lithium-Ion Pouch Cell Based on Fully Coupled Tree-Dimensional Electrochemical-Thermal Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samba, Ahmadou; Omar, Noshin; Gualous, Hamid; Capron, Odile; Van den Bossche, Peter; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents extensive three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large LiFPO 4 pouch cells. 3D simulations of the Li-ion battery behavior are highly nonlinear and computationally demanding. Coupling electrochemical modeling to thermal models represents an important step towards accurate simulation of the Li-ion battery. Non-uniform temperature, potential and current density through the battery induce non-uniform use of the active material and can have a negative impact on cell performance and lifetime. Different pouch cell designs, with different tab locations, have been investigated in term of performance, current density, potential and heat distributions. The model is first validated with experimental data at different current discharge rates. Afterwards, the electrochemical, thermal and electrical behaviors over each cell design under high discharge rate (4 I t ) are compared between configurations. It has been shown that the designs with symmetrical configurations show uniform potential and current density gradient, which minimize the ohmic heat and lead to more uniform active material utilization and temperature distributions across the cell surface.Introduction

  5. Report of Task Group on Ex-Vessel Thermal-Hydraulics Corium/concrete interactions and combustible gas distribution in large dry containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The Task Group on Ex-Vessel Thermal-Hydraulics was established by the PWG 2 to address the physical processes that occur in the ex-vessel phase of severe accidents, to study their impact on containment loading and failure, and to assess the available calculation methods. This effort is part of an overall CSNI effort to come to an international understanding of the issues involved. The Task Group decided to focus its initial efforts on the Large Dry Containment used extensively to contain the consequences of postulated (design basis) accidents in Light Water Reactors (LWR). Although such containments have not been designed with explicit consideration of severe accidents, recent assessments indicate a substantial inherent capability for these accidents. The Task Group has examined the loads likely to challenge the integrity of the containment, and considered the calculation of the containment's response. This report is the outcome of this effort

  6. Microbiological and environmental effects of aquifer thermal energy storage - studies at the Stuttgart man-made aquifer and a large-scale model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Ruck, W.

    1993-01-01

    The storage of thermal energy, either heat or cold, in natural or artificial aquifers creates local perturbations of the indigenous microflora and the environmental properties. Within an international working group of the International Energy Agency (IEA Annex VI) possible environmental impacts of ATES-systems were recognized and investigated. Investigations of storage systems on natural sites, man-made aquifers and large-scale models of impounded aquifers showed changes in microbial populations, but until now no adverse microbiological processes associated with ATES-systems could be documented. However, examinations with a model system indicate an increased risk of environmental impact. Therefore, the operation of ATES-systems should be accompanied by chemical and biological investigations. (orig.) [de

  7. Validation of the Large Interface Method of NEPTUNE{sub C}FD 1.0.8 for Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coste, P., E-mail: pierre.coste@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER/SSTH, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Lavieville, J. [Electricite de France, Chatou (France); Pouvreau, J. [CEA, DEN, DER/SSTH, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Douce, A. [Electricite de France, Chatou (France)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) is a key thermohydraulics issue for PWR safety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic and condensation models are firstly validated separately. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Then the global validation is done with the COSI experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the calculations performed with the same set of models both in the Large Interface Method and in the k-{epsilon} approach for turbulence substantiate the application of the tool to PTS. - Abstract: NEPTUNE{sub C}FD is a code based on a 3D transient Eulerian two-fluid model. One of the main application targets is the two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS), which is related to PWR Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) lifetime safety studies, when sub-cooled water from Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) system is injected into the possibly uncovered cold leg and penetrates into the RPV downcomer. Five experiments were selected for the validation, a selection reviewed by a panel of European experts. The dynamic models are validated with a co-current smooth and wavy air-water stratified flow in a rectangular channel with detailed measurements of turbulence and velocities. The condensation models are validated with a co-current smooth and wavy steam-water stratified flow in a rectangular channel with measurements of the steam flow rates. The dynamic models are validated in the situation of a jet impinging a pool free surface with two experiments dealing with a water jet impingement on a water pool free surface in air environment. Finally, all the models involved in the reactor conditions are validated with the COSI experiment. The calculations are done with the same set of Large Interface Method models and a RANS (k-{epsilon}) approach for turbulence. They substantiate the application of the tool to PTS studies.

  8. The application of two-step linear temperature program to thermal analysis for monitoring the lipid induction of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 in large scale cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bongmun; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, microalgae was considered as a renewable energy for fuel production because its production is nonseasonal and may take place on nonarable land. Despite all of these advantages, microalgal oil production is significantly affected by environmental factors. Furthermore, the large variability remains an important problem in measurement of algae productivity and compositional analysis, especially, the total lipid content. Thus, there is considerable interest in accurate determination of total lipid content during the biotechnological process. For these reason, various high-throughput technologies were suggested for accurate measurement of total lipids contained in the microorganisms, especially oleaginous microalgae. In addition, more advanced technologies were employed to quantify the total lipids of the microalgae without a pretreatment. However, these methods are difficult to measure total lipid content in wet form microalgae obtained from large-scale production. In present study, the thermal analysis performed with two-step linear temeperature program was applied to measure heat evolved in temperature range from 310 to 351 °C of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 obtained from large-scale cultivation. And then, we examined the relationship between the heat evolved in 310-351 °C (HE) and total lipid content of the wet Nostoc cell cultivated in raceway. As a result, the linear relationship was determined between HE value and total lipid content of Nostoc sp. KNUA003. Particularly, there was a linear relationship of 98% between the HE value and the total lipid content of the tested microorganism. Based on this relationship, the total lipid content converted from the heat evolved of wet Nostoc sp. KNUA003 could be used for monitoring its lipid induction in large-scale cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Impact of Great Garuda Project on Wind and Thermal Environment over Built-Up Area in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, M.; Sueishi, T.; Inagaki, A.; Kanda, M.

    2017-12-01

    `Great Garuda' project is an eagle-shaped offshore structure with 17 artificial islands. This project has been designed for the coastal protection and land reclamation of Jakarta due to catastrophic flooding in the city. It offers an urban generation for 300.000 inhabitants and 600.000 workers in addition to its water safety goal. A broad coalition of Indonesian scientists has criticized the project for being negative impacts on the surrounding environment. Despite the vast research by Indonesian scientist on maritime environment, studies on wind and thermal environment over built-up area are still lacking. However, the construction of the various islands off the coast may result changes in wind patterns and thermal environment due to the alteration of the coastline and urbanization in the Jakarta Bay. Therefore, it is important to understand the airflow within the urban canopy in case of unpredictable gust events. These gust events may occur through the closely-packed high-rise buildings and pedestrians may be harmed from such gusts. Accordingly, we used numerical simulations to investigate the impact of the sea wall and the artificial islands over built-up area and, the intensity of wind gusts at the pedestrian level. Considering the fact that the size of turbulence organized structure sufficiently large computational domain is required. Therefore, a 19.2km×4.8km×1.0 km simulation domain with 2-m resolution in all directions was created to explicitly resolve the detailed shapes of buildings and the flow at the pedestrian level. This complex computation was accomplished by implementing a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Two case studies were conducted considering the effect of realistic surface roughness and upward heat flux. Case_1 was conducted based on the current built environment and Case_2 for investigating the effect of the project on the chosen coastal region of the city. Fig.1 illustrates the schematic of the large-eddy simulation domains of two cases

  10. Thermal load determination in the mixing TEE impacted by a turbulent flow generated by two fluids at large gap of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braillard, O.

    2005-01-01

    A 304L mixing tee mock-up is instrumented to assess the fluctuating temperature in the mixing area generated by two fluids (water) at large gap of temperature meet. The turbulent mixing layer impacts the structure wall and creates stresses, which lead to the damages. The case studied in this paper corresponds to the 'swinging streak' within a flow rate ratio of 25 %. The instrumentation is specifically planned to measure the fluctuating temperature in the fluid close to the internal skin and inside the wall too. This experiment is performed using a new sensor 'fluxmeter' which is non intrusive and typically designed to catch the fluctuation without any signal attenuation, within a frequency range 0-25Hz. The facility called 'Fatherino' supplies an available delta T of 70 degree C in water at 4 m/s mixture velocity in a mixing tee mock-up 50 mm in diameter. The flow features generate a large turbulent flow in the mixing layer and favour the heat flux transfer to the wall. By applying an inverse heat conduction method applied to the output data given by the fluxmeter, both the heat flux is deduced and the temperature (mean and fluctuating values) at the internal surface can be accurately determined. In addition, a calculation using the Trio U code (thermal hydraulic code) within the large eddy simulation module is computed to assess the fluid temperature distribution in the mixing area close to the internal surface. The output data in mean and standard deviation are compared with the Fatherino measurements. The comparison consists in analysing the main parameters as the mean and standard deviation in the fluid along the main axis and in a circumferential view. The mixing layer geometry and the frequency of the fluctuation are also analysed. These experiments added to the calculation allow us improving the state of the knowledge in the mixing tees and the thermal load to be used in the industrial mixing tees in operating for the long lifetime assessment or for the

  11. Model Predictive Control for Flexible Power Consumption of Large-Scale Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafiei, Seyed Ehsan; Stoustrup, Jakob; Rasmussen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) scheme is introduced to directly control the electrical power consumption of large-scale refrigeration systems. Deviation from the baseline of the consumption is corresponded to the storing and delivering of thermal energy. By virtue of such correspondence...

  12. Large thermal protection system panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David J. (Inventor); Myers, Franklin K. (Inventor); Tran, Tu T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A protective panel for a reusable launch vehicle provides enhanced moisture protection, simplified maintenance, and increased temperature resistance. The protective panel includes an outer ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panel, and an insulative bag assembly coupled to the outer CMC panel for isolating the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures and moisture. A standoff attachment system attaches the outer CMC panel and the bag assembly to the primary structure of the launch vehicle. The insulative bag assembly includes a foil bag having a first opening shrink fitted to the outer CMC panel such that the first opening and the outer CMC panel form a water tight seal at temperatures below a desired temperature threshold. Fibrous insulation is contained within the foil bag for protecting the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures. The insulative bag assembly further includes a back panel coupled to a second opening of the foil bag such that the fibrous insulation is encapsulated by the back panel, the foil bag, and the outer CMC panel. The use of a CMC material for the outer panel in conjunction with the insulative bag assembly eliminates the need for waterproofing processes, and ultimately allows for more efficient reentry profiles.

  13. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System for Small and Large Scale Missions: Approaching TRL 6 for Planetary and Human Exploration Missions and TRL 9 for Small Probe Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R. A. S.; Gasch, M. J.; Milos, F. S.; Stackpoole, M. M.; Smith, B. P.; Switzer, M. R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Wilder, M. C.; Boghhozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) funded an effort to develop an ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material that would have improved properties when compared to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and AVCOAT. Their goal was a conformal material, processed with a flexible reinforcement that would result in similar or better thermal characteristics and higher strain-to-failure characteristics that would allow for easier integration on flight aeroshells than then-current rigid ablative TPS materials. In 2012, NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) began funding the maturation of the best formulation of the game changing conformal ablator, C-PICA. Progress has been reported at IPPW over the past three years, describing C-PICA with a density and recession rates similar to PICA, but with a higher strain-to-failure which allows for direct bonding and no gap fillers, and even more important, with thermal characteristics resulting in half the temperature rise of PICA. Overall, C-PICA should be able to replace PICA with a thinner, lighter weight, less complicated design. These characteristics should be particularly attractive for use as backshell TPS on high energy planetary entry vehicles. At the end of this year, the material should be ready for missions to consider including in their design, in fact, NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is considering incentivizing the use of C-PICA in the next Discovery Proposal call. This year both scale up of the material to large (1-m) sized pieces and the design and build of small probe heatshields for flight tests will be completed. NASA, with an industry partner, will build a 1-m long manufacturing demonstration unit (MDU) with a shape based on a mid LD lifting body. In addition, in an effort to fly as you test and test as you fly, NASA, with a second industry partner, will build a small probe to test in the Interactive Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet and, using nearly the

  14. Delivering Science from Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Peter Joseph

    2015-08-01

    The SKA will be capable of producing a stream of science data products that are Exa-scale in terms of their storage and processing requirements. This Google-scale enterprise is attracting considerable international interest and excitement from within the industrial and academic communities. In this paper we examine the data flow, storage and processing requirements of a number of key SKA survey science projects to be executed on the baseline SKA1 configuration. Based on a set of conservative assumptions about trends for HPC and storage costs, and the data flow process within the SKA Observatory, it is apparent that survey projects of the scale proposed will potentially drive construction and operations costs beyond the current anticipated SKA1 budget. This implies a sharing of the resources and costs to deliver SKA science between the community and what is contained within the SKA Observatory. A similar situation was apparent to the designers of the LHC more than 10 years ago. We propose that it is time for the SKA project and broader community to consider the effort and process needed to design and implement a distributed science data system that leans on the lessons of other projects and looks to recent developments in Cloud technologies to ensure an affordable, effective and global achievement of science goals.

  15. Numerical modeling of flows and pollutant dispersion within and above urban street canyons under unstable thermal stratification by large-eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming-Chung; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2013-04-01

    Recently, with the ever increasing urban areas in developing countries, the problem of air pollution due to vehicular exhaust arouses the concern of different groups of people. Understanding how different factors, such as urban morphology, meteorological conditions and human activities, affect the characteristics of street canyon ventilation, pollutant dispersion above urban areas and pollutant re-entrainment from the shear layer can help us improve air pollution control strategies. Among the factors mentioned above, thermal stratification is a significant one determining the pollutant transport behaviors in certain situation, e.g. when the urban surface is heated by strong solar radiation, which, however, is still not widely explored. The objective of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the effects of unstable thermal stratification on the flows and pollutant dispersion within and above urban street canyons through numerical modeling using large-eddy simulation (LES). In this study, LES equipped with one-equation subgrid-scale (SGS) model is employed to model the flows and pollutant dispersion within and above two-dimensional (2D) urban street canyons (flanked by idealized buildings, which are square solid bars in these models) under different intensities of unstable thermal stratifications. Three building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios, 0.5, 1 and 2, are included in this study as a representation of different building densities. The prevailing wind flow above the urban canopy is driven by background pressure gradient, which is perpendicular to the street axis, while the condition of unstable thermal stratification is induced by applying a higher uniform temperature on the no-slip urban surface. The relative importance between stratification and background wind is characterized by the Richardson number, with zero value as a neutral case and negative value as an unstable case. The buoyancy force is modeled by Boussinesq approximation and the

  16. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, 61 Daizong Street, Tai' an 271018 (China); Wang, Qingguo, E-mail: wqgyyy@126.com [College of Food Science and Engineering, Shandong Agricultural University, 61 Daizong Street, Tai' an 271018 (China); Xu, Jing, E-mail: jiaxu@sdau.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agricultural University, 61 Daizong Street, Tai' an 271018 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180–914 cm{sup −1}) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention. - Graphical abstract: The fabrication process of LLDPE/LDH composite films. - Highlights: • LDH with basal spacing of 4.07 nm was synthesized by high-energy ball milling. • LLDPE composite films with homogeneous LDH dispersion were fabricated. • The properties of LLDPE/LDH composite films were improved. • LLDPE/LDH composite films show superior heat retention property.

  17. Large Piezoelectric Strain with Superior Thermal Stability and Excellent Fatigue Resistance of Lead-Free Potassium Sodium Niobate-Based Grain Orientation-Controlled Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yi; Ren, Wei; Niu, Gang; Wang, Lingyan; Zhao, Jinyan; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Ming; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Liu, Liqiang; Karaki, Tomoaki

    2018-03-19

    Environment-friendly lead-free piezoelectric materials with high piezoelectric response and high stability in a wide temperature range are urgently needed for various applications. In this work, grain orientation-controlled (with a 90% ⟨001⟩ c -oriented texture) (K,Na)NbO 3 -based ceramics with a large piezoelectric response ( d 33 *) = 505 pm V -1 and a high Curie temperature ( T C ) of 247 °C have been developed. Such a high d 33 * value varies by less than 5% from 30 to 180 °C, showing a superior thermal stability. Furthermore, the high piezoelectricity exhibits an excellent fatigue resistance with the d 33 * value decreasing within only by 6% at a field of 20 kV cm -1 up to 10 7 cycles. These exceptional properties can be attributed to the vertical morphotropic phase boundary and the highly ⟨001⟩ c -oriented textured ceramic microstructure. These results open a pathway to promote lead-free piezoelectric ceramics as a viable alternative to lead-based piezoceramics for various practical applications, such as actuators, transducers, sensors, and acoustic devices, in a wide temperature range.

  18. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Progress report, 1 October 1974--30 September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which large ectotherms adjust to thermal stress in their natural environment. The effect of mouth gaping on head temperatures and the role of radiation, conduction and convection on body temperatures of alligators have been determined. The utility of energy budget modeling as a method for studying the thermoregulatory mechanisms of animals has been demonstrated. Steady state and time dependent models of body temperature have been tested. Convection coefficients and evaporative water loss rates have been measured for the turtle, Chysemys scripta. Climate space diagrams have been formulated and are being tested. Behavioral thermoregulation of turtles has been studied in PAR pond on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Steady state energy budget equations have been computed for largemouth bass. Experimental heat transfer coefficients indicate that most heat transfer is through the body wall and not via the gills. A time dependent model is being tested. It predicts the body temperature of a fish in a heterothermal environment. Theoretical calculations have been made of the effects of body size, color, and metabolism on the temperature regulation of ectotherms

  19. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua; Wang, Qingguo; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180–914 cm −1 ) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention. - Graphical abstract: The fabrication process of LLDPE/LDH composite films. - Highlights: • LDH with basal spacing of 4.07 nm was synthesized by high-energy ball milling. • LLDPE composite films with homogeneous LDH dispersion were fabricated. • The properties of LLDPE/LDH composite films were improved. • LLDPE/LDH composite films show superior heat retention property.

  20. Capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care by community pharmacies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacy practice has transcended from largely a dispensary practice to pharmaceutical care practice. The capacity of community pharmacies to deliver pharmaceutical care was studied using pretested self survey methods. Ninety five percent (95%) of the respondents always educated customers on drug related needs, ...

  1. Will Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Be the Predominant Setting for Oral Health Care by 2025? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be the Setting in Which the Majority of Oral Health Care Is Delivered by 2025 and Viewpoint 2: Increases in DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be Offset by Models Allowing Dentists to Retain the Independence and Freedom of a Traditional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James R; Dodge, William W; Findley, John S; Young, Stephen K; Horn, Bruce D; Kalkwarf, Kenneth L; Martin, Max M; Winder, Ronald L

    2015-05-01

    This Point/Counterpoint article discusses the transformation of dental practice from the traditional solo/small-group (partnership) model of the 1900s to large Dental Support Organizations (DSO) that support affiliated dental practices by providing nonclinical functions such as, but not limited to, accounting, human resources, marketing, and legal and practice management. Many feel that DSO-managed group practices (DMGPs) with employed providers will become the setting in which the majority of oral health care will be delivered in the future. Viewpoint 1 asserts that the traditional dental practice patterns of the past are shifting as many younger dentists gravitate toward employed positions in large group practices or the public sector. Although educational debt is relevant in predicting graduates' practice choices, other variables such as gender, race, and work-life balance play critical roles as well. Societal characteristics demonstrated by aging Gen Xers and those in the Millennial generation blend seamlessly with the opportunities DMGPs offer their employees. Viewpoint 2 contends the traditional model of dental care delivery-allowing entrepreneurial practitioners to make decisions in an autonomous setting-is changing but not to the degree nor as rapidly as Viewpoint 1 professes. Millennials entering the dental profession, with characteristics universally attributed to their generation, see value in the independence and flexibility that a traditional practice allows. Although DMGPs provide dentists one option for practice, several alternative delivery models offer current dentists and future dental school graduates many of the advantages of DMGPs while allowing them to maintain the independence and freedom a traditional practice provides.

  2. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  3. Dissolved oxygen stratification and response to thermal structure and long-term climate change in a large and deep subtropical reservoir (Lake Qiandaohu, China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Wu, Zhixu; Liu, Mingliang; He, Jianbo; Shi, Kun; Zhou, Yongqiang; Wang, Mingzhu; Liu, Xiaohan

    2015-05-15

    From January 2010 to March 2014, detailed depth profiles of water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were collected at three sites in Lake Qiandaohu, a large, deep subtropical reservoir in China. Additionally, we assessed the changes in DO stratification over the past 61 years (1953-2013) based on our empirical models and long-term air temperature and transparency data. The DO concentration never fell below 2 mg/L, the critical value for anoxia, and the DO depth profiles were closely linked to the water temperature depth profiles. In the stable stratification period in summer and autumn, the significant increase in CDOM in the metalimnion explained the decrease in DO due to the oxygen consumed by CDOM. Well-developed oxygen stratification was detected at the three sites in spring, summer and autumn and was associated with thermal stratification. Oxycline depth was significantly negatively correlated with daily air temperature and thermocline thickness but significantly positively correlated with thermocline depth during the stratification weakness period (July-February). However, there were no significant correlations among these parameters during the stratification formation period (March-June). The increase of 1.67 °C in yearly average daily air temperature between 1980 and 2013 and the decrease of 0.78 m in Secchi disk depth caused a decrease of 1.65 m and 2.78 m in oxycline depth, respectively, facilitating oxygen stratification and decreasing water quality. Therefore, climate warming has had a substantial effect on water quality through changing the DO regime in Lake Qiandaohu. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in nurse education: delivering the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine changes in pre-registration nursing education through the personal accounts of nurse teachers. This paper is based on 37 in-depth interviews within a central London Healthcare Faculty. Each interview was subjected to a process of content analysis described by Miles and Huberman. The interviews took place between August 2003 and March 2004 and totalled 34.4 hours or 305,736 words. There were thirty female and seven male participants, who shared 1015 years of nursing experience, averaging at 27.4 years (min 7-max 42). These were supplemented by 552 years of teaching practice, the average being 15 years (min 0.5-max 29). This paper--delivering the nursing curriculum--identifies that the nature of nursing has changed as it has both expanded and contracted. Participants identified three major changes; the nature of nursing, selection of future nurses and the current impact that large cohorts have on our traditional model of person-centred education. The practice placements remain central to nursing education and it is the nursing role that should define the curriculum and the values of higher education should be supportive of this identity.

  5. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  6. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  7. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  8. Thermal oxidation of biosolids : the green technology has come of age in large cities[Manure, biosolids, and organic industrial/commercial residuals in land applications programs : improving beneficial reuse and protection of water quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puchajda, B.; Oleszkiewicz, J. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Biosolids management and disposal that is safe and effective by public standards is difficult, particularly for large communities. Land application, landfilling and thermal oxidation with energy recovery (TOER) are the three most popular forms of solids disposal. This paper focused on different aspects of the TOER technology such as energy recovery; air pollution; volume reduction; impact of solids management on waste water treatment plants; process economics; ash residue management; and recycling of nutrients and heavy metals. The thermal oxidation process was described in detail. Societal and environmental impacts were also identified and common factors in mono-incineration, co-combustion and alternative thermal process technologies were presented. The paper also provided examples of successfully operating incineration installations in Europe and North America. It was concluded that the key assets of TOER include volume reduction; decreased liability and product safety; and beneficial use of ash in construction, with future potential for metals and phosphorus recovery. 32 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  9. Electro-thermal Modeling for Junction Temperature Cycling-Based Lifetime Prediction of a Press-Pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC Applied to Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    Reliability is a critical criterion for multi-MW wind turbines, which are being employed with increasing numbers in wind power plants, since they operate under harsh conditions and have high maintenance cost due to their remote locations. In this study, the wind turbine grid-side converter...... reliability is investigated regarding IGBT lifetime based on junction temperature cycling for the grid-side press-pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC, which is a state-of-the art high reliability solution. In order to acquire IGBT junction temperatures for given wind power profiles and to use them in IGBT lifetime...... prediction, the converter electro-thermal model including electrical, power loss, and dynamical thermal models is developed with the main focus on the thermal modeling regarding converter topology, switch technology, and physical structure. Moreover, these models are simplified for their practical...

  10. Nanosolar: Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, Brian [Nanosolar, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-05-31

    Nanosolar has developed proprietary technology based on Copper-Indium-Gallium-diSelenide (CIGS) absorber technology that allows the printing of this semiconductor material using a high-speed, high-throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing process. A central challenge in cost-effectively constructing a large-area CIGS-based solar cell or module is that the elements of the CIGS layer must be within a narrow stoichiometric ratio on nano-, meso-, and macroscopic length scale in all three dimensions in order for the resulting cell or module to be highly efficient. Achieving precise stoichiometric composition over relatively large substrate areas is however difficult using traditional vacuum-based deposition processes. For example, it is difficult to uniformly deposit compounds and/or alloys containing more than one element by sputtering or evaporation. Both techniques rely on deposition approaches that are limited to line-of-sight and limited-area sources, tending to result in poor surface coverage. Line-of-sight trajectories and limited-area sources can result in non-uniform three-dimensional distribution of the elements in all three dimensions and/or poor film-thickness uniformity over large areas. These non-uniformities can occur over the nano-, meso-, and/or macroscopic scales. Such non-uniformity also alters the local stoichiometric ratios of the absorber layer, decreasing the potential power conversion efficiency of the complete cell or module. Nanosolar has overcome these challenges by printing nanoparticulate CIGS precursor materials onto low-cost metal foil substrates, and performing a rapid thermal processing to convert the nanoparticulate coating into a CIGS absorber layer By locking in the appropriate stochiometry into the nanoparticulate precursor material, spatial uniformity is ensured in the coated layers, while printing at high speed and throughput minimizes solar cell cost.

  11. Particle tracker system delivered to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Pitcher, Graham

    2006-01-01

    "The CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has delivered a system to CERN that will help to process the vast amounts of data generated by the silicon tracking detector within the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment." (1/2 page)

  12. Delivering construction projects using innovative building technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ampofo-Anti, Naalamkai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available . Figure 1: IBT delivery flowchart Proceedings 11th Built Environment Conference 6 th August – 8 th August 2017 Delivering construction projects using innovative building technologies Durban, South Africa 5. REFERENCES Ampofo-Anti, N...

  13. Delivering high performance BWR fuel reliably

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schardt, J.F. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Utilities are under intense pressure to reduce their production costs in order to compete in the increasingly deregulated marketplace. They need fuel, which can deliver high performance to meet demanding operating strategies. GE's latest BWR fuel design, GE14, provides that high performance capability. GE's product introduction process assures that this performance will be delivered reliably, with little risk to the utility. (author)

  14. Application of large underground seasonal thermal energy storage in district heating system : a model-based energy performance assessment of a pilot system in Chifeng, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, L.; Torrens Galdiz, J.I.; Guo, F.; Yang, X.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) technology is a proven solution to resolve the seasonal discrepancy between heating energy generation from renewables and building heating demands. This research focuses on the performance assessment of district heating (DH) systems powered by low-grade energy

  15. Evolution of a nursing education program delivered to baccalaureate-prepared Haitian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Elise L; Lindgren, Teri G; Pearson, Gayle A; Alcindor, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Haiti has high morbidity and mortality rates, a large proportion of people living in poverty, and a shortage of nurses and nursing faculty members. A partnership program between a US and Haitian university was formed to deliver a certificate program in nursing education. The authors describe their experiences developing, delivering, and evaluating the blended on-site and online program and their future goals.

  16. Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management (TOP-M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 18-07-2017 Final Technical Jul 2015 - Jul 2017 NICOP - Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management ...The main goal of this research was to present a New Thermal Management Approach, which combines thermally aware Very/Ultra Large Scale Integration...SPAD) image sensors were used to demonstrate the new thermal management approach. Thermal management , integrated temperature sensors, Vt extractor

  17. THE LOCATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES—REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Non-thermal velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in non-thermal velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in non-thermal velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events

  18. Thermal large Eddy simulations and experiments in the framework of non-isothermal blowing; Simulations des grandes echelles thermiques et experiences dans le cadre d'effusion anisotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, G

    2004-06-15

    The aim of this work is to study thermal large-eddy simulations and to determine the nonisothermal blowing impact on a turbulent boundary layer. An experimental study is also carried out in order to complete and validate simulation results. In a first time, we developed a turbulent inlet condition for the velocity and the temperature, which is necessary for the blowing simulations.We studied the asymptotic behavior of the velocity, the temperature and the thermal turbulent fluxes in a large-eddy simulation point of view. We then considered dynamics models for the eddy-diffusivity and we simulated a turbulent channel flow with imposed temperature, imposed flux and adiabatic walls. The numerical and experimental study of blowing permitted to obtain to the modifications of a thermal turbulent boundary layer with the blowing rate. We observed the consequences of the blowing on mean and rms profiles of velocity and temperature but also on velocity-velocity and velocity-temperature correlations. Moreover, we noticed an increase of the turbulent structures in the boundary layer with blowing. (author)

  19. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  20. Rayleigh- and Prandtl-number dependence of the large-scale flow-structure in weakly-rotating turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection under rotation shows a remarkable variety of different flow states. The Nusselt number (Nu) at slow rotation rates (expressed as the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1/Ro), for example, is not a monotonic function of 1/Ro. Different 1/Ro-ranges can be observed with different slopes ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) . Some of these ranges are connected by sharp transitions where ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) changes discontinuously. We investigate different regimes in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio Γ = 1 by measuring temperatures at the sidewall of the sample for various Prandtl numbers in the range 3 Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  1. Numerical analysis of thermal stress and dislocation density distributions in large size multi-crystalline silicon ingots during the seeded growth process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Hu, Chieh; Chen, Chun-Hung; Huang, Yen-Hao; Lin, Huang-Wei; Yu, Andy; Hsu, Bruce

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a global transient numerical simulation of silicon growth from the beginning of the solidification process until the end of the cooling process is carried out modeling the growth of an 800 kg ingot in an industrial seeded directional solidification furnace. The standard furnace is modified by the addition of insulating blocks in the hot zone. The simulation results show that there is a significant decrease in the thermal stress and dislocation density in the modified model as compared to the standard one (a maximal decrease of 23% and 75% along the center line of ingot for thermal stress and dislocation density, respectively). This modification reduces the heating power consumption for solidification of the silicon melt by about 17% and shortens the growth time by about 2.5 h. Moreover, it is found that adjusting the operating conditions of modified model to obtain the lower growth rate during the early stages of the solidification process can lower dislocation density and total heater power.

  2. Visualization and measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with large density difference using thermal neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Y.; Hibiki, T.; Mishima, K.; Nishihara, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Kanda, K.; Tobita, Y.; Konishi, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1998-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor there is a possibility of boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the containment pool. In relation to safety evaluation on severe accident, it is indispensable to evaluate the recriticality of melted core. Gas-liquid two-phase flow with a large density difference is formed due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture. Although the large density difference may affect the basic characteristics of two-phase flow, little work has been performed so far on two-phase flow with large density difference has not been performed well. In this study, visualization and void fraction measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow were performed by using neutron radiography. The effect of the large density difference between gas and liquid phases on the basic flow characteristics of two-phase flow was clarified. (author)

  3. Delivering service adaptation with 3G technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liotta, A.; Yew, A.; Bohoris, C.; Pavlou, G.; Feridun, M.; Kropf, P.G.; Babin, G.

    2002-01-01

    Now that 3G technologies have reached their maturity, newly advanced services can be delivered to the mobile user. These include context- aware services, adaptable services and Virtual Home Environment (VHE)-like services. Important research issues relate, however, to managing such services through

  4. Utah Delivers Opportunities for Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Kristine; Fischio, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    Providing information and resources to support career exploration is key to the mission of career and technical education (CTE) in Utah. Utah CTE has responded in a variety of ways to meet the career exploration needs of students of all ages. This article discusses how the career and technical education in Utah delivers opportunities for career…

  5. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  6. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John MESSING

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study Jason HOWARTH John MESSING Irfan ALTAS Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga-AUSTRALIA ABSTRACT This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master’s degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU. The Industry Master’s degree is an academic program for students currently employed in the IT industry. Using Internet Based Testing (IBT, these students are examined in test centres throughout the world. This offers many benefits. For example, students have the freedom of sitting exams at any time during a designated interval. Computer-based testing also provides instructors with valuable feedback through test statistics and student comments. In this paper, we document CSU’s use of the IBT system, including how tests are built and delivered, and how both human and statistical feedback is used to evaluate and enhance the testing process.

  7. How natural capital delivers ecosystem services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.C.; Harrison, P.A.; Pérez Soba, M.; Archaux, F.; Blicharska, M.; Egoh, B.N.; Erős, T.; Fabrega Domenech, N.; György, I.; Haines-Young, R.; Li, S.; Lommelen, E.; Meiresonne, L.; Miguel Ayala, L.; Mononen, L.; Simpson, G.; Stange, E.; Turkelboom, F.; Uiterwijk, M.; Veerkamp, C.J.; Wyllie de Echeverria, V.

    2017-01-01

    There is no unified evidence base to help decision-makers understand how the multiple components of natural capital interact to deliver ecosystem services. We systematically reviewed 780 papers, recording how natural capital attributes (29 biotic attributes and 11 abiotic factors) affect the

  8. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  9. Thermal fluctuations induced in a conducting wall by mixing sodium jets: an application of TRIO-VF using Large Eddy Simulation modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menant, B.; Villand, M.

    1994-01-01

    The general-purpose thermal-hydraulics program TRIO-VF allows explicit simulation of the main instabilities in an un-compressible flow: it has been applied to the prediction of flow instabilities in a sodium hot jet through a transverse cold flow. in front of a conducting wall. The temperature fluctuations induced in the flow and the wall are studied and an acute skin-effect is evidenced. The temperature gradients (including three components) are analysed: temperature gradients up to 20000 degrees per meter are currently seen in the skin. They are due to the very strong value of the unstationary component normal to the fluid-wall interface. The limitations of TRIO-VF in the present state, and the lack of experimental support for validation does not allow to promise quantitative applications of this modelling to complex industrial situations nowadays, but we hope these applications are for tomorrow. (author)

  10. Modelling study, efficiency analysis and optimisation of large-scale Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage systems with low-temperature thermal storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xing; Wang, Jihong; Krupke, Christopher; Wang, Yue; Sheng, Yong; Li, Jian; Xu, Yujie; Wang, Dan; Miao, Shihong; Chen, Haisheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents an A-CAES system thermodynamic model with low temperature thermal energy storage integration. • The initial parameter value ranges for A-CAES system simulation are identified from the study of a CAES plant in operation. • The strategies of system efficiency improvement are investigated via a parametric study with a sensitivity analysis. • Various system configurations are discussed for analysing the efficiency improvement potentials. - Abstract: The key feature of Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (A-CAES) is the reuse of the heat generated from the air compression process at the stage of air expansion. This increases the complexity of the whole system since the heat exchange and thermal storage units must have the capacities and performance to match the air compression/expansion units. Thus it raises a strong demand in the whole system modelling and simulation tool for A-CAES system optimisation. The paper presents a new whole system mathematical model for A-CAES with simulation implementation and the model is developed with consideration of lowing capital cost of the system. The paper then focuses on the study of system efficiency improvement strategies via parametric analysis and system structure optimisation. The paper investigates how the system efficiency is affected by the system component performance and parameters. From the study, the key parameters are identified, which give dominant influences in improving the system efficiency. The study is extended onto optimal system configuration and the recommendations are made for achieving higher efficiency, which provides a useful guidance for A-CAES system design.

  11. A masonry heater, a large thermal flywheel and constant temperatures : the winter of 1996/1997 of the Alberta Sustainable Home/Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowski, J.; Fofonoff, B.

    1997-07-01

    A masonry heater using scrapwood and firewood as the only source of back-up heat in this 1820 sq ft single-family live-in demonstration home/office, was described. The heater also contributed significantly to the thermal flywheel of the house. Together with other forms of thermal mass within the building (concrete slab, wood studs, drywall, tiles, furniture, plants, etc), the masonry heater was sufficient to see the occupants through the severe and long winter of 1996/97 with comfortable indoor temperatures. The masonry heater is located near the center of the house with a sunny view towards the south. On sunny winter days it operates as a passive solar heat sink, with the sun charging up the brick face by about five degrees C. In the evening, a 40 pound load of scrap and firewood will take about 1.25 hours to penetrate through the refractory interior core and brick exterior. This provides a cosy fireplace for the occupants, while storing heat in its mass for slow release during the next 1.5 to 3 days. It heats water for storage in the hot water tank. During the period of September 1996 to May 1997 one cord of wood was burned, which is about 12 per cent of the energy pumped into the average single family home in Calgary during the same period. Experience to-date suggests that the masonry heater performs very well as a back-up heater, maintaining an ambient temperature of about 20 degrees C throughout the winter. Some flat plate solar collectors might be necessary to provide for radiant floor heating of the mass since floor temperatures were lower than most occupants found comfortable.

  12. Large sample NAA of a pottery replica utilizing thermal neutron flux at AHWR critical facility and X-Z rotary scanning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Dasari, K.B.; Pujari, P.K.; Swain, K.K.; Shinde, A.D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2013-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) of a clay pottery replica from Peru was carried out using low neutron flux graphite reflector position of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) critical facility. This work was taken up as a part of inter-comparison exercise under IAEA CRP on LSNAA of archaeological objects. Irradiated large size sample, placed on an X-Z rotary scanning unit, was assayed using a 40% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The k 0 -based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) in conjunction with insitu relative detection efficiency was used to calculate concentration ratios of 12 elements with respect to Na. Analyses of both small and large size samples were carried out to check homogeneity and to arrive at absolute concentrations. (author)

  13. Visualization and measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with large density difference using thermal neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hibiki, T.; Saito, Y.; Nishihara, H.; Tobita, Y.; Konishi, K.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1999-01-01

    In a core melt accident of a fast breeder reactor, there is a possibility of boiling of the fuel-steel mixture in the containment pool. In relation to safety evaluation on severe accident, it is indispensable to evaluate the possibility of re-criticality of melted core. Gas-liquid two-phase flow with a large liquid-to-gas density ratio is formed due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture. Although it is anticipated that the large density ratio may affect the basic characteristics of two-phase flow, little work has been performed so far on two-phase flow with a large liquid-to-gas density ratio. In this study, visualization and void fraction measurement of gas-liquid metal two-phase flow were performed by using neutron radiography and image processing techniques. Then, the effect of large density difference between gas and liquid phases on the basic flow characteristics of two-phase flow was clarified

  14. A simple circuit to deliver bubbling CPAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Charanjit; Sema, Akatoli; Beri, Rajbir S; Puliyel, Jacob M

    2008-04-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), especially bubbling CPAP, is known to reduce the need for more invasive ventilation. We here describe a circuit that can deliver bubbling CPAP in resource poor settings. We describe how the oxygen concentration can be altered from 98% to 21% oxygen using this system. Addition of a humidifier in the circuit has the effect of reducing the oxygen concentration by 1 to 5%. The cost of putting together the system is approximately Rs 5000.

  15. Impact of peer delivered wellness coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarbrick, Margaret; Gill, Kenneth J; Pratt, Carlos W

    2016-09-01

    People receiving publicly funded behavioral health services for severe mental disorders have shorter lifespans and significantly impaired health-related quality of life compared to the general population. The aim of this article was to explore how peer wellness coaching (PWC), a manualized approach to pursue specific physical wellness goals, impacted goal attainment and overall health related quality of life. Deidentified archival program evaluation data were examined to explore whether peer delivered wellness coaching had an impact on 33 service recipients with regard to goal attainment and health-related quality of life. Participants were served by 1 of 12 wellness coach trainees from a transformation transfer initiative grant who had been trained in the manualized approach. Coaching participants and their coaches reported significant progress toward the attainment of individually chosen goals, 2 to 4 weeks after establishing their goals. After 8 to 10 weeks of peer delivered wellness coaching, improvements were evident in the self-report of physical health, general health, and perceived health. These improvements were sustained 90 days later. PWC is potentially a promising practice for helping people choose and pursue individual goals and facilitating positive health and wellness changes. Rigorous controlled research with larger samples is needed to evaluate the benefits of peer delivered wellness coaching. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Possible pressurized thermal shock events during large primary to secondary leakage. The Hungarian AGNES project and PRISE accident scenarios in VVER-440/V213 type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perneczky, L. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budabest (Hungary)

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear power plants of WWER-440/213-type have several special features. Consequently, the transient behaviour of such a reactor system should be different from the behaviour of the PWRs of western design. The opening of the steam generator (SG) collector cover, as a specific primary to secondary circuit leakage (PRISE) occurring in WWER-type reactors happened first time in Rovno NPP Unit I on January 22, 1982. Similar accident was studied in the framework of IAEA project RER/9/004 in 1987-88 using the RELAP4/mod6 code. The Hungarian AGNES (Advanced General and New Evaluation of Safety) project was performed in the period 1991-94 with the aim to reassess the safety of the Paks NPP using state-of-the-art techniques. The project comprised three type of analyses for the primary to secondary circuit leakages: Design Basis Accident (DBA) analyses, Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) study and deterministic analyses for Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Major part of the thermohydraulic analyses has been performed by the RELAP5/mod2.5/V251 code version with two input models. 32 refs.

  17. Geotechnical and large numeric studies on direct ultimate disposal of spent fuel elements. Project part 1: Thermal simulation of gallery storage. Final report (8th report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusermann, S.; Liedtke, L.; Soennke, J.; Sprado, K.H.; Gloeggler, W.

    1995-01-01

    Short-term tension measurements show that a reduced rock tension level exists in the Thermal Storage Simulation field (TSS). This tension level is markedly lower than the lithostatic rock pressure to be expected in the salt rock. The long-term tension measurements show that tension maxima will develop until early in 1993 in the close-in area of the experimental fields, for instance in the pillar between the galleries A and B. Creep tests with salt rock specimens from the TSS field show that the creep performance at room temperature of the Na2β rock salt to be considered in the experimental fields can be sufficiently accurately described by the reference creep law for stationary creep used by the BGR (Bundesanstalt f. Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe).The experimental in-situ results on the permeability of the salt rock in the experimental fields indicate i.a. very low permeabilities, except for a restricted, local area within the loosening zone below gallery B. This exhibits relatively high permeabilities. The experimental in-situ results on the permeability of the backfilling in the experimental galleries show that during the experimental measuring period, an only small change in permeability due to compaction of the backfilling material was observed. This result agrees with results of compaction tests performed by the GSF. The measured results show a difference in permeabilities between backfilling material subject to heating up, and colder material. (orig.) [de

  18. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of radiation and convection on the equilibrium body temperatures of alligators have been determined. Gaping has been shown to be an effective thermoregulatory device for retarding heat gain in the heads of these animals. Initial time dependent experiments have been completed and ketamine hydrochloride has been shown to be an effective anesthetic for alligators. Evaporative water loss rates have been measured as a function of size, temperature and wind speed for the turtle Chrysemys scripta. Convection coefficients have been determined and climate spaces are being formulated. Field studies are under way at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Convection coefficients for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides change as a function of temperature and water speed. Steady state heat energy budgets have been computed for this fish. The effects of arsenic and temperature on the temperature tolerance of larval muskellunge, Esox masquinongy, have been determined. The thermal tolerances of several species of minnows have also been measured. The role of the skin in the control of evaporation from amphibians and reptiles has been assessed. During the past year one article has been published, two are in press, one is in review, and eight are in preparation. Five masters theses will be completed by July 1976.

  19. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-11-01

    Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

  20. Possible pressurized thermal shock events during large primary to secondary leakage. The Hungarian AGNES project and PRISE accident scenarios in VVER-440/V213 type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perneczky, L [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budabest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    Nuclear power plants of WWER-440/213-type have several special features. Consequently, the transient behaviour of such a reactor system should be different from the behaviour of the PWRs of western design. The opening of the steam generator (SG) collector cover, as a specific primary to secondary circuit leakage (PRISE) occurring in WWER-type reactors happened first time in Rovno NPP Unit I on January 22, 1982. Similar accident was studied in the framework of IAEA project RER/9/004 in 1987-88 using the RELAP4/mod6 code. The Hungarian AGNES (Advanced General and New Evaluation of Safety) project was performed in the period 1991-94 with the aim to reassess the safety of the Paks NPP using state-of-the-art techniques. The project comprised three type of analyses for the primary to secondary circuit leakages: Design Basis Accident (DBA) analyses, Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) study and deterministic analyses for Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Major part of the thermohydraulic analyses has been performed by the RELAP5/mod2.5/V251 code version with two input models. 32 refs.

  1. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of radiation and convection on the equilibrium body temperatures of alligators have been determined. Gaping has been shown to be an effective thermoregulatory device for retarding heat gain in the heads of these animals. Initial time dependent experiments have been completed and ketamine hydrochloride has been shown to be an effective anesthetic for alligators. Evaporative water loss rates have been measured as a function of size, temperature and wind speed for the turtle Chrysemys scripta. Convection coefficients have been determined and climate spaces are being formulated. Field studies are under way at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Convection coefficients for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides change as a function of temperature and water speed. Steady state heat energy budgets have been computed for this fish. The effects of arsenic and temperature on the temperature tolerance of larval muskellunge, Esox masquinongy, have been determined. The thermal tolerances of several species of minnows have also been measured. The role of the skin in the control of evaporation from amphibians and reptiles has been assessed. During the past year one article has been published, two are in press, one is in review, and eight are in preparation. Five masters theses will be completed by July 1976

  2. Self-consistent phonons revisited. I. The role of thermal versus quantum fluctuations on structural transitions in large Lennard-Jones clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Ionuţ; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2012-10-14

    The theory of self-consistent phonons (SCP) was originally developed to address the anharmonic effects in condensed matter systems. The method seeks a harmonic, temperature-dependent Hamiltonian that provides the "best fit" for the physical Hamiltonian, the "best fit" being defined as the one that optimizes the Helmholtz free energy at a fixed temperature. The present developments provide a scalable O(N) unified framework that accounts for anharmonic effects in a many-body system, when it is probed by either thermal (ℏ → 0) or quantum fluctuations (T → 0). In these important limits, the solution of the nonlinear SCP equations can be reached in a manner that requires only the multiplication of 3N × 3N matrices, with no need of diagonalization. For short range potentials, such as Lennard-Jones, the Hessian, and other related matrices are highly sparse, so that the scaling of the matrix multiplications can be reduced from O(N(3)) to ~O(N). We investigate the role of quantum effects by continuously varying the de-Boer quantum delocalization parameter Λ and report the N-Λ (T = 0), and also the classical N-T (Λ = 0) phase diagrams for sizes up to N ~ 10(4). Our results demonstrate that the harmonic approximation becomes inadequate already for such weakly quantum systems as neon clusters, or for classical systems much below the melting temperatures.

  3. Electricity storage using a thermal storage scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alexander, E-mail: ajw36@cam.ac.uk [Hopkinson Laboratory, Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge. CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-22

    The increasing use of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation, many of which have an unpredictably intermittent nature, will inevitably lead to a greater demand for large-scale electricity storage schemes. For example, the expanding fraction of electricity produced by wind turbines will require either backup or storage capacity to cover extended periods of wind lull. This paper describes a recently proposed storage scheme, referred to here as Pumped Thermal Storage (PTS), and which is based on “sensible heat” storage in large thermal reservoirs. During the charging phase, the system effectively operates as a high temperature-ratio heat pump, extracting heat from a cold reservoir and delivering heat to a hot one. In the discharge phase the processes are reversed and it operates as a heat engine. The round-trip efficiency is limited only by process irreversibilities (as opposed to Second Law limitations on the coefficient of performance and the thermal efficiency of the heat pump and heat engine respectively). PTS is currently being developed in both France and England. In both cases, the schemes operate on the Joule-Brayton (gas turbine) cycle, using argon as the working fluid. However, the French scheme proposes the use of turbomachinery for compression and expansion, whereas for that being developed in England reciprocating devices are proposed. The current paper focuses on the impact of the various process irreversibilities on the thermodynamic round-trip efficiency of the scheme. Consideration is given to compression and expansion losses and pressure losses (in pipe-work, valves and thermal reservoirs); heat transfer related irreversibility in the thermal reservoirs is discussed but not included in the analysis. Results are presented demonstrating how the various loss parameters and operating conditions influence the overall performance.

  4. Thermally Dried Ink-Jet Process for 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-Pentacene for High Mobility and High Uniformity on a Large Area Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-05-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 °C without any “coffee stain”. The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192×150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44±0.08 cm2·V-1·s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 °C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  5. Thermally dried ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene for high mobility and high uniformity on a large area substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 degrees C without any "coffee stain". The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192 x 150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44 +/- 0.08 cm2.V-1.s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 degrees C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  6. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, α)7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,γ)2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning

  7. A better way to deliver bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Jean-François

    2002-09-01

    In an ideal world, a subordinate would accept critical feedback from a manager with an open mind. He or she would ask a few clarifying questions, promise to work on certain performance areas, and show signs of improvement over time. But things don't always turn out that way. Such conversations can be unpleasant. Emotions can run high; tempers can flare. Fearing that the employee will become angry and defensive, the boss all too often inadvertently sabotages the meeting by preparing for it in a way that stifles honest discussion. This unintentional--indeed, unconscious--stress-induced habit makes it difficult to deliver corrective feedback effectively. Insead professor Jean-François Manzoni says that by changing the mind-set with which they develop and deliver negative feedback, managers can increase their odds of having productive conversations without damaging relationships. Manzoni describes two behavioral phenomena that color the feedback process--the fundamental attribution error and the false consensus effect--and uses real-world examples to demonstrate how bosses' critiques can go astray. Managers tend to frame difficult situations and decisions in a way that is narrow (alternatives aren't considered) and binary (there are only two possible outcomes--win or lose). And during the feedback discussion, managers' framing of the issues often remains frozen, regardless of the direction the conversation takes. Manzoni advises managers not to just settle on the first acceptable explanation for a behavior or situation they've witnessed. Bosses also need to consider an employee's circumstances rather than just attributing weak performance to a person's disposition. In short, delivering more effective feedback requires an open-minded approach, one that will convince employees that the process is fair and that the boss is ready for an honest conversation.

  8. Delivering IT and eBusiness value

    CERN Document Server

    Willcocks, Leslie

    2001-01-01

    Delivering Business Value from IT' is focused on the evaluation issue in IT and how IT evaluation can proceed across the life-cycle of any IT investment and be linked positively to improving business performance. .Chapters 1,2 and 3 detail an approach to IT evaluation whilst chapters 4 and 5 build on these by showing two distinctive approaches to linking IT to business performance. The remaining three chapters deal with a range of evaluation issues emerging as important - specifically Internet evaluation, Y2K and beyond, EMU, quality outsourcing, infrastructure, role of benchmarking, and cost

  9. How to deliver better policy integration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Several challenges and possible ways forward in reconciling the delivery of energy policy goals including security and affordability are presented, based on the recent analyses by the International Energy Agency (IEA). This article addresses five topics: multiple challenging policy goals of the IEA’s 3 E’s (energy security, economic growth, and environmental sustainability); needs in the transformation to low carbon societies in the energy sectors; major policies and measures for energy sector transformation; multiple related policy goals and multiple benefits of energy efficiency policy; and realising climate and energy policy integration. Overall, this article explores how to better deliver climate and energy policy integration in the real world.

  10. A study on the effect of fluidic device installed in a safety injection tank on thermal-hydraulic phenomena of large break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Young Jong; Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Song, Jin Ho; Sim, Suk Ku; Park, Jong Kyun

    1999-03-01

    The performance of the Safety Injection Tank (SIT) with fluidic device (advanced SIT) is analyzed for the large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) using RELAP5/MOD3.1-KREM. First the case is analyzed using the conventional SIT. Among various cases the case with 4-split downcomer, discharge coefficient Cd=0.6, MCP trip with reactor trip and break location of cold leg discharge side with the pressurizer is found to be the most limiting case. For the same condition, the advanced SIT results the similar PCT, however it can maintain adequately the liquid level in the downcomer. By changing the ECCS location from the current injection to the cold leg elevations, PCT is improved by 75 K. (Author). 6 refs., 4 tabs., 54 figs

  11. Studies on the elements of optical and thermal energy transport through large components with transparent thermal insulation and shading; Untersuchungen der Grundlagen des optischen und thermischen Energietransportes bei grossflaechigen Komponenten mit transparenter Waermedaemmung und Verschattung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzer, W. [ed.; Apian-Bennewitz, P.; Kuhn, T.; Dill, F.U.; Wirth, H.; Wittwer, V.

    1997-11-28

    The report describes experimental and theoretical studies aiming at the comprehensive light-technical and energetic characterization of large, transparent construction elements including shading.- The two main measuring devices used for this purpose were a solar calorimeter for determining the total rate of energy passage, and a photogoniometer for measuring the bidirectional reflection and transmission properties of transparent construction elements and solar protection devices. The aims envisaged were to enhance measuring accuracy, create internationally comparable measuring conditions, and to integrate the experimental data into computer tools serving to evaluate construction elements in light-technical and energetic terms. (orig./GL) [Deutsch] In dem vorliegenden Sachbericht werden experimentelle und theoretische Arbeiten beschrieben, die auf eine umfassende lichttechnische und energetische Charakterisierung von grossflaechigen transparenten Bauteilen inklusive Sonnenschutz hinzielen. Die beiden wesentlichen Messvorrichtungen dazu sind ein Solarkalorimeter zur Bestimmung des Gesamtenergiedurchlassgrades und ein Photogoniometer zur Vermessung der bidirektionalen Reflexions- und Transmissionseigenschaften von transparenten Bauteilen und Sonnenschutzvorrichtungen. Ziele waren die Erhoehung der Messgenauigkeit, die Schaffung von international vergleichbaren Messbedingungen und die Integration der experimentellen Daten in Computerwerkzeuge, die der lichttechnischen und energetischen Bewertung von Bauteilen im Gebaeude dienen. (orig./GL)

  12. DESIGNS MATTER: Delivering Information Sources for Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie A. Nolasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has benefits not just for travelers, but also to the local economy. Since, Bicol Region has natural and cultural attractions; it is a potential travel destination in the country. Technology in delivering information sources played vital role for the success of the tourism industry in the Region. This allows travel enthusiasts to get more information about various tourist attractions. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of delivering information sources such as web advertisement and desktop publishing for tourist promotion in the Bicol Region. Specifically, it determined the status of tourism, and identified common forms of promotions for tourism development. The study adopted mixed method of research. This method was utilized to confirm and validate findings. Interviews and focus group discussions were used to gather data from the respondents of the selected Local Government Units, Department of Tourism, Travel Agencies and Hotel Agents in the Region. Based on the findings, of the total foreign visitors in the country, only 9.14% visited Bicol Region in 2014. That is why, domestic tourist showed high percentage against foreign visitors with 25.7%. Brochures with EZ maps as most commonly used desktop publishing materials and websites and social media for web advertisement. Thus, there is a need to reevaluate promotional activities by the DOT and other agencies. Adoption suggestive features for creative desktop publishing materials and web services should be considered to increase tourist visitors in the Region.

  13. Can the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) deliver?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, Srikanth; Lloyd, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates whether the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the Kyoto Protocol has played a significant role in the development of rural communities, specifically investigating uptake of small-scale renewable energy projects. The investigation involved an assessment of 500 registered small-scale CDM projects under the Kyoto Protocol in terms of their potential impact on the envisaged sustainable development goals for rural communities. Five case studies from the Indian subcontinent were also examined. The paper concludes that the CDM in its current state and design has typically failed to deliver the promised benefits with regard to development objectives in rural areas. Successful projects were found to have had good community involvement and such projects were typically managed by cooperative ventures rather than money making corporations. The paper puts forward a new framework for the assessment of such benefits in the hope that future projects can be better assessed in this regard. The key problem, however, remains on how to deal with the inherent contradiction between development and sustainability. - Research Highlights: → Role of CDM towards sustainable development of rural communities. → Assessment of 500 registered small-scale CDM projects. → CDM in its current state and design has typically failed to deliver. → A new framework for sustainable development assessment of small-scale CDM projects. → Inherent contradiction between development and sustainability.

  14. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Genome-wide association analysis for heat tolerance at flowering detected a large set of genes involved in adaptation to thermal and other stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Lafarge

    Full Text Available Fertilization sensitivity to heat in rice is a major issue within climate change scenarios in the tropics. A panel of 167 indica landraces and improved varieties was phenotyped for spikelet sterility (SPKST under 38°C during anthesis and for several secondary traits potentially affecting panicle micro-climate and thus the fertilization process. The panel was genotyped with an average density of one marker per 29 kb using genotyping by sequencing. Genome-wide association analyses (GWAS were conducted using three methods based on single marker regression, haplotype regression and simultaneous fitting of all markers, respectively. Fourteen loci significantly associated with SPKST under at least two GWAS methods were detected. A large number of associations was also detected for the secondary traits. Analysis of co-localization of SPKST associated loci with QTLs detected in progenies of bi-parental crosses reported in the literature allowed to narrow -down the position of eight of those QTLs, including the most documented one, qHTSF4.1. Gene families underlying loci associated with SPKST corresponded to functions ranging from sensing abiotic stresses and regulating plant response, such as wall-associated kinases and heat shock proteins, to cell division and gametophyte development. Analysis of diversity at the vicinity of loci associated with SPKST within the rice three thousand genomes, revealed widespread distribution of the favourable alleles across O. sativa genetic groups. However, few accessions assembled the favourable alleles at all loci. Effective donors included the heat tolerant variety N22 and some Indian and Taiwanese varieties. These results provide a basis for breeding for heat tolerance during anthesis and for functional validation of major loci governing this trait.

  16. Optimizing a Drone Network to Deliver Automated External Defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutilier, Justin J; Brooks, Steven C; Janmohamed, Alyf; Byers, Adam; Buick, Jason E; Zhan, Cathy; Schoellig, Angela P; Cheskes, Sheldon; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-06-20

    Public access defibrillation programs can improve survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, but automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are rarely available for bystander use at the scene. Drones are an emerging technology that can deliver an AED to the scene of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for bystander use. We hypothesize that a drone network designed with the aid of a mathematical model combining both optimization and queuing can reduce the time to AED arrival. We applied our model to 53 702 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred in the 8 regions of the Toronto Regional RescuNET between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2014. Our primary analysis quantified the drone network size required to deliver an AED 1, 2, or 3 minutes faster than historical median 911 response times for each region independently. A secondary analysis quantified the reduction in drone resources required if RescuNET was treated as a large coordinated region. The region-specific analysis determined that 81 bases and 100 drones would be required to deliver an AED ahead of median 911 response times by 3 minutes. In the most urban region, the 90th percentile of the AED arrival time was reduced by 6 minutes and 43 seconds relative to historical 911 response times in the region. In the most rural region, the 90th percentile was reduced by 10 minutes and 34 seconds. A single coordinated drone network across all regions required 39.5% fewer bases and 30.0% fewer drones to achieve similar AED delivery times. An optimized drone network designed with the aid of a novel mathematical model can substantially reduce the AED delivery time to an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest event. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Large ferroelectric polarization of TiN/Hf0.5Zr0.5O2/TiN capacitors due to stress-induced crystallization at low thermal budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Joon; Narayan, Dushyant; Lee, Jae-Gil; Mohan, Jaidah; Lee, Joy S.; Lee, Jaebeom; Kim, Harrison S.; Byun, Young-Chul; Lucero, Antonio T.; Young, Chadwin D.; Summerfelt, Scott R.; San, Tamer; Colombo, Luigi; Kim, Jiyoung

    2017-12-01

    We report on atomic layer deposited Hf0.5Zr0.5O2 (HZO)-based capacitors which exhibit excellent ferroelectric (FE) characteristics featuring a large switching polarization (45 μC/cm2) and a low FE saturation voltage (˜1.5 V) as extracted from pulse write/read measurements. The large FE polarization in HZO is achieved by the formation of a non-centrosymmetric orthorhombic phase, which is enabled by the TiN top electrode (TE) having a thickness of at least 90 nm. The TiN films are deposited at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C in an inert environment for at least 1 min in a rapid thermal annealing system. The room-temperature deposited TiN TE acts as a tensile stressor on the HZO film during the annealing process. The stress-inducing TiN TE is shown to inhibit the formation of the monoclinic phase during HZO crystallization, forming an orthorhombic phase that generates a large FE polarization, even at low process temperatures.

  18. Delivering Hubble Discoveries to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Villard, R.; Weaver, D.; Cordes, K.; Knisely, L.

    2013-04-01

    Today's classrooms are significantly influenced by current news events, delivered instantly into the classroom via the Internet. Educators are challenged daily to transform these events into student learning opportunities. In the case of space science, current news events may be the only chance for educators and students to explore the marvels of the Universe. Inspired by these circumstances, the education and news teams developed the Star Witness News science content reading series. These online news stories (also available in downloadable PDF format) mirror the content of Hubble press releases and are designed for upper elementary and middle school level readers to enjoy. Educators can use Star Witness News stories to reinforce students' reading skills while exposing students to the latest Hubble discoveries.

  19. Delivering advanced therapies: the big pharma approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, J; Krishna, D; Jespers, L; Ketkar, A; Haddock, R; Imrie, J; Kili, S

    2017-09-01

    After two decades of focused development and some recent clinical successes, cell and gene therapy (CGT) is emerging as a promising approach to personalized medicines. Genetically engineered cells as a medical modality are poised to stand alongside or in combination with small molecule and biopharmaceutical approaches to bring new therapies to patients globally. Big pharma can have a vital role in industrializing CGT by focusing on diseases with high unmet medical need and compelling genetic evidence. Pharma should invest in manufacturing and supply chain solutions that deliver reproducible, high-quality therapies at a commercially viable cost. Owing to the fast pace of innovation in this field proactive engagement with regulators is critical. It is also vital to understand the needs of patients all along the patient care pathway and to establish product pricing that is accepted by prescribers, payers and patients.

  20. Delivering Results for Peace and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, Hazel

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA’s technical cooperation programme is the primary mechanism for delivering the IAEA’s capacity-building services to its Member States. The programme supports the safe and secure application of nuclear technology for sustainable socioeconomic development in Member States. The overall strategic framework of the TC programme is determined by pertinent provisions laid down in key documents of the IAEA. Strategic direction for the multi-annual TC programme is provided by the Agency’s Members States and, more specifically, by relevant advisory and governance entities. The programme concentrates on: improving human health; supporting agriculture, rural development and food security; advancing water resource management; addressing environmental challenges; helping sustainable energy development, including the use of nuclear power for electricity; and promoting safety and security

  1. Combining Technologies to Deliver Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Freeman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1997 a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA grant was awarded to the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS at The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston (UTMB for support of the Laboratory Education and Advancement Project (LEAP. The project entailed three primary objectives, targeting laboratory practitioners in rural and medically underserved areas of Texas for delivering a bachelor's degree, laboratory-intensive course of study via distance education. Several delivery mechanisms were utilized and evaluated for their effectiveness and friendliness to both the faculty and students. The authors discuss and describe the mechanisms utilized for delivery of courses, the advantages and disadvantages encountered with each mechanism, and subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of the courses. Also discussed are the lessons learned and plans for future development.

  2. Photochemical internalization enhanced macrophage delivered chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Diane; Christie, Catherine; Ju, David; Nair, Rohit Kumar; Molina, Stephanie; Berg, Kristian; Krasieva, Tatiana B; Madsen, Steen J; Hirschberg, Henry

    2018-03-01

    Macrophage (Ma) vectorization of chemotherapeutic drugs has the advantage for cancer therapy in that it can actively target and maintain an elevated concentration of drugs at the tumor site, preventing their spread into healthy tissue. A potential drawback is the inability to deliver a sufficient number of drug-loaded Ma into the tumor, thus limiting the amount of active drug delivered. This study examined the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to enhance the efficacy of released drug by Ma transport. Tumor spheroids consisting of either F98 rat glioma cells or F98 cells combined with a subpopulation of empty or doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded mouse Ma (RAW264.7) were used as in vitro tumor models. PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS 2a and laser irradiation at 670 nm. RAW264.7 Ma pulsed with DOX released the majority of the incorporated DOX within two hours of incubation. PCI significantly increased the toxicity of DOX either as pure drug or derived from monolayers of DOX-loaded Ma. Significant growth inhibition of hybrid spheroids was also observed with PCI even at subpopulations of DOX-loaded Ma as low as 11% of the total initial hybrid spheroid cell number. Results show that RAW264.7 Ma, pulsed with DOX, could effectively incorporate and release DOX. PCI significantly increased the ability of both free and Ma-released DOX to inhibit the growth of tumor spheroids in vitro. The growth of F98 + DOX loaded Ma hybrid spheroids were synergistically reduced by PCI, compared to either photodynamic therapy or released DOX acting alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Temperature of gas delivered from ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikata, Yusuke; Onodera, Mutsuo; Imanaka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Masaji

    2013-01-01

    Although heated humidifiers (HHs) are the most efficient humidifying device for mechanical ventilation, some HHs do not provide sufficient humidification when the inlet temperature to the water chamber is high. Because portable and home-care ventilators use turbines, blowers, pistons, or compressors to inhale in ambient air, they may have higher gas temperature than ventilators with piping systems. We carried out a bench study to investigate the temperature of gas delivered from portable and home-care ventilators, including the effects of distance from ventilator outlet, fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FIO2), and minute volume (MV). We evaluated five ventilators equipped with turbine, blower, piston, or compressor system. Ambient air temperature was adjusted to 24°C ± 0.5°C, and ventilation was set at FIO2 0.21, 0.6, and 1.0, at MV 5 and 10 L/min. We analyzed gas temperature at 0, 40, 80, and 120 cm from ventilator outlet and altered ventilator settings. While temperature varied according to ventilators, the outlet gas temperature of ventilators became stable after, at the most, 5 h. Gas temperature was 34.3°C ± 3.9°C at the ventilator outlet, 29.5°C ± 2.2°C after 40 cm, 25.4°C ± 1.2°C after 80 cm and 25.1°C ± 1.2°C after 120 cm (P < 0.01). FIO2 and MV did not affect gas temperature. Gas delivered from portable and home-care ventilator was not too hot to induce heated humidifier malfunctioning. Gas soon declined when passing through the limb.

  4. Development of a replacement technology for the standard {sup 3}He detector for the detection of thermal neutron on large areas; Entwicklung einer Ersatztechnologie fuer den Standard {sup 3}He Detektor zum Nachweis thermischer Neutronen auf grossen Flaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modzel, Gerd

    2014-07-23

    The large area Jalousie detector concept has been developed as a replacement for {sup 3}He based neutron detectors. It is based on inclined and stacked layers coated with {sup 10}B, detecting the conversion products in a gas detector. Prototypes have been built based on the requirements of the POWTEX experiment. The spatial resolution has been measured as FWHM{sub z}=11.9 mm and FWHM{sub θ}=6.4 mm, slightly above the prediction due to the range of the conversion products in the gas. The correlated anode and cathode deliver an efficiency with the expected dependency on the inclination angle. The absolute efficiency of the anode wires has been measured as 93.6% of the predicted value at 1.17 Aa, validating the detector concept. Simulations in Garfield have been made to better understand the inner workings of the detector. Tools to analyze the raw detector data have been developed, which enabled further optimizations in the data processing chain and solving some problems. A test environment has been built for the n-XYTER 2.0 chip and some preliminary tests have been conducted. They showcase some problems, but a statement about the state of the chip cannot be made yet.

  5. Can learning health systems help organisations deliver personalised care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaru, Bright I; Friedman, Charles; Halamka, John; Sheikh, Aziz

    2017-10-02

    There is increasing international policy and clinical interest in developing learning health systems and delivering precision medicine, which it is hoped will help reduce variation in the quality and safety of care, improve efficiency, and lead to increasing the personalisation of healthcare. Although reliant on similar policies, informatics tools, and data science and implementation research capabilities, these two major initiatives have thus far largely progressed in parallel. In this opinion piece, we argue that they should be considered as complementary, synergistic initiatives whereby the creation of learning health systems infrastructure can support and catalyse the delivery of precision medicine that maximises the benefits and minimises the risks associated with treatments for individual patients. We illustrate this synergy by considering the example of treatments for asthma, which is now recognised as an umbrella term for a heterogeneous group of related conditions.

  6. Highly porous thermoelectric nanocomposites with low thermal conductivity and high figure of merit from large-scale solution-synthesized Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.5}Se{sub 0.5} hollow nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Biao; Wu, Yue [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Ames Laboratory, Department of Energy, Ames, IA (United States); Feng, Tianli; Ruan, Xiulin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Agne, Matthias T.; Snyder, G. Jeffery [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory, Department of Energy, Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    To enhance the performance of thermoelectric materials and enable access to their widespread applications, it is beneficial yet challenging to synthesize hollow nanostructures in large quantities, with high porosity, low thermal conductivity (κ) and excellent figure of merit (z T). Herein we report a scalable (ca. 11.0 g per batch) and low-temperature colloidal processing route for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.5}Se{sub 0.5} hollow nanostructures. They are sintered into porous, bulk nanocomposites (phi 10 mm x h 10 mm) with low κ (0.48 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) and the highest z T (1.18) among state-of-the-art Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3-x}Se{sub x} materials. Additional benefits of the unprecedented low relative density (68-77 %) are the large demand reduction of raw materials and the improved portability. This method can be adopted to fabricate other porous phase-transition and thermoelectric chalcogenide materials and will pave the way for the implementation of hollow nanostructures in other fields. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Bakery Delivers With Biodiesel Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels

  8. Apparatus for delivering and receiving radioactive gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dansky, B.; Epifano, L.; Farella, R.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for delivering and receiving gas to and from a patient, such as for lung ventilation studies. In accordance with the invention there is provided a restrictive breathing chamber adapted for coupling to the patient's breathing organs. A system, including a first check valve, is provided for coupling the breathing chamber to an inflatable gas receptacle so as to allow flow only toward the inflatable gas receptacle. Active gas input apparatus, including a second check valve, is also coupled to the breathing chamber, the second check valve allowing flow only toward the breathing chamber means. First and second auxiliary tubes and a gas filter are also provided. A system is provided for coupling the first auxiliary tube from the inflatable receptacle through the gas filter and to an ambient air environment. The second auxiliary tube is coupled from the inflatable receptacle to an ambient air environment. Finally, a gas pump is switchably coupled as between the first and second auxiliary tubes and operative to selectively cause gas flow in the first auxiliary tube toward the ambient environment, and in the second auxiliary tube toward the inflatable receptacle. A gas trap structure is also disclosed

  9. Delivering bad news in emergency care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting is a strategy for delivering bad news and is compared to two other strategies, stalling and being blunt. Forecasting provides some warning that bad news is forthcoming without keeping the recipient in a state of indefinite suspense (stalling) or conveying the news abruptly (being blunt). Forecasting appears to be more effective than stalling or being blunt in helping a recipient to "realize" the bad news because it involves the deliverer and recipient in a particular social relation. The deliverer of bad news initiates the telling by giving an advance indication of the bad news to come; this allows the recipient to calculate the news in advance of its final presentation, when the deliverer confirms what the recipient has been led to anticipate. Thus, realization of bad news emerges from intimate collaboration, whereas stalling and being blunt require recipients to apprehend the news in a social vacuum. Exacerbating disruption to recipients' everyday world, stalling and being blunt increase the probability of misapprehension (denying, blaming, taking the situation as a joke, etc.) and thereby inhibit rather than facilitate realization. Particular attention is paid to the "perspective display sequence", a particular forecasting strategy that enables both confirming the recipient's perspective and using that perspective to affirm the clinical news. An example from acute or emergency medicine is examined at the close of the paper.

  10. Delivering new physics at impressive speed

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The speed with which the heavy ion run at the LHC is delivering new physics is impressive not only for the insights it is bringing to the early Universe, but also for the clear demonstration it gives of the value of competition and complementarity between the experiments.   ALICE was the first off the mark to publish papers from the ion run, as you’d expect from the LHC’s dedicated ion experiment, but results emerging from ATLAS and CMS are bringing new understanding in their own right. Each collaboration’s result plays to the strengths of its detector, and it is by taking all the results together that our knowledge advances. The creation, observation and understanding of the hot dense matter that would have existed in the early Universe, normally known as Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), is complex science and one of the ion programme’s key goals. Many signals for QGP exist, and like pieces of a puzzle, we must assemble all of them to get the full picture. At th...

  11. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  12. Subnanomolar antisense activity of phosphonate-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates delivered by cationic lipids to HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hamzavi, Ramin; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    oligomer. This modification of the PNA does not interfere with the nucleic acid target binding affinity based on thermal stability of the PNA/RNA duplexes. When delivered to cultured HeLa pLuc705 cells by Lipofectamine, the PNAs showed dose-dependent nuclear antisense activity in the nanomolar range...

  13. Simply delivered meals: a tale of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah L; Connelly, Nancy; Parsons, Cassandra; Blackstone, Katlyn

    2018-06-01

    Western medicine is undergoing a transition toward transparency of quality and costs, and healthcare systems are striving to achieve the Triple Aim, a framework for improving the patient experience of care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the per capita cost of healthcare. Meanwhile, there is growing recognition of the impact of social determinants of health and a new federal requirement for nonprofit hospitals to implement prevention strategies. A specialized meal delivery program called Simply Delivered for ME (SDM) was formed in an effort to improve care and reduce 30-day hospital readmission rates.The Maine Medical Center (MMC) partnered with the Southern Maine Agency on Aging to offer SDM on a voluntary basis to high-risk Medicare patients already enrolled in the Community-based Care Transition Program (CCTP) at MMC. We report the results of the 2-year intervention in terms of 30-day hospital readmission rates and cost measures (ie, return on investment and cost savings).Of the 622 MMC patients who received SDM during the 24 months, the 30-day readmission rate was 10.3% (compared with the 16.6% 30-day rate of hospital readmission at baseline [ie, before the adoption of CCTP]) for all-cause readmissions. The cost savings for reduced readmissions were $212,160. The return on investment was 387%, or a benefit-cost ratio of $3.87 for every $1.00 spent on meals. Programs such as SDM may reduce the rate of hospital readmission among high-risk older adults and, thereby, yield lower healthcare costs.

  14. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  15. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  16. Rebamipide delivered by brushite cement enhances osteoblast and macrophage proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pujari-Palmer

    Full Text Available Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2, BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70% ± 0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage. Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4 uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 ± 7.4% at 1 uM, and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts.

  17. Engineering a plant community to deliver multiple ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Döring, Thomas; Baddeley, John; Collins, Rosemary; Roderick, Stephen; Jones, Hannah; Watson, Christine

    2015-06-01

    The sustainable delivery of multiple ecosystem services requires the management of functionally diverse biological communities. In an agricultural context, an emphasis on food production has often led to a loss of biodiversity to the detriment of other ecosystem services such as the maintenance of soil health and pest regulation. In scenarios where multiple species can be grown together, it may be possible to better balance environmental and agronomic services through the targeted selection of companion species. We used the case study of legume-based cover crops to engineer a plant community that delivered the optimal balance of six ecosystem services: early productivity, regrowth following mowing, weed suppression, support of invertebrates, soil fertility building (measured as yield of following crop), and conservation of nutrients in the soil. An experimental species pool of 12 cultivated legume species was screened for a range of functional traits and ecosystem services at five sites across a geographical gradient in the United Kingdom. All possible species combinations were then analyzed, using a process-based model of plant competition, to identify the community that delivered the best balance of services at each site. In our system, low to intermediate levels of species richness (one to four species) that exploited functional contrasts in growth habit and phenology were identified as being optimal. The optimal solution was determined largely by the number of species and functional diversity represented by the starting species pool, emphasizing the importance of the initial selection of species for the screening experiments. The approach of using relationships between functional traits and ecosystem services to design multifunctional biological communities has the potential to inform the design of agricultural systems that better balance agronomic and environmental services and meet the current objective of European agricultural policy to maintain viable food

  18. Thermal resistance and conductivity of recycled construction and demolition waste (RCDW concrete blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Julio Apolonio Callejas

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, studies to reuse construction and demolition waste are a special issue because a large amount of this material has been delivered to the public landfills and in illegal places. Some researchers have suggested reusing this material in building elements, such as bricks or blocks. It is possible to find a lot of researches in physical/mechanical characterization, while little effort has been made to characterize recycled construction and demolition waste blocks (RCDW for their thermal properties. The aim of this work was to characterize the RCDW thermal resistance and conductivity in order to provide subsidies for a building's thermal performance analysis. The hot-box method was adapted, together with measuring techniques with a heat-flow meter to determine the RCDW thermal properties. The results indicated that the RCDW block overall thermal resistance and thermal conductivity in the solid region was within the intervals of 0.33≤RT≤0.41m2KW-1 and 0.60≤l≤0.78Wm-1K-1, respectively. The lower resistance and conductivity values are justified by the presence of aggregate with a lower density and lower thermal conductivity than the natural aggregate.

  19. Delivering a Multi-Functional and Resilient Urban Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Hale

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tree planting is widely advocated and applied in urban areas, with large-scale projects underway in cities globally. Numerous potential benefits are used to justify these planting campaigns. However, reports of poor tree survival raise questions about the ability of such projects to deliver on their promises over the long-term. Each potential benefit requires different supporting conditions—relating not only to the type and placement of the tree, but also to the broader urban system within which it is embedded. This set of supporting conditions may not always be mutually compatible and may not persist for the lifetime of the tree. Here, we demonstrate a systems-based approach that makes these dependencies, synergies, and tensions more explicit, allowing them to be used to test the decadal-scale resilience of urban street trees. Our analysis highlights social, environmental, and economic assumptions that are implicit within planting projects; notably that high levels of maintenance and public support for urban street trees will persist throughout their natural lifespan, and that the surrounding built form will remain largely unchanged. Whilst the vulnerability of each benefit may be highly context specific, we identify approaches that address some typical weaknesses, making a functional, resilient, urban forest more attainable.

  20. Thermal management of batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, H. F.; Chen, C.-C.

    Control of the internal temperature during high rate discharge or charge can be a major design problem for large, high energy density battery systems. A systematic approach to the thermal management of such systems is described for different load profiles based on: thermodynamic calculations of internal heat generation; calorimetric measurements of heat flux; analytical and finite difference calculations of the internal temperature distribution; appropriate system designs for heat removal and temperature control. Examples are presented of thermal studies on large lead-acid batteries for electrical utility load levelling and nickel-zinc and lithium-iron sulphide batteries for electric vehicle propulsion.

  1. Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, E.I.

    1997-01-01

    The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before

  2. Oral microflora in infants delivered vaginally and by caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelun Barfod, Mette; Magnusson, Kerstin; Lexner, Michala Oron

    2011-01-01

    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 2011 Background. Early in life, vaginally delivered infants exhibit a different composition of the gut flora compared with infants delivered by caesarean section (C-section); however, it is unclear whether this also applies to the oral cavity. Aim....... To investigate and compare the oral microbial profile between infants delivered vaginally and by C-section. Design. This is a cross-sectional case-control study. Eighty-four infants delivered either vaginally (n = 42) or by C-section (n = 42) were randomly selected from the 2009 birth cohort at the County...

  3. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Staub, Isabelle; Knight, Les

    2005-02-01

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability to real problems in

  4. DECOVALEX III III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (comp.) [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Staub, Isabelle (comp.) [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Knight, Les (comp.) [Nirex UK Ltd, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability

  5. Thermal Transgressions and Phanerozoic Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, T. R.; Kidder, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    A number of significant Phanerozoic extinctions are associated with marine transgressions that were probably driven by rapid ocean warming. The conditions associated with what we call thermal transgressions are extremely stressful to life on Earth. The Earth system setting associated with end-Permian extinction exemplifies an end-member case of our model. The conditions favoring extreme warmth and sea-level increases driven by thermal expansion are also conducive to changes in ocean circulation that foster widespread anoxia and sulfidic subsurface ocean waters. Equable climates are characterized by reduced wind shear and weak surface ocean circulation. Late Permian and Early Triassic thermohaline circulation differs considerably from today's world, with minimal polar sinking and intensified mid-latitude sinking that delivers sulfate from shallow evaporative areas to deeper water where it is reduced to sulfide. Reduced nutrient input to oceans from land at many of the extinction intervals results from diminished silicate weathering and weakened delivery of iron via eolian dust. The falloff in iron-bearing dust leads to minimal nitrate production, weakening food webs and rendering faunas and floras more susceptible to extinction when stressed. Factors such as heat, anoxia, ocean acidification, hypercapnia, and hydrogen sulfide poisoning would significantly affect these biotas. Intervals of tectonic quiescence set up preconditions favoring extinctions. Reductions in chemical silicate weathering lead to carbon dioxide buildup, oxygen drawdown, nutrient depletion, wind and ocean current abatement, long-term global warming, and ocean acidification. The effects of extinction triggers such as large igneous provinces, bolide impacts, and episodes of sudden methane release are more potent against the backdrop of our proposed preconditions. Extinctions that have characteristics we call for in the thermal transgressions include the Early Cambrian Sinsk event, as well as

  6. Measurement of thermal conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The 6-m long, 45-kG, warm-iron superconducting magnets envisioned for the Energy Doubler stage of the Fermilab accelerator require stiff supports with minimized thermal conductances in order to keep the refrigeration power reasonable. The large number of supports involved in the system required a careful study of their heat conduction from the room temperature wall to the intercepting refrigeration at 20 0 K and to the liquid helium. For this purpose the thermal conductance of this support was measured by comparing it with the thermal conductance of a copper strap of known geometry. An association of steady-state thermal analysis and experimental thermal conductivity techniques forms the basis of this method. An important advantage is the automatic simulation of the 20 0 K refrigeration intercept by the copper strap, which simplifies the apparatus considerably. This relative resistance technique, which uses electrical analogy as a guideline, is applicable with no restrictions for materials with temperature-independent thermal conductivity. For other materials the results obtained are functions of the specific temperature interval involved in the measurements. A comprehensive review of the literature on thermal conductivity indicates that this approach has not been used before. A demonstration of its self-consistency is stressed here rather than results obtained for different supports

  7. Training radiographers to deliver an intervention to promote early presentation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, Caroline; Teasdale, Emma; Omar, Lynne; Tucker, Lorraine; Ramirez, Amanda-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of training sufficient radiographers to deliver an intervention to promote early presentation of breast cancer to all older women attending for their final routine mammogram within the NHS Breast Screening Programme. If the Promoting Early Presentation (PEP) intervention is demonstrated to be cost-effective, it may be implemented across the NHS requiring at least four radiographers per screening service to deliver the intervention. Methods: A pilot study in a single breast screening service was conducted to assess the feasibility of training sufficient radiographers to meet this objective. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the impact of training on participating radiographers and the screening service. Competency to deliver the intervention was assessed at key points during training according to quality criteria based on delivery of the key messages and style of delivery. Confidence to deliver the intervention was assessed using a self-report measure before and after training. Radiographers' experiences of training were elicited in face-to-face qualitative interviews. Results: Seven of eight radiographers who were released to undertake the training achieved the required level of competency to deliver the intervention within four months. All improved over time in their confidence to deliver the key messages of the intervention. The qualitative analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of training from the perspective of the radiographers. Conclusion: It was feasible and acceptable to train sufficient radiographers to deliver the PEP Intervention. The training package will be streamlined to improve efficiency for large implementation trials and clinical practice across the NHS.

  8. Adaptive principles for thermal comfort in dwellings : From comfort temperatures to avoiding discomfort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, E.E.; Kurvers, S.R.; Van den Ham, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Many theories on thermal comfort exist and there are many ways to deliver this in an energy efficient way. Both aspects are often studied in a static way and most of these studies only regard one of the aspects, seldom investigating what influence the way of delivering thermal comfort has on the

  9. Thermal performance and heat transport in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Doornenbal, P.J.; Drijver, B.C.; Gaans, van P.F.M.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is used for seasonal storage of large quantities of thermal energy. Due to the increasing demand for sustainable energy, the number of ATES systems has increased rapidly, which has raised questions on the effect of ATES systems on their surroundings as well as

  10. Delivering LHC software to HPC compute elements

    CERN Document Server

    Blomer, Jakob; Hardi, Nikola; Popescu, Radu

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there was a growing interest in improving the utilization of supercomputers by running applications of experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN when idle cores cannot be assigned to traditional HPC jobs. At the same time, the upcoming LHC machine and detector upgrades will produce some 60 times higher data rates and challenge LHC experiments to use so far untapped compute resources. LHC experiment applications are tailored to run on high-throughput computing resources and they have a different anatomy than HPC applications. LHC applications comprise a core framework that allows hundreds of researchers to plug in their specific algorithms. The software stacks easily accumulate to many gigabytes for a single release. New releases are often produced on a daily basis. To facilitate the distribution of these software stacks to world-wide distributed computing resources, LHC experiments use a purpose-built, global, POSIX file system, the CernVM File System. CernVM-FS pre-processes dat...

  11. Gulf team delivers on DP drillship promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R von

    2001-06-01

    The technological achievements of the project by Amoco and BP to complete a deepwater subsea well in the Gulf of Mexico from a dynamically positioned (DP) vessel are described. In 2000, the dual activity drillship, Discoverer Enterprise (owned by Transocean Sedco Forex), completed the Nile well in the Viosca Knoll area and then the King Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 85. Stringent safety and environmental protection criteria imposed by Amoco and BP drove the design of the Dril-Quip subsea wellhead to ensure that the wellhead profile and connector coped with the worst case scenario. BP also specified a disconnect system that would secure the well in less than a minute. The SenTREE 7 and Commander telemetry systems developed by Schlumberger, the components of the work string and test work with the Nile well to ensure BP conditions were met and that the perforation and surge procedure proceeded successfully are explained. The time reduction achieved by using large DP drillships and future BP plans are outlined.

  12. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  13. How to design and deliver a local teaching program

    OpenAIRE

    Limb, Christopher; Whitehurst, Katharine; Gundogan, Buket; Koshy, Kiron; Agha, Riaz

    2017-01-01

    Teaching is an invaluable aspect of any medical or surgical career. Many trainees will find themselves delivering teaching at several stages in their career and in this “How to” article we explain how to design, set up, and deliver a successful teaching program, as well as how to evidence this in your portfolio.

  14. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    be widely used also in the field of medicine. Implementation of every new technology in a daily clinical practice requires large number of measurements with such equipment compared by reference method for the purpose of clinical validation. The knowledge of measurement problematics is crucial. Collaboration between physicians and engineers on multi- and interdisciplinary level is of high importance for thermal imaging to win confidence of physicians and to gain reliability as a clinical diagnostic tool.

  15. Thermalized axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio, E-mail: rferreira@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: notari@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton φ to gauge fields of the form φ F F-tilde / f , as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= φ-dot /(2 fH ), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H , due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξ∼>2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξ∼>3.4; however, observations require ξ∼>6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} ≅ ξ H / g-bar where g-bar is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if φ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H /(2 T ), if tensors do not thermalize.

  16. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  17. Novel Battery Management System with Distributed Wireless and Fiber Optic Sensors for Early Detection and Suppression of Thermal Runaway in Large Battery Packs, FY13 Q4 Report, ARPA-E Program: Advanced Management Protection of Energy Storage Devices (AMPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zumstein, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kovotsky, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Puglia, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobley, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osswald, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolf, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kaschmitter, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eaves, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-08

    at various temperatures, thereby enabling earlier warning of thermal runaway than possible with external sensors. Ultimately, the team plans to extend this work to include: (12) flexible wireless controllers, also using Bluetooth 4.0 standard, essential for balancing large-scale battery packs. LLNL received $925K for this project, and has $191K remaining after accomplishing these objectives.

  18. Thermal Nanosystems and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Volz, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer laws for conduction, radiation and convection change when the dimensions of the systems in question shrink. The altered behaviours can be used efficiently in energy conversion, respectively bio- and high-performance materials to control microelectronic devices. To understand and model those thermal mechanisms, specific metrologies have to be established. This book provides an overview of actual devices and materials involving micro-nanoscale heat transfer mechanisms. These are clearly explained and exemplified by a large spectrum of relevant physical models, while the most advanced nanoscale thermal metrologies are presented.

  19. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  20. The knowledge and skills gap of medical practitioners delivering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge and skills gap of medical practitioners delivering district hospital ... and quality health services, and also for guiding appropriate undergraduate, ... The uneven skill and knowledge base in aspects of HIV/AIDS management ...

  1. Contractor firm strategies in delivering green project: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powmya, Ayisha; Abidin, Nazirah Zainul; Azizi, Nurul Sakina Mokhtar

    2017-10-01

    Building green requires effort from various parties, from those who plan, design, manage and construct the building. Contractors are responsible for converting the design on paper into a real building and their role at the construction site support environmental sustainability by implementing responsible construction practices. Inefficient or inexperienced contractor in green construction project may find that delivering this type of project is not an easy task due to added requirement in design, stringent practices at site and the use of green technology and materials. Adopting suitable strategies at firm level will assist in preparatory process and readiness of delivering the green project. This paper reviews the strategies at firm level to deliver green construction project. From extensive literature review, it was discovered that there are six strategies to be adopted by the contractor. Understanding these strategies is expected to promote more contractors to be proactive in delivering green projects.

  2. Using technology to deliver quality education in Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-08

    Jun 8, 2016 ... Using technology to deliver quality education in Asia ... Entrepreneurship has been a major driver of growth and job creation in Southeast Asia. ... to provide access to health services, especially to vulnerable populations.

  3. A dynamic allocation mechanism of delivering capacity in coupled networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Wen-Bo; Zhou, Xing-Lian; Zhu, Yan-Bo; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Traffic process is ubiquitous in many critical infrastructures. In this paper, we introduce a mechanism to dynamically allocate the delivering capacity into the data-packet traffic model on the coupled Internet autonomous-system-level network of South Korea and Japan, and focus on its effect on the transport efficiency. In this mechanism, the total delivering capacity is constant and the lowest-load node will give one unit delivering capacity to the highest-load node at each time step. It is found that the delivering capacity of busy nodes and non-busy nodes can be well balanced and the effective betweenness of busy nodes with interconnections is significantly reduced. Consequently, the transport efficiency such as average traveling time and packet arrival rate is remarkably improved. Our work may shed some light on the traffic dynamics in coupled networks.

  4. Delivering on a gendered definition of health needs in local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delivering on a gendered definition of health needs in local government budgeting: ... of financial grants channelled annually from central to local governments. ... does not reflect the broad community-wide understanding of health needs.

  5. Quality assurance of the dose delivered by small radiation segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Vebeke N.; Evans, Philip M.; Budgell, Geoffrey J.; Mott, Judith H.L.; Williams, Peter C.; Brugmans, Marco J.P.; Wittkaemper, Frits W.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Brown, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    The use of intensity modulation with multiple static fields has been suggested by many authors as a way to achieve highly conformal fields in radiotherapy. However, quality assurance of linear accelerators is generally done only for beam segments of 100 MU or higher, and by measuring beam profiles once the beam has stabilized. We propose a set of measurements to check the stability of dose delivery in small segments, and present measured data from three radiotherapy centres. The dose delivered per monitor unit, MU, was measured for various numbers of MU segments. The field flatness and symmetry were measured using either photographic films that are subsequently scanned by a densitometer, or by using a diode array. We performed the set of measurements at the three radiotherapy centres on a set of five different Philips SL accelerators with energies of 6 MV, 8 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV. The dose per monitor unit over the range of 1 to 100 MU was found to be accurate to within ±5% of the nominal dose per monitor unit as defined for the delivery of 100 MU for all the energies. For four out of the five accelerators the dose per monitor unit over the same range was even found to be accurate to within ±2%. The flatness and symmetry were in some cases found to be larger for small segments by a maximum of 9% of the flatness/symmetry for large segments. The result of this study provides the dosimetric evidence that the delivery of small segment doses as top-up fields for beam intensity modulation is feasible. However, it should be stressed that linear accelerators have different characteristics for the delivery of small segments, hence this type of measurement should be performed for each machine before the delivery of small dose segments is approved. In some cases it may be advisable to use a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) to obtain more accurate dose delivery of small segments. (author)

  6. Adaptive principles for thermal comfort in dwellings: From comfort temperatures to avoiding discomfort

    OpenAIRE

    Alders, E.E.; Kurvers, S.R.; Van den Ham, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Many theories on thermal comfort exist and there are many ways to deliver this in an energy efficient way. Both aspects are often studied in a static way and most of these studies only regard one of the aspects, seldom investigating what influence the way of delivering thermal comfort has on the actual perceived thermal comfort. This paper analyses the knowledge of the different disciplines and integrates it to get a holistic image of comfort and its delivery systems as well as opportunities ...

  7. Future of Food : Shaping the Food System to Deliver Jobs

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Robert; Benfica, Rui Manuel; Prasann, Ashesh; Lee, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Shaping the Food System to Deliver Jobs is the fourth paper in a series on The Future of Food. This paper focuses on how the food system can deliver jobs. It provides a framework for understanding the factors determining the number and quality of jobs in the food system, including inclusion of women and youth. It highlights a set of actions that countries can adopt, adapt, and apply to the...

  8. Delivered Pricing, FOB Pricing, and Collusion in Spatial Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Paz Espinosa

    1992-01-01

    This article examines price discrimination and collusion in spatial markets. The problem is analyzed in the context of a repeated duopoly game. I conclude that the prevailing pricing systems depend on the structural elements of the market. Delivered pricing systems emerge in equilibrium in highly monopolistic and highly competitive industries, while FOB is used in intermediate market structures. The fact driving this result is that delivered pricing policies allow spatial price discrimination...

  9. Thermal Properties and Thermal Analysis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Tonchev, Dan

    The chapter provides a summary of the fundamental concepts that are needed to understand the heat capacity C P, thermal conductivity κ, and thermal expansion coefficient α L of materials. The C P, κ, and α of various classes of materials, namely, semiconductors, polymers, and glasses, are reviewed, and various typical characteristics are summarized. A key concept in crystalline solids is the Debye theory of the heat capacity, which has been widely used for many decades for calculating the C P of crystals. The thermal properties are interrelated through Grüneisen's theorem. Various useful empirical rules for calculating C P and κ have been used, some of which are summarized. Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful and convenient thermal analysis technique that allows various important physical and chemical transformations, such as the glass transition, crystallization, oxidation, melting etc. to be studied. DSC can also be used to obtain information on the kinetics of the transformations, and some of these thermal analysis techniques are summarized. Temperature-modulated DSC, TMDSC, is a relatively recent innovation in which the sample temperature is ramped slowly and, at the same time, sinusoidally modulated. TMDSC has a number of distinct advantages compared with the conventional DSC since it measures the complex heat capacity. For example, the glass-transition temperature T g measured by TMDSC has almost no dependence on the thermal history, and corresponds to an almost step life change in C P. The new Tzero DSC has an additional thermocouple to calibrate better for thermal lags inherent in the DSC measurement, and allows more accurate thermal analysis.

  10. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions.

  11. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  12. Thermal expansion behaviors of Li{sub 3}AsW{sub 7}O{sub 25}. A case study for comparative Debye temperature for a large polyatomic unit cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangir Murshed, M.; Gesing, Thorsten M. [Solid State Chemical Crystallography, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Crystallography, University of Bremen (Germany); MAPEX Center for Materials and Processes, University of Bremen (Germany); Zhao, Pei [Solid State Chemical Crystallography, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Crystallography, University of Bremen (Germany); Huq, Ashfia [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of Li{sub 3}AsW{sub 7}O{sub 25} has been studied. The temperature-dependent development of crystal structural parameters was obtained from Rietveld refinement using neutron time of flight powder diffraction data. Modeling of the lattice thermal expansion was carried out using a Grueneisen first-order approximation for the zero-pressure equation of state, where the temperature-dependent vibrational energy was calculated taking the Debye-Einstein-Anharmonicity approach. Temperature-dependent Raman spectra shed light on some selective modes with unusual anharmonicity. Debye temperatures were calculated using three different theoretical approaches, namely, thermal expansion, mean-squared isotropic atomic displacement parameter and heat capacity. Similarities as well as discrepancies between the numerical values obtained from different theoretical approaches are discussed. (copyright 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Non-Dam Alternatives for Delivering Water Services at Least Cost and Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Totten

    2010-06-01

    We present evidence that a value-adding and risk-minimising water planning process can be achieved by shifting from the conventional focus on supply expansion to one that concentrates on efficiently delivering services at and near the point of use. The State of California has two decades of experience with this approach, demonstrating that market-based policy and regulatory innovations can unleash efficiency gains resulting in more utility water services and energy services delivered with less supply expansion at lower costs, while minimising climate-change risk, pollution and the social cost that accompany large infrastructural projects. Efficiency in delivered water services could be accomplished with investments in the range of US$10-25 billion annually, while obviating the need for spending hundreds of billions of dollars on more expensive hydropower and related infrastructural expansion projects. The shift to a regulatory system that encompasses cost-effective end-use efficiency improvements in delivering water and energy services could eliminate the need for an estimated half of all proposed dams globally, thus allowing for the maintenance of other ecosystem service benefits and offer the best hopes of meeting basic human needs for water at a more achievable level of investment.

  14. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  15. Pressurized Thermal Shock, Pts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized Thermal Shock (Pts) refers to a condition that challenges the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. The root cause of this problem is the radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel. This embrittlement leads to an increase in the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RTNDT). RTNDT can increase to the point where the reactor vessel material can loose fracture toughness during overcooling events. The analysis of the risk of having a Pts for a specific plant is a multi-disciplinary problem involving probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), thermal-hydraulic analysis, and ultimately a structural and fracture analysis of the vessel wall. The PRA effort involves the postulation of overcooling events and ultimately leads to an integrated risk analysis. The thermal-hydraulic effort involves the difficult task of predicting the system behavior during a postulated overcooling scenario with a special emphasis on predicting the thermal and mechanic loadings on the reactor pressure vessel wall. The structural and fracture analysis of the reactor vessel wall relies on the thermal-hydraulic conditions as boundary conditions. The US experience has indicated that medium and large diameter primary system breaks dominate the risk of Pts along with scenarios that involve a stuck open valve (and associated system cooldown) that recloses resulting in system re-pressurization while the vessel wall is cool.

  16. Direct thermal dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger, Edward

    1990-07-01

    Direct thermal dyes are members of a class of compounds referred to in the imaging industry as color formers or leuco dyes. The oldest members of that class have simple triarylmethane structures, and have been employed for years in various dyeing applications. More complex triarylmethane compounds, such as phthalides and fluorans, are now used in various imaging systems to produce color. Color is derived from all of these compounds via the same mechanism, on a molecular level. That is, an event of activation produces a highly resonating cationic system whose interaction with incident light produces reflected light of a specific color. The activation event in the case of a direct thermal system is the creation of a melt on the paper involving dye and an acidic developer. The three major performance parameters in a thermal system are background color, image density, and image stability. The three major dye physical parameters affecting thermal performance are chemical constituency, purity, and particle size. Those dyes having the best combination of characteristics which can also be manufactured economically dominate the marketplace. Manufacturing high performance dyes for the thermal market involves multi-step, convergent reaction sequences performed on large scale. Intermediates must be manufactured at the right time, and at the right quality to be useful.

  17. Thermal Interaction of Closely Spaced Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.; Tøgersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results from a pilot study on the thermal interaction of closely spaced persons in a large enclosure. The surface temperature at different densities of persons is evaluated using a high resolution thermo vision camera in a controlled thermal environment. The corresponding ther...... thermal sensation is evaluated using questionnaires for the various densities. The results indicate that it may be acceptable to consider persons standalone, in a thermal sense, disregarding thermal interaction at usual densities in the design of large enclosures.......This paper presents results from a pilot study on the thermal interaction of closely spaced persons in a large enclosure. The surface temperature at different densities of persons is evaluated using a high resolution thermo vision camera in a controlled thermal environment. The corresponding...

  18. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years

    OpenAIRE

    de Dear, R; Akimoto, T; Arens, E; Brager, G; Candido, C; Cheong, K.W.; Li, B; Nishihara, N; Sekhar, S.C.; Tanabe, S; Toftum, J; Zhang, H; Zhu, Y

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has ta...

  19. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  20. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  1. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  2. Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun, Ayşe Kıvılcım

    2009-01-01

    High temperatures and large thermal variations on the die create severe challenges in system reliability, performance, leakage power, and cooling costs. Designing for worst-case thermal conditions is highly costly and time-consuming. Therefore, dynamic thermal management methods are needed to maintain safe temperature levels during execution. Conventional management techniques sacrifice performance to control temperature and only consider the hot spots, neglecting the effects of thermal varia...

  3. Energy Efficiency Enhancement of Photovoltaics by Phase Change Materials through Thermal Energy Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV panels convert a certain amount of incident solar radiation into electricity, while the rest is converted to heat, leading to a temperature rise in the PV. This elevated temperature deteriorates the power output and induces structural degradation, resulting in reduced PV lifespan. One potential solution entails PV thermal management employing active and passive means. The traditional passive means are found to be largely ineffective, while active means are considered to be energy intensive. A passive thermal management system using phase change materials (PCMs can effectively limit PV temperature rises. The PCM-based approach however is cost inefficient unless the stored thermal energy is recovered effectively. The current article investigates a way to utilize the thermal energy stored in the PCM behind the PV for domestic water heating applications. The system is evaluated in the winter conditions of UAE to deliver heat during water heating demand periods. The proposed system achieved a ~1.3% increase in PV electrical conversion efficiency, along with the recovery of ~41% of the thermal energy compared to the incident solar radiation.

  4. Delivered volumes of enteral nutrition exceed prescribed volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Renee Nichole; Utech, Anne; Velez, Maria Eugenia; Schwartz, Katie

    2014-10-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) provisions are typically calculated based on a 24-hour infusion period. However, feedings are often interrupted for daily activities, procedures, or gastrointestinal intolerance. The study's objective was to determine the delivered EN quantities provided to stable hospitalized patients, using cellular time and measured volumes to verify our EN calculation adjustment. A supply of consecutively numbered ready-to-hang (RTH) EN product was delivered to the bedside of 26 inpatients with established EN tolerance at goal rates on various types of nursing units. The dietitian weighed the volume remaining in the infusing product and recorded the measurement time. On the following days, the dietitian continued to weigh the infusing RTH product and the empty RTH bottles saved by nursing. The primary outcome was the difference between the prescribed and delivered EN provisions, which was calculated with a paired t test. Patients received significantly more calories in the delivered enteral feeding (mean [SD], 1678 [385] kcal) than prescribed calories in the EN order (1489 [246 kcal]; t = 3.736, P = .001), adjusting for observed time. No significant differences were found between nursing units, product, and rate. EN delivered may actually exceed ordered amounts by 5%–21% (mean, 12%) with feeding pump inaccuracy as the primary contributing factor. This differs from what others have found. Our findings support using a volume-based ordering system vs a rate-based ordering system for more accurate EN delivery.

  5. Solar thermal barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The european solar thermal system market grew spectacularly in 2008 with over 4,6 million m 2 installed as against less than 3,1 million in 2007. This was largely due to the doubling of the German market, bu strong growth in Southern Europe also played a vital part. While 2009 is looking uncertain, the medium and long term growth prospects are still very exciting. This barometer provides statistical data on the production, market, capacity and enterprises. (A.L.B.)

  6. Thermal power plant efficiency enhancement with Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Vergara, Julio

    2014-01-01

    In addition to greenhouse gas emissions, coastal thermal power plants would gain further opposition due to their heat rejection distressing the local ecosystem. Therefore, these plants need to enhance their thermal efficiency while reducing their environmental offense. In this study, a hybrid plant based on the principle of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion was coupled to a 740 MW coal-fired power plant project located at latitude 28°S where the surface to deepwater temperature difference would not suffice for regular OTEC plants. This paper presents the thermodynamical model to assess the overall efficiency gained by adopting an ammonia Rankine cycle plus a desalinating unit, heated by the power plant condenser discharge and refrigerated by cold deep seawater. The simulation allowed us to optimize a system that would finally enhance the plant power output by 25–37 MW, depending on the season, without added emissions while reducing dramatically the water temperature at discharge and also desalinating up to 5.8 million tons per year. The supplemental equipment was sized and the specific emissions reduction was estimated. We believe that this approach would improve the acceptability of thermal and nuclear power plant projects regardless of the plant location. -- Highlights: • An Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion hybrid plant was designed. • The waste heat of a power plant was delivered as an OTEC heat source. • The effect of size and operating conditions on plant efficiency were studied. • The OTEC implementation in a Chilean thermal power plant was evaluated. • The net efficiency of the thermal power plant was increased by 1.3%

  7. The experiences of high intensity therapists delivering cognitive behavioural therapy to people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwood, Hayley; Chinn, Deborah; Gannon, Kenneth; Scior, Katrina

    2018-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities (ID) should be able to access the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, currently a main provider of mainstream mental health services in England. IAPT offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to individuals experiencing mental health problems, although its effectiveness for people with ID, when delivered within IAPT, is unclear. Ten high-intensity therapists took part in semi-structured interviews, analysed using thematic analysis, regarding their experiences of delivering CBT to people with ID in IAPT. The rigidity of the IAPT model appears to offer a poor fit with the needs of people with ID. Therapists appeared uncertain about how to modify CBT and highlighted training and service development needs. Findings suggest barriers to accessing IAPT largely remain unaddressed where people with ID are concerned. Services may need to reconsider what constitutes appropriate reasonable adjustments to ensure equitable access. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pelvic Radiotherapy for Cancer of the Cervix: Is What You Plan Actually What You Deliver?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Karen; Kelly, Valerie; Stewart, James; Xie, Jason; Cho, Young-Bin; Moseley, Joanne B.; Brock, Kristy; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Milosevic, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly being used to treat cervix cancer and other gynecologic tumors. However, tumor and normal organ movement during treatment can substantially detract from the benefits of this approach. This study explored the effect of internal anatomic changes on the dose delivered to the tumor and organs at risk using a strategy integrating deformable soft-tissue modeling with simulated dose accumulation. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with cervix cancer underwent baseline and weekly pelvic magnetic resonance imaging during treatment. Interfraction organ motion and delivered (accumulated) dose was modeled for three treatment scenarios: four-field box, large-margin whole pelvic IMRT (20-mm planning target volume, but 10 mm inferiorly) and small-margin IMRT (5-mm planning target volume). Results: Individually, the planned dose was not the same as the simulated delivered dose; however, when taken as a group, this was not statistically significant for the four-field box and large-margin IMRT plans. The small-margin IMRT plans yielded adequate target coverage in most patients; however, significant target underdosing occurred in 1 patient who displayed excessive, unpredictable internal target movement. The delivered doses to the organs at risk were significantly reduced with the small-margin plan, although substantial variability was present among the patients. Conclusion: Simulated dose accumulation might provide a more accurate depiction of the target and organ at risk coverage during fractionated whole pelvic IMRT for cervical cancer. The adequacy of primary tumor coverage using 5-mm planning target volume margins is contingent on the use of daily image-guided setup.

  9. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Varadhan, S R S

    2016-01-01

    The theory of large deviations deals with rates at which probabilities of certain events decay as a natural parameter in the problem varies. This book, which is based on a graduate course on large deviations at the Courant Institute, focuses on three concrete sets of examples: (i) diffusions with small noise and the exit problem, (ii) large time behavior of Markov processes and their connection to the Feynman-Kac formula and the related large deviation behavior of the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk, and (iii) interacting particle systems, their scaling limits, and large deviations from their expected limits. For the most part the examples are worked out in detail, and in the process the subject of large deviations is developed. The book will give the reader a flavor of how large deviation theory can help in problems that are not posed directly in terms of large deviations. The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with probability, Markov processes, and interacting particle systems.

  10. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  11. VET Providers Planning to Deliver Degrees: Good Practice Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This good practice guide is intended to assist public and private registered training organisations (RTOs) planning to commence higher education (HE) delivery. The guide is based on research undertaken by Victor Callan and Kaye Bowman, who completed case studies with six providers currently delivering higher education qualifications in addition to…

  12. School Nurse-Delivered Adolescent Relationship Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Claire A.; Dick, Rebecca; Gilkerson, Fern; Mattern, Cheryl S.; James, Lisa; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background: Project Connect is a national program to build partnerships among public health agencies and domestic violence services to improve the health care sector response to partner and sexual violence. Pennsylvania piloted the first school nurse-delivered adolescent relationship abuse intervention in the certified school nurses' office…

  13. Delivering Instruction via Streaming Media: A Higher Education Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Mark; Schlieve, Paul; Young, Jon

    2000-01-01

    Describes streaming media, an audio/video presentation that is delivered across a network so that it is viewed while being downloaded onto the user's computer, including a continuous stream of video that can be pre-recorded or live. Discusses its use for nontraditional students in higher education and reports on implementation experiences. (LRW)

  14. Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women delivering at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier and infectivity status among women delivering at Harare Maternity Hospital. Design: A serological survey study of pregnant women admitted for labour and delivery. Setting: Harare Maternity Hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe between June 1996 and June ...

  15. Foresight begins with FMEA. Delivering accurate risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, R D

    1999-03-01

    If sufficient factors are taken into account and two- or three-stage analysis is employed, failure mode and effect analysis represents an excellent technique for delivering accurate risk assessments for products and processes, and for relating them to legal liability. This article describes a format that facilitates easy interpretation.

  16. The Challenges of Globalisation: Delivering an MBA Programme in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dence, Roger; O'Toole, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of delivering an MBA (Master in Business Administration) program in Eritrea (North East Africa) through the United Kingdom's Open University. Discusses tutoring teams that travel to Eritrea, localizing case examples and assignments, sensitivity to local cultural contexts, writing assignments, student assessment, and…

  17. post partum haemorhage among women delivered at mbeya referral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    death is among women who deliver at home either alone or with tradition birth attendant. (TBA) [9]. To date, effort to reduce maternal mortality through training TBAs have been disappointing [2]. Study population and Methods: This study was a hospital based descriptive retrospective hospital based cross-sectional.

  18. Inefficient charging for delivered gas by local gas distributors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Bikić

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this region, especially in Serbia, common belief is that local distributors of gas used by households don’t charge for gas properly. It is suspected that there are two sources for improper ways of gas charging. Local distributors charge for delivered gas only, according to flow rat but not according to gas quality. It is usual that local distributors deliver gas of different quality than one signed in contract. In this work will be considered only one of aspects inefficient charging for delivered gas by local gas distributors, which is connected to variable atmospheric pressure. There is doubt, that local distributors make mistakes during accounting for delivered gas to costumers in regard atmospheric pressure. At the beginning of every investigation, problem has to be located and recognized. Authors are going to collect as much as possible available data, to elaborate and analyze data by scientific methods and to represent conclusions. So, the aim of this work is to diagnose current state and to approve or disapprove above mentioned suspicions. In our region this theme is very interesting, both because of energy efficiency and air pollution control. In this way both consumer and distributor will know, how mush energy they have really spent.

  19. Could the Hokusai Impact Have Delivered Mercury's Water Ice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, C. M.; Chabot, N. L.; Barnouin, O. S.

    2018-05-01

    Hokusai is the best candidate source crater for Mercury’s water-ice inventory if it was primarily delivered by a single impact event. The Hokusai impact could account for the inventory of water ice on Mercury for impact velocities <30 km/s.

  20. Delivering mental health awareness training to police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Carlos; Caswell, Nick; Spicer, Jerina

    Police officers regularly come into contact with people with mental health problems but receive relatively little training on the issue. This article outlines an initiative to deliver awareness training to officers, and explores the benefits of such programmes. It also gives details of the evaluation carried out.

  1. Portable devices for delivering imagery and modelling interventions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of portable devices (MP4) and a stationary device (DVD and fixed point stationary computer) in delivering imagery and modelling training among female netball players, examining the effect on imagery adherence, performance, self-efficacy, and the relative ...

  2. Geothermal use of the Wiesbaden thermal water with high minerals content for heat base load supply of the town hall and affiliated buildings. Geothermische Nutzung des hochmineralisierten Wiesbadener Thermalwassers fuer die Grundlastwaermedeckung des Rathauses und angeschlossener Baulichkeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedle, K.

    1991-10-01

    Within the framework of the large-scale renovation of the spa center Wiesbaden also heat base load supply of all heat consumers is realized with extracted thermal energy. As the thermal water has a high mineral content a delivery method has to be used, which avoids incrustations in form of calcareous sediments, sulphur sludges and iron ochre as well as the escape of the well gas CO{sub 2} and the diffusion of atmospheric oxygene that has an oxidative effect. For this purpose a closed system is used with which the water is drawn off, delivered, stored and distributed. In the second part of the report the heat supply system of the town hall is presented which consists of a direct heat exchange system of thermal water, of residual thermal heat utilization with heat pumps, a cogeneration system as well as of gas boilers to cover peak loads. (BWI).

  3. Solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnatbaum, L.

    2009-01-01

    The solar thermal power plant technology, the opportunities it presents and the developments in the market are outlined. The focus is on the technology of parabolic trough power plants, a proven technology for solar power generation on a large scale. In a parabolic trough power plant, trough-shaped mirrors concentrate the solar irradiation onto a pipe in the focal line of the collector. The thermal energy thus generated is used for electricity generation in a steam turbine. Parabolic trough plants can be combined with thermal storage and fossil or biomass fired heat exchangers to generate electricity even when the sun is not shining. Solar Millennium AG in Erlangen has developed the first power plant of this kind in Europe. After two years of construction the plant started operation in Southern Spain in 2008. This one and its sister projects are important steps leading the way for the whole market. The paper also covers the technological challenges, the key components used and the research and development activities concerning this technology. Solar thermal power plants are ideal for covering peak and medium loads in power grids. In hybrid operation they can also cover base-load. The Solar Chimney power plant, another striking technology for the conversion of solar into electric energy, is described briefly. The paper concludes with a look at the future - the import of solar energy from the deserts of North Africa to central Europe. (author)

  4. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  5. Thermal Properties of Beryllium Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Tae Won; Baek, Je Kyun; Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the presence of as-fabricated porosity largely affect thermal conductivity of beryllium. Therefore, in this paper we will suggest a new thermal conductivity equation which consider volume fraction and discuss how this can be applied to irradiation induced degradation of thermal conductivity later. This study was performed to develop a new correlation of thermal conductivity of Beryllium. Although there are many factors like BeO contents, impurity level, grain size, and porosity, we assumed porosity will be the dominant factor for thermal conductivity. Therefore, a new correlation which consider volume fraction by applying Maxwell-Eucken equation is developed and this is consistent to some degrees. However, increasing impurity level and decreasing grain size will decrease thermal conductivity. Therefore, we need to consider their effects although we assume BeO contents, impurity, and grain size do not make noticeable effects in the future. Furthermore, thermal conductivity degradation by neutron irradiation should be considered afterward. There are two main factors for the thermal conductivity degradation: the one is defects formed by neutron collisions and the other is helium generated by transmutation of Be. It is known that they make a considerable degradation of conductivity. Beryllium is known there are considerable volume increases by helium accumulation. Therefore, we anticipate our suggested model can be applicable if it has been developed furthermore considering irradiation induced swelling

  6. Constraining Non-thermal and Thermal properties of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupal eDev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially with the primordial bath or remain non-thermal throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being non-thermal, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and non-thermal regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the non-thermal DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.

  7. Efficient thermal diode with ballistic spacer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shunda; Donadio, Davide; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2018-03-01

    Thermal rectification is of importance not only for fundamental physics, but also for potential applications in thermal manipulations and thermal management. However, thermal rectification effect usually decays rapidly with system size. Here, we show that a mass-graded system, with two diffusive leads separated by a ballistic spacer, can exhibit large thermal rectification effect, with the rectification factor independent of system size. The underlying mechanism is explained in terms of the effective size-independent thermal gradient and the match or mismatch of the phonon bands. We also show the robustness of the thermal diode upon variation of the model's parameters. Our finding suggests a promising way for designing realistic efficient thermal diodes.

  8. Do new anesthesia ventilators deliver small tidal volumes accurately during volume-controlled ventilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller, Patricia R; McDonough, Joseph M; Feldman, Jeffrey M

    2008-05-01

    During mechanical ventilation of infants and neonates, small changes in tidal volume may lead to hypo- or hyperventilation, barotrauma, or volutrauma. Partly because breathing circuit compliance and fresh gas flow affect tidal volume delivery by traditional anesthesia ventilators in volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) mode, pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) using a circle breathing system has become a common approach to minimizing the risk of mechanical ventilation for small patients, although delivered tidal volume is not assured during PCV. A new generation of anesthesia machine ventilators addresses the problems of VCV by adjusting for fresh gas flow and for the compliance of the breathing circuit. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of new anesthesia ventilators to deliver small tidal volumes. Four anesthesia ventilator systems were evaluated to determine the accuracy of volume delivery to the airway during VCV at tidal volume settings of 100, 200, and 500 mL under different conditions of breathing circuit compliance (fully extended and fully contracted circuits) and lung compliance. A mechanical test lung (adult and infant) was used to simulate lung compliances ranging from 0.0025 to 0.03 L/cm H(2)O. Volumes and pressures were measured using a calibrated screen pneumotachograph and custom software. We tested the Smartvent 7900, Avance, and Aisys anesthesia ventilator systems (GE Healthcare, Madison, WI) and the Apollo anesthesia ventilator (Draeger Medical, Telford, PA). The Smartvent 7900 and Avance ventilators use inspiratory flow sensors to control the volume delivered, whereas the Aisys and Apollo ventilators compensate for the compliance of the circuit. We found that the anesthesia ventilators that use compliance compensation (Aisys and Apollo) accurately delivered both large and small tidal volumes to the airway of the test lung under conditions of normal and low lung compliance during VCV (ranging from 95.5% to 106.2% of the set tidal volume

  9. Comet thermal modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, P.R.; Kieffer, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The past year was one of tremendous activity because of the appearance of Halley's Comet. Observations of the comet were collected from a number of sources and compared with the detailed predictions of the comet thermal modeling program. Spacecraft observations of key physical parameters for cometary nucleus were incorporated into the thermal model and new cases run. These results have led to a much better understanding of physical processes on the nucleus and have pointed the way for further improvements to the modeling program. A model for the large-scale structure of cometary nuclei was proposed in which comets were envisioned as loosely bound agglomerations of smaller icy planetesimals, essentially a rubble pile of primordial dirty snowballs. In addition, a study of the physical history of comets was begun, concentrating on processes during formation and in the Oort cloud which would alter the volatile and nonvolatile materials in cometary nuclei from their pristine state before formation

  10. Thermal Responsive Envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Pasold, Anke

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an architectural computational method and model, which, through additive and subtractive processes, create composite elements with bending behaviour based on thermal variations in the surrounding climatic environment. The present effort is focused on the manipulation of assembly...... alterations, their respective durability and copper’s architectural (visual and transformative) aesthetic qualities. Through the use of an evolutionary solver, the composite structure of the elements are organised to find the bending behaviour specified by and for the thermal environments. The entire model...... in which the behavioural composites are organised in modules and how they act and perform. Furthermore, a large full-scale prototype is made as a demonstrator and experimental setup for post-construct analysis and evaluation of the design research. The work finds that the presented method and model can...

  11. Internet-delivered interpersonal psychotherapy versus internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depressive symptoms: randomized controlled noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Tara; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony; Mackinnon, Andrew; van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim; Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2013-05-13

    Face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) are both effective treatments for depressive disorders, but access is limited. Online CBT interventions have demonstrated efficacy in decreasing depressive symptoms and can facilitate the dissemination of therapies among the public. However, the efficacy of Internet-delivered IPT is as yet unknown. This study examines whether IPT is effective, noninferior to, and as feasible as CBT when delivered online to spontaneous visitors of an online therapy website. An automated, 3-arm, fully self-guided, online noninferiority trial compared 2 new treatments (IPT: n=620; CBT: n=610) to an active control treatment (MoodGYM: n=613) over a 4-week period in the general population. Outcomes were assessed using online self-report questionnaires, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) completed immediately following treatment (posttest) and at 6-month follow-up. Completers analyses showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at posttest and follow-up for both CBT and IPT, and were noninferior to MoodGYM. Within-group effect sizes were medium to large for all groups. There were no differences in clinical significant change between the programs. Reliable change was shown at posttest and follow-up for all programs, with consistently higher rates for CBT. Participants allocated to IPT showed significantly lower treatment satisfaction compared to CBT and MoodGYM. There was a dropout rate of 1294/1843 (70%) at posttest, highest for MoodGYM. Intention-to-treat analyses confirmed these findings. Despite a high dropout rate and lower satisfaction scores, this study suggests that Internet-delivered self-guided IPT is effective in reducing depressive symptoms, and may be noninferior to MoodGYM. The completion rates of IPT and CBT were higher than MoodGYM, indicating some progress in refining Internet-based self

  12. Live Cell Characterization of DNA Aggregation Delivered through Lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieruszynski, Stephen; Briggs, Candida; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Jones, Mark R

    2015-05-27

    DNA trafficking phenomena, such as information on where and to what extent DNA aggregation occurs, have yet to be fully characterised in the live cell. Here we characterise the aggregation of DNA when delivered through lipofection by applying the Number and Brightness (N&B) approach. The N&B analysis demonstrates extensive aggregation throughout the live cell with DNA clusters in the extremity of the cell and peri-nuclear areas. Once within the nucleus aggregation had decreased 3-fold. In addition, we show that increasing serum concentration of cell media results in greater cytoplasmic aggregation. Further, the effects of the DNA fragment size on aggregation was explored, where larger DNA constructs exhibited less aggregation. This study demonstrates the first quantification of DNA aggregation when delivered through lipofection in live cells. In addition, this study has presents a model for alternative uses of this imaging approach, which was originally developed to study protein oligomerization and aggregation.

  13. BEING DELIVERED: SPIRITUALITY IN SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Gregory P.; Martsolf, Donna S.; Draucker, Claire B.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical framework explaining how survivors of sexual violence use spirituality to respond to or recover from sexual violence is presented. Data were drawn from open-ended interviews of 27 women and 23 men who participated in a larger, ongoing study of women’s and men’s responses to sexual violence. Grounded theory methodology was used to develop the core category of Being Delivered, reflecting the participants’ experiences of being rescued, saved, or set free from the effects of sexual violence by a spiritual being or power. The theoretical framework describing Being Delivered is composed of three dimensions: Spiritual Connection, Spiritual Journey, and Spiritual Transformation. The framework can be used by clinicians to guide discussions of spirituality and healing with survivors of sexual violence. PMID:18382913

  14. Power Delivered to Mechanical Systems by Random Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S. Edwards

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops deformational response power descriptions of multiple degree-of-freedom systems due to stationary random vibration excitation. Two new concepts are developed. The deformational response power density (DRPD can be computed when a structure's natural frequencies and modal masses are available. The DRPD shows the spectral content of the deformational power delivered to a specific structure by the stationary, random excitation. This function can be found through a weighted windowing of the power spectrum of the input acceleration excitation. Deformational response input power spectra (DRIPS, similar to the input energy spectrum and shock response spectrum, give the power delivered to single-degree-of-freedom systems as a function of natural frequency. It is shown that the DRIPS is simply a smoothed version of the power spectrum of the input acceleration excitation. The DRIPS gives rise to a useful power-based data smoothing operation.

  15. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Deuschel, Jean-Dominique; Deuschel, Jean-Dominique

    2001-01-01

    This is the second printing of the book first published in 1988. The first four chapters of the volume are based on lectures given by Stroock at MIT in 1987. They form an introduction to the basic ideas of the theory of large deviations and make a suitable package on which to base a semester-length course for advanced graduate students with a strong background in analysis and some probability theory. A large selection of exercises presents important material and many applications. The last two chapters present various non-uniform results (Chapter 5) and outline the analytic approach that allow

  16. THE SELLER'S OBLIGATION TO DELIVER THE GOODS ACCORDING TO CISG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan VELICU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the seller's obligations under the Convention on International Sale of Goods (CISG and in particular the obligation to deliver the goods showing the main issues that arise in an international sale. We also wish to point the major innovations or improvements brought by the CISG in comparison to the European civil codes regulation and to conclude if the CSIG managed to revolutionize the tradition view on this issue.

  17. Delivering business analytics practical guidelines for best practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stubbs, Evan

    2013-01-01

    AVOID THE MISTAKES THAT OTHERS MAKE - LEARN WHAT LEADS TO BEST PRACTICE AND KICKSTART SUCCESS This groundbreaking resource provides comprehensive coverage across all aspects of business analytics, presenting proven management guidelines to drive sustainable differentiation. Through a rich set of case studies, author Evan Stubbs reviews solutions and examples to over twenty common problems spanning managing analytics assets and information, leveraging technology, nurturing skills, and defining processes. Delivering Business Analytics also outlines the Data Scientist's Code, fifteen principle

  18. North West Surrey's locality hubs - delivering integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, Lisa; Wilkinson, Peter; Lawn, Liz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: North West Surrey CCG (NWSCCG) is establishing Locality Hubs – physical buildings offering a fully integrated GP-led, multi-disciplinary ‘one-stop-shop’ services in the community for a defined cohort of frail elderly patients with multiple core morbidities. Hubs will ultimately deliver proactive and reactive care, available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.The key drivers are;Ageing population, people living longer & more people living with chronic conditionsCost & demand...

  19. Examining the cost of delivering routine immunization in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janusz, Cara Bess; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos; Molina Aguilera, Ida Berenice; Felix Garcia, Ana Gabriela; Mendoza, Lourdes; Díaz, Iris Yolanda; Resch, Stephen C

    2015-05-07

    Many countries have introduced new vaccines and expanded their immunization programs to protect additional risk groups, thus raising the cost of routine immunization delivery. Honduras recently adopted two new vaccines, and the country continues to broaden the reach of its program to adolescents and adults. In this article, we estimate and examine the economic cost of the Honduran routine immunization program for the year 2011. The data were gathered from a probability sample of 71 health facilities delivering routine immunization, as well as 8 regional and 1 central office of the national immunization program. Data were collected on vaccinations delivered, staff time dedicated to the program, cold chain equipment and upkeep, vehicle use, infrastructure, and other recurrent and capital costs at each health facility and administrative office. Annualized economic costs were estimated from a modified societal perspective and reported in 2011 US dollars. With the addition of rotavirus and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, the total cost for routine immunization delivery in Honduras for 2011 was US$ 32.5 million. Vaccines and related supplies accounted for 23% of the costs. Labor, cold chain, and vehicles represented 54%, 4%, and 1%, respectively. At the facility level, the non-vaccine system costs per dose ranged widely, from US$ 25.55 in facilities delivering fewer than 500 doses per year to US$ 2.84 in facilities with volume exceeding 10,000 doses per year. Cost per dose was higher in rural facilities despite somewhat lower wage rates for health workers in these settings; this appears to be driven by lower demand for services per health worker in sparsely populated areas, rather than increased cost of outreach. These more-precise estimates of the operational costs to deliver routine immunizations provide program managers with important information for mobilizing resources to help sustain the program and for improving annual planning and budgeting as well as longer

  20. Mapping a product-service-system delivering defence avionics availability

    OpenAIRE

    Settanni, E.; Thenent, N.; Newnes, L.; Parry, G.; Goh, Y. M.

    2017-01-01

    Long-term support agreements such as availability-based contracts are often associated with the servitization of business models in such sectors as defence aerospace. In practice, there is no unambiguous way of linking availability and service outcomes from an operational perspective; rather, the focus tends to be placed almost exclusively on product-related metrics. To address this gap, this paper outlines a conceptual model of how advanced service outcomes should be delivered under an avail...

  1. Thermal performance and heat transport in aquifer thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, W. T.; Doornenbal, P. J.; Drijver, B. C.; van Gaans, P. F. M.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J. T. C.; Rijnaarts, H. H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is used for seasonal storage of large quantities of thermal energy. Due to the increasing demand for sustainable energy, the number of ATES systems has increased rapidly, which has raised questions on the effect of ATES systems on their surroundings as well as their thermal performance. Furthermore, the increasing density of systems generates concern regarding thermal interference between the wells of one system and between neighboring systems. An assessment is made of (1) the thermal storage performance, and (2) the heat transport around the wells of an existing ATES system in the Netherlands. Reconstruction of flow rates and injection and extraction temperatures from hourly logs of operational data from 2005 to 2012 show that the average thermal recovery is 82 % for cold storage and 68 % for heat storage. Subsurface heat transport is monitored using distributed temperature sensing. Although the measurements reveal unequal distribution of flow rate over different parts of the well screen and preferential flow due to aquifer heterogeneity, sufficient well spacing has avoided thermal interference. However, oversizing of well spacing may limit the number of systems that can be realized in an area and lower the potential of ATES.

  2. Thermal Testing Measurements Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wagner

    2002-09-26

    , including graphical displays and comprehensive spreadsheets. In some cases, there was no need to reformat or restructure Input-DTNs so they remained unchanged. Thermal testing measurement data come from the characterization (pre-heating/baseline and post-cooling) and testing (heating and cooling) phases of the Large Block Test (LBT), the Single Heater Test (SHT), and the Drift Scale Test (DST). Since the LBT and SHT are completed, all phases of those two tests are addressed. DST measurements addressed in this report include preheating and the entire four-year heating phase, which ended January 14, 2002. Discussion of measurements from the ongoing cooling phase will be included in future revision(s) of this report.

  3. The feasibility of using the 25MW super near boiling nuclear reactor (SNB25) to provide thermal and electrical energy for a large Canadian Forces base in the Canadian Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, S.; Bonin, H.W.; Baskin, M.; Bowen, K.; Switzer, Z., E-mail: Stephane.Paquette@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    A feasibility study of a power plant using the Super Near Boiling 25 MWt (SNB25) nuclear reactor as a heat source and capable of supporting the electrical and thermal requirements for a base the size of Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Kingston in the Arctic was carried out. Such a power plant would allow the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) to have a self-sustaining operational base in the Arctic to conduct Search and Rescue (SAR) and sovereignty missions. The thermal and electrical requirements for a base the size of CFB Kingston are determined to be 31.63 MWt and 7.16 MWe, respectively. Using the Heating Degree Days (HDD) approach to account for temperature differences between Southern Ontario and the Arctic, a base the size of CFB Kingston in the Arctic would require 75.16 MWt to operate. A chemical engineering software program, UniSim, was used to simulate the energy cycle of the base which consisted of a district heating loop to provide hot water and an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) using n-pentane as the working fluid to provide the electrical energy. The UniSim simulations determined that the cycle would use six shell and tube heat exchangers, two axial gas turbines coupled to generators, and twelve centrifugal pumps, in addition to a group of five SNB25 reactors that could provide 25.03 MWt and 2.63 MWe to a base in the Arctic with energy requirements about a third of those of CFB Kingston. The design foresees redundancy which is essential to safe operation in the Arctic. (author)

  4. Modeling patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E Vance; Lankton, Nancy K

    2004-01-01

    Health care providers are beginning to deliver a range of Internet-based services to patients; however, it is not clear which of these e-health services patients need or desire. The authors propose that patients' acceptance of provider-delivered e-health can be modeled in advance of application development by measuring the effects of several key antecedents to e-health use and applying models of acceptance developed in the information technology (IT) field. This study tested three theoretical models of IT acceptance among patients who had recently registered for access to provider-delivered e-health. An online questionnaire administered items measuring perceptual constructs from the IT acceptance models (intrinsic motivation, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness/extrinsic motivation, and behavioral intention to use e-health) and five hypothesized antecedents (satisfaction with medical care, health care knowledge, Internet dependence, information-seeking preference, and health care need). Responses were collected and stored in a central database. All tested IT acceptance models performed well in predicting patients' behavioral intention to use e-health. Antecedent factors of satisfaction with provider, information-seeking preference, and Internet dependence uniquely predicted constructs in the models. Information technology acceptance models provide a means to understand which aspects of e-health are valued by patients and how this may affect future use. In addition, antecedents to the models can be used to predict e-health acceptance in advance of system development.

  5. On-Orbit Health Monitoring and Repair Assessment of Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers On-orbit health MoNItoring and repair assessment of THERMal protection systems (OMNI_THERM). OMNI_THERM features impedance-based...

  6. More with thermal energy storage. Report 7. Interference. Effects of thermal energy storage systems on the environment. Modelling of large-scale implementation in urban areas. Final report; Meer met bodemenergie. Rapport 7. Interferentie. Effecten van bodemenergiesystemen op hun omgeving. Modellering grootschalige inpassing in stedelijke gebieden. Eindrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oostrom, N.; Bakr, M. [Deltares, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-06-29

    The project More With Thermal Energy Storage (MMB, abbreviated in Dutch) focuses on knowledge gaps and potential opportunities regarding open systems. The main questions to be answered are: (1) What effects (hydrological, thermal, microbiological and chemical) occur in the soil system by application of thermal energy storage; (2) Which technical options are available for a sustainable integration of thermal energy storage in the water and energy chain?; (3) Is it possible to achieve multiple objectives by using smart combinations? The project is organized in different work packages. In work package 2, the effects of individual and collective thermal energy storage storage systems on subsoils and the environment are determined. In work package 3 the opportunities for thermal energy storage and soil remediation are examined, while in work package 4 the focus is on new sustainable combinations of heat and cold storage. Work package 1 is the umbrella part where communication and policy of and participation in MMB are the main subjects. The objective of this report is to gain insight in the mutual influencing of heat and cold storage systems in areas where several such systems occur close to each other. This insight might contribute to a policy and/or model approach to interference [Dutch] Het project Meer Met Bodemenergie (MMB) richt zich op het invullen van kennisleemtes en mogelijke kansen ten aanzien van open systemen. De belangrijkste vragen waarop het onderzoeksprogramma MMB antwoord geeft zijn: (1) Welke effecten (hydrologisch, thermisch, microbiologisch en chemisch) treden op in het bodemsysteem bij toepassing van bodemenergie?; (2) Welke technische mogelijkheden zijn er voor het duurzaam inpassen van bodem-energie in de water- en energieketen?; (3) Is het mogelijk om meerdere doelstellingen tegelijk te verwezenlijken door slimme combinaties te maken? Het project is ingericht met verschillende werkpakketten. In werkpakket 2 worden de effecten van individuele en

  7. Investigating the Plasma-Assisted and Thermal Catalytic Dry Methane Reforming for Syngas Production: Process Design, Simulation and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Delikonstantis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing surplus of green electricity generated by renewable energy technologies has fueled research towards chemical industry electrification. By adapting power-to-chemical concepts, such as plasma-assisted processes, cheap resources could be converted into fuels and base chemicals. However, the feasibility of those electrified processes at large scale has not been investigated yet. Thus, the current work strives to compare, for first time in the literature, plasma-assisted production of syngas, from CH4 and CO2 (dry methane reforming, with thermal catalytic dry methane reforming. Specifically, both processes are conceptually designed to deliver syngas suitable for methanol synthesis (H2/CO ≥ 2 in mole. The processes are simulated in the Aspen Plus process simulator where different process steps are investigated. Heat integration and equipment cost estimation are performed for the most promising process flow diagrams. Collectively, plasma-assisted dry methane reforming integrated with combined steam/CO2 methane reforming is an effective way to deliver syngas for methanol production. It is more sustainable than combined thermal catalytic dry methane reforming with steam methane reforming, which has also been proposed for syngas production of H2/CO ≥ 2; in the former process, 40% more CO2 is captured, while 38% less H2O is consumed per mol of syngas. Furthermore, the plasma-assisted process is less complex than the thermal catalytic one; it requires higher amount of utilities, but comparable capital investment.

  8. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal...

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  10. Solar Thermal Barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurskens, L.W.M.; Mozaffarian, M.

    2008-09-01

    After two years of very strong growth, the solar thermal market (taking all technologies including unglazed flexible collectors into account) marked time in 2007 with 6.9% less collectors being sold with respect to year 2006. In the end, this market reached 2.9 million m 2 vs. 3.1 million m 2 in 2006, i.e. an equivalent capacity of more than 2000 MWth. This decrease is explained for a large part by a strong decline of the German market, the largest market of the European Union. Conversely, other countries are continuing to develop their markets and are showing double-digit growth rates

  11. Solar thermal barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    After two years of very strong growth, the solar thermal market marked time in 2007 with 6,9% less collectors being sold with respect to year 2006. In the end this market reached 2,9 million m 2 facing 3,1 million m 2 in 2006, an equivalent capacity of more than 2000 MWth. This decrease is explained for a large part by a strong decline of the german market, the largest market of the european union. Conversely, other countries are continuing to develop their markets and are showing double-digit growth rates. (A.L.B.)

  12. Rectenna thermal model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiramangalam, Murall; Alden, Adrian; Speyer, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Deploying rectennas in space requires adapting existing designs developed for terrestrial applications to the space environment. One of the major issues in doing so is to understand the thermal performance of existing designs in the space environment. Toward that end, a 3D rectenna thermal model has been developed, which involves analyzing shorted rectenna elements and finite size rectenna element arrays. A shorted rectenna element is a single element whose ends are connected together by a material of negligible thermal resistance. A shorted element is a good approximation to a central element of a large array. This model has been applied to Brown's 2.45 GHz rectenna design. Results indicate that Brown's rectenna requires redesign or some means of enhancing the heat dissipation in order for the diode temperature to be maintained below 200 C above an output power density of 620 W/sq.m. The model developed in this paper is very general and can be used for the analysis and design of any type of rectenna design of any frequency.

  13. Homogenized thermal conduction model for particulate foods

    OpenAIRE

    Chinesta , Francisco; Torres , Rafael; Ramón , Antonio; Rodrigo , Mari Carmen; Rodrigo , Miguel

    2002-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the definition of an equivalent thermal conductivity for particulate foods. An homogenized thermal model is used to asses the effect of particulate spatial distribution and differences in thermal conductivities. We prove that the spatial average of the conductivity can be used in an homogenized heat transfer model if the conductivity differences among the food components are not very large, usually the highest conductivity ratio between the foods ...

  14. Thermal performance of the ATST secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung K.; DeVries, Joe; Hansen, Eric

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has a 4.24m off-axis primary mirror designed to deliver diffractionlimited images of the sun. Its baseline secondary mirror (M2) design uses a 0.65m diameter Silicon Carbide mirror mounted kinematically by a bi-pod flexure mechanism at three equally spaced locations. Unlike other common telescopes, the ATST M2 is to be exposed to a significant solar heat loading. A thermal management system (TMS) will be developed to accommodate the solar loading and minimize "mirror seeing effect" by controlling the temperature difference between the M2 optical surface and the ambient air at the site. Thermo-elastic analyses for steady state thermal behaviors of the ATST secondary mirror was performed using finite element analysis by I-DEAS TM and PCRINGE TM for the optical analysis. We examined extensive heat transfer simulation cases and their results were discussed. The goal of this study is to establish thermal models by I-DEAS for an adequate thermal environment. These thermal models will be useful for estimating segment thermal responses. Current study assumes a few sample time dependent thermal loadings to synthesize the operational environment.

  15. Thermal-hydraulic unreliability of passive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Saltos, N.T.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced light water reactor designs like AP600 and the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) use passive safety systems for accident prevention and mitigation. Because these systems rely on natural forces for their operation, their unavailability due to hardware failures and human error is significantly smaller than that of active systems. However, the coolant flows predicted to be delivered by these systems can be subject to significant uncertainties, which in turn can lead to a significant uncertainty in the predicted thermal-hydraulic performance of the plant under accident conditions. Because of these uncertainties, there is a probability that an accident sequence for which a best estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis predicts no core damage (success sequence) may actually lead to core damage. For brevity, this probability will be called thermal-hydraulic unreliability. The assessment of this unreliability for all the success sequences requires very expensive computations. Moreover, the computational cost increases drastically as the required thermal-hydraulic reliability increases. The required computational effort can be greatly reduced if a bounding approach can be used that either eliminates the need to compute thermal-hydraulic unreliabilities, or it leads to the analysis of a few bounding sequences for which the required thermal-hydraulic reliability is relatively small. The objective of this paper is to present such an approach and determine the order of magnitude of the thermal-hydraulic unreliabilities that may have to be computed

  16. Using Behavioral Economics to Design Physician Incentives That Deliver High-Value Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Ubel, Peter A; Kessler, Judd B; Meyer, Gregg; Muller, Ralph W; Navathe, Amol S; Patel, Pankaj; Pearl, Robert; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Sacks, Lee; Sen, Aditi P; Sherman, Paul; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-01-19

    Behavioral economics provides insights about the development of effective incentives for physicians to deliver high-value care. It suggests that the structure and delivery of incentives can shape behavior, as can thoughtful design of the decision-making environment. This article discusses several principles of behavioral economics, including inertia, loss aversion, choice overload, and relative social ranking. Whereas these principles have been applied to motivate personal health decisions, retirement planning, and savings behavior, they have been largely ignored in the design of physician incentive programs. Applying these principles to physician incentives can improve their effectiveness through better alignment with performance goals. Anecdotal examples of successful incentive programs that apply behavioral economics principles are provided, even as the authors recognize that its application to the design of physician incentives is largely untested, and many outstanding questions exist. Application and rigorous evaluation of infrastructure changes and incentives are needed to design payment systems that incentivize high-quality, cost-conscious care.

  17. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects.

  18. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  19. Partner-delivered reflexology: effects on cancer pain and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Nancy L N; Swanson, Melvin; Dalton, Joann; Keefe, Frances J; Engelke, Martha

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effects of partner-delivered foot reflexology and usual care plus attention on patients' perceived pain and anxiety. The experimental pretest/post-test design included patient-partner dyads randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Four hospitals in the southeastern United States. 42 experimental and 44 control subjects comprised 86 dyads of patients with metastatic cancer and their partners, representing 16 different types of cancer; 23% of patients had lung cancer, followed by breast, colorectal, and head and neck cancer and lymphoma. The subjects had a mean age of 58.3 years, 51% were female, 66% had a high school education or less, and 58% were Caucasian, 40% were African American, and 1% were Filipino. The intervention included a 15- to 30-minute teaching session on foot reflexology to the partner by a certified reflexologist, an optional 15- to 30-minute foot reflexology session for the partner, and a 30-minute, partner-delivered foot reflexology intervention for the patient. The control group received a 30-minute reading session from their partners. Pain and anxiety. Following the initial partner-delivered foot reflexology, patients experienced a significant decrease in pain intensity and anxiety. A nurse reflexologist taught partners how to perform reflexology on patients with metastatic cancer pain in the hospital, resulting in an immediate decrease in pain intensity and anxiety; minimal changes were seen in the control group, who received usual care plus attention. Hospitals could have qualified professionals offer reflexology as a complementary therapy and teach interested partners the modality.

  20. Hipparcos to deliver its final results catalogue soon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    them, almost 30 years ago, to propose carrying out these observations from the relatively benign environment of space. Hipparcos is, by present standards, a medium-sized satellite, with a 30 cm telescope sensing simply ordinary light. But it has been described as the most imaginative in the short history of space astronomy. This foresight has been amply repaid. In the long history of stargazing it ranks with the surveys by Hipparchus the Greek in the 2nd Century BC and by Tichy Brahe the Dane in the 16th Century AD, both of which transformed human perceptions of the Universe. Positions derived from the Hipparcos satellite are better than a millionth of a degree, and newly a thousand times more accurate than star positions routinely determined from he ground. This accuracy makes it possible to measure directly the distances to the stars. While it took 250 years between astronomers first setting out on the exacting task of measuring the distance to a star, and a stellar distance being measured for the first time, ESA's Hipparcos mission has revolutionised this long, painstaking, and fundamental task by measuring accurate distances and movements of more than one hundred thousand. The measurement concept involved he satellite triangulating its way between he stars all wound the sky, building up a celestial map in much the same way as land surveyors use triangulation between hill-tops to measure distances accurately. Only the angles involved are much smaller : the accuracy that has been achieved with the Hipparcos Catalogue is such that he two edges of a coin, viewed from he other side of the Atlantic Ocean, could be distinguished. The results from Hipparcos will deliver scientists with long-awaited details of our place in he Milky Way Galaxy. Most of he stars visible to the naked eye are, to a large extent, companions of the Sun, in a great orbital march around the centre of the Galaxy, a journey so long that it takes individual stars 250 million years to complete, in

  1. Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1977-10-17

    The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

  2. Delivering Sustainability Through Supply Chain Distribution Network Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Ravet

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Companies could gain (cost, service, green/sustainable competitive advantage through the supply chain network. The goal of this article is to study how to deliver sustainability through the supply chain distribution network redesign.Design/methodology/approach - A literature review is conducted to examine research relating to sustainable supply chain strategies and supply chain distribution network redesign.Findings - A study of the supply chain literature reveals the importance to rethink the supply chain distribution network design and to treat sustainability as integral to operations.

  3. Externally Delivered Focused Ultrasound for Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, Petr; Ormiston, John; Brinton, Todd J; Starek, Zdenek; Esler, Murray; Dawood, Omar; Anderson, Thomas L; Gertner, Michael; Whitbourne, Rob; Schmieder, Roland E

    2016-06-27

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical safety and efficacy outcomes of renal denervation executed by an externally delivered, completely noninvasive focused therapeutic ultrasound device. Renal denervation has emerged as a potential treatment approach for resistant hypertension. Sixty-nine subjects received renal denervation with externally delivered focused ultrasound via the Kona Medical Surround Sound System. This approach was investigated across 3 consecutive studies to optimize targeting, tracking, and dosing. In the third study, treatments were performed in a completely noninvasive way using duplex ultrasound image guidance to target the therapy. Short- and long-term safety and efficacy were evaluated through use of clinical assessments, magnetic resonance imaging scans prior to and 3 and 24 weeks after renal denervation, and, in cases in which a targeting catheter was used to facilitate targeting, fluoroscopic angiography with contrast. All patients tolerated renal denervation using externally delivered focused ultrasound. Office blood pressure (BP) decreased by 24.6 ± 27.6/9.0 ± 15.0 mm Hg (from baseline BP of 180.0 ± 18.5/97.7 ± 13.7 mm Hg) in 69 patients after 6 months and 23.8 ± 24.1/10.3 ± 13.1 mm Hg in 64 patients with complete 1-year follow-up. The response rate (BP decrease >10 mm Hg) was 75% after 6 months and 77% after 1 year. The most common adverse event was post-treatment back pain, which was reported in 32 of 69 patients and resolved within 72 h in most cases. No intervention-related adverse events involving motor or sensory deficits were reported. Renal function was not altered, and vascular safety was established by magnetic resonance imaging (all patients), fluoroscopic angiography (n = 48), and optical coherence tomography (n = 5). Using externally delivered focused ultrasound and noninvasive duplex ultrasound, image-guided targeting was associated with substantial BP reduction without any major safety signals. Further

  4. Thermal comfort assessment of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Carlucci, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    A number of metrics for assessing human thermal response to climatic conditions have been proposed in scientific literature over the last decades. They aim at describing human thermal perception of the thermal environment to which an individual or a group of people is exposed. More recently, a new type of “discomfort index” has been proposed for describing, in a synthetic way, long-term phenomena. Starting from a systematic review of a number of long-term global discomfort indices, they are then contrasted and compared on a reference case study in order to identify their similarities and differences and strengths and weaknesses. Based on this analysis, a new short-term local discomfort index is proposed for the American Adaptive comfort model. Finally, a new and reliable long-term general discomfort index is presented. It is delivered in three versions and each of them is suitable to be respectively coupled with the Fanger, the European Adaptive and the American Adaptive comfort models.

  5. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  6. Maternal and neonatal complications in term breech delivered vaginally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, S.; Jadoon, S.M.K.; Shah, R.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the maternal and neonatal complications in terms of genital tract trauma to mother, perinatal mortality. Apgar score at 5 minutes and neonatal trauma in all singleton term breech cases delivered vaginally. A 100 consecutive patients with singleton breech presentation, whether booked or unbooked, were admitted and delivered vaginally in hospital during the study period. They were studied for maternal and neonatal complications. Maternal complication included any genital tract trauma during delivery while neonatal complications were perinatal mortality, low Apgar score (less than eight at 5 minutes) and birth trauma. There were a total 3977 deliveries during this study period, 145 breech presentation (incidence 3.6%). Out of those, 100 were included in the study. All were unbooked cases, 87% were multigravida while 13% were primigravida. An Apgar score of eight was recorded in 87% babies while 10% had an Apgar score of less than eight after 5 minutes. There were 3 still births and one neonatal death. Aggregated perinatal mortality rate was 40/1000 live births. Only one baby had birth trauma (Erbs paralysis) during vaginal breech delivery. Ninety seven (97%) mothers had no complications while only 3 (3%) had complications. Out of these, one had cervical tear and 2 had vaginal tears. Offering a trial of vaginal breech delivery to strictly selected and well-counselled patients remains an appropriate option without compromising perinatal and maternal outcome. It also decreases the rate of operative delivery for this malpresentation. (author)

  7. Delivering the Goods for Genome Engineering and Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Kristian Alsbjerg; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2015-08-01

    A basic understanding of genome evolution and the life and impact of microorganisms, like viruses and bacteria, has been fundamental in the quest for efficient genetic therapies. The expanding tool box for genetic engineering now contains transposases, recombinases, and nucleases, all created from naturally occurring genome-modifying proteins. Whereas conventional gene therapies have sought to establish sustained expression of therapeutic genes, genomic tools are needed only in a short time window and should be delivered to cells ideally in a balanced "hit-and-run" fashion. Current state-of-the-art delivery strategies are based on intracellular production of protein from transfected plasmid DNA or in vitro-transcribed RNA, or from transduced viral templates. Here, we discuss advantages and challenges of intracellular production strategies and describe emerging approaches based on the direct delivery of protein either by transfer of recombinant protein or by lentiviral protein transduction. With focus on adapting viruses for protein delivery, we describe the concept of "all-in-one" lentiviral particles engineered to codeliver effector proteins and donor sequences for DNA transposition or homologous recombination. With optimized delivery methods-based on transferring DNA, RNA, or protein-it is no longer far-fetched that researchers in the field will indeed deliver the goods for somatic gene therapies.

  8. Principles for designing and delivering psychosocial and mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard; Kemp, V

    2018-03-08

    The development of the UK's military policy includes the potential for military organisations to deploy in support of humanitarian aid operations. This paper offers an overview of the risks to people's mental health of their exposure to emergencies, major incidents, disasters, terrorism, displacement, postconflict environments in which humanitarian aid is delivered, and deployments to conflict zones. It summarises the psychosocial approach recommended by many contemporary researchers and practitioners. It differentiates the extremely common experience of distress from the mental disorders that people who are affected may develop and introduces the construct of psychosocial resilience. The authors recognise the importance of trajectories of response in separating people who are distressed and require psychosocial care from those who require mental healthcare. Finally, this paper summarises a strategic approach to designing, planning and providing psychosocial and mental healthcare, provides a model of care and outlines the principles for early psychosocial interventions that do not require training in mental healthcare to deliver them. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Internet delivered question and answer column for patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maijala, Riikka; Anttila, Minna; Koivunen, Marita; Pitkänen, Anneli; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the use of an Internet delivered question and answer column among patients with schizophrenia. The column was developed for research purposes. The study sample consisted of patients (N = 100) admitted to acute inpatient psychiatric care in two hospital districts. Descriptive data were collected from the column to which a nurse replied within 3 days and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The column had four to five questions weekly. The most common age of users was 18-24 years, and the gender distribution was almost equal. Column use was heaviest among students (44%) and least among unemployed people (19%). Out of 85 questions or comments sent to the column, 25 (29%) were related to program training and the remaining 60 (71%) were related to medication (31%), illness and tests (25%), other questions or comments (9%), daily life and coping with it (4%), and places to receive treatment (2%). An Internet delivered question and answer column can be included in the care of patients with schizophrenia. However, it requires a new type of basic and additional education in the field of mental health care in order for nurses to be able to provide nursing via the Internet forum.

  10. Delivering phonological and phonics training within whole-class teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Laura R; Solity, Jonathan

    2008-12-01

    Early, intensive phonological awareness and phonics training is widely held to be beneficial for children with poor phonological awareness. However, most studies have delivered this training separately from children's normal whole-class reading lessons. We examined whether integrating this training into whole class, mixed-ability reading lessons could impact on children with poor phonological awareness, whilst also benefiting normally developing readers. Teachers delivered the training within a broad reading programme to whole classes of children from Reception to the end of Year 1 (N=251). A comparison group of children received standard teaching methods (N=213). Children's literacy was assessed at the beginning of Reception, and then at the end of each year until 1 year post-intervention. The strategy significantly impacted on reading performance for normally developing readers and those with poor phonological awareness, vastly reducing the incidence of reading difficulties from 20% in comparison schools to 5% in intervention schools. Phonological and phonics training is highly effective for children with poor phonological awareness, even when incorporated into whole-class teaching.

  11. Thermal properties of graphite oxide, thermally reduced graphene and chemically reduced graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Lojka, Michal; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2017-07-01

    We compared thermal behavior and other properties of graphite oxide, thermally reduced graphene and chemically reduced graphene. Graphite was oxidized according to the Hofmann method using potassium chlorate as oxidizing agent in strongly acidic environment. In the next step, the formed graphite oxide was chemically or thermally reduced yielding graphene. The mechanism of thermal reduction was studied using STA-MS. Graphite oxide and both thermally and chemically reduced graphenes were analysed by SEM, EDS, elemental combustion analysis, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and BET. These findings will help for the large scale production of graphene with appropriate chemical composition.

  12. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  13. Thermal stress mitigation by Active Thermal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Dossena, Fabrizio; Pietrini, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) of power switches. Leveraging on the fact that thermal stress has wide impact on the system reliability, controlling thermal transients is supposed to lengthen the lifetime of electronic conversion systems. Indeed in some environments...... results of control schemes are presented, together with evaluation of the proposed loss models. Experimental proof of the ability of the proposed control to reduce thermal swing and related stress on the device is presented, too....

  14. Cooling towers for thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboseau, J.

    1987-01-01

    After a brief recall on cooling towers testing and construction, this paper presents four examples of very large French nuclear power plant cooling towers, and one of an Australian thermal power plant [fr

  15. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dear, R. J. de; Akimoto, T.; Arens, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature...... review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has taken place in thermal comfort thinking over the last 20 years; a shift away from the physically based...... developed, driven by the continuous challenge to model thermal comfort at the same anatomical resolution and to combine these localized signals into a coherent, global thermal perception. Finally, the demand for ever increasing building energy efficiency is pushing technological innovation in the way we...

  16. SIFT: A method to verify the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Boer, Hans C.J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy patients are increasingly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high tumor doses. As part of our quality control program to ensure accurate dose delivery, a new method was investigated that enables the verification of the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), irrespective of changes in patient geometry. Methods and materials: Each IMRT treatment field is split into a static field and a modulated field, which are delivered in sequence. Images are acquired for both fields using an EPID. The portal dose image obtained for the static field is used to determine changes in patient geometry between the planning CT scan and the time of treatment delivery. With knowledge of these changes, the delivered IMRT fluence can be verified using the portal dose image of the modulated field. This method, called split IMRT field technique (SIFT), was validated first for several phantom geometries, followed by clinical implementation for a number of patients treated with IMRT. Results: The split IMRT field technique allows for an accurate verification of the delivered IMRT fluence (generally within 1% [standard deviation]), even if large interfraction changes in patient geometry occur. For interfraction radiological path length changes of 10 cm, deliberately introduced errors in the delivered fluence could still be detected to within 1% accuracy. Application of SIFT requires only a minor increase in treatment time relative to the standard IMRT delivery. Conclusions: A new technique to verify the delivered IMRT fluence from EPID images, which is independent of changes in the patient geometry, has been developed. SIFT has been clinically implemented for daily verification of IMRT treatment delivery

  17. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  18. JAERI femtosecond pulsed and tens-kilowatts average-powered free-electron lasers and their applications of large-scaled non-thermal manufacturing in nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2004-01-01

    We first reported the novel method that femto-second (fs) lasers of the low average power Ti: Sapphire one, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser, excimer laser, fiber laser and so on could peel off and remove both stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked (CW) and very crack-susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in the hardened surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the last and third origin of corrosive environment. Because it has been successfully demonstrated that the fs lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins, we could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC in many field near future. The SCC is a well known phenomenon in modern material sciences, technologies, and industries, and defined as an insidious failure mechanism that is caused by the corrosive environment, and the crack-susceptible material and the surface residual tensile stress simultaneously. There are a large number of famous SCC examples for damaging stainless steels, aluminum alloys, brass and other alloy metals in many different cases. In many boiling light-water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants and a few pressurized light water reactor (PWR) ones in Japan and the world up to now, a large number of the deep and wide cracks have been recently found in the reactor-grade low-carbon stainless steel components of core shroud, control-blade handle, re-circulating pipes, sheath and other internals in the reactor vessel under very low or no applied stresses. These cracks have been thought to be initiated from the crack-susceptible like very small-sized cracks, pinholes, concentrated dislocation defects and so on in the hardened surface, which were originated from cold-work machining processes in reactor manufacturing factories, and to be insidiously penetrated widely into the deep inside under the residual tensile stress and corrosive environment, and under no

  19. Metoder for Modellering, Simulering og Regulering af Større Termiske Processer anvendt i Sukkerproduktion. Methods for Modelling, Simulation and Control of Large Scale Thermal Systems Applied in Sugar Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis is to investigate and develop methods for modelling, simulation and control applicable in large scale termal industrial plants. An ambition has been to evaluate the results in a physical process. Sugar production is well suited for the purpose. In collaboration...... simulator has been developed. The simulator handles the normal working conditions relevant to control engineers. A non-linear dynamic model based on mass and energy balances has been developed. The model parameters have been adjusted to data measured on a Danish sugar plant. The simulator consists...... of a computer, a data terminal and an electric interface corresponding to the interface at the sugar plant. The simulator is operating in realtime and thus a realistic test of controllers is possible. The idiomatic control methodology has been investigated developing a control concept for the evaporation...

  20. The Art and Skill of Delivering Culturally Responsive TF-CBT in Tanzania and Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kava, Christine M.; Akiba, Christopher F.; Lucid, Leah; Dorsey, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the facilitators, barriers, and strategies used to deliver a child mental health evidence-based treatment (EBT), trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT), in a culturally responsive manner. In low- and middle-income countries most individuals with mental health problems do not receive treatment due to a shortage of mental health professionals. One approach to addressing this problem is task-sharing, in which lay counselors are trained to deliver mental health treatment. Combining this approach with a focus on EBT provides a strategy for bridging the mental health treatment gap. However, little is known how about western-developed EBTs are delivered in a culturally responsive manner. Method Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 TF-CBT lay counselors involved in a large randomized controlled trial of TF-CBT in Kenya and Tanzania. An inductive approach was used to analyze the data. Results Lay counselors described the importance of being responsive to TF-CBT participants’ customs, beliefs, and socioeconomic conditions and highlighted the value of TF-CBT for their community. They also discussed the importance of partnering with other organizations to address unmet socioeconomic needs. Conclusion The findings from this study provide support for the acceptability and appropriateness of TF-CBT as a treatment approach for improving child mental health. Having a better understanding of the strategies used by lay counselors to ensure that treatment is relevant to the cultural and socioeconomic context of participants can help to inform the implementation of future EBTs. PMID:27414470

  1. Controlling torque and cutting costs: steerable drill bits deliver in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Steve; Garcia, Alexis; Amorim, Dalmo [ReedHycalog, Stonehouse (United Kingdom); Iramina, Wilson [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Herrera, Gabriel

    2008-07-01

    Tool face Control is widely regarded as one of the greatest directional drilling challenges with a Fixed Cutter (FC) drill bit on a Steerable Motor assembly. Tool face offset is proportional to the torque generated by the bit, and by nature, FC bits are capable of generating high levels of torque. If large changes in downhole torque are produced while drilling, this will cause rotation of the drill string, and loss of tool face orientation. This results in inefficient drilling and increases risk of bit and downhole tool damage. This paper examines the effect of various FC drill bit components to determine the key design requirements to deliver a smooth torque response and an improved directional performance. Included is a review of the results from comprehensive laboratory testing to determine the effectiveness of a number of different configurations of removable Torque Controlling Components (TCC). These, in combination with specific cutting structure layouts, combine to provide predictable torque response while optimized for high rates of penetration. In addition, unique gauge geometry is disclosed that was engineered to reduce drag and deliver improved borehole quality. This gauge design produces less torque when sliding and beneficial gauge pad interaction with the borehole when in rotating mode. Field performance studies from within Latin America clearly demonstrate that matching TCC, an optimized cutting structure, and gauge geometry to a steerable assembly delivers smooth torque response and improved directional control. Benefits with regard to improved stability are also discussed. Successful application has resulted in significant time and cost savings for the operator, demonstrating that Stability and Steerability improvements can be achieved with an increase in penetration rate. (author)

  2. Alternative perspectives of safety in home delivered health care: a sequential exploratory mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarahjane

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to discover and describe how patients, carers and case management nurses define safety and compare it to the traditional risk reduction and harm avoidance definition of safety. Care services are increasingly being delivered in the home for patients with complex long-term conditions. However, the concept of safety remains largely unexplored. A sequential, exploratory mixed method design. A qualitative case study of the UK National Health Service case management programme in the English UK National Health Service was deployed during 2012. Thirteen interviews were conducted with patients (n = 9) and carers (n = 6) and three focus groups with nurses (n = 17) from three community care providers. The qualitative element explored the definition of safety. Data were subjected to framework analysis and themes were identified by participant group. Sequentially, a cross-sectional survey was conducted during 2013 in a fourth community care provider (patient n = 35, carer n = 19, nurse n = 26) as a form of triangulation. Patients and carers describe safety differently to case management nurses, choosing to focus on meeting needs. They use more positive language and recognize the role they have in safety in home-delivered health care. In comparison, case management nurses described safety similarly to the definitions found in the literature. However, when offered the patient and carer definition of safety, they preferentially selected this definition to their own or the literature definition. Patients and carers offer an alternative perspective on patient safety in home-delivered health care that identifies their role in ensuring safety and is more closely aligned with the empowerment philosophy of case management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Large ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents an alternative to the traditional view that ethics means judging individual behavior against standards of right and wrong. Instead, ethics is understood as creating ethical communities through the promises we make to each other. The "aim" of ethics is to demonstrate in our own behavior a credible willingness to work to create a mutually better world. The "game" of ethics then becomes searching for strategies that overlap with others' strategies so that we are all better for intending to act on a basis of reciprocal trust. This is a difficult process because we have partial, simultaneous, shifting, and inconsistent views of the world. But despite the reality that we each "frame" ethics in personal terms, it is still possible to create sufficient common understanding to prosper together. Large ethics does not make it a prerequisite for moral behavior that everyone adheres to a universally agreed set of ethical principles; all that is necessary is sufficient overlap in commitment to searching for better alternatives.

  4. SU-E-T-357: Electronic Compensation Technique to Deliver Total Body Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, T [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Wang, I; Podgorsak, M [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient’s immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has conventionally been used to compensate for the varying thickness through the entire body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern electronic compensation technique to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Methods: Treatment plans utilizing electronic compensation to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Each treatment plan includes two, specifically weighted, pair of opposed fields. One pair of open, large fields (collimator=45°), to encompass the patient’s entire anatomy, and one pair of smaller fields (collimator=0°) focused only on the thicker midsection of the patient. The optimal fluence for each one of the smaller fields was calculated at a patient specific penetration depth. Irregular surface compensators provide a more uniform dose distribution within the smaller opposed fields. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the evaluating the electronic compensation technique. In one case, the maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the non-compensated 195.8% to 165.3% in the electronically compensated plans, indicating a more uniform dose with the region of electronic compensation. The mean body doses calculated from the DVH were also reduced from the non-compensated 120.6% to 112.7% in the electronically compensated plans, indicating a more accurate delivery of the prescription dose. All calculated monitor units were well within clinically acceptable limits. Conclusion: Electronic compensation technique for TBI will not substantially increase the beam on time while it can significantly reduce the compensator

  5. Thermal-spectrum recriticality energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1993-12-01

    Large computer codes have been created in the past to predict the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (CDA), postulated to occur in liquid metal reactors (LMR). These codes, such as SIMMER, are highly specific to LMR designs. More recent attention has focused on thermal-spectrum criticality accidents, such as for fuel storage basins and waste tanks containing fissile material. This paper resents results from recent one-dimensional kinetics simulations, performed for a recriticality accident in a thermal spectrum. Reactivity insertion rates generally are smaller than in LMR CDAs, and the energetics generally are more benign. Parametric variation of input was performed, including reactivity insertion and initial temperature

  6. Competitive advantage of diferric transferrin in delivering iron to reticulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebers, H A; Csiba, E; Huebers, E; Finch, C A

    1983-01-01

    Radioiron- and radioiodine-labeled forms of human diferric and monoferric transferrin and apotransferrin, isolated by preparative isoelectric focusing, were used to define transferrin-iron uptake by human reticulocytes. In mixtures of human diferric and monoferric transferrin, the diferric molecule had a constant 7-fold advantage in delivering iron to reticulocytes, as compared with the 2-fold advantage when single solutions of mono- and diferric transferrins were compared. This was shown to be due to competitive interaction in iron delivery, probably at a common membrane-receptor binding site for transferrin. Apotransferrin did not interfere with the iron-donating process and its limited cellular uptake was inhibited in noncompetitive fashion by diferric transferrin. PMID:6572005

  7. Adaptation finance: How can Durban deliver on past promises?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciplet, David; Roperts, J. Timmons; He, Linlang; Fields, Spencer [Brown University (United States); Khan, Mizan [North South University (Bangladesh)

    2011-11-15

    There is an ever-widening chasm between the support developing countries need to adapt to climate change, and the funding promised and delivered by wealthy nations. While UN climate meetings endlessly debate terms such as 'new and additional' or 'balanced allocation', even some basic commitments to adaptation funding are going unfulfilled. And as we approach the final year of the 'fast-start' phase for climate finance, there is no plan for the crucial 'scale-up' period of 2013–2019, when contributions must swell tenfold. At the Durban negotiations, countries should take three steps to ensure the developed world can meet its agreed responsibilities: establish funding sources based on international trade; define annual targets for the scale-up; and adopt a transparent, centralised accounting system.

  8. L-Asparaginase delivered by Salmonella typhimurium suppresses solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangsoo Kim

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be engineered to deliver anticancer proteins to tumors via a controlled expression system that maximizes the concentration of the therapeutic agent in the tumor. L-asparaginase (L-ASNase, which primarily converts asparagine to aspartate, is an anticancer protein used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this study, Salmonellae were engineered to express L-ASNase selectively within tumor tissues using the inducible araBAD promoter system of Escherichia coli. Antitumor efficacy of the engineered bacteria was demonstrated in vivo in solid malignancies. This result demonstrates the merit of bacteria as cancer drug delivery vehicles to administer cancer-starving proteins such as L-ASNase to be effective selectively within the microenvironment of cancer tissue.

  9. Digital television: a new way to deliver information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Samson

    1998-12-01

    Digital television (DTV) is a new way to deliver video, audio, and other data. Why should TV be converted to digital? How does DTV work? What can we do with it? This paper provides some introduction about DTV, its history, and its roll-out plan. It then compares DTV with analog TV, and describes how DTV works. It also describes why the computer industry, as well as the consumer electronics industry, are both very interested I the DTV market. Next, it describes what Intel has done on DTV, including how we build a PC- based DTV, its test evaluation results, its new applications, and Intel's DTV station DMRL. This paper also describes remaining issues, our roadmap, vision, and future directions.

  10. A Fetus with Iniencephaly Delivered at the Third Trimester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Cinar Tanriverdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iniencephaly is an uncommon neural tube defect, having retroflexion of the head without a neck and severe distortion of the spine. Iniencephaly is classified into two groups, iniencephaly apertus (with encephalocele and iniencephaly clausus (without encephalocele. Incidence ranges from 0.1 to 10 in 10.000 pregnancies and it is seen more frequently in girls. Most of the fetuses with this defect die before birth or soon after birth, while those with the milder forms may live through childhood. Recurrence risk is around 1–5%. Family should be offered termination to reduce maternal risks and counseled for folic acid supplementation before the next planned pregnancy. Here we present a rare case of iniencephaly clausus which was diagnosed at 18th week of gestation by ultrasonography and delivered in the third trimester of pregnancy due to rejection of termination.

  11. Sex preferences among mothers delivering at Patan Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, U D; Ansari, I; Bandary, S; Adhikari, N

    2011-01-01

    High sex ratios at birth (SRB) are seen in China, Taiwan, South Korea, parts of India and Vietnam. The imbalance is the result of son preference, accentuated by declining fertility. Prenatal sex determination and female feticides are common in many countries. It is reflected in sex ratio To determine reasons for the preferences for different sex; to find out whether there is altered sex ratio at birth and to find out whether female feticide are common among women who had abortion. It is a prospective study. Women who had previous history of abortion and had delivered at Patan Hospital in the year 2066 were interviewed as per questionnaires. Among 560 women with total live births of 965, (462 male and 503 female) during their life time the overall sex ratio was 92 male per 100 female birth; total abortions were 663. Preferences for male were 10%, female 15.4% and either was for 74%. The reason for male preference was to continue family lineage, to bring honor, old age security, and performing funeral rites while the reasons for daughter preferences were that they understand mothers pain, help in household work. The sex ratio of the babies born during the study period was 113 male per 100 female births. The Sex ratio at birth from 1st to 6th deliveries was 61, 79, 101, 210, 286 and 1100 male per 100 female birth respectively. Prenatal sex selection was 8% (by USG) but none had sex selected abortion. Sex ratio of those delivered during the study period was skewed (136 boys per 100 girls) towards male. There was shift in SRB in 4th and subsequent pregnancies in favor of boys. As the male sex ratio increased the number of induced abortion decreased in subsequent pregnancies.

  12. Delivering affordable cancer care in high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Sikora, Karol; Zalcberg, John; Meropol, Neal J; Amir, Eitan; Khayat, David; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe; Tannock, Ian F; Fojo, Tito; Siderov, Jim; Williamson, Steve; Camporesi, Silvia; McVie, J Gordon; Purushotham, Arnie D; Naredi, Peter; Eggermont, Alexander; Brennan, Murray F; Steinberg, Michael L; De Ridder, Mark; McCloskey, Susan A; Verellen, Dirk; Roberts, Terence; Storme, Guy; Hicks, Rodney J; Ell, Peter J; Hirsch, Bradford R; Carbone, David P; Schulman, Kevin A; Catchpole, Paul; Taylor, David; Geissler, Jan; Brinker, Nancy G; Meltzer, David; Kerr, David; Aapro, Matti

    2011-09-01

    The burden of cancer is growing, and the disease is becoming a major economic expenditure for all developed countries. In 2008, the worldwide cost of cancer due to premature death and disability (not including direct medical costs) was estimated to be US$895 billion. This is not simply due to an increase in absolute numbers, but also the rate of increase of expenditure on cancer. What are the drivers and solutions to the so-called cancer-cost curve in developed countries? How are we going to afford to deliver high quality and equitable care? Here, expert opinion from health-care professionals, policy makers, and cancer survivors has been gathered to address the barriers and solutions to delivering affordable cancer care. Although many of the drivers and themes are specific to a particular field-eg, the huge development costs for cancer medicines-there is strong concordance running through each contribution. Several drivers of cost, such as over-use, rapid expansion, and shortening life cycles of cancer technologies (such as medicines and imaging modalities), and the lack of suitable clinical research and integrated health economic studies, have converged with more defensive medical practice, a less informed regulatory system, a lack of evidence-based sociopolitical debate, and a declining degree of fairness for all patients with cancer. Urgent solutions range from re-engineering of the macroeconomic basis of cancer costs (eg, value-based approaches to bend the cost curve and allow cost-saving technologies), greater education of policy makers, and an informed and transparent regulatory system. A radical shift in cancer policy is also required. Political toleration of unfairness in access to affordable cancer treatment is unacceptable. The cancer profession and industry should take responsibility and not accept a substandard evidence base and an ethos of very small benefit at whatever cost; rather, we need delivery of fair prices and real value from new technologies

  13. Stability of thermal HFB and dissipative thermal RPA

    CERN Document Server

    Tanabe, K

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that, as for a Nilsson + pairing model, the extended stability condition of the thermal Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (THFB) solution coincides with the one of the thermal RPA (TRPA) solution unless the pairing constant G is too large. As possible extensions of the TRPA equation in alternative ways describing thermal fluctuation effect, the extended TRPA (ETRPA) and the dissipative TRPA (DTRPA) are discussed. Furthermore, the general microscopic framework of the TRPA predicts the saturation and decrease of giant resonance width in high temperature limit, i.e. the fragmentation width GAMMA sub f propor to(kT) sup ( sup - sup 3 sup ( sup 2 sup ) sup ) and the spreading width GAMMA suparrow down propor to(kT) sup ( sup - sup 1 sup ( sup 2 sup ) sup ).

  14. The limits to solar thermal electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainer, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The potential and limits of solar thermal power systems depend primarily on their capacity to meet electricity demand in mid-winter, and the associated cost, storage and other implications. Evidence on output and costs is analysed. Most attention is given to central receivers. Problems of low radiation levels, embodied energy costs, variability and storage are discussed and are found to set significant difficulties for large scale solar thermal supply in less than ideal latitudes and seasons. It is concluded that for solar thermal systems to meet a large fraction of anticipated global electricity demand in winter would involve prohibitive capital costs. - Highlights: • Output and capital cost data for various solar thermal technologies is examined. • Special attention is given to performance in winter. • Attention is also given to the effect of solar intermittency. • Implications for storage are considered. • It is concluded that there are significant limits to solar thermal power

  15. Thermal expansion: Metallic elements and alloys. [Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Kirby, R. K.; Taylor, R. E.; Desai, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The introductory sections of the work are devoted to the theory of thermal expansion of solids and to methods for the measurement of the linear thermal expansion of solids (X-ray methods, high speed methods, interferometry, push-rod dilatometry, etc.). The bulk of the work is devoted to numerical data on the thermal linear expansion of all the metallic elements, a large number of intermetallics, and a large number of binary alloy systems and multiple alloy systems. A comprehensive bibliography is provided along with an index to the materials examined.

  16. An evaluation of a collaborative bibliotherapy scheme delivered via a library service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J; Vallance, D; McGrath, M

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of a bibliotherapy scheme delivered via a local library service, in conjunction with General Practice (GP) practices, local social welfare agencies and through self-referral. The Read Yourself Well (RYW) scheme was based on principles established from other similar schemes and as a way of delivering support for adults experiencing mild to moderate mental health problems for whom clinical treatments are not appropriate. The intervention consisted of initial referral and evaluation by the scheme bibliotherapist, a one-hour session at the beginning and end of the intervention where a purpose-designed questionnaire and two mental health assessments were carried out (the General Health Questionnaire and the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation questionnaire). Contact and support from the bibliotherapist was provided during the intervention period. One hundred and fifty-seven participants were recruited to the evaluation of whom 114 provided full data. Statistical analyses of the mental health scores showed significant improvements post treatment, for, both male and female participants, for all three referral routes, and for participants who were previously library users, and those who joined the library service to participate in the RYW scheme. The results of this large sample evaluation support the proposal that library-based bibliotherapy can be effective in the treatment of mental health problems. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Internet-Delivered Exposure Therapy for Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman-Lagerlöf, Maria; Hedman-Lagerlöf, Erik; Axelsson, Erland; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Engelbrektsson, Johanna; Hultkrantz, Sofia; Lundbäck, Karolina; Björkander, Daniel; Wicksell, Rikard K; Flink, Ida; Andersson, Erik

    2018-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common and disabling chronic pain disorder, for which existing pharmacological and psychological treatments have yet yielded insufficient effects. Previous literature has shown that exposure therapy may be an effective treatment for chronic pain. This study constitutes the first randomized controlled trial evaluating exposure therapy for FM. A total of 140 participants with diagnosed FM were randomized to a 10-week Internet-delivered exposure treatment (iExp; n=70) or a waitlist control condition (WLC; n=70). Primary outcome measure were FM symptoms and impact, and secondary outcome measures were fatigue, disability, quality of life, pain-related distress and avoidance behaviors, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. Data retention was high (100% data completion at posttreatment for primary outcome, 96% at 6-month follow-up and 94% at 12-month follow-up). Results showed that participants in the iExp group made large and superior improvements compared with WLC on FM symptoms and impact (B, -1.93; z, -10.14; P<0.001, between-group Cohen d=0.90), as well as all secondary outcomes (between-group Cohen d ranging from 0.44 to 1.38) with sustained results. We conclude that iExp seems to be an efficacious treatment for FM compared with no treatment, and the results also highlight the potential increase of accessibility by using the Internet format to deliver psychological treatments for these patients. Future trials with active control conditions are warranted.

  18. Infectious polymorphic toxins delivered by outer membrane exchange discriminate kin in myxobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Christopher N; Cao, Pengbo; Conklin, Austin; Finkelstein, Hayley; Hayes, Christopher S; Wall, Daniel

    2017-08-18

    Myxobacteria are known for complex social behaviors including outer membrane exchange (OME), in which cells exchange large amounts of outer membrane lipids and proteins upon contact. The TraA cell surface receptor selects OME partners based on a variable domain. However, traA polymorphism alone is not sufficient to precisely discriminate kin. Here, we report a novel family of OME-delivered toxins that promote kin discrimination of OME partners. These SitA lipoprotein toxins are polymorphic and widespread in myxobacteria. Each sitA is associated with a cognate sitI immunity gene, and in some cases a sitB accessory gene. Remarkably, we show that SitA is transferred serially between target cells, allowing the toxins to move cell-to-cell like an infectious agent. Consequently, SitA toxins define strong identity barriers between strains and likely contribute to population structure, maintenance of cooperation, and strain diversification. Moreover, these results highlight the diversity of systems evolved to deliver toxins between bacteria.

  19. Delivering "Just-In-Time" Smoking Cessation Support Via Mobile Phones: Current Knowledge and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Felix

    2016-05-28

    Smoking lapses early on during a quit attempt are highly predictive of failing to quit. A large proportion of these lapses are driven by cravings brought about by situational and environmental cues. Use of cognitive-behavioral lapse prevention strategies to combat cue-induced cravings is associated with a reduced risk of lapse, but evidence is lacking in how these strategies can be effectively promoted. Unlike most traditional methods of delivering behavioral support, mobile phones can in principle deliver automated support, including lapse prevention strategy recommendations, Just-In-Time (JIT) for when a smoker is most vulnerable, and prevent early lapse. JIT support can be activated by smokers themselves (user-triggered), by prespecified rules (server-triggered) or through sensors that dynamically monitor a smoker's context and trigger support when a high risk environment is sensed (context-triggered), also known as a Just-In-Time Adaptive Intervention (JITAI). However, research suggests that user-triggered JIT cessation support is seldom used and existing server-triggered JIT support is likely to lack sufficient accuracy to effectively target high-risk situations in real time. Evaluations of mobile phone cessation interventions that include user and/or server-triggered JIT support have yet to adequately assess whether this improves management of high risk situations. While context-triggered systems have the greatest potential to deliver JIT support, there are, as yet, no impact evaluations of such systems. Although it may soon be feasible to learn about and monitor a smoker's context unobtrusively using their smartphone without burdensome data entry, there are several potential advantages to involving the smoker in data collection. This commentary describes the current knowledge on the potential for mobile phones to deliver automated support to help smokers manage or cope with high risk environments or situations for smoking, known as JIT support. The article

  20. Large orbit neoclassical transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    Neoclassical transport in the presence of large ion orbits is investigated. The study is motivated by the recent experimental results that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas fall below the open-quotes irreducible minimum levelclose quotes predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system. Analytical and simulation results are in agreement with trends from experiments. The development of a general formalism for neoclassical transport theory with finite orbit width is also discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  1. Effectiveness of a baking soda toothpaste delivering calcium and phosphate in reducing dentinal hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, A; Hooper, W; Winston, A E; Sowinski, J; Bowman, J; Sharma, N

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this controlled clinical trial was to determine the effectiveness and safety of a single-phase dentifrice that delivers calcium, phosphate, and fluoride to the tooth surface (Arm & Hammer Enamel Care for Sensitive Teeth toothpaste, United Kingdom) in reducing dentinal hypersensitivity. Two-hundred and eight qualifying subjects were randomly assigned to either the Enamel Care dentifrice group or a control dentifrice group, and brushed twice daily with their assigned dentifrice for eight weeks. Pain/discomfort in response to a thermal stimulus was assessed at baseline, week 4, and week 8 using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS; primary outcome variable) and the Schiff Thermal Sensitivity Scale (STSS; secondary outcome variable). After eight weeks, volunteers from the Enamel Care group were switched to the control dentifrice and participated in a second eight-week study to determine the degree of persistence of pain reduction. Both groups had statistically significant VAS score reductions from baseline at weeks 4 and 8, with mean VAS scores in the Enamel Care group decreasing by 45.6% at week 4 and 61.1% at week 8 (p < 0.0001). Enamel Care was statistically significantly more effective than the control at weeks 4 and 8, with respective mean VAS reductions of 63% (p < 0.0001) and 33% (p = 0.0004) greater than the control. Consistent with the VAS score results, the Enamel Care group had respective statistically significant STSS score reductions of 77% and 58% greater than the control group (p < 0.0001). The reductions in dentinal hypersensitivity seen in the Enamel Care group at week 8 persisted for an additional eight weeks, during which the subjects discontinued use of Enamel Care and brushed with the control dentifrice. Enamel Care for Sensitive Teeth toothpaste (United Kingdom) is an effective dentifrice for the management of dentinal hypersensitivity, and its efficacy persists for a least eight weeks following discontinued product use.

  2. Applicability of advanced automotive heat engines to solar thermal power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beremand, D. G.; Evans, D. G.; Alger, D. L.

    The requirements of a solar thermal power system are reviewed and compared with the predicted characteristics of automobile engines under development. A good match is found in terms of power level and efficiency when the automobile engines, designed for maximum powers of 65-100 kW (87 to 133 hp) are operated to the nominal 20-40 kW electric output requirement of the solar thermal application. At these reduced power levels it appears that the automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines have the potential to deliver the 40+ percent efficiency goal of the solar thermal program.

  3. Thermal conductivity issues of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, U.; Raetzer-Scheibe, H.J.; Saruhan, B. [DLR - German Aerospace Center, Institute of Materials Research, 51170 Cologne (Germany); Renteria, A.F. [BTU, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The thermal conductivity of electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was investigated by the Laser Flash technique. Sample type and methodology of data analyses as well as atmosphere during the measurement have some influence on the data. A large variation of the thermal conductivity was found by changes in TBC microstructure. Exposure at high temperature caused sintering of the porous microstructure that finally increased thermal conductivity up to 30 %. EB-PVD TBCs show a distinct thickness dependence of the thermal conductivity due to the anisotropic microstructure in thickness direction. Thin TBCs had a 20 % lower thermal conductivity than thick coatings. New compositions of the ceramic top layer offer the largest potential to lower thermal conductivity. Values down to 0.8W/(mK) have been already demonstrated with virgin coatings of pyrochlore compositions. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Die Waermeleitfaehigkeit von elektronenstrahl-aufgedampften (EB-PVD) Waermedaemmschichten (TBCs) wurde mittels Laser-Flash untersucht. Probentyp, Messmethodik und die Atmosphaere waehrend der Messung haben einen Einfluss auf die Ergebnisse. Aenderungen in der Mikrostruktur der TBC fuehrten zu grossen Unterschieden der Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Eine Hochtemperaturbelastung verursachte Sintervorgaenge in der poroesen Mikrostruktur, was die Waermeleitfaehigkeit um bis zu 30 % ansteigen liess. EB-PVD TBCs zeigen eine deutliche Dickenabhaengigkeit der Waermeleitfaehigkeit durch die Anisotropie der Mikrostruktur in dieser Richtung. Duenne TBCs haben eine um 20 % geringere Waermeleitfaehigkeit als dicke Schichten. Neue Zusammensetzungen der keramischen Deckschicht bieten die groessten Moeglichkeiten fuer eine Reduktion der Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Werte bis zu 0,8 W/(mK) wurden damit bereits erreicht. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Theory of thermal sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1977-01-01

    An energetic ion which is incident on a solid target causes a momentary temperature increase in the impact region, i.e., a so-called thermal spike occurs. Such spikes are capable of causing (or supplementing) disordering, precipitation, crystallization, electronic excitation, stoichiometry change, desorption, and sputtering, it being the contribution to sputtering that is considered here. The approach used is compatible with modern damage-distribution theory. Thus the temperature profile left by the incident ion is taken as a three-dimensional Gaussian with parameters appropriate to power-law scattering, and is used as the initial condition for solving the heat-conduction equation. Let us write this solution as T = T(t, y), where t is time and y is a dimension parallel to the target surface. The vaporization flux from a solid surface is taken as pnsup(1/2)(2π 2 >kT)sup(-1/2), where p, the equilibrium pressure of a vapor species containing n atoms, can be written as p 0 exp(-L/T), p 0 and L are constants largely independent of temperature, and 2 > is the mean mass per atom of target. An equation for the thermal sputtering coefficient is given: after integration the final result takes the form: Ssub(thermal)=pnsup(1/2)[2π 2 >k(Tsub(infinity)+cΔT 0 )]sup(-1/2)πlambda 2 tsub(eff.)atoms/ion, where Tsub(infinity) is the macroscopic target temperature, cΔT 0 is the maximum temperature increase at x = y = 0, p is to be evaluated at T = Tsub(infinity) + cΔT 0 , lambda is the mean atomic spacing of the target, and tsub(eff.) is a quantity with units of time. (author)

  5. Thermalization of squeezed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a thermal squeezed state defined as a conventional thermal state based on an appropriate Hamiltonian, we show how an important physical property, the signal-to-noise ratio, is degraded, and propose a simple model of thermalization (Kraus thermalization)

  6. Predicting the effects of organ motion on the dose delivered by dynamic intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Jaffray, David; Martinez, A.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    of several breathing cycles. To simplify the analysis, the three-dimensional target was projected to one depth level and the movements of the target along beam direction were assumed to have negligible effects. Results: The dose variations in the target due to the interplay of the target motion and the movement of the beam aperture can be large, over 100% (peak-to-peak) for a clinically realistic range of the speed of collimator travel and size of field segments. Predictions using the numerical model agreed with results measured with a moving phantom. The magnitude of the dose variations in the target showed strong dependence on the collimator speed relative to the speed of the target motion, and the size of field segments relative to the amplitude of target motion. The dose variation was small when the speed of field boundary variation is very low. The dose variation decreased with the size of the field segments. When the treatment was delivered in multiple fractions, the desired beam intensities were smoothed, defeating the purpose of intensity modulation. Conclusion: A simple model was developed to analyze the dosimetric effects of target movement during delivery of dynamic intensity modulation. The dose distributions in a moving target can be predicted before an intensity-modulated treatment is delivered. In regions where the target moves during irradiation, the detrimental dosimetric effects could be significant and cannot be neglected. In such cases, methods of fixing the target position, such as gating or breathing control, are required for dynamic intensity modulation to be delivered

  7. Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Krauss, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The project examined the effectiveness of studying the creep behavior of thermal barrier coating system through the use of a general purpose, large strain finite element program, NIKE2D. Constitutive models implemented in this code were applied to simulate thermal-elastic and creep behavior. Four separate ceramic-bond coat interface geometries were examined in combination with a variety of constitutive models and material properties. The reason for focusing attention on the ceramic-bond coat interface is that prior studies have shown that cracking occurs in the ceramic near interface features which act as stress concentration points. The model conditions examined include: (1) two bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion curves; (2) the creep coefficient and creep exponent of the bond coat for steady state creep; (3) the interface geometry; and (4) the material model employed to represent the bond coat, ceramic, and superalloy base.

  8. Thermal aspects of a superconducting coil for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models are used to simulate both localized and extensive thermal excursions in a large superconducting magnet for fusion reactor. Conditions for the failure of fusion magnet due to thermal excursion are delineated. Designs to protect the magnet against such thermal excursion are evaluated

  9. Savings on natural gas consumption by doubling thermal efficiencies of balanced-flue space heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juanico, Luis E. [Conicet, and Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Gonzalez, Alejandro D. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales, Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medio Ambiente (Inibioma-Conicet), 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas is a relatively clean fossil fuel for space heating. However, when it is not used efficiently high consumption can become an environmental problem. In Argentina, individual balanced-flue space heaters are the most extensively used in temperate and cold regions. This furnace is a simple device with a burner set into a metal chamber, separated from the indoor ambient by an enclosing cabinet, and both inlet and outgas chimneys are connected to the outdoor ambient. In previous studies, we measured the performance of these commercial devices, and found very low thermal efficiency (in the range of 39-63% depending on the chimney configuration). The extensive use of these devices is possible due to the availability of unlimited amount of subsidised natural gas to households and businesses. In the present work, we developed a prototype with simple and low cost modifications made on commercial models, and measured the improvements on the thermal efficiency. Findings showed better infrared radiation, enhanced indoor air convection, and passive chimney flow regulation leading to thermal efficiency in the range of 75-85%. These values represent an improvement of 100% when compared to marketed models, and hence, the specific cost of the heater per unit of useful heating power delivered was actually reduced. Considering the large market presence of these furnaces in both residential and business sectors in Argentina, the potential benefits related to gas consumption and environmental emissions are very significant. (author)

  10. Delivering on Industry Equipment Reliability Goals By Leveraging an Integration Platform and Decision Support Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coveney, Maureen K.; Bailey, W. Henry; Parkinson, William

    2004-01-01

    Utilities have invested in many costly enterprise systems - computerized maintenance management systems, document management systems, enterprise grade portals, to name but a few - and often very specialized systems, like data historians, high end diagnostic systems, and other focused and point solutions. From recent industry reports, we now know that the average nuclear power utilizes on average 1900 systems to perform daily work, of which 250 might facilitate the equipment reliability decision-making process. The time has come to leverage the investment in these systems by providing a common platform for integration and decision-making that will further the collective industry aim of enhancing the reliability of our nuclear generation assets to maintain high plant availability and to deliver on plant life extension goals without requiring additional large scale investment in IT infrastructure. (authors)

  11. Delivering the Goods: Scaling out Results of Natural Resource Management Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Harrington

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To help integrated natural resource management (INRM research "deliver the goods" for many of the world's poor over a large area and in a timely manner, the authors suggest a problem-solving approach that facilitates the scaling out of relevant agricultural practices. They propose seven ways to foster scaling out: (1 develop more attractive practices and technologies through participatory research (2 balance supply-driven approaches with resource user demands, (3 use feedback to redefine the research agenda, (4 encourage support groups and networks for information sharing, (5 facilitate negotiation among stakeholders, (6 inform policy change and institutional development, and (7 make sensible use of information management tools, including models and geographic information systems (GIS. They also draw on experiences in Mesoamerica, South Asia, and southern Africa to describe useful information management tools, including site similarity analyses, the linking of simulation models with GIS, and the use of farmer and land type categories.

  12. Excessive sodium ions delivered into cells by nanodiamonds: implications for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Li, Wenxin; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Chen, Nan; Sun, Yanhong; Chen, Wen; Tai, Renzhong; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Qing

    2012-06-11

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess many excellent physical and chemical properties that make them attractive materials for applications in biomedicine. In this paper, the adsorption and delivery of a large amount of sodium ions into the cell interior by NDs in serum-free medium is demonstrated. The excess sodium ions inside the cells induce osmotic stresses followed by cell swelling and an increase in the intracellular levels of calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to severe cellular damage. In complete culture medium, however, serum proteins wrapped around the NDs effectively prevent the sodium ions from adsorbing onto the NDs, and thus the NDs show no cytotoxicity. This work is the first to elaborate on the correlation between the sodium ions adsorbed on the nanomaterials and their bio-effects. Excessive ions delivered into cells by NDs might have potential applications in tumor therapy. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Multiplex CARS imaging with spectral notch shaped laser pulses delivered by optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Soohyun

    2017-12-11

    We present an experimental demonstration of single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) using a spectrally shaped broadband laser that is delivered by an optical fiber to a sample at its distal end. The optical fiber consists of a fiber Bragg grating component to serve as a narrowband notch filter and a combined large-mode-area fiber to transmit such shaped ultrashort laser pulses without spectral distortion in a long distance. Experimentally, our implementation showed a capability to measure CARS spectra of various samples with molecular vibrations in the fingerprint region. Furthermore, CARS imaging of poly(methyl methacrylate) bead samples was carried out successfully under epi-CARS geometry in which backward-scattered CARS signals were collected into a multimode optical fiber. A compatibility of single-pulse CARS scheme with fiber optics, verified in this study, implies a potential for future realization of compact all-fiber CARS spectroscopic imaging systems.

  14. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  15. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dear, R J; Akimoto, T; Arens, E A; Brager, G; Candido, C; Cheong, K W D; Li, B; Nishihara, N; Sekhar, S C; Tanabe, S; Toftum, J; Zhang, H; Zhu, Y

    2013-12-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has taken place in thermal comfort thinking over the last 20 years; a shift away from the physically based determinism of Fanger's comfort model toward the mainstream and acceptance of the adaptive comfort model. Another noticeable shift has been from the undesirable toward the desirable qualities of air movement. Additionally, sophisticated models covering the physics and physiology of the human body were developed, driven by the continuous challenge to model thermal comfort at the same anatomical resolution and to combine these localized signals into a coherent, global thermal perception. Finally, the demand for ever increasing building energy efficiency is pushing technological innovation in the way we deliver comfortable indoor environments. These trends, in turn, continue setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research for the next decades. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison of nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivered by seven ventilators using simulated neonatal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevhammar, Thomas; Nilsson, Kjell; Zetterström, Henrik; Jonsson, Baldvin

    2013-05-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is an established treatment for respiratory distress in neonates. Most modern ventilators are able to provide NCPAP. There have been no large studies examining the properties of NCPAP delivered by ventilators. The aim of this study was to compare pressure stability and imposed work of breathing (iWOB) for NCPAP delivered by ventilators using simulated neonatal breathing. Experimental in vitro study. Research laboratory in Sweden. None. Neonatal breathing was simulated using a mechanical lung simulator. Seven ventilators were tested at different CPAP levels using two breath profiles. Pressure stability and iWOB were determined. Results from three ventilators revealed that they provided a slight pressure support. For these ventilators, iWOB could not be calculated. There were large differences in pressure stability and iWOB between the tested ventilators. For simulations using the 3.4-kg breath profile, the pressure swings around the mean pressure were more than five times greater, and iWOB more than four times higher, for the system with the highest measured values compared with the system with the lowest. Overall, the Fabian ventilator was the most pressure stable system. Evita XL and SERVO-i were found more pressure stable than Fabian in some simulations. The results for iWOB were in accordance with pressure stability for systems that allowed determination of this variable. Some of the tested ventilators unexpectedly provided a minor degree of pressure support. In terms of pressure stability, we have not found any advantages of ventilators as a group compared with Bubble CPAP, Neopuff, and variable flow generators that were tested in our previous study. The variation between individual systems is great within both categories. The clinical importance of these findings needs further investigation.

  17. Little Brother Joins the Large Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    On the night of 15 December 2006, the fourth and last-to-be-installed VLTI Auxiliary Telescope (AT4) obtained its 'First Light'. The first images demonstrate that AT4 will be able to deliver the excellent image quality already delivered by the first three ATs. It will soon join its siblings to perform routinely interferometric measurements. ESO PR Photo 51a/06 ESO PR Photo 51a/06 VLT Auxiliary Telescope The VLT is composed of four 8.2-m Unit Telescope (Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun). They have been progressively put into service together with a vast suite of the most advanced astronomical instruments and are operated every night in the year. Contrary to other large astronomical telescopes, the VLT was designed from the beginning with the use of interferometry as a major goal. The VLT Interferometer (VLTI) combines starlight captured by two or three 8.2- VLT Unit Telescopes, dramatically increasing the spatial resolution and showing fine details of a large variety of celestial objects. ESO PR Photo 51b/06 ESO PR Photo 51b/06 One AT Under the Sky However, most of the time the large telescopes are used for other research purposes. They are therefore only available for interferometric observations during a limited number of nights every year. Thus, in order to exploit the VLTI each night and to achieve the full potential of this unique setup, some other (smaller), dedicated telescopes were included into the overall VLT concept. These telescopes, known as the VLTI Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), are mounted on tracks and can be placed at precisely defined "parking" observing positions on the observatory platform. From these positions, their light beams are fed into the same common focal point via a complex system of reflecting mirrors mounted in an underground system of tunnels. The Auxiliary Telescopes are real technological jewels. They are placed in ultra-compact enclosures, complete with all necessary electronics, an air conditioning system and cooling liquid for

  18. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDI VOL ) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to compare doses delivered in low dose chest CT with chest X-ray doses. CTDI VOL and DLP doses were taken to analysis from routine CT chest examinations (64 MDCT TK LIGHT SPEED GE Medical System) performed in 202 adult patients with FBP reconstruction: 51 low dose, 106 helical, 20 angio CT, and 25 high resolution CT protocols, as well as 19 helical protocols with iterative ASIR reconstruction. The analysis of chest X-ray doses was made on the basis of reports from 44 examinations. Mean values of CTDI VOL and DLP were, respectively: 2.1 mGy and 85.1 mGy·cm, for low dose, 9.7 mGy and 392.3 mGy·cm for helical, 18.2 mGy and 813.9 mGy·cm for angio CT, 2.3 mGy and 64.4 mGy·cm for high resolution CT, 8.9 mGy. and 317.6 mGy·cm for helical ASIR protocols. Significantly lower CTDI VOL and DLP values were observed for low dose and high resolution CT versus the remaining CT protocols; doses delivered in CT ASIR protocols were also lower (80–81%). The ratio between medial doses in low dose CT and chest X-ray was 11.56. Radiation dose in extended chest LDCT with parameters allowing for identification of mediastinal structures and adrenal glands is still much lower than that in standard CT protocols. Effective doses predicted for LDCT may exceed those used in chest X-ray examinations by a factor of 4 to 12, depending on LDCT scan parameters. Our results, as well as results from other authors, suggest a possibility of reducing the dose by means of iterative reconstruction. Efforts towards further dose

  19. Global thermal coal trade outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, E.

    2008-01-01

    Wood Mackenzie operates coal consulting offices in several cities around the world and is the number one consulting company in terms of global coal coverage. The company offers a unique mine-by-mine research methodology, and owns a proprietary modeling system for coal and power market forecasting. This presentation provided an overview of global thermal markets as well as recent market trends. Seaborne markets have an impact on price far greater than the volume of trade would imply. Research has also demonstrated that the global thermal coal market is divided between the Pacific and Atlantic Basins. The current status of several major coal exporting countries such as Canada, the United States, Venezuela, Colombia, Indonesia, Australia, China, South Africa, and Russia was displayed in an illustration. The presentation included several graphs indicating that the seaborne thermal coal market is highly concentrated; traditional coal flow and pricing trends shift as Asian demand growth and supply constraints lead to chronic under supply; coal prices have risen to historic highs in recent times; and, the Asian power sector demand is a major driver of future growth. The correlation between oil and gas markets to thermal coal was illustrated along with two scenarios of coal use in the United States in a carbon-constrained world. The impact of carbon legislation on coal demand from selected coal regions in the United States was also discussed. Wood Mackenzie forecasts a very strong growth in global thermal coal demand, driven largely by emerging Asian economies. tabs., figs

  20. Thermal behavior of natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal behavior of natural zeolites impacts their application and identification and varies significantly from zeolite to zeolite. Zeolites evolve H 2 0 upon heating, but recent data show that distinct ''types'' of water (e.g., loosely bound or tightly bound zeolitic water) do not exist. Rather water is bound primarily to extra-framework cations with a continuum of energies, giving rise to pseudocontinuous loss of water accompanied by a dynamic interaction between remaining H 2 0 molecules and extra-framework cations. These interactions in the channels of zeolites give rise to dehydration dependent on the extra-framework cation, in addition to temperature and water vapor pressure. The dehydration reaction and the extra-framework cation also affect the thermal expansion/contraction. Most zeolites undergo dehydration-induced contractions that may be anisotropic, although minor thermal expansion can be seen with some zeolites. Such contractions can be partially or completely irreversible if they involve modifications of the tetrahedral framework and/or if rehydration is sluggish. Thermally induced structural modifications are also driven initially by dehydration and the concomitant contraction and migration of extra-framework cations. Contraction is accommodated by rotations of structural units and tetrahedral cation-oxygen linkages may break. Thermal reactions that involve breaking of tetrahedral cation-oxygen bonds markedly irreversible and may be kinetically limited, producing large differences between short- and long-term heating

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Golden Eagle Delivers Beer With Natural Gas Trucks on Twitter Bookmark

  2. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Solar thermal electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasemagha, Khairy Ramadan

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of modeling the thermal performance and economic feasibility of large (utility scale) and small solar thermal power plants for electricity generation. A number of solar concepts for power systems applications have been investigated. Each concept has been analyzed over a range of plant power ratings from 1 MW(sub e) to 300 MW(sub e) and over a range of capacity factors from a no-storage case (capacity factor of about 0.25 to 0.30) up to intermediate load capacity factors in the range of 0.46 to 0.60. The solar plant's economic viability is investigated by examining the effect of various parameters on the plant costs (both capital and O & M) and the levelized energy costs (LEC). The cost components are reported in six categories: collectors, energy transport, energy storage, energy conversion, balance of plant, and indirect/contingency costs. Concentrator and receiver costs are included in the collector category. Thermal and electric energy transport costs are included in the energy transport category. Costs for the thermal or electric storage are included in the energy storage category; energy conversion costs are included in the energy conversion category. The balance of plant cost category comprises the structures, land, service facilities, power conditioning, instrumentation and controls, and spare part costs. The indirect/contingency category consists of the indirect construction and the contingency costs. The concepts included in the study are (1) molten salt cavity central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-C-Salt); (2) molten salt external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Salt); (3) sodium external central receiver with sodium storage (PFCR/RE-Na); (4) sodium external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Na/Salt); (5) water/steam external central receiver with oil/rock storage (PFCR/R-E-W/S); (6) parabolic dish with stirling engine conversion and lead acid battery storage (PFDR/SLAB); (7) parabolic dish

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets in Helium – the electric field and the charge delivered to a dielectric surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobota, A.; Slikboer, E.T.; Guaitella, O.Y.N.

    2015-01-01

    The family of non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges has been the focus of intense research of a large number of research groups in the last fifteen years, as they are easy and cheap to assemble and run, and exhibit properties that can be used in surface treatment or biological applications. In

  5. Can the capitalist economic system deliver environmental justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Can a healthy environment for all social groups be delivered through capitalism via market mechanisms? Or is it the capitalist system, itself, that has been at the root of the environmental and social crises we now face? This letter engages with this ongoing debate by drawing on material from a wider study, ‘Achieving Environmental Justice’, which examined the extent, form and causes of environmental justice and injustice in a range of countries with varying depths of marketization—United States, South Korea, United Kingdom, Sweden, China, Bolivia and Cuba. The analysis described here focuses on the interview material from this mixed methods study, drawing on over 140 interviews with officials, policy makers, and civil society leaders. The letter argues that there is an apparent propensity for capitalist processes to exacerbate, rather than reduce, environmental problems and inequities though the pursuit of relentless economic growth and profit accumulation. Therefore, we should perhaps let go of efforts to resolve environmental injustice within the constraints of capitalism and, instead, build an alternative economic system that can meet human needs in the context of a harmonious and respectful relationship with nature.

  6. Public Private Partnership Benefits in Delivering Public Facilities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of infrastructure in developing country such as Malaysia was increasingly founded by the Public–Private Partnership (PPP scheme. Collaboration with private sector has become popular as a means to improve the delivery of public facilities. Yet, empirical evidence on how PPP initiative has benefits the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context is lagging. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the perception of stakeholders on the benefits of adopting PPP in delivering public facilities in Malaysia. Literature review was carried out to identify PPP benefits, which were then incorporated into the questionnaire. The mean score and mean score ranking was conducted to assess the agreement level of stakeholders towards the PPP benefits. The overall findings show that the implementation of PPP has benefitted the delivery of public facilities in both financial and non-financial aspects. From the analysis, improvement in service quality is perceived as the top advantage followed by innovation in design and transfer of risk. The findings provide more informed basis on the rationale of PPP implementation and its potential in improving the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context.

  7. Increasing capacity to deliver diabetes self-management education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, M. E.; Mandalia, P. K.; Daly, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. Methods: We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2 di...... educator role can provide equivalent patient benefits. This could provide a method that increases capacity, maintains quality and is cost-effective, while increasing access to self-management education.......Aim: To develop and test a format of delivery of diabetes self-management education by paired professional and lay educators. Methods: We conducted an equivalence trial with non-randomized participant allocation to a Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed Type 2...... diabetes (DESMOND) course, delivered in the standard format by two trained healthcare professional educators (to the control group) or by one trained lay educator and one professional educator (to the intervention group). A total of 260 people with Type 2 diabetes diagnosed within the previous 12 months...

  8. Habitable Worlds: Delivering on the Promises of Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, Lev B.; Mead, Chris; Belinson, Zack; Buxner, Sanlyn; Semken, Steven; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2018-01-01

    Critical thinking and scientific reasoning are central to higher education in the United States, but many courses (in-person and online) teach students information about science much more than they teach the actual process of science and its associated knowledge and skills. In the online arena specifically, the tools available for course construction exacerbate this problem by making it difficult to build the types of active learning activities that research shows to be the most effective. Here, we present a report on Habitable Worlds, offered by Arizona State University for 12 semesters over the past 6 years. This is a unique online course that uses an array of novel technologies to deliver an active, inquiry-driven learning experience. Learning outcomes and quantitative data from more than 3000 students demonstrate the success of our approach but also identify several remaining challenges. The design and development of this course offers valuable lessons for instructional designers and educators who are interested in fully capitalizing on the capabilities of 21st-century technology to achieve educational goals.

  9. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Bonetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  10. Can natural polymers assist in delivering insulin orally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Mokhamad; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most grave and lethal non communicable diseases. Insulin is normally used to medicate diabetes. Due to bioavailability issues, the most regular route of administration is through injection, which may pose compliance problems to treatment. The oral administration thus appears as a suitable alternative, but with several important problems. Low stability of insulin in the gastrointestinal tract and low intestinal permeation are some of the issues. Encapsulation of insulin into polymer-based particles emerges as a plausible strategy. Different encapsulation approaches and polymers have been used in this regard. Polymers with different characteristics from natural or synthetic origin have been assessed to attain this goal, with natural polymers being preferable. Natural polymers studied so far include chitosan, alginate, carrageenan, starch, pectin, casein, tragacanth, dextran, carrageenan, gelatine and cyclodextrin. While some promising knowledge and results have been gained, a polymeric-based particle system to deliver insulin orally has not been introduced onto the market yet. In this review, effectiveness of different natural polymer materials developed so far along with fabrication techniques are evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomarkers: Delivering on the expectation of molecularly driven, quantitative health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer L; Altman, Russ B

    2018-02-01

    Biomarkers are the pillars of precision medicine and are delivering on expectations of molecular, quantitative health. These features have made clinical decisions more precise and personalized, but require a high bar for validation. Biomarkers have improved health outcomes in a few areas such as cancer, pharmacogenetics, and safety. Burgeoning big data research infrastructure, the internet of things, and increased patient participation will accelerate discovery in the many areas that have not yet realized the full potential of biomarkers for precision health. Here we review themes of biomarker discovery, current implementations of biomarkers for precision health, and future opportunities and challenges for biomarker discovery. Impact statement Precision medicine evolved because of the understanding that human disease is molecularly driven and is highly variable across patients. This understanding has made biomarkers, a diverse class of biological measurements, more relevant for disease diagnosis, monitoring, and selection of treatment strategy. Biomarkers' impact on precision medicine can be seen in cancer, pharmacogenomics, and safety. The successes in these cases suggest many more applications for biomarkers and a greater impact for precision medicine across the spectrum of human disease. The authors assess the status of biomarker-guided medical practice by analyzing themes for biomarker discovery, reviewing the impact of these markers in the clinic, and highlight future and ongoing challenges for biomarker discovery. This work is timely and relevant, as the molecular, quantitative approach of precision medicine is spreading to many disease indications.

  12. Delivering effective science communication: advice from a professional science communicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Sam

    2017-10-01

    Science communication is becoming ever more prevalent, with more and more scientists expected to not only communicate their research to a wider public, but to do so in an innovative and engaging manner. Given the other commitments that researchers and academics are required to fulfil as part of their workload models, it is unfair to be expect them to also instantly produce effective science communication events and activities. However, by thinking carefully about what it is that needs to be communicated, and why this is being done, it is possible to develop high-quality activities that are of benefit to both the audience and the communicator(s). In this paper, I present some practical advice for developing, delivering and evaluating effective science communication initiatives, based on over a decade of experience as being a professional science communicator. I provide advice regarding event logistics, suggestions on how to successfully market and advertise your science communication initiatives, and recommendations for establishing effective branding and legacy. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Delivering Key Graduate Attributes via Teams Working in Virtual Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn Brodie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transferable skills are gaining an increasing emphasis in engineering education. The skills of teamwork, communication, self directed learning and problem solving feature in most of the accrediting agencies criteria. This paper is a case study of a course which uses Problem Based Learning method to deliver key transferable skills to engineering students studying via distance education The students use a range of communication systems including a Learning Management System which offers synchronous and asynchronous communications to work in a team where there is no face to face contact between either the team members or with the supervising academic. The teams solve open ended, contextualised engineering problems. These teams form a learning community which scaffolds individual and team learning goals. Results from a longitudinal study show that students significantly increase their teamwork, communication, problem solving and self directed learning skills. These are key graduate attributes now required by professional accreditation bodies. In addition specific theoretical and technical skills and knowledge are learnt and applied to new problems.

  14. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral treatment for adolescents with chronic pain and their parents: a randomized controlled multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Fales, Jessica; Bromberg, Maggie H; Jessen-Fiddick, Tricia; Tai, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Internet-delivered interventions are emerging as a strategy to address barriers to care for individuals with chronic pain. This is the first large multicenter randomized controlled trial of Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric chronic pain. Participants included were 273 adolescents (205 females and 68 males), aged 11 to 17 years with mixed chronic pain conditions and their parents, who were randomly assigned in a parallel-group design to Internet-delivered CBT (n = 138) or Internet-delivered Education (n = 135). Assessments were completed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. All data collection and procedures took place online. The primary analysis used linear growth models. Results demonstrated significantly greater reduction on the primary outcome of activity limitations from baseline to 6-month follow-up for Internet CBT compared with Internet education (b = -1.13, P = 0.03). On secondary outcomes, significant beneficial effects of Internet CBT were found on sleep quality (b = 0.14, P = 0.04), on reducing parent miscarried helping (b = -2.66, P = 0.007) and protective behaviors (b = -0.19, P = 0.001), and on treatment satisfaction (P values parent-perceived impact (ie, reductions in depression, anxiety, self-blame about their adolescent's pain, and improvement in parent behavioral responses to pain). In conclusion, our Internet-delivered CBT intervention produced a number of beneficial effects on adolescent and parent outcomes, and could ultimately lead to wide dissemination of evidence-based psychological pain treatment for youth and their families.

  15. Predictors and moderators of response to internet-delivered Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, T; Batterham, P J; Warmerdam, L; Bennett, K; Bennett, A; Cuijpers, P; Griffiths, K M; Christensen, H

    2013-10-01

    By identifying which predictors and moderators lead to beneficial outcomes, accurate selection of the best initial treatment will have significant benefits for depressed individuals. An automated, fully self-guided randomized controlled internet-delivered noninferiority trial was conducted comparing two new interventions (Interpersonal Psychotherapy [IPT; n=620] and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy [CBT; n=610]) to an active control intervention (MoodGYM; n=613) over a period of 4 weeks to spontaneous visitors of an internet-delivered therapy website (e-couch). A range of putative predictors and moderators (socio-demographic characteristics [age, gender, marital status, education level], clinical characteristics [depression/anxiety symptoms, disability, quality of life, medication use], skills [mastery and dysfunctional attitudes] and treatment preference) were assessed using internet-delivered self-report measures at baseline and immediately following treatment and at six months follow-up. Analyses were conducted using Mixed Model Repeated Measures (MMRM). Female gender, lower mastery and lower dysfunctional attitudes predicted better outcome at post-test and/or follow-up regardless of intervention. No overall differential effects for condition on depression as a function of outcome were found. However, based on time-specific estimates, a significant interaction effect of age was found. For younger people, internet-delivered IPT may be the preferred treatment choice, whereas older participants derive more benefits from internet-delivered CBT programs. Although the sample of participants was large, power to detect moderator effects was still lacking. Different e-mental health programs may be more beneficial for specific age groups. The findings raise important possibilities for increasing depression treatment effectiveness and improving clinical practice guidelines for depression treatment of different age groups. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal characteristics of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators for treating chest wall recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P F; Craciunescu, O I; Stauffer, P R; Schlorff, J L

    2010-01-01

    . Lower bolus temperature may be chosen to reduce the thermal enhancement ratio (TER) in the most sensitive skin where maximum radiation dose is delivered and to extend the thermal enhancement of radiation dose deeper. This computational study indicates that well-localized elevation of tumor target temperature to 40-44 deg. C can be accomplished by large surface-conforming TBSAs using appropriate selection of coupling bolus temperature.

  17. Multiple thermal transitions and anisotropic thermal expansions of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'akobovitz, Assaf

    2016-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) hold the potential to play an instrumental role in a wide variety of applications in micro- and nano-devices and composites. However, their successful large-scale implementation in engineering systems requires a thorough understanding of their material properties, including their thermal behavior, which was the focus of the current study. Thus, the thermal expansion of as-grown VA-CNT microstructures was investigated while increasing the temperature from room temperature to 800 °C and then cooling it down. First thermal transition was observed at 191 ± 68 °C during heating, and an additional thermal transition was observed at 523 ± 138 °C during heating and at similar temperatures during cooling. Each thermal transition was characterized by a significant change in the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), which can be related to a morphological change in the VA-CNT microstructures. Measurements of the CTEs in the lateral directions revealed differences in the lateral thermal behaviors of the top, middle, and bottom portions of the VA-CNT microstructures, again indicating that their morphology dominates their thermal characteristics. A hysteretic behavior was observed, as the measured values of CTEs were altered due to the applied thermal loads and the height of the microstructures was slightly higher compared to its initial value. These findings provide an insight into the anisotropic thermal behavior of VA-CNT microstructures and shed light on the relationship between their morphology and thermal behavior.

  18. Factors Affecting the Thickness of Thermal Aureoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Annen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Intrusions of magma induce thermal aureoles in the country rock. Analytical solutions predict that the thickness of an aureole is proportional to the thickness of the intrusion. However, in the field, thermal aureoles are often significantly thinner or wider than predicted by simple thermal models. Numerical models show that thermal aureoles are wider if the heat transfer in the magma is faster than in the country rock due to contrasts in thermal diffusivities or the effect of magma convection. Large thermal aureoles can also be caused by repeated injection close to the contact. Aureoles are thin when heat transfer in the country rock is faster than heat transfer within the magma or in case of incrementally, slowly emplaced magma. Absorption of latent heat due to metamorphic reactions or water volatilization also affects thermal aureoles but to a lesser extent. The way these parameters affect the thickness of a thermal aureole depends on the isotherm under consideration, hence on which metamorphic phase is used to draw the limit of the aureole. Thermal aureoles provide insight on the dynamics of intrusions emplacement. Although available examples are limited, asymmetric aureoles point to magma emplacement by over-accretion for mafic cases and by under-accretion for felsic cases, consistent with geochronological data.

  19. Toward automated face detection in thermal and polarimetric thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher; Acosta, Mark; Short, Nathan; Hu, Shuowen; Chan, Alex L.

    2016-05-01

    Visible spectrum face detection algorithms perform pretty reliably under controlled lighting conditions. However, variations in illumination and application of cosmetics can distort the features used by common face detectors, thereby degrade their detection performance. Thermal and polarimetric thermal facial imaging are relatively invariant to illumination and robust to the application of makeup, due to their measurement of emitted radiation instead of reflected light signals. The objective of this work is to evaluate a government off-the-shelf wavelet based naïve-Bayes face detection algorithm and a commercial off-the-shelf Viola-Jones cascade face detection algorithm on face imagery acquired in different spectral bands. New classifiers were trained using the Viola-Jones cascade object detection framework with preprocessed facial imagery. Preprocessing using Difference of Gaussians (DoG) filtering reduces the modality gap between facial signatures across the different spectral bands, thus enabling more correlated histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) features to be extracted from the preprocessed thermal and visible face images. Since the availability of training data is much more limited in the thermal spectrum than in the visible spectrum, it is not feasible to train a robust multi-modal face detector using thermal imagery alone. A large training dataset was constituted with DoG filtered visible and thermal imagery, which was subsequently used to generate a custom trained Viola-Jones detector. A 40% increase in face detection rate was achieved on a testing dataset, as compared to the performance of a pre-trained/baseline face detector. Insights gained in this research are valuable in the development of more robust multi-modal face detectors.

  20. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E; Cui, Y; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P

    2010-01-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  1. Protein Nanoscaffolds for Delivering Toxic Inorganic Cargo to Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioloboc, Daniela

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs or prodrugs to tumors can minimize systemic toxicity and side effects. This study develops platforms for targeted delivery of two potentially less systemically toxic prodrugs by exploiting the native and/or bioinorganic properties of two ferritins, both of which function naturally as iron storage proteins. Two delivery approaches were investigated. The first system was designed to serve as either an enhancement or alternative to traditional photodynamic therapy by generating hydroxyl radical in addition to singlet oxygen as the toxic reactive oxygen species. This system used Escherichia coli bacterioferritin (Bfr) loaded with 2,500 irons and multiple zinc-porphyrin (ZnP) photosensitizers. Ferrous iron was released by photoreduction of ferric iron stored within the Bfr protein shell. Hydroxyl radicals were generated via the Fenton reaction between hydrogen peroxide and the released ferrous iron. The outer surface of the Bfr protein shell was coated with peptides that specifically bind to a receptor known to be overexpressed in many tumor cells and tumor vasculature. The iron-loaded peptide-ZnP-Bfr was endocytosed by melanoma cells, where it showed photo-triggered release of iron and light-dependent cytotoxicity. The second system, built around human heavy chain ferritin (HFn), was loaded with arsenate as a less toxic "prodrug" and designed to release arsenic in its toxic, therapeutically effective reduced form, arsenic trioxide (ATO). The Hfn shell was coated with peptides targeting receptors that are hyperexpressed in triple negative breast cancers. The arsenate/iron-loaded-Hfn was endocytosed by a breast cancer cell line and showed cytotoxicity equivalent to that of free ATO on an arsenic basis, whereas the "empty" or iron-only loaded Hfn showed no cytotoxicity. Although HFn has previously been used to deliver organic drugs and imaging agents, these new results demonstrate that both Bfr and HFn can be manipulated to function

  2. Nursing leaders can deliver a new model of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalala, Donna E

    2014-01-01

    Millions more insured Americans. Increasing numbers of older patients. Higher rates of chronic illness. Fewer providers. How can our healthcare system not only manage these challenges but also improve performance and access to care while containing costs? The answer lies with our nurses. In some parts of the United States, nurses provide the full spectrum of primary and preventive care. They have successfully improved access and quality in rural areas. In other parts, nurses' hands are tied by antiquated laws and regulations that limit their ability to expand access to care. Our system cannot increase access when we have providers who are not allowed to perform to the top of their education, training, and capability. It is time to rethink how we deliver primary and preventive care and redefine the roles of doctors and nurses. This article examines the history of the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Future of Nursing report (chaired by the author) and the resulting Future of Nursing Campaign for Action, which is working to institute the report's recommendations in all 50 states. The IOM report's recommendations are simple: 1. Remove outdated restrictions on nursing practice. 2. Promote nurse leadership on hospital boards and in all healthcare sectors. 3. Strengthen nurse education and training, and increase the number of nurses with advanced degrees. 4. Increase diversity in the nursing workforce to better reflect the patient population. 5. Improve data reporting and compilation to predict workforce needs. New York, Kentucky, and Minnesota are three recent states to remove barriers pre venting advanced practice registered nurses from practicing at the top of their license. Similar efforts in California, Florida, and Indiana failed initially but are expected to make progress in the near future. The article makes clear how and why the Center to Champion Nursing in America (an initiative of AARP, the AARP Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) is working to

  3. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Ruger Porter

    Full Text Available Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange. Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT. Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory

  4. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Ruger; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body) as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange). Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI) technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory tissue temperature

  5. The development and testing of the thermal break divertor monoblock target design delivering 20 MW m-2 heat load capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursdon, M.; Barrett, T.; Domptail, F.; Evans, Ll M.; Luzginova, N.; Greuner, N. H.; You, J.-H.; Li, M.; Richou, M.; Gallay, F.; Visca, E.

    2017-12-01

    The design and development of a novel plasma facing component (for fusion power plants) is described. The component uses the existing ‘monoblock’ construction which consists of a tungsten ‘block’ joined via a copper interlayer to a through CuCrZr cooling pipe. In the new concept the interlayer stiffness and conductivity properties are tuned so that stress in the principal structural element of the component (the cooling pipe) is reduced. Following initial trials with off-the-shelf materials, the concept was realized by machined features in an otherwise solid copper interlayer. The shape and distribution of the features were tuned by finite element analyses subject to ITER structural design criterion in-vessel components (SDC-IC) design rules. Proof of concept mock-ups were manufactured using a two stage brazing process verified by tomography and micrographic inspection. Full assemblies were inspected using ultrasound and thermographic (SATIR) test methods at ENEA and CEA respectively. High heat flux tests using IPP’s GLADIS facility showed that 200 cycles at 20 MW m-2 and five cycles at 25 MW m-2 could be sustained without apparent component damage. Further testing and component development is planned.

  6. The development and testing of the thermal break divertor monoblock target design delivering 20 MW m−2 heat load capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fursdon, M; Barrett, T; Domptail, F; Evans, Ll M; Luzginova, N; Greuner, N H; You, J-H; Li, M; Richou, M; Gallay, F; Visca, E

    2017-01-01

    The design and development of a novel plasma facing component (for fusion power plants) is described. The component uses the existing ‘monoblock’ construction which consists of a tungsten ‘block’ joined via a copper interlayer to a through CuCrZr cooling pipe. In the new concept the interlayer stiffness and conductivity properties are tuned so that stress in the principal structural element of the component (the cooling pipe) is reduced. Following initial trials with off-the-shelf materials, the concept was realized by machined features in an otherwise solid copper interlayer. The shape and distribution of the features were tuned by finite element analyses subject to ITER structural design criterion in-vessel components (SDC-IC) design rules. Proof of concept mock-ups were manufactured using a two stage brazing process verified by tomography and micrographic inspection. Full assemblies were inspected using ultrasound and thermographic (SATIR) test methods at ENEA and CEA respectively. High heat flux tests using IPP’s GLADIS facility showed that 200 cycles at 20 MW m −2 and five cycles at 25 MW m −2 could be sustained without apparent component damage. Further testing and component development is planned. (paper)

  7. EU-NORSEWIND - Delivering Offshore Wind Speed Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldroyd, Andy; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Stickland, M.T.

    Offshore wind is the major growth area in the wind industry sector today, with a host of large projects being announced and innovative approaches being proposed. However, with all this investment and innovation there remains a key, fundamental missing element - a thorough understanding...

  8. Thermal battery for portable climate control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Shankar; Li, Xiansen; Yang, Sungwoo; Kim, Hyunho; Umans, Ari; McKay, Ian S.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ATB is adsorptive thermal battery delivering both heating and cooling via storage. • The novel design promotes transport and maximizes ATB performance. • A general theoretical framework is developed to analyze ATB performance. • NaX–water is used as the adsorbent–refrigerant pair as a specific case study. • The effect of key geometric parameters and operating conditions are presented. - Abstract: Current technologies that provide climate control in the transportation sector are quite inefficient. In gasoline-powered vehicles, the use of air-conditioning is known to result in higher emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants apart from decreasing the gas-mileage. On the other hand, for electric vehicles (EVs), a drain in the onboard electric battery due to the operation of heating and cooling system results in a substantial decrease in the driving range. As an alternative to the conventional climate control system, we are developing an adsorption-based thermal battery (ATB), which is capable of storing thermal energy, and delivering both heating and cooling on demand, while requiring minimal electric power supply. Analogous to an electrical battery, the ATB can be charged for reuse. Furthermore, it promises to be compact, lightweight, and deliver high performance, which is desirable for mobile applications. In this study, we describe the design and operation of the ATB-based climate control system. We present a general theoretical framework to determine the maximum achievable heating and cooling performance using the ATB. The framework is then applied to study the feasibility of ATB integration in EVs, wherein we analyze the use of NaX zeolite–water as the adsorbent–refrigerant pair. In order to deliver the necessary heating and cooling performance, exceeding 2.5 kW h thermal capacity for EVs, the analysis determines the optimal design and operating conditions. While the use of the ATB in EVs can potentially enhance its driving

  9. Large Blast and Thermal Simulator Reflected Wave Eliminator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    it delays the passage of this wave through the test section until after the test is complete. The required length of extra duct depends on the strength...tube axis, which acts like an additional contraction effect since Se = Sj/[Cqsin(aj)]. Tii extra area is illustrated best by plotting (Se-Ae)/Ac versus...34Simulation de Choc et de Soaffie. Comimpensateur d’Ondes de Detente de Bouche pour tube a Choc de 2400 mm de diametre de Veine. Description, Compte- Renda

  10. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W. [Australian Nucl. Sci. and Tech. Organ., Menai, NSW (Australia). Phys. Div.; Smith, G.C. [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    1997-06-21

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm{sup 2}. To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimise parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa {sup 3}He plus 100 kPa CF{sub 4}, and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count rate of the detector was 10{sup 5} events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 A neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm{sup 2}) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise line width of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The proportional counter operating system (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp, USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display. (orig.).

  11. A large 2D PSD for thermal neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.B.; Watt, G.; Boldeman, J.W.; Smith, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    A 2D PSD based on a MWPC has been constructed for a small angle neutron scattering instrument. The active area of the detector was 640 x 640 mm 2 . To meet the specifications for neutron detection efficiency and spatial resolution, and to minimize parallax, the gas mixture was 190 kPa 3 He plus 100 kPa CF 4 and the active volume had a thickness of 30 mm. The design maximum neutron count-rate of the detector was 10 5 events per second. The (calculated) neutron detection efficiency was 60% for 2 angstrom neutrons and the (measured) neutron energy resolution on the anode grid was typically 20% (fwhm). The location of a neutron detection event within the active area was determined using the wire-by-wire method: the spatial resolution (5 x 5 mm 2 ) was thereby defined by the wire geometry. A 16 channel charge-sensitive preamplifier/amplifier/comparator module has been developed with a channel sensitivity of 0.1 V/fC, noise linewidth of 0.4 fC (fwhm) and channel-to-channel cross-talk of less than 5%. The Proportional Counter Operating System (PCOS III) (LeCroy Corp USA) was used for event encoding. The ECL signals produced by the 16 channel modules were latched in PCOS III by a trigger pulse from the anode and the fast encoders produce a position and width for each event. The information was transferred to a UNIX workstation for accumulation and online display

  12. Molecular thermal transistor: Dimension analysis and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, S.; Panahinia, R.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, large challenge has been spent to realize high efficient thermal transistors. Outstanding properties of DNA make it as an excellent nano material in future technologies. In this paper, we introduced a high efficient DNA based thermal transistor. The thermal transistor operates when the system shows an increase in the thermal flux despite of decreasing temperature gradient. This is what called as negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR). Based on multifractal analysis, we could distinguish regions with NDTR state from non-NDTR state. Moreover, Based on dimension spectrum of the system, it is detected that NDTR state is accompanied by ballistic transport regime. The generalized correlation sum (analogous to specific heat) shows that an irregular decrease in the specific heat induces an increase in the mean free path (mfp) of phonons. This leads to the occurrence of NDTR.

  13. The thermal Virasoro formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisaki, Haruo

    1991-01-01

    The thermal stability of non-planar duality is described at any finite temperature through the new-fashioned four-tachyon tree amplitude of closed bosonic thermal strings within the dispersion theoretic approach based upon the thermofield dynamics. (author)

  14. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  15. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  16. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  17. Hi-g lithium thionyl chloride flat cells for artillery/air delivered expendables. Quarterly report no. 1, 10 October 31-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snuggerud, D.; Surprenant, J.; Waterhouse, R.

    1981-05-01

    Rate capability studies on small prototype cells showed that single anode designs should be adequate for Hi-G rate specifications. Large prototype cells safely delivered 1.6 amps for 6 hours. Design work was begun on seal structures to withstand extreme g forces.

  18. An exploration of factors related to dissemination of and exposure to internet-delivered behavior change interventions aimed at adults: A Delphi study approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Brouwer (Wendy); A. Oenema (Anke); R. Crutzen (Rik); J. de Nooijer (Jascha); N.K. de Vries (Nanne); J. Brug (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Internet is an attractive medium for delivering individualized, computer-tailored behavior change interventions to large numbers of people. However, the actual numbers of people reached seem to fall behind the high expectations. Insight into factors that determine use of

  19. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of biomaterials measured with self-heated thermistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvano, J. W.; Cochran, J. R.; Diller, K. R.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental method to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of biomaterials. Self-heated thermistor probes, inserted into the tissue of interest, are used to deliver heat as well as to monitor the rate of heat removal. An empirical calibration procedure allows accurate thermal-property measurements over a wide range of tissue temperatures. Operation of the instrument in three media with known thermal properties shows the uncertainty of measurements to be about 2%. The reproducibility is 0.5% for the thermal-conductivity measurements and 2% for the thermal-diffusivity measurements. Thermal properties were measured in dog, pig, rabbit, and human tissues. The tissues included kidney, spleen, liver, brain, heart, lung, pancreas, colon cancer, and breast cancer. Thermal properties were measured for 65 separate tissue samples at 3, 10, 17, 23, 30, 37, and 45°C. The results show that the temperature coefficient of biomaterials approximates that of water.

  20. Direct visualization of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2 in recipient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Qinghua; Tu, Haitao; Lim, Zijie; Pan, Shen Q

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a natural genetic engineer widely used to deliver DNA into various recipients, including plant, yeast and fungal cells. The bacterium can transfer single-stranded DNA molecules (T–DNAs) and bacterial virulence proteins, including VirE2. However, neither the DNA nor the protein molecules have ever been directly visualized after the delivery. In this report, we adopted a split-GFP approach: the small GFP fragment (GFP11) was inserted into VirE2 at a permissive site to create the VirE2-GFP11 fusion, which was expressed in A. tumefaciens; and the large fragment (GFP1–10) was expressed in recipient cells. Upon delivery of VirE2-GFP11 into the recipient cells, GFP fluorescence signals were visualized. VirE2-GFP11 was functional like VirE2; the GFP fusion movement could indicate the trafficking of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2. As the natural host, all plant cells seen under a microscope received the VirE2 protein in a leaf-infiltration assay; most of VirE2 moved at a speed of 1.3–3.1 μm sec−1 in a nearly linear direction, suggesting an active trafficking process. Inside plant cells, VirE2-GFP formed filamentous structures of different lengths, even in the absence of T-DNA. As a non-natural host recipient, 51% of yeast cells received VirE2, which did not move inside yeast. All plant cells seen under a microscope transiently expressed the Agrobacterium-delivered transgene, but only 0.2% yeast cells expressed the transgene. This indicates that Agrobacterium is a more efficient vector for protein delivery than T-DNA transformation for a non-natural host recipient: VirE2 trafficking is a limiting factor for the genetic transformation of a non-natural host recipient. The split-GFP approach could enable the real-time visualization of VirE2 trafficking inside recipient cells. PMID:24299048