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Sample records for deliver large thermal

  1. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, Cindy

    2012-08-31

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  2. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  3. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-hung; Brace, Chris L.

    2016-08-01

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm-1), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm-1) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm-1). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility was

  4. Large-scale solar thermal collector concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal collector could be used ultimately to power steamplant to produce electricity. Collector would consist of two major subsystems: (1) series of segmented tracking mirrors with two axes of rotation and (2) absorber mounted on centrally located tower.

  5. Thermal Insulation System for Large Flame Buckets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, E. Eugene, Jr.; Gamblin, Tonya Pleshette

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the use of thermal protection coatings, single tiles, and layered insulation systems to protect the walls of the flame buckets used in the testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine, while reducing the cost and maintenance of the system. The physical behavior is modeled by a plane wall boundary value problem with a convective frontface condition and a backface condition designed to provide higher heat rates through the material.

  6. Combined chemo- and photo-thermal therapy delivered by multifunctional theranostic gold nanorod-loaded microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; di, Yingfeng; Chen, Dan; Madrid, Kyle; Zhang, Min; Tian, Caiping; Tang, Liping; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-05-01

    A polyelectrolyte microcapsule-based, cancer-targeting, and controlled drug delivery system has been developed as a multifunctional theranostic agent for synergistic cancer treatment. This new system, called FA-MC@GNR, is composed of folic acid (FA)-modified, multi-layered, hollow microcapsules loaded with gold nanorods (GNRs), and undergoes thermal degradation under near infrared (NIR) light. Either an NIR dye (MPA) or anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) was loaded into the microcapsules via physical adsorption, yielding FA-MC@GNRs/MPA or FA-MC@GNRs/DOX, both of which exhibit no obvious toxicity, high stability, and remarkably improved tumor-targeting capabilities in vivo. Utilizing the strong NIR absorption of FA-MC@GNRs/DOX, we demonstrate the system's ability to simultaneously elicit photothermal therapy and controlled chemotherapy, achieving synergistic cancer treatment both in vitro cellular and in vivo animal experiments. Our study presents a new type of multifunctional micro-carrier for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and photothermal agents, which has been shown to be an effective therapeutic approach for combined cancer treatment.

  7. HIV-infected women delivering without antenatal care in a large Bangkok hospital, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetts, A; Inneam, B; Krajangthong, R; Bhengsri, S; Jetsawang, B; Siriwasin, W; Simond, R J; Shaffer, N

    2000-03-01

    The aim was to estimate the proportion of HIV-infected women giving birth at a large Bangkok hospital who had not received antenatal care (ANC) and to identify predictors of not receiving ANC. At Rajavithi Hospital, Bangkok, women with ANC are routinely tested for HIV at their first antenatal visit; women without ANC are routinely tested at delivery. Hospital staff interview all HIV-infected women and record sociodemographic and HIV risk factor information in a delivery room log book. We abstracted and analyzed data recorded in this log book for all HIV-infected women who gave birth at Rajavithi Hospital in 1997. Of 303 HIV-infected women who gave birth, 75% had received ANC at Rajavithi Hospital, 10% had received ANC at other locations, and 15% had not received ANC. On multivariate analysis, HIV-infected women who had received ANC were more likely to work or have partners who worked in construction (25% vs 11%; adjusted odds ratio [AOR]; 2.6; p = 0.03) or have a history of injection drug use (4% vs 0.4%; AOR = 20.8; p = 0.02) than those who had not received ANC, but were less likely to report their current partner as a risk factor for acquiring HIV infection (22% vs. 40%; AOR = 0.4; p = 0.05). Because a substantial number of HIV-infected women give birth in this large Bangkok hospital without receiving ANC, interventions are needed to increase the number of HIV-infected women who receive ANC and to prevent perinatal HIV transmission from HIV-infected pregnant women who have not received ANC.

  8. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach

  9. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  10. Large format lithium ion pouch cell full thermal characterisation for improved electric vehicle thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Thomas; Barai, Anup; Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Guo, Yue; McGordon, Andrew; Marco, James

    2017-08-01

    It is crucial to maintain temperature homogeneity in lithium ion batteries in order to prevent adverse voltage distributions and differential ageing within the cell. As such, the thermal behaviour of a large-format 20 Ah lithium iron phosphate pouch cell is investigated over a wide range of ambient temperatures and C rates during both charging and discharging. Whilst previous studies have only considered one surface, this article presents experimental results, which characterise both surfaces of the cell exposed to similar thermal media and boundary conditions, allowing for thermal gradients in-plane and perpendicular to the stack to be quantified. Temperature gradients, caused by self-heating, are found to increase with increasing C rate and decreasing temperature to such an extent that 13.4 ± 0.7% capacity can be extracted using a 10C discharge compared to a 0.5C discharge, both at -10 °C ambient temperature. The former condition causes an 18.8 ± 1.1 °C in plane gradient and a 19.7 ± 0.8 °C thermal gradient perpendicular to the stack, which results in large current density distributions and local state of charge differences within the cell. The implications of these thermal and electrical inhomogeneities on ageing and battery pack design for the automotive industry are discussed.

  11. Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Carrie, Remi F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); McWilliams, Jennifer [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wang, Duo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Modera, Mark P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-12-08

    This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2000 m2. The air leakage from ducts is reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class CL, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2/m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2/m2 of floor area served. The ASHRAE-defined duct leakage classes ranged from 34 to 606 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios were estimated to be up to approximately one-third of the fan-supplied airflow in the constant air volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicated that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varied significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. Overall, the duct systems measured were much leakier than the ductwork specified as “unsealed ducts” by ASHRAE. On the other hand, thermal losses from supply ducts induced by conduction (including convection and radiation) were significant, on the scale that was comparable to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. Furthermore, the energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggested that there exist significant energy savings potentials from duct sealing and duct insulation practice in large commercial buildings.

  12. Thermal activation of dislocations in large scale obstacle bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Capolungo, Laurent; McDowell, David L.; Martinez, Enrique

    2017-08-01

    Dislocation dynamics simulations have been used extensively to predict hardening caused by dislocation-obstacle interactions, including irradiation defect hardening in the athermal case. Incorporating the role of thermal energy on these interactions is possible with a framework provided by harmonic transition state theory (HTST) enabling direct access to thermally activated reaction rates using the Arrhenius equation, including rates of dislocation-obstacle bypass processes. Moving beyond unit dislocation-defect reactions to a representative environment containing a large number of defects requires coarse-graining the activation energy barriers of a population of obstacles into an effective energy barrier that accurately represents the large scale collective process. The work presented here investigates the relationship between unit dislocation-defect bypass processes and the distribution of activation energy barriers calculated for ensemble bypass processes. A significant difference between these cases is observed, which is attributed to the inherent cooperative nature of dislocation bypass processes. In addition to the dislocation-defect interaction, the morphology of the dislocation segments pinned to the defects play an important role on the activation energies for bypass. A phenomenological model for activation energy stress dependence is shown to describe well the effect of a distribution of activation energies, and a probabilistic activation energy model incorporating the stress distribution in a material is presented.

  13. Scaling in large Prandtl number turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrulle, B

    2011-01-01

    We study the scaling properties of heat transfer $Nu$ in turbulent thermal convection at large Prandtl number $Pr$ using a quasi-linear theory. We show that two regimes arise, depending on the Reynolds number $Re$. At low Reynolds number, $Nu Pr^{-1/2}$ and $Re$ are a function of $Ra Pr^{-3/2}$. At large Reynolds number $Nu Pr^{1/3}$ and $Re Pr$ are function only of $Ra Pr^{2/3}$ (within logarithmic corrections). In practice, since $Nu$ is always close to $Ra^{1/3}$, this corresponds to a much weaker dependence of the heat transfer in the Prandtl number at low Reynolds number than at large Reynolds number. This difference may solve an existing controversy between measurements in SF6 (large $Re$) and in alcohol/water (lower $Re$). We link these regimes with a possible global bifurcation in the turbulent mean flow. We further show how a scaling theory could be used to describe these two regimes through a single universal function. This function presents a bimodal character for intermediate range of Reynolds num...

  14. European research school on large scale solar thermal – SHINE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bales, Chris; Forteza, Pau Joan Cortés; Furbo, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Heat Integration NEtwork (SHINE) is a European research school in which 13 PhD students in solar thermal technologies are funded by the EU Marie-Curie program. It has five PhD course modules as well as workshops and seminars dedicated to PhD students both within the project as well...... as outside of it. The SHINE research activities focus on large solar heating systems and new applications: on district heating, industrial processes and new storage systems. The scope of this paper is on systems for district heating for which there are five PhD students, three at universities and two...... at companies. The PhD students all started during the early part of 2014 and their initial work has concentrated on literature studies and on setting up models and data collection to be used for validation purposes. The PhD students will complete their studies in 2017-18....

  15. Dissociation rates from single-molecule pulling experiments under large thermal fluctuations or large applied force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkenar, Masoud; Gray, Thomas H; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-04-01

    Theories that are used to extract energy-landscape information from single-molecule pulling experiments in biophysics are all invariably based on Kramers' theory of the thermally activated escape rate from a potential well. As is well known, this theory recovers the Arrhenius dependence of the rate on the barrier energy and crucially relies on the assumption that the barrier energy is much larger than k_{B}T (limit of comparatively low thermal fluctuations). As was shown already in Dudko et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 108101 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.108101], this approach leads to the unphysical prediction of dissociation time increasing with decreasing binding energy when the latter is lowered to values comparable to k_{B}T (limit of large thermal fluctuations). We propose a theoretical framework (fully supported by numerical simulations) which amends Kramers' theory in this limit and use it to extract the dissociation rate from single-molecule experiments where now predictions are physically meaningful and in agreement with simulations over the whole range of applied forces (binding energies). These results are expected to be relevant for a large number of experimental settings in single-molecule biophysics.

  16. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  17. Corrugated paraffin nanocomposite films as large stroke thermal actuators and self-activating thermal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copic, Davor; Hart, A John

    2015-04-22

    High performance active materials are of rapidly growing interest for applications including soft robotics, microfluidic systems, and morphing composites. In particular, paraffin wax has been used to actuate miniature pumps, solenoid valves, and composite fibers, yet its deployment is typically limited by the need for external volume constraint. We demonstrate that compact, high-performance paraffin actuators can be made by confining paraffin within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films. This large-stroke vertical actuation is enabled by strong capillary interaction between paraffin and CNTs and by engineering the CNT morphology by mechanical compression before capillary-driven infiltration of the molten paraffin. The maximum actuation strain of the corrugated CNT-paraffin films (∼0.02-0.2) is comparable to natural muscle, yet the maximum stress is limited to ∼10 kPa by collapse of the CNT network. We also show how a CNT-paraffin film can serve as a self-activating thermal interface that closes a gap when it is heated. These new CNT-paraffin film actuators could be produced by large-area CNT growth, infiltration, and lamination methods, and are attractive for use in miniature systems due to their self-contained design.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Thermal Pollution of Large Water Bodies from Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoly; Lyakhin, Yury; Parshakova, Yanina; Tiunov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the major manufacturers of electrical energy are the thermal and nuclear power plants including the cooling ponds in the processing chains. For a wide range of both environmental and technological problems, the evaluation of the temperature fields in the cooling ponds at certain critical values of hydrological and meteorological parameters is important. The present paper deals with the evaluation of the thermal effect of one of the largest thermal power plant in Europe - Perm GRES - to its cooling pond which is the Kama Reservoir. Since the area of the possible impact is rather large and the reservoir itself is characterized by a very complex morphometry, numerical modeling of thermal spot propagation in the Kama River due to the discharge of warm water by Perm GRES for the entire area in the 3D-formulation with the desired detail setting morphometric characteristics of the water body meets very serious difficulties. Because of that, to solve the problem, a combined scheme of calculations based on the combination of hydrodynamic models in 2D and 3D formulations was used. At the first stage of the combined scheme implementation, 2D hydrodynamical model was developed for all possible area, using software SMS v.11.1. The boundary and initial conditions for this model were formulated on the basis of calculations made using 1D hydrodynamical model developed and applied for the entire Kama Reservoir. Application of 2D hydrodynamical model for solving the problem under consideration was needed to obtain the necessary information for setting the boundary conditions for the 3D model. Software package ANSYS Fluent v.6.3 was used for the realization of 3D model. 3D modeling was performed for different wind speeds and directions and quantitative characteristics of the discharge of warm water. To verify the models, the data of the detailed field measurements in the zones of thermal pollution of the Kama reservoir due to impact of the Perm GRES were used. A

  19. Thermal characterization of large size lithium-ion pouch cell based on 1d electro-thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertiz, G.; Oyarbide, M.; Macicior, H.; Miguel, O.; Cantero, I.; Fernandez de Arroiabe, P.; Ulacia, I.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management is one of the key factors to keep lithium-ion cells in optimum electrical performance, under safe working conditions and into a reasonably low ageing process. This issue is becoming particularly relevant due to the heterogeneous heat generation along the cell. Cell working temperature is determined by ambient temperature, heat generation and evacuation capacity. Therefore, thermal management is established by: i) the intrinsic thermal properties (heat capacity & thermal conductivity) and ii) the heat generation electro-thermal parameters (internal resistance, open circuit voltage & entropic factor). In this research, different methods - calculated and experimental - are used to characterize the main heat properties of a 14Ah -LiFePO4/graphite-commercial large sizes pouch cell. In order to evaluate the accuracy of methods, two comparisons were performed. First, Newman heat generation estimations were compared with experimental heat measurements. Secondly, empirical thermal cell behaviour was match with 1D electro-thermal model response. Finally, considering the results, the most adequate methodology to evaluate the key thermal parameters of a large size Lithium-ion pouch cell are proposed to be: i) pulse method for internal resistance, ii)heat loss method for entropic factor; and iii)experimental measurement (ARC calorimeter and C-177-97 standard method) for heat capacity and thermal conductivity.

  20. Delivering a very brief psychoeducational program to cancer patients and family members in a large group format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A J; Edmonds, C V; Williams, D

    1999-01-01

    It is well established that brief psychoeducational programs for cancer patients will significantly improve mean quality of life. As this kind of adjunctive treatment becomes integrated into general cancer management, it will be necessary to devise cost-effective and efficacious programs that can be offered to relatively large numbers of patients. We have developed a very brief 4-session program that provides this service to 40-80 patients and family members per month (and seems capable of serving much larger numbers, depending on the capacity of the facility in which they assemble). Patients meet in a hospital auditorium for a large group, lecture-style program that offers training in basic coping skills: stress management, relaxation training, thought monitoring and changing, mental imagery and goal setting. Over the first year we have treated 363 patients and 150 family members. Improvements were assessed by changes in the POMS-Short Form, and both patients and family members were found to improve significantly over the course of the program. While this is not a randomized comparison, it suggests that the benefits gained from a large group in a classroom are not substantially less than the improvements that have been documented in the usual small group format, where more interactive discussions are possible.

  1. Meeting today's requirements for large thermal vacuum test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinth, R. L.; Rouse, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Lockheed Thermal Vacuum Facility at Sunnyvale, California, completed in late 1986, one of the largest multi-program facilities constructed to date is described. The horizontal 12.2 m diameter by 24.4 m long chamber has removable heads at each end and houses a thermal shroud providing a test volume 10.4 m diameter by 24.4 m long. The chamber and thermal shroud are configured to permit the insertion of a 6.1 m wide by 24.4 m long vibration isolated optical bench. The pumpimg system incorporates an internal cryopumping array, turbomolecular pumps and cryopumps to handle multi-program needs and ranges of gas loads. The high vacuum system is capable of achieving clean, dry and empty pressures below 1.3 times 10 to the minus 6 power Pa (10 to the minus 8 power torr.)

  2. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Alan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Winiarski, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carmichael, Robert T. [Cadeo Group, Washington D. C. (United States); Mayhorn, Ebony T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fisher, Andrew R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  3. Thermal Width of the $\\Upsilon$ at Large t' Hooft Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to show that the heavy quark (static) potential in a strongly-coupled plasma develops an imaginary part at finite temperature of $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{\\lambda} L^4 T^4 / L)$, where $L$ is the distance between the heavy quarks. Thus, deeply bound heavy quarkonia states acquire a small nonzero thermal width when the t'Hooft coupling $\\lambda=g^2 N_c \\gg 1$ and the number of colors $N_c \\to \\infty$. In the dual gravity description, this imaginary contribution comes from thermal fluctuations around the bottom of the classical sagging string in the bulk that connects the heavy quarks located at the boundary. We predict a strong suppression of $\\Upsilon$'s in heavy-ion collisions and discuss how this may be used to estimate the initial temperature.

  4. Vanadium dioxide as a natural disordered metamaterial: perfect thermal emission and large broadband negative differential thermal emittance

    CERN Document Server

    Kats, Mikhail A; Zhang, Shuyan; Genevet, Patrice; Ko, Changhyun; Ramanathan, Shriram; Capasso, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a thin (~150 nm) film of vanadium dioxide (VO2) deposited on sapphire has an anomalous thermal emittance profile when heated, which arises due to the optical interaction between the film and the substrate when the VO2 is at an intermediate state of its insulator-metal transition (IMT). Within the IMT region, the VO2 film comprises nanoscale islands of metal- and dielectric-phase, and can thus be viewed as a natural, disordered metamaterial. This structure displays "perfect" blackbody-like thermal emissivity over a narrow wavelength range (~40 cm-1), surpassing the emissivity of our black soot reference. We observed large broadband negative differential thermal emittance over a >10 {\\deg}C range: upon heating, the VO2/sapphire structure emitted less thermal radiation and appeared colder on an infrared camera. We anticipate that emissivity engineering with thin film geometries comprising VO2 will find applications in infrared camouflage, thermal regulation, infrared tagging an...

  5. Optimization and spatial pattern of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Valstar, J.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is a cost-effective technology that enables the reduction of energy use and CO2 emissions associated with the heating and cooling of buildings by storage and recovery of large quantities of thermal energy in the subsurface. Reducing the distance between wells in

  6. Thermal design and performance of the balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry BLASTPol

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, J D; Angilè, F E; Benton, S J; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Fissel, L M; Fukui, Y; Galitzki, N; Gandilo, N N; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Matthews, T G; Moncelsi, L; Mroczkowski, A; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Thomas, N E; Truch, M D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Ward-Thompson, D

    2014-01-01

    We present the thermal model of the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). This instrument was successfully flown in two circumpolar flights from McMurdo, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. During these two flights, BLASTPol obtained unprecedented information about the magnetic field in molecular clouds through the measurement of the polarized thermal emission of interstellar dust grains. The thermal design of the experiment addresses the stability and control of the payload necessary for this kind of measurement. We describe the thermal modeling of the payload including the sun-shielding strategy. We present the in-flight thermal performance of the instrument and compare the predictions of the model with the temperatures registered during the flight. We describe the difficulties of modeling the thermal behavior of the balloon-borne platform and establish landmarks that can be used in the design of future balloon-borne instruments.

  7. Thermocapillary migration of a droplet with a thermal source at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zuo-Bing

    2014-01-01

    The {\\it unsteady} process for thermocapillary droplet migration at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers has been previously reported by identifying a nonconservative integral thermal flux across the surface in the {\\it steady} thermocapillary droplet migration, [Wu and Hu, J. Math. Phys. {\\bf 54} 023102, (2013)]. Here we add a thermal source in the droplet to preserve the integral thermal flux across the surface as conservative, so that thermocapillary droplet migration at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers can reach a {\\it quasi-steady} process. Under assumptions of {\\it quasi-steady} state and non-deformation of the droplet, we make an analytical result for the {\\it steady} thermocapillary migration of droplet with the thermal source at large Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. The result shows that the thermocapillary droplet migration speed slowly increases with the increase of Marangoni number.

  8. NST: Thermal Modeling for a Large Aperture Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Roy

    2011-05-01

    Late in the 1990s the Dutch Open Telescope demonstrated that internal seeing in open, large aperture solar telescopes can be controlled by flushing air across the primary mirror and other telescope structures exposed to sunlight. In that system natural wind provides a uniform air temperature throughout the imaging volume, while efficiently sweeping heated air away from the optics and mechanical structure. Big Bear Solar Observatory's New Solar Telescope (NST) was designed to realize that same performance in an enclosed system by using both natural wind through the dome and forced air circulation around the primary mirror to provide the uniform air temperatures required within the telescope volume. The NST is housed in a conventional, ventilated dome with a circular opening, in place of the standard dome slit, that allows sunlight to fall only on an aperture stop and the primary mirror. The primary mirror is housed deep inside a cylindrical cell with only minimal openings in the side at the level of the mirror. To date, the forced air and cooling systems designed for the NST primary mirror have not been implemented, yet the telescope regularly produces solar images indicative of the absence of mirror seeing. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of the NST primary mirror system along with measurements of air flows within the dome, around the telescope structure, and internal to the mirror cell are used to explain the origin of this seemingly incongruent result. The CFD analysis is also extended to hypothetical systems of various scales. We will discuss the results of these investigations.

  9. Large-eddy simulation of thermal mixing flows for thermal fatigue analysis; Large-eddy Simulation von thermischer Vermischung zur Analyse thermischer Ermuedung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeren, D. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE); EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim (Germany); Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2012-11-01

    For the safety evaluation of nuclear facilities the lifetime estimation of piping component in the cooling circuits are required. Besides system transients temperature fluctuations due to flow instabilities in case of mixing processes contribute to thermal fatigue of the pipe material. The material failure corresponds to the damage mechanism cause by high-cycle fatigue (HCF). Through-wall cracks attributed to HCF were found in the mixing flow region of a T-joint in the decay-heat removal system of a French reactor. Detailed temperature measurements for HCF analysis are not possible in nuclear facilities. It is therefore of interest to have a reliable problem specific database using numerical flow simulation (CFD) for HCF analyses. The contribution is focused on the validation of numerical methods concerning the fluid-structures interaction in thermal mixing and stratified flows. The experimental data were gained with new measuring equipment using optical measuring methods for thermal information. The calculations were performed using large eddy simulation of thermal mixing flows for the assessment of their effect on thermal fatigue for a T-shaped piping segment with circumferential weld.

  10. TC-2 Satellite Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    On April 18, 2005, TC-2, the second satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), which was jointly developed by CNSA and ESA, was approved to be delivered to the user after the on-board test and trial operation. The satellite is working well and the performance can meet the user's need. The satellite has collected large amount of valuable scientific data

  11. Thermal interaction in crusted melt jets with large-scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Sotome, Fuminori; Ishikawa, Michio [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally observe thermal interaction which would be capable of triggering due to entrainment, or entrapment in crusted melt jets with `large-scale structure`. The present experiment was carried out by dropping molten zinc and molten tin of 100 grams, of which mass was sufficient to generate large-scale structures of melt jets. The experimental results show that the thermal interaction of entrapment type occurs in molten-zinc jets with rare probability, and the thermal interaction of entrainment type occurs in molten tin jets with high probability. The difference of thermal interaction between molten zinc and molten tin may attribute to differences of kinematic viscosity and melting point between them. (author)

  12. Thermal stratification level of low sidewall air supply with air-conditioning system in large space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晨; 蔡宁; 高雪垒

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stratification level of low sidewall air supply system in large space was defined. Depending on the experiment of low sidewall air supply in summer 2008,the thermal stratification level was studied by simulation. Based on the simulation of experiment condition,the air velocity and vertical temperature distribution in a large space were simulated at different air-outlet velocities,and then the thermal stratification level line was obtained. The simulation results well match with the experimental ones and the average relative error is 3.4%. The thermal stratification level is heightened by increasing the air-outlet velocity with low sidewall air supply mode. It is concluded that when air-outlet velocity is 0.29 m/s,which is the experimental case,a uniform thermal environment in the higher occupied zone and a stable stratification level are formed. When the air-outlet velocity is low,such as 0.05 m/s,the thermal stratification level is too low and the air velocity is too small to meet the human thermal comfort in the occupied zone. So,it would be reasonable that the air-outlet velocity may be designed as 0.31 m/s if the height of the occupied zone is 2 m.

  13. Implementation and process evaluation of three interventions to promote screening mammograms delivered for 4 years in a large primary care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckmann, Roger; White, Mary Jo; Costanza, Mary E; Frisard, Christine F; Cranos, Caroline; Sama, Susan; Yood, Robert

    2017-04-27

    The optimal form of outreach to promote repeated, on time screening mammograms in primary care has not been established. The purpose of this study is to assess the implementation process and process outcomes for three interventions for promoting biannual screening mammography in a randomized trial. In a large urban primary care practice over a 4-year period, we randomized women aged 40-85 and eligible for mammograms to three interventions: reminder letter only (LO), reminder letter + reminder call (RC), and reminder letter + counseling call (CC). We tracked information system development, staff training, patient and provider recruitment, reach, dose delivered and received, fidelity, and context measures. Ninety-three of 95 providers approved participation by 80% (23,999) of age-eligible patients, of whom only 207 (0.9%) opted not to receive any intervention. Of 9161 initial reminder letters mailed to women coming due or overdue for mammograms, 0.8% were undeliverable. Of women in the RC and CC arms unresponsive to the first reminder letter (n = 3982), 71.4% were called and reached, and of those, 49.1% scheduled a mammogram. Only 33.4% of women reached in the CC arm received full counseling, and women in the CC arm were less likely to schedule a mammogram than those in the RC arm. Implementing mail and telephone mammography reminders is feasible and acceptable in a large urban practice and reaches a majority of patients. Many schedule a mammogram when reached. A reminder letter followed by a simple reminder call if needed may be the optimal approach to promoting screening mammograms.

  14. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  15. Computational study of thermal effects of large blood vessels in human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xu; He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to present a comprehensive investigation on the thermal effects of large blood vessels of human knee joint during topical cooling and fomentation treatment. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis by taking full use of the anatomical CAD model of human knee joint was developed to accurately simulate the treatment process. Based on the classical Pennes bio-heat transfer equation, the time evolution of knee joint's temperature distribution and heat flux from large blood vessels was obtained. In addition, we compared several influencing factors and obtained some key conclusions which cannot be easily acquired through clinical experiments. The results indicated that the thermal effects of large blood vessels could remarkably affect the temperature distribution of knee joint during treatment process. Fluctuations of blood flow velocity and metabolic heat production rate affect little on the thermal effects of large blood vessels. Changing the temperature of blood and regimes of treatment could effectively regulate this phenomenon, which is important for many physiological activities. These results provide a guideline to the basic and applied research for the thermally significant large blood vessels in the knee organism.

  16. Early time instability in nanofilms exposed to a large transverse thermal gradient: Improved image and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Kevin R.; Troian, Sandra M.

    2016-11-01

    Liquid nanofilms exposed to a large transverse thermal gradient undergo an instability featuring an array of nanopillars whose typical pitch is tens of microns. In earlier works, a comparison of this pitch with the fastest growing wavelength predicted by three different models based on linear instability showed closest agreement with a long wavelength thermocapillary mechanism in which gravity plays no role. Here, we present improved feature extraction techniques, which allow identification of the fastest growing wavelength at much earlier times than previously reported, and more realistic simulations for assessing thermal gradients, which better approximate the actual experimental system. While these improvements lead to better agreement with the thermocapillary mechanism, there persists a quantitative discrepancy with theory which we attribute to a number of experimental challenges.

  17. Thermal power generation projects ``Large Scale Solar Heating``; EU-Thermie-Projekte ``Large Scale Solar Heating``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuebler, R.; Fisch, M.N. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum Energie-, Gebaeude- und Solartechnik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of this project is the preparation of the ``Large-Scale Solar Heating`` programme for an Europe-wide development of subject technology. The following demonstration programme was judged well by the experts but was not immediately (1996) accepted for financial subsidies. In November 1997 the EU-commission provided 1,5 million ECU which allowed the realisation of an updated project proposal. By mid 1997 a small project was approved, that had been requested under the lead of Chalmes Industriteteknik (CIT) in Sweden and is mainly carried out for the transfer of technology. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieses Vorhabens ist die Vorbereitung eines Schwerpunktprogramms `Large Scale Solar Heating`, mit dem die Technologie europaweit weiterentwickelt werden sollte. Das daraus entwickelte Demonstrationsprogramm wurde von den Gutachtern positiv bewertet, konnte jedoch nicht auf Anhieb (1996) in die Foerderung aufgenommen werden. Im November 1997 wurden von der EU-Kommission dann kurzfristig noch 1,5 Mio ECU an Foerderung bewilligt, mit denen ein aktualisierter Projektvorschlag realisiert werden kann. Bereits Mitte 1997 wurde ein kleineres Vorhaben bewilligt, das unter Federfuehrung von Chalmers Industriteknik (CIT) in Schweden beantragt worden war und das vor allem dem Technologietransfer dient. (orig.)

  18. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wu, W; Shi, X H; Zeng, X Y; Deng, K; Lu, Z H

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing.

  19. Coupled large-eddy simulation of thermal mixing in a T-junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeren, D., E-mail: david.kloeren@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Univ. of Stuttgart, Inst. for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany); EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim, Neckarwestheim (Germany); Laurien, E., E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Univ. of Stuttgart, Inst. for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Analyzing thermal fatigue due to thermal mixing in T-junctions is part of the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. Results of two large-eddy simulations of mixing flow in a T-junction with coupled and adiabatic boundary condition are presented and compared. The temperature difference is set to 100 K, which leads to strong stratification of the flow. The main and the branch pipe intersect horizontally in this simulation. The flow is characterized by steady wavy pattern of stratification and temperature distribution. The coupled solution approach shows highly reduced temperature fluctuations in the near wall region due to thermal inertia of the wall. A conjugate heat transfer approach is necessary in order to simulate unsteady heat transfer accurately for large inlet temperature differences. (author)

  20. Thermal Stability of Large Al-stabilized Superconducting Magnets Theoritical Analysis of CMS Solenoid.

    CERN Document Server

    Juster, F P

    1998-01-01

    The CMS detector magnet presently under design for the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an epoxy-impregnated structure, indirectly cooled by two-phase flow liquid helium. This magnet, based on aluminum-stabilized, mechanically reinforced conductor, is not cryostable : the heat generated by a thermal disturbance can be removed only by thermal diffusivity through the windings. In order to study the thermal stability of the magnet, we have developed numerical codes able to predict the thermal behaviour of an anisotropic and non-homogeneous medium against thermal perturbations due to friction or epoxy cracking. Our 3D finite element codes can calculate the propagation or the recovery of a normal zone in a superconducting magnet, taking into account the current diffusion effect, which strongly affects the heat generated by a transition in the case of large Al-stabilized conductors. Two different codes, CASTEM 2000 and HEATING are described in this paper. We present the results of the CMS Solenoid magnet sta...

  1. Large negative thermal expansion of a polymer driven by a submolecular conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xingyuan; Viney, Christopher; Johnson, Erin R; Wang, Changchun; Lu, Jennifer Q

    2013-12-01

    Mechanoresponsive polymers hold great technological potential in drug delivery, 'smart' optical systems and microelectromechanical systems. However, hysteresis and fatigue (associated with large-scale polymer chain rearrangement) are often problematic. Here, we describe a polyarylamide film that contains s-dibenzocyclooctadiene (DBCOD), which can generate unconventional and completely reversible thermal contraction under low-energy stimulation. The films exhibit a giant negative thermal expansion coefficient of approximately -1,200 ppm K(-1) at ambient or near-ambient temperatures, much higher than any known negative-thermal-expansion materials under similar operating conditions. Mechanical characterization, calorimetry, spectroscopic analysis and density-functional theory calculations all point to the conformational change of the DBCOD moiety, from the thermodynamic global energy minimum (twist-boat) to a local minimum (chair), as the origin of this abnormal thermal shrinkage. This newly identified, low-energy-driven, thermally agile molecular subunit opens a new pathway to creating near-infrared-based macromolecular switches and motors, and for ambient thermal energy storage and conversion.

  2. ETHERNES: A new design of radionuclide source-based thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R; Sacco, D; Gómez-Ros, J M; Lorenzoli, M; Gentile, A; Buonomo, B; Pola, A; Introini, M V; Bortot, D; Domingo, C

    2016-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility based on an (241)Am-Be source embedded in a polyethylene moderator has been designed, and is called ETHERNES (Extended THERmal NEutron Source). The facility shows a large irradiation cavity (45 cm × 45 cm square section, 63 cm in height), which is separated from the source by means of a polyethylene sphere acting as shadowing object. Taking advantage of multiple scattering of neutrons with the walls of this cavity, the moderation process is especially effective and allows obtaining useful thermal fluence rates from 550 to 800 cm(-2) s(-1) with a source having nominal emission rate 5.7×10(6) s(-1). Irradiation planes parallel to the cavity bottom have been identified. The fluence rate across a given plane is as uniform as 3% (or better) in a disk with 30 cm (or higher) diameter. In practice, the value of thermal fluence rate simply depends on the height from the cavity bottom. The thermal neutron spectral fraction ranges from 77% up to 89%, depending on the irradiation plane. The angular distribution of thermal neutrons is roughly isotropic, with a slight prevalence of directions from bottom to top of the cavity. The mentioned characteristics are expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  3. Experimental characterization of HOTNES: A new thermal neutron facility with large homogeneity area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R.; Sperduti, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Pola, A.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, called HOTNES (HOmogeneous Thermal NEutron Source), was established in the framework of a collaboration between INFN-LNF and ENEA-Frascati. HOTNES is a polyethylene assembly, with about 70 cmx70 cm square section and 100 cm height, including a large, cylindrical cavity with diameter 30 cm and height 70 cm. The facility is supplied by a 241Am-B source located at the bottom of this cavity. The facility was designed in such a way that the iso-thermal-fluence surfaces, characterizing the irradiation volume, coincide with planes parallel to the cavity bottom. The thermal fluence rate across a given isofluence plane is as uniform as 1% on a disk with 30 cm diameter. Thermal fluence rate values from about 700 cm-2 s-1 to 1000 cm-2 s-1 can be achieved. The facility design, previously optimized by Monte Carlo simulation, was experimentally verified. The following techniques were used: gold activation foils to assess the thermal fluence rate, semiconductor-based active detector for mapping the irradiation volume, and Bonner Sphere Spectrometer to determine the complete neutron spectrum. HOTNES is expected to be attractive for the scientific community involved in neutron metrology, neutron dosimetry and neutron detector testing.

  4. Structure Topology Optimization of Brake Pad in Large- megawatt Wind Turbine Brake Considering Thermal- structural Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. F.; Yin, J.; Liu, Y.; Sha, Z. H.; Ma, F. J.

    2016-11-01

    There always exists severe non-uniform wear of brake pad in large-megawatt wind turbine brake during the braking process, which has the brake pad worn out in advance and even threats the safety production of wind turbine. The root cause of this phenomenon is the non-uniform deformation caused by thermal-structural coupling effect between brake pad and disc while braking under the conditions of both high speed and heavy load. For this problem, mathematical model of thermal-structural coupling analysis is built. Based on the topology optimization method of Solid Isotropic Microstructures with Penalization, SIMP, structure topology optimization of brake pad is developed considering the deformation caused by thermal-structural coupling effect. The objective function is the minimum flexibility, and the structure topology optimization model of brake pad is established after indirect thermal- structural coupling analysis. Compared with the optimization result considering non-thermal- structural coupling, the conspicuous influence of thermal effect on brake pad wear and deformation is proven as well as the rationality of taking thermal-structural coupling effect as optimization condition. Reconstructed model is built according to the result, meanwhile analysis for verification is carried out with the same working condition. This study provides theoretical foundation for the design of high-speed and heavy-load brake pad. The new structure may provide design reference for improving the stress condition between brake pad and disc, enhancing the use ratio of friction material and increasing the working performance of large-megawatt wind turbine brake.

  5. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stresses of large-sized castings in solidification processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    When heavy machines and large scaled receiver system of communication equipment are manufactured, it always needs to produce large- sized steel castings, aluminum castings and etc. Some defects of hot cracking by thermal stress often appear during solidification process as these castings are produced, which results in failure of castings.Therefore predicting the effects of technological parameters for production of castings on the thermal stress during solidification process becomes an important means. In this paper, the mathematical models have been established and numerical calculation of temperature fields by using finite difference method (FDM) and then thermal stress fields by using finite element method (FEM) during solidification process of castings have been carried out. The technological parameters of production have been optimized by the results of calculation and the defects of hot cracking have been eliminated. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stress during solidification processes of large-sized castings provided a scientific basis, which promoted further development of advanced manufacturing technique.

  6. Potential benefits of a ceramic thermal barrier coating on large power generation gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating design option offers benefit in terms of reduced electricity costs when used in utility gas turbines. Options considered include: increased firing temperature, increased component life, reduced cooling air requirements, and increased corrosion resistance (resulting in increased tolerance for dirty fuels). Performance and cost data were obtained. Simple, recuperated and combined cycle applications were considered, and distillate and residual fuels were assumed. The results indicate that thermal barrier coatings could produce large electricity cost savings if these coatings permit turbine operation with residual fuels at distillate-rated firing temperatures. The results also show that increased turbine inlet temperature can result in substantial savings in fuel and capital costs.

  7. Thermal photon radiation in high multiplicity p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, C; Denicol, G S; Jeon, S; Gale, C

    2015-01-01

    The collective behaviour of hadronic particles has been observed in high multiplicity proton-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), as well as in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). In this work we present the first calculation, in the hydrodynamic framework, of thermal photon radiation from such small collision systems. Owing to their compact size, these systems can reach temperatures comparable to those in central nucleus-nucleus collisions. The thermal photons can thus shine over the prompt background, and increase the low $p_T$ direct photon spectrum by a factor of 2-3 in 0-1% p+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. This thermal photon enhancement can therefore serve as a clean signature of the existence of a hot quark-gluon plasma during the evolution of these small collision systems, as well as validate hydrodynamic behavior in small systems.

  8. Large eddy simulation on thermal fluid mixing in a T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick; Kulenovic, R.; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst fuer Kernenergie und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2014-11-15

    High cycle thermal fatigue damage caused in piping systems is an important problem encountered in the context of nuclear safety and lifetime management of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The T-junction piping system present in the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) is more vulnerable to thermal fatigue cracking. In this numerical study, thermal mixing of fluids at temperature difference (?T) of 117 K between the mixing fluids is analyzed. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed with conjugate heat transfer between the fluid and structure. LES is performed based on the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at University of Stuttgart. The results show an intense turbulent mixing of fluids downstream of T-junction. Amplitude of temperature fluctuations near the wall region and its corresponding frequency distribution is analyzed. LES is performed using commercial CFD software ANSYS CFX 14.0.

  9. An excellent candidate for largely reducing interfacial thermal resistance: a nano-confined mass graded interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pursuing extremely low interfacial thermal resistance has long been the task of many researchers in the area of nano-scale heat transfer, in particular pertaining to improve heat dissipation performance in electronic cooling. While it is well known and documented that confining a macroscopic third layer between two dissimilar materials usually increases the overall interfacial thermal resistance, no research has realized the fundamental decrease in resistance so far. By performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the overall interfacial thermal resistance can be reduced by 6 fold by confining mass graded materials with thickness of the order of nanometers. As comparison we also studied the thermal transport across the perfectly abrupt interface and the widely used alloyed (rough) interface, which shows an opposing and significantly large increase in the overall thermal resistance. With the help of frequency dependent interfacial thermal conductance and wave packet dynamics simulation, different mechanisms governing the heat transfer across these three types of interfaces are identified. It is found that for the rough interface there are two different regimes of interfacial heat transfer, which originates from the competition between phonon scattering and the thickness of the interface. The mechanism of dramatically improved interfacial heat transfer across the nano-confined mass graded interface resides in the minor phonon reflection when the phonons first reach the mass graded area and the rare occurrence of phonon scattering in the subsequent interior region. The phonons are found to be gradually truncated by the geometric interfaces and can travel through the mass graded layer with a high transmission coefficient, benefited from the small mass mismatch between two neighboring layers in the interfacial region. Our findings provide deep insight into the phonon transport across nano-confined mass graded layers and also offer significant

  10. Large magnetostriction and negative thermal expansion in the frustrated antiferromagnet ZnCr2Se4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberger, J; von Nidda, H-A Krug; Tsurkan, V; Loidl, A

    2007-04-06

    A detailed investigation of ZnCr2Se4 is presented which is dominated by strong ferromagnetic exchange but orders antiferromagnetically at TN=21 K. Specific heat and thermal expansion exhibit sharp first-order anomalies at the antiferromagnetic transition. TN is shifted to lower temperatures by external magnetic fields and finally is fully suppressed by a field of 65 kOe. The relative length change DeltaL/L(T) is unusually large and exhibits negative thermal expansion alpha below 75 K down to TN indicating strong frustration of the lattice. Magnetostriction DeltaL/L(H) reveals large values comparable to giant magnetostrictive materials. These results point to a spin-driven origin of the structural instability at TN explained in terms of competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions.

  11. Temperature control for thermal treatment of aluminum alloy in a large-scale vertical quench furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈玲; 贺建军; 喻寿益; 桂卫华

    2016-01-01

    The temperature control of the large-scale vertical quench furnace is very difficult due to its huge volume and complex thermal exchanges. To meet the technical requirement of the quenching process, a temperature control system which integrates temperature calibration and temperature uniformity control is developed for the thermal treatment of aluminum alloy workpieces in the large-scale vertical quench furnace. To obtain the aluminum alloy workpiece temperature, an air heat transfer model is newly established to describe the temperature gradient distribution so that the immeasurable workpiece temperature can be calibrated from the available thermocouple temperature. To satisfy the uniformity control of the furnace temperature, a second order partial differential equation (PDE) is derived to describe the thermal dynamics inside the vertical quench furnace. Based on the PDE, a decoupling matrix is constructed to solve the coupling issue and decouple the heating process into multiple independent heating subsystems. Then, using the expert control rule to find a compromise of temperature rising time and overshoot during the quenching process. The developed temperature control system has been successfully applied to a 31 m large-scale vertical quench furnace, and the industrial running results show the significant improvement of the temperature uniformity, lower overshoot and shortened processing time.

  12. A Verilog-A large signal model for InP DHBT including thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuxia, Shi; Zhi, Jin; Zhijian, Pan; Yongbo, Su; Yuxiong, Cao; Yan, Wang

    2013-06-01

    A large signal model for InP/InGaAs double heterojunction bipolar transistors including thermal effects has been reported, which demonstrated good agreements of simulations with measurements. On the basis of the previous model in which the double heterojunction effect, current blocking effect and high current effect in current expression are considered, the effect of bandgap narrowing with temperature has been considered in transport current while a formula for model parameters as a function of temperature has been developed. This model is implemented by Verilog-A and embedded in ADS. The proposed model is verified with DC and large signal measurements.

  13. High temperature thermal behaviour modeling of large-scale fused silica optics for laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jing-Xia; He Shao-Bo; Xiang Xia; Yuan Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo; Lü Hai-Bing; Zu Xiao-Tao

    2012-01-01

    High temperature annealing is often used for the stress control of optical materials.However,weight and viscosity at high temperature may destroy the surface morphology,especially for the large-scale,thin and heavy optics used for large laser facilities.It is necessary to understand the thermal behaviour and design proper support systems for large-scale optics at high temperature.In this work,three support systems for fused silica optics are designed and simulated with the finite element method.After the analysis of the thermal behaviours of different support systems,some advantages and disadvantages can be revealed.The results show that the support with the optical surface vertical is optimal because both pollution and deformation of optics could be well controlled during annealing at high temperature.Annealing process of the optics irradiated by CO2 laser is also simulated.It can be concluded that high temperature annealing can effectively reduce the residual stress.However,the effects of annealing on surface morphology of the optics are complex.Annealing creep is closely related to the residual stress and strain distribution.In the region with large residual stress,the creep is too large and probably increases the deformation gradient which may affect the laser beam propagation.

  14. Ultra-low thermal conductivities in large-area Si-Ge nanomeshes for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Taborda, Jaime Andres; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Maiz, Jon; Neophytou, Neophytos; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we measure the thermal and thermoelectric properties of large-area Si0.8Ge0.2 nano-meshed films fabricated by DC sputtering of Si0.8Ge0.2 on highly ordered porous alumina matrices. The Si0.8Ge0.2 film replicated the porous alumina structure resulting in nano-meshed films. Very good control of the nanomesh geometrical features (pore diameter, pitch, neck) was achieved through the alumina template, with pore diameters ranging from 294 ± 5nm down to 31 ± 4 nm. The method we developed is able to provide large areas of nano-meshes in a simple and reproducible way, being easily scalable for industrial applications. Most importantly, the thermal conductivity of the films was reduced as the diameter of the porous became smaller to values that varied from κ = 1.54 ± 0.27 W K−1m−1, down to the ultra-low κ = 0.55 ± 0.10 W K−1m−1 value. The latter is well below the amorphous limit, while the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the material were retained. These properties, together with our large area fabrication approach, can provide an important route towards achieving high conversion efficiency, large area, and high scalable thermoelectric materials. PMID:27650202

  15. Ultra-low thermal conductivities in large-area Si-Ge nanomeshes for thermoelectric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Taborda, Jaime Andres; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Maiz, Jon; Neophytou, Neophytos; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-09-21

    In this work, we measure the thermal and thermoelectric properties of large-area Si0.8Ge0.2 nano-meshed films fabricated by DC sputtering of Si0.8Ge0.2 on highly ordered porous alumina matrices. The Si0.8Ge0.2 film replicated the porous alumina structure resulting in nano-meshed films. Very good control of the nanomesh geometrical features (pore diameter, pitch, neck) was achieved through the alumina template, with pore diameters ranging from 294 ± 5nm down to 31 ± 4 nm. The method we developed is able to provide large areas of nano-meshes in a simple and reproducible way, being easily scalable for industrial applications. Most importantly, the thermal conductivity of the films was reduced as the diameter of the porous became smaller to values that varied from κ = 1.54 ± 0.27 W K(-1)m(-1), down to the ultra-low κ = 0.55 ± 0.10 W K(-1)m(-1) value. The latter is well below the amorphous limit, while the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the material were retained. These properties, together with our large area fabrication approach, can provide an important route towards achieving high conversion efficiency, large area, and high scalable thermoelectric materials.

  16. Formation and Thermal Stability of Large Precipitates and Oxides in Titanium and Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Xiao-jun; WOO Dae-hee; WANG Xin-hua; LEE Hae-geon

    2008-01-01

    As-cast CC slabs of microalloyed steels are prone to surface and sub-surface cracking. Precipitation phenomena in-itiated during solidification reduce ductility at high temperature. The unidirectional solidification unit is employed to sim-ulate the solidification process during continuous casting. Precipitation behavior and thermal stability are systemati-cally investigated. Samples of adding titanium and niobium to steels have been examined using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It has been found that the addition of titanium and niobium to high-strength low-alloyed (HSLA) steel resuited in undesirable large precipitation in the steels, i. e. , precipitation of large precipitates with various morphologies. The composition of the large precipitates has been determined. The effect of cooling rate on (Ti, Nb)(C, N) precipitate formation is investigated. With increasing the cooling rate, titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C, N) precipitates are transformed to niobium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitates. The thermal stability of these large precipitates and oxides have been assessed by carrying out various heat treatments such as holding and quenching from temperature at 800 and 1 200 ℃. It has been found that titanium-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 1 200 ℃ and niobi-um-rich (Ti,Nb)(C,N) precipitate is stable at about 800 ℃. After reheating at 1 200 ℃ for 1 h, (Ca, Mn)S and TiN are precipitated from Ca-Al oxide. However, during reheating at 800 ℃ for 1 h, Ca-Al-Ti oxide in specimens was stable. The thermodynamic calculation of simulating the thermal process is employed. The calculation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  18. Thermal Deformation and RF Performance Analyses for the SWOT Large Deployable Ka-Band Reflectarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; Sunada, E.; Chaubell, J.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Thomson, M.; Nicaise, F.

    2010-01-01

    A large deployable antenna technology for the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission is currently being developed by JPL in response to NRC Earth Science Tier 2 Decadal Survey recommendations. This technology is required to enable the SWOT mission due to the fact that no currently available antenna is capable of meeting SWOT's demanding Ka-Band remote sensing requirements. One of the key aspects of this antenna development is to minimize the effect of the on-orbit thermal distortion to the antenna RF performance. An analysis process which includes: 1) the on-orbit thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution; 2) structural deformation analysis to get the geometry of the antenna surface; and 3) the RF performance with the given deformed antenna surface has been developed to accommodate the development of this antenna technology. The detailed analysis process and some analysis results will be presented and discussed by this paper.

  19. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieler, Thomas R., E-mail: bieler@egr.msu.edu; Kang, Di, E-mail: kangdi@msu.edu; Baars, Derek C., E-mail: baarsder@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States); Chandrasekaran, Saravan, E-mail: saravan@fnal.gov [Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States); Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606, US (United States); Mapar, Aboozar, E-mail: maparabo@egr.msu.edu; Wright, Neil T., E-mail: ntwright@egr.msu.edu [Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati Rao, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606, US (United States); Pourboghrat, Farhang, E-mail: pourboghrat.2@osu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, US (United States); Murphy, James E., E-mail: jim@unr.edu [Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno NV, 89557, US (United States); Compton, Chris C., E-mail: compton@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  20. Thermal Behaviour Investigation of a Large and High Power Lithium Iron Phosphate Cylindrical Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Capron

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the thermal behaviour of a large lithium iron phosphate (LFP battery cell based on its electrochemical-thermal modelling for the predictions of its temperature evolution and distribution during both charge and discharge processes. The electrochemical-thermal modelling of the cell is performed for two cell geometry approaches: homogeneous (the internal region is considered as a single region and discrete (the internal region is split into smaller regions for each layer inside the cell. The experimental measurements and the predictions of the cell surface temperature achieved with the simulations for both approaches are in good agreement with 1.5 °C maximum root mean square error. From the results, the maximum cell surface temperature and temperature gradient between the internal and the surface regions are around 31.3 °C and 1.6 °C. The temperature gradient in the radial direction is observed to be greater about 1.1 °C compared to the longitudinal direction, which is caused by the lower thermal conductivity of the cell in the radial compared to the longitudinal direction. During its discharge, the reversible, the ohmic and the reaction heat generations inside the cell reach up to 2 W, 7 W and 17 W respectively. From the comparison of the two modelling approaches, this paper establishes that the homogeneous modelling of the cell internal region is suitable for the study of a single cylindrical cell and is appropriate for the two-dimensional thermal behaviour investigation of a battery module made of multiple cells.

  1. RESOURCE SAVING TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS OF LARGE-SIZE DIE THERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Glazkov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The given paper presents a development of a technological process pertaining to hardening large-size parts made of die steel. The proposed process applies a water-air mixture instead of a conventional hardening medium that is industrial oil.While developing this new technological process it has been necessary to solve the following problems: reduction of thermal treatment duration, reduction of power resource expense (natural gas and mineral oil, elimination of fire danger and increase of process ecological efficiency. 

  2. PHOS Experiment: Thermal Response of a Large Diameter Pulsating Heat Pipe on Board REXUS-18 Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Marengo, M.; Manzoni, M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the results of two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) tested on board REXUS-1 8 sounding rocket in order to get experimental data over a relatively broad reduced gravity period (about 90 s) are thoroughly discussed. The CLPHPs are partially filled with refrigerant FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 .0 mm) and slightly smaller (1 .6 mm) than a critical diameter defined on Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP works as a real Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the typical capillary slug flow pattern forms inside the device and the heat exchange is triggered by self-sustained thermally driven oscillations of the working fluid. Conversely, the large diameter CLPHP behaves like a two-phase thermosyphon in vertical position while does not operate in horizontal position as the working fluid stratifies within the tube and surface tension is not able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs under reduced gravity conditions: as soon as gravity reduces, buoyancy becomes less intense and the typical capillary slug flow pattern can also forms within a tube with a larger diameter. Moreover, this allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience the expected reduced gravity conditions due to a failure of the yo-yo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  3. Thermal Influence of a Large Green Space on a Hot Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Shogo; Takahashi, Hideo; Hagiwara, Shinsuke; Narita, Ken-Ichi; Mikami, Takehiko; Hirano, Tatsuki

    2016-01-01

    City-scale warming is becoming a serious problem in terms of human health. Urban green spaces are expected to act as a countermeasure for urban warming, and therefore better understanding of the micro-climate benefits of urban green is needed. This study quantified the thermal influence of a large green park in Tokyo, Japan on the surrounding urban area by collecting long-term measurements. Apparent variations in the temperature difference between the park and surrounding town were found at both the diurnal and seasonal scales. Advection by regional-scale wind and turbulent mixing transfers colder air from the park to urban areas in its vicinity. The extent of the park's thermal influence on the town was greater on the downwind side of the park (450 m) than on the upwind side (65 m). The extent was also greater in an area where the terrain slopes down toward the town. Even on calm nights, the extent of the thermal influence extended by the park breeze to an average of 200 m from the park boundary. The park breeze was characterized by its divergent flow in a horizontal plane, which was found to develop well in calm conditions late at night (regional scale wind green space tempered the hot summer nights on a city block scale. These findings can help urban planners in designing a heat-adapted city. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  5. XMM-Newton Large Program on SN1006 - II: Thermal Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Miceli, Marco; Vink, Jacco; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Based on the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006 and our newly developed spatially resolved spectroscopy tools (Paper~I), we study the thermal emission from ISM and ejecta of SN1006 by analyzing the spectra extracted from 583 tessellated regions dominated by thermal emission. With some key improvements in spectral analysis as compared to Paper~I, we obtain much better spectral fitting results with less residuals. The spatial distributions of the thermal and ionization states of the ISM and ejecta show different features, which are consistent with a scenario that the ISM (ejecta) is heated and ionized by the forward (reverse) shock propagating outward (inward). Different elements have different spatial distributions and origins, with Ne mostly from the ISM, Si and S from the ejecta, and O and Mg from both ISM and ejecta. Fe L-shell lines are only detected in a small shell-like region SE to the center of SN1006, indicating that most of the Fe-rich ejecta has not yet or just recently been reached by the reverse s...

  6. Thermally Sprayed Large Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Stack: Geometry Optimization, Preparation, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; He, Peng-Jiang; Yun, Liang-Liang; Song, Bo; Xie, Ying-Xin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we develop a large tubular solid oxide fuel cells design with several cells in series on a porous cermet support, which has many characteristics such as self-sealing, low Ohmic loss, high strength, and good thermal expansion coefficient matching. Here, we investigate aspects of the cell design, manufacture, performance, and application. Firstly, the cell length and number of cells in series are optimized by theoretical analysis. Then, thermal spraying is applied as a cost-effective method to prepare all the cell components. Finally, the performance of different types of cells and two types of stacks is characterized. The maximum output power of one tube, which had 20 cells in series, reaches 31 and 40.5 W at 800 and 900 °C, respectively. Moreover, the output power of a stack assembled with 56 tubes, each with ten cells in series, reaches 800 W at 830 °C. The excellent single tube and cell stack performance suggest that thermally sprayed tubular SOFCs have significant potential for commercialized application.

  7. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Goethe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  8. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethe, Martin; Fita, Ignacio; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2016-03-01

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  9. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethe, Martin, E-mail: martingoethe@ub.edu; Rubi, J. Miguel [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  10. Review of pressurized thermal shock studies of large scale reactor pressure vessels in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fekete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, four nuclear power units were constructed more than 30 years ago; they are operating to this day. In every unit, VVER-440 V213-type light-water cooled, light-water moderated, ressurized water reactors are in operation. Since the mid-1980s, numerous researches in the field of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analyses of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs have been conducted in Hungary; in all of them, the concept of structural integrity was the basis of research and development. During this time, four large PTS studies with industrial relevance have been completed in Hungary. Each used different objectives and guides, and the analysis methodology was also changing. This paper gives a comparative review of the methodologies used in these large PTS Structural Integrity Analysis projects, presenting the latest results as well

  11. Thermal System Analysis and Optimization of Large-Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongguang Fu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As an important solution to issues regarding peak load and renewable energy resources on grids, large-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES power generation technology has recently become a popular research topic in the area of large-scale industrial energy storage. At present, the combination of high-expansion ratio turbines with advanced gas turbine technology is an important breakthrough in energy storage technology. In this study, a new gas turbine power generation system is coupled with current CAES technology. Moreover, a thermodynamic cycle system is optimized by calculating for the parameters of a thermodynamic system. Results show that the thermal efficiency of the new system increases by at least 5% over that of the existing system.

  12. Neutrophil dysfunction after thermal injury: alteration of phagolysosomal acidification in patients with large burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerknes, R; Vindenes, H

    1989-04-01

    The neutrophil phagolysosomal acidification during phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus was examined in six patients with large burns, using a flow cytometric technique allowing the simultaneous measurement of phagocytosis and phagolysosomal pH. The kinetics of neutrophil phagolysosomal acidification were altered during the first 20 days following injury, as the initial alkalinization of the phagolysosomes documented in control neutrophils could not be demonstrated in patient cells. Only at discharge and follow-up were the kinetics of phagolysosomal acidification normal. In addition, measurements of neutrophil maximal phagolysosomal acidification showed a lower pH in patient phagolysosomes than in the controls during the first 5 days of hospitalization. The changes of phagolysosomal acidification did not correlate with the alterations of neutrophil maturity or phagocytic capacity. The results demonstrate alterations of an oxygen-independent microbicidal mechanism in neutrophils from patients with large burns, which may contribute to the reduced capacity of neutrophil intracellular killing following thermal injury.

  13. Modification of a very large thermal-vacuum test chamber for ionosphere and plasmasphere simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    No large-volume chamber existed which could simulate the ion and electron environment of near-earth space. A very large thermal-vacuum chamber was modified to provide for the manipulation of the test volume magnetic field and for the generation and monitoring of plasma. Plasma densities of 1 million particles per cu cm were generated in the chamber where a variable magnetic flux density of up to 0.00015 T (1.5 gauss) was produced. Plasma temperature, density, composition, and visual effects were monitored, and plasma containment and control were investigated. Initial operation of the modified chamber demonstrated a capability satisfactory for a wide variety of experiments and hardware tests which require an interaction with the plasma environment. Potential for improving the quality of the simulation exists.

  14. Thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite: A large scale waste treatment option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Abbie N.; Marsden, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    This study has investigated the laboratory scale thermal oxidation of nuclear graphite, as a proof-of-concept for the treatment and decommissioning of reactor cores on a larger industrial scale. If showed to be effective, this technology could have promising international significance with a considerable impact on the nuclear waste management problem currently facing many countries worldwide. The use of thermal treatment of such graphite waste is seen as advantageous since it will decouple the need for an operational Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). Particulate samples of Magnox Reactor Pile Grade-A (PGA) graphite, were oxidised in both air and 60% O2, over the temperature range 400–1200°C. Oxidation rates were found to increase with temperature, with a particular rise between 700–800°C, suggesting a change in oxidation mechanism. A second increase in oxidation rate was observed between 1000–1200°C and was found to correspond to a large increase in the CO/CO2 ratio, as confirmed through gas analysis. Increasing the oxidant flow rate gave a linear increase in oxidation rate, up to a certain point, and maximum rates of 23.3 and 69.6 mg / min for air and 60% O2 respectively were achieved at a flow of 250 ml / min and temperature of 1000°C. These promising results show that large-scale thermal treatment could be a potential option for the decommissioning of graphite cores, although the design of the plant would need careful consideration in order to achieve optimum efficiency and throughput. PMID:28793326

  15. Large thermally induced nonlinear refraction of gold nanoparticles stabilized by cyclohexanone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkhosh, Leila; Aleali, Hoda; Karimzadeh, Rouhollah; Mansour, Nastaran [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin 19839, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Stabilized gold nanoparticle (AuNP) colloids have been fabricated by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a pure gold plate in cyclohexanone. The AuNPs colloid exhibits a UV-Vis absorption spectrum with a surface plasmon absorption peak at about 540 nm. Scanning electron microscopy has shown the formation of spherical AuNPs with average size about 53 nm. The shift of 24 cm{sup -1} is observed in the carbonyl band of the colloid using FTIR spectroscopy. This shift indicates that the monomer carbonyl group of cyclohexanone interacts with the surface of the AuNPs and leads to stabilizing the colloid. A large nonlinear refractive index of -2.92 x 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/W is measured using the Z-scan technique under continuous wave laser irradiation at 532 nm. Our results show that the large induced nonlinear refraction is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhancement effect of AuNPs, high thermo-optic coefficient and low thermal conductivity of cyclohexanone. Observation of far-field diffraction ring patterns confirm a thermally induced negative lens effect and spatial self-phase modulation in the laser beam as it traverses the colloids. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Optimal simulations of ultrasonic fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays using the angular spectrum approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; McGough, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The angular spectrum approach is evaluated for the simulation of focused ultrasound fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays. For an input pressure or normal particle velocity distribution in a plane, the angular spectrum approach rapidly computes the output pressure field in a three dimensional volume. To determine the optimal combination of simulation parameters for angular spectrum calculations, the effect of the size, location, and the numerical accuracy of the input plane on the computed output pressure is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that angular spectrum calculations performed with an input pressure plane are more accurate than calculations with an input velocity plane. Results also indicate that when the input pressure plane is slightly larger than the array aperture and is located approximately one wavelength from the array, angular spectrum simulations have very small numerical errors for two dimensional planar arrays. Furthermore, the root mean squared error from angular spectrum simulations asymptotically approaches a nonzero lower limit as the error in the input plane decreases. Overall, the angular spectrum approach is an accurate and robust method for thermal therapy simulations of large ultrasound phased arrays when the input pressure plane is computed with the fast nearfield method and an optimal combination of input parameters.

  17. Mechanical abuse simulation and thermal runaway risks of large-format Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Rule, Evan T.; Winchester, Clinton S.

    2017-02-01

    Internal short circuit of large-format Li-ion pouch cells induced by mechanical abuse was simulated using a modified mechanical pinch test. A torsion force was added manually at ∼40% maximum compressive loading force during the pinch test. The cell was twisted about 5° to the side by horizontally pulling a wire attached to the anode tab. The combined torsion-compression force created small failure at the separator yet allowed testing of fully charged large format Li-ion cells without triggering thermal runaway. Two types of commercial cells were tested using 4-6 cells at each state-of-charge (SOC). Commercially available 18 Ahr LiFePO4 (LFP) and 25 Ahr Li(NiMnCo)1/3O2 (NMC) cells were tested, and a thermal runaway risk (TRR) score system was used to evaluate the safety of the cells under the same testing conditions. The aim was to provide the cell manufacturers and end users with a tool to compare different designs and safety features.

  18. Heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres enhance large-wound healing by delivering growth factors in platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Wan-Geun; Yang, Hee Seok

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains many growth factors that are involved in tissue regeneration processes. For successful tissue regeneration, protein growth factors require a delivery vehicle for long-term and sustained release to a defect site in order to maintain their bioactivity. Previously, we showed that heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres (HCPNs) can provide long-term delivery of growth factors with affinity for heparin. In this study, we hypothesize that treatment of a skin wound with a mixture of PRP and HCPNs would provide long-term delivery of several growth factors contained in PRP to promote the skin wound healing process with preservation of bioactivity. The release of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), contained in PRP, from HCPN with fibrin gel (FG) showed a prolonged release period versus a PRP mixture with FG alone (FG-PRP). Also, growth factors released from PRP with HCPN and FG showed sustained human dermal fibroblast growth for 12 days. Full-thickness skin wound treatment in mice with FG-HCPN-PRP resulted in much faster wound closure as well as dermal and epidermal regeneration at day 9 compared with treatment with FG-HCPN or FG-PRP. The enhanced wound healing using FG-HCPN-PRP may be due to the prolonged release not only of PDGF-BB but also of other growth factors in the PRP. The delivered growth factors accelerated angiogenesis at the wound site.

  19. Volcanic Infillings of Large Basins on Mercury as Indicators of Mantle Thermal State and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovan, Sebastiano; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Ruedas, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The crust of Mercury is mostly the cumulative result of partial melting in the mantle associated with solid-state convection [1]. The details of how the surface composition represents the result of dynamical processes in the interior are difficult to elucidate. Explanations for the observed geochemically varied surface include a heterogeneous mantle, the effects of ancient giant impacts, an evolving mantle composition, or a combination of these processes [e.g., 2]. Here we explore the effects of large impacts on mantle dynamics and associated melt production. With the convection code GAIA we compute thermal evolution histories of Mercury compatible with the expected amount of heat producing elements in the mantle and with the crustal thickness inferred from gravity and topography data. We estimate the thermal anomalies in the mantle generated by large impacts using scaling laws [3]. Impactors have a velocity of 42 km/s and an impact angle of 45°, as appropriate for Mercury [4]. Their size is varied in order to produce basins with diameters in the range from 715 km (Rembrandt) to 1550 km (Caloris). Depending on the timing of the impact, the melt erupting in the basin interior is a combination of convective melt generated at depth and shallow melt resulting from shallow impact-induced convective currents. The volcanic infillings following an impact happening early in the evolution of the planet, when convection is still vigorous, are dominated by convective melt. Later in the evolution, the erupted melt shows the signature of the impact-induced shallow melt. We show that the properties of melt sheets within the young large basins Caloris and Rembrandt depend on the mantle thermal state and composition. In particular, we predict the source depth of the volcanic plains within large young basins to be different from the source depth of older surface units, a result that can help explaining the peculiar composition of the volcanic plains inside Caloris [2, 5]. [1] Tosi

  20. The development of an environmental disturbance model for large space structures after the onset of thermal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamsath, N.; Bainum, P. M.; Krishna, R.

    1986-01-01

    Expressions for the temperature response across a thin large space structure during and immediately following the onset of thermal shock are obtained as a function of the properties of the material and the solar incidence angle. The thermal gradients induced due to solar radiation heating result in thermal deformation. From the temperature gradient information, expressions are developed for the time history of the thermally induced deflections based on the thermoelastic relationships. The effect of the variation of the solar incidence angle and the variation of the emissivity of the surface is considered. From the deflection time history, a model of the disturbance moments is developed and evaluated for different solar incidence angles.

  1. Large magnetocaloric effect and near-zero thermal hysteresis in the rare earth intermetallic Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuyang; Tian, Fanghua; Chang, Tieyan; Chen, Kaiyun; Yang, Sen; Cao, Kaiyan; Zhou, Chao; Song, Xiaoping

    2017-02-01

    We report the magnetocaloric effect in a Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compound which exhibits a wide working temperature window around the Curie temperature (T C) and delivers a large refrigerant capacity (RC) with near-zero thermal hysteresis. Specifically, the wide full width at half maxima ({δ\\text{WFHM}} ) can reach up to 62 K and the RC value changes from 216.5 to 274.3 J Kg-1 when the external magnetic field increases to 5 T. Such magnetocaloric effects are attributed to a magnetic and structural transition from a paramagnetic and cubic phase to a ferromagnetic (M S along [1 1 1] direction) and rhombohedral phase or ferromagnetic (M S along [0 0 1] direction) and tetragonal phase.

  2. Effect of crystallographic orientation on hillock formation in thermally cycled large grain tin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, John Patrick

    Tin whiskers and hillocks grow spontaneously from the surfaces of polycrystalline Sn films at room temperature. Whiskers can grow long enough to cause short circuits in electronic devices. We hypothesized that the anisotropies of the crystal structure lead to locally high strain energies that are relieved by the growth of whiskers and hillocks. This research studies hillock formations on large grain Sn-alloy films relative to the crystallographic orientations of the adjacent grains. Large grain films were produced by solidifying 96.5wt% Sn - 3wt% Ag - 0.5wt% Cu solder alloy on a Cu substrate. These surface defects (hillocks) grew predominately at grain boundaries during thermal cycling. The formation of the surface defects between two grains created a pseudo-bi-crystal sample geometry, making it ideal for studying surface defects relative to the local crystallographic orientations and the grains' corresponding anisotropic properties. The crystallographic orientations of the grains were studied with Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) and Laue micro-diffraction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Local orientation studies of the surface defects and the surrounding grains indicated that the surface defects nucleated and grew with low dislocation densities. In addition, the linear surface defect densities along the grain boundaries were measured and observed to change as a function of orientation. The change in linear defect density with respect to orientation was due, in part, to the anisotropy of the coefficient of thermal expansion of β-Sn. In addition, it was important to account for elastic anisotropies. The elastic stresses, strains, and strain energy densities of the microstructures were determined with Object Oriented Finite element analysis. The simulations indicated that during thermal cycling the local stresses exceeded the yield strength. As a result, the highest linear defect densities did not occur at orientations

  3. Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Helium Loop Heat Pipe for Large Area Cryocooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin

    2016-01-01

    Future NASA space telescopes and exploration missions require cryocooling of large areas such as optics, detector arrays, and cryogenic propellant tanks. One device that can potentially be used to provide closed-loop cryocooling is the cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP). A CLHP has many advantages over other devices in terms of reduced mass, reduced vibration, high reliability, and long life. A helium CLHP has been tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber using a cryocooler as the heat sink to characterize its transient and steady performance and to verify its ability to cool large areas or components in the 3 degrees Kelvin temperature range. The helium CLHP thermal performance test included cool-down from the ambient temperature, startup, capillary limit, heat removal capability, rapid power changes, and long duration steady state operation. The helium CLHP demonstrated robust operation under steady state and transient conditions. The loop could be cooled from the ambient temperature to subcritical temperatures very effectively, and could start successfully by simply applying power to both the capillary pump and the evaporator plate without pre-conditioning. It could adapt to a rapid heat load change and quickly reach a new steady state. Heat removal between 10 megawatts and 140 megawatts was demonstrated, yielding a power turn down ratio of 14. When the CLHP capillary limit was exceeded, the loop could resume its normal function by reducing the power to the capillary pump. Steady state operations up to 17 hours at several heat loads were demonstrated. The ability of the helium CLHP to cool large areas was therefore successfully verified.

  4. Reconstruction of the thermal environment evolution from subsurface temperature distribution in large cities in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, H.; Goto, S.; Vuthy, M.; Nishijima, J.; Yamano, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Miyakoshi, A.; Hachinohe, S.; Sasaka, K.; Shiraishi, H.

    2009-12-01

    Temperature changes at the ground surface propagate into the underground and disturb the subsurface temperature structure. Analyzing disturbances in the subsurface temperature structure, we can reconstruct the past ground surface temperature (GST) change, which is closely related to the past surface air temperature change. This method can be applied to studies of thermal environment evolution in urban areas such as the development of “heat islands”. As part of an international multidisciplinary research project “Human Impacts on Urban Subsurface Environments”, we have been investigating GST histories in and around several large cities in East Asia, including Bangkok and Tokyo. We have also started a study on the subsurface thermal environment in Saitama prefecture, located on the north of Tokyo, as a research project of CESS (Center for Environmental Science in Saitama). The eastern part of Saitama prefecture is densely populated and considered to be a part of Tokyo Metropolitan area. In this presentation, we show the results of GST history reconstruction in the both areas. In Bangkok area, we conducted measurements of temperature profiles in groundwater monitoring wells at 45 sites in 2004, 2006, and 2008. In Saitama, we measured temperature profiles at 15 sites in 2009. We examined the shapes of the temperature profiles and selected ones that are not significantly disturbed by groundwater flow. Reconstruction of GST history for the last several hundred years was made at six sites in the Bangkok area and at two sites in the Saitama area. We used a multi-layer model that allows layers with different thermal properties, determining layer boundaries based on lithology of the formations around the wells. All of the reconstructed GST histories show surface warming in the last century. In the Bangkok area, the amount of the temperature increase ranges from 0.4 to 2.6 K and is larger in the city than in the area to the west of Bangkok and in the northern rural

  5. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  6. Measurements of indoor thermal environment and energy analysis in a large space building in typical seasons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen; Zou, Zhijun; Li, Meiling; Wang, Xin; Huang, Wugang; Yang, Jiangang [University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Li, Wei; Xiao, Xueqin [Shanghai International Gymnastics Stadium, Shanghai (China)

    2007-05-15

    Shanghai International Gymnastics Stadium is the selected object for site-measurement. The site-measurements have been carried out during summer, winter, and the transitional seasons. Their indoor thermal environments were controlled by continuous air-conditioning, intermittent air-conditioning and natural ventilation, respectively. The site-measurement includes outdoor environment (the weather conditions and peripheral hallway), indoor air temperature distribution (the occupant zone temperature, radial temperature near upper openings and the vertical temperature distributions, etc.), and the heat balance of air-conditioning system, etc. It is found that temperature stratification in winter with air-conditioning is most obvious. The maximum difference of vertical temperature is 15{sup o}C in winter. The second largest one is 12{sup o}C in summer, and less than 2{sup o}C in the transitional season. The results of measurements indicate that it is different in the characteristics on energy saving of upper openings during the different seasons. With heat balance measurements, it is discovered that the roof load and ventilated and infiltrated load account for larger percentages in terms of cooling and heating load. In this paper, many discussions on the results of site measurements show some characteristics and regulations of indoor thermal environment in large space building. (author)

  7. Conformal Electroplating of Azobenzene-Based Solar Thermal Fuels onto Large-Area and Fiber Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitomirsky, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-10-05

    There is tremendous growth in fields where small functional molecules and colloidal nanomaterials are integrated into thin films for solid-state device applications. Many of these materials are synthesized in solution and there often exists a significant barrier to transition them into the solid state in an efficient manner. Here, we develop a methodology employing an electrodepositable copolymer consisting of small functional molecules for applications in solar energy harvesting and storage. We employ azobenzene solar thermal fuel polymers and functionalize them to enable deposition from low concentration solutions in methanol, resulting in uniform and large-area thin films. This approach enables conformal deposition on a variety of conducting substrates that can be either flat or structured depending on the application. Our approach further enables control over film growth via electrodepsition conditions and results in highly uniform films of hundreds of nanometers to microns in thickness. We demonstrate that this method enables superior retention of solar thermal fuel properties, with energy densities of ∼90 J/g, chargeability in the solid state, and exceptional materials utilization compared to other solid-state processing approaches. This novel approach is applicable to systems such as photon upconversion, photovoltaics, photosensing, light emission, and beyond, where small functional molecules enable solid-state applications.

  8. Reducing dynamic disorder in small-molecule organic semiconductors by suppressing large-amplitude thermal motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, Steffen; Eggeman, Alexander S; Troisi, Alessandro; Jiang, Lang; Warwick, Chris; Nikolka, Mark; Schweicher, Guillaume; Yeates, Stephen G; Henri Geerts, Yves; Anthony, John E; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-02-22

    Thermal vibrations and the dynamic disorder they create can detrimentally affect the transport properties of van der Waals bonded molecular semiconductors. The low-energy nature of these vibrations makes it difficult to access them experimentally, which is why we still lack clear molecular design rules to control and reduce dynamic disorder. In this study we discuss the promising organic semiconductors rubrene, 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothio-phene and 2,9-di-decyl-dinaphtho-[2,3-b:20,30-f]-thieno-[3,2-b]-thiophene in terms of an exceptionally low degree of dynamic disorder. In particular, we analyse diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy, to show that small molecules that have their side chains attached along the long axis of their conjugated core are better encapsulated in their crystal structure, which helps reduce large-amplitude thermal motions. Our work provides a general strategy for the design of new classes of very high mobility organic semiconductors with a low degree of dynamic disorder.

  9. Small- and Large-scale Characterization and Mixing Properties in a Thermally Driven Thin Liquid Film

    CERN Document Server

    Winkler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thin liquid films are nanoscopic elements of foams, emulsions and suspensions, and form a paradigm for nanochannel transport that eventually test the limits of hydrodynamic descriptions. Here we use classical dynamical systems characteristics to study the complex interplay of thermal convection, interface and gravitational forces which yields turbulent mixing and transport: Lyapunov exponents and entropies. We induce a stable two eddy convection in an extremely thin liquid film by applying a temperature gradient. Experimentally, we determine the small-scale dynamics using the motion and deformation of spots of equal size/equal color, we dubbed that technique "color imaging velocimetry". The large-scale dynamics is captured by encoding the left/right motion of the liquid directed to the left or right of the separatrix between the two rolls. This way, we characterize chaos of course mixing in this peculiar fluid geometry of a thin, free-standing liquid film.

  10. Large-amplitude internal waves sustain coral health during thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gertraud M.; Wall, Marlene; Taylor, Marc; Jantzen, Carin; Richter, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Ocean warming is a major threat for coral reefs causing widespread coral bleaching and mortality. Potential refugia are thus crucial for coral survival. Exposure to large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) mitigated heat stress and ensured coral survival and recovery during and after an extreme heat anomaly. The physiological status of two common corals, Porites lutea and Pocillopora meandrina, was monitored in host and symbiont traits, in response to LAIW-exposure throughout the unprecedented 2010 heat anomaly in the Andaman Sea. LAIW-exposed corals of both species survived and recovered, while LAIW-sheltered corals suffered partial and total mortality in P. lutea and P. meandrina, respectively. LAIW are ubiquitous in the tropics and potentially generate coral refuge areas. As thermal stress to corals is expected to increase in a warming ocean, the mechanisms linking coral bleaching to ocean dynamics will be crucial to predict coral survival on a warming planet.

  11. Integrated Thermal-structural-electromagnetic Design Optimization of Large Space Antenna Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, H. M.; Padula, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    The requirements for low mass and high electromagnetic (EM) performance in large, flexible space antenna structures is motivating the development of a systematic procedure for antenna design. In contrast to previous work which concentrated on reducing rms distortions of the reflector surface, thereby indirectly increasing antenna performance, the current work involves a direct approach to increasing electromagnetic performance using mathematical optimization. The thermal, structural, and EM analyses are fully integrated in the context of an optimization procedure, and consequently, the interaction of the various responses is accounted for directly and automatically. Preliminary results are presented for sizing cross-sectional areas of a tetrahedral truss reflector. The results indicate potential for this integrated procedure from the standpoint of mass reduction, performance increase, and efficiency of the design process.

  12. Preliminary Design of Large Scale Sodium Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Tae Joon; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Lee, Jae Han; Jeong, Ji Young; Park, Su Ki; Han, Ji Woong; Yoo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Yong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A large scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test facility is being designed for verification of the advanced design concept of the passive decay heat removal circuit (PDRC) in a medium- or large-sized pool-type SFR. In the test, its cooling capability during the long- and short-term periods after the reactor trip will be evaluated, and also the produced experimental data will be utilized for the assessment and verification of the safety and performance analysis codes. Starting with the preliminary design of the test facility this year using KALIMER-600 as a reference reactor, the basic and the detailed designs will be made through 2011-2012 based on the demonstration reactor which is intended to be constructed by 2028 according to a long-term national SFR development plan. The installation is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2013, and the main experiments will commence from 2015 after the startup test in 2014. This paper briefly introduces the preliminary design features which were produced as a first step to assess the appropriateness of the facility design methodology.

  13. Thermal Stresses and Cracks During the Growth of Large-sized Sapphire with SAPMAC Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The finite-element method has been used to study the thermal stress distribution in large-sized sapphire crystals grown with the sapphire growth technique with micro-pulling and shoulder-expanding at cooled center (SAPMAC) method. A critical defect model has been established to explain the growth and propagation of cracks during the sapphire growing process. It is demonstrated that the stress field depends on the growth rate, the ambient temperature and the crystallizing direction. High stresses always exist near the growth interfaces, at the shoulder-expanding locations, the tailing locations and the sites where the diameters undergo sharp changes. The maximum stresses always occur at the interface of seeds and crystals. Cracks often form in the critical defect region and spread in the m-planes and a-planes under applied tensile stresses during crystal growth. The experimental results have verified that with the improved system of crystal growth and well-controlled techniques, the large-sized sapphire crystals of high quality can be grown due to absence of cracks.

  14. Growth of large aluminum nitride single crystals with thermal-gradient control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondokov, Robert T.; Rao, Shailaja P.; Schowalter, Leo J.

    2017-02-28

    In various embodiments, non-zero thermal gradients are formed within a growth chamber both substantially parallel and substantially perpendicular to the growth direction during formation of semiconductor crystals, where the ratio of the two thermal gradients (parallel to perpendicular) is less than 10, by, e.g., arrangement of thermal shields outside of the growth chamber.

  15. Thermal perturbations caused by large impacts and consequences for mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, W. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Hager, B. H.

    2009-02-01

    We examine the effects of thermal perturbations on a convecting layer of incompressible fluid with uniform viscosity in the limit of infinite Prandtl number, for two upper boundary conditions (free- and no-slip) and heat sources (100% volumetric heating and 100% bottom heating) in 2-D Cartesian finite element simulations. Small, low-temperature perturbations are swept into nearby downflows and have almost no effect on the ambient flow field. Large, high-temperature perturbations are rapidly buoyed and flattened, and spread along the layer's upper boundary as a viscous gravity current. The spreading flow severs and displaces downwellings in its path, and also thins and stabilizes the upper thermal boundary layer (TBL), preventing new instabilities from growing until the spreading motion stops. A return flow driven by the spreading current displaces the roots of plumes toward the center of the spreading region and inhibits nascent plumes in the basal TBL. When spreading halts, the flow field is reorganized as convection reinitiates. We obtain an expression for the spreading time scale, t s , in terms of the Rayleigh number and a dimensionless perturbation temperature (Θ), as well as a size (Λ), and a condition that indicates when convection is slowed at a system-wide scale. We also describe a method for calculating the heat deposited by shock waves at the increased temperatures and pressures of terrestrial mantles, and supply estimates for projectile radii in the range 200 to 900 km and vertical incident velocities in the range 7 to 20 km s-1. We also consider potential applications of this work for understanding the history of early Mars.

  16. Thermal properties of a large-bore cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet for a hybrid magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, M., E-mail: Mas_Ishizuka@shi.co.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Research and Development Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., 19 Natsushima-chou, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan); Hamajima, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aramaki Aza Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Itou, T. [Ehime Works, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., 5-2 Soubiraki-cho, Niihama, Ehime 792-8588 (Japan); Sakuraba, J. [Research and Development Center, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., 19 Natsushima-chou, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-8555 (Japan); Nishijima, G.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    A cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet with a 360 mm room temperature bore has been developed for a hybrid magnet. The superconducting magnet cooled by four Gifford-McMahon cryocoolers has been designed to generate a magnetic field of 10 T. Since superconducting wires composed of coils were subjected to large hoop stress over 150 MPa and Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting wires particularly showed a low mechanical strength due to those brittle property, Nb{sub 3}Sn wires strengthened by NbTi-filaments were developed for the cryocooled superconducting magnet. We have already reported that the hybrid magnet could generate the resultant magnetic field of 27.5 T by adding 8.5 T from the superconducting magnet and 19 T from a water-cooled Bitter resistive magnet, after the water-cooled resistive magnet was inserted into the 360 mm room temperature bore of the cryocooled superconducting magnet. When the hybrid magnet generated the field of 27.5 T, it achieved the high magnetic-force field (B x {partial_derivative}Bz/{partial_derivative}z) of 4500 T{sup 2}/m, which was useful for magneto-science in high fields such as materials levitation research. In this paper, we particularly focus on the cause that the cryocooled superconducting magnet was limited to generate the designed magnetic field of 10 T in the hybrid magnet operation. As a result, it was found that there existed mainly two causes as the limitation of the magnetic field generation. One was a decrease of thermal conductive passes due to exfoliation from the coil bobbin of the cooling flange. The other was large AC loss due to both a thick Nb{sub 3}Sn layer and its large diameter formed on Nb-barrier component in Nb{sub 3}Sn wires.

  17. Metamorphic and thermal evolution of large contact aureoles - lessons from the Bushveld Igneous Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, D.

    2012-04-01

    Large igneous intrusions crystallise, cool, and transfer heat out into their host rocks. The thermal structure of the resulting aureole can be mapped as a series of assemblage zones and isograds, and can in principle be modelled on the assumption that heat transfer is dominantly by conduction. The local peak of contact metamorphism occurs later in time with increasing distance from the igneous contact. The importance of fluids as a metamorphic/metasomatic agent or heat transfer mechanism depends on volatile contents of magma and country rock, and on the geometry of the intrusion. Many of these features are spectacularly illustrated by the aureole beneath the mafic Rustenburg Layered Suite of the Bushveld Complex, which was emplaced at ca. 2060 Ma sub-concordantly into the shale-quartzite succession of the Pretoria Group in the Transvaal Basin. The layered suite reaches a thickness of at least 8 km, and the metamorphic aureole extends 4 km or more downwards into the "floor" of the intrusion. The great extent and relative absence of deformation make this a remarkable natural laboratory for studying the fundamental processes of metamorphism. In quantifying the thermal history, however, a number of second-order factors need to be taken into account. The first relates to the markedly different thermal properties of the major quartzite and shale units, and the second to the importance of endothermic metamorphic reactions in shale units relative to the quartzites. Further insights into metamorphic processes arise from the exquisite detail of poikiloblast growth microstructures preserved in graphite-poor metapelites of the Timeball Hill and Silverton Formations, 2.5 to 3.5 km beneath the igneous contact. These allow a detailed reconstruction of the time sequence of mineral growth and replacement, revealing a marked overlap of the growth intervals of porphyroblastic staurolite, cordierite, biotite, garnet and andalusite at the expense of muscovite, chlorite and chloritoid

  18. Thermal adaptation of the large-scale circulation to the summer heating over the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The potential vorticity equation is employed to diagnose the variation in the large-scale atmospheric circulation in July by using the NCAR/NCEP daily reanalysis data from 1986 to 1995. Based on the theogy of thermal adaptation, the schematic diagram of the formation and maintenance of the circulation over the Tibetan Plateau is revealed in this paper. The result shows that near the surface of ground is the positive potential vorticity source produced by the increasing diabatic heating with height, which maintains the cyclonic circulation, and that the positive Ertel potential vorticitv (PV) source is balanced by friction dissipation. On the other hand, in the upper troposphere the negative PV produced by the decreasing diabatic heating with height maintains the anticyclone, and it is balanced by the divergence of the negative PV. The Gauss' theorem has been applied to analyze the Ertel potential vorticity flux crossing each of the lateral boundaries of the area over the Tibetan Plateau. The result shows that the negative PV flux is transferred through the eastern and northern boundaries of the area from the Tibetan Plateau region to the outer world. It is evident that the Tibetan Plateau region is an important source of negative vorticity of the atmosphere.

  19. Anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN with large deviations from the traditional 1 /T law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huimin; Hu, Ming

    2017-05-01

    Efficient heat dissipation, which is featured by high thermal conductivity, is one of the crucial issues for the reliability and stability of nanodevices. However, due to the generally fast 1 /T decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase, the efficiency of heat dissipation quickly drops down at an elevated temperature caused by the increase of work load in electronic devices. To this end, pursuing semiconductor materials that possess large thermal conductivity at high temperature, i.e., slower decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase than the traditional κ ˜1 /T relation, is extremely important to the development of disruptive nanoelectronics. Recently, monolayer gallium nitride (GaN) with a planar honeycomb structure emerges as a promising new two-dimensional material with great potential for applications in nano- and optoelectronics. Here, we report that, despite the commonly established 1 /T relation of thermal conductivity in plenty of materials, monolayer GaN exhibits anomalous behavior that the thermal conductivity almost decreases linearly over a wide temperature range above 300 K, deviating largely from the traditional κ ˜1 /T law. The thermal conductivity at high temperature is much larger than the expected thermal conductivity that follows the general κ ˜1 /T trend, which would be beneficial for applications of monolayer GaN in nano- and optoelectronics in terms of efficient heat dissipation. We perform detailed analysis on the mechanisms underlying the anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN in the framework of Boltzmann transport theory and further get insight from the view of electronic structure. Beyond that, we also propose two required conditions for materials that would exhibit similar anomalous temperature dependence of thermal conductivity: large difference in atom mass (huge phonon band gap) and electronegativity (LO-TO splitting due to strong polarization of bond). Our

  20. Thermal management for high-capacity large format Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Kepler, Keith Douglas; Pannala, Sreekanth; Allu, Srikanth

    2017-05-30

    A lithium ion battery includes a cathode in electrical and thermal connection with a cathode current collector. The cathode current collector has an electrode tab. A separator is provided. An anode is in electrical and thermal connection with an anode current collector. The anode current collector has an electrode tab. At least one of the cathode current collector and the anode current collector comprises a thermal tab for heat transfer with the at least one current collector. The thermal tab is separated from the electrode tab. A method of operating a battery is also disclosed.

  1. Rectified Continuous Flow Loop for Thermal Control of Large Deployable Structures and Distributed Loads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future instruments and platforms for NASA's Earth Science Enterprises will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications...

  2. Hydrogenation of Penta-Graphene Leads to Unexpected Large Improvement in Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Zhang, Teng; Wohlwend, Jennifer L; Roy, Ajit K; Luo, Tengfei

    2016-06-08

    Penta-graphene (PG) has been identified as a novel two-dimensional (2D) material with an intrinsic bandgap, which makes it especially promising for electronics applications. In this work, we use first-principles lattice dynamics and iterative solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) to determine the thermal conductivity of PG and its more stable derivative, hydrogenated penta-graphene (HPG). As a comparison, we also studied the effect of hydrogenation on graphene thermal conductivity. In contrast to hydrogenation of graphene, which leads to a dramatic decrease in thermal conductivity, HPG shows a notable increase in thermal conductivity, which is much higher than that of PG. Considering the necessity of using the same thickness when comparing thermal conductivity values of different 2D materials, hydrogenation leads to a 63% reduction in thermal conductivity for graphene, while it results in a 76% increase for PG. The high thermal conductivity of HPG makes it more thermally conductive than most other semiconducting 2D materials, such as the transition metal chalcogenides. Our detailed analyses show that the primary reason for the counterintuitive hydrogenation-induced thermal conductivity enhancement is the weaker bond anharmonicity in HPG than PG. This leads to weaker phonon scattering after hydrogenation, despite the increase in the phonon scattering phase space. The high thermal conductivity of HPG may inspire intensive research around HPG and other derivatives of PG as potential materials for future nanoelectronic devices. The fundamental physics understood from this study may open up a new strategy to engineer thermal transport properties of other 2D materials by controlling bond anharmonicity via functionalization.

  3. Large Thermal Conductivity Differences between the Crystalline and Vitrified States of DMSO with Applications to Cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lili E.; Feig, Justin S. G.; Schiffres, Scott N.; Malen, Jonathan A.; Rabin, Yoed

    2015-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is measured in this study using a transient hot wire technique, where DMSO is a key ingredient in many cryoprotective agent (CPA) cocktails. Characterization of thermal properties of cryoprotective agents is essential to the analysis of cryopreservation processes, either when evaluating experimental data or for the design of new protocols. Also presented are reference measurements of thermal conductivity for pure water ice and glycerol. The thermal conductivity measurement setup is integrated into the experimentation stage of a scanning cryomacroscope apparatus, which facilitates the correlation of measured data with visualization of physical events. Thermal conductivity measurements were conducted for a DMSO concentration range of 2M and 10M, in a temperature range of -180°C and 25°C. Vitrified samples showed decreased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature, while crystalline samples showed increased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature. These different behaviors result in up to a tenfold difference in thermal conductivity at -180°C. Such dramatic differences can drastically impact heat transfer during cryopreservation and their quantification is therefore critical to cryobiology. PMID:25985058

  4. Large Thermal Conductivity Differences between the Crystalline and Vitrified States of DMSO with Applications to Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lili E; Feig, Justin S G; Schiffres, Scott N; Malen, Jonathan A; Rabin, Yoed

    2015-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO) solution is measured in this study using a transient hot wire technique, where DMSO is a key ingredient in many cryoprotective agent (CPA) cocktails. Characterization of thermal properties of cryoprotective agents is essential to the analysis of cryopreservation processes, either when evaluating experimental data or for the design of new protocols. Also presented are reference measurements of thermal conductivity for pure water ice and glycerol. The thermal conductivity measurement setup is integrated into the experimentation stage of a scanning cryomacroscope apparatus, which facilitates the correlation of measured data with visualization of physical events. Thermal conductivity measurements were conducted for a DMSO concentration range of 2M and 10M, in a temperature range of -180°C and 25°C. Vitrified samples showed decreased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature, while crystalline samples showed increased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature. These different behaviors result in up to a tenfold difference in thermal conductivity at -180°C. Such dramatic differences can drastically impact heat transfer during cryopreservation and their quantification is therefore critical to cryobiology.

  5. Large Thermal Conductivity Differences between the Crystalline and Vitrified States of DMSO with Applications to Cryopreservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili E Ehrlich

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity of dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO solution is measured in this study using a transient hot wire technique, where DMSO is a key ingredient in many cryoprotective agent (CPA cocktails. Characterization of thermal properties of cryoprotective agents is essential to the analysis of cryopreservation processes, either when evaluating experimental data or for the design of new protocols. Also presented are reference measurements of thermal conductivity for pure water ice and glycerol. The thermal conductivity measurement setup is integrated into the experimentation stage of a scanning cryomacroscope apparatus, which facilitates the correlation of measured data with visualization of physical events. Thermal conductivity measurements were conducted for a DMSO concentration range of 2M and 10M, in a temperature range of -180°C and 25°C. Vitrified samples showed decreased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature, while crystalline samples showed increased thermal conductivity with decreasing temperature. These different behaviors result in up to a tenfold difference in thermal conductivity at -180°C. Such dramatic differences can drastically impact heat transfer during cryopreservation and their quantification is therefore critical to cryobiology.

  6. Thin films of spin-crossover coordination polymers with large thermal hysteresis loops prepared by nanoparticle spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Aketa, Naoki; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tamaki, Takashi; Inose, Tomoko; Akai, Tomoki; Toyama, Hirotaka; Sakata, Osami; Tajiri, Hiroo; Ogawa, Takuji

    2014-09-11

    This communication describes the synthesis of spin-crossover nanoparticles, which can disperse in various organic solvents without an excess amount of surfactants. The nanoparticles form homogeneous thin films on substrates by spin coating. The films show abrupt spin transitions with large thermal hysteresis loops.

  7. Thermal effect-resilient design of large mode area double-cladding Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Johansen, Mette Marie;

    2013-01-01

    The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of different large mode area fibers have been numerically analyzed. A simple but accurate model has been applied to obtain the refractive index change in the fiber cross-section, and a full-vector modal solver base...

  8. Synthesis of thermally stable extra-large pore crystalline materials: a uranyl germanate with 12-ring channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2009-02-18

    A thermally stable extra-large pore uranyl germanate is synthesized under high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal conditions at 585 degrees C and 150 MPa. The structure contains U(6+)O(6) tetragonal bipyramids which are interconnected by digermanate groups to form a 3D framework with 12-ring pore openings.

  9. Thermal Stability of Magnetic States in Circular Thin-Film Nanomagnets with Large Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel

    The scaling of the energy barrier to magnetization reversal in thin-film nanomagnets with perpendicular magnetization as a function of their lateral size is of great interest and importance for high-density magnetic random access memory devices. Experimental studies of such elements show either a quadratic or linear dependence of the energy barrier on element diameter. I will discuss a theoretical model we developed to determine the micromagnetic configurations that set the energy barrier for thermally activated reversal of a thin disk with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as a function of disk diameter. We find a critical length in the problem that is set by the exchange and effective perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies, with the latter including the size dependence of the demagnetization energy. For diameters smaller than this critical length, the reversal occurs by nearly coherent magnetization rotation and the energy barrier scales with the square of the diameter normalized to the critical length (for fixed film thickness), while for larger diameters, the transition state has a domain wall, and the energy barrier depends linearly on the normalized diameter. Simple analytic expressions are derived for these two limiting cases and verified using full micromagnetic simulations with the string method. Further, the effect of an applied field is considered and shown to lead to a plateau in the energy barrier versus diameter dependence at large diameters. Based on these finding I discuss the prospects and material challenges in the scaling of magnetic memory devices based on thin films with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. In collaboration with G. Wolf, J. Z. Sun and A. D. Kent. Supported by NSF-DMR-1309202 and in part by Spin Transfer Technologies Inc. and the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative through the Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration.

  10. Thermal performance of residential buildings in Lisbon with large glazing areas

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, Márcia; Gonçalves, Helder; Bastos, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of residential buildings (multi-family apartments) with glazing areas greater than 75% of the total façade area, and for different solar exposures in Lisbon. These buildings were designed after the implementation of the first Portuguese Buildings Thermal Regulation and they are intrinsically related with the construction and architecture practiced in the last few years. The analysis includes the thermal behaviour of the apartments select...

  11. Large thermal conductivity reduction induced by La/O vacancies in the thermoelectric LaCoO3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Li, Fang; Xu, Luxiang; Sui, Yu; Wang, Xianjie; Su, Wenhui; Liu, Xiaoyang

    2011-05-16

    A series of compact La/O-vacant La(1-x)CoO(3-y) compounds were prepared by a cold high-pressure procedure, and their thermoelectric (TE) properties were investigated. Compared with the ion-substituted hole-type LaCoO(3) systems (e.g., La(1-x)Sr(x)CoO(3)), the thermal conduction of La(1-x)CoO(3-y) is noticeably reduced by the La/O vacancies, whereas the electric transport is less influenced, which results in an efficient ZT enhancement. We demonstrate that the large thermal conductivity reduction originates from the strong point-defect scattering, and La(1-x)CoO(3-y) can be rationalized as a partially filled solid solution: La(1-x)◻(x)CoO(3-y)◻(y), where ◻ denotes a vacancy. Such intrinsic thermal conductivity suppression provides an effective pathway for the design of better TE materials.

  12. Thermal specialization across large geographical scales predicts the resilience of mangrove crab populations to global warming

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2014-11-18

    The broad prediction that ectotherms will be more vulnerable to climate change in the tropics than in temperate regions includes assumptions about centre/edge population effects that can only be tested by within-species comparisons across wide latitudinal gradients. Here, we investigated the thermal vulnerability of two mangrove crab species, comparing populations at the centre (Kenya) and edge (South Africa) of their distributions. At the same time, we investigated the role of respiratory mode (water- versus air-breathing) in determining the thermal tolerance in amphibious organisms. To do this, we compared the vulnerability to acute temperature fluctuations of two sympatric species with two different lifestyle adaptations: the free living Perisesarma guttatum and the burrowing Uca urvillei, both pivotal to the ecosystem functioning of mangroves. The results revealed the air-breathing U. urvillei to be a thermal generalist with much higher thermal tolerances than P. guttatum. Importantly, however, we found that, while U. urvillei showed little difference between edge and centre populations, P. guttatum showed adaptation to local conditions. Equatorial populations had elevated tolerances to acute heat stress and mechanisms of partial thermoregulation, which make them less vulnerable to global warming than temperate conspecifics. The results reveal both the importance of respiratory mode to thermal tolerance and the unexpected potential for low latitude populations/species to endure a warming climate. The results also contribute to a conceptual model on the latitudinal thermal tolerance of these key species. This highlights the need for an integrated population-level approach to predict the consequences of climate change. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Large concentration changes due to thermal diffusion effects in gas flow microsystems with temperature gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Johannessen, Tue; Jensen, Søren;

    Thermal diffusion, or Sorét diffusion, is shown to cause significant concentration changes and transients in gas flow microsystems with temperature gradients. In a silicon microsystem, a temperature gradient of about 100 oC/mm is measured to produce concentration transients of up to 13.......7 % in an argon/helium mixture, when the flow is abruptly changed from a high value to a low value. Finite element simulations of the thermal diffusion in a geometry similar to the experimental setup reproduce the measurements....

  14. Numerical modeling of the spring thermal bar and pollutant transport in a large lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsydenov, Bair O.; Kay, Anthony; Starchenko, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    The spring riverine thermal bar phenomenon is investigated numerically on an example of Lake Baikal, and the spread of pollutants coming from the Selenga River is forecast using the 2.5 D non-hydrostatic model in the Boussinesq approximation. This hydrodynamic model takes into account the diurnal variability of the heat fluxes on the lake surface and the effects of wind and the Earth's rotation. The results of numerical modeling show that the variability of the total heat flux over 24 h plays a significant role in the variation of the thermal bar movement rate that contributes to the rapid mixing of impurities entering with river water.

  15. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF THERMALLY-STRATIFIED TURBULENT CHANNEL FLOW WITH TEMPERATURE OSCILLATION ON THE BOTTOM WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-hong; LU Xi-yun; ZHUANG Li-xian

    2004-01-01

    Thermally-stratified shear turbulent channel flow with temperature oscillation on the bottom wall of the channel was investigated with the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach coupled with dynamic Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS) models. The effect of temperature oscillation on the turbulent channel flow behavior was examined. The phase-averaged velocities and temperature, and flow structures at different Richardson numbers and periods of the oscillation was analyzed.

  16. Functionalization of nanomaterials by non-thermal large area atmospheric pressure plasmas: application to flexible dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heesoo; Park, Jaeyoung; Yoo, Eun Sang; Han, Gill-Sang; Jung, Hyun Suk; Ko, Min Jae; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho

    2013-08-01

    A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of non-thermal radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film properties can be obtained by the non-thermal APP method when compared with the thermal sintering process operating at 450 °C. The crystallinity of the anatase TiO2 nanoparticles is significantly improved without thermal agglomeration, while the surface defects such as Ti3+ ions are eliminated, thus providing efficient charge collecting properties for solar cells. Finally, we successfully fabricated a flexible DSSC with an energy conversion efficiency of 4.2% using a transparent plastic substrate. This work demonstrates the potential of non-thermal APP technology in the area of device-level, nano-enabled material manufacturing.A key challenge to the industrial application of nanotechnology is the development of fabrication processes for functional devices based on nanomaterials which can be scaled up for mass production. In this report, we disclose the results of non-thermal radio-frequency (rf) atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) based deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on a flexible substrate for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Operating at 190 °C without a vacuum enclosure, the APP method can avoid thermal damage and vacuum compatibility restrictions and utilize roll-to-roll processing over a large area. The various analyses of the TiO2 films demonstrate that superior film

  17. An overview of modeling methods for thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures for reactor safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2010-10-01

    Thermal mixing and stratification phenomena play major roles in the safety of reactor systems with large enclosures, such as containment safety in current fleet of LWRs, long-term passive containment cooling in Gen III+ plants including AP-1000 and ESBWR, the cold and hot pool mixing in pool type sodium cooled fast reactor systems (SFR), and reactor cavity cooling system behavior in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), etc. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, 0-D steady state models (heat transfer correlations), 0-D lumped parameter based transient models, 1-D physical-based coarse grain models, and 3-D CFD models are available. Current major system analysis codes either have no models or only 0-D models for thermal stratification and mixing, which can only give highly approximate results for simple cases. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries. Due to prohibitive computational expenses for long transients in very large volumes, 3-D CFD simulations remain impractical for system analyses. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, UC Berkeley developed 1-D models basing on Zuber’s hierarchical two-tiered scaling analysis (HTTSA) method where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. This paper will present an overview on important thermal mixing and stratification phenomena in large enclosures for different reactors, major modeling methods and their advantages and limits, potential paths to improve simulation capability and reduce analysis uncertainty in this area for advanced reactor system analysis tools.

  18. Reentrant Structural and Optical Properties and Large Positive Thermal Expansion in Perovskite Formamidinium Lead Iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabini, Douglas H; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Laurita, Geneva; Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Kontos, Athanassios G; Falaras, Polycarpos; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Seshadri, Ram

    2016-12-05

    The structure of the hybrid perovskite HC(NH2 )2 PbI3 (formamidinium lead iodide) reflects competing interactions associated with molecular motion, hydrogen bonding tendencies, thermally activated soft octahedral rotations, and the propensity for the Pb(2+) lone pair to express its stereochemistry. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction reveals a continuous transition from the cubic α-phase (Pm3‾ m, #221) to a tetragonal β-phase (P4/mbm, #127) at around 285 K, followed by a first-order transition to a tetragonal γ-phase (retaining P4/mbm, #127) at 140 K. An unusual reentrant pseudosymmetry in the β-to-γ phase transition is seen that is also reflected in the photoluminescence. Around room temperature, the coefficient of volumetric thermal expansion is among the largest for any extended crystalline solid.

  19. Continuum modeling of the mechanical and thermal behavior of discrete large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hefzy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper we introduce a rather straightforward construction procedure in order to derive continuum equivalence of discrete truss-like repetitive structures. Once the actual structure is specified, the construction procedure can be outlined by the following three steps: (a) all sets of parallel members are identified, (b) unidirectional 'effective continuum' properties are derived for each of these sets and (c) orthogonal transformations are finally used to determine the contribution of each set to the 'overall effective continuum' properties of the structure. Here the properties includes mechanical (stiffnesses), thermal (coefficients of thermal expansions) and material densities. Once expanded descriptions of the steps (b) and (c) are done, the construction procedure will be applied to a wide variety of discrete structures and the results will be compared with those of other existing methods.

  20. Large modular graphite radiant heaters for testing space shuttle thermal protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B. G.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite radiant heating array, capable of heating a 5-ft span of shuttle wing leading edge or a 4 x 8 ft flat panel through an entry thermal profile up to 3200 G, has been designed and built by McDonnell Douglas Corporation for NASA-Johnson Space Center. The unique, interchangeable, self-contained heather modules and their versatile support structure/coolant manifold are discussed along with the extensive thermal analysis that accompanied the design effort. A complete description of the geometric capabilities of the array, as well as the design details of the individual modules, is presented. The complete performance envelope of the array is discussed, including maximum temperature and gradients, heating uniformity, and the required utilities and support equipment.

  1. Damped and thermal motion of large, laser-aligned molecules in droplet beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodub, D; Doak, B; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Wu, J; Spence, J; Howells, M; Marcus, M; Shapiro, D; Barty, A; Chapman, H

    2005-09-29

    We consider a monodispersed Rayleigh droplet beam of water droplets doped with proteins. An intense infrared laser is used to align these droplets. The arrangement has been proposed for electron and X-ray diffraction studies of proteins which are difficult to crystallize. This paper considers the effect of thermal fluctuations on the angular spread of alignment in thermal equilibrium, and relaxation phenomena, particularly the damping of oscillations excited as the molecules enter the field. The possibility of adiabatic alignment is also considered. We find that damping times in high pressure gas cell as used in X-ray diffraction experiments are short compared to the time taken for molecules to traverse the beam, and that a suitably shaped field might be used for electron diffraction experiments in vacuum to provide adiabatic alignment, thus obviating the need for a damping gas cell.

  2. Large modular graphite radiant heaters for testing space shuttle thermal protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B. G.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite radiant heating array, capable of heating a 5-ft span of shuttle wing leading edge or a 4 x 8 ft flat panel through an entry thermal profile up to 3200 G, has been designed and built by McDonnell Douglas Corporation for NASA-Johnson Space Center. The unique, interchangeable, self-contained heather modules and their versatile support structure/coolant manifold are discussed along with the extensive thermal analysis that accompanied the design effort. A complete description of the geometric capabilities of the array, as well as the design details of the individual modules, is presented. The complete performance envelope of the array is discussed, including maximum temperature and gradients, heating uniformity, and the required utilities and support equipment.

  3. Large-Scale Physical Models of Thermal Remediation of DNAPL Source Zones in Aquitards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    the water table. All met or exceeded their goals. Typical turnkey unit costs (including design, permitting, fabrication, mobilization, drilling...to post-treatment concentrations below 0.1 mg/kg for CVOCs, meeting the stringent target criteria. The overall turnkey cost, including oversight and...expensive to lease . However, MKTS and TerraTherm have been using STARS or its predecessor Therm since 1989 for numerous thermal conduction projects

  4. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  5. Automation and Upgrade of Thermal System for Large 38-Year Young Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Environment Simulator (SES) facility has been improved by the upgrade of its thermal control hardware and software. This paper describes the preliminary design process, funding constraints, and the proposed enhancements as well as the installation details, the testing difficulties, and the overall benefits realized from this upgrade. The preliminary design process was discussed in a paper presented in October 1996 and will be recapped in this paper to provide background and comparison to actual product. Structuring the procurement process to match the funding constraints allowed Goddard to enhance its capabilities in an environment of reduced budgets. The installation of the new system into a location that has been occupied for over 38-years was one of the driving design factors for the size of the equipment. The installation was completed on-time and under budget. The tuning of the automatic sequences for the new thermal system to the existing shroud system required more time and ultimately presented some setbacks to the vendor and the final completion of the system. However, the end product and its benefits to Goddard's thermal vacuum test portfolio will carry the usefulness of this facility well into the next century.

  6. Automation and Upgrade of Thermal System for Large 38-Year-Young Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew T.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Environment Simulator (SES) facility has been improved by the upgrade of its thermal control hardware and software. This paper describes the preliminary design process, funding constraints, and the proposed enhancements as well as the installation details, the testing difficulties, and the overall benefits realized from this upgrade. The preliminary design process was discussed in a paper presented in October 1996 and will be recapped in this paper to provide background and comparison to actual product. Structuring the procurement process to match the funding constraints allowed Goddard to enhance its capabilities in an environment of reduced budgets. The installation of the new system into a location that has been occupied for over 38 years was one of the driving design factors for the size of the equipment. The installation was completed on time and under budget. The tuning of the automatic sequences for the new thermal system to the existing shroud system required more time and ultimately presented some setbacks to the vendor and the final completion of the system. However, the end product and its benefits to Goddard's thermal vacuum test portfolio will carry the usefulness of this facility well into the next century.

  7. Energy beyond food: foraging theory informs time spent in thermals by a large soaring bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L C Shepard

    Full Text Available Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus. Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered.

  8. Experimental investigation of thermally induced core laser leakage in large mode area single trench fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingchao; Huang, Liangjin; Gu, Shaoyi; Leng, Jinyong; Guo, Shaofeng; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Zongfu

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated a new phenomenon, namely, thermally induced core laser leakage in single trench fiber (STF), for the first time. The STF provides very high loss and power delocalization of higher order mode (HOM) and maintain the effective single mode operation. However these properties are chartered only under low power situations. In this paper we established a 976nm directly pumped high power co-pumping fiber amplifier based on the STF. The maximum output power was 1022W with a slope efficiency of 76%. Further increase the pump power will leads to the output power decrease. Meanwhile a micro second Level noise like power fluctuation was observed. No resonance frequency was observed in frequency domain indicating the mode instability is not triggered. We believe that it is the thermally induced waveguide index profile change due to the excessively heat load in the front section of STF that leads to the failure of HOM suppression and the power of FM was coupled into the HOM. However the heat load in the rear section of STF was relatively low and the HOM leaked into the cladding due to the bending loss. We provide a mitigating method by pumping with pump light of smaller absorption. A maximum power of 1330W was achieved without power decrease via pumping the STF with 905nm and 976nm pump light (same amplifier). To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of thermally induced core laser leakage in STF and the pertinent results can provide significant reference for future optimization.

  9. Large-scale variation of electron parameters from Quasi-Thermal Noise during WIND perigees in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issautier, Karine; Ongala-Edoumou, Samuel; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) method consists in measuring the electrostatic fluctuations produced by the thermal motion of the ambient particles. This noise is detected with a sensitive wave receiver and measured at the terminal of a passive electric antenna, which is immersed in a stable plasma. The analysis of the so-called QTN provides in situ measurements, mainly the total electron density, with a good accuracy, and thermal temperature in a large number of space media. We create a preliminary electron database to analyse the anti-correlation between electron density and temperature deduced from WIND perigees in the Earth's plasmasphere. We analyse the radio power spectra measured by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR), using the 100-m long dipole antenna, onboard WIND spacecraft. We develop a systematic routine to determine the electron density, core and halo temperature and the magnitude of the magnetic field based on QTN in Bernstein modes. Indeed, the spectra are weakly banded between gyroharmonics below the upper hybrid frequency, from which we derive the local electron density. From the gyrofrequency determination, we obtain an independent measure of the magnetic field magnitude, which is in close agreement with the onboard magnetometer.

  10. Large Scale Finite Element Thermal Analysis of the Bolts of a French PWR Core Internal Baffle Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupp, Isabelle; Christophe, Peniguel [EDF R and D, Paris (France); Tommy, Martin Michel [1 av du General de Gaulle, Paris (France)

    2009-11-15

    The internal core baffle structure of a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) consists of a collection of baffles and formers that are attached to the barrel. The connections are done thanks to a large number of bolts (about 1500). After inspection, some of the bolts have been found cracked. This has been attributed to the Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). The Electricite De France (EDF) has set up a research program to gain better knowledge of the temperature distribution, which may affect the bolts and the whole structure. The temperature distribution in the structure was calculated thanks to the thermal code SYRTHES that used a finite element approach. The heat transfer between the by-pass flow inside the cavities of the core baffle and the structure was accounted for thanks to a strong thermal coupling between the thermal code SYRTHES and the CFD code named Code{sub S}aturne. The results for the CP0 plant design show that both the high temperature and strong temperature gradients could potentially induce mechanical stresses. The CPY design, where each bolt is individually cooled, had led to a reduction of temperatures inside the structures. A new parallel version of SYRTHES, for calculations on very large meshes and based on MPI, has been developed. A demonstration test on the complete structure that has led to about 1.1 billion linear tetraedra has been calculated on 2048 processors of the EDF Blue Gene computer

  11. Thermally induced switching field distribution of a single CoPt dot in a large array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, J.B.C.; Delalande, M.; Febre, le A.J.; Bolhuis, T.; Kikuchi, N.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.; Shimatsu, T.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic dot arrays with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated by patterning Co80Pt20-alloy continuous films by means of laser interference lithography. As commonly seen in large dot arrays, there is a large difference in the switching field between dots. Here we investigate the origin o

  12. Scaling analysis of the thermal-hydraulic test facility for the large break LOCA of KNGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Byong Jo; Kwon, Tae Soon; Song, Chul Hwa; Euh, Dong Jin; Chu, In Cheol; Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Park, Jong Kyun

    2001-03-01

    Korea Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) adopts a Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) system instead of conventional Cold Leg Injection (CLI) system. In this report, a scaling analysis for the steam-water test facility of KNGR with DVI under reflood phase of Loss of Coolant Accident(LBLOCA) is carried out. The major objectives of the test facility are to clarify the thermal hydraulics phenomena in the upper downcomer region and to provide experimental data for evaluating or validating relevant thermal hydraulic models and correlations of the best estimate codes. The test facility should be designed based on the appropriate scaling law so that the same thermal hydraulics phenomena is happened as in the case of prototype. For these, the investigations of previous scaling laws are carried out. And, in the present study, a new scaling approach, named the modified linear scaling, is developed for the design of a scaled-down experimental facility. Its velocity is scaled by a Wallis-type parameter and an aspect ratio of experimental facility is preserved with that of a prototype. The test facility is designed primarily by a volume scaling law and the area ratio of test facility is set to be 1/24.3. However, additional DVI nozzles are also installed at the elevation which is determined by the modified linear scaling law. It is for the scaling analysis of ECC bypass fraction. The cold leg, hot leg and DVI nozzles are additionally attached in the upper annulus downcomer region so that the UPTF counterpart test is possible.

  13. Large eddy simulation of hot and cold fluids mixing in a T-junction for predicting thermal fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-yu ZHU; Tao LU; Pei-xue JIANG; Zhi-jun GUO; Kui-sheng WANG

    2009-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations in a mixing T-junction have been simulated on the FLUENT platform using the large eddy simulation (LES) turbulent flow model and a sub-grid scale Smagorinsky-Lilly model. The normalized mean and root mean square temperatures for describing time-averaged temperature and temperature fluctuation intensity, and the velocity are obtained. The power spectrum densities of temperature fluctuations, which are key parameters for thermal fatigue analysis and lifetime evaluation, are analyzed. Simulation results are consistent with experimental data published in the literature, showing that the LES is reliable. Several mixing processes under different conditions are simulated in order to analyze the effects of varying Reynolds number and Richardson number on the mixing course and thermal fluctuations.

  14. Combined electrochemical, heat generation, and thermal model for large prismatic lithium-ion batteries in real-time applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohammed; Sweity, Haitham; Fleckenstein, Matthias; Habibi, Saeid

    2017-08-01

    Real-time prediction of the battery's core temperature and terminal voltage is very crucial for an accurate battery management system. In this paper, a combined electrochemical, heat generation, and thermal model is developed for large prismatic cells. The proposed model consists of three sub-models, an electrochemical model, heat generation model, and thermal model which are coupled together in an iterative fashion through physicochemical temperature dependent parameters. The proposed parameterization cycles identify the sub-models' parameters separately by exciting the battery under isothermal and non-isothermal operating conditions. The proposed combined model structure shows accurate terminal voltage and core temperature prediction at various operating conditions while maintaining a simple mathematical structure, making it ideal for real-time BMS applications. Finally, the model is validated against both isothermal and non-isothermal drive cycles, covering a broad range of C-rates, and temperature ranges [-25 °C to 45 °C].

  15. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Flaschel, Nils; Diez, Sergio; Gerboles, Marta; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Mussgiller, Andreas; Quirion, David; Tackmann, Kerstin; Ullan, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics for thermal management of silicon tracking detectors. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more lightweight and direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. DESY and IMB-CNM are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  16. Thermal Performance of the Supporting System for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Castoldi, M; Parma, Vittorio; Vandoni, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    The LHC collider will be composed of approximately 1700 main ring superconducting magnets cooled to 1.9 K in pressurised superfluid helium and supported within their cryostats on low heat in-leak column-type supports. The precise positioning of the heavy magnets and the stringent thermal budgets imposed by the machine cryogenic system, require a sound thermo-mechanical design of the support system. Each support is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in glass-fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with its top part interfaced to the magnet at 1.9 K and its bottom part mounted onto the cryostat vacuum vessel at 293 K. In order to reduce the conduction heat in-leak at 1.9 K, each support mounts two heat intercepts at intermediate locations on the column, both actively cooled by cryogenic lines carrying helium gas at 4.5-10 K and 50-65 K. The need to assess the thermal performance of the supports has lead to setting up a dedicated test set-up for precision heat load measurements on prototype supports. This pa...

  17. A Vibration Isolation System for Use in a Large Thermal Vacuum Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershfeld, Donald; VanCampen, Julie

    2002-01-01

    A thermal vacuum payload platform that is isolated from background vibration is required to support the development of future instruments for Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Because of the size and weight of the thermal/vacuum facility in which the instruments are tested, it is not practical to isolate the entire facility externally. Therefore, a vibration isolation system has been designed and fabricated to be installed inside the chamber. The isolation system provides a payload interface of 3.05 m (10 feet) in diameter and is capable of supporting a maximum payload weight of 4536 kg (10,000 Lbs). A counterweight system has been included to insure stability of payloads having high centers of gravity. The vibration isolation system poses a potential problem in that leakage into the chamber could compromise the ability to maintain vacuum. Strict specifications were imposed on the isolation system design to minimize leakage. Vibration measurements, obtained inside the chamber, prior to installing the vibration isolation system, indicated levels in all axes of approximately 1 milli-g at about 20 Hz. The vibration isolation system was designed to provide a minimum attenuation of 40 dB to these levels. This paper describes the design and testing of this unique vibration isolation system. Problems with leakage and corrective methods are presented. Isolation performance results are also presented.

  18. Thermal System Analysis and Optimization of Large-Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongguang Fu; Ke Lu; Yiming Zhu

    2015-01-01

    As an important solution to issues regarding peak load and renewable energy resources on grids, large-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES) power generation technology has recently become a popular research topic in the area of large-scale industrial energy storage. At present, the combination of high-expansion ratio turbines with advanced gas turbine technology is an important breakthrough in energy storage technology. In this study, a new gas turbine power generation system is coupled ...

  19. A fast and conformal heating scheme for producing large thermal lesions using a 2D ultrasound phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Lin, Win-Li; Chen, Yung-Yaw

    2007-02-01

    The treatment conformability and the total treatment time of large tumors are both important issues in ultrasound thermal therapy. Previous heating strategies all show their restrictions in achieving these two issues to satisfactory levels simultaneously. This work theoretically presents a new heating strategy which is capable of both increasing the treatment conformability and shortening the treatment time, when using a 2D ultrasound phased array transducer. To perform this, a set of the multiple-foci patterns (considered the basic heating units) were temporally switched to steer the beam at different focal planes with the lesion length being well-controlled. Then, to conformally cover an irregular target volume, the 2D phased array was laterally shifted by a positioning system to deposit a suitable heating unit to cover a subvolume part. Results demonstrated that the totally treatment time can be largely reduced. The heating rate can be increased up to 0.96 cm3/min compared to the previously reported 0.26 cm3/min. Also, the proposed scheme showed that the tumor regions can be completely treated with the normal tissue damage at satisfactory level. The feasibility of the proposed strategy for irregular tumor treatment was also demonstrated. This study offers useful information in large tumor treatment in ultrasound thermal therapy.

  20. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1981-06-01

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

  1. Testing and evaluation of large-area heliostats for solar thermal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, J. W.; Houser, R. M.

    1993-02-01

    Two heliostats representing the state-of-the-art in glass-metal designs for central receiver (and photovoltaic tracking) applications were tested and evaluated at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1986 to 1992. These heliostats have collection areas of 148 and 200 m(exp 2) and represent low-cost designs for heliostats that employ glass-metal mirrors. The evaluation encompassed the performance and operational characteristics of the heliostats, and examined heliostat beam quality, the effect of elevated winds on beam quality, heliostat drives and controls, mirror module reflectance and durability, and the overall operational and maintenance characteristics of the two heliostats. A comprehensive presentation of the results of these and other tests is presented. The results are prefaced by a review of the development (in the United States) of heliostat technology.

  2. Thermally stable molecules with large dipole moments and polarizabilities and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Seth R. (Inventor); Peyghambarian, Nasser (Inventor); Kippelen, Bernard (Inventor); Volodin, Boris (Inventor); Hendrickx, Eric (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are fused ring bridge, ring-locked dyes that form thermally stable photorefractive compositions. The fused ring bridge structures are .pi.-conjugated bonds in benzene-, naphthalene- or anthracene-derived fused ring systems that connect donor and acceptor groups. The donor and acceptor groups contribute to a high molecular dipole moment and linear polarizability anisotropy. The polarization characteristics of the dye molecules are stabilized since the bonds in the fused ring bridge are not susceptible to rotation, reducing the opportunity for photoisomerization. The dyes are compatible with polymeric compositions, including thermoplastics. The dyes are electrically neutral but have charge transport, electronic and orientational properties such that upon illumination of a composition containing the dye, the dye facilitates refractive index modulation and a photorefractive effect that can be utilized advantageously in numerous applications such as in optical quality devices and biological imaging.

  3. Testing and evaluation of large-area heliostats for solar thermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J.W.; Houser, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Two heliostats representing the state-of-the-art in glass-metal designs for central receiver (and photovoltaic tracking) applications were tested and evaluated at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1986 to 1992. These heliostats have collection areas of 148 and 200 m{sup 2} and represent low-cost designs for heliostats that employ glass-metal mirrors. The evaluation encompassed the performance and operational characteristics of the heliostats, and examined heliostat beam quality, the effect of elevated winds on beam quality, heliostat drives and controls, mirror module reflectance and durability, and the overall operational and maintenance characteristics of the two heliostats. A comprehensive presentation of the results of these and other tests is presented. The results are prefaced by a review of the development (in the United States) of heliostat technology.

  4. Large-volume excitation of air, argon, nitrogen and combustible mixtures by thermal jets produced by nanosecond spark discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sergey; Hayashi, Jun; Salmon, Arthur; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents experimental observations of strong expanding thermal jets following the application of nanosecond spark discharges. These jets propagate in a toroidal shape perpendicular to the interelectrode axis, with high velocities of up to 30 m s‑1 and over distances of the order of a cm. Their propagation length is much larger than the thermal expansion region produced by the conventional millisecond sparks used in car engine ignition, thus greatly improving the volumetric excitation of gas mixtures. The shape and velocity of the jets is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of the electrodes. In addition, their spatial extent is found to increase with the number of nanosecond sparks and with the discharge voltage, and to decrease slightly with the pressure between 1 and 7 atm at constant applied voltage. Finally, this thermal jet phenomenon is observed in experiments conducted with many types of gas mixtures, including air, nitrogen, argon, and combustible CH4/air mixtures. This makes nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges particularly attractive for aerodynamic flow control or plasma-assisted combustion because of their ability to excite large volumes of gas, typically about 100 times the volume of the discharge.

  5. 1000th magnet delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On Monday 20 February members of the AT Department marked the delivery of the 1000th superconducting dipole magnet to CERN. Only 232 more of the dipole magnets are needed for the LHC. The 35-tonne-dipoles are 15 meters long and are being manufactured by three companies: Babcock Noell Nuclear in Germany (which completed its contract in November 2005), Ansaldo Superconduttori in Italy and Alstom-Jeumont in France. 'The production is proceeding well and we expect to be complete in October as foreseen,' said Lucio Rossi, Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group (AT-MAS). In total, 1650 main magnets are needed for the LHC, of which 1300 have already been delivered.

  6. 1000th magnet delivered!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On Monday 20 February members of the AT Department marked the delivery of the 1000th superconducting dipole magnet to CERN. Only 232 more of the dipole magnets are needed for the LHC. The 35 tonne-dipoles are 15 meters long and are being manufactured by three companies: Babcock Noell Nuclear in Germany (which finished its contract in November 2005), Ansaldo Superconduttori in Italy and Alstom-Jeumont in France. "The production is proceeding well and we expect to be complete in October as previously foreseen," said Lucio Rossi, Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group (AT-MAS). In total, 1650 main magnets are needed for the LHC, of which 1300 have been delivered.

  7. A Review of Large-Scale Fracture Experiments Relevant to Pressure Vessel Integrity Under Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-29

    Numerous large-scale fracture experiments have been performed over the past thirty years to advance fracture mechanics methodologies applicable to thick-wall pressure vessels. This report first identifies major factors important to nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. It then covers 20 key experiments that have contributed to identifying fracture behavior of RPVs and to validating applicable assessment methodologies. The experiments are categorized according to four types of specimens: (1) cylindrical specimens, (2) pressurized vessels, (3) large plate specimens, and (4) thick beam specimens. These experiments were performed in laboratories in six different countries. This report serves as a summary of those experiments, and provides a guide to references for detailed information.

  8. A progress report for the large block test of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Wilder, D.G.; Blink, J. [and others

    1994-10-01

    This is a progress report on the Large Block Test (LBT) project. The purpose of the LBT is to study some of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the near field of a nuclear waste repository under controlled boundary conditions. To do so, a large block of Topopah Spring tuff will be heated from within for about 4 to 6 months, then cooled down for about the same duration. Instruments to measure temperature, moisture content, stress, displacement, and chemical changes will be installed in three directions in the block. Meanwhile, laboratory tests will be conducted on small blocks to investigate individual thermal-mechanical, thermal-hydrological, and thermal-chemical processes. The fractures in the large block will be characterized from five exposed surfaces. The minerals on fracture surfaces will be studied before and after the test. The results from the LBT will be useful for testing and building confidence in models that will be used to predict TMHC processes in a repository. The boundary conditions to be controlled on the block include zero moisture flux and zero heat flux on the sides, constant temperature on the top, and constant stress on the outside surfaces of the block. To control these boundary conditions, a load-retaining frame is required. A 3 x 3 x 4.5 m block of Topopah Spring tuff has been isolated on the outcrop at Fran Ridge, Nevada Test Site. Pre-test model calculations indicate that a permeability of at least 10{sup -15} m{sup 2} is required so that a dryout zone can be created within a practical time frame when the block is heated from within. Neutron logging was conducted in some of the vertical holes to estimate the initial moisture content of the block. It was found that about 60 to 80% of the pore volume of the block is saturated with water. Cores from the vertical holes have been used to map the fractures and to determine the properties of the rock. A current schedule is included in the report.

  9. Very large release of mostly volcanic carbon during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Marcus; Ridgwell, Andy; Sexton, Philip F.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Pearson, Paul N.; Pälike, Heiko; Norris, Richard D.; Thomas, Ellen; Foster, Gavin L.

    2017-08-01

    The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was a global warming event that occurred about 56 million years ago, and is commonly thought to have been driven primarily by the destabilization of carbon from surface sedimentary reservoirs such as methane hydrates. However, it remains controversial whether such reservoirs were indeed the source of the carbon that drove the warming. Resolving this issue is key to understanding the proximal cause of the warming, and to quantifying the roles of triggers versus feedbacks. Here we present boron isotope data—a proxy for seawater pH—that show that the ocean surface pH was persistently low during the PETM. We combine our pH data with a paired carbon isotope record in an Earth system model in order to reconstruct the unfolding carbon-cycle dynamics during the event. We find strong evidence for a much larger (more than 10,000 petagrams)—and, on average, isotopically heavier—carbon source than considered previously. This leads us to identify volcanism associated with the North Atlantic Igneous Province, rather than carbon from a surface reservoir, as the main driver of the PETM. This finding implies that climate-driven amplification of organic carbon feedbacks probably played only a minor part in driving the event. However, we find that enhanced burial of organic matter seems to have been important in eventually sequestering the released carbon and accelerating the recovery of the Earth system.

  10. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Yin, Rongxin; Brown, Carrie; Kim, DongEun

    2009-06-01

    The potential for using building thermal mass for load shifting and peak energy demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Previous Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory research has demonstrated that the approach is very effective in cool and moderately warm climate conditions (California Climate Zones 2-4). However, this method had not been tested in hotter climate zones. This project studied the potential of pre-cooling the building early in the morning and increasing temperature setpoints during peak hours to reduce cooling-related demand in two typical office buildings in hotter California climates ? one in Visalia (CEC Climate Zone 13) and the other in San Bernardino (CEC Climate Zone 10). The conclusion of the work to date is that pre-cooling in hotter climates has similar potential to that seen previously in cool and moderate climates. All other factors being equal, results to date indicate that pre-cooling increases the depth (kW) and duration (kWh) of the possible demand shed of a given building. The effectiveness of night pre-cooling in typical office building under hot weather conditions is very limited. However, night pre-cooling is helpful for office buildings with an undersized HVAC system. Further work is required to duplicate the tests in other typical buildings and in other hot climate zones and prove that pre-cooling is truly effective.

  11. Multi-Sensing system for outdoor thermal monitoring: Application to large scale civil engineering components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Manceau, Jean-Luc; Perez, Laetitia; Bourquin, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Aging of transport infrastructures combined with traffic and climatic solicitations contribute to the reduction of their performances. To address and quantify the resilience of civil engineering structure, investigations on robust, fast and efficient methods are required. Among research works carried out at IFSTTAR, methods for long term monitoring face an increasing demand. Such works take benefits of this last decade technological progresses in ICT domain. The present study follows the ISTIMES European project [1], which aimed at demonstrate the ability of different electromagnetic sensing techniques, processing methods and ICT architecture, to be used for long term monitoring of critical transport infrastructures. Thanks to this project a multi-sensing techniques system, able to date and synchronize measurements carried out by infrared thermography coupled with various measurements data (i.e. weather parameters), have been designed, developed and implemented on real site [2]. Among experiments carried out on real transport infrastructure, it has been shown, for the "Musmesci" bridge deck (Italy), that by using infrared thermal image sequence with weather measurements during sevral days it was possible to develop analysis methods able to produce qualitative and quantitative data [3]. In the present study, added functionalities were designed and added to the "IrLAW" system in order to reach full autonomy in term of power supply, very long term measurement capability (at least 1 year) and automated data base feeding. The surveyed civil engineering structures consist in two concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T weight each. One of the two beams was damage by high energy mechanical impact at the IFSTTAR falling rocks test station facilities located in the French Alpes [4]. The system is composed of one IR uncooled microbolometric camera (FLIR SC325) with a 320X240 Focal Plane Array detector in band III, a weather station VAISALA WXT520, a GPS, a failover power supply

  12. Nonlinear excitations of blood flow in large vessels under thermal radiations and uniform magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabi, C. B.; Motsumi, T. G.; Bansi Kamdem, C. D.; Mohamadou, A.

    2017-08-01

    A nonlinear model of blood flow in large vessels is addressed. The influence of radiations, viscosity and uniform magnetic fields on velocity and temperature distribution waveforms is studied. Exact solutions for the studied model are investigated through the F - expansion method. Based on the choice of parameter values, single-, multi-soliton and Jacobi elliptic function solutions are obtained. Viscosity and permanent magnetic field bring about wave spreading and reduce the velocity of blood, while radiations have reversed effects with strong impact on the waveform frequency of both the velocity and temperature distribution.

  13. Delivering SKA Science

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Peter; Bird, Ian; Dodson, Richard; Szalay, Alex; Wicenec, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The SKA will be capable of producing a stream of science data products that are Exa-scale in terms of their storage and processing requirements. This Google-scale enterprise is attracting considerable international interest and excitement from within the industrial and academic communities. In this chapter we examine the data flow, storage and processing requirements of a number of key SKA survey science projects to be executed on the baseline SKA1 configuration. Based on a set of conservative assumptions about trends for HPC and storage costs, and the data flow process within the SKA Observatory, it is apparent that survey projects of the scale proposed will potentially drive construction and operations costs beyond the current anticipated SKA1 budget. This implies a sharing of the resources and costs to deliver SKA science between the community and what is contained within the SKA Observatory. A similar situation was apparent to the designers of the LHC more than 10 years ago. We propose that it is time for...

  14. Large eddy simulation on thermal mixing of fluids in a T-junction with conjugate heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • LES of fluid mixing in a T-junction at ΔT = 117 K and 123 K is performed. • Dynamical thermal stratification flow behavior downstream of T-junction. • Temperature fluctuations have maximum amplitudes of about 3.4–5.6% of ΔT. • High amplitude fluctuations occur near stratification layer in the mixing region. • Energy of temperature fluctuations mainly contained in the range 0.1–3 Hz. - Abstract: High cycle thermal fatigue failure in a nuclear power plant T-junction piping system may be caused by near-wall temperature fluctuations due to thermal mixing of hot and cold fluid streams. In the present study, thermal mixing at temperature differences (ΔT) of 117 K and 123 K between the mixing fluids is numerically investigated using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method with the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS CFX 14.0. LES results from the study are validated with experimental data obtained from Fluid–Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at the Materials Testing Institute (MPA), University of Stuttgart. Mass flow rate ratios (main/branch) in both cases are 4 and 6, respectively. LES results in both cases show that there is incomplete mixing of fluids and within three diameters downstream of T-junction, the mixing results in a dynamical thermal stratification flow behavior, which is maintained throughout the computational domain. Mean temperature predictions by LES show good agreement with the experimental data, whereas the root mean square (RMS) temperature fluctuations are over or understated at a few positions. The temperature fluctuations have amplitudes ranging from 0.09 to 5.6% of ΔT between the mixing fluids. Incomplete mixing of fluids and relatively lower amplitude of temperature fluctuations are mainly due to lower Reynolds number of 3670 in the cold fluid coming from the branch pipe along with buoyancy effects in the flow due to higher inflow temperature in the main pipe.

  15. Moduli dynamics as a predictive tool for thermal maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills at large N

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Takeshi; Wiseman, Toby; Withers, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Maximally supersymmetric (p+1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory at large N and finite temperature, with possibly compact spatial directions, has a rich phase structure. Strongly coupled phases may have holographic descriptions as black branes in various string duality frames, or there may be no gravity dual. In this paper we provide tools in the gauge theory which give a simple and unified picture of the various strongly coupled phases, and transitions between them. Building on our previous work we consider the effective theory describing the moduli of the gauge theory, which can be computed precisely when it is weakly coupled far out on the Coulomb branch. Whilst for perturbation theory naive extrapolation from weak coupling to strong gives little information, for this moduli theory naive extrapolation from its weakly to its strongly coupled regime appears to encode a surprising amount of information about the various strongly coupled phases. We argue it encodes not only the parametric form of thermodynamic qua...

  16. Large-eddy simulations of isolated disc galaxies with thermal and turbulent feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Harald; Niemeyer, Jens C; Almgren, Ann S

    2014-01-01

    We present a subgrid-scale model for the Multi-phase Interstellar medium, Star formation, and Turbulence (MIST) and explore its behaviour in high-resolution large-eddy simulations of isolated disc galaxies. MIST follows the evolution of a clumpy cold and a diffuse warm component of the gas within a volume element which exchange mass and energy via various cooling, heating and mixing processes. The star formation rate is dynamically computed from the state of the gas in the cold phase. An important feature of MIST is the treatment of unresolved turbulence in the two phases and its interaction with star formation and feedback by supernovae. This makes MIST a particularly suitable model for the interstellar medium in galaxy simulations. We carried out a suite of simulations varying fundamental parameters of our feedback implementation. Several observational properties of galactic star formation are reproduced in our simulations, such as an average star formation efficiency ~1%, a typical velocity dispersion arou...

  17. Thermal models, stable isotopes and cooling ages from the incrementally constructed Tuolumne batholith, Sierra Nevada: why large chambers did exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, S. R.; Okaya, D. A.; Memeti, V.; Mundil, R.; Lackey, J.; Clemens-Knott, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our studies of the zoned, 1100 km2, 95-85 Ma Tuolumne batholith are in part designed to evaluate the thermal evolution of normally zoned, large magma bodies formed by the amalgamation of a few to many magma pulses. We use finite difference models with full spatial heterogeneity of rock properties, fine-scale internal grid spacing allowing for rock geometries at scales between sub-m to km’s, small internal time steps for runs over durations of days to millions of years and latent heat of fusion. Our initial stable isotopic studies, including δ18O variation in zircon (6-6.5‰), titanite (4.5-5.2‰), quartz (9-10‰), and whole rock (7-9 ‰) (Lackey et al. 2008, J. Pet.) and of the dD of biotites (-65 to -75‰) reveal isotopic exchange during magmatic cooling but the absence of a pervasive hydrothermal circulation system. We thus excluded advective cooling from our models. A range of incremental chamber construction scenarios are modeled including (1) repeated intrusions of rectangular or elliptical geometry (sills, dikes, or blobs); (2) a sequence of intrusions emplaced at specified but arbitrary times or according to a time rate with pulse shapes fixed or set to randomly vary within a range of dimensions and aspect ratios; (3) sheeted dike complexes in which the thermal model expands according to an extension rate to accommodate the emplacement of new dikes with width and time between dikes coupled to growth rate; (4) nested diapiric pulses; and (5) nested, irregularly shaped bodies based on maps or cross-sections that are digitally rendered into rock types, assigned thermal properties and intruded at specified times as new magma pulses. This wide range of batholith construction scenarios naturally results in a wide range of length and timescales of magma chambers. However, many likely scenarios for the TB, based on flux rates constrained by mapping and geochronology indicate that (1) the lobes of the Tuolumne batholith will crystallize in 100

  18. Moduli dynamics as a predictive tool for thermal maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills at large N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Shiba, Shotaro; Wiseman, Toby; Withers, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    Maximally supersymmetric ( p + 1)-dimensional Yang-Mills theory at large N and finite temperature, with possibly compact spatial directions, has a rich phase structure. Strongly coupled phases may have holographic descriptions as black branes in various string duality frames, or there may be no gravity dual. In this paper we provide tools in the gauge theory which give a simple and unified picture of the various strongly coupled phases, and transitions between them. Building on our previous work we consider the effective theory describing the moduli of the gauge theory, which can be computed precisely when it is weakly coupled far out on the Coulomb branch. Whilst for perturbation theory naive extrapolation from weak coupling to strong gives little information, for this moduli theory naive extrapolation from its weakly to its strongly coupled regime appears to encode a surprising amount of information about the various strongly coupled phases. We argue it encodes not only the parametric form of thermodynamic quantities for these strongly coupled phases, but also certain transcendental factors with a geometric origin, and allows one to deduce transitions between the phases. We emphasise it also gives predictions for the behaviour of other observables in these phases.

  19. Renormalization Group Flow, Stability, and Bulk Viscosity in a Large N Thermal QCD Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dasgupta, Keshav; Gale, Charles; Richard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The ultraviolet completion of a large N QCD model requires introducing new degrees of freedom at certain scale so that the UV behavior may become asymptotically conformal with no Landau poles and no UV divergences of Wilson loops. These UV degrees of freedom are represented by certain anti-branes arranged on the blown-up sphere of a warped resolved conifold in a way that they are separated from the other set of branes that control the IR behavior of the theory. This separation of the branes and the anti-branes creates instability in the theory. Further complications arise from the curvature of the ambient space. We show that, despite these analytical hurdles, stability may still be achieved by switching on appropriate world-volume fluxes on the branes. The UV degrees of freedom, on the other hand, modify the RG flow in the model. We discuss this in details by evaluating the flow from IR confining to UV conformal. Finally we lay down a calculational scheme to study bulk viscosity which, in turn, would signal t...

  20. First Detection of Thermal Radio Emission from Solar-Type Stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array

    CERN Document Server

    Villadsen, Jackie; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars {\\tau} Cet, {\\eta} Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in calcium-II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few {\\mu}Jy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. {\\tau} Cet, {\\eta} Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0-GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for {\\tau} Cet and 1.6 for {\\eta} Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5-GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically- thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions...

  1. Large solid-angle polarisation analysis at thermal neutron wavelengths using a sup 3 He spin filter

    CERN Document Server

    Heil, W; Cywinski, R; Humblot, H; Ritter, C; Roberts, T W; Stewart, J R

    2002-01-01

    The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarised sup 3 He opens up the possibility of polarising neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons. In this paper we describe the first large solid-angle polarisation analysis measurement using a sup 3 He neutron spin filter at thermal neutron wavelengths (lambda=2.5 A). This experiment was performed on the two-axis diffractometer D1B at the Institut Laue-Langevin using a banana-shaped filter cell (530 cm sup 3 ) filled with sup 3 He gas with a polarisation of P=52% at a pressure of 2.7 bar. A comparison is made with a previous measurement on D7 using a cold neutron beam on the same sample, i.e. amorphous ErY sub 6 Ni sub 3. Using uniaxial polarisation analysis both the nuclear and magnetic cross-sections could be extracted over the range of scattering-vectors [0.5<=Q(A sup - sup 1)<=3.5]. The results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the D7-data, whe...

  2. Large-scale uniform ZnO tetrapods on catalyst free glass substrate by thermal evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsultany, Forat H., E-mail: foratusm@gmail.com [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hassan, Z. [Institute of Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (INOR), USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Ahmed, Naser M. [School of Physics, USM, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigate the growth of ZnO-Ts on glass substrate by thermal evaporation method. • Glass substrate without any catalyst or a seed layer. • The morphology was controlled by adjusting the temperature of the material and the substrate. • Glass substrate was placed vertically in the quartz tube. - Abstract: Here, we report for the first time the catalyst-free growth of large-scale uniform shape and size ZnO tetrapods on a glass substrate via thermal evaporation method. Three-dimensional networks of ZnO tetrapods have needle–wire junctions, an average leg length of 2.1–2.6 μm, and a diameter of 35–240 nm. The morphology and structure of ZnO tetrapods were investigated by controlling the preparation temperature of each of the Zn powder and the glass substrate under O{sub 2} and Ar gases. Studies were carried out on ZnO tetrapods using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer, and a photoluminescence. The results showed that the sample grow in the hexagonal wurtzite structure with preferentially oriented along (002) direction, good crystallinity and high transmittance. The band gap value is about 3.27 eV. Photoluminescence spectrum exhibits a very sharp peak at 378 nm and a weak broad green emission.

  3. Structure of ADAFs in a general large-scale B-field: the role of wind and thermal conduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amin Mosallanezhad; Mehdi Khajavi; Shahram Abbassi

    2013-01-01

    We have explored the structure of a hot flow bathed in a general large-scale magnetic field.The importance of outflow and thermal conduction on the self-similar structure of a hot accretion flow has been investigated.We consider the additional magnetic parameters βr,(η),z [=cr,(η),z2/(2cs2)],wherecr,cr(η),z2 are the Alfvén sound speeds in three directions of cylindrical coordinates.In comparison to the accretion disk without winds,our results show that the radial and rotational velocities of the disk become faster,but the disk becomes cooler because of the angular momentum and energy flux which are taken away by the winds.Moreover,thermal conduction opposes the effect of winds and not only decreases the rotational velocity but also increases the radial velocity as well as the sound speed of the disk.In addition,we study the effect of the global magnetic field on the structure of the disk.Our numerical results show that all the components of a magnetic field can be important and they have a considerable effect on velocities and vertical structure of the disk.

  4. Interactivity in an Electronically Delivered Marketing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    In a marketing course delivered using Lotus Notes, 32 students were randomly assigned to large or small groups with heavy or light coaching. No differences in interactivity appeared related to group size or gender. More coaching increased the quantity, not quality, of interactivity. Quality seemed to decrease as quantity increased. (Contains 35…

  5. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.; Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T') were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T' large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T' structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T' structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T' structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T' structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested.

  6. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Diez, Sergio; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Tackmann, Kerstin [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gerboles, Marta; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Ullan, Miguel [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-01-15

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  7. Comparison of the microstructure and thermal stability of an AZ31 alloy processed by ECAP and large strain hot rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddahbi, M. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Valle, J.A. del [Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Prado, M.T. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: tpprado@cenim.csic.es; Ruano, O.A. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM), CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-11-25

    The aim of this work is to compare the microstructure, the texture, as well as the thermal stability of an AZ31 Mg alloy processed via two different severe plastic deformation processing techniques, namely large strain hot rolling (LSHR) and equal channel angular pressing (ECAP). The microstructure was characterized by optical microscopy and the texture was measured both by X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure obtained via LSHR has average grain sizes around 3 {mu}m, but it is quite heterogeneous. Additionally, a well-defined basal texture develops. ECAP gives rise to a more homogeneous and slightly coarser microstructure, with an average grain size of 7 {mu}m and a shear type texture. The higher resistance of the extruded sample to secondary recrystallization after severe post-deformation annealing is attributed to a texture effect.

  8. Large reduction in the magnitude and thermal variation of Frank elastic constants in a gold nanorod/nematic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Madhuri, P.; Krishna Prasad, S.; Shinde, Pravin; Prasad, B. L. V.

    2016-10-01

    We report measurements of splay and bend Frank elastic constants in a composite comprising a nematic liquid crystal doped with a small concentration of sterically stabilized gold nanorods. The composite exhibits not only a large reduction in the magnitude of the threshold voltage for switching (V th, 20%), as well as of the splay (K 11, 40%) and bend (K 33, 40%) elastic constants, but also presents an unprecedented feature: a substantial diminution in the temperature dependence of these parameters, almost to the point of becoming thermally invariant. This observation is significant because the electro-optic switching of liquid-crystal devices is largely controlled by the K 11 and K 33 elastic constants. Electrical conductivity measurements also show interesting behavior upon the inclusion of nanorods. Whereas the intrinsic Arrhenius behavior governing the temperature dependence is enhanced, the frequency dependence shows qualitative features of Jonscher’s universal model, albeit with a higher exponent. Further, photoisomerization of an azobenzene guest component provides an additional influence on the elastic constants. The results are discussed in terms of (a) the effect of the order parameter dependence seen from the viewpoint of an extended mean-field model, and (b) local order. The advantage of incorporating nanorods with photofunctionality is also pointed out.

  9. Multi-temporal thermal analyses for submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) detection over large spatial scales in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Hanna; Mallast, Ulf; Merz, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) sites act as important pathways for nutrients and contaminants that deteriorate marine ecosystems. In the Mediterranean it is estimated that 75% of freshwater input is contributed from karst aquifers. Thermal remote sensing can be used for a pre-screening of potential SGD sites in order to optimize field surveys. Although different platforms (ground-, air- and spaceborne) may serve for thermal remote sensing, the most cost-effective are spaceborne platforms (satellites) that likewise cover the largest spatial scale (>100 km per image). Therefore an automatized and objective approach that uses thermal satellite images from Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 was used to localize potential SGD sites on a large spatial scale. The method using descriptive statistic parameter specially range and standard deviation by (Mallast et al., 2014) was adapted to the Mediterranean Sea. Since the method was developed for the Dead Sea were satellite images with cloud cover are rare and no sea level change occurs through tidal cycles it was essential to adapt the method to a region where tidal cycles occur and cloud cover is more frequent . These adaptations include: (1) an automatic and adaptive coastline detection (2) include and process cloud covered scenes to enlarge the data basis, (3) implement tidal data in order to analyze low tide images as SGD is enhanced during these phases and (4) test the applicability for Landsat 8 images that will provide data in the future once Landsat 7 stops working. As previously shown, the range method shows more accurate results compared to the standard deviation. However, the result exclusively depends on two scenes (minimum and maximum) and is largely influenced by outliers. Counteracting on this drawback we developed a new approach. Since it is assumed that sea surface temperature (SST) is stabilized by groundwater at SGD sites, the slope of a bootstrapped linear model fitted to sorted SST per pixel would be less

  10. Performance tests of a fast-acting valve for the driver tubes of a large blast/thermal simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Marcela R.

    1992-05-01

    This document describes the testing of a fast-acting throat valve element designed by Eaton Consolidated Controls for use in driver tubes, (blast generators) of a Large Blast/Thermal Simulator (LB/TS). An LB/TS is used to simulate decaying blast waves such as are generated by nuclear explosions. The Eaton Throat Valve Element (ETVE) was tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to evaluate its performance against the design criteria. The ETVE was mounted at the end of a driver tube and actuated 16 times at 6 different driver pressures ranging from 396 kPa to 12.4 MPa (57.5 psi to 1,800 psi). The valve seals survived successfully all 16 tests with the driver gas at room temperature and maintained an acceptable leak rate throughout the test program. The average valve lag time was determined to vary from 36 to 120 ms; however, the valve was found to chatter, going through several (up to 20) opening/closing cycles after actuation before settling in the open position. An increase in the pneumatic supply pressure driving the valve showed a minor decrease in the number of chattering cycles. When the valve was actuated with no pressure in the driver tube, no chattering was observed. At the conclusion of the test sequence, the valve seals were inspected and were in good condition. The shock waves appeared to agree with code predictions when the chattering effects were disregarded.

  11. Pervasive faulting revealed by acoustic blanking: a potential explanation for large thermal anomalies in the Anglo-Paris Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentzer, Jacques; Bruel, Dominique; Delescluse, Matthias; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Beccaletto, Laurent; Lopez, Simon; Courrioux, Gabriel; Violette, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Based on new seismic interpretations, this work explores different scenarios to explain major temperature variations in the Anglo-Paris Basin. The work considers both the horizontal and vertical dimensions of these thermal heterogeneities by coupling measurements from geothermal wells with temperature profiles. In addition to detailed geological structures (anticline and faults), reprocessing and interpretation of seismic data have revealed the presence of vertically extending zones with characteristic low-energy seismic facies affecting a large part of the sedimentary pile. Such observations are known in other sedimentary contexts and are interpreted as fractured lithology. We consider their potential role regarding fluid flows in continental domain geothermal modelling for an intracratonic sedimentary basin. Different fault and fracture scenarios clearly show their contribution to the heterogeneity observed in the basin's temperature field, which cannot be explained either by conductive phenomena with heterogeneous radiogenic production nor by flows without vertical leakage via the faults or fractured zones affecting the sedimentary pile. An important consequence of this work would then be to research these zones to localize them systematically and understand their origin, and to then confirm their hydrodynamic properties.

  12. CFD-Guided Development of Test Rigs for Studying Erosion and Large-Particle Damage of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Kuczmarski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Burner rigs are routinely used to qualify materials for gas turbine applications. The most useful rig tests are those that can replicate, often in an accelerated manner, the degradation that materials experience in the engine. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be used to accelerate the successful development and continuous improvement of combustion burner rigs for meaningful materials testing. Rig development is typically an iterative process of making incremental modifications to improve the rig performance for testing requirements. Application of CFD allows many of these iterations to be done computationally before hardware is built or modified, reducing overall testing costs and time, and it can provide an improved understanding of how these rigs operate. This paper describes the use of CFD to develop burner test rigs for studying erosion and large-particle damage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs used to protect turbine blades from high heat fluxes in combustion engines. The steps used in this study—determining the questions that need to be answered regarding the test rig performance, developing and validating the model, and using it to predict rig performance—can be applied to the efficient development of other test rigs.

  13. Thermal energy harvesting for large-scale applications using MWCNT-grafted glass fibers and polycarbonate-MWCNT nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounis, L.; Liebscher, M.; Mäder, E.; Pötschke, P.; Stamm, M.; Logothetidis, S.

    2015-02-01

    /MWCNT nanocomposites are ideal candidates for large-scale thermal energy harvesting. However, the thermoelectric values are still too low for commercial applications and in the future could be enhanced as will be discussed in this work.

  14. Thermal energy harvesting for large-scale applications using MWCNT-grafted glass fibers and polycarbonate-MWCNT nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzounis, L., E-mail: ltzounis@physics.auth.gr [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtzstraße 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrolo (Greece); Liebscher, M.; Stamm, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden, Germany and Technische Universität Dresden, Helmholtzstraße 10, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Mäder, E.; Pötschke, P. [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V., IPF, Hohe Str. 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Logothetidis, S., E-mail: logot@auth.gr [Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-02-17

    materials and PC/MWCNT nanocomposites are ideal candidates for large-scale thermal energy harvesting. However, the thermoelectric values are still too low for commercial applications and in the future could be enhanced as will be discussed in this work.

  15. Low Thermal Gradient Czochralski growth of large CdWO{sub 4} crystals and electronic properties of (010) cleaved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V., E-mail: atuchin@isp.nsc.ru [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90 630090 (Russian Federation); Functional Electronics Laboratory, Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Semiconductor and Dielectric Materials, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Galashov, E.N. [Department of Applied Physics, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Khyzhun, O.Y.; Bekenev, V.L. [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, NAS of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Street, Kyiv UA-03142 (Ukraine); Pokrovsky, L.D. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90 630090 (Russian Federation); Borovlev, Yu.A. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhdankov, V.N. [CML Ltd., 3 Lavrentiev Avenue, Novosibirsk 90 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    The crystal growth of large high-quality inclusion-free CdWO4 crystals, 110 mm in diameter and mass up to 20 kg, has been carried out by the Low Thermal Gradient Czochralski (LTG Cz) technique. The high-purity CdWO{sub 4}(010) surface has been prepared by cleavage and high structural quality of the surface has been verified by RHEED, revealing a system of Kikuchi lines. The chemical state and electronic structure of the surface have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). The total and partial densities of states of the CdWO{sub 4} tungstate were calculated employing the first-principles full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The results indicate that the principal contributors to the valence band of CdWO{sub 4} are the Cd 4d, W 5d and O 2p states which contribute mainly at the bottom, in the central portion and at the top of the valence band, respectively, with also significant contributions of the mentioned states throughout the whole CdWO{sub 4} valence-band region. With respect to the occupation of the O 2p states, the results of the FP-LAPW calculations are confirmed by comparison on a common energy scale of the XPS valence-band spectrum and the XES band representing the energy distribution of the O 2p states in this compound. Additionally, the FP-LAPW data allow us to conclude that the CdWO{sub 4} tungstate is a non-direct semiconductor. - Highlights: • Large high-quality CdWO{sub 4} crystals, up to 115 mm in diameter and mass up to 20 kg, have been grown. • The high-purity cleaved CdWO{sub 4}(010) surface has been studied by the XPS and XES methods. • The principal contributors to the CdWO{sub 4} valence band are the Cd 4d, W 5d and O 2p states.

  16. Do sex, body size and reproductive condition influence the thermal preferences of a large lizard? A study in Tupinambis merianae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchetto, Nicolas Rodolfo; Naretto, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Body temperature is a key factor in physiological processes, influencing lizard performances; and life history traits are expected to generate variability of thermal preferences in different individuals. Gender, body size and reproductive condition may impose specific requirements on preferred body temperatures. If these three factors have different physiological functions and thermal requirements, then the preferred temperature may represent a compromise that optimizes these physiological functions. Therefore, the body temperatures that lizards select in a controlled environment may reflect a temperature that maximizes their physiological needs. The tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae is one of the largest lizards in South America and has wide ontogenetic variation in body size and sexual dimorphism. In the present study we evaluate intraspecific variability of thermal preferences of T. merianae. We determined the selected body temperature and the rate at which males and females attain their selected temperature, in relation to body size and reproductive condition. We also compared the behavior in the thermal gradient between males and females and between reproductive condition of individuals. Our study show that T. merianae selected body temperature within a narrow range of temperatures variation in the laboratory thermal gradient, with 36.24±1.49°C being the preferred temperature. We observed no significant differences between sex, body size and reproductive condition in thermal preferences. Accordingly, we suggest that the evaluated categories of T. merianae have similar thermal requirements. Males showed higher rates to obtain heat than females and reproductive females, higher rates than non-reproductive ones females. Moreover, males and reproductive females showed a more dynamic behavior in the thermal gradient. Therefore, even though they achieve the same selected temperature, they do it differentially.

  17. Influence of magnesia-to-phosphate molar ratio on microstructures, mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of magnesium potassium phosphate cement paste with large water-to-solid ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Biwan, E-mail: xubiwan@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ma, Hongyan, E-mail: mhy1103@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Li, Zongjin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-02-15

    This paper describes the influence of the magnesia-to-phosphate (M/P) molar ratios ranging from 4 to 12, on the properties and microstructures of magnesium potassium phosphate cement (MKPC) pastes with a large water-to-solid ratio (w/s) of 0.50. The setting behavior, compressive strength, tensile bonding strength and thermal conductivity of the MKPC pastes, were investigated. The results show that an increase in the M/P ratio can slow down the setting reaction, and clearly degrade the mechanical strengths, but clearly improve the thermal conductivity of MKPC pastes. Furthermore, micro-characterizations including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, on the MKPC pastes reveal that a lower M/P ratio can facilitate better crystallization of the resultant magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate (MKP) and a denser microstructure. Moreover, strong linear correlations are found between the mechanical strengths and the MKP-to-space ratio, and between thermal conductivity and the volume ratio of the unreacted magnesia to the MKP. - Highlights: • Increase of M/P molar ratio causes clear mechanical degradations on MKPC pastes. • Thermal conductivity of MKPC pastes is improved with increase of M/P molar ratio. • Lower M/P ratio leads to better MKP crystallization and denser microstructure. • Strengths of MKPC pastes are linearly correlated to the MKP-to-space ratios. • Thermal conductivity is affected by the volume ratio of unreacted magnesia to MKP.

  18. Reducing the thermal stress in a heterogeneous material stack for large-area hybrid optical silicon-lithium niobate waveguide micro-chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, P. O.; Mookherjea, S.

    2017-04-01

    The bonding of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to lithium niobate-on-insulator (LNOI) is becoming important for a new category of linear and nonlinear micro-photonic optical devices. In studying the bonding of SOI to LNOI through benzocyclobutene (BCB), a popular interlayer bonding dielectric used in hybrid silicon photonic devices, we use thermal stress calculations to suggest that BCB thickness does not affect thermal stress in this type of structure, and instead, thermal stress can be mitigated satisfactorily by matching the handles of the SOI and LNOI. We bond LNOI with a silicon handle to a silicon chip, remove the handle on the LNOI side, and thermally cycle the bonded stack repeatedly from room temperature up to 300°C and back down without incurring thermal stress cracks, which do appear when using LNOI with a lithium niobate handle, regardless of the BCB thickness. We show that this process can be used to create many hybrid silicon-lithium niobate waveguiding structures on a single patterned SOI chip bonded to a large-area (16 mm × 4.2 mm) lithium niobate film.

  19. Chromium–niobium co-doped vanadium dioxide films: Large temperature coefficient of resistance and practically no thermal hysteresis of the metal–insulator transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Miyazaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of chromium (Cr and niobium (Nb co-doping on the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR and the thermal hysteresis of the metal–insulator transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2 films. We determined the TCR and thermal-hysteresis-width diagram of the V1−x−yCrxNbyO2 films by electrical-transport measurements and we found that the doping conditions x ≳ y and x + y ≥ 0.1 are appropriate for simultaneously realizing a large TCR value and an absence of thermal hysteresis in the films. By using these findings, we developed a V0.90Cr0.06Nb0.04O2 film grown on a TiO2-buffered SiO2/Si substrate that showed practically no thermal hysteresis while retaining a large TCR of 11.9%/K. This study has potential applications in the development of VO2-based uncooled bolometers.

  20. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma: a large-scale analysis of long-term outcome and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J; Jing, X; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Du, Z

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome and prognostic factors when treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with thermal ablation. A total of 846 HCC patients, diagnosed histopathologically and/or radiologically, underwent thermal ablation from October 2001 to May 2013. Thermal ablation included both radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA), and was performed by percutaneous, open, and laparoscopic approaches. Clinical data, especially focused on disease-free survival, were retrospectively analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 1,185 thermal ablation treatments were performed, corresponding to 1,240 tumours. The complete ablation rate was 97.1%. The 12-, 24-, 36-, and 60-month disease-free survival rates after thermal ablation were 72.3%, 52.7%, 33.5%, and 16.1%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that the serum alkaline phosphatase levels (ALP) and the number of tumours were independent risk factors affecting disease-free survival. The 12-, 36-, 60-, 84-, and 120-month overall survival rates of all patients were 92.9%, 74.7%, 58.1%, 41.3%, and 15.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that age, ALP, number of tumours, and treatment sessions per case were independent risk factors related to overall survival. Thermal ablation was a relatively safe and effective procedure. Patients with increased serum ALP levels and/or multiple tumours had a higher incidence of recurrence and poorer prognosis, and therefore, should be monitored closely in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hubble Space telescope thermal cycle test report for large solar array samples with BSFR cells (Sample numbers 703 and 704)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble space telescope (HST) solar array was designed to meet specific output power requirements after 2 years in low-Earth orbit, and to remain operational for 5 years. The array, therefore, had to withstand 30,000 thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. The ability of the array to meet this requirement was evaluated by thermal cycle testing, in vacuum, two 128-cell solar cell modules that exactly duplicated the flight HST solar array design. Also, the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit was evaluated by performing a cold-roll test using one module.

  2. Measurements of the densities, isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We report the measurements of the densities of linear alkylbenzene at three temperatures over 4 to 23 Celsius degree with pressures up to 10 MPa. The measurements have been analysed to yield the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and, so far for the first time, isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene.

  3. Vacuum compatible large uniform-radiance source for ground calibration of satellite cameras inside a thermal vacuum environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arecchi, Angelo V.; Pal, Samir; Jablonski, Joseph W.; Gervais, Marc; Gugliotta, Mark; Seth, Harish; Bhardwaj, Arun; Sahoo, Hari Sankar

    2008-08-01

    A vacuum compatible integrating sphere was built to operate inside a thermal vacuum chamber. This paper presents the design and test results for a 1.65 meter diameter vacuum compatible integrating sphere with a 1.0 meter diameter exit port and approximately 10kW of internal tungsten lamps. Liquid nitrogen is used as cooling medium to remove the heat generated by these lamps. There are no moving parts inside the vacuum chamber. The radiance is monitored with two filter-wheel detectors, one TE-cooled silicon and one TE-cooled germanium, as well as a TE-cooled silicon array spectrometer. All three detectors are located outside the thermal vacuum chamber and view the sphere radiance through fiber optic cables. The system was tested inside a thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center before commissioning in the 5.5 meter thermal vacuum chamber at Space Applications Centre in Ahmedabad, India. Results of tests of radiance uniformity, radiance levels, and radiance stability are presented. Comparisons of the filter radiometers with the array spectrometer are also presented.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Striping Phenomena in a T-Junction Piping System Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masa-Aki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Monji, Hideaki

    At the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the simulation code “MUGTHES (MUlti Geometry simulation code for THErmal-hydraulic and Structure heat conduction analysis in boundary fitted coordinate)” has been developed to evaluate thermal striping phenomena that are caused by the turbulence mixing of fluids at different temperatures. In this paper, numerical schemes for thermal-hydraulic simulation employed in MUGTHES are described, including the LES model. A simple method to limit numerical oscillation is adopted in energy equation solutions. A new iterative method to solve the Poisson equation in the BFC system is developed for effective transient calculations. This method is based on the BiCGSTAB method and the SOR technique. As the code validation of MUGTHES, a numerical simulation in a T-junction piping system with the LES approach was conducted. Numerical results related to velocity and fluid temperature distributions were compared with existing water experimental data and the applicability of numerical schemes with the LES model in MUGTHES to the thermal striping phenomenon was confirmed.

  5. Growth of wrinkle-free graphene on texture-controlled platinum films and thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Kyung; Kwak, Jinsung; Park, Soon-Dong; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kim, Se-Yang; Jung, Minbok; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Kibog; Kang, Seoktae; Kim, Sung-Dae; Park, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Su; Hong, Suk-Kyoung; Shin, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2015-01-27

    Growth of large-scale patterned, wrinkle-free graphene and the gentle transfer technique without further damage are most important requirements for the practical use of graphene. Here we report the growth of wrinkle-free, strictly uniform monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition on a platinum (Pt) substrate with texture-controlled giant grains and the thermal-assisted transfer of large-scale patterned graphene onto arbitrary substrates. The designed Pt surfaces with limited numbers of grain boundaries and improved surface perfectness as well as small thermal expansion coefficient difference to graphene provide a venue for uniform growth of monolayer graphene with wrinkle-free characteristic. The thermal-assisted transfer technique allows the complete transfer of large-scale patterned graphene films onto arbitrary substrates without any ripples, tears, or folds. The transferred graphene shows high crystalline quality with an average carrier mobility of ∼ 5500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, this transfer technique shows a high tolerance to variations in types and morphologies of underlying substrates.

  6. Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in a large-scale underground heater test in partially saturated fractured tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholzer, J. T.; Tsang, Y. W.

    2000-02-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is being conducted in an underground facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to probe the coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical processes likely to occur in the fractured rock mass around a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Thermal-hydrological processes in the DST have been simulated using a three-dimensional numerical model. The model incorporates the realistic test configuration and all available site-specific measurements pertaining to the thermal and hydrological properties of the unsaturated fractured tuff of the test block. The modeled predictions were compared to the extensive set of measured data collected in the first year of this 8-year-long test. The mean error between the predictions and measurement at 12 months of heating for over 1600 temperature sensors is about 2°C. Heat-pipe signature in the temperature data, indicating two-phase regions of liquid-vapor counterflow, is seen in both the measurements and simulated results. The redistribution of moisture content in the rock mass (resulting from vaporization and condensation) was probed by periodic air-injection testing and geophysical measurements. Good agreement also occurred between the model predictions and these measurements. The general agreement between predictions from the numerical simulations and the measurements of the thermal test indicates that our fundamental understanding of the coupled thermal-hydrologic processes at Yucca Mountain is sound. However, effects of spatial heterogeneity from discrete fractures that are observed in the temperature data are not matched by simulations from the numerical model, which treat the densely spaced fractures as a continuum.

  7. Validation of Effective Models for Simulation of Thermal Stratification and Mixing Induced by Steam Injection into a Large Pool of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Effective Heat Source (EHS and Effective Momentum Source (EMS models have been proposed to predict the development of thermal stratification and mixing during a steam injection into a large pool of water. These effective models are implemented in GOTHIC software and validated against the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-21 tests and the PPOOLEX MIX-01 test. First, the EHS model is validated against STB-20 test which shows the development of thermal stratification. Different numerical schemes and grid resolutions have been tested. A 48×114 grid with second order scheme is sufficient to capture the vertical temperature distribution in the pool. Next, the EHS and EMS models are validated against STB-21 test. Effective momentum is estimated based on the water level oscillations in the blowdown pipe. An effective momentum selected within the experimental measurement uncertainty can reproduce the mixing details. Finally, the EHS-EMS models are validated against MIX-01 test which has improved space and time resolution of temperature measurements inside the blowdown pipe. Excellent agreement in averaged pool temperature and water level in the pool between the experiment and simulation has been achieved. The development of thermal stratification in the pool is also well captured in the simulation as well as the thermal behavior of the pool during the mixing phase.

  8. New insights into properties of large- N holographic thermal QCD at finite gauge coupling at (the non-conformal/next-to) leading order in N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Karunava; Misra, Aalok

    2016-11-01

    It is believed that large- N thermal QCD laboratories like strongly coupled QGP (sQGP) require not only a large `t Hooft coupling but also a finite gauge coupling (Natsuume, String theory and quark-gluon plasma. arXiv:hep-ph/0701201, 2007). Unlike almost all top-down holographic models in the literature, holographic large- N thermal QCD models, based on this assumption, therefore necessarily require addressing this limit from M-theory. This was initiated in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) which presented a local M-theory uplift of the string theoretic dual of large- N thermal QCD-like theories at finite gauge/string coupling of Mia et al. (Nucl. Phys. B 839:187, arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) (g_s deformation - this paper) or deformed (deformation > resolution - Dhuria and Misra in Eur Phys J C 75(1):16, arXiv:1406.6076 [hep-th], 2015) resolved warped deformed conifold, the local T^3 of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) in the MQGP limit is the T^2-invariant special Lagrangian three-cycle of Ionel and Min-OO (Ill J Math 52(3), 2008) justifying the construction in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) of the delocalized Strominger-Yau-Zaslow Type IIA mirror of the Type IIB background of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187, arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010).

  9. Large-scale thermal convection of viscous fluids in a faulted system: 3D test case for numerical codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Cacace, Mauro; Fischer, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to simple homogeneous 1D and 2D systems, no appropriate analytical solutions exist to test onset of thermal convection against numerical models of complex 3D systems that account for variable fluid density and viscosity as well as permeability heterogeneity (e.g. presence of faults). Owing to the importance of thermal convection for the transport of energy and minerals, the development of a benchmark test for density/viscosity driven flow is crucial to ensure that the applied numerical models accurately simulate the physical processes at hands. The presented study proposes a 3D test case for the simulation of thermal convection in a faulted system that accounts for temperature dependent fluid density and viscosity. The linear stability analysis recently developed by Malkovsky and Magri (2016) is used to estimate the critical Rayleigh number above which thermal convection of viscous fluids is triggered. The numerical simulations are carried out using the finite element technique. OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012) and Moose (Gaston et al., 2009) results are compared to those obtained using the commercial software FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014) to test the ability of widely applied codes in matching both the critical Rayleigh number and the dynamical features of convective processes. The methodology and Rayleigh expressions given in this study can be applied to any numerical model that deals with 3D geothermal processes in faulted basins as by example the Tiberas Basin (Magri et al., 2016). References Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B., 2012. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental

  10. Large pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients in the [(CH3)2NH2]Mn (HCOO)3 metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yinina; Cong, Junzhuang; Chai, Yisheng; Yan, Liqin; Shang, Dashan; Sun, Young

    2017-07-01

    The [(CH3)2NH2]Mn(HCOO)3 perovskite metal-organic framework exhibits a first-order ferroelectric phase transition with a high polarization at Tc ˜ 192 K, induced by the order-disorder transition of hydrogen bonds. Accompanying this sharp phase transition, a huge pyroelectric coefficient with a peak value of 5.16 × 10-2 C/m2 K is detected. In addition, there is a large lattice expansion along the [012] direction at Tc, resulting in a giant linear thermal expansion coefficient as high as 35 000 ppm/K. These striking results indicate that ferroelectric metal-organic frameworks combing both merits of inorganic and organic compounds hold a great potential in generating superior pyroelectric and thermal expansion properties.

  11. Influence of the geothermal fluid rheology in the large scale hydro-thermal circulation in Soultz-sous-Forêts reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Bérénice; Magnenet, Vincent; Fond, Christophe; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Many numerical models have been developed in deep geothermal reservoir engineering to interpret field measurements of the natural hydro-thermal circulations or to predict exploitation scenarios. They typically aim at analyzing the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical and Chemical (THMC) coupling including complex rheologies of the rock matrix like thermo-poro-elasticity. Few approaches address in details the role of the fluid rheology and more specifically the non-linear sensitivity of the brine rheology with temperature and pressure. Here we use the finite element Code_Aster to solve the balance equations of a 2D THM model of the Soultz-sous-Forêts reservoir. The brine properties are assumed to depend on the fluid pressure and the temperature as in Magnenet et al. (2014). A sensitive parameter is the thermal dilatation of the brine that is assumed to depend quadratically with temperature as proposed by the experimental measurements of Rowe and Chou (1970). The rock matrix is homogenized at the scale of the equation resolution assuming to have a representative elementary volume of the fractured medium smaller than the mesh size. We still chose four main geological units to adjust the rock physic parameters at large scale: thermal conductivity, permeability, radioactive source production rate, elastic and Biot parameters. We obtain a three layer solution with a large hydro-thermal convection below the cover-basement transition. Interestingly, the geothermal gradient in the sedimentary layer is controlled by the radioactive production rate in the upper altered granite. The second part of the study deals with an inversion approach of the homogenized solid and fluid parameters at large scale using our direct THM model. The goal is to compare the large scale inverted estimates of the rock and brine properties with direct laboratory measurements on cores and discuss their upscaling in the context of a fractured network hydraulically active. Magnenet V., Fond C., Genter A. and

  12. LOW PRESSURE CARBURIZING IN A LARGE-CHAMBER DEVICE FOR HIGH-PERFORMANCE AND PRECISION THERMAL TREATMENT OF PARTS OF MECHANICAL GEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Wołowiec-Korecka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of research of a short-pulse low pressure carburizing technology developed for a new large-chamber furnace for high-performance and precision thermal treatment of parts of mechanical gear. Sections of the article discuss the novel constructions of the device in which parts being carburized flow in a stream, as well as the low-pressure carburizing experiment. The method has been found to yield uniform, even and repeatable carburized layers on typical gear used in automotive industry.

  13. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  14. Extended X-ray emission from non-thermal sources in the COSMOS field: A detailed study of a large radio galaxy at z=1.168

    CERN Document Server

    Jelic, Vibor; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Civano, Francesca; Schinnerer, Eva; Cappelluti, Nico; Koekemoer, Anton

    2012-01-01

    X-ray selected galaxy group samples are usually generated by searching for extended X- ray sources that reflect the thermal radiation of the intragroup medium. On the other hand, large radio galaxies that regularly occupy galaxy groups also emit in the X-ray window, and their contribution to X-ray selected group samples is still not well understood. In order to investigate their relative importance, we have carried out a systematic search for non-thermal extended X-ray sources in the COSMOS field. Based on the morphological coincidence of X-ray and radio extensions, out of 60 radio galaxies, and \\sim 300 extended X-ray sources, we find only one candidate where the observed extended X-ray emission arises from non- thermal processes related to radio galaxies. We present a detailed analysis of this source, and its environment. Our results yield that external Inverse Compton emission of the lobes is the dominant process that generates the observed X-ray emission of our extended X-ray candidate, with a minor contr...

  15. Developing a semi/automated protocol to post-process large volume, High-resolution airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery for urban waste heat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mir Mustafizur

    In collaboration with The City of Calgary 2011 Sustainability Direction and as part of the HEAT (Heat Energy Assessment Technologies) project, the focus of this research is to develop a semi/automated 'protocol' to post-process large volumes of high-resolution (H-res) airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to enable accurate urban waste heat mapping. HEAT is a free GeoWeb service, designed to help Calgary residents improve their home energy efficiency by visualizing the amount and location of waste heat leaving their homes and communities, as easily as clicking on their house in Google Maps. HEAT metrics are derived from 43 flight lines of TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) data acquired on May 13--14, 2012 at night (11:00 pm--5:00 am) over The City of Calgary, Alberta (˜825 km 2) at a 50 cm spatial resolution and 0.05°C thermal resolution. At present, the only way to generate a large area, high-spatial resolution TIR scene is to acquire separate airborne flight lines and mosaic them together. However, the ambient sensed temperature within, and between flight lines naturally changes during acquisition (due to varying atmospheric and local micro-climate conditions), resulting in mosaicked images with different temperatures for the same scene components (e.g. roads, buildings), and mosaic join-lines arbitrarily bisect many thousands of homes. In combination these effects result in reduced utility and classification accuracy including, poorly defined HEAT Metrics, inaccurate hotspot detection and raw imagery that are difficult to interpret. In an effort to minimize these effects, three new semi/automated post-processing algorithms (the protocol) are described, which are then used to generate a 43 flight line mosaic of TABI-1800 data from which accurate Calgary waste heat maps and HEAT metrics can be generated. These algorithms (presented as four peer-reviewed papers)---are: (a) Thermal Urban Road Normalization (TURN)---used to mitigate the microclimatic

  16. Thermally induced recrystallization of MAPbI3 perovskite under methylamine atmosphere: an approach to fabricating large uniform crystalline grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Daniel L; Zang, Ling

    2016-09-14

    A liquid to solid phase transition of methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) under methylamine (MA) atmosphere at elevated temperatures was discovered, and used to form high quality and uniform thin films containing large, low defect crystal grains tens of microns in size.

  17. Indoor test for the thermal performance evaluation of the DEC 8A large manifold sunmaster evacuated tube (liquid) solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The Sunmaster DEC 8A Large Manifold solar collector using simulated conditions was evaluated. The collector provided 17.17 square feet of gross collector area. Test conditions, test requirements, an analysis of results, and tables of test data are reported.

  18. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  19. Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

    1976-08-31

    The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

  20. Evaluation of a New Thermal Fog Machine for Control of Adult Aedes albopictus in a Large Enclosed Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer; Smith, Michael L; Xue, Rui-De; Ren, Dong-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Testing of the PSO BASDKA-AC1200 multifunction ultrafine particle atomization machine, a thermal fog machine, with Aqualuer 20-20(®) (permethrin 20.6%, piperonyl butoxide 20.6%) was conducted against Aedes albopictus. The machine was set at a 40 sec maximum burst interval dispersing 36 ml of chemical with an average droplet volume of 50%. Female adult Ae. albopictus were placed into cylindrical paper cages and adhered to poles at 5, 8, 10, 15, and 25 m from the center point of the machine. Control cages consisted of 1 cage placed at 5, 10, and 25 m. Control and treatment groups were left in the experiment area for 15 min. Initial knockdown after 15 min and 24 h mortality were documented. At 15 min post-treatment, Ae. albopictus displayed less than 50% knockdown. After 24 h, all treatment cages displayed greater than 90% mortality. Further bottle bioassays were conducted to determine the lowest chemical dose possible to achieve a lethal dose of 90%. A 1% dilution (10 ml Aqualuer 20-20 to 1,000 ml of polyether) of Aqualuer showed high mortality in the laboratory. However, after running 3 repetitions of a 1% dilution, there was no significant difference between the mortality of the mosquitoes at any of the distances 24 h post-treatment. This study indicates that the test machine would be an applicable and suitable machine for control of Ae. albopictus in enclosed spaces.

  1. Investigation of a novel multifunctional roof panel for hybrid photovoltaic/thermal/daylight application in atrium and large green house

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Daylight is an energy efficient solution for illumination and visual comfort in buildings. However, successful daylight design requires effective daylight control technology to eliminate the negative impact such as overheating, unbalanced indoor daylight distribution and glare. With this mind, the current thesis presents a novel multifunctional roof panel which might be applied in atrium and large green house. The working principle of the panel is based on the non-imaging low-concentration so...

  2. The thermal aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles decreases its allergenicity for egg allergic patients and in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, M; Lupi, R; Bouchaud, G; Bodinier, M; Brossard, C; Denery-Papini, S

    2016-07-15

    Most egg-allergic children can tolerate extensively cooked eggs. Ovalbumin, a major allergen in egg whites, is prone to aggregate upon heating. This study compares ovalbumin's allergenicity when it is aggregated as large particles to ovalbumin in its native form. Immunoglobulins (Ig)-binding and the degranulation capacities of native and aggregated ovalbumin were measured with sera from egg-allergic children and from mice sensitized to native or aggregated ovalbumin. The influence of ovalbumin structure on Ig production upon sensitization and elicitation potency by challenge was also studied. We showed that heat aggregation of ovalbumin as large particles enhances IgG production and promotes IgG2a production (a shift toward the T helper 1 profile). Aggregated ovalbumin displayed lower Ig-binding and basophil-activation capacities for sera from both allergic patients and mice. This work illustrates the links between ovalbumin structure after heating and allergenicity potential using parameters from both the sensitization and elicitation phases of the allergic reaction.

  3. Budget-limited thermal biology: Design, construction and performance of a large, walk-in style temperature-controlled chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Agosta, Salvatore J

    2016-05-01

    We describe a partial redesign of the conventional air-conditioning system and apply it to the construction of a relatively large (1.87m(3) air mass), walk-in style temperature-controlled chamber (TCC) using parts easily obtained in most countries. We conducted several tests to demonstrate the performance of the TCC. Across the physiologically relevant range of 5-37°C, the TCC took 26.5-50.0min to reach the desired set point temperature. Once at set point, temperature inside the chamber was controlled with an accuracy of ±1.0°C. User-entry effects on deviations from and return times to set point temperature were minimal. Overall, performance of the TCC was sufficient to make precise physiological measurements of insect metabolic rate while controlling assay temperature. Major advantages of the TCC include its simplicity, flexibility, and low cost.

  4. New insights into properties of large-N holographic thermal QCD at finite gauge coupling at (the non-conformal/next-to) leading order in N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sil, Karunava; Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India)

    2016-11-15

    It is believed that large-N thermal QCD laboratories like strongly coupled QGP (sQGP) require not only a large 't Hooft coupling but also a finite gauge coupling (Natsuume, String theory and quark-gluon plasma. arXiv:hep-ph/0701201, 2007). Unlike almost all top-down holographic models in the literature, holographic large-N thermal QCD models, based on this assumption, therefore necessarily require addressing this limit from M-theory. This was initiated in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) which presented a local M-theory uplift of the string theoretic dual of large-N thermal QCD-like theories at finite gauge/string coupling of Mia et al. (Nucl. Phys. B 839:187, arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) (g{sub s} largely address the following two non-trivial issues pertaining to the same. First, up to LO in N (the number of D3-branes), by calculating the temperature dependence of the thermal (and electrical) conductivity and the consequent deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law, upon comparison with Garg et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103:096402, 2009), we show that, remarkably, the results qualitatively mimic a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger liquid with impurities. Second, by looking at, respectively, the scalar, vector, and tensor modes of metric perturbations and using the prescription of Kovtun and Starinets (Phys. Rev. D 72:086009, arXiv:hep-th/0506184, 2005) for constructing appropriate gauge-invariant perturbations, we obtain the non-conformal corrections to the conformal results (but at finite g{sub s}), respectively, for the speed of sound, the shear mode diffusion constant, and the shear viscosity η (and (η)/(s)). The new insight gained is that it

  5. Infrared thermal imaging-based research on the intermediate structures of the lung and large intestine exterior-interior relationship in asthma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Ni, Jin-Xia; Marmori, Federico; Zhu, Qi; Tan, Cheng; Zhao, Ji-Ping

    2016-11-01

    By observing body surface temperature variation of the intermediate structures of the Lung (Fei) and Large Intestine (Dachang) exterior-interior relationship in asthmatic patients, to investigate the pathological response on the pathway of channels and to substantiate the objective existence of the intermediary structures. The study included 60 subjects meeting the bronchial asthma inclusion criteria (experimental group) and 60 healthy subjects (normal control group). ATIR-M301 infrared thermal imaging device was used for detecting body surface temperature of the subjects and collecting the infrared thermal images. The temperature values of the intermediate structures of Lung and Large Intestine exterior-interior relationship [throat, Quepen, elbow, nose, Lieque (LU 7), Pianli (LI 6)], control areas (0.2 cm lateral to the above structures) and Yintang (EX-HN 3) were measured on the infrared thermal image by infrared imaging system. Then, the above temperature values were compared and analyzed within and between two groups. There were insignificant differences between the temperature on the left and right sides of the intermediate structures (Quepen, elbow, LU 7, LI 6) in normal control group (P>0.05). Except for that of Quepen, there were insignifificant differences between the temperature of the intermediate structures and their corresponding control areas in normal control group (P>0.05). In the experimental group, the temperature on the left and right sides of the intermediate structures (Quepen, elbow, LU 7, LI 6) showed statistically signifificant differences (P<0.05 or P<0.01); the temperature difference between intermediate structure (throat, Quepen, elbow, nose, LI 6) and their respective control areas were also significant (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The temperature of the intermediate structures (throat, Quepen, elbow, LU7, LI 6) between the experimental group and normal control group showed signifificant differences (P<0.05 or P<0.01). This study is an initial

  6. A temperature inversion in WASP-33b? Large Binocular Telescope occultation data confirm significant thermal flux at short wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    von Essen, C; Albrecht, S; Antoci, V; Smith, A M S; Dreizler, S; Strassmeier, K G

    2015-01-01

    We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-33b quasi-simultaneously in the optical (~0.55 {\\mu}m) and the near-infrared (~1.05 {\\mu}m) using the 2x8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. WASP-33 is a {\\delta} Scuti star pulsating with periods comparable to the eclipse duration, making the determination of the eclipse depth challenging. We use previously determined oscillation frequencies to model and remove the pulsation signal from the light curves, isolating the secondary eclipse. The determined eclipse depth is dF = 1.03 +/- 0.34 parts per thousand, corresponding to a brightness temperature of Tb = 3398 +/- 302 K. Combining previously published data with our new measurement we find the equilibrium temperature of WASP-33b to be Tb = 3358 +/- 165 K. We compare all existing eclipse data to a blackbody spectrum, to a carbon-rich non-inverted model and to a solar composition model with an inverted temperature structure. We find that current available data on WASP-33b's atmosphere can be best represented by a simple black...

  7. Anomalously large formula unit volume and its effect on the thermal behavior of LiBF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Hagiwara, Rika; Mazej, Zoran; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Zemva, Boris

    2006-02-09

    The crystal structure of LiBF4 has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. LiBF4 crystallizes as a merohedral twin in the trigonal space group P3(1)21 with a=4.892(5) A, c=11.002(12) A, V=228.0(4) A3, and Z=3 at 200 K. The twin is generated by a 2-fold rotation about the [10] direction. The lithium cation is coordinated by four fluorine atoms in a distorted tetrahedral manner, wherein two Li-F distances of 1.862(5) and 1.846(5) A are observed. The formula unit volume (FUV=V/Z) of 77.9 A3 for LiBF4 at 298 K is considerably larger than 72.7 A3 for NaBF4 and 72.5 A3 for AgBF4, despite the smaller size of Li+, indicating loose ionic packing of LiBF4. The thermodynamic evaluation of the decomposition temperature for LiBF4 was performed using the empirical relationship between the standard entropy and the FUV obtained. The results indicate that the large FUV of LiBF4 contributes to its higher decomposition temperature compared to that of LiPF6.

  8. A NOVEL LOW THERMAL BUDGET THIN-FILM POLYSILICON FABRICATION PROCESS FOR LARGE-AREA, HIGH-THROUGHPUT SOLAR CELL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Kuo

    2010-08-15

    A novel thin-film poly-Si fabrication process has been demonstrated. This low thermal budget process transforms the single- and multi-layer amorphous silicon thin films into a poly-Si structure in one simple step over a pulsed rapid thermal annealing process with the enhancement of an ultrathin Ni layer. The complete poly-Si solar cell was fabricated in a short period of time without deteriorating the underneath glass substrate. The unique vertical crystallization process including the mechanism is discussed. Influences of the dopant type and process parameters on crystal structure will be revealed. The poly-Si film structure has been proved using TEM, XRD, Raman, and XPS methods. The poly-Si solar cell structure and the performance have been examined. In principle, the new process is potentially applicable to produce large-area thin-film poly-Si solar cells at a high throughput and low cost. A critical issue in this process is to prevent the excessive dopant diffusion during crystallization. Process parameters and the cell structure have to be optimized to achieve the production goal.

  9. On Large-N Holographic Thermal QCD at Finite Gauge Coupling at (the Non-Conformal/Next-to) Leading Order in N

    CERN Document Server

    Sil, Karunava

    2016-01-01

    In the context of [1]'s string theoretic dual of large-N thermal QCD-like theories at finite gauge/string coupling (as part of the `MQGP' limit of [2]), we discuss the following. First, up to LO in N, using the results of [3], we show that the local T^3 of [2] is the T^2-invariant sLag of [3] in a resolved conifold. This, together with the results of [4], shows that for a (predominantly resolved or deformed) resolved warped deformed conifold, the local T^3 of [2] in the MQGP limit, is the T^2-invariant sLag of [3] justifying the construction of the delocalized SYZ type IIA mirror of the type IIB background of [1]. Then, using the prescription of [5], we obtain the temperature dependence of the thermal (and electrical) conductivity working up to leading order in N (the number of D3-branes), and upon comparison with [6] show that the results mimic a 1+1-dimensional Luttinger liquid with impurities. Further, including sub-leading non-conformal terms in the metric determined by M (the number of fractional D-brane...

  10. Vacuum-thermal-evaporation: the route for roll-to-roll production of large-area organic electronic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D. M.

    2015-05-01

    Surprisingly little consideration is apparently being given to vacuum-evaporation as the route for the roll-to-roll (R2R) production of large-area organic electronic circuits. While considerable progress has been made by combining silicon lithographic approaches with solution processing, it is not obvious that these will be compatible with a low-cost, high-speed R2R process. Most efforts at achieving this ambition are directed at conventional solution printing approaches such as inkjet and gravure. This is surprising considering that vacuum-evaporation of organic semiconductors (OSCs) is already used commercially in the production of organic light emitting diode displays. Beginning from a discussion of the materials and geometrical parameters determining transistor performance and drawing on results from numerous publications, this review makes a case for vacuum-evaporation as an enabler of R2R organic circuit production. The potential of the vacuum route is benchmarked against solution approaches and found to be highly competitive. For example, evaporated small molecules tend to have higher mobility than printed OSCs. High resolution metal patterning on plastic films is already a low-cost commercial process for high-volume packaging applications. Similarly, solvent-free flash-evaporation and polymerization of thin films on plastic substrates is also a high-volume commercial process and has been shown capable of producing robust gate dielectrics. Reports of basic logic circuit elements produced in a vacuum R2R environment are reviewed and shown to be superior to all-solution printing approaches. Finally, the main issues that need to be resolved in order to fully develop the vacuum route to R2R circuit production are highlighted.

  11. Thermal emission from large solid particles in the coma of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) around perihelion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, J.; Milam, S.; Coulson, I.; Gicquel, A.; Meech, K.; Yang, B.; Riesen, T.; Remijan, A.; Villanueva, G.; Corrinder, M.; Charnley, S.; Mumma, M.

    2014-07-01

    large-scale fragmentation event and/or the comet's disruption. The ratio of fluxes at 450 μ m and 850 μ m is 3.5±0.4, which compares well with the expected value of 3.7 if both data come from the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a black-body spectrum of these temperatures. We discuss both the significance and limitations of our findings and compare them to other investigations obtained simultaneously at complementary wavelengths (such as SOHO and STEREO).

  12. More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the 'Snow White' trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008. The Wet Chemistry Laboratory mixes Martian soil with an aqueous solution from Earth as part of a process to identify soluble nutrients and other chemicals in the soil. Preliminary analysis of this soil confirms that it is alkaline, and composed of salts and other chemicals such as perchlorate, sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium. This data validates prior results from that same location, said JPL's Michael Hecht, the lead scientist for MECA. In the coming days, the Phoenix team will also fill the final four of eight single-use ovens on another soil-analysis instrument, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The team's strategy is to deliver as many samples as possible before the power produced by Phoenix's solar panels declines due to the end of the Martian summer. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. The application of two-step linear temperature program to thermal analysis for monitoring the lipid induction of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 in large scale cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bongmun; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, microalgae was considered as a renewable energy for fuel production because its production is nonseasonal and may take place on nonarable land. Despite all of these advantages, microalgal oil production is significantly affected by environmental factors. Furthermore, the large variability remains an important problem in measurement of algae productivity and compositional analysis, especially, the total lipid content. Thus, there is considerable interest in accurate determination of total lipid content during the biotechnological process. For these reason, various high-throughput technologies were suggested for accurate measurement of total lipids contained in the microorganisms, especially oleaginous microalgae. In addition, more advanced technologies were employed to quantify the total lipids of the microalgae without a pretreatment. However, these methods are difficult to measure total lipid content in wet form microalgae obtained from large-scale production. In present study, the thermal analysis performed with two-step linear temeperature program was applied to measure heat evolved in temperature range from 310 to 351 °C of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 obtained from large-scale cultivation. And then, we examined the relationship between the heat evolved in 310-351 °C (HE) and total lipid content of the wet Nostoc cell cultivated in raceway. As a result, the linear relationship was determined between HE value and total lipid content of Nostoc sp. KNUA003. Particularly, there was a linear relationship of 98% between the HE value and the total lipid content of the tested microorganism. Based on this relationship, the total lipid content converted from the heat evolved of wet Nostoc sp. KNUA003 could be used for monitoring its lipid induction in large-scale cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Will Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Be the Predominant Setting for Oral Health Care by 2025? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Large DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be the Setting in Which the Majority of Oral Health Care Is Delivered by 2025 and Viewpoint 2: Increases in DSO-Managed Group Practices Will Be Offset by Models Allowing Dentists to Retain the Independence and Freedom of a Traditional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James R; Dodge, William W; Findley, John S; Young, Stephen K; Horn, Bruce D; Kalkwarf, Kenneth L; Martin, Max M; Winder, Ronald L

    2015-05-01

    This Point/Counterpoint article discusses the transformation of dental practice from the traditional solo/small-group (partnership) model of the 1900s to large Dental Support Organizations (DSO) that support affiliated dental practices by providing nonclinical functions such as, but not limited to, accounting, human resources, marketing, and legal and practice management. Many feel that DSO-managed group practices (DMGPs) with employed providers will become the setting in which the majority of oral health care will be delivered in the future. Viewpoint 1 asserts that the traditional dental practice patterns of the past are shifting as many younger dentists gravitate toward employed positions in large group practices or the public sector. Although educational debt is relevant in predicting graduates' practice choices, other variables such as gender, race, and work-life balance play critical roles as well. Societal characteristics demonstrated by aging Gen Xers and those in the Millennial generation blend seamlessly with the opportunities DMGPs offer their employees. Viewpoint 2 contends the traditional model of dental care delivery-allowing entrepreneurial practitioners to make decisions in an autonomous setting-is changing but not to the degree nor as rapidly as Viewpoint 1 professes. Millennials entering the dental profession, with characteristics universally attributed to their generation, see value in the independence and flexibility that a traditional practice allows. Although DMGPs provide dentists one option for practice, several alternative delivery models offer current dentists and future dental school graduates many of the advantages of DMGPs while allowing them to maintain the independence and freedom a traditional practice provides.

  15. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, 1 July 1976--30 September 1977. [Ecology of Par Pond, Savannah River Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the biophysical and thermal relationships between large ectotherms and their aquatic environment. Data are reported from laboratory and field studies on alligators, turtles, and fish. Mathematical models of the effect of body size and physical characteristics on temperature regulation of ectotherms and of thermal stress in aquatic organisms were developed. Results are included of field studies on the physiological and behavioral adjustments of turtles in response to changes in water temperature produced by thermal effluents in PAR Pond at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL).

  16. Changes in nurse education: delivering the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine changes in pre-registration nursing education through the personal accounts of nurse teachers. This paper is based on 37 in-depth interviews within a central London Healthcare Faculty. Each interview was subjected to a process of content analysis described by Miles and Huberman. The interviews took place between August 2003 and March 2004 and totalled 34.4 hours or 305,736 words. There were thirty female and seven male participants, who shared 1015 years of nursing experience, averaging at 27.4 years (min 7-max 42). These were supplemented by 552 years of teaching practice, the average being 15 years (min 0.5-max 29). This paper--delivering the nursing curriculum--identifies that the nature of nursing has changed as it has both expanded and contracted. Participants identified three major changes; the nature of nursing, selection of future nurses and the current impact that large cohorts have on our traditional model of person-centred education. The practice placements remain central to nursing education and it is the nursing role that should define the curriculum and the values of higher education should be supportive of this identity.

  17. Conformal Ablative Thermal Protection System for Small and Large Scale Missions: Approaching TRL 6 for Planetary and Human Exploration Missions and TRL 9 for Small Probe Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R. A. S.; Gasch, M. J.; Milos, F. S.; Stackpoole, M. M.; Smith, B. P.; Switzer, M. R.; Venkatapathy, E.; Wilder, M. C.; Boghhozian, T.; Chavez-Garcia, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) funded an effort to develop an ablative thermal protection system (TPS) material that would have improved properties when compared to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and AVCOAT. Their goal was a conformal material, processed with a flexible reinforcement that would result in similar or better thermal characteristics and higher strain-to-failure characteristics that would allow for easier integration on flight aeroshells than then-current rigid ablative TPS materials. In 2012, NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) began funding the maturation of the best formulation of the game changing conformal ablator, C-PICA. Progress has been reported at IPPW over the past three years, describing C-PICA with a density and recession rates similar to PICA, but with a higher strain-to-failure which allows for direct bonding and no gap fillers, and even more important, with thermal characteristics resulting in half the temperature rise of PICA. Overall, C-PICA should be able to replace PICA with a thinner, lighter weight, less complicated design. These characteristics should be particularly attractive for use as backshell TPS on high energy planetary entry vehicles. At the end of this year, the material should be ready for missions to consider including in their design, in fact, NASAs Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is considering incentivizing the use of C-PICA in the next Discovery Proposal call. This year both scale up of the material to large (1-m) sized pieces and the design and build of small probe heatshields for flight tests will be completed. NASA, with an industry partner, will build a 1-m long manufacturing demonstration unit (MDU) with a shape based on a mid LD lifting body. In addition, in an effort to fly as you test and test as you fly, NASA, with a second industry partner, will build a small probe to test in the Interactive Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet and, using nearly the

  18. Color View of 'Rosy Red' Delivered to TEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this false color image on Sol 72 (August 7, 2008), the 72nd Martian day after landing. It shows a soil sample from a trench informally called 'Rosy Red' after being delivered to a gap between partially opened doors on the lander's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. A compact thermal infrared imaging radiometer with high spatial resolution and wide swath for a small satellite using a large format uncooled infrared focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kenji; Sakuma, Fumihiro; Kikuchi, Masakuni; Tanii, Jun; Kawanishi, Toneo; Ueno, Shinichi; Kuga, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a feasibility study for the potential of a high spatial resolution and wide swath thermal infrared (TIR) imaging radiometer for a small satellite using a large format uncooled infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA). The preliminary TIR imaging radiometer designs were performed. One is a panchromatic (mono-band) imaging radiometer (8-12μm) with a large format 2000 x 1000 pixels uncooled IR-FPA with a pixel pitch of 15 μm. The other is a multiband imaging radiometer (8.8μm, 10.8μm, 11.4μm). This radiometer is employed separate optics and detectors for each wave band. It is based on the use of a 640 x 480 pixels uncooled IR-FPA with a pixel pitch of 25 μm. The thermal time constant of an uncooled IR-FPA is approximately 10-16ms, and introduces a constraint to the satellite operation to achieve better signal-to-noise ratio, MTF and linearity performances. The study addressed both on-ground time-delayintegration binning and staring imaging solutions, although a staring imaging was preferred after trade-off. The staring imaging requires that the line of sight of the TIR imaging radiometer gazes at a target area during the acquisition time of the image, which can be obtained by rotating the satellite or a steering mirror around the pitch axis. The single band radiometer has been designed to yield a 30m ground sample distance over a 30km swath width from a satellite altitude of 500km. The radiometric performance, enhanced with staring imaging, is expected to yield a NETD less than 0.5K for a 300K ground scene. The multi-band radiometer has three spectral bands with spatial resolution of 50m and swath width of 24km. The radiometric performance is expected to yield a NETD less than 0.85K. We also showed some preliminary simulation results on volcano, desert/urban scenes, and wildfire.

  20. Conformational and thermal stability improvements for the large-scale production of yeast-derived rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus-like particles as multipurpose vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlinda Fernández

    Full Text Available Recombinant virus-like particles (VLP antigenically similar to rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV were recently expressed at high levels inside Pichia pastoris cells. Based on the potential of RHDV VLP as platform for diverse vaccination purposes we undertook the design, development and scale-up of a production process. Conformational and stability issues were addressed to improve process control and optimization. Analyses on the structure, morphology and antigenicity of these multimers were carried out at different pH values during cell disruption and purification by size-exclusion chromatography. Process steps and environmental stresses in which aggregation or conformational instability can be detected were included. These analyses revealed higher stability and recoveries of properly assembled high-purity capsids at acidic and neutral pH in phosphate buffer. The use of stabilizers during long-term storage in solution showed that sucrose, sorbitol, trehalose and glycerol acted as useful aggregation-reducing agents. The VLP emulsified in an oil-based adjuvant were subjected to accelerated thermal stress treatments. None to slight variations were detected in the stability of formulations and in the structure of recovered capsids. A comprehensive analysis on scale-up strategies was accomplished and a nine steps large-scale production process was established. VLP produced after chromatographic separation protected rabbits against a lethal challenge. The minimum protective dose was identified. Stabilized particles were ultimately assayed as carriers of a foreign viral epitope from another pathogen affecting a larger animal species. For that purpose, a linear protective B-cell epitope from Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV E2 envelope protein was chemically coupled to RHDV VLP. Conjugates were able to present the E2 peptide fragment for immune recognition and significantly enhanced the peptide-specific antibody response in vaccinated pigs

  1. Conformational and Thermal Stability Improvements for the Large-Scale Production of Yeast-Derived Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus-Like Particles as Multipurpose Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lídice; González, Nemecio; Parra, Francisco; Martín-Alonso, José M.; Limonta, Miladys; Sánchez, Kosara; Cabrales, Ania; Estrada, Mario P.; Rodríguez-Mallón, Alina; Farnós, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLP) antigenically similar to rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) were recently expressed at high levels inside Pichia pastoris cells. Based on the potential of RHDV VLP as platform for diverse vaccination purposes we undertook the design, development and scale-up of a production process. Conformational and stability issues were addressed to improve process control and optimization. Analyses on the structure, morphology and antigenicity of these multimers were carried out at different pH values during cell disruption and purification by size-exclusion chromatography. Process steps and environmental stresses in which aggregation or conformational instability can be detected were included. These analyses revealed higher stability and recoveries of properly assembled high-purity capsids at acidic and neutral pH in phosphate buffer. The use of stabilizers during long-term storage in solution showed that sucrose, sorbitol, trehalose and glycerol acted as useful aggregation-reducing agents. The VLP emulsified in an oil-based adjuvant were subjected to accelerated thermal stress treatments. None to slight variations were detected in the stability of formulations and in the structure of recovered capsids. A comprehensive analysis on scale-up strategies was accomplished and a nine steps large-scale production process was established. VLP produced after chromatographic separation protected rabbits against a lethal challenge. The minimum protective dose was identified. Stabilized particles were ultimately assayed as carriers of a foreign viral epitope from another pathogen affecting a larger animal species. For that purpose, a linear protective B-cell epitope from Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E2 envelope protein was chemically coupled to RHDV VLP. Conjugates were able to present the E2 peptide fragment for immune recognition and significantly enhanced the peptide-specific antibody response in vaccinated pigs. Overall these results

  2. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Progress report, 1 October 1974--30 September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which large ectotherms adjust to thermal stress in their natural environment. The effect of mouth gaping on head temperatures and the role of radiation, conduction and convection on body temperatures of alligators have been determined. The utility of energy budget modeling as a method for studying the thermoregulatory mechanisms of animals has been demonstrated. Steady state and time dependent models of body temperature have been tested. Convection coefficients and evaporative water loss rates have been measured for the turtle, Chysemys scripta. Climate space diagrams have been formulated and are being tested. Behavioral thermoregulation of turtles has been studied in PAR pond on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Steady state energy budget equations have been computed for largemouth bass. Experimental heat transfer coefficients indicate that most heat transfer is through the body wall and not via the gills. A time dependent model is being tested. It predicts the body temperature of a fish in a heterothermal environment. Theoretical calculations have been made of the effects of body size, color, and metabolism on the temperature regulation of ectotherms.

  3. Novel characterization of the adsorption sites in large pore metal-organic frameworks: combination of X-ray powder diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani-Dorcheh, Ali; Dinnebier, Robert E; Kuc, Agnieszka; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Adams, Frank; Denysenko, Dmytro; Heine, Thomas; Volkmer, Dirk; Donner, Wolfgang; Hirscher, Michael

    2012-10-05

    The preferred adsorption sites of xenon in the recently synthesized metal-organic framework MFU-4l(arge) possessing a bimodal pore structure (with pore sizes of 12 Å and 18.6 Å) were studied via the combination of low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy and in situ X-ray powder diffraction. The diffraction patterns were collected at 110 K and 150 K according to the temperature of the desorption maxima. The maximum entropy method was used to reconstruct the electron density distribution of the structure and to localize the adsorbed xenon using refined data of the Xe-filled and empty sample. First principles calculations revealed that Xe atoms exclusively occupy the Wyckoff 32f position at approximately 2/3 2/3 2/3 along the body diagonal of the cubic crystal structure. At 110 K, Xe atoms occupy all 32 f positions (8 atoms per pore) while at 150 K the occupancy descends to 25% (2 atoms per pore). No Xe occupation of the small pores is observed by neither experimental measurements nor theoretical studies.

  4. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua; Wang, Qingguo; Xu, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180-914 cm-1) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention.

  5. Delivering HPC Systems to 132 Dock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettering, Brett Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-23

    The intention of this document is to provide the subcontractor with information to enable trucks delivering HPC (High Performance Computing) systems to the 03-0132, computer rooms with the information they need to do so successfully.

  6. Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163389.html Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep Camping and exposure to natural light helps prime ... Spending time in the outdoors may improve your sleep, a small study suggests. Researchers found that a ...

  7. Nanosolar: Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, Brian [Nanosolar, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-05-31

    Nanosolar has developed proprietary technology based on Copper-Indium-Gallium-diSelenide (CIGS) absorber technology that allows the printing of this semiconductor material using a high-speed, high-throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing process. A central challenge in cost-effectively constructing a large-area CIGS-based solar cell or module is that the elements of the CIGS layer must be within a narrow stoichiometric ratio on nano-, meso-, and macroscopic length scale in all three dimensions in order for the resulting cell or module to be highly efficient. Achieving precise stoichiometric composition over relatively large substrate areas is however difficult using traditional vacuum-based deposition processes. For example, it is difficult to uniformly deposit compounds and/or alloys containing more than one element by sputtering or evaporation. Both techniques rely on deposition approaches that are limited to line-of-sight and limited-area sources, tending to result in poor surface coverage. Line-of-sight trajectories and limited-area sources can result in non-uniform three-dimensional distribution of the elements in all three dimensions and/or poor film-thickness uniformity over large areas. These non-uniformities can occur over the nano-, meso-, and/or macroscopic scales. Such non-uniformity also alters the local stoichiometric ratios of the absorber layer, decreasing the potential power conversion efficiency of the complete cell or module. Nanosolar has overcome these challenges by printing nanoparticulate CIGS precursor materials onto low-cost metal foil substrates, and performing a rapid thermal processing to convert the nanoparticulate coating into a CIGS absorber layer By locking in the appropriate stochiometry into the nanoparticulate precursor material, spatial uniformity is ensured in the coated layers, while printing at high speed and throughput minimizes solar cell cost.

  8. Study on thermal decomposition kinetics of limestone with large particle size%大粒径石灰石热分解动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海; 张世红; 杨海平; 李攀; 陈汉平; 曾军

    2013-01-01

    主要研究大粒径石灰石的煅烧特性,采用热重分析仪研究了5种不同粒径石灰石的煅烧过程.石灰石粒径分布在0.5~10 mm,煅烧温度在900~1 050℃.研究结果表明,粒径越小温度越高石灰石分解速率越快,而且粒径和煅烧温度对石灰石热分解机理也有明显的影响.粒径小温度高时反应符合随机成核和随后生长机理模型,粒径大温度低时反应符合相界面反应机理.当粒径为0.5~1 mm时反应活化能很小,随着粒径的增大反应活化能有所增加,粒径在1~5 mm时活化能变化不大,粒径继续增大(5~10 mm)活化能增大了1倍.%Thermal decomposition experiments of limestone with five different particle sizes were conducted through thermo gravimetric analyzer to study its calcined characteristics with large particle size.The limestone particle sizes were distributed in the range of 0.5~10 mm,and the temperature was controlled at 900~1 050 ℃ during the experiments.Rresults revealed that the smaller the particle size,the higher the temperature and the faster the decomposition.And the particle size and calcining temperature made an obvious influence on the thermal decomposition mechanism.When the particle size was small and the temperature was high,the reaction was in accordance with the randomly nucleating and nucleus growth model,but in contrast,reaction was in accordance with the phase interface mechanism.When the particle size was at 0.5~ 1 mm,reaction activation energy was very small,and with the increase of particle size,reaction activation energy increased,while in the range of 1~5 mm,activation energy fluctuated,with the continuous increase of particle size to 5~10 mm,the activation energy doubled.

  9. Rapid pre-eruptive thermal rejuvenation in a large silicic magma body: the case of the Masonic Park Tuff, Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field, CO, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinski, J. T.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.; Huber, C.; Deering, C. D.; Lipman, P. W.; Martin, L. H. J.; Liebske, C.

    2017-05-01

    Determining the mechanisms involved in generating large-volume eruptions (>100 km3) of silicic magma with crystallinities approaching rheological lock-up ( 50 vol% crystals) remains a challenge for volcanologists. The Cenozoic Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field, in Colorado and northernmost New Mexico, USA, produced ten such crystal-rich ignimbrites within 3 m.y. This work focuses on the 28.7 Ma Masonic Park Tuff, a dacitic ( 62-65 wt% SiO2) ignimbrite with an estimated erupted volume of 500 km3 and an average of 45 vol% crystals. Near-absence of quartz, titanite, and sanidine, pronounced An-rich spikes near the rims of plagioclase, and reverse zoning in clinopyroxene record the reheating (from 750 to >800 °C) of an upper crustal mush in response to hotter recharge from below. Zircon U-Pb ages suggest prolonged magmatic residence, while Yb/Dy vs temperature trends indicate co-crystallization with titanite which was later resorbed. High Sr, Ba, and Ti concentrations in plagioclase microlites and phenocryst rims require in-situ feldspar melting and concurrent, but limited, mass addition provided by the recharge, likely in the form of a melt-gas mixture. The larger Fish Canyon Tuff, which erupted from the same location 0.7 m.y. later, also underwent pre-eruptive reheating and partial melting of quartz, titanite, and feldspars in a long-lived upper crustal mush following the underplating of hotter magma. The Fish Canyon Tuff, however, records cooler pre-eruptive temperatures ( 710-760 °C) and a mineral assemblage indicative of higher magmatic water contents (abundant resorbed sanidine and quartz, euhedral amphibole and titanite, and absence of pyroxene). These similar pre-eruptive mush-reactivation histories, despite differing mineral assemblages and pre-eruptive temperatures, indicate that thermal rejuvenation is a key step in the eruption of crystal-rich silicic volcanics over a wide range of conditions.

  10. A new method of measuring a large pulsed neutron fluence or dose exploiting the die-away of thermalized neutrons in a polyethylene moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J. W.; Lowe, T.; Mason, R. S.; White, G.

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations of the response to very short pulses of neutron and gamma radiation of a spherical polyethylene moderator with a central thermal neutron counter and a new, fast, active restore amplifier system have been carried out. A large neutron burst produces count rates in the detector that are too high to measure initially but when the exponential decay of the count rate falls below about 50 k per sec then counting can start. If the counts are recorded in contiguous time intervals (of 60 μs in this case) and the time is measured at which the measured count in an interval falls to 1 or 2 then the size of the initial burst can be calculated. It is shown that it should be possible to measure pulsed neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) or dose equivalent rate from about 2 nSv up to about 100 μSv per burst, or 7.2 N μSv s h -1 to 360 N mSv s h -1, where N is the number of neutron bursts per second. The calculations show that a gamma burst of about 10 μGy can be tolerated without affecting the measurement of the largest neutron bursts. This extends our earlier estimate of the maximum dose that can be measured for pulsed neutrons by more than 10 k. This method could also be used to measure the neutron fluence or dose from a single unplanned event such as a beam dump on an accelerator or a criticality incident from fissile material. Although the method described is new it is based on a combination of proven techniques.

  11. Electro-thermal Modeling for Junction Temperature Cycling-Based Lifetime Prediction of a Press-Pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC Applied to Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Teodorescu, Remus;

    2011-01-01

    reliability is investigated regarding IGBT lifetime based on junction temperature cycling for the grid-side press-pack IGBT 3L-NPC-VSC, which is a state-of-the art high reliability solution. In order to acquire IGBT junction temperatures for given wind power profiles and to use them in IGBT lifetime...... prediction, the converter electro-thermal model including electrical, power loss, and dynamical thermal models is developed with the main focus on the thermal modeling regarding converter topology, switch technology, and physical structure. Moreover, these models are simplified for their practical...

  12. Delay Efficient Method for Delivering IPTV Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangamesh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Internet Protocol Television (IPTV is a system through which Internet television services are delivered using the architecture and networking methods of the Internet Protocol Suite over a packet-switched network infrastructure, e.g., the Internet and broadband Internet access networks, instead of being delivered through traditional radio frequency broadcast, satellite signal, and cable television (CATV formats. IPTV provides mainly three services: live TV, catch up TV, and video on demand (VoD.This paper focuses on delivering the live TV services by exploiting the virtualised cloud architecture of the IPTV and statistical multiplexing. The VoD tasks are prescheduled so that there will be less Instant Channel Change (ICC delay. We select a proper scheduling algorithm for rescheduling the VoD tasks. We then implement the scheduling algorithm for preshifting the VoD tasks.

  13. The Relationship between Excessive Leakage Current, Large Thermal Resistance and Voids Rate%功率VDMOS器件漏电流、热阻与软焊料空洞率的关系∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭稀; 蒲年年; 徐冬梅; 崔卫兵; 王磊; 朱宇鹏; 柴彦科; 刘肃

    2015-01-01

    Commercialized VDMOS failed to meet designed values for many reasons. Usual problems are excessive leakage current and large thermal resistance. Failed VDMOS was characterized using X-RAY,SEM and EDS. The relationship between excessive leakage current, large thermal resistance and voids rate was acquired. The results show leakage current and thermal resistance increase in direct proportion to voids rate when voids rate keeps in a low level, while the ratio changes. We attribute this to different dilatation coefficient and thermal conductivity of each material,as well as low thermal conductivity of air. Moreover,large thermal resistance will facilitate migration of Al and polluted ion,which causes increasing leakage current in turn.%现在被广泛应用的VDMOS器件存在诸多失效模式,主要表现为直流参数大漏电和热阻过高问题,限制了器件应用。通过对其失效器件进行X-RAY、SEM、EDS分析表征得到相关规律。研究结果表明空洞率相对较小时,漏电流大小、热阻值高低均与空洞率成正相关关系,只是随空洞率增长的趋势有所变化。构成器件的不同材料膨胀系数与导热率不同以及空气导热率较低是空洞率引起热阻值改变的主要原因;高热阻加速了Al的电迁移和可动污染离子移动,最终导致器件漏电流增大。

  14. Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Duncan

    Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported as feedstock for bio-fuel facilities. All feedstock are suited for gasification, which produces syngas that can be used to synthesise petrol or diesel via Fischer-Tropsch reactions, or produce hydrogen via water gas shift reactions. Alternatively, the bio-oil product of fast pyrolysis may be upgraded to produce petrol and diesel, or can undergo steam reformation to produce hydrogen. Implementing a network of mobile facilities reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use a fraction of the biomass energy content to meet thermal or electrical demands. The total energy delivered by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energy content, respectively. However, implementing mobile facilities is economically feasible when large transport distances are required. For an annual harvest of 1.717 million m3 (equivalent to 2000 ODTPD), transport costs are reduced to less than 40% of the total levelised delivered feedstock cost when mobile facilities are implemented; transport costs account for up to 80% of feedstock costs for conventional woodchip delivery. Torrefaction provides the lowest cost pathway of delivering a forest residue resource when using mobile facilities. Cost savings occur against woodchip delivery for annual forest residue harvests above 2.25 million m3 or when transport distances greater than 250 km are required. Important parameters that influence levelised delivered costs of feedstock are transport distances (forest residue spatial density), haul cost factors, thermal and electrical demands of mobile facilities, and initial moisture content of forest residues. Relocating mobile facilities can be optimised for lowest cost

  15. Amino acid survival in large cometary impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierazzo, E.; Chyba, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    A significant fraction of the Earth's prebiotic volatile inventory may have been delivered by asteroidal and cometary impacts during the period of heavy bombardment. The realization that comets are particularly rich in organic material seemed to strengthen this suggestion. Previous modeling studies, however, indicated that most organics would be entirely destroyed in large comet and asteroid impacts. The availability of new kinetic parameters for the thermal degradation of amino acids in the solid phase made it possible to readdress this question. We present the results of new high-resolution hydrocode simulations of asteroid and comet impact coupled with recent experimental data for amino acid pyrolysis in the solid phase. Differences due to impact velocity as well as projectile material have been investigated. Effects of angle of impacts were also addressed. The results suggest that some amino acids would survive the shock heating of large (kilometer-radius) cometary impacts. At the time of the origins of life on Earth, the steady-state oceanic concentration of certain amino acids (like aspartic and glutamic acid) delivered by comets could have equaled or substantially exceeded that due to Miller-Urey synthesis in a carbon dioxide-rich atmosphere. Furthermore, in the unlikely case of a grazing impact (impact angle around 5 degrees from the horizontal) an amount of some amino acids comparable to that due to the background steady-state production or delivery would be delivered to the early Earth.

  16. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm(2)) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm(2)) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  17. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm2) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm2) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  18. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  19. TC-1 Satellite of DSP Delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunQing

    2004-01-01

    TC-1 satellite of Double Star Program (DSP), a near-earth equatorial satellite, was delivered to the representative of the end user, the Research Center for Space Science and Application under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) on April 12, 2004, which symbolized that TC-1 satellite was put into operation formally.

  20. Is International Accounting Education Delivering Pedagogical Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chris; Millanta, Brian; Tweedie, Dale

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines whether universities are delivering pedagogical value to international accounting students commensurate with the costs of studying abroad. The paper uses survey and interview methods to explore the extent to which Chinese Learners (CLs) in an Australian postgraduate accounting subject have distinct learning needs. The paper…

  1. Science Ⅲ marine research ship delivered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Wei

    2006-01-01

    @@ On August 18, China's most advanced marine research ship Science Ⅲ was commissioned into operation at Qingdao and became an official member of China's marine research fleet. Designed and built by CSIC, the ship was delivered at Shanghai to the Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  2. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John MESSING

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study Jason HOWARTH John MESSING Irfan ALTAS Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga-AUSTRALIA ABSTRACT This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master’s degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU. The Industry Master’s degree is an academic program for students currently employed in the IT industry. Using Internet Based Testing (IBT, these students are examined in test centres throughout the world. This offers many benefits. For example, students have the freedom of sitting exams at any time during a designated interval. Computer-based testing also provides instructors with valuable feedback through test statistics and student comments. In this paper, we document CSU’s use of the IBT system, including how tests are built and delivered, and how both human and statistical feedback is used to evaluate and enhance the testing process.

  3. Delivering best care in war and peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2014-06-24

    Col Alan Finnegan, the fi rst Ministry of Defence professor of nursing, is driving forward research into preparing nurses for deployment and ensuring they deliver the best care possible in war and peace. Research topics range from the role of autonomous practitioners to the effects on soldiers of injuries to their genitalia.

  4. Construction and thermal efficiency test of 145m and 165m SpaceTube large-aperture parabolic trough collector prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia, Salvador Valenzuela; Schramm, Markus; Yildiz, Hülya; Marcotte, Patrick; Casero, David Martín; Magee, John Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    During 2013-2014 two prototype SpaceTube® 8.2 parabolic trough collector [1] were built, optically tested, and interconnected into an existing parabolic trough thermal testing loop at Abengoa's Solucar Platform in Spain. After this startup process more than 500 hours of testing at nominal operating conditions (393 °C maximum temperature and 40 bar maximum pressure) were accumulated, allowing verification of the real-world thermal performance against model predictions. Measured performances of both collectors met the optical performance target and no significant optical or assembly deficiency was found, resulting in verification of the collector(s) as ready to commercialize.

  5. TMS delivered for A-3 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A state-of-the-art thrust measurement system for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was delivered March 17. Once completed, the A-3 stand (seen in background) will allow simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program. Work on the stand began in 2007, with activation scheduled for 2012. The stand is the first major test structure to be built at Stennis since the 1960s. The recently delivered TMS was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with an accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds.

  6. 结合CFD的EnergyPlus大空间温度分层能耗模拟%Energy Consumption Simulation on Large Space with Thermal Stratification by Softwares of EnergyPlus and CFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传成; 章昭昭; 季群峰

    2012-01-01

    本文探讨了与CFD模拟相结合的EnergyPlus大空间温度分层能耗模拟方法.首先使用Fluent软件对大空间温度分层现象进行了模拟,而后将获得的大空间温度分层数据输入到EnergyPlus Room Air模块,从而精确模拟大空间能耗.结合夏热冬冷地区火车站候车大厅实例,将采用温度分层策略的能耗与普通分层空调系统的能耗进行对比,验证了该模拟方法的可行性,同时证明了大空间采用温度分层策略的节能效果显著.%In this paper,the method of EnergyPlus combined with CFD was presented for simulating the energy consumption of large space with thermal stratification. Firstly, the software of Fluent was used to simulate the thermal stratification in large space, and then the results were put into the Room Air module of EnergyPlus, which would accurately consider the thermal stratification while simulating the energy consumption. To verify the feasibility of this method, a case study on a railway waiting room in hot summer and cold winter region was given out. Furthermore, the energy consumption based on the thermal stratification strategy was compared with that of the ordinary air-conditioning system,and the energy-saving effect of thermal stratification strategy was validated.

  7. Internet-delivered eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (iEMDR): an open trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Spence; Nickolai Titov; Luke Johnston; Dear, Blake F.; Bethany Wootton; Matthew Terides; Judy Zou

    2013-01-01

    Recent research indicates internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) can reduce symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study examined the efficacy of an internet-delivered treatment protocol that combined iCBT and internet-delivered eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (iEMDR), in an uncontrolled trial. Eleven of the 15 participants completed post-treatment questionnaires. Large effect sizes were found from pre-treatment to 3-month follow-up ( d = 1.03 –...

  8. Delivering IT and eBusiness value

    CERN Document Server

    Willcocks, Leslie

    2001-01-01

    Delivering Business Value from IT' is focused on the evaluation issue in IT and how IT evaluation can proceed across the life-cycle of any IT investment and be linked positively to improving business performance. .Chapters 1,2 and 3 detail an approach to IT evaluation whilst chapters 4 and 5 build on these by showing two distinctive approaches to linking IT to business performance. The remaining three chapters deal with a range of evaluation issues emerging as important - specifically Internet evaluation, Y2K and beyond, EMU, quality outsourcing, infrastructure, role of benchmarking, and cost

  9. Thermal large Eddy simulations and experiments in the framework of non-isothermal blowing; Simulations des grandes echelles thermiques et experiences dans le cadre d'effusion anisotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, G

    2004-06-15

    The aim of this work is to study thermal large-eddy simulations and to determine the nonisothermal blowing impact on a turbulent boundary layer. An experimental study is also carried out in order to complete and validate simulation results. In a first time, we developed a turbulent inlet condition for the velocity and the temperature, which is necessary for the blowing simulations.We studied the asymptotic behavior of the velocity, the temperature and the thermal turbulent fluxes in a large-eddy simulation point of view. We then considered dynamics models for the eddy-diffusivity and we simulated a turbulent channel flow with imposed temperature, imposed flux and adiabatic walls. The numerical and experimental study of blowing permitted to obtain to the modifications of a thermal turbulent boundary layer with the blowing rate. We observed the consequences of the blowing on mean and rms profiles of velocity and temperature but also on velocity-velocity and velocity-temperature correlations. Moreover, we noticed an increase of the turbulent structures in the boundary layer with blowing. (author)

  10. Thermal management systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  11. DESIGNS MATTER: Delivering Information Sources for Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie A. Nolasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has benefits not just for travelers, but also to the local economy. Since, Bicol Region has natural and cultural attractions; it is a potential travel destination in the country. Technology in delivering information sources played vital role for the success of the tourism industry in the Region. This allows travel enthusiasts to get more information about various tourist attractions. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of delivering information sources such as web advertisement and desktop publishing for tourist promotion in the Bicol Region. Specifically, it determined the status of tourism, and identified common forms of promotions for tourism development. The study adopted mixed method of research. This method was utilized to confirm and validate findings. Interviews and focus group discussions were used to gather data from the respondents of the selected Local Government Units, Department of Tourism, Travel Agencies and Hotel Agents in the Region. Based on the findings, of the total foreign visitors in the country, only 9.14% visited Bicol Region in 2014. That is why, domestic tourist showed high percentage against foreign visitors with 25.7%. Brochures with EZ maps as most commonly used desktop publishing materials and websites and social media for web advertisement. Thus, there is a need to reevaluate promotional activities by the DOT and other agencies. Adoption suggestive features for creative desktop publishing materials and web services should be considered to increase tourist visitors in the Region.

  12. A Large-scale Finite Element Model on Micromechanical Damage and Failure of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Including Thermal Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P. F.; Li, X. K.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study micromechanical progressive failure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites with thermal residual stress by finite element analysis (FEA). Composite microstructures with hexagonal fiber distribution are used for the representative volume element (RVE), where an initial fiber breakage is assumed. Fiber breakage with random fiber strength is predicted using Monte Carlo simulation, progressive matrix damage is predicted by proposing a continuum damage mechanics model and interface failure is simulated using Xu and Needleman's cohesive model. Temperature dependent thermal expansion coefficients for epoxy matrix are used. FEA by developing numerical codes using ANSYS finite element software is divided into two steps: 1. Thermal residual stresses due to mismatch between fiber and matrix are calculated; 2. Longitudinal tensile load is further exerted on the RVE to perform progressive failure analysis of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Numerical convergence is solved by introducing the viscous damping effect properly. The extended Mori-Tanaka method that considers interface debonding is used to get homogenized mechanical responses of composites. Three main results by FEA are obtained: 1. the real-time matrix cracking, fiber breakage and interface debonding with increasing tensile strain is simulated. 2. the stress concentration coefficients on neighbouring fibers near the initial broken fiber and the axial fiber stress distribution along the broken fiber are predicted, compared with the results using the global and local load-sharing models based on the shear-lag theory. 3. the tensile strength of composite by FEA is compared with those by the shear-lag theory and experiments. Finally, the tensile stress-strain curve of composites by FEA is applied to the progressive failure analysis of composite pressure vessel.

  13. The most modern solar thermal large-scale plant of the world. Panorama sauna in the county Holzweiler; Die modernste solarthermische Grossanlage der Welt. Panoramasauna in Grafschaft-Holzweiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Rolf [Paradigma, Karlsruhe (Germany). Bereich ' ' Solarthermische Grossanlagen und Prozesswaerme' '

    2009-01-15

    Among other things, the 30 years old panorama sauna in county Holzweiler, region Ahrweiler in Rhineland-Palatinate (Federal Republic of Germany), offer eight Finnish large-scale thematic saunas, Caldarium and infrared heat cabs, vapour bath, sun studio, fitness room as well as a bath range with eleven different pools and baths on a large area of nearly 30,000 m{sup 2}. Beyond that there are an internal wellness centre in the oriental Hamam and a forest park with an area of nearly 15,000 m{sup 2} for nudism. Since the end of February 2008, the panorama sauna has the most modern solar thermal large-scale installation of the world.

  14. Experimental Study of Thermal Effect on Large Size Nd:YAG Side Pumped Thin Disk Laser%大尺寸Nd∶YAG侧面泵浦薄片激光器热效应实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯驰; 郭渭荣; 李强

    2011-01-01

    A diode array side pumped thin disk laser was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The thermal effect, the thermal deformation of surface and the aberration of the large scale composite thin disk gain medium were researched by Finite Element Analysis method and numerical calculation. The phase distribution of wavefront was measured in different pump conditions, and the distortion of gain medium was analyzed. Experimental results showed that the thermal aberration of the large size thin disk crystal was smaller; heat dissipation power density was lower, which were consistent with the results of theoretical analysis. Increasing the surface scale of the laser gain medium is beneficial to improve the thermal effect.%对二极管侧面泵浦的薄片激光器进行了热效应理论模拟和实验研究.针对大尺寸的复合薄片增益介质的热负荷与表面形变进行了有限元理论分析和数值模拟以及实验研究.在不同的泵浦条件下分别进行了波前相位测量,分析了高功率泵浦情况下,大尺寸薄片状激光晶体的形变状况.实验测量结果表明,大尺寸薄片晶体的表面热形变较小,热耗散功率密度降低,与有限元理论模拟分析的结果基本一致,增大激光增益介质的表面尺寸有利于减小热效应.

  15. Optimizing a Drone Network to Deliver Automated External Defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutilier, Justin J; Brooks, Steven C; Janmohamed, Alyf; Byers, Adam; Buick, Jason E; Zhan, Cathy; Schoellig, Angela P; Cheskes, Sheldon; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-03-02

    Background -Public access defibrillation programs can improve survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are rarely available for bystander use at the scene. Drones are an emerging technology that can deliver an AED to the scene of an OHCA for bystander use. We hypothesize that a drone network designed with the aid of a mathematical model combining both optimization and queuing can reduce the time to AED arrival. Methods -We applied our model to 53,702 OHCAs that occurred in the eight regions of the Toronto Regional RescuNET between January 1st 2006 and December 31st 2014. Our primary analysis quantified the drone network size required to deliver an AED one, two, or three minutes faster than historical median 911 response times for each region independently. A secondary analysis quantified the reduction in drone resources required if RescuNET was treated as one large coordinated region. Results -The region-specific analysis determined that 81 bases and 100 drones would be required to deliver an AED ahead of median 911 response times by three minutes. In the most urban region, the 90th percentile of the AED arrival time was reduced by 6 minutes and 43 seconds relative to historical 911 response times in the region. In the most rural region, the 90th percentile was reduced by 10 minutes and 34 seconds. A single coordinated drone network across all regions required 39.5% fewer bases and 30.0% fewer drones to achieve similar AED delivery times. Conclusions -An optimized drone network designed with the aid of a novel mathematical model can substantially reduce the AED delivery time to an OHCA event.

  16. Numerical analysis of thermal stress and dislocation density distributions in large size multi-crystalline silicon ingots during the seeded growth process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoai Thu; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Hu, Chieh; Chen, Chun-Hung; Huang, Yen-Hao; Lin, Huang-Wei; Yu, Andy; Hsu, Bruce

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a global transient numerical simulation of silicon growth from the beginning of the solidification process until the end of the cooling process is carried out modeling the growth of an 800 kg ingot in an industrial seeded directional solidification furnace. The standard furnace is modified by the addition of insulating blocks in the hot zone. The simulation results show that there is a significant decrease in the thermal stress and dislocation density in the modified model as compared to the standard one (a maximal decrease of 23% and 75% along the center line of ingot for thermal stress and dislocation density, respectively). This modification reduces the heating power consumption for solidification of the silicon melt by about 17% and shortens the growth time by about 2.5 h. Moreover, it is found that adjusting the operating conditions of modified model to obtain the lower growth rate during the early stages of the solidification process can lower dislocation density and total heater power.

  17. Global existence and large time asymptotic bounds of L$^{\\infty}$ solutions of thermal diffusive combustion systems on R$^{n}$

    CERN Document Server

    Collet, P; Collet, P; Xin, J

    1994-01-01

    We consider the initial value problem for the thermal-diffusive combustion systems of the form: u_{1,t}= Delta_{x}u_1 - u_1 u_2^m, u_{2,t}= d Delta_{x} u_2 + u_1 u_2^m, x in R^{n}, n geq 1, m geq 1, d > 1, with bounded uniformly continuous nonnegative initial data. For such initial data, solutions can be simple traveling fronts or complicated domain walls. Due to the well-known thermal-diffusive instabilities when d, the Lewis number, is sufficiently away from one, front solutions are potentially chaotic. It is known in the literature that solutions are uniformly bounded in time in case d leq 1 by a simple comparison argument. In case d >1, no comparison principle seems to apply. Nevertheless, we prove the existence of global classical solutions and show that the L^{infty} norm of u_2 can not grow faster than O(log log t) for any space dimension. Our main tools are local L^{p} a-priori estimates and time dependent spatially decaying test functions. Our results also hold for the Arrhenius type reactions.

  18. Electronic compensation technique to deliver a total body dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, Tara E.

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient's immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has been conventionally used to compensate for the varying thickness throughout the body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern electronic compensation technique to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Method: Treatment plans utilizing the electronic compensation to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Each treatment plan includes two pair of parallel opposed fields. One pair of large fields is used to encompass the majority of the patient's anatomy. The other pair are very small open fields focused only on the thin bottom portion of the patient's anatomy, which requires much less radiation than the rest of the body to reach 100% of the prescribed dose. A desirable fluence pattern was manually painted within each of the larger fields for each patient to provide a more uniform distribution. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for evaluating the electronic compensation technique. In the electronically compensated plans, the maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the conventionally-compensated plans by an average of 15%, indicating a more uniform dose. The mean body doses calculated from the electronically compensated DVH remained comparable to that of the conventionally-compensated plans, indicating an accurate delivery of the prescription dose using electronic compensation. All calculated monitor units were within clinically acceptable limits. Conclusion: Electronic compensation technique for TBI will not increase the beam on time beyond clinically acceptable limits while it can substantially reduce the compensator setup

  19. 高大空间建筑室内热环境特性数值分析%Numerical Analysis on Characteristics of Indoor Thermal Environment in Large Space Building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙立军

    2012-01-01

    Simplified the boundary conditions of large space building, standard k-e turbulence model and CFD method were applied to analyze the characteristics of indoor thermal environment, and air distribution of air-conditioning was simulated, then the effect of indoor thermal environment in large space building with two schemes were analyzed. The results show that: (1) In scheme 1 of large space building,the wind speed nearby air return opening are larger and the temperatures around ground, walls, persons and lampshade are higher in whole space scheme of air-conditioning system . (2) The wind speed of jet axis and the recirculation zone are larger; and in the working area of air-conditioning, the temperatures are comfortable in the scheme of stratified air-conditioning system. The research conclusions show that the reasonable air distribution and thermal comfort in the working area could attained in the stratified air-conditioning system.%通过简化高大空间建筑边界条件,采用标准k-ε湍流模型,利用CFD方法数值分析了其室内热环境特性,并对空调气流组织进行模拟.给出了两种方案对高大空间室内热环境的影响.结果表明:(1)初始方案中高大空间建筑气流组织较差,地板温度较高.(2)优化方案中回风口设在两侧墙壁上,在送风口下方,温度场分布合理,满足热舒适要求.

  20. People deliver eye care: managing human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Odusote

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available People deliver health. Effective health care needs an efficient and motivated health workforce, which is the totality of individuals who directly or indirectly contribute to the promotion, protection and improvement of the health of the population.Community eye health is about providing eye health care to the people as close as possible to where they live and as much as possible at a price they can afford. It promotes people-centred care rather than the traditional disease-centred eye care services. In order to provide effective and efficient eye care services, we need an adequate number of well-qualified, well-motivated and equitably distributed eye health workers (EHWs.

  1. ISES Experience in Delivering Space Weather Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteler, David

    The International Space Environment Service has over eighty years experience in providing space weather services to meet a wide variety of user needs. This started with broadcast on December 1, 2008 from the Eiffel Tower about radio conditions. The delivery of information about ionospheric effects on high frequency (HF) radio propagation continue to be a major concern in many parts of the world. The movement into space brought requirements for a new set of space weather services, ranging from radiation dangers to man in space, damage to satellites and effects on satellite communication and navigation systems. On the ground magnetic survey, power system and pipeline operators require information about magnetic disturbances that can affect their operations. In the past these services have been delivered by individual Regional Warning Centres. However, the needs of new trans-national users are stimulating the development of new collaborative international space weather services.

  2. Delivering Hubble Discoveries to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Villard, R.; Weaver, D.; Cordes, K.; Knisely, L.

    2013-04-01

    Today's classrooms are significantly influenced by current news events, delivered instantly into the classroom via the Internet. Educators are challenged daily to transform these events into student learning opportunities. In the case of space science, current news events may be the only chance for educators and students to explore the marvels of the Universe. Inspired by these circumstances, the education and news teams developed the Star Witness News science content reading series. These online news stories (also available in downloadable PDF format) mirror the content of Hubble press releases and are designed for upper elementary and middle school level readers to enjoy. Educators can use Star Witness News stories to reinforce students' reading skills while exposing students to the latest Hubble discoveries.

  3. Combining Technologies to Deliver Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Freeman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1997 a Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA grant was awarded to the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS at The University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston (UTMB for support of the Laboratory Education and Advancement Project (LEAP. The project entailed three primary objectives, targeting laboratory practitioners in rural and medically underserved areas of Texas for delivering a bachelor's degree, laboratory-intensive course of study via distance education. Several delivery mechanisms were utilized and evaluated for their effectiveness and friendliness to both the faculty and students. The authors discuss and describe the mechanisms utilized for delivery of courses, the advantages and disadvantages encountered with each mechanism, and subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of the courses. Also discussed are the lessons learned and plans for future development.

  4. Empathic engineering: helping deliver dignity through design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Ian; Cornish, Katie; Bradley, Mike; Clarkson, P. John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dignity is a key value within healthcare. Technology is also recognized as being a fundamental part of healthcare delivery, but also a potential cause of dehumanization of the patient. Therefore, understanding how medical devices can be designed to help deliver dignity is important. This paper explores the role of empathy tools as a way of engendering empathy in engineers and designers to enable them to design for dignity. A framework is proposed that makes the link between empathy tools and outcomes of feelings of dignity. It represents a broad systems view that provides a structure for reviewing the evidence for the efficacy of empathy tools and also how dignity can be systematically understood for particular medical devices. PMID:26453036

  5. Delivering advanced therapies: The big pharma approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, J; Krishna, D; Jespers, L; Ketkar, A; Haddock, R; Imrie, J; Kili, S

    2017-07-24

    After two decades of focused development and some recent clinical successes, cell and gene therapy (CGT) is emerging as a promising approach to personalized medicines. Genetically engineered cells as a medical modality are poised to stand alongside or in combination with small molecule and biopharmaceutical approaches to bring new therapies to patients globally. Big pharma can play a vital role in industrializing CGT by focusing on diseases with high un-met medical need and compelling genetic evidence. Pharma should invest in manufacturing and supply chain solutions that deliver reproducible, high quality therapies at a commercially viable cost. Due to the fast pace of innovation in this field proactive engagement with regulators is critical. It is also vital to understand the needs of patients all along the patient care pathway and to establish product pricing that is accepted by prescribers, payers, and patients.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 24 July 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.65.

  6. Intranasal formulations: promising strategy to deliver vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, Peggy; Sakthivel, Priya; Trittel, Stephanie; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of new diseases and the lack of efficient vaccines against numerous non-treatable pathogens require the development of novel vaccination strategies. To date, only a few mucosal vaccines have been approved for humans. This was in part due to i) the use of live attenuated vaccines, which are not suitable for certain groups of individuals, ii) safety concerns derived from implementation in humans of some mucosal vaccines, iii) the poor stability, absorption and immunogenicity of antigens delivered by the mucosal route and iv) the limited number of available technologies to overcome the bottlenecks associated with mucosal antigen delivery. Recent advances make feasible the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines with adequate safety profile. Thus, currently intranasal vaccines represent an attractive and valid alternative to conventional vaccines. The present review is focused on the potentials and limitations of market-approved intranasal vaccines and promising candidates undergoing clinical investigations. Furthermore, emerging strategies to overcome main bottlenecks including efficient breaching of the mucosal barrier and safety concerns by implementation of new adjuvants and delivery systems are discussed. The rational design of intranasal vaccines requires an in-depth understanding of the anatomic, physicochemical and barrier properties of the nasal mucosa, as well as the molecular mechanisms governing the activation of the local innate and adaptive immune system. This would provide the critical knowledge to establish effective approaches to deliver vaccine antigens across the mucosal barrier, supporting the stimulation of a long-lasting protective response at both mucosal and systemic levels. Current developments in the area of adjuvants, nanotechnologies and mucosal immunology, together with the identification of surface receptors that can be exploited for cell targeting and manipulating their physiological properties, will become instrumental

  7. Photosynthetic acclimation to drought stress in Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings is largely dependent on thermal dissipation and enhanced electron flux to photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Huitziméngari; Trejo, Carlos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Conde-Martínez, F Víctor; Cruz-Ortega, Ma Del Rocío

    2014-10-01

    Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck, a crassulacean acid metabolism plant that is adapted to water-limited environments, has great potential for bioenergy production. However, drought stress decreases the requirement for light energy, and if the amount of incident light exceeds energy consumption, the photosynthetic apparatus can be injured, thereby limiting plant growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought and re-watering on the photosynthetic efficiency of A. salmiana seedlings. The leaf relative water content and leaf water potential decreased to 39.6 % and -1.1 MPa, respectively, over 115 days of water withholding and recovered after re-watering. Drought caused a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in light-acclimated leaves, as indicated by a decrease in the photosynthetic electron transport rate. Additionally, down-regulation of photochemical activity occurred mainly through the inactivation of PSII reaction centres and an increased thermal dissipation capacity of the leaves. Prompt fluorescence kinetics also showed a larger pool of terminal electron acceptors in photosystem I (PSI) as well as an increase in some JIP-test parameters compared to controls, reflecting an enhanced efficiency and specific fluxes for electron transport from the plastoquinone pool to the PSI terminal acceptors. All the above parameters showed similar levels after re-watering. These results suggest that the thermal dissipation of excess energy and the increased energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction of PSI end acceptors may be an important acclimation mechanism to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from over-excitation in Agave plants.

  8. A masonry heater, a large thermal flywheel and constant temperatures : the winter of 1996/1997 of the Alberta Sustainable Home/Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrowski, J.; Fofonoff, B.

    1997-07-01

    A masonry heater using scrapwood and firewood as the only source of back-up heat in this 1820 sq ft single-family live-in demonstration home/office, was described. The heater also contributed significantly to the thermal flywheel of the house. Together with other forms of thermal mass within the building (concrete slab, wood studs, drywall, tiles, furniture, plants, etc), the masonry heater was sufficient to see the occupants through the severe and long winter of 1996/97 with comfortable indoor temperatures. The masonry heater is located near the center of the house with a sunny view towards the south. On sunny winter days it operates as a passive solar heat sink, with the sun charging up the brick face by about five degrees C. In the evening, a 40 pound load of scrap and firewood will take about 1.25 hours to penetrate through the refractory interior core and brick exterior. This provides a cosy fireplace for the occupants, while storing heat in its mass for slow release during the next 1.5 to 3 days. It heats water for storage in the hot water tank. During the period of September 1996 to May 1997 one cord of wood was burned, which is about 12 per cent of the energy pumped into the average single family home in Calgary during the same period. Experience to-date suggests that the masonry heater performs very well as a back-up heater, maintaining an ambient temperature of about 20 degrees C throughout the winter. Some flat plate solar collectors might be necessary to provide for radiant floor heating of the mass since floor temperatures were lower than most occupants found comfortable.

  9. Triangular flow of thermal photons from an event-by-event hydrodynamic model for 2.76 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Renk, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the triangular flow parameter v3 of thermal photons from an event-by-event ideal hydrodynamic model for 0-40% central collisions of Pb nuclei at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. v3 determined with respect to the participant plane (PP) is found to be nonzero and positive, and its pT dependence is qualitatively similar to the elliptic flow parameter v2(PP) of thermal photons in the range 1 ≤pT≤6 GeV/c . In the range pT≤ 3 GeV/c , v3(PP) is found to be about 50-75% of v2(PP) and for pT> 3 GeV/c the two anisotropy parameters become comparable. The value of v3 is driven by local density fluctuations both directly via the creation of triangular geometry and indirectly via additional flow. As expected, the triangular flow parameter calculated with respect to the reaction plane v3(RP) is found to be close to zero. We show that v3(PP) strongly depends on the spatial size of fluctuations, especially in the higher pT(≥3 GeV /c ) region where a larger value of σ results in a smaller v3(PP ) . In addition, v3(PP ) is found to increase with the assumed formation time of the thermalized system.

  10. Comparison of large aperture scintillometer and eddy covariance measurements: Can thermal infrared data be used to capture footprint-induced differences?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedjes, J.C.B.; Chehbouni, A.; Ezzahar, J.; Escadafal, R.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) and large aperture scintillometer (LAS) measurements were collected over an irrigated olive orchard near Marrakech, Morocco. The tall, sparse vegetation in the experimental site was relatively homogeneous, but during irrigation events spatial variability in soil humidity was lar

  11. Design Environment for Novel Vertical Lift Vehicles: DELIVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This is a 20 minute presentation discussing the DELIVER vision. DELIVER is part of the ARMD Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Program, particularly the Convergent Aeronautics Solutions Project. The presentation covers the DELIVER vision, transforming markets, conceptual design process, challenges addressed, technical content, and FY2016 key activities.

  12. Large Energy Storage Density and High Thermal Stability in a Highly Textured (111)-Oriented Pb0.8Ba0.2ZrO3 Relaxor Thin Film with the Coexistence of Antiferroelectric and Ferroelectric Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Biaolin; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xing; Sun, Tieyu; Fan, Huiqing; Ke, Shanming; Ye, Mao; Wang, Yu; Lu, Wei; Niu, Hanben; Zeng, Xierong; Huang, Haitao

    2015-06-24

    A highly textured (111)-oriented Pb0.8Ba0.2ZrO3 (PBZ) relaxor thin film with the coexistence of antiferroelectric (AFE) and ferroelectric (FE) phases was prepared on a Pt/TiOx/SiO2/Si(100) substrate by using a sol-gel method. A large recoverable energy storage density of 40.18 J/cm(3) along with an efficiency of 64.1% was achieved at room temperature. Over a wide temperature range of 250 K (from room temperature to 523 K), the variation of the energy density is within 5%, indicating a high thermal stability. The high energy storage performance was endowed by a large dielectric breakdown strength, great relaxor dispersion, highly textured orientation, and the coexistence of FE and AFE phases. The PBZ thin film is believed to be an attractive material for applications in energy storage systems over a wide temperature range.

  13. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of radiation and convection on the equilibrium body temperatures of alligators have been determined. Gaping has been shown to be an effective thermoregulatory device for retarding heat gain in the heads of these animals. Initial time dependent experiments have been completed and ketamine hydrochloride has been shown to be an effective anesthetic for alligators. Evaporative water loss rates have been measured as a function of size, temperature and wind speed for the turtle Chrysemys scripta. Convection coefficients have been determined and climate spaces are being formulated. Field studies are under way at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Convection coefficients for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides change as a function of temperature and water speed. Steady state heat energy budgets have been computed for this fish. The effects of arsenic and temperature on the temperature tolerance of larval muskellunge, Esox masquinongy, have been determined. The thermal tolerances of several species of minnows have also been measured. The role of the skin in the control of evaporation from amphibians and reptiles has been assessed. During the past year one article has been published, two are in press, one is in review, and eight are in preparation. Five masters theses will be completed by July 1976.

  14. Massive and refined: a sample of large galaxy clusters simulated at high resolution. I:Thermal gas and shock waves properties

    CERN Document Server

    Vazza, Franco; Gheller, Claudio; Brunino, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    We present a sample of 20 massive galaxy clusters with total virial masses in the range of 6 10^14 M_sol< M_vir<2 10^15 M_sol, re-simulated with a customized version of the 1.5. ENZO code employing Adaptive Mesh Refinement. This technique allowed us to obtain unprecedented high spatial resolution (=25kpc/h) up to the distance of 3 virial radii from the clusters center, and makes it possible to focus with the same level of detail on the physical properties of the innermost and of the outermost cluster regions, providing new clues on the role of shock waves and turbulent motions in the ICM, across a wide range of scales. In this paper, a first exploratory study of this data set is presented. We report on the thermal properties of galaxy clusters at z=0. Integrated and morphological properties of gas density, gas temperature, gas entropy and baryon fraction distributions are discussed, and compared with existing outcomes both from the observational and from the numerical literature. Our cluster sample show...

  15. Possible pressurized thermal shock events during large primary to secondary leakage. The Hungarian AGNES project and PRISE accident scenarios in VVER-440/V213 type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perneczky, L. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budabest (Hungary)

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear power plants of WWER-440/213-type have several special features. Consequently, the transient behaviour of such a reactor system should be different from the behaviour of the PWRs of western design. The opening of the steam generator (SG) collector cover, as a specific primary to secondary circuit leakage (PRISE) occurring in WWER-type reactors happened first time in Rovno NPP Unit I on January 22, 1982. Similar accident was studied in the framework of IAEA project RER/9/004 in 1987-88 using the RELAP4/mod6 code. The Hungarian AGNES (Advanced General and New Evaluation of Safety) project was performed in the period 1991-94 with the aim to reassess the safety of the Paks NPP using state-of-the-art techniques. The project comprised three type of analyses for the primary to secondary circuit leakages: Design Basis Accident (DBA) analyses, Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) study and deterministic analyses for Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Major part of the thermohydraulic analyses has been performed by the RELAP5/mod2.5/V251 code version with two input models. 32 refs.

  16. Self-consistent phonons revisited. I. The role of thermal versus quantum fluctuations on structural transitions in large Lennard-Jones clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Ionuţ; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2012-10-14

    The theory of self-consistent phonons (SCP) was originally developed to address the anharmonic effects in condensed matter systems. The method seeks a harmonic, temperature-dependent Hamiltonian that provides the "best fit" for the physical Hamiltonian, the "best fit" being defined as the one that optimizes the Helmholtz free energy at a fixed temperature. The present developments provide a scalable O(N) unified framework that accounts for anharmonic effects in a many-body system, when it is probed by either thermal (ℏ → 0) or quantum fluctuations (T → 0). In these important limits, the solution of the nonlinear SCP equations can be reached in a manner that requires only the multiplication of 3N × 3N matrices, with no need of diagonalization. For short range potentials, such as Lennard-Jones, the Hessian, and other related matrices are highly sparse, so that the scaling of the matrix multiplications can be reduced from O(N(3)) to ~O(N). We investigate the role of quantum effects by continuously varying the de-Boer quantum delocalization parameter Λ and report the N-Λ (T = 0), and also the classical N-T (Λ = 0) phase diagrams for sizes up to N ~ 10(4). Our results demonstrate that the harmonic approximation becomes inadequate already for such weakly quantum systems as neon clusters, or for classical systems much below the melting temperatures.

  17. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-11-01

    Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

  18. Thermally dried ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene for high mobility and high uniformity on a large area substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 degrees C without any "coffee stain". The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192 x 150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44 +/- 0.08 cm2.V-1.s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 degrees C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  19. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  20. Where should noninvasive ventilation be delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas S

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has assumed an important role in the management of certain types of respiratory failure in acute-care hospitals. However, the optimal location for NIV has been a matter of debate. Some have argued that all patients begun on NIV in the acute-care setting should go to an intensive care unit (ICU), but this is impractical because ICU beds are often unavailable, and it may not be a sensible use of resources. Also, relatively few studies have examined the question of location for NIV. One problem is that various units' capabilities to deliver NIV differ substantially, even in the same hospital. Choosing the appropriate environment for NIV requires consideration of the patient's need for monitoring, the monitoring capabilities of the unit, including both technical and personnel resources (nursing and respiratory therapy), and the staff's skill and experience. In some hospitals NIV is begun most often in the emergency department, but is most often managed in an ICU. Step-down units are often good locations for NIV, but many institutions do not have step-down units. With ICU beds at a premium, many hospitals are forced to manage some NIV patients on general wards, which can be safely done with more stable patients if the ward is suitably monitored and experienced. When deciding where to locate the patient, clinicians must be familiar with the capabilities of the units in their facility and try to match the patient's need for monitoring and the unit's capabilities.

  1. Delivering new physics at impressive speed

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    The speed with which the heavy ion run at the LHC is delivering new physics is impressive not only for the insights it is bringing to the early Universe, but also for the clear demonstration it gives of the value of competition and complementarity between the experiments.   ALICE was the first off the mark to publish papers from the ion run, as you’d expect from the LHC’s dedicated ion experiment, but results emerging from ATLAS and CMS are bringing new understanding in their own right. Each collaboration’s result plays to the strengths of its detector, and it is by taking all the results together that our knowledge advances. The creation, observation and understanding of the hot dense matter that would have existed in the early Universe, normally known as Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), is complex science and one of the ion programme’s key goals. Many signals for QGP exist, and like pieces of a puzzle, we must assemble all of them to get the full picture. At th...

  2. Urban poverty: delivering babies in the slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, M

    1998-01-01

    Government of India statistics indicate that about 3 million of New Delhi's 11 million people live in slums, while another 3 million people, most fleeing rural poverty, are expected to migrate to the capital by 2000. ASHA Community Health and Development Society is a nongovernmental organization currently working in 23 of India's slums, serving a population of about 150,000 people. The group has pioneered the use of community-based networks in New Delhi to improve health in the poorest communities. While ASHA has a small, full-time staff, most of the daily health care work is conducted by slum volunteers. Ekta Vihar is a slum community of 1800 residents. Community members' primary source of health care are Vimla Rana and Sobha, two illiterate women who reside in the community and are part of a team of community health workers trained by ASHA. Rana and Sobha deliver almost all of the babies born annually in the slum and care for community members when they become ill.

  3. Development of a ReaxFF potential for carbon condensed phases and its application to the thermal fragmentation of a large fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sriram Goverapet; van Duin, Adri C T; Ganesh, P

    2015-01-29

    In this article, we report the development of a ReaxFF reactive potential that can accurately describe the chemistry and dynamics of carbon condensed phases. Density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations were performed to obtain the equation of state for graphite and diamond and the formation energies of defects in graphene and amorphous phases from fullerenes. The DFT data were used to reparametrize ReaxFFCHO, resulting in a new potential called ReaxFFC-2013. ReaxFFC-2013 accurately predicts the atomization energy of graphite and closely reproduces the DFT-based energy difference between graphite and diamond, and the barrier for transition from graphite to diamond. ReaxFFC-2013 also accurately predicts the DFT-based energy barrier for Stone-Wales transformation in a C60(Ih) fullerene through the concerted rotation of a C2 unit. Later, MD simulations of a C180 fullerene using ReaxFFC-2013 suggested that the thermal fragmentation of these giant fullerenes is an exponential function of time. An Arrhenius-type equation was fit to the decay rate, giving an activation energy of 7.66 eV for the loss of carbon atoms from the fullerene. Although the decay of the molecule occurs primarily via the loss of C2 units, we observed that, with an increase in temperature, the probability of loss of larger fragments increases. The ReaxFFC-2013 potential developed in this work, and the results obtained on fullerene fragmentation, provide an important step toward the full computational chemical modeling of coal pyrolysis, soot incandescence, high temperature erosion of graphitic rocket nozzles, and ablation of carbon-based spacecraft materials during atmospheric reentry.

  4. Large negative thermal expansion of the Co subnetwork measured by EXAFS in highly disordered Nd₁-xCox thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J; Cid, R; Hierro, A; M Álvarez-Prado, L; Quirós, C; Alameda, J M

    2013-10-23

    We have measured a negative thermal expansion (NTE) of the Co subnetwork in amorphous Nd1-xCox (0.78 < x < 0.84) thin films of the order of 1% in volume using linearly polarized EXAFS spectroscopy at RT and 10 K. The expansion, which is anisotropic, is uncorrelated with the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) observed in all the films, but correlated with the method used to deposit them. The atomic environments of the Nd atoms resulted in such a strong disorder that Nd-Nd and Nd-Co environments were invisible to EXAFS, and only Co-Co atomic environments were detected. The information on the Nd subnetwork was obtained through its magnetic moment measured by XMCD. These measurements demonstrate an increasing interaction of neodymium atoms with their particular local crystal field as the temperature decreased, suggesting possible structural modifications at their sites. Since the magnetic moment of the cobalt subnetwork remains essentially constant with the temperature, it is proposed that its detected NTE may be caused by the mechanical response of the amorphous network to structural transformations at the Nd sites. These results support that the PMA in RE-TM alloys is localized at the RE sites. The complete absence of EXAFS oscillations in the Nd L3 EXAFS spectra is remarkable: it means that the coherence length of the photoemitted electrons in disordered matter can be strongly reduced from that expected by atomic calculations to the point of being less than first neighbor distances, which is contrary to the common belief that first neighbors are always visible by EXAFS.

  5. Subnanomolar antisense activity of phosphonate-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates delivered by cationic lipids to HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hamzavi, Ramin; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    oligomer. This modification of the PNA does not interfere with the nucleic acid target binding affinity based on thermal stability of the PNA/RNA duplexes. When delivered to cultured HeLa pLuc705 cells by Lipofectamine, the PNAs showed dose-dependent nuclear antisense activity in the nanomolar range...

  6. 协调大规模风电汇聚外送的火电容量优化%Capacity Optimization of Corollary Thermal Sources Transmitted with Large-Scale Clustering Wind Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯婷婷; 娄素华; 张滋华; 吴耀武

    2012-01-01

    针对风电基地风电外送的形势,提出了一种风电汇聚外送配套火电容量优化方法。针对风电的随机性,定义了输电通道的持续STC曲线,来分析输电通道输送风电后火电可用容量空间的特性。在此基础上,建立了风电外送配套火电容量优化模型,模型考虑了输电线路、配套火电的费用及输送电量收益,在风电优先外送的前提下,充分利用输电通道,使得经济效益最大化,并采用两层优化策略对模型进行求解。应用本文模型对一个算例系统进行了计算分析,并对电价和火电煤价对结果的影响进行了分析,结果证明了所提方法的正确性和有效性。%ince wind power is explored on a large scale and in a highly centralized way these years,and usually wind bases are inconsistent with load in geographic region,so transmitting wind power through high-voltage transmission line will be an inevitable trend.In this new situation,the paper presents an optimal methodology for corollary thermal sources transmitted with wind power together for wind power’s variability and low energy density.For the random nature of wind power,the duration curve of spare capacity of transmission line(STC) which can be used to transmit thermal power is introduced to illustrate characteristics of capacity for thermal power after transmitting wind power.Based on the duration curve of STC,the model for optimizing the capacity of corollary thermal sources is proposed,which takes into account transmission line costs,thermal sources costs and benefit of electric power transmitted,and the objective function being maximized is the total benefits.The model can be solved by a two-stage optimal strategy.The case studies are carried out for a system,where effects of coal price and electricity price on the optimal schemes is also studied,and the results verify the effectiveness of the presented method.

  7. Retrovirus-delivered siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devroe Eric

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of transfected synthetic small interfering (si RNAs to suppress the expression of specific transcripts has proved a useful technique to probe gene function in mammalian cells. However, high production costs limit this technology's utility for many laboratories and experimental situations. Recently, several DNA-based plasmid vectors have been developed that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors provide certain advantages over chemically synthesized siRNAs, numerous disadvantages remain including merely transient siRNA expression and low and variable transfection efficiency. Results To overcome several limitations of plasmid-based siRNA, a retroviral siRNA delivery system was developed based on commerically available vectors. As a pilot study, a vector was designed to target the human Nuclear Dbf2-Related (NDR kinase. Cells infected with the anti-NDR siRNA virus dramatically downregulate NDR expression, whereas control viruses have no effect on total NDR levels. To confirm and extend these findings, an additional virus was constructed to target a second gene, transcriptional coactivator p75. Conclusion The experiments presented here demonstrate that retroviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells. Retrovirus-delivered siRNA provides significant advancement over previously available methods by providing efficient, uniform delivery and immediate selection of stable "knock-down" cells. This development should provide a method to rapidly assess gene function in established cell lines, primary cells, or animals.

  8. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Brian D.; Caffrey, Jarvis; Hedayat, Ali; Stephens, Jonathan; Polsgrove, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management (CFM) is critical to the success of future nuclear thermal propulsion powered vehicles. While this is an issue for any propulsion system utilizing cryogenic propellants, this is made more challenging by the radiation flux produced by the reactor in a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR). Managing the cryogenic fuel to prevent propellant loss to boil off and leakage is needed to limit the required quantity of propellant to a reasonable level. Analysis shows deposition of energy into liquid hydrogen fuel tanks in the vicinity of the nuclear thermal engine. This is on top of ambient environment sources of heat. Investments in cryogenic/thermal management systems (some of which are ongoing at various organizations) are needed in parallel to nuclear thermal engine development in order to one day see the successful operation of an entire stage. High durability, low thermal conductivity insulation is one developmental need. Light weight cryocoolers capable of removing heat from large fluid volumes at temperatures as low as approx. 20 K are needed to remove heat leak from the propellant of an NTR. Valve leakage is an additional CFM issue of great importance. Leakage rates of state of the art, launch vehicle size valves (which is approximately the size valves needed for a Mars transfer vehicle) are quite high and would result in large quantities of lost propellant over a long duration mission. Additionally, the liquid acquisition system inside the propellant tank must deliver properly conditioned propellant to the feed line for successful engine operation and avoid intake of warm or gaseous propellant. Analysis of the thermal environment and the CFM technology development are discussed in the accompanying presentation.

  9. Delivering the Goods : Scaling out Results of Natural Resource Management Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrington, L.; White, J.; Grace, P.; Hodson, D.; Hartkamp, A.D.; Vaughan, C.; Meisner, C.

    2002-01-01

    To help integrated natural resource management (INRM) research "deliver the goods" for many of the world's poor over a large area and in a timely manner, the authors suggest a problem-solving approach that facilitates the scaling out of relevant agricultural practices. They propose seven ways to fos

  10. Delivering the Goods : Scaling out Results of Natural Resource Management Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrington, L.; White, J.; Grace, P.; Hodson, D.; Hartkamp, A.D.; Vaughan, C.; Meisner, C.

    2002-01-01

    To help integrated natural resource management (INRM) research "deliver the goods" for many of the world's poor over a large area and in a timely manner, the authors suggest a problem-solving approach that facilitates the scaling out of relevant agricultural practices. They propose seven ways to

  11. Delivering the Goods : Scaling out Results of Natural Resource Management Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrington, L.; White, J.; Grace, P.; Hodson, D.; Hartkamp, A.D.; Vaughan, C.; Meisner, C.

    2002-01-01

    To help integrated natural resource management (INRM) research "deliver the goods" for many of the world's poor over a large area and in a timely manner, the authors suggest a problem-solving approach that facilitates the scaling out of relevant agricultural practices. They propose seven ways to fos

  12. Studies on the elements of optical and thermal energy transport through large components with transparent thermal insulation and shading; Untersuchungen der Grundlagen des optischen und thermischen Energietransportes bei grossflaechigen Komponenten mit transparenter Waermedaemmung und Verschattung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzer, W. [ed.; Apian-Bennewitz, P.; Kuhn, T.; Dill, F.U.; Wirth, H.; Wittwer, V.

    1997-11-28

    The report describes experimental and theoretical studies aiming at the comprehensive light-technical and energetic characterization of large, transparent construction elements including shading.- The two main measuring devices used for this purpose were a solar calorimeter for determining the total rate of energy passage, and a photogoniometer for measuring the bidirectional reflection and transmission properties of transparent construction elements and solar protection devices. The aims envisaged were to enhance measuring accuracy, create internationally comparable measuring conditions, and to integrate the experimental data into computer tools serving to evaluate construction elements in light-technical and energetic terms. (orig./GL) [Deutsch] In dem vorliegenden Sachbericht werden experimentelle und theoretische Arbeiten beschrieben, die auf eine umfassende lichttechnische und energetische Charakterisierung von grossflaechigen transparenten Bauteilen inklusive Sonnenschutz hinzielen. Die beiden wesentlichen Messvorrichtungen dazu sind ein Solarkalorimeter zur Bestimmung des Gesamtenergiedurchlassgrades und ein Photogoniometer zur Vermessung der bidirektionalen Reflexions- und Transmissionseigenschaften von transparenten Bauteilen und Sonnenschutzvorrichtungen. Ziele waren die Erhoehung der Messgenauigkeit, die Schaffung von international vergleichbaren Messbedingungen und die Integration der experimentellen Daten in Computerwerkzeuge, die der lichttechnischen und energetischen Bewertung von Bauteilen im Gebaeude dienen. (orig./GL)

  13. Rebamipide delivered by brushite cement enhances osteoblast and macrophage proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Engqvist, Håkan; Karlsson Ott, Marjam

    2015-01-01

    Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70% ± 0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage). Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4 uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 ± 7.4% at 1 uM), and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts.

  14. Rebamipide delivered by brushite cement enhances osteoblast and macrophage proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pujari-Palmer

    Full Text Available Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2, BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70% ± 0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage. Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4 uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 ± 7.4% at 1 uM, and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts.

  15. Engineering a plant community to deliver multiple ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Döring, Thomas; Baddeley, John; Collins, Rosemary; Roderick, Stephen; Jones, Hannah; Watson, Christine

    2015-06-01

    The sustainable delivery of multiple ecosystem services requires the management of functionally diverse biological communities. In an agricultural context, an emphasis on food production has often led to a loss of biodiversity to the detriment of other ecosystem services such as the maintenance of soil health and pest regulation. In scenarios where multiple species can be grown together, it may be possible to better balance environmental and agronomic services through the targeted selection of companion species. We used the case study of legume-based cover crops to engineer a plant community that delivered the optimal balance of six ecosystem services: early productivity, regrowth following mowing, weed suppression, support of invertebrates, soil fertility building (measured as yield of following crop), and conservation of nutrients in the soil. An experimental species pool of 12 cultivated legume species was screened for a range of functional traits and ecosystem services at five sites across a geographical gradient in the United Kingdom. All possible species combinations were then analyzed, using a process-based model of plant competition, to identify the community that delivered the best balance of services at each site. In our system, low to intermediate levels of species richness (one to four species) that exploited functional contrasts in growth habit and phenology were identified as being optimal. The optimal solution was determined largely by the number of species and functional diversity represented by the starting species pool, emphasizing the importance of the initial selection of species for the screening experiments. The approach of using relationships between functional traits and ecosystem services to design multifunctional biological communities has the potential to inform the design of agricultural systems that better balance agronomic and environmental services and meet the current objective of European agricultural policy to maintain viable food

  16. Rapid flash annealing of thermally reactive copolymers in a roll-to-roll process for polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgesen, Martin; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Andreasen, Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    intensity pulsed light, delivered by a commercial photonic sintering system. Thermally labile ester groups are positioned on the DTZ unit of the copolymer that can be eliminated thermally for enhanced photochemical stability and advantages in terms of processing (solubility/insolubility switching......). The photonic sintering system was successfully implemented in a full roll-to-roll process on flexible PET substrates and large-area polymer solar cell modules were prepared by solution processing of five layers under ambient conditions using the photonic sintering system for thermocleaving of the active layer...

  17. Social Media–Delivered Sexual Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana S.; Levine, Deborah; Black, Sandra R.; Schmiege, Sarah; Santelli, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Youth are using social media regularly and represent a group facing substantial risk for sexually transmitted infection (STI). Although there is evidence that the Internet can be used effectively in supporting healthy sexual behavior, this hasn't yet extended to social networking sites. Purpose To determine whether STI prevention messages delivered via Facebook are efficacious in preventing increases in sexual risk behavior at 2 and 6 months. Design Cluster RCT, October 2010–May 2011. Setting/participants Individuals (seeds) recruited in multiple settings (online, via newspaper ads and face-to-face) were asked to recruit three friends, who in turn recruited additional friends, extending three waves from the seed. Seeds and waves of friends were considered networks and exposed to either the intervention or control condition. Intervention Exposure to Just/Us, a Facebook page developed with youth input, or to control content on 18–24 News, a Facebook page with current events for 2 months. Main outcome measures Condom use at last sex and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms. Repeated measures of nested data were used to model main effects of exposure to Just/Us and time by treatment interaction. Results 1578 participants enrolled, with 14% Latino and 35% African-American; 75% of participants completed at least one study follow-up. Time by treatment effects were observed at 2 months for condom use (intervention 68% vs control 56%, p=0.04) and proportion of sex acts protected by condoms (intervention 63% vs control 57%, p=0.03) where intervention participation reduced the tendency for condom use to decrease over time. No effects were seen at 6 months. Conclusions Social networking sites may be venues for efficacious health education interventions. More work is needed to understand what elements of social media are compelling, how network membership influences effects, and whether linking social media to clinical and social services can be beneficial

  18. Delivering a Multi-Functional and Resilient Urban Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Hale

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tree planting is widely advocated and applied in urban areas, with large-scale projects underway in cities globally. Numerous potential benefits are used to justify these planting campaigns. However, reports of poor tree survival raise questions about the ability of such projects to deliver on their promises over the long-term. Each potential benefit requires different supporting conditions—relating not only to the type and placement of the tree, but also to the broader urban system within which it is embedded. This set of supporting conditions may not always be mutually compatible and may not persist for the lifetime of the tree. Here, we demonstrate a systems-based approach that makes these dependencies, synergies, and tensions more explicit, allowing them to be used to test the decadal-scale resilience of urban street trees. Our analysis highlights social, environmental, and economic assumptions that are implicit within planting projects; notably that high levels of maintenance and public support for urban street trees will persist throughout their natural lifespan, and that the surrounding built form will remain largely unchanged. Whilst the vulnerability of each benefit may be highly context specific, we identify approaches that address some typical weaknesses, making a functional, resilient, urban forest more attainable.

  19. Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1980-04-01

    Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

  20. Development of a replacement technology for the standard {sup 3}He detector for the detection of thermal neutron on large areas; Entwicklung einer Ersatztechnologie fuer den Standard {sup 3}He Detektor zum Nachweis thermischer Neutronen auf grossen Flaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modzel, Gerd

    2014-07-23

    The large area Jalousie detector concept has been developed as a replacement for {sup 3}He based neutron detectors. It is based on inclined and stacked layers coated with {sup 10}B, detecting the conversion products in a gas detector. Prototypes have been built based on the requirements of the POWTEX experiment. The spatial resolution has been measured as FWHM{sub z}=11.9 mm and FWHM{sub θ}=6.4 mm, slightly above the prediction due to the range of the conversion products in the gas. The correlated anode and cathode deliver an efficiency with the expected dependency on the inclination angle. The absolute efficiency of the anode wires has been measured as 93.6% of the predicted value at 1.17 Aa, validating the detector concept. Simulations in Garfield have been made to better understand the inner workings of the detector. Tools to analyze the raw detector data have been developed, which enabled further optimizations in the data processing chain and solving some problems. A test environment has been built for the n-XYTER 2.0 chip and some preliminary tests have been conducted. They showcase some problems, but a statement about the state of the chip cannot be made yet.

  1. Genome-wide association analysis for heat tolerance at flowering detected a large set of genes involved in adaptation to thermal and other stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, Tanguy; Bueno, Crisanta; Frouin, Julien; Jacquin, Laval; Courtois, Brigitte; Ahmadi, Nourollah

    2017-01-01

    Fertilization sensitivity to heat in rice is a major issue within climate change scenarios in the tropics. A panel of 167 indica landraces and improved varieties was phenotyped for spikelet sterility (SPKST) under 38°C during anthesis and for several secondary traits potentially affecting panicle micro-climate and thus the fertilization process. The panel was genotyped with an average density of one marker per 29 kb using genotyping by sequencing. Genome-wide association analyses (GWAS) were conducted using three methods based on single marker regression, haplotype regression and simultaneous fitting of all markers, respectively. Fourteen loci significantly associated with SPKST under at least two GWAS methods were detected. A large number of associations was also detected for the secondary traits. Analysis of co-localization of SPKST associated loci with QTLs detected in progenies of bi-parental crosses reported in the literature allowed to narrow -down the position of eight of those QTLs, including the most documented one, qHTSF4.1. Gene families underlying loci associated with SPKST corresponded to functions ranging from sensing abiotic stresses and regulating plant response, such as wall-associated kinases and heat shock proteins, to cell division and gametophyte development. Analysis of diversity at the vicinity of loci associated with SPKST within the rice three thousand genomes, revealed widespread distribution of the favourable alleles across O. sativa genetic groups. However, few accessions assembled the favourable alleles at all loci. Effective donors included the heat tolerant variety N22 and some Indian and Taiwanese varieties. These results provide a basis for breeding for heat tolerance during anthesis and for functional validation of major loci governing this trait. PMID:28152098

  2. Thermal Radiation Source Test Facility,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    KEY WORDS (Continu on revers side I eesr and identify by block nuMb.,) Thermal Radiation Source Thermal Test Facility 20 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse...SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1-1 GENERAL Defense Nuclear Agency’s Field Command, located at Kirtland AFB in New Mexico, has recently upgraded its thermal test facility...is used to evaluate damage and survivability in a nuclear environment. The thermal test facility was first established in 1979 and used O large

  3. Oral microflora in infants delivered vaginally and by caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelun Barfod, Mette; Magnusson, Kerstin; Lexner, Michala Oron

    2011-01-01

    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 2011 Background. Early in life, vaginally delivered infants exhibit a different composition of the gut flora compared with infants delivered by caesarean section (C-section); however, it is unclear whether this also applies to the oral cavity. Aim....... To investigate and compare the oral microbial profile between infants delivered vaginally and by C-section. Design. This is a cross-sectional case-control study. Eighty-four infants delivered either vaginally (n = 42) or by C-section (n = 42) were randomly selected from the 2009 birth cohort at the County...

  4. Are Financial Variables Inputs in Delivered Production Functions? Are Financial Variables Inputs in Delivered Production Functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Kiguel

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Fischer's classic (1974 paper develops conditions under which it is appropriate to use money as an input in a 'delivered' production function. In this paper, we extend Fischer's model I (the Baumol-Tobin inventory approach by incorporating credit into the analysis. Our investigation of the extended model brings out a very restrictive but necessary implicit assumption employed by Fischer to treat money as an input. Namely. that there exists a binding constraint on the use of money! A similar result holds for our more general model. Fischer's classic (1974 paper develops conditions under which it is appropriate to use money as an input in a 'delivered' production function. In this paper, we extend Fischer's model I (the Baumol-Tobin inventory approach by incorporating credit into the analysis. Our investigation of the extended model brings out a very restrictive but necessary implicit assumption employed by Fischer to treat money as an input. Namely. that there exists a binding constraint on the use of money! A similar result holds for our more general model.

  5. The use of smart technology to deliver efficient and effective pressure-damage education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpaul, Kumal; Acton, Claire

    2015-11-11

    This article outlines an innovative joint working strategy, as well as a partnership project, between two NHS Foundation Trusts-a community trust and industry partner-to develop a mobile training app to deliver pressure ulcer prevention and management for clinical staff. The aim of the innovation was to enable a new way of delivering education to large numbers of staff by moving away from traditional classroom-based training. The process included development of the app, along with testing and implementation, followed by a review of the qualitative data after the app's implementation. The review takes into account the key outcomes that have had an impact on this method of delivering education, its challenges and how it has been received by clinical staff and patients.

  6. The Use of Freshmen Seminar Programs to Deliver Personalized Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Amber M.; Correia, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    The current study tested the effectiveness of delivering personalized feedback to first-semester college freshmen in a group lecture format. Participants enrolled in semester-long courses were randomly assigned to receive either personalized feedback or general information about alcohol. Both lecture conditions were delivered during a standard…

  7. Delivering value to multiple stakeholders: 2013 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Michael E

    2012-12-01

    To deliver greater value, top payers and providers should: Measure the value they deliver to their business partners and customers, Create value through continuous performance improvement, Package and price value to optimize their margin, mission, and market share, Organize for value through new legal entities, employed medical groups, or both.

  8. 76 FR 35295 - Delivering an Efficient, Effective, and Accountable Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... June 16, 2011 Part III The President Executive Order 13576--Delivering an Efficient, Effective, and... 13576 of June 13, 2011 Delivering an Efficient, Effective, and Accountable Government By the authority... frequently analyzed ] and reviewed by agency leadership. Agencies shall update these metrics quarterly,...

  9. Highly porous thermoelectric nanocomposites with low thermal conductivity and high figure of merit from large-scale solution-synthesized Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.5}Se{sub 0.5} hollow nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Biao; Wu, Yue [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Ames Laboratory, Department of Energy, Ames, IA (United States); Feng, Tianli; Ruan, Xiulin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Agne, Matthias T.; Snyder, G. Jeffery [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory, Department of Energy, Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    To enhance the performance of thermoelectric materials and enable access to their widespread applications, it is beneficial yet challenging to synthesize hollow nanostructures in large quantities, with high porosity, low thermal conductivity (κ) and excellent figure of merit (z T). Herein we report a scalable (ca. 11.0 g per batch) and low-temperature colloidal processing route for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.5}Se{sub 0.5} hollow nanostructures. They are sintered into porous, bulk nanocomposites (phi 10 mm x h 10 mm) with low κ (0.48 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) and the highest z T (1.18) among state-of-the-art Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3-x}Se{sub x} materials. Additional benefits of the unprecedented low relative density (68-77 %) are the large demand reduction of raw materials and the improved portability. This method can be adopted to fabricate other porous phase-transition and thermoelectric chalcogenide materials and will pave the way for the implementation of hollow nanostructures in other fields. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Lipid Nanoparticles to Deliver miRNA in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, Virginia; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Misso, Gabriella; Zarone, Mayra R; Grimaldi, Anna

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of post-transcriptional gene expression modulators. In the past two decades, over 1500 human miRNAs were discovered. These small non-coding RNAs regulate various biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Thus, miRNAs have been proposed as new therapeutical agents in different multifactorial diseases such as cancer. Since miRNAs therapies represent a great promise, many research studies have been focused on the development of delivery strategies to overcome miRNAs biopharmaceutical issues. Lipid delivery systems are undoubtedly the non-viral carriers most largely investigated due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, easy production, low toxicity and immunogenicity, possibility to easily modify the carriers for targeting strategies. In this mini-review we provide a rapid and updated overview on the lipid delivery system currently used to deliver miRNAs, pointing out the progresses achieved in the optimization of these nanovectors, which led up to the first clinical trial.

  11. Gulf team delivers on DP drillship promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R. von

    2001-06-01

    The technological achievements of the project by Amoco and BP to complete a deepwater subsea well in the Gulf of Mexico from a dynamically positioned (DP) vessel are described. In 2000, the dual activity drillship, Discoverer Enterprise (owned by Transocean Sedco Forex), completed the Nile well in the Viosca Knoll area and then the King Well in Mississippi Canyon Block 85. Stringent safety and environmental protection criteria imposed by Amoco and BP drove the design of the Dril-Quip subsea wellhead to ensure that the wellhead profile and connector coped with the worst case scenario. BP also specified a disconnect system that would secure the well in less than a minute. The SenTREE 7 and Commander telemetry systems developed by Schlumberger, the components of the work string and test work with the Nile well to ensure BP conditions were met and that the perforation and surge procedure proceeded successfully are explained. The time reduction achieved by using large DP drillships and future BP plans are outlined.

  12. Phage therapy: delivering on the promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D R; Anderson, J; Enright, M C

    2011-07-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and, in many cases, destroy their bacterial targets. Within a few years of their initial discovery they were being investigated as therapeutic agents for infectious disease, an approach known as phage therapy. However, the nature of these exquisitely specific agents was not understood and much early use was both uninformed and unsuccessful. As a result they were replaced by chemical antibiotics once these became available. Although work on phage therapy continued (and continues) in Eastern Europe, this was not conducted to a standard allowing it to support clinical uses in areas regulated by the European Medicines Agency or the US FDA. To develop phage therapy for these areas requires work carried out in accordance with the requirements of these agencies, and, driven by the current crisis of antibiotic resistance, such clinical trials are now under way. The first Phase I clinical trial of safety was reported in 2005, and the results of the first Phase II clinical trial of efficacy of a bacteriophage therapeutic was published in 2009. While the delivery of these relatively large and complex agents to the site of disease can be more challenging than for conventional, small-molecule antibiotics, bacteriophages are then able to multiply locally even from an extremely low (picogram range) initial dose. This multiplication where and only where they are needed underlies the potential for bacteriophage therapeutics to become a much needed and powerful weapon against bacterial disease.

  13. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  14. Thermal conveyance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meador, J.T.

    1978-09-01

    The purpose of the evaluation is to characterize modern technology for long-distance, large-diameter, underground steam and high-temperature water (HTW) transport systems and for hot-water and chilled-water systems that distribute thermal energy within communities. Data on the status of existing systems have been compiled and compared with recommended design factors for fluid flow to aid in parameter selection for assessing performance in transporting and distributing thermal energy.

  15. Enhanced performance thermal diode via thermal boundary resistance at nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Padilla, M.; Licea-Jimenez, L.; Pérez-Garcia, S. A.; Alvarez-Quintana, J.

    2015-08-01

    Hypothetically, a thermal rectifier is a device which leads a greater heat flux in one direction than another one, similarly as the electrical diode works for the electrical flux. Here, a drastic increment in the rectification factor has been obtained in nanoscale layered thermal diodes due to the effect of thermal boundary resistance present on an asymmetrical stack of nanofilms. Measurements show a thermal rectification factor as large as 3.3 under a temperature bias well below 1 K, which is the biggest thermal rectification factor reported at room temperature compared to previously reported thermal diodes so far. According to the direction of the applied heat flux, the observed impact of the thermal boundary resistance on the device is manifested through the presence of an asymmetric temperature rise along the heat transfer axis. Such effect provides an alternative route for the development of high performance thermal diodes.

  16. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high performance thermal devices. Here we show through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (< 20 oC) across the device, which is a significant advantage over other thermal diodes which need temperature biases on the order of the operating temperature. Taking this into consideration, we show that the dimensionless temperature-scaled rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25 - much larger than other thermal diodes (< 8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized t...

  17. ELASTIC EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF STEEL FRAME-BENT STRUCTURES OF MAIN BUILDINGS FOR LARGE THERMAL POWER PLANT%大型火电厂钢结构主厂房弹性地震反应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛建阳; 梁炯丰; 彭修宁; 温永强

    2012-01-01

    The steel frame-bent structure is the main load-supporting structure in thermal power plants of China, whose structural quality and rigidity are distributed non-uniformly. It is particularly necessary to research earthquake resistant behavior of this structure. The time history response analysis method was used to study the dynamic properties, the interlayer deformation and the interlayer shear of steel frame-bent structures of main buildings for large thermal power plant. The results showed that there were many weak parts in the horizontal frame-bent and longitudinal frame-supporting structures, which must be strengthened when designed. The space model should be used to consider the effect of torsion in structural calculation and analysis.%钢框排架结构是我国火电厂主厂房的主要结构形式之一,但因其结构质量、刚度分布不均匀,所以对它的抗震性能研究尤为必要。采用弹性时程分析方法对大型火电厂钢框排架主厂房进行抗震分析,研究该类结构的动力特性、层间变形和层剪力等。计算结果表明:主厂房横向框排架和纵向框架-支撑结构存在较多的薄弱部位,计算分析应采用考虑扭转效应的空间模型。

  18. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  19. Thermal Transgressions and Phanerozoic Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, T. R.; Kidder, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    A number of significant Phanerozoic extinctions are associated with marine transgressions that were probably driven by rapid ocean warming. The conditions associated with what we call thermal transgressions are extremely stressful to life on Earth. The Earth system setting associated with end-Permian extinction exemplifies an end-member case of our model. The conditions favoring extreme warmth and sea-level increases driven by thermal expansion are also conducive to changes in ocean circulation that foster widespread anoxia and sulfidic subsurface ocean waters. Equable climates are characterized by reduced wind shear and weak surface ocean circulation. Late Permian and Early Triassic thermohaline circulation differs considerably from today's world, with minimal polar sinking and intensified mid-latitude sinking that delivers sulfate from shallow evaporative areas to deeper water where it is reduced to sulfide. Reduced nutrient input to oceans from land at many of the extinction intervals results from diminished silicate weathering and weakened delivery of iron via eolian dust. The falloff in iron-bearing dust leads to minimal nitrate production, weakening food webs and rendering faunas and floras more susceptible to extinction when stressed. Factors such as heat, anoxia, ocean acidification, hypercapnia, and hydrogen sulfide poisoning would significantly affect these biotas. Intervals of tectonic quiescence set up preconditions favoring extinctions. Reductions in chemical silicate weathering lead to carbon dioxide buildup, oxygen drawdown, nutrient depletion, wind and ocean current abatement, long-term global warming, and ocean acidification. The effects of extinction triggers such as large igneous provinces, bolide impacts, and episodes of sudden methane release are more potent against the backdrop of our proposed preconditions. Extinctions that have characteristics we call for in the thermal transgressions include the Early Cambrian Sinsk event, as well as

  20. Oral microflora in infants delivered vaginally and by caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelun Barfod, Mette; Magnusson, Kerstin; Lexner, Michala Oron; Blomqvist, Susanne; Dahlén, Gunnar; Twetman, Svante

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND.  Early in life, vaginally delivered infants exhibit a different composition of the gut flora compared with infants delivered by caesarean section (C-section); however, it is unclear whether this also applies to the oral cavity. AIM.  To investigate and compare the oral microbial profile between infants delivered vaginally and by C-section. DESIGN.  This is a cross-sectional case-control study. Eighty-four infants delivered either vaginally (n = 42) or by C-section (n = 42) were randomly selected from the 2009 birth cohort at the County Hospital in Halmstad, Sweden. Medically compromised and premature children (oral health need to be further investigated.

  1. Delivering Physical Education in selected schools in Soweto, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delivering Physical Education in selected schools in Soweto, South Africa: ... Principals and sport masters of all five schools made up the 10 interviewees. ... preparedness of teachers, as well as the level of motivation and workload of teachers.

  2. Maximising the potential of social media to deliver academic library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maximising the potential of social media to deliver academic library services to ... that academic libraries in Kenya are currently using Facebook, WhatsApp, ... The Technical University of Kenya library, social media, social media marketing ...

  3. Capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care by community pharmacies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The capacity of community pharmacies to deliver pharmaceutical care was studied ... Ninety five percent (95%) of the respondents always educated customers on ... of the principles of Millennium Development Goals and pharmaceutical care ...

  4. Efficiency of the Thermal Jacket on the Delivered Temperature of Prewarmed Crystalloid Intravenous Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    right caused by metabolic acidosis . Metabolic acidosis ac,-ompanies ihe peripheral vasoconstriction seen with hypothermia. Functionally, then, the...fibrillation is still in doubt (Howland, Schweizer, Boyan, & Dotto, 1955). Hyperkalemia or citrate intoxication with resultant hypocalcemia was thought to...of administraion was not the only factor responsible. 20 Other possible factors contributing to cardic dysrhythmias incuded ..........- hyperkalemia

  5. Multi-Cell Thermal Battery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The multi-cell thermal battery (MCTB) is a device that can recover a large fraction of the thermal energy from heated regolith and subsequently apply this energy to...

  6. Non-Dam Alternatives for Delivering Water Services at Least Cost and Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Totten

    2010-06-01

    We present evidence that a value-adding and risk-minimising water planning process can be achieved by shifting from the conventional focus on supply expansion to one that concentrates on efficiently delivering services at and near the point of use. The State of California has two decades of experience with this approach, demonstrating that market-based policy and regulatory innovations can unleash efficiency gains resulting in more utility water services and energy services delivered with less supply expansion at lower costs, while minimising climate-change risk, pollution and the social cost that accompany large infrastructural projects. Efficiency in delivered water services could be accomplished with investments in the range of US$10-25 billion annually, while obviating the need for spending hundreds of billions of dollars on more expensive hydropower and related infrastructural expansion projects. The shift to a regulatory system that encompasses cost-effective end-use efficiency improvements in delivering water and energy services could eliminate the need for an estimated half of all proposed dams globally, thus allowing for the maintenance of other ecosystem service benefits and offer the best hopes of meeting basic human needs for water at a more achievable level of investment.

  7. Thermomechanical analysis of large deployable space reflector antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarev Viktor S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article results of large reflector thermal condition forecast using modern numerical simulation methods are presented. The results of thermal analysis are complemented with stress-strain analysis results of the whole structure under thermal loads.

  8. DECOVALEX III III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (comp.) [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Staub, Isabelle (comp.) [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Knight, Les (comp.) [Nirex UK Ltd, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability

  9. Holographic thermalization in noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational collapse of a dust shell in noncommutative geometry is probed by the renormalized geodesic length and minimal area surface, which are dual to the two-point correlation function and expectation value of Wilson loop in the dual conformal field theory. For the spacetime without a horizon, we find the shell will not collapse all the time but will stop in a stable state. For the spacetime with a horizon, we investigate how the noncommutative parameter affects the thermalization process in detail. From the numeric results, we find that larger the noncommutative parameter is, longer the thermalization time is, which implies that the large noncommutative parameter delays the thermalization process. From the fitted functions of the thermalization curve, we find for both thermalization probes, there is a phase transition point during the thermalization process, which divides the thermalization into an acceleration phase and a deceleration phase. During the acceleration phase, the acceleration is found to ...

  10. Thermal performance and heat transport in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.; Doornenbal, P.J.; Drijver, B.C.; Gaans, van P.F.M.; Leusbrock, I.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is used for seasonal storage of large quantities of thermal energy. Due to the increasing demand for sustainable energy, the number of ATES systems has increased rapidly, which has raised questions on the effect of ATES systems on their surroundings as well as t

  11. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    be widely used also in the field of medicine. Implementation of every new technology in a daily clinical practice requires large number of measurements with such equipment compared by reference method for the purpose of clinical validation. The knowledge of measurement problematics is crucial. Collaboration between physicians and engineers on multi- and interdisciplinary level is of high importance for thermal imaging to win confidence of physicians and to gain reliability as a clinical diagnostic tool.

  12. DECOVALEX III III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (comp.) [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Staub, Isabelle (comp.) [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Knight, Les (comp.) [Nirex UK Ltd, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability

  13. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  14. Novel Battery Management System with Distributed Wireless and Fiber Optic Sensors for Early Detection and Suppression of Thermal Runaway in Large Battery Packs, FY13 Q4 Report, ARPA-E Program: Advanced Management Protection of Energy Storage Devices (AMPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zumstein, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kovotsky, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Puglia, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobley, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osswald, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolf, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kaschmitter, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eaves, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-08

    at various temperatures, thereby enabling earlier warning of thermal runaway than possible with external sensors. Ultimately, the team plans to extend this work to include: (12) flexible wireless controllers, also using Bluetooth 4.0 standard, essential for balancing large-scale battery packs. LLNL received $925K for this project, and has $191K remaining after accomplishing these objectives.

  15. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  16. Thermal effect of climate change on groundwater-fed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick; Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Dunham, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater temperature changes will lag surface temperature changes from a changing climate. Steady state solutions of the heat-transport equations are used to identify key processes that control the long-term thermal response of springs and other groundwater discharge to climate change, in particular changes in (1) groundwater recharge rate and temperature and (2) land-surface temperature transmitted through the vadose zone. Transient solutions are developed to estimate the time required for new thermal signals to arrive at ecosystems. The solution is applied to the volcanic Medicine Lake highlands, California, USA, and associated springs complexes that host groundwater-dependent ecosystems. In this system, upper basin groundwater temperatures are strongly affected only by recharge conditions. However, as the vadose zone thins away from the highlands, changes in the average annual land-surface temperature also influence groundwater temperatures. Transient response to temperature change depends on both the conductive time scale and the rate at which recharge delivers heat. Most of the thermal response of groundwater at high elevations will occur within 20 years of a shift in recharge temperatures, but the large lower elevation springs will respond more slowly, with about half of the conductive response occurring within the first 20 years and about half of the advective response to higher recharge temperatures occurring in approximately 60 years.

  17. Thermal Nanosystems and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Volz, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer laws for conduction, radiation and convection change when the dimensions of the systems in question shrink. The altered behaviours can be used efficiently in energy conversion, respectively bio- and high-performance materials to control microelectronic devices. To understand and model those thermal mechanisms, specific metrologies have to be established. This book provides an overview of actual devices and materials involving micro-nanoscale heat transfer mechanisms. These are clearly explained and exemplified by a large spectrum of relevant physical models, while the most advanced nanoscale thermal metrologies are presented.

  18. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-09-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high-performance thermal devices. Here, it is shown through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase-dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25-much larger than those of other thermal diodes (<8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized to tune the phase transition temperature of the crystalline portion, enabling thermal diodes capable of operating at different temperatures. This work will be instrumental to the design of high performance, inexpensive, and easily processible thermal devices, based on which thermal circuits can be built to ultimately enable phononic computing.

  19. Effectiveness of an Electronic Booster Session Delivered to Mandated Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linowski, Sally A; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Fedorchak, Diane; Puleo, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    College student drinking continues to be a problem in the United States. Students who have violated campus alcohol policy are at particularly high risk for dangerous drinking. While Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) has been found to be an effective strategy in reducing high-risk drinking and associated consequences, questions remain about ways to further reduce risk or sustain changes associated with a face-to face intervention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a computer-delivered personalized feedback (electronic booster) delivered to policy violators who completed a mandated BASICS program. At 3-month post-intervention, 346 participants (60.4% male and 39.6% female) were randomized to one of two conditions: assessment only (n = 171) or electronic booster feedback (n = 175). Follow-up assessments were given to all participants at 3, 6, and 12-month post-initial intervention. Both groups showed reductions in drinking after the in-person BASICS intervention, but no additional reductions were seen with the addition of an electronic booster session. Findings suggest that although brief motivational interventions delivered in person to mandated students have been shown to be effective with mandated students, there is no additional benefit from an electronic booster session delivered 3-month post-intervention for this population.

  20. The Challenges of Globalisation: Delivering an MBA Programme in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dence, Roger; O'Toole, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of delivering an MBA (Master in Business Administration) program in Eritrea (North East Africa) through the United Kingdom's Open University. Discusses tutoring teams that travel to Eritrea, localizing case examples and assignments, sensitivity to local cultural contexts, writing assignments, student assessment, and…

  1. Lessons from VET Providers Delivering Degrees: Case Studies. Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Victor J.; Bowman, Kaye

    2015-01-01

    The recent growth in the number of registered vocational education and training (VET) providers delivering associate degrees and bachelor degrees in their own right has been well publicized. However, little is known about why these VET providers have made this transition, what support is being provided to their staff and students, and how the…

  2. Justice Delivered Locally : Systems, Challenges, and Innovations in Solomon Islands

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the research findings of the Justice Delivered Locally (JDL) initiative of Solomon Islands' Ministry of Justice and Legal Affairs, which was supported by the World Bank's Justice for the Poor (J4P) program. JDL supports the Solomon Islands Government (SIG) policy of reinvigorating local-level justice systems. This is based on an understanding that developmentally impor...

  3. Designing and Delivering Intensive Interventions: A Teacher's Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christy S.; Coleman, Meghan A.; Vaughn, Sharon; Wanzek, Jeanne; Roberts, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This toolkit provides activities and resources to assist practitioners in designing and delivering intensive interventions in reading and mathematics for K-12 students with significant learning difficulties and disabilities. Grounded in research, this toolkit is based on the Center on Instruction's "Intensive Interventions for Students Struggling…

  4. Frequency Activated Fast Power Reserve for Wind Power Plant Delivered from Stored Kinetic Energy in the Wind Turbine Inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Thuring, P.; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    is proposed that delivers a short-term power reserve from the kinetic energy in the wind turbine (WT) inertia, while considering the inherent characteristics of a wind power plant. The aim is to contribute with a fast power reserve to stabilize the frequency drop during large and sudden production deficits...

  5. Energy Efficiency Enhancement of Photovoltaics by Phase Change Materials through Thermal Energy Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV panels convert a certain amount of incident solar radiation into electricity, while the rest is converted to heat, leading to a temperature rise in the PV. This elevated temperature deteriorates the power output and induces structural degradation, resulting in reduced PV lifespan. One potential solution entails PV thermal management employing active and passive means. The traditional passive means are found to be largely ineffective, while active means are considered to be energy intensive. A passive thermal management system using phase change materials (PCMs can effectively limit PV temperature rises. The PCM-based approach however is cost inefficient unless the stored thermal energy is recovered effectively. The current article investigates a way to utilize the thermal energy stored in the PCM behind the PV for domestic water heating applications. The system is evaluated in the winter conditions of UAE to deliver heat during water heating demand periods. The proposed system achieved a ~1.3% increase in PV electrical conversion efficiency, along with the recovery of ~41% of the thermal energy compared to the incident solar radiation.

  6. Polymer Nanofibers with Outstanding Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Stability: Fundamental Linkage between Molecular Characteristics and Macroscopic Thermal Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanofibers with high thermal conductivities and outstanding thermal stabilities are highly desirable in heat transfer-critical applications such as thermal management, heat exchangers and energy storage. In this work, we unlock the fundamental relations between the thermal conductivity and thermal stability of polymer nanofibers and their molecular characteristics by studying the temperature-induced phase transitions and thermal transport of a series of polymer nanofibers. Ten different polymer nanofibers with systematically chosen molecular structures are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We found that high thermal conductivity and good thermal stability can be achieved in polymers with rigid backbones, exemplified by {\\pi}-conjugated polymers, due to suppressed segmental rotations and large phonon group velocities. The low probability of segmental rotation does not only prevent temperature-induced phase transition but also enables long phonon mean free paths due to reduced di...

  7. Topically applied methotrexate is rapidly delivered into skin by fractional laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem; Lerche, Catharina; Vissing, Anne-Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Methotrexate (MTX) is a chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects. This study investigated kinetics and biodistribution of MTX delivered topically by ablative fractional laser (AFXL). Methods: In vitro passive diffusion of 10 mg/ml MTX (1 w...... of 690 µm ablation depth, lined by the 47 µm thermal coagulation zone (CZ). Quantitatively, MTX was detectable by HPLC in mid-dermis after 15 min, significantly exceeded deposition in intact skin after 1.5 h, and saturated skin after 7 h at a 10-fold increased MTX-deposition versus intact skin (3.08 vs 0.......30 mg/cm3, p = 0.002). Transdermal permeation was saturation, and increased up to 8.0% after 24 h. Qualitatively, MTX distributed into CZ within 15 min (p = 0.015) and further into surrounding dermal tissue after 1.5 h (p = 0.004). After skin saturation at 7 h, MTX...

  8. Efficacy of photothermal ablation using intravenously delivered NIR-absorbing nanorods in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Glenn P.; Payne, J. Donald; Sharp, Kelly; Bao, LiLi; Sang, Kristina L.

    2009-02-01

    The use of near-infrared absorbing nanoparticles recently has been proposed for the minimally invasive photothermal ablation of solid tumors, and this approach currently is being investigated in the clinic. One class of nanoparticles, gold nanorods, has been investigated for the ablation of various cancer types using both direct injection and systemic delivery. Here we investigate the photothermal ablation of colon cancer in an animal model using intravenously delivered gold nanorods. Nanorods with an aspect ratio of ~3.2 and an extinction peak of 774 nm were PEGylated, suspended in an isotonic solution, and infused into the tail vein of BALB/c mice bearing subcutaneous CT26.wt murine colon cancer tumors. After 24 hrs, an isotropic laser fiber was inserted through a small incision in the skin to a point proximate to and beneath the tumor. The area was illuminated with 3.5 W average power for 3 minutes. Control groups consisted of laser-only, nanorod-only and untreated tumored animals. The survival of the animals receiving nanorod-based photothermal ablation was statistically longer than the control groups with >44% complete response. This work demonstrates the promise of systemically delivering nanoparticles to tumors for thermal ablation

  9. Internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Mats; Andersson, Gerhard; Magnusson, Kristoffer; Johansson, Tomas; Sjögren, Johan; Håkansson, Andreas; Pettersson, Magnus; Kadowaki, Åsa; Cuijpers, Pim; Carlbring, Per

    2016-02-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a disabling condition which can be treated with cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). The present study tested the effects of therapist-guided internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy on symptoms of GAD and quality of life. An audio CD with acceptance and mindfulness exercises and a separate workbook were also included in the treatment. Participants diagnosed with GAD (N = 103) were randomly allocated to immediate therapist-guided internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy or to a waiting-list control condition. A six month follow-up was also included. Results using hierarchical linear modelling showed moderate to large effects on symptoms of GAD (Cohen's d = 0.70 to 0.98), moderate effects on depressive symptoms (Cohen's d = 0.51 to 0.56), and no effect on quality of life. Follow-up data showed maintained effects. While there was a 20% dropout rate, sensitivity analyses showed that dropouts did not differ in their degree of change during treatment. To conclude, our study suggests that internet-delivered acceptance-based behaviour therapy can be effective in reducing the symptoms of GAD.

  10. Design and analysis of the NFIRAOS thermal optics enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Joeleff; Andersen, David; Atwood, Jenny; Byrnes, Peter; Herriot, Glen; Hill, Alexis; Szeto, Kei

    2016-08-01

    The Narrow Field InfraRed Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) will be the first-light facility adaptive optics system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). In order to meet the optical performance and stability specifications essential to leveraging the extraordinary capabilities of the TMT, all of the optical components within NFIRAOS will be protected within a large thermally-controlled optics enclosure (ENCL). Among the many functions performed by the ENCL, the most critical functions include providing a highly stable, light-tight, cold, dry environment maintained at 243±0.5 K for the NFIRAOS opto-mechanical sub-systems and supporting TABL structure. Although the performance of the ENCL during the science operation of NFIRAOS is critical, the maximum thermal loading will be defined by the cooldown/ warm-up cycle which must be accomplished within a time-frame that will minimize the on-sky operational impact due to daytime maintenance work. This study describes the thermal/mechanical design development and supporting analyses (analytical and finite element analyses (FEA)) completed during the preliminary design phase and through the current progression of the ENCL final design phase. The walls of the ENCL consist of interlocking, multilayered, thermally insulated panels, which are supported by an externally located structural framework which attaches to the NFIRAOS Instrument Support Structure. The regulation of the interior ENCL wall surface temperature to within ±0.5 K requires that the heat flux into the interior of NFIRAOS be eliminated by cooling a thermal conduction plate embedded between multiple layers of insulation. The thermal design of the enclosure was evaluated for both steady-state (SS) performance and transient performance (cool-down and warm-up cycles). The transient analysis utilizes a hybrid of a one-dimensional thermal network approach combined with three-dimensional conjugate heat transfer analyses of explicit opto-mechanical components within

  11. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor;

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  12. Delivering innovation and choice in water supply in Kenya's informal settlements

    OpenAIRE

    O'Regan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Improved access to water and sanitation in the worlds slums were among the key targets in the Millennium Development Goals. In Kenya, water is generally accessed in slum areas by filling 20l jerrycans at standposts and water kiosks and carrying back to households, with residents paying up to nine times more than utility bulk water prices and spending large parts of their day collecting water. The aim of this research was to assess consumers’ response and reaction to a series of water deliv...

  13. Solar thermal power systems. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    Each of DOE's solar Thermal Power Systems projects funded and/or in existence during FY 1978 is described and the status as of September 30, 1978 is reflected. These projects are divided as follows: small thermal power applications, large thermal power applications, and advanced thermal technology. Also included are: 1978 project summary tables, bibliography, and an alphabetical index of contractors. (MHR)

  14. Matrix Thermalization

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Nguyen, Kévin

    2016-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  15. Delivering Collaborative Web Labs as a Service for Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bochicchio, Mario A.; Antonella Longo

    2012-01-01

    As Internet speed grows up and academic networks reach more users, engineering schools take interest in online laboratories as a mean to increase the spectrum of offered services and to reduce costs by sharing expensive lab equipments. In this perspective, online labs must comply both with the scientific and pedagogic requirements coming from the lab users (students, researchers, …) and with the requirements coming from the administrative and technical staff in charge to manage and deliver th...

  16. FY-2E Delivered And FY-3A Performs Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The FY-2E meteorological satellite was delivered to China Meteorological Administration (CMA) on May 19, 2009. Developed by Shanghai Academy of Spacefiight Technology (SAST), a subsidiary of CASC, the satellite was launched atop a LM-3A from Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC). The satellite passed in-orbit testing on February 28,2009 and all the onboard systems performed well when the satellite was in the Earth's shadow.

  17. Delivering business analytics practical guidelines for best practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stubbs, Evan

    2013-01-01

    AVOID THE MISTAKES THAT OTHERS MAKE - LEARN WHAT LEADS TO BEST PRACTICE AND KICKSTART SUCCESS This groundbreaking resource provides comprehensive coverage across all aspects of business analytics, presenting proven management guidelines to drive sustainable differentiation. Through a rich set of case studies, author Evan Stubbs reviews solutions and examples to over twenty common problems spanning managing analytics assets and information, leveraging technology, nurturing skills, and defining processes. Delivering Business Analytics also outlines the Data Scientist's Code, fifteen principle

  18. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral treatment for adolescents with chronic pain and their parents: a randomized controlled multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Fales, Jessica; Bromberg, Maggie H; Jessen-Fiddick, Tricia; Tai, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Internet-delivered interventions are emerging as a strategy to address barriers to care for individuals with chronic pain. This is the first large multicenter randomized controlled trial of Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric chronic pain. Participants included were 273 adolescents (205 females and 68 males), aged 11 to 17 years with mixed chronic pain conditions and their parents, who were randomly assigned in a parallel-group design to Internet-delivered CBT (n = 138) or Internet-delivered Education (n = 135). Assessments were completed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. All data collection and procedures took place online. The primary analysis used linear growth models. Results demonstrated significantly greater reduction on the primary outcome of activity limitations from baseline to 6-month follow-up for Internet CBT compared with Internet education (b = -1.13, P = 0.03). On secondary outcomes, significant beneficial effects of Internet CBT were found on sleep quality (b = 0.14, P = 0.04), on reducing parent miscarried helping (b = -2.66, P = 0.007) and protective behaviors (b = -0.19, P = 0.001), and on treatment satisfaction (P values pain, and improvement in parent behavioral responses to pain). In conclusion, our Internet-delivered CBT intervention produced a number of beneficial effects on adolescent and parent outcomes, and could ultimately lead to wide dissemination of evidence-based psychological pain treatment for youth and their families.

  19. Thermal Hardware for the Thermal Analyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). NCTS 21070-1. Most Thermal analysts do not have a good background into the hardware which thermally controls the spacecraft they design. SINDA and Thermal Desktop models are nice, but knowing how this applies to the actual thermal hardware (heaters, thermostats, thermistors, MLI blanketing, optical coatings, etc...) is just as important. The course will delve into the thermal hardware and their application techniques on actual spacecraft. Knowledge of how thermal hardware is used and applied will make a thermal analyst a better engineer.

  20. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty CO2 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and CO2 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not acurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  1. Delivering digital health and well-being at scale: lessons learned during the implementation of the dallas program in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, Alison M.; McGee-Lennon, Marily; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Agbakoba, Ruth; O'Connor, Siobhan; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Wyke, Sally; Watson, Nicholas; Browne, Susan; Frances S Mair

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify implementation lessons from the United Kingdom Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) program—a large-scale, national technology program that aims to deliver a broad range of digital services and products to the public to promote health and well-being.\\ud \\ud Materials and Methods: Prospective, longitudinal qualitative research study investigating implementation processes. Qualitative data collected includes semi-structured e-Health Implementation Toolk...

  2. Thermal treatment for nanofibrous membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinylidene fluoride nanofibrous membranes with high porosity, large electrolyte solution uptake, and adequate mechanical properties were prepared by electrospinning. The physical properties of the electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride membranes can be improved by thermal treatment. Results showed after the thermal treatment, there had appeared ever-increasing tensile strength and elongation of the poly(vinylidene fluoride membranes. The crystal structures of poly(vinylidene fluoride fibers were greatly improved.

  3. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects.

  4. Internet delivered diabetes self-management education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Katherine; Phillips, Beth; Johnson, Constance; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: "type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education" and "type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education." The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Internet-delivered diabetes education has the added benefit of easier access for many individuals, and patients can self-pace themselves through materials. More research on the cost-benefits of Internet diabetes education and best methods to maintain patient engagement are needed, along with more studies assessing the long-term impact of Internet-delivered DSME.

  5. Thermal Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Gateway Technologies, Inc. is marketing and developing textile insulation technology originally developed by Triangle Research and Development Corporation. The enhanced thermal insulation stems from Small Business Innovation Research contracts from NASA's Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Air Force. The effectiveness of the insulation comes from the microencapsulated phase-change materials originally made to keep astronauts gloved hands warm. The applications for the product range from outer wear, housing insulation, and blankets to protective firefighting gear and scuba diving suits. Gateway has developed and begun marketing thermal regulating products under the trademark, OUTLAST. Products made from OUTLAST are already on the market, including boot and shoe liners, winter headgear, hats and caps for hunting and other outdoor sports, and a variety of men's and women's ski gloves.

  6. On-Orbit Health Monitoring and Repair Assessment of Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers On-orbit health MoNItoring and repair assessment of THERMal protection systems (OMNI_THERM). OMNI_THERM features impedance-based...

  7. Using Behavioral Economics to Design Physician Incentives That Deliver High-Value Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Ubel, Peter A; Kessler, Judd B; Meyer, Gregg; Muller, Ralph W; Navathe, Amol S; Patel, Pankaj; Pearl, Robert; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Sacks, Lee; Sen, Aditi P; Sherman, Paul; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-01-19

    Behavioral economics provides insights about the development of effective incentives for physicians to deliver high-value care. It suggests that the structure and delivery of incentives can shape behavior, as can thoughtful design of the decision-making environment. This article discusses several principles of behavioral economics, including inertia, loss aversion, choice overload, and relative social ranking. Whereas these principles have been applied to motivate personal health decisions, retirement planning, and savings behavior, they have been largely ignored in the design of physician incentive programs. Applying these principles to physician incentives can improve their effectiveness through better alignment with performance goals. Anecdotal examples of successful incentive programs that apply behavioral economics principles are provided, even as the authors recognize that its application to the design of physician incentives is largely untested, and many outstanding questions exist. Application and rigorous evaluation of infrastructure changes and incentives are needed to design payment systems that incentivize high-quality, cost-conscious care.

  8. Industrial thermal insulation: an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, R.G.; Tennery, V.J.; McElroy, D.L.; Godfrey, T.G.; Kolb, J.O.

    1976-03-01

    A large variety of thermal insulation materials is manufactured for application in various temperature ranges and environments. Additional and improved thermal insulation for steam systems is a key area with immediate energy conservation potential in several of the larger energy-consuming industries. Industrial thermal insulation technology was assessed by obtaining input from a variety of sources including insulation manufacturers, system designers, installers, users, consultants, measurement laboratories, open literature, and in-house knowledge. The assessment identified a number of factors relevant to insulation materials and usage that could contribute significantly to improved energy conservation.

  9. Confocal epifluorescence detection for microspheres delivered on disposable microfluidic chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Honghua Hu; Xiyun Hou; Guoguang Yang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system for 5-μm microspheres delivered on microfluidic chip is presented employing confocal optical scheme. The parameters of the optical system are specifically optimized for single microsphere detection. With the excitation laser spot size of 4.6 μm and optical sectioning power of 27 μm, the lowest concentration detection limit is 0.45 nmol/L, corresponding to only 122 molecules in probe volume. The microsphere detection is carried on successfully with the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55.7, which provides good detection sensitivity.

  10. Delivering a Remote Laboratory Course within an Undergraduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Azad

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the offering of anundergraduate laboratory course over the Internet. Thepaper provides a brief description of a modular Internetbasedlaboratory facility using commercially availablehardware and software, in-built password control and usertracking, and simultaneously accessibility to multipleclients. The modules are adaptable with a variety oflaboratory experiments with little effort. The facility wasused to deliver a remote laboratory course for anundergraduate digital electronics laboratory. An evaluationscheme was implemented to assess the effectiveness of thesystem as well students’ learning outcomes. In-builtcapability to collect systems’ operational data and weeklysurvey are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the system,while pre- and post-tests

  11. Bench Crater Meteorite: Hydrated Asteroidal Material Delivered to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, K. H.; Messenger, S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Frank, D. R.; Kring, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    D/H measurements from the lunar regolith agglutinates [8] indicate mixing between a low D/H solar implanted component and additional higher D/H sources (e.g., meteoritic/ cometary/volcanic gases). We have determined the range and average D/H ratio of Bench Crater meteorite, which is the first direct D/H analysis of meteoritic material delivered to the lunar surface. This result provides an important ground truth for future investigations of lunar water resources by missions to the Moon.

  12. Twin delivery: how should the second twin be delivered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, P; Rydhström, H

    1985-11-01

    In a series of 803 pairs of twins born between 1973 and 1982, 0.33% of second twins were delivered by cesarean section after vaginal delivery of the first twin. During the last year the frequency has increased to 7%, calling attention to the problem of declining obstetric skills and experience. This has caused us to update the routines of intrapartum management of twin gestations. In the present program only commonly available obstetric techniques are used. The potentially hazardous twin delivery is excluded from a trial of vaginal delivery. Hopefully, the program will help other obstetricians to decide in favor of vaginal delivery in selected twin gestations.

  13. The role of accountable care organizations in delivering value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Kevin; Depalma, Andres; Joseph, Vilma; Cobelli, Neil; Sharan, Alok

    2012-12-01

    The goal of Accountable Care Organizations is to improve patient outcomes while maximizing the value of the services provided. This will be achieved through the use of performance and quality measures that facilitate efficient, cost-effective, evidence-based care. By creating a network connecting primary care physicians, specialists, rehabilitation facilities and hospitals, patient care should be maximized while at the same time delivering appropriate value for those services provided. The Medicare Shared Savings Program will financially reward ACOs that meet performance standards while at the same time lowering costs. The orthopaedic surgeon can only benefit by understanding how to participate in and negotiate the complexities of these organizations.

  14. Delivering Sustainability Through Supply Chain Distribution Network Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Ravet

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - Companies could gain (cost, service, green/sustainable competitive advantage through the supply chain network. The goal of this article is to study how to deliver sustainability through the supply chain distribution network redesign.Design/methodology/approach - A literature review is conducted to examine research relating to sustainable supply chain strategies and supply chain distribution network redesign.Findings - A study of the supply chain literature reveals the importance to rethink the supply chain distribution network design and to treat sustainability as integral to operations.

  15. Hipparcos to deliver its final results catalogue soon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    them, almost 30 years ago, to propose carrying out these observations from the relatively benign environment of space. Hipparcos is, by present standards, a medium-sized satellite, with a 30 cm telescope sensing simply ordinary light. But it has been described as the most imaginative in the short history of space astronomy. This foresight has been amply repaid. In the long history of stargazing it ranks with the surveys by Hipparchus the Greek in the 2nd Century BC and by Tichy Brahe the Dane in the 16th Century AD, both of which transformed human perceptions of the Universe. Positions derived from the Hipparcos satellite are better than a millionth of a degree, and newly a thousand times more accurate than star positions routinely determined from he ground. This accuracy makes it possible to measure directly the distances to the stars. While it took 250 years between astronomers first setting out on the exacting task of measuring the distance to a star, and a stellar distance being measured for the first time, ESA's Hipparcos mission has revolutionised this long, painstaking, and fundamental task by measuring accurate distances and movements of more than one hundred thousand. The measurement concept involved he satellite triangulating its way between he stars all wound the sky, building up a celestial map in much the same way as land surveyors use triangulation between hill-tops to measure distances accurately. Only the angles involved are much smaller : the accuracy that has been achieved with the Hipparcos Catalogue is such that he two edges of a coin, viewed from he other side of the Atlantic Ocean, could be distinguished. The results from Hipparcos will deliver scientists with long-awaited details of our place in he Milky Way Galaxy. Most of he stars visible to the naked eye are, to a large extent, companions of the Sun, in a great orbital march around the centre of the Galaxy, a journey so long that it takes individual stars 250 million years to complete, in

  16. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Klaudia U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Fernandes, Laura L. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cornwall, Craig [Department of Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  17. Constraining Non-thermal and Thermal properties of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupal eDev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially with the primordial bath or remain non-thermal throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being non-thermal, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and non-thermal regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the non-thermal DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF BIRTHS DELIVERED IN A UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Senih MAYDA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the records of the births delivered in the Hospital of Duzce Medical School to determine the frequency of low birth weight, stillbirth, sezerian ratio; the relation between these variables and age of mother, number of pregnancy, birth weight, sex of the baby, way of the delivery. Data of this descriptive study was obtained from all the records of births delivered in this hospital from February 2001 to 2005 October. Number of total births according to the records was 2562. According to 2495 (97.4% birth records in which data if the baby was stillbirth or not had been written the number of stillbirth was 112 (4.5%. According to 2491 (97.25 birth records data about birth weight had been written the number of babies with low birth weight (less than 2500 gr was 564 (22.6%. Stillbirth was found related with low birth weight (x2=193.186, p<0.001; and low birth weight with female sex of the baby (x2 = 16.16, p<0.001, and less than 19 years of mothers’ ages. Of 2521 births, 1190 (47.2% was cesarean section. The results of this study showed that birth record of this hospital hasn’t included the data which must be at birth records. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(6.000: 408-415

  19. Expert assessment concludes negative emissions scenarios may not deliver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Naomi E.; Gough, Clair

    2016-09-01

    Many integrated assessment models (IAMs) rely on the availability and extensive use of biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) to deliver emissions scenarios consistent with limiting climate change to below 2 °C average temperature rise. BECCS has the potential to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, delivering ‘negative emissions’. The deployment of BECCS at the scale assumed in IAM scenarios is highly uncertain: biomass energy is commonly used but not at such a scale, and CCS technologies have been demonstrated but not commercially established. Here we present the results of an expert elicitation process that explores the explicit and implicit assumptions underpinning the feasibility of BECCS in IAM scenarios. Our results show that the assumptions are considered realistic regarding technical aspects of CCS but unrealistic regarding the extent of bioenergy deployment, and development of adequate societal support and governance structures for BECCS. The results highlight concerns about the assumed magnitude of carbon dioxide removal achieved across a full BECCS supply chain, with the greatest uncertainty in bioenergy production. Unrealistically optimistic assumptions regarding the future availability of BECCS in IAM scenarios could lead to the overshoot of critical warming limits and have significant impacts on near-term mitigation options.

  20. Delivering the Goods for Genome Engineering and Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Kristian Alsbjerg; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2015-08-01

    A basic understanding of genome evolution and the life and impact of microorganisms, like viruses and bacteria, has been fundamental in the quest for efficient genetic therapies. The expanding tool box for genetic engineering now contains transposases, recombinases, and nucleases, all created from naturally occurring genome-modifying proteins. Whereas conventional gene therapies have sought to establish sustained expression of therapeutic genes, genomic tools are needed only in a short time window and should be delivered to cells ideally in a balanced "hit-and-run" fashion. Current state-of-the-art delivery strategies are based on intracellular production of protein from transfected plasmid DNA or in vitro-transcribed RNA, or from transduced viral templates. Here, we discuss advantages and challenges of intracellular production strategies and describe emerging approaches based on the direct delivery of protein either by transfer of recombinant protein or by lentiviral protein transduction. With focus on adapting viruses for protein delivery, we describe the concept of "all-in-one" lentiviral particles engineered to codeliver effector proteins and donor sequences for DNA transposition or homologous recombination. With optimized delivery methods-based on transferring DNA, RNA, or protein-it is no longer far-fetched that researchers in the field will indeed deliver the goods for somatic gene therapies.

  1. Behavior of nanoporous thermal barrier coatings under cyclic thermal loading. Computer-aided simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, D. D., E-mail: mdd@ispms.tsc.ru; Maksimov, P. V., E-mail: mdd@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Sciences SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Panin, S. V., E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru; Panin, V. E., E-mail: paninve@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Sciences SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Berto, F., E-mail: berto@gest.unipd.it [University of Padua, Vicenza, 36100 Italy (Italy)

    2015-10-27

    The work presents the development of new algorithms for calculating the fraction of thermal energy dissipated during the irradiation on the inner surface of pores. On the basis of these algorithms, the simulation of heat transfer in three-layered systems was carried out taking into account the dissipation of thermal energy in specimens having different porosity. We have performed quantitative estimates of the portion of dissipating thermal energy and its influence on the distribution of thermal stresses in thermal barrier coating systems. It was demonstrated that the presence of pores with a large internal surface area in the intermediate layer material enables two-fold decrease of the internal thermal stresses.

  2. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Varadhan, S R S

    2016-01-01

    The theory of large deviations deals with rates at which probabilities of certain events decay as a natural parameter in the problem varies. This book, which is based on a graduate course on large deviations at the Courant Institute, focuses on three concrete sets of examples: (i) diffusions with small noise and the exit problem, (ii) large time behavior of Markov processes and their connection to the Feynman-Kac formula and the related large deviation behavior of the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk, and (iii) interacting particle systems, their scaling limits, and large deviations from their expected limits. For the most part the examples are worked out in detail, and in the process the subject of large deviations is developed. The book will give the reader a flavor of how large deviation theory can help in problems that are not posed directly in terms of large deviations. The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with probability, Markov processes, and interacting particle systems.

  3. Advanced thermal control for spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert; Parker, Kelsey

    2015-09-01

    In optical systems just like any other space borne system, thermal control plays an important role. In fact, most advanced designs are plagued with volume constraints that further complicate the thermal control challenges for even the most experienced systems engineers. Peregrine will present advances in satellite thermal control based upon passive heat transfer technologies to dissipate large thermal loads. This will address the use of 700 W/m K and higher conducting products that are five times better than aluminum on a specific basis providing enabling thermal control while maintaining structural support.

  4. Controlling torque and cutting costs: steerable drill bits deliver in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Steve; Garcia, Alexis; Amorim, Dalmo [ReedHycalog, Stonehouse (United Kingdom); Iramina, Wilson [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Herrera, Gabriel

    2008-07-01

    Tool face Control is widely regarded as one of the greatest directional drilling challenges with a Fixed Cutter (FC) drill bit on a Steerable Motor assembly. Tool face offset is proportional to the torque generated by the bit, and by nature, FC bits are capable of generating high levels of torque. If large changes in downhole torque are produced while drilling, this will cause rotation of the drill string, and loss of tool face orientation. This results in inefficient drilling and increases risk of bit and downhole tool damage. This paper examines the effect of various FC drill bit components to determine the key design requirements to deliver a smooth torque response and an improved directional performance. Included is a review of the results from comprehensive laboratory testing to determine the effectiveness of a number of different configurations of removable Torque Controlling Components (TCC). These, in combination with specific cutting structure layouts, combine to provide predictable torque response while optimized for high rates of penetration. In addition, unique gauge geometry is disclosed that was engineered to reduce drag and deliver improved borehole quality. This gauge design produces less torque when sliding and beneficial gauge pad interaction with the borehole when in rotating mode. Field performance studies from within Latin America clearly demonstrate that matching TCC, an optimized cutting structure, and gauge geometry to a steerable assembly delivers smooth torque response and improved directional control. Benefits with regard to improved stability are also discussed. Successful application has resulted in significant time and cost savings for the operator, demonstrating that Stability and Steerability improvements can be achieved with an increase in penetration rate. (author)

  5. DOWNSCALE APPLICATION OF BOILER THERMAL CALCULATION APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Zelený, Zbynĕk; Hrdlička, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used thermal calculation methods are intended primarily for large scale boilers. Hot water small scale boilers, which are commonly used for home heating have many specifics, that distinguish them from large scale boilers especially steam boilers. This paper is focused on application of thermal calculation procedure that is designed for large scale boilers, on a small scale boiler for biomass combustion of load capacity 25 kW. Special issue solved here is influence of formation of dep...

  6. Thermal insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R.; Asada, Y.; Matsuo, Y.; Mikoda, M.

    1985-07-16

    A thermal insulator comprises an expanded resin body having embedded therein an evacuated powder insulation portion which consists of fine powder and a container of film-like plastics or a film-like composite of plastics and metal for enclosing the powder. The resin body has been expanded by a Freon gas as a blowing agent. Since a Freon gas has a larger molecular diameter than the constituent gases of air, it is less likely to permeate through the container than air. Thus present invention provides a novel composite insulator which fully utilizes the benefits of vacuum insulation without necessitating a strong and costly material for a vacuum container.

  7. Thermal Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵柳

    2011-01-01

    The group G of general coordinate transformations on the thermodynamic configuration space ε spanned by all the extensive variables keeps the first law of thermodynamics invariant. One can introduce a metric with Lorentzian signature on the space ε, with the corresponding line element also being invariant under the action of G. This line element is identi6ed as the square of the proper entropy. Thus the second law of thermodynamics is also formulated invariantly and this lays down the foundation for the principle of thermal relativity.

  8. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den

    2008-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory and applications of large deviations, a branch of probability theory that describes the probability of rare events in terms of variational problems. By focusing the theory, in Part A of the book, on random sequences, the author succeeds in conveying the main ideas behind large deviations without a need for technicalities, thus providing a concise and accessible entry to this challenging and captivating subject. The selection of modern applications, described in Part B of the book, offers a good sample of what large deviation theory is able to achieve

  9. SU-E-T-357: Electronic Compensation Technique to Deliver Total Body Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, T [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Wang, I; Podgorsak, M [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient’s immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has conventionally been used to compensate for the varying thickness through the entire body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern electronic compensation technique to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Methods: Treatment plans utilizing electronic compensation to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Each treatment plan includes two, specifically weighted, pair of opposed fields. One pair of open, large fields (collimator=45°), to encompass the patient’s entire anatomy, and one pair of smaller fields (collimator=0°) focused only on the thicker midsection of the patient. The optimal fluence for each one of the smaller fields was calculated at a patient specific penetration depth. Irregular surface compensators provide a more uniform dose distribution within the smaller opposed fields. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the evaluating the electronic compensation technique. In one case, the maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the non-compensated 195.8% to 165.3% in the electronically compensated plans, indicating a more uniform dose with the region of electronic compensation. The mean body doses calculated from the DVH were also reduced from the non-compensated 120.6% to 112.7% in the electronically compensated plans, indicating a more accurate delivery of the prescription dose. All calculated monitor units were well within clinically acceptable limits. Conclusion: Electronic compensation technique for TBI will not substantially increase the beam on time while it can significantly reduce the compensator

  10. 大型抽水蓄能机组热工保护设置与应用%Setting and Application of Thermal Protections for Large Pumped-storage Power Units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭煜民

    2012-01-01

    The unit of pumped -storage power station will be run in many different conditions and switched between them frequently. The thermal protections have important roles on the normal operation of units and the mitigation of accidents. The thermal protections, including temperature protection, pressure and pressure difference protection, flow protection, liquid level protection, displacement/position protection, vibration protection, over-speed protection and powerhouse flooded protection, are analyzed in detail herein. The experiences can be as references to the design of other pumped-storage power stations.%抽水蓄能电站机组运行工况多且工况转换频繁,热工保护对机组正常运行、避免扩大事故有着举足轻重的作用.对热工保护中的温度保护、压力压差保护、流量保护、液位保护、位移(位置)保护、振动保护、过速保护及水淹厂房等保护做了详细的分析与说明,可供其他抽水蓄能电站进行热工保护设计时借鉴.

  11. Delivering quality pain management: the challenge for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Kim; Gordon, Debra B

    2015-03-01

    The delivery of high-quality pain management in the perioperative environment can be challenging and difficult to quantify. Commonly used tools in delivering care, such as pain intensity ratings, individual pain experience reporting, assessments of individual patients' expectations, and patient satisfaction scores, have limitations and are not always useful when addressing quality improvement measures. Despite clinical advances in pain management, patients continue to experience inadequate pain control and inconsistent pain management practices. In this article, we discuss the challenges in providing consistent quality pain management, the need for a coordinated plan of care with a goal of meeting desired pain outcomes, and the essential role that perianesthesia and perioperative nurses play throughout the transitions in perioperative care to promote optimal pain management interventions based on the patient's individual needs.

  12. Delivering cervical cancer prevention services in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J; Barone, M; Mahé, C; Lewis, R; Luciani, S

    2005-05-01

    The goals of any cervical cancer prevention program should be threefold: to achieve high coverage of the population at risk, to screen women with an accurate test as part of high-quality services, and to ensure that women with positive test results are properly managed. This article focuses on the experiences of the Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) in delivery of screening and treatment services as part of cervical cancer prevention projects in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Research and experience show that cervical cancer can be prevented when strategies and services are well planned and well managed and when attention is paid to program monitoring and evaluation. Coordination of program components, reduction of the number of visits, improvement of service quality, and flexibility in how services are delivered are all essential features of an effective service.

  13. Adaptation finance: How can Durban deliver on past promises?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciplet, David; Roperts, J. Timmons; He, Linlang; Fields, Spencer [Brown University (United States); Khan, Mizan [North South University (Bangladesh)

    2011-11-15

    There is an ever-widening chasm between the support developing countries need to adapt to climate change, and the funding promised and delivered by wealthy nations. While UN climate meetings endlessly debate terms such as 'new and additional' or 'balanced allocation', even some basic commitments to adaptation funding are going unfulfilled. And as we approach the final year of the 'fast-start' phase for climate finance, there is no plan for the crucial 'scale-up' period of 2013–2019, when contributions must swell tenfold. At the Durban negotiations, countries should take three steps to ensure the developed world can meet its agreed responsibilities: establish funding sources based on international trade; define annual targets for the scale-up; and adopt a transparent, centralised accounting system.

  14. A Fetus with Iniencephaly Delivered at the Third Trimester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Cinar Tanriverdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Iniencephaly is an uncommon neural tube defect, having retroflexion of the head without a neck and severe distortion of the spine. Iniencephaly is classified into two groups, iniencephaly apertus (with encephalocele and iniencephaly clausus (without encephalocele. Incidence ranges from 0.1 to 10 in 10.000 pregnancies and it is seen more frequently in girls. Most of the fetuses with this defect die before birth or soon after birth, while those with the milder forms may live through childhood. Recurrence risk is around 1–5%. Family should be offered termination to reduce maternal risks and counseled for folic acid supplementation before the next planned pregnancy. Here we present a rare case of iniencephaly clausus which was diagnosed at 18th week of gestation by ultrasonography and delivered in the third trimester of pregnancy due to rejection of termination.

  15. Delivering sound energy along an arbitrary convex trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sipei; Hu, Yuxiang; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun; Burnett, Ian

    2014-10-15

    Accelerating beams have attracted considerable research interest due to their peculiar properties and various applications. Although there have been numerous research on the generation and application of accelerating light beams, few results have been published on the generation of accelerating acoustic beams. Here we report on the experimental observation of accelerating acoustic beams along arbitrary convex trajectories. The desired trajectory is projected to the spatial phase profile on the boundary which is discretized and sampled spatially. The sound field distribution is formulated with the Green function and the integral equation method. Both the paraxial and the non-paraxial regimes are examined and observed in the experiments. The effect of obstacle scattering in the sound field is also investigated and the results demonstrate that the approach is robust against obstacle scattering. The realization of accelerating acoustic beams will have an impact on various applications where acoustic information and energy are required to be delivered along an arbitrary convex trajectory.

  16. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesinger, K; Cuppett, D; Dyer, D

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with Kalwall building panels. An added feature of the Kalwall system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  17. Prediction of bone density around orthopedic implants delivering bisphosphonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Terrier, Alexandre; Gauthier, O; Bouler, J-M; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2009-06-19

    The fixation of an orthopedic implant depends strongly upon its initial stability. Peri-implant bone may resorb shortly after the surgery. This resorption is directly followed by new bone formation and implants fixation strengthening, the so-called secondary fixation. If the initial stability is not reached, the resorption continues and the implant fixation weakens, which leads to implant loosening. Studies with rats and dogs have shown that a solution to prevent peri-implant resorption is to deliver bisphosphonate from the implant surface. The aims of the study were, first, to develop a model of bone remodeling around an implant delivering bisphosphonate, second, to predict the bisphosphonate dose that would induce the maximal peri-implant bone density, and third to verify in vivo that peri-implant bone density is maximal with the calculated dose. The model consists of a bone remodeling equation and a drug diffusion equation. The change in bone density is driven by a mechanical stimulus and a drug stimulus. The drug stimulus function and the other numerical parameters were identified from experimental data. The model predicted that a dose of 0.3 microg of zoledronate on the implant would induce a maximal bone density. Implants with 0.3 microg of zoledronate were then implanted in rat femurs for 3, 6 and 9 weeks. We measured that peri-implant bone density was 4% greater with the calculated dose compared to the dose empirically described as best. The approach presented in this paper could be used in the design and analysis processes of experiments in local delivery of drug such as bisphosphonate.

  18. Forest conservation delivers highly variable coral reef conservation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Carissa J; Jupiter, Stacy D; Selig, Elizabeth R; Watts, Matthew E; Halpern, Benjamin S; Kamal, Muhammad; Roelfsema, Chris; Possingham, Hugh P

    2012-06-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by human activities on both the land (e.g., deforestation) and the sea (e.g., overfishing). Most conservation planning for coral reefs focuses on removing threats in the sea, neglecting management actions on the land. A more integrated approach to coral reef conservation, inclusive of land-sea connections, requires an understanding of how and where terrestrial conservation actions influence reefs. We address this by developing a land-sea planning approach to inform fine-scale spatial management decisions and test it in Fiji. Our aim is to determine where the protection of forest can deliver the greatest return on investment for coral reef ecosystems. To assess the benefits of conservation to coral reefs, we estimate their relative condition as influenced by watershed-based pollution and fishing. We calculate the cost-effectiveness of protecting forest and find that investments deliver rapidly diminishing returns for improvements to relative reef condition. For example, protecting 2% of forest in one area is almost 500 times more beneficial than protecting 2% in another area, making prioritization essential. For the scenarios evaluated, relative coral reef condition could be improved by 8-58% if all remnant forest in Fiji were protected rather than deforested. Finally, we determine the priority of each coral reef for implementing a marine protected area when all remnant forest is protected for conservation. The general results will support decisions made by the Fiji Protected Area Committee as they establish a national protected area network that aims to protect 20% of the land and 30% of the inshore waters by 2020. Although challenges remain, we can inform conservation decisions around the globe by tackling the complex issues relevant to integrated land-sea planning.

  19. An evaluation of a collaborative bibliotherapy scheme delivered via a library service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J; Vallance, D; McGrath, M

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of a bibliotherapy scheme delivered via a local library service, in conjunction with General Practice (GP) practices, local social welfare agencies and through self-referral. The Read Yourself Well (RYW) scheme was based on principles established from other similar schemes and as a way of delivering support for adults experiencing mild to moderate mental health problems for whom clinical treatments are not appropriate. The intervention consisted of initial referral and evaluation by the scheme bibliotherapist, a one-hour session at the beginning and end of the intervention where a purpose-designed questionnaire and two mental health assessments were carried out (the General Health Questionnaire and the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation questionnaire). Contact and support from the bibliotherapist was provided during the intervention period. One hundred and fifty-seven participants were recruited to the evaluation of whom 114 provided full data. Statistical analyses of the mental health scores showed significant improvements post treatment, for, both male and female participants, for all three referral routes, and for participants who were previously library users, and those who joined the library service to participate in the RYW scheme. The results of this large sample evaluation support the proposal that library-based bibliotherapy can be effective in the treatment of mental health problems.

  20. Strategies for delivering insecticide-treated nets at scale for malaria control: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paintain, Lucy Smith; Mangham, Lindsay; Car, Josip; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To synthesize findings from recent studies of strategies to deliver insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) at scale in malaria-endemic areas. Methods Databases were searched for studies published between January 2000 and December 2010 in which: subjects resided in areas with endemicity for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria; ITN delivery at scale was evaluated; ITN ownership among households, receipt by pregnant women and/or use among children aged cost-effectiveness studies linked to an eligible paper were also included. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias checklist and GRADE criteria. Important influences on scaling up were identified and assessed across delivery strategies. Findings A total of 32 papers describing 20 African studies were reviewed. Many delivery strategies involved health sectors and retail outlets (partial subsidy), antenatal care clinics (full subsidy) and campaigns (full subsidy). Strategies achieving high ownership among households and use among children Costs were largely comparable across strategies; ITNs were the main cost. Cost-effectiveness estimates were most sensitive to the assumed net lifespan and leakage. Common barriers to delivery included cost, stock-outs and poor logistics. Common facilitators were staff training and supervision, cooperation across departments or ministries and stakeholder involvement. Conclusion There is a broad taxonomy of strategies for delivering ITNs at scale. PMID:22984312

  1. Capacity of mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Meeju; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Won, Jong-Eun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2012-11-01

    Inorganic bioactive nanomaterials are attractive for hard tissue regeneration, including nanocomponents for bone replacement composites and nanovehicles for delivering therapeutics. Bioactive glass nanoparticles (BGn) have recently gained potential usefulness as bone and tooth regeneratives. Here we demonstrate the capacity of the BGn with mesopores to load and deliver therapeutic molecules (drugs and particularly genes). Spherical BGn with sizes of 80-90 nm were produced to obtain 3-5 nm sized mesopores through a sono-reacted sol-gel process. A simulated body fluid test of the mesoporous BGn confirmed their excellent apatite forming ability and the cellular toxicity study demonstrated their good cell viability up to 100 μg ml-1. Small molecules like chemical drug (Na-ampicillin) and gene (small interfering RNA; siRNA) were introduced as model drugs considering the mesopore size of the nanoparticles. Moreover, amine-functionalization allowed switchable surface charge property of the BGn (from -20-30 mV to +20-30 mV). Loading of ampicillin or siRNA saturated within a few hours (~2 h) and reflected the mesopore structure. While the ampicillin released relatively rapidly (~12 h), the siRNA continued to release up to 3 days with almost zero-order kinetics. The siRNA-nanoparticles were easily taken up by the cells, with a transfection efficiency as high as ~80%. The silencing effect of siRNA delivered from the BGn, as examined by using bcl-2 model gene, showed dramatic down-regulation (~15% of control), suggesting the potential use of BGn as a new class of nanovehicles for genes. This, in conjunction with other attractive properties, including size- and mesopore-related high surface area and pore volume, tunable surface chemistry, apatite-forming ability, good cell viability and the possible ion-related stimulatory effects, will potentiate the usefulness of the BGn in hard tissue regeneration.Inorganic bioactive nanomaterials are attractive for hard tissue regeneration

  2. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal...

  3. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal...

  4. Variability in delivered dose and respirable delivered dose from nebulizers: are current regulatory testing guidelines sufficient to produce meaningful information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatley, Ross HM; Byrne, Sarah M

    2017-01-01

    Background To improve convenience to patients, there have been advances in the operation of nebulizers, resulting in fast treatment times and less drug lost to the environment. However, limited attention has been paid to the effects of these developments on the delivered dose (DD) and respirable delivered dose (RDD). Published pharmacopoeia and ISO testing guidelines for adult-use testing utilize a single breathing pattern, which may not be sufficient to enable effective comparisons between the devices. Materials and methods The DD of 5 mg of salbutamol sulfate into adult breathing patterns with inhalation:exhalation (I:E) ratios between 1:1 and 1:4 was determined. Droplet size was determined by laser diffraction and RDD calculated. Nine different nebulizer brands with different modes of operation (conventional, venturi, breath-enhanced, mesh, and breath-activated) were tested. Results Between the non-breath-activated nebulizers, a 2.5-fold difference in DD (~750–1,900 µg salbutamol) was found; with RDD, there was a more than fourfold difference (~210–980 µg). With increasing time spent on exhalation, there were progressive reductions in DD and RDD, with the RDD at an I:E ratio of 1:4 being as little as 40% of the dose with the 1:1 I:E ratio. The DD and RDD from the breath-activated mesh nebulizer were independent of the I:E ratio, and for the breath-activated jet nebulizer, there was less than 20% change in RDD between the I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:4. Conclusion Comparing nebulizers using the I:E ratio recommended in the guidelines does not predict relative performance between the devices at other ratios. There was significant variance in DD or RDD between different brands of non-breath-activated nebulizer. In future, consideration should be given to revision of the test protocols included in the guidelines, to reflect more accurately the potential therapeutic dose that is delivered to a realistic spectrum of breathing patterns. PMID:28203110

  5. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  6. More with thermal energy storage. Report 7. Interference. Effects of thermal energy storage systems on the environment. Modelling of large-scale implementation in urban areas. Final report; Meer met bodemenergie. Rapport 7. Interferentie. Effecten van bodemenergiesystemen op hun omgeving. Modellering grootschalige inpassing in stedelijke gebieden. Eindrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oostrom, N.; Bakr, M. [Deltares, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-06-29

    The project More With Thermal Energy Storage (MMB, abbreviated in Dutch) focuses on knowledge gaps and potential opportunities regarding open systems. The main questions to be answered are: (1) What effects (hydrological, thermal, microbiological and chemical) occur in the soil system by application of thermal energy storage; (2) Which technical options are available for a sustainable integration of thermal energy storage in the water and energy chain?; (3) Is it possible to achieve multiple objectives by using smart combinations? The project is organized in different work packages. In work package 2, the effects of individual and collective thermal energy storage storage systems on subsoils and the environment are determined. In work package 3 the opportunities for thermal energy storage and soil remediation are examined, while in work package 4 the focus is on new sustainable combinations of heat and cold storage. Work package 1 is the umbrella part where communication and policy of and participation in MMB are the main subjects. The objective of this report is to gain insight in the mutual influencing of heat and cold storage systems in areas where several such systems occur close to each other. This insight might contribute to a policy and/or model approach to interference [Dutch] Het project Meer Met Bodemenergie (MMB) richt zich op het invullen van kennisleemtes en mogelijke kansen ten aanzien van open systemen. De belangrijkste vragen waarop het onderzoeksprogramma MMB antwoord geeft zijn: (1) Welke effecten (hydrologisch, thermisch, microbiologisch en chemisch) treden op in het bodemsysteem bij toepassing van bodemenergie?; (2) Welke technische mogelijkheden zijn er voor het duurzaam inpassen van bodem-energie in de water- en energieketen?; (3) Is het mogelijk om meerdere doelstellingen tegelijk te verwezenlijken door slimme combinaties te maken? Het project is ingericht met verschillende werkpakketten. In werkpakket 2 worden de effecten van individuele en

  7. Colloidal Thermal Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotzadeh, Saba

    In this dissertation, a reversible system with a well controlled degree of particle aggregation was developed. By surface modification of colloidal silica with aminosilanes, interactions among the particles were tuned in a controlled way to produce stable sized clusters at different pH values ranges from well-disposed to a colloidal gel. N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (TMPE) monolayer on particle surface not only removes all the reactive sites to prevent chemical aggregation, also provides steric stabilization in the absence of any repulsion. After surface modification, electrokinetic behavior of silica particles were changed to that of amino groups, positive in acidic pH and neutral at basic pH values. By tuning the pH, the balance between electrostatic repulsion and hydrophobic interactions was reversibly controlled. As a result, clusters with different sizes were developed. The effect of clustering on the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions was quantified using silane-treated silica, a system engineered to exhibit reversible clustering under well-controlled conditions. Thermal conductivity of this system was measured by transient hot wire, the standard method of thermal conductivity measurements in liquids. We show that the thermal conductivity increases monotonically with cluster size and spans the entire range between the two limits of Maxwell's theory. The results, corroborated by numerical simulation, demonstrate that large increases of the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions are possible, yet fully within the predictions of classical theory. Numerical calculations were performed to evaluate the importance of structural properties of particles/aggregates on thermal conduction in colloidal particles. Thermal conductivity of non-spherical particles including hollow particles, cubic particles and rods was studied using a Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that anisotropic shapes, increase conductivity above that of isotropic

  8. Thermal instability in the interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ghanbari

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This study demonstrates how thermal structures in the interstellar medium can emerge as a result of thermal instability. For a two-dimensional case, the steady state thermal structures was investigeted and it was shown that a large class of solutions exist. For a one –dimensional case the conductivity was found to be negligible. The effects of to cal cooling on the thermal instability were explored in some depth. In this case analytical results for time-dependent cooling function were presented, too. We studied nonlinear wave phenomena in thermal fluid systems, with a particular emphasis on presenting analytical results. When conductivity is proportional to temperature, the beliavior of thermal waves is soliton like. For slow thermal waves, approximate analytical results were presented. Extensions of this work are discussed briefly, together with possible astrophysical applications.

  9. The thermal conductivity of clustered nanocolloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Lotfizadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantify the effect of clustering on the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions using silane-treated silica, a system engineered to exhibit reversible clustering under well-controlled conditions. We show that the thermal conductivity increases monotonically with cluster size and spans the entire range between the two limits of Maxwell's theory. The results, corroborated by numerical simulation, demonstrate that large increases of the thermal conductivity of colloidal dispersions are possible, yet fully within the predictions of classical theory.

  10. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzhi; Ding, Xiangdong; Ren, Jie; Moya, Xavier; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2014-09-01

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity κ of ferroic twinned thin films can be reversibly controlled by strain. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations reveal that thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of twin boundaries perpendicular to the direction of heat flow. Our demonstration of large and reversible changes in thermal conductivity driven by strain may inspire the design of controllable thermal switches for thermal logic gates and all-solid-state cooling devices.

  11. Excessive sodium ions delivered into cells by nanodiamonds: implications for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Li, Wenxin; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Chen, Nan; Sun, Yanhong; Chen, Wen; Tai, Renzhong; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Qing

    2012-06-11

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess many excellent physical and chemical properties that make them attractive materials for applications in biomedicine. In this paper, the adsorption and delivery of a large amount of sodium ions into the cell interior by NDs in serum-free medium is demonstrated. The excess sodium ions inside the cells induce osmotic stresses followed by cell swelling and an increase in the intracellular levels of calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to severe cellular damage. In complete culture medium, however, serum proteins wrapped around the NDs effectively prevent the sodium ions from adsorbing onto the NDs, and thus the NDs show no cytotoxicity. This work is the first to elaborate on the correlation between the sodium ions adsorbed on the nanomaterials and their bio-effects. Excessive ions delivered into cells by NDs might have potential applications in tumor therapy.

  12. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders is here to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin; Newby, Jill M; Williams, Alishia D

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and disabling. Cognitive behavior therapy is the treatment of choice but is often difficult to obtain. Automated, internet-delivered, cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) courses may be an answer. There are three recent systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials that show that the benefits are substantial (d = 1.0) and similar to face to face CBT. There are two large effectiveness trials that demonstrate strong effects when iCBT is used in primary care; 60 % of patients who complete the courses no longer meet diagnostic criteria. The courses are suitable for most people with a primary anxiety disorder. Research studies usually exclude people whose anxiety is secondary to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or substance abuse or who are actively suicidal. Little additional input from clinicians is required. Patients find the courses very convenient. Clinically, the principal advantage is the fidelity of the treatment. What you prescribe is what the patient sees.

  13. Women are designed to deliver vaginally and not by cesarean section: an obstetrician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Gerard H A

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, there is a rapid increase in deliveries by cesarean section. The large differences among countries, from about 16% to more than 60%, suggest that the cesarean delivery (CD) rate has little to do with evidence-based medicine. In this review, the background for the increasing CD rate is discussed as well as the limited positive effects on neonatal outcome in both term and preterm neonates. Negative effects of CD, including direct maternal morbidity, complications of subsequent pregnancies and iatrogenic early delivery resulting in increased neonatal morbidity, are discussed in addition to long-term implications for the offspring involving altered development of the immune system. The 'battle' to lower the CD rate will be difficult, but we should not forget that women are designed to deliver vaginally and not by cesarean section.

  14. Delivering the Goods: Scaling out Results of Natural Resource Management Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Harrington

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To help integrated natural resource management (INRM research "deliver the goods" for many of the world's poor over a large area and in a timely manner, the authors suggest a problem-solving approach that facilitates the scaling out of relevant agricultural practices. They propose seven ways to foster scaling out: (1 develop more attractive practices and technologies through participatory research (2 balance supply-driven approaches with resource user demands, (3 use feedback to redefine the research agenda, (4 encourage support groups and networks for information sharing, (5 facilitate negotiation among stakeholders, (6 inform policy change and institutional development, and (7 make sensible use of information management tools, including models and geographic information systems (GIS. They also draw on experiences in Mesoamerica, South Asia, and southern Africa to describe useful information management tools, including site similarity analyses, the linking of simulation models with GIS, and the use of farmer and land type categories.

  15. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  16. 76 FR 59963 - Closed Captioning of Internet Protocol-Delivered Video Programming: Implementation of the Twenty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 15 and 79 Closed Captioning of Internet Protocol-Delivered Video Programming...'') that mandate rules for closed captioning of certain video programming delivered using Internet protocol... owners of IP-delivered video programming, as well as the devices that display such programming....

  17. 77 FR 46632 - Closed Captioning of Internet Protocol-Delivered Video Programming: Implementation of the Twenty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... distributors of video programming delivered using Internet protocol (IP). Pursuant to Section 203 of the CVAA... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 79 Closed Captioning of Internet Protocol-Delivered Video Programming: Implementation... captioning of Internet protocol-delivered video programming and apparatus closed captioning...

  18. Thermal comfort assessment of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Carlucci, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    A number of metrics for assessing human thermal response to climatic conditions have been proposed in scientific literature over the last decades. They aim at describing human thermal perception of the thermal environment to which an individual or a group of people is exposed. More recently, a new type of “discomfort index” has been proposed for describing, in a synthetic way, long-term phenomena. Starting from a systematic review of a number of long-term global discomfort indices, they are then contrasted and compared on a reference case study in order to identify their similarities and differences and strengths and weaknesses. Based on this analysis, a new short-term local discomfort index is proposed for the American Adaptive comfort model. Finally, a new and reliable long-term general discomfort index is presented. It is delivered in three versions and each of them is suitable to be respectively coupled with the Fanger, the European Adaptive and the American Adaptive comfort models.

  19. Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B. [and others

    1996-12-31

    As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

  20. CEQATR Thermal Test Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balusek, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    A thermal test overview of the Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Test Requirement (CEQATR) is presented. The contents include: 1) CEQATR Thermal Test Overview; 2) CxP Environments; 3) CEQATR Table 1.2-1; 4) Levels of Assembly; 5) Definitions for Levels of Assembly; 6) Hardware Applicability; 7) CEQATR Thermal-Related Definitions; 8) Requirements for unit-level thermal testing; 9) Requirements for major assembly level thermal testing; 10) General thermal testing requirements; 11) General thermal cycle, thermal vacuum profiles; 12) Test tolerances; 13) Vacuum vs Ambient; 14) Thermal Gradient; 15) Sequence of Testing; 16) Alternative Strategies; 17) Protoflight; 18) Halt/Hass; 19) Humidity; and 20) Tailoring.

  1. Efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy delivered over the Internet for depressive symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztein, Dina M; Koransky, Charles E; Fegan, Leah; Himelhoch, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive behavioural therapy has been shown to improve depressive symptoms in adults with mild to moderate depression. To overcome many of the barriers associated with delivering this treatment, attempts have been made to deliver cognitive behavioural therapy via the Internet. The objective of this meta-analysis is to assess whether Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy delivered to adults with depressive symptoms leads to a reduction in these symptoms as compared to those who receive no therapy. Methods In September 2015, the Cochrane, PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched; studies were also found through bibliography searches. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials published in English between 2005-2015 conducted with adults >18 years of age experiencing mild to moderate depression where study subjects received Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy, and the control group was placed on a wait-list. The search yielded 257 articles; 14 of these were included in the meta-analysis. Results Internet delivered cognitive behavioural therapy had a medium effect on reducing depressive symptoms at the end of the study period (standardized mean difference: 0.74, confidence interval: 0.62-0.86, p cognitive behavioural therapy also has a large sustained effect in maintaining reduction of depressive symptoms in follow-up measures done 3-6 months after the conclusion of the therapy (standardized mean difference: 0.83, confidence interval: 0.69-0.99, p Cognitive behavioural therapy delivered over the Internet leads to immediate and sustained reduction in depressive symptoms; thus, it may be a good treatment modality for individuals unable or unwilling to access traditional face-to-face therapy.

  2. Thermal Interaction of Closely Spaced Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.; Tøgersen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results from a pilot study on the thermal interaction of closely spaced persons in a large enclosure. The surface temperature at different densities of persons is evaluated using a high resolution thermo vision camera in a controlled thermal environment. The corresponding ther...

  3. Delivering effective science communication: advice from a professional science communicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Sam

    2017-04-12

    Science communication is becoming ever more prevalent, with more and more scientists expected to not only communicate their research to a wider public, but to do so in an innovative and engaging manner. Given the other commitments that researchers and academics are required to fulfil as part of their workload models, it is unfair to be expect them to also instantly produce effective science communication events and activities. However, by thinking carefully about what it is that needs to be communicated, and why this is being done, it is possible to develop high-quality activities that are of benefit to both the audience and the communicator(s). In this paper, I present some practical advice for developing, delivering and evaluating effective science communication initiatives, based on over a decade of experience as being a professional science communicator. I provide advice regarding event logistics, suggestions on how to successfully market and advertise your science communication initiatives, and recommendations for establishing effective branding and legacy. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Public Private Partnership Benefits in Delivering Public Facilities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of infrastructure in developing country such as Malaysia was increasingly founded by the Public–Private Partnership (PPP scheme. Collaboration with private sector has become popular as a means to improve the delivery of public facilities. Yet, empirical evidence on how PPP initiative has benefits the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context is lagging. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the perception of stakeholders on the benefits of adopting PPP in delivering public facilities in Malaysia. Literature review was carried out to identify PPP benefits, which were then incorporated into the questionnaire. The mean score and mean score ranking was conducted to assess the agreement level of stakeholders towards the PPP benefits. The overall findings show that the implementation of PPP has benefitted the delivery of public facilities in both financial and non-financial aspects. From the analysis, improvement in service quality is perceived as the top advantage followed by innovation in design and transfer of risk. The findings provide more informed basis on the rationale of PPP implementation and its potential in improving the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context.

  5. Adenovirally Delivered Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor to Rat Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hou; Dan Hu; Yannian Hui

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To study the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the rat retina delivered by adenovirus.Methods: Adenovirus with BDNF gene was injected into the vitreous. Gene expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining, and quantitative analysis was performed after injury and transfection by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results: The positive cells can be seen on the 3rd day and last 4 weeks by immunofluorescence staining. Positive cells in the control group were fewer than those in the transfection group or the fluorescence intensity was lower at every time point. Quantitative analysis showed that the expression of BDNF groups was higher than that of the control group at every time point(P < 0.01 ), and that of the injured group without transfection was higher than that of the control group on the 3rd day and the 7th day (P < 0.01 ).Conclusion: Efficient and stable transfer of BDNF gene could be achieved by adenovirus delivery into the retina of rats. Injury can promote the expression of BDNF in early period.

  6. Analytical characterization of an orally-delivered peptide pharmaceutical product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Wayne P; Chen, Shujun; Floyd, Philip D; Hu, Ping; Kapsi, Shiva G; Kord, Alireza S; Sun, Mingjiang; Vogt, Frederick G

    2012-05-15

    The characterization of orally-delivered peptide pharmaceuticals presents several challenges to analytical methods in comparison to characterization of conventional small-molecule drugs. These challenges include the analysis and characterization of difficult-to-separate impurities, secondary structure, the amorphous solid-state form, and the integrity of enteric-coated drug delivery systems. This work presents the multidisciplinary analytical characterization of a parathyroid hormone (PTH) peptide active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and an oral formulation of this API within enteric-coated sucrose spheres. The analysis of impurities and degradation products in API and formulated drug product was facilitated by the development of an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method for analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). The use of UHPLC allowed for additional resolution needed to detect impurities and degradation products of interest. The secondary structure was probed using a combination of solution-state NMR, infrared, and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. Solid-state NMR is used to detect amorphous API in a nondestructive manner directly within the coated sucrose sphere formulation. Fluorescence and Raman microscopy were used in conjunction with Raman mapping to show enteric coating integrity and observe the distribution of API beneath the enteric-coating on the sucrose spheres. The methods are combined in a multidisciplinary approach to characterize the quality of the enteric-coated peptide product.

  7. Can the capitalist economic system deliver environmental justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Can a healthy environment for all social groups be delivered through capitalism via market mechanisms? Or is it the capitalist system, itself, that has been at the root of the environmental and social crises we now face? This letter engages with this ongoing debate by drawing on material from a wider study, ‘Achieving Environmental Justice’, which examined the extent, form and causes of environmental justice and injustice in a range of countries with varying depths of marketization—United States, South Korea, United Kingdom, Sweden, China, Bolivia and Cuba. The analysis described here focuses on the interview material from this mixed methods study, drawing on over 140 interviews with officials, policy makers, and civil society leaders. The letter argues that there is an apparent propensity for capitalist processes to exacerbate, rather than reduce, environmental problems and inequities though the pursuit of relentless economic growth and profit accumulation. Therefore, we should perhaps let go of efforts to resolve environmental injustice within the constraints of capitalism and, instead, build an alternative economic system that can meet human needs in the context of a harmonious and respectful relationship with nature.

  8. Biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles as drug delivering injectable cell scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanhong; Gallego, Monica Ramos; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Jorgensen, Lene; Everland, Hanne; Møller, Eva Horn; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2011-11-30

    Injectable cell scaffolds play a dual role in tissue engineering by supporting cellular functions and delivering bioactive molecules. The present study aimed at developing biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles with sustained drug delivery properties thus potentially being suitable for autologous stem cell therapy. Semi-crystalline poly(l-lactide/dl-lactide) (PLDL70) and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA85) were used to prepare nanoparticles by the double emulsion method. Uniform and spherical nanoparticles were obtained at an average size of 270-300 nm. The thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 (TRAP-6) was successfully loaded in PLDL70 and PLGA85 nanoparticles. During the 30 days' release, PLDL70 nanoparticles showed sustainable release with only 30% TRAP-6 released within the first 15 days, while almost 80% TRAP-6 was released from PLGA85 nanoparticles during the same time interval. The release mechanism was found to depend on the crystallinity and composition of the nanoparticles. Subsequently, mPEG-PLGA nanocomposite microparticles containing PLDL70 nanoparticles were produced by the ultrasonic atomization method and evaluated to successfully preserve the intrinsic particulate properties and the sustainable release profile, which was identical to that of the nanoparticles. Good cell adhesion of the human fibroblasts onto the nanocomposite microparticles was observed, indicating the desired cell biocompatibility. The presented results thus demonstrate the development of nanocomposite microparticles tailored for sustainable drug release for application as injectable cell scaffolds.

  9. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Bonetti

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  10. 大型吸收式热泵应用于火电厂回收余热供热的试验研究%The Experiment Study on Waste Heat Recovery from Circulating Water in Thermal Power Plant Using Large Absorption Heat Pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周崇波; 俞聪; 郭栋; 丁贯林

    2013-01-01

    An experiment on waste heat recovery thermal characteristics from circulating water in 125MW and 300MW thermal power plants using large absorption heat pump is conducted. The steam pressure, the temperature of the backwater from heat-supply network, the inlet circulating water temperature of the large absorption heat pump system are analyzed under other external conditions and different parameters. Then the effects of main external parameters on heating capacity, the recovery of residual heat, energy efficiency ratio and other important indicators in the large absorption heat pump are quantitatively discussed . The conclusion provide the firsthand information for the design of the waste heat recovery engineering and regular operation of large absorption heat pump.%针对已在125MW及300MW等级火电厂中投产的大型吸收式热泵系统的变工况热力特性进行试验测试,并分析其试验数据,对吸收式热泵系统在驱动蒸汽压力、热网水回水温度、余热水进水温度等主要外部条件和参数变化条件下的运行指标进行了测试和分析,从而获得了这些主要外部参数改变对吸收式热泵制热能力、余热回收量、能效比等重要指标的定量影响.该试验结果为采用大型吸收式热泵系统进行电厂冷凝热回收供热改造工程的初期设计及投产后的优化运行提供了第一手参考资料.

  11. Quick-Response Thermal Actuator for Use as a Heat Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan

    2010-01-01

    This work improves the performance of a heat switch, or a thermal actuator, by delivering heat to the actuator in a more efficient manner. The method uses a heat pipe as the plunger or plug instead of just using a solid piece of metal. The heat pipe could be one tailored for fast transient thermal response.

  12. Solar Total Energy System: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume I. Section 1. Conclusions and recommendations. Section 2. Systems requirements. [1. 72-MW thermal and 383. 6-kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1977-10-17

    The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is described. The various LSE's are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power (both space heating and process heat) and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The section on conclusions and recommendations described the baseline design recommendation, facility requirements, the solar system, power conversion system, schedules and cost, and additional candidate systems. The systems requirements analysis includes detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: load analysis, energy displacement, local laws and ordinances, life cycle cost, health and safety, environmental assessment, reliability assessment, and utility interface. (WHK)

  13. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  14. THERMAL TECHNIQUES FOR THE IN-SITU CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION OF MERCURY: INSIGHTS FROM DEPLOYMENT OF THE MEMBRANE INTERFACE PROBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Dennis; Looney, Brian; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.

    2013-08-07

    This presentation focuses on how thermal energy can effectively be used to enhance characterization, promote the remediation, and aid in delivering a sequestering agent to stabilize elemental mercury in subsurface soils. Slides and speaker notes are provided.

  15. Thermal Characteristics Analysis on Large Torque and High Capacity Angular Milling Head%大功率大扭矩的摆角铣头热特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭铁能; 戎伟; 刘志峰; 李富平; 杨文通; 董湘敏

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve precise temperature distribution, all possible factors are considered in the FEA model, such as the heat source and the way of heat dissipation. The heat source includes of bearings, gears, and cutting. And the heat dissipation includes of heat conversion, radiation and lubrication mode. The temperature change of key point on the angular milling head is analyzed and the characteristics of the angular milling head are obtained. The thermal experiment on the angular milling head under the practical cutting condition is carried on, and the temperature change of key point on the milling head is measured. The discrepancy between the experimental results and the analysis results is small. Therefore, the analysis model can simulate effectively the temperature change of the actual milling head, and the proposed method can be used to predict the temperature characteristics during the design of the angular milling head is effective.%针对大功率大扭矩摆角铣头系统,根据加工切削条件,充分考虑轴承、齿轮和切削等热源作用以及润滑、对流和辐射等散热方式,进行了有限元建模和分析.为了验证分析结果的准确性,对摆角铣头实际切削情况下铣头关键部位的温度进行测量,测量结果与分析结果表明,在摆角铣头设计阶段,通过提出的建模和分析方法,能较准确地获取铣头的热性能特征.

  16. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning.

  17. Therapeutic Silencing of KRAS using Systemically Delivered siRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecot, Chad V.; Wu, Sherry Y.; Bellister, Seth; Filant, Justyna; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Hisamatsu, Takeshi; Bhattacharya, Rajat; Maharaj, Anshumaan; Azam, Salma; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Morelli, Maria Pia; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Waugh, Trent A.; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Zand, Behrouz; Dalton, Heather J.; Kopetz, Scott; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ellis, Lee M.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being amongst the most common oncogenes in human cancer, to date there are no effective clinical options for inhibiting KRAS activity. We investigated whether systemically delivered KRAS siRNAs have therapeutic potential in KRAS mutated cancer models. We identified KRAS siRNA sequences with notable potency in knocking-down KRAS expression. Using lung and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines, we assessed anti-proliferative effects of KRAS silencing in vitro. For in vivo experiments, we used a nano-liposomal delivery platform, DOPC, for systemic delivery of siRNAs. Various lung and colon cancer models were utilized to determine efficacy of systemic KRAS siRNA based on tumor growth, development of metastasis and down-stream signaling. KRAS siRNA sequences induced >90% knock-down of KRAS expression, significantly reducing viability in mutant cell lines. In the lung cancer model, KRAS siRNA treatment demonstrated significant reductions in primary tumor growth and distant metastatic disease, while the addition of CDDP was not additive. Significant reductions in Ki-67 indices were seen in all treatment groups, while significant increases in caspase-3 activity was only seen in the CDDP treatment groups. In the colon cancer model, KRAS siRNA reduced tumor KRAS and pERK expression. KRAS siRNAs significantly reduced HCP1 subcutaneous tumor growth, as well as outgrowth of liver metastases. Our studies demonstrate a proof-of-concept approach to therapeutic KRAS targeting using nanoparticle delivery of siRNA. This study highlights the potential translational impact of therapeutic RNA interference, which may have broad applications in oncology, especially for traditional “undruggable” targets. PMID:25281617

  18. Electrotactile stimuli delivered across fingertips inducing the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jay P; Santello, Marco; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have been unable to induce the Cutaneous Rabbit Effect (CRE) when the most likely perceived location of the illusory stimulus is on a non-continuous skin area. To determine whether the CRE could be elicited when each of the delivered stimuli were on non-continuous skin areas, we developed a new electrotactile stimulation paradigm attempting to induce the CRE across the fingertips. Though our stimulation paradigm differed from classic reduced CRE paradigms through the use of electrotactile stimuli, focusing the subject attention to a 'likely' illusory site, and the inclusion of a fourth stimulation site (two stimuli after the illusory stimulus), these factors were not the cause of the illusory effect we observed. Experiments conducted on the forearm validated that our paradigm elicited similar results to those reported in previous CRE studies that used either 3-stimulation-point mechanical or electrotactile stimuli with subject attention focused on the 'likely' illusory site. Across the fingertips, we observed an increase in stimulus mislocalization onto the middle fingertip, the 'likely' perceived location of the illusory stimuli, under Illusory Rabbit Trains compared to the Motion Bias Trains. Because the Motion Bias Trains should not induce a perceived location shift of the illusory stimulus but stimulates the adjacent digits in a similar way to the Illusory Rabbit Trains, differences observed between their mislocalization rates between these trains indicate that the CRE can be induced across the fingertips. These results provide the first evidence that the CRE can 'jump' when the stimuli occur across non-continuous skin areas.

  19. Drug absorption efficiency in Caenorhbditis elegans delivered by different methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Qing Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caenorhbditis elegans has being vigorously used as a model organism in many research fields and often accompanied by administrating with various drugs. The methods of delivering drugs to worms are varied from one study to another, which make difficult in comparing results between studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the drug absorption efficiency in C. elegans using five frequently used methods with resveratrol with low aqueous solubility and water-soluble 5-Fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUDR as positive compounds. The drugs were either applied to the LB medium with bacteria OP50, before spreading onto Nematode Growth Medium (NGM plates (LB medium method, or to the NGM with live (NGM live method or dead bacteria (NGM dead method, or spotting the drug solution to the surface of plates directly (spot dead method, or growing the worms in liquid medium (liquid growing method. The concentration of resveratrol and FUDR increased gradually within C. elegans and reached the highest during 12 hours to one day and then decreased slowly. At the same time point, the higher the drug concentration, the higher the metabolism rate. The drug concentrations in worms fed with dead bacteria were higher than with live bacteria at the same time point. Consistently, the drug concentration in medium with live bacteria decreased much faster than in medium with dead bacteria, reach to about half of the original concentration within 12 hours. CONCLUSION: Resveratrol with low aqueous solubility and water-soluble FUDR have the same absorption and metabolism pattern. The drug metabolism rate in worms was both dosage and time dependent. NGM dead method and liquid growing method achieved the best absorption efficiency in worms. The drug concentration within worms was comparable with that in mice, providing a bridge for dose translation from worms to mammals.

  20. Carbohydrate Biopolymers Enhance Antibody Responses to Mucosally Delivered Vaccine Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, A.; Makin, J.; Sizer, P. J.; Jabbal-Gill, I.; Hinchcliffe, M.; Illum, L.; Chatfield, S.; Roberts, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the ability of two carbohydrate biopolymers, chitosan and gellan, to enhance antibody responses to subunit influenza virus vaccines delivered to the respiratory tracts of mice. Groups of mice were vaccinated three times intranasally (i.n.) with 10 μg of purified influenza B/Panama virus surface antigens (PSAs), which consist of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), either alone or admixed with chitosan or gellan solutions. Separate groups were vaccinated subcutaneously (s.c.) with PSAs adsorbed to Alhydrogel or chitosan or gellan alone i.n. Serum antibody responses were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for influenza virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and by HA inhibition (HAI) and NA inhibition (NAI) assays. The local respiratory immune response was measured by assaying for influenza virus-specific IgA antibody in nasal secretions and by enumerating nasal and pulmonary lymphocytes secreting IgA, IgG, and IgM anti-influenza virus-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunospotting (ELISPOT). When administered alone i.n., B/Panama PSA was poorly immunogenic. Parenteral immunization with B/Panama PSA with Alhydrogel elicited high titers of anti-B/Panama antibodies in serum but a very poor respiratory anti-B/Panama IgA response. In contrast, i.n. immunization with PSA plus chitosan stimulated very strong local and systemic anti-B/Panama responses. Gellan also enhanced the local and serum antibody responses to i.n. PSA but not to the same extent as chitosan. The ability of chitosan to augment the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines given i.n. was confirmed using PSA prepared from an influenza A virus (A/Texas H1N1). PMID:10992483

  1. CURRICULUM LEADERSIHP: STRATEGIES FOR LINKING THE WRITTEN AND DELIVERED CURRICULIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Damovska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus will be put on teachers as curriculum leaders, being challenged on a daily basis by how to attend to the delivered curriculum(the practice without neglecting the written curriculum(the theory, and vice versa, all the while analyzing strategies that will link both curricula and implement these conclusions in their further teaching practice.Curricula present written guides identifying the content and material that should be covered, and are given to teachers (sometimes as a detailed guide to follow religiously. However, as opposed to theory, practice is a different and delicate matter, as the teachers tries not to overstep the boundaries of the curriculum already include as much of their own creative energy as possible.These points will be expanded through analysis of the results of a qualitative research on the understanding of the content of leadership, done on pre-school and primary school teachers, whose everyday contact with their pupils will illustrate the reality of leadership in schools in the local context of R. Macedonia.Furthermore, the “how” of overcoming the challenges on the path of successful school leadership, however tricky they might be will be analyzed from firsthand experiences and compared through the matrix of what is considered able to “correct”. As educators, we successfully bridge the gap between theory and practice, to apply the theoretical know-how in a realistic classroom setting, and to convert the written paradigms into practice, thus only through educational leadership can we overcome the pedagogical challenges and  effectively transfer the knowledge to the students, bringing about positive outcomes.

  2. Two-compartment model of radioimmunotherapy delivered through cerebrospinal fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Ping [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using {sup 131}I-3F8 injected into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was a safe modality for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases (JCO, 25:5465, 2007). A single-compartment pharmacokinetic model described previously (JNM 50:1324, 2009) showed good fitting to the CSF radioactivity data obtained from patients. We now describe a two-compartment model to account for the ventricular reservoir of {sup 131}I-3F8 and to identify limiting factors that may impact therapeutic ratio. Each parameter was examined for its effects on (1) the area under the radioactivity concentration curve of the bound antibody (AUC[C{sub IAR}]), (2) that of the unbound antibody AUC[C{sub IA}], and (3) their therapeutic ratio (AUC[C{sub IAR}]/AUC[C{sub IA}]). Data fitting showed that CSF kBq/ml data fitted well using the two-compartment model (R = 0.95 {+-} 0.03). Correlations were substantially better when compared to the one-compartment model (R = 0.92 {+-} 0.11 versus 0.77 {+-} 0.21, p = 0.005). In addition, we made the following new predictions: (1) Increasing immunoreactivity of {sup 131}I-3F8 from 10% to 90% increased both (AUC[C{sub IAR}]) and therapeutic ratio (AUC[C{sub IAR}]/AUC[C{sub IA}]) by 7.4 fold, (2) When extrapolated to the clinical setting, the model predicted that if {sup 131}I-3F8 could be split into 4 doses of 1.4 mg each and given at {>=}24 hours apart, an antibody affinity of K{sub D} of 4 x 10{sup -9} at 50% immunoreactivity were adequate in order to deliver {>=}100 Gy to tumor cells while keeping normal CSF exposure to <10 Gy. This model predicted that immunoreactivity, affinity and optimal scheduling of antibody injections were crucial in improving therapeutic index. (orig.)

  3. FedExosomes: Engineering Therapeutic Biological Nanoparticles that Truly Deliver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E. Marcus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Many aspects of intercellular communication are mediated through “sending” and “receiving” packets of information via the secretion and subsequent receptor-mediated detection of biomolecular species including cytokines, chemokines, and even metabolites. Recent evidence has now established a new modality of intercellular communication through which biomolecular species are exchanged between cells via extracellular lipid vesicles. A particularly important class of extracellular vesicles is exosomes, which is a term generally applied to biological nanovesicles ~30–200 nm in diameter. Exosomes form through invagination of endosomes to encapsulate cytoplasmic contents, and upon fusion of these multivesicular endosomes to the cell surface, exosomes are released to the extracellular space and transport mRNA, microRNA (miRNA and proteins between cells. Importantly, exosome-mediated delivery of such cargo molecules results in functional modulation of the recipient cell, and such modulation is sufficiently potent to modulate disease processes in vivo. It is possible that such functional delivery of biomolecules indicates that exosomes utilize native mechanisms (e.g., for internalization and trafficking that may be harnessed by using exosomes to deliver exogenous RNA for therapeutic applications. A complementary perspective is that understanding the mechanisms of exosome-mediated transport may provide opportunities for “reverse engineering” such mechanisms to improve the performance of synthetic delivery vehicles. In this review, we summarize recent progress in harnessing exosomes for therapeutic RNA delivery, discuss the potential for engineering exosomes to overcome delivery challenges and establish robust technology platforms, and describe both potential challenges and advantages of utilizing exosomes as RNA delivery vehicles.

  4. Large N

    CERN Document Server

    Hooft, G

    2002-01-01

    In the first part of this lecture, the 1/N expansion technique is illustrated for the case of the large-N sigma model. In large-N gauge theories, the 1/N expansion is tantamount to sorting the Feynman diagrams according to their degree of planarity, that is, the minimal genus of the plane onto which the diagram can be mapped without any crossings. This holds both for the usual perturbative expansion with respect to powers of {tilde g}^2=g^2 N, as well as for the expansion of lattice theories in positive powers of 1/{tilde g}^2. If there were no renormalization effects, the tilde g expansion would have a finite radius of convergence. The zero-dimensional theory can be used for counting planar diagrams. It can be solved explicitly, so that the generating function for the number of diagrams with given 3-vertices and 4-vertices, can be derived exactly. This can be done for various kinds of Feynman diagrams. We end with some remarks about planar renormalization.

  5. Savings on natural gas consumption by doubling thermal efficiencies of balanced-flue space heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juanico, Luis E. [Conicet, and Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Gonzalez, Alejandro D. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales, Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medio Ambiente (Inibioma-Conicet), 8400 Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas is a relatively clean fossil fuel for space heating. However, when it is not used efficiently high consumption can become an environmental problem. In Argentina, individual balanced-flue space heaters are the most extensively used in temperate and cold regions. This furnace is a simple device with a burner set into a metal chamber, separated from the indoor ambient by an enclosing cabinet, and both inlet and outgas chimneys are connected to the outdoor ambient. In previous studies, we measured the performance of these commercial devices, and found very low thermal efficiency (in the range of 39-63% depending on the chimney configuration). The extensive use of these devices is possible due to the availability of unlimited amount of subsidised natural gas to households and businesses. In the present work, we developed a prototype with simple and low cost modifications made on commercial models, and measured the improvements on the thermal efficiency. Findings showed better infrared radiation, enhanced indoor air convection, and passive chimney flow regulation leading to thermal efficiency in the range of 75-85%. These values represent an improvement of 100% when compared to marketed models, and hence, the specific cost of the heater per unit of useful heating power delivered was actually reduced. Considering the large market presence of these furnaces in both residential and business sectors in Argentina, the potential benefits related to gas consumption and environmental emissions are very significant. (author)

  6. Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

    1994-10-28

    The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

  7. An exploration of factors related to dissemination of and exposure to internet-delivered behavior change interventions aimed at adults: A Delphi study approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Brouwer (Wendy); A. Oenema (Anke); R. Crutzen (Rik); J. de Nooijer (Jascha); N.K. de Vries (Nanne); J. Brug (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Internet is an attractive medium for delivering individualized, computer-tailored behavior change interventions to large numbers of people. However, the actual numbers of people reached seem to fall behind the high expectations. Insight into factors that determine use of

  8. Delivering high-resolution landmarks using inkjet micropatterning for spatial monitoring of leaf expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronk Quentin CB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inkjet micropatterning is a versatile deposition technique with broad applications in numerous fields. However, its application in plant science is largely unexplored. Leaf expansion is one of the most important parameters in the field of plant science and many methods have been developed to examine differential expansion rates of different parts of the leaf lamina. Among them, methods based on the tracking of natural landmarks through digital imaging require a complicated setup in which the leaf must remain fixed and under tension. Furthermore, the resolution is limited to that of the natural landmarks, which are often difficult to find, particularly in young leaves. To study the fine scale expansion dynamics of the leaf lamina using artificial landmarks it is necessary to place small, noninvasive marks on a leaf surface and then recover the location of those marks after a period of time. Results To monitor leaf expansion in two dimensions, at very fine scales, we used a custom designed inkjet micropatterning system to print a grid composed of c. 0.19 mm2 cells on small developing leaves of ivy (Hedera helix using 40 μm dots at a spacing of c. 91 μm. The leaves in different growing stages were imaged under magnification to extract the coordinates of the marks which were then used in subsequent computer-assisted leaf expansion analyses. As an example we obtained quantified global and local expansion information and created expansion maps over the entire leaf surface. The results reveal a striking pattern of fine-scale expansion differences over short periods of time. In these experiments, the base of the leaf is a "cold spot" for expansion, while the leaf sinuses are "hot spots" for expansion. We have also measured a strong shading effect on leaf expansion. We discuss the features required to build an inkjet printing apparatus optimized for use in plant science, which will further maximize the range of tissues that can be

  9. Current perspectives on Internet delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with anxiety and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mewton L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Louise Mewton, Jessica Smith, Pieter Rossouw, Gavin Andrews Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: The aim of the current review is to provide a summary of research into Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT for anxiety disorders. We include 37 randomized controlled trials that examined the efficacy of iCBT programs in adults (aged over 18 years, as compared with waiting list or active control. The included studies were identified from Medline searches and from reference lists, and only published data were included. Several trials of iCBT for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia were identified. Two trials of iCBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder were identified, whilst one trial each was identified for hypochondriasis, specific phobia (spiders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, there were five trials that focused on transdiagnostic therapy for either a range of comorbid anxiety disorders or comorbid anxiety and depression. Between-group effect sizes were moderate to large for all disorders, and ranged from 0.30 to 2.53. iCBT was found to be commensurate with face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy whether delivered individually or in group format. Guidance may not be necessary for iCBT to be effective for immediate gains, but may be more important in longer-term maintenance of symptom improvement and maximizing patient adherence. The clinical experience of the individual providing guidance does not appear to impact treatment outcomes. Future research needs to focus on the optimal level of guidance required to generate maximum patient benefits, whilst balancing the efficient use of clinician time and resources. Evidence-based contraindications to iCBT should also be developed so that the choice of treatment modality accurately reflects patients’ needs. Further research should be conducted into the effective elements of

  10. Thermal Conductance through Sapphire-Sapphire Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Tomaru, T.; Haruyama, T.; Shintomi, T.; Uchinyama, T.; Miyoki, S.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.

    2003-07-01

    Thermal conductance on sapphire-sapphire bonded interface has been investigated. Two pieces of single crystal sapphire bar with square cross section were bonded together by adhesion free bonding. In two sections of the bar, thermal conductivity was measured between 5 K to 300K. One section contains a bonded interface and the other section measured a thermal conductivity of the sapphire as a reference. No significant thermal resistance due to bonded interface was found from this measurement. Obtained thermal conductivity reaches κ 1 × 104 [W/m·K] in temperature range of T = 20 ˜ 30 K which is a planned operating temperature of a cryogenic mirror of the Large scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave telescope. It looks promising for sapphire bonding technique to improve a heat transfer from a large cryogenic mirror to susp ension wires.

  11. CMB spectral distortion constraints on thermal inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kihyun; Hong, Sungwook E.; Stewart, Ewan D.; Zoe, Heeseung

    2017-08-01

    Thermal inflation is a second epoch of exponential expansion at typical energy scales V1/4 ~ 106 ~ 8 GeV. If the usual primordial inflation is followed by thermal inflation, the primordial power spectrum is only modestly redshifted on large scales, but strongly suppressed on scales smaller than the horizon size at the beginning of thermal inflation, k > kb = ab Hb. We calculate the spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background generated by the dissipation of acoustic waves in this context. For kb ll 103 Mpc-1, thermal inflation results in a large suppression of the μ-distortion amplitude, predicting that it falls well below the standard value of μ simeq 2× 10-8. Thus, future spectral distortion experiments, similar to PIXIE, can place new limits on the thermal inflation scenario, constraining kb gtrsim 103 Mpc-1 if μ simeq 2× 10-8 were found.

  12. Internet-delivered cognitive therapy for PTSD: a development pilot series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wild

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Randomised controlled trials have established that face-to-face cognitive therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (CT-PTSD based on Ehlers and Clark's cognitive model of PTSD is highly effective and feasible with low rates of dropout. Access to evidence-based psychological treatments for PTSD is insufficient. Several studies have shown that therapist-assisted treatment delivery over the Internet is a promising way of improving access to cognitive behavioural therapy interventions. Objective: To develop an Internet version of CT-PTSD that significantly reduces therapist contact time without compromising treatment integrity or retention rates. Methods: We describe the development of an Internet version of CT-PTSD. It implements all the key procedures of face-to-face CT-PTSD, including techniques that focus on the trauma memory, such as memory updating, stimulus discrimination and revisiting the trauma site, as well as restructuring individually relevant appraisals relating to overgeneralisation of danger, guilt, shame or anger, behavioural experiments and planning activities to reclaim quality of life. A cohort of 10 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for PTSD worked through the programme, with remote guidance from a therapist, and they were assessed at pre- and post-treatment on PTSD outcome, mood, work and social adjustment and process measures. Results: No patients dropped out. Therapists facilitated the treatment with 192 min of contact time per patient, plus 57 min for reviewing the patient's progress and messages. Internet-delivered CT-PTSD was associated with very large improvements on all outcome and process measures, with 80% of patients achieving clinically significant change and remission from PTSD. Conclusions: Internet-delivered cognitive therapy for PTSD (iCT-PTSD appears to be an acceptable and efficacious treatment. Therapist time was reduced to less than 25% of time in face-to-face CT-PTSD. Randomised controlled trials

  13. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  14. Outcome Expectations and Associated Treatment Outcomes in Motivational Enhancement Therapy Delivered in English and Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Decker, Suzanne; Kiluk, Brian D.; Añez, Luis; Paris, Manuel; Frankforter, Tami; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The relationship between patients’ baseline expectations regarding treatment outcome and actual outcomes has not been widely studied within the field of substance use disorders. We hypothesized that outcome expectations would be unrelated to outcomes in a study investigating Motivational Enhancement Therapy delivered in English (MET-E) consistent with our earlier work, and conducted exploratory analyses in a separate study that investigated the same treatment delivered in Spanish (MET-S). Methods These secondary analyses compared patient outcome expectations and substance use treatment outcomes in two large, multisite randomized controlled clinical trials that evaluated three sessions of MET-E or MET-S. The MET-E sample included 461 participants and the MET-S sample included 405 participants. Outcome expectations were measured by a single item regarding expectations about abstinence prior to initiating treatment. Results Outcome expectations were strongly associated with most substance use outcomes in the MET-S trial (but not in MET-E), even after controlling for severity of substance use at baseline. In MET-S, those who indicated that they were ‘unsure’ that they would achieve abstinence during treatment submitted a greater percentage of drug-positive urine toxicology screens during the treatment period than those who were ‘sure’ they would achieve abstinence (F = 18.83, p <.001). Discussion and Conclusions Patients’ outcome expectations regarding the likelihood of abstinence may be an important predictor of drug use treatment outcomes among Spanish-speakers, but not necessarily for English-speakers. Scientific Significance Individual differences and cultural factors may play a role in the association between outcome expectations and treatment outcomes. PMID:26541501

  15. The effectiveness of nurse-delivered aromatherapy in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill R; Rivard, Rachael L; Griffin, Kristen H; Kolste, Alison K; Joswiak, Denise; Kinney, Mary Ellen; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-04-01

    To examine the use and effectiveness of essential oil therapeutic interventions on pain, nausea, and anxiety, when provided by nurses to patients in acute hospital settings across a large health system. This study expands upon the limited body of literature on aromatherapy use among inpatients. Retrospective, effectiveness study using data obtained from electronic health records. Ten Allina Health hospitals located in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Nurse-delivered aromatherapy. Change in patient-reported pain, anxiety, and nausea, rated before and after receiving aromatherapy using a numeric rating scale (0-10). There were 10,262 hospital admissions during the study time frame in which nurse-delivered aromatherapy was part of patient care. The majority of admissions receiving aromatherapy were females (81.71%) and white (87.32%). Over 75% of all aromatherapy sessions were administered via inhalation. Lavender had the highest absolute frequency (49.5%) of use regardless of mode of administration, followed by ginger (21.2%), sweet marjoram (12.3%), mandarin (9.4%), and combination oils (7.6%). Sweet marjoram resulted in the largest single oil average pain change at -3.31 units (95% CI: -4.28, -2.33), while lavender and sweet marjoram had equivalent average anxiety changes at -2.73 units, and ginger had the largest single oil average change in nausea at -2.02 units (95% CI: -2.55, -1.49). Essential oils generally resulted in significant clinical improvements based on their intended use, although each oil also showed ancillary benefits for other symptoms. Future research should explore use of additional essential oils, modes of administration, and different patient populations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Current perspectives on Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with anxiety and related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewton, Louise; Smith, Jessica; Rossouw, Pieter; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current review is to provide a summary of research into Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for anxiety disorders. We include 37 randomized controlled trials that examined the efficacy of iCBT programs in adults (aged over 18 years), as compared with waiting list or active control. The included studies were identified from Medline searches and from reference lists, and only published data were included. Several trials of iCBT for generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia were identified. Two trials of iCBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder were identified, whilst one trial each was identified for hypochondriasis, specific phobia (spiders), and post-traumatic stress disorder. Finally, there were five trials that focused on transdiagnostic therapy for either a range of comorbid anxiety disorders or comorbid anxiety and depression. Between-group effect sizes were moderate to large for all disorders, and ranged from 0.30 to 2.53. iCBT was found to be commensurate with face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy whether delivered individually or in group format. Guidance may not be necessary for iCBT to be effective for immediate gains, but may be more important in longer-term maintenance of symptom improvement and maximizing patient adherence. The clinical experience of the individual providing guidance does not appear to impact treatment outcomes. Future research needs to focus on the optimal level of guidance required to generate maximum patient benefits, whilst balancing the efficient use of clinician time and resources. Evidence-based contraindications to iCBT should also be developed so that the choice of treatment modality accurately reflects patients’ needs. Further research should be conducted into the effective elements of iCBT, as well as the extent to which therapy enhancers and advancing technology can be accommodated into established iCBT frameworks. PMID:24511246

  17. Helping oxytocin deliver: considerations in the development of oxytocin-based therapeutics for brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, K; Feifel, D

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding a drought in psychopharmacology have risen from many quarters. From one perspective, the wellspring of bedrock medications for anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia was serendipitously discovered over 30 year ago, the swell of pharmaceutical investment in drug discovery has receded, and the pipeline's flow of medications with unique mechanisms of action (i.e., glutamatergic agents, CRF antagonists) has slowed to a trickle. Might oxytocin (OT)-based therapeutics be an oasis? Though a large basic science literature and a slowly increasing number of studies in human diseases support this hope, the bulk of extant OT studies in humans are single-dose studies on normals, and do not directly relate to improvements in human brain-based diseases. Instead, these studies have left us with a field pregnant with therapeutic possibilities, but barren of definitive treatments. In this clinically oriented review, we discuss the extant OT literature with an eye toward helping OT deliver on its promise as a therapeutic agent. To this end, we identify 10 key questions that we believe future OT research should address. From this overview, several conclusions are clear: (1) the OT system represents an extremely promising target for novel CNS drug development; (2) there is a pressing need for rigorous, randomized controlled clinical trials targeting actual patients; and (3) in order to inform the design and execution of these vital trials, we need further translational studies addressing the questions posed in this review. Looking forward, we extend a cautious hope that the next decade of OT research will birth OT-targeted treatments that can truly deliver on this system's therapeutic potential.

  18. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dear, R J; Akimoto, T; Arens, E A; Brager, G; Candido, C; Cheong, K W D; Li, B; Nishihara, N; Sekhar, S C; Tanabe, S; Toftum, J; Zhang, H; Zhu, Y

    2013-12-01

    Climate change and the urgency of decarbonizing the built environment are driving technological innovation in the way we deliver thermal comfort to occupants. These changes, in turn, seem to be setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research. This article presents a literature review of major changes, developments, and trends in the field of thermal comfort research over the last 20 years. One of the main paradigm shift was the fundamental conceptual reorientation that has taken place in thermal comfort thinking over the last 20 years; a shift away from the physically based determinism of Fanger's comfort model toward the mainstream and acceptance of the adaptive comfort model. Another noticeable shift has been from the undesirable toward the desirable qualities of air movement. Additionally, sophisticated models covering the physics and physiology of the human body were developed, driven by the continuous challenge to model thermal comfort at the same anatomical resolution and to combine these localized signals into a coherent, global thermal perception. Finally, the demand for ever increasing building energy efficiency is pushing technological innovation in the way we deliver comfortable indoor environments. These trends, in turn, continue setting the directions for contemporary thermal comfort research for the next decades.

  19. Metoder for Modellering, Simulering og Regulering af Større Termiske Processer anvendt i Sukkerproduktion. Methods for Modelling, Simulation and Control of Large Scale Thermal Systems Applied in Sugar Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis is to investigate and develop methods for modelling, simulation and control applicable in large scale termal industrial plants. An ambition has been to evaluate the results in a physical process. Sugar production is well suited for the purpose. In collaboration...... simulator has been developed. The simulator handles the normal working conditions relevant to control engineers. A non-linear dynamic model based on mass and energy balances has been developed. The model parameters have been adjusted to data measured on a Danish sugar plant. The simulator consists...... of a computer, a data terminal and an electric interface corresponding to the interface at the sugar plant. The simulator is operating in realtime and thus a realistic test of controllers is possible. The idiomatic control methodology has been investigated developing a control concept for the evaporation...

  20. Metoder for Modellering, Simulering og Regulering af Større Termiske Processer anvendt i Sukkerproduktion. Methods for Modelling, Simulation and Control of Large Scale Thermal Systems Applied in Sugar Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis is to investigate and develop methods for modelling, simulation and control applicable in large scale termal industrial plants. An ambition has been to evaluate the results in a physical process. Sugar production is well suited for the purpose. In collaboration...... with The Danish Sugar Corporation two subsystems in the production have been chosen for application - the evaporation process and the crystallization process. In order to obtain information about the static and dynamic behaviour of the subsystems, field measurements have been performed. A realtime evaporator...... simulator has been developed. The simulator handles the normal working conditions relevant to control engineers. A non-linear dynamic model based on mass and energy balances has been developed. The model parameters have been adjusted to data measured on a Danish sugar plant. The simulator consists...

  1. Locally-Delivered T-Cell-Derived Cellular Vehicles Efficiently Track and Deliver Adenovirus Delta24-RGD to Infiltrating Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger K. Balvers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviral vectors are a promising alternative for the treatment of glioblastoma. Recent publications have demonstrated the advantages of shielding viral particles within cellular vehicles (CVs, which can be targeted towards the tumor microenvironment. Here, we studied T-cells, often having a natural capacity to target tumors, for their feasibility as a CV to deliver the oncolytic adenovirus, Delta24-RGD, to glioblastoma. The Jurkat T-cell line was assessed in co-culture with the glioblastoma stem cell (GSC line, MGG8, for the optimal transfer conditions of Delta24-RGD in vitro. The effect of intraparenchymal and tail vein injections on intratumoral virus distribution and overall survival was addressed in an orthotopic glioma stem cell (GSC-based xenograft model. Jurkat T-cells were demonstrated to facilitate the amplification and transfer of Delta24-RGD onto GSCs. Delta24-RGD dosing and incubation time were found to influence the migratory ability of T-cells towards GSCs. Injection of Delta24-RGD-loaded T-cells into the brains of GSC-bearing mice led to migration towards the tumor and dispersion of the virus within the tumor core and infiltrative zones. This occurred after injection into the ipsilateral hemisphere, as well as into the non-tumor-bearing hemisphere. We found that T-cell-mediated delivery of Delta24-RGD led to the inhibition of tumor growth compared to non-treated controls, resulting in prolonged survival (p = 0.007. Systemic administration of virus-loaded T-cells resulted in intratumoral viral delivery, albeit at low levels. Based on these findings, we conclude that T-cell-based CVs are a feasible approach to local Delta24-RGD delivery in glioblastoma, although efficient systemic targeting requires further improvement.

  2. Delivering stepped care: an analysis of implementation in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards David A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United Kingdom, clinical guidelines recommend that services for depression and anxiety should be structured around a stepped care model, where patients receive treatment at different 'steps,' with the intensity of treatment (i.e., the amount and type increasing at each step if they fail to benefit at previous steps. There are very limited data available on the implementation of this model, particularly on the intensity of psychological treatment at each step. Our objective was to describe patient pathways through stepped care services and the impact of this on patient flow and management. Methods We recorded service design features of four National Health Service sites implementing stepped care (e.g., the types of treatments available and their links with other treatments, together with the actual treatments received by individual patients and their transitions between different treatment steps. We computed the proportions of patients accessing, receiving, and transiting between the various steps and mapped these proportions visually to illustrate patient movement. Results We collected throughput data on 7,698 patients referred. Patient pathways were highly complex and very variable within and between sites. The ratio of low (e.g., self-help to high-intensity (e.g., cognitive behaviour therapy treatments delivered varied between sites from 22:1, through 2.1:1, 1.4:1 to 0.5:1. The numbers of patients allocated directly to high-intensity treatment varied from 3% to 45%. Rates of stepping up from low-intensity treatment to high-intensity treatment were less than 10%. Conclusions When services attempt to implement the recommendation for stepped care in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines, there were significant differences in implementation and consequent high levels of variation in patient pathways. Evaluations driven by the principles of implementation science (such as targeted planning

  3. Negative effects of internet interventions: a qualitative content analysis of patients' experiences with treatments delivered online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Alexander; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Schmidt, Brad; Carlbring, Per

    2015-01-01

    Internet interventions are defined as the delivery of health care-related treatments via an online or a smartphone interface, and have been shown to be a viable alternative to face-to-face treatments. However, not all patients benefit from such treatments, and it is possible that some may experience negative effects. Investigations of face-to-face treatments indicate that deterioration occurs in 5-10% of all patients. The nature and scope of other negative effects of Internet interventions is, however, largely unknown. Hence, the current study explored patients' reported negative experiences while undergoing treatments delivered via the Internet. Data from four large clinical trials (total N = 558) revealed that 9.3% of patients reported some type of negative effects. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore the patients' responses to open-ended questions regarding their negative experiences. Results yielded two broad categories and four subcategories of negative effects: patient-related negative effects (insight and symptom) and treatment-related negative effects (implementation and format). Results emphasize the importance of always considering negative effects in Internet-based interventions, and point to several ways of preventing such experiences, including regular assessment of negative events, increasing the flexibility of treatment schedules and therapist contact, as well as prolonging the treatment duration.

  4. Life cycle assessment perspectives on delivering an infant in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campion, Nicole [University of Pittsburgh, 949 Benedum Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Thiel, Cassandra L., E-mail: clt31@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh, 949 Benedum Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); DeBlois, Justin [University of Pittsburgh, 949 Benedum Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Woods, Noe C. [Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Landis, Amy E. [Arizona State University, P.O. Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 (United States); Bilec, Melissa M. [University of Pittsburgh, 949 Benedum Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    This study introduces life cycle assessment as a tool to analyze one aspect of sustainability in healthcare: the birth of a baby. The process life cycle assessment case study presented evaluates two common procedures in a hospital, a cesarean section and a vaginal birth. This case study was conducted at Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, which delivers over 10,000 infants per year. The results show that heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), waste disposal, and the production of the disposable custom packs comprise a large percentage of the environmental impacts. Applying the life cycle assessment tool to medical procedures allows hospital decision makers to target and guide efforts to reduce the environmental impacts of healthcare procedures. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle assessment helps identify the environmental impacts of medical procedures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disposable custom packs represent a large portion of environmental impacts of births. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electricity loading contributes to global warming potential and respiratory effects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impact improvements should focus on heating, ventilation, and air conditioning and disposable custom packs.

  5. Rebamipide Delivered by Brushite Cement Enhances Osteoblast and Macrophage Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in ...

  6. Delivering carbide ligands to sulfide-rich clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Herbst, Konrad; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The propensity of the terminal ruthenium carbide Ru(C)Cl2(PCy3)2 (RuC) to form carbide bridges to electron-rich transition metals enables synthetic routes to metal clusters with coexisting carbide and sulfide ligands. Electrochemical experiments show the Ru≡C ligand to exert a relatively large electron-withdrawing effect compared with PPh3, effectively shifting redox potentials.

  7. Chimpanzees do not take advantage of very low cost opportunities to deliver food to unrelated group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonk, Jennifer; Brosnan, Sarah F; Silk, Joan B; Henrich, Joseph; Richardson, Amanda S; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J; Povinelli, Daniel J

    2008-05-01

    We conducted experiments on two populations of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, to determine whether they would take advantage of opportunities to provide food rewards to familiar group members at little cost to themselves. In both of the experiments described here, chimpanzees were able to deliver identical rewards to themselves and to other members of their social groups. We compared the chimpanzees' behaviour when they were paired with another chimpanzee and when they were alone. If chimpanzees are motivated to provide benefits to others, they are expected to consistently deliver rewards to others and to distinguish between the partner-present and partner-absent conditions. Results from both experiments indicate that our subjects were largely indifferent to the benefits they could provide to others. They were less likely to provide rewards to potential recipients as the experiment progressed, and all but one of the 18 subjects were as likely to deliver rewards to an empty enclosure as to an enclosure housing another chimpanzee. These results, in conjunction with similar results obtained in previous experiments, suggest that chimpanzees are not motivated by prosocial sentiments to provide food rewards to other group members.

  8. Analysis of system thermal hydraulic responses for passive safety injection experiment at ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility. Using JAERI modified version of RELAP5/MOD2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaka, Hideaki; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kukita, Yutaka (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1994-12-01

    An experiment was conducted at the ROSA-IV/Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) on the performance of a gravity-driven emergency core coolant (ECC) injection system attached to a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Such a gravity-driven injection system, though not used in the current-generation PWRs, is proposed for future reactor designs. The experiment was performed to identify key phenomena peculiar to the operation of a gravity injection system and to provide data base for code assessment against such phenomena. The simulated injection system consisted of a tank which was initially filled with cold water of the same pressure as the primary system. The tank was connected at its top and bottom, respectively, to the cold leg and the vessel downcomer. The injection into the downcomer was driven primarily by the static head difference between the cold water in the tank and the hot water in the pressure balance line (PBL) connecting the cold leg to the tank top. The injection flow was oscillatory after the flow through the PBL became two-phase flow. The experiment was post-test analyzed using a JAERI modified version of the RELAP5/MOD2 code. The code calculation simulated reasonably well the system responses observed in the experiment, and suggested that the oscillations in the injection flow was caused by oscillatory liquid holdup in the PBL connecting the cold leg to tank top. (author).

  9. Solar Thermal Electricity Generating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sambeet; Tripathy, Pratyasha

    2012-08-01

    A Solar Thermal Electricity generating system also known as Solar Thermal Power plant is an emerging renewable energy technology, where we generate the thermal energy by concentrating and converting the direct solar radiationat medium/high temperature (300∫C ñ 800∫C). The resulting thermal energy is then used in a thermodynamic cycleto produce electricity, by running a heat engine, which turns a generator to make electricity. Solar thermal power is currently paving the way for the most cost-effective solar technology on a large scale and is heading to establish a cleaner, pollution free and secured future. Photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal technologies are two main ways of generating energy from the sun, which is considered the inexhaustible source of energy. PV converts sunlight directly into electricity whereas in Solar thermal technology, heat from the sun's rays is concentrated to heat a fluid, whose steam powers a generator that produces electricity. It is similar to the way fossil fuel-burning power plants work except that the steam is produced by the collected heat rather than from the combustion of fossil fuels. In order to generate electricity, five major varieties of solar thermal technologies used are:* Parabolic Trough Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS).* Central Receiver Power Plant.* Solar Chimney Power Plant.* Dish Sterling System.* Solar Pond Power Plant.Most parts of India,Asia experiences a clear sunny weather for about 250 to 300 days a year, because of its location in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, receiving fairly large amount of radiation as compared to many parts of the world especially Japan, Europe and the US where development and deployment of solar technologies is maximum.Whether accompanied with this benefit or not, usually we have to concentrate the solar radiation in order to compensate for the attenuation of solar radiation in its way to earthís surface, which results in from 63,2 GW/m2 at the Sun to 1 kW/m2 at

  10. Delivering Transgenic DNA Exceeding the Carrying Capacity of AAV Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Wolf, Sonya J; Samulski, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has emerged to the forefront demonstrating safe and effective phenotypic correction of diverse diseases including hemophilia B and Leber's congenital amaurosis. In addition to rAAV's high efficiency of transduction and the capacity for long-term transgene expression, the safety profile of rAAV remains unsoiled in humans with no deleterious vector-related consequences observed thus far. Despite these favorable attributes, rAAV vectors have a major disadvantage preventing widespread therapeutic applications; as the AAV capsid is the smallest described to date, it cannot package "large" genomes. Currently, the packaging capacity of rAAV has yet to be definitively defined but is approximately 5 kb, which has served as a limitation for large gene transfer. There are two main approaches that have been developed to overcome this limitation, split AAV vectors, and fragment AAV (fAAV) genome reassembly (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010). Split rAAV vector applications were developed based upon the finding that rAAV genomes naturally concatemerize in the cell post-transduction and are substrates for enhanced homologous recombination (HR) (Hirsch et al., Mol Ther 18(1):6-8, 2010; Duan et al., J Virol 73(1):161-169, 1999; Duan et al., J Virol 72(11):8568-8577, 1998; Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002). This method involves "splitting" the large transgene into two separate vectors and upon co-transduction, intracellular large gene reconstruction via vector genome concatemerization occurs via HR or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Within the split rAAV approaches there currently exist three strategies: overlapping, trans-splicing, and hybrid trans-splicing (Duan et al., Mol Ther 4(4):383-391, 2001; Halbert et al., Nat Biotechnol 20(7):697-701, 2002; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 16(1):124-130, 2008; Ghosh et al., Mol Ther 15(4):750-755, 2007). The other major

  11. Battery Thermal Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, Matthew; Saxon, Aron; Powell, Mitchell; Shi, Ying

    2016-06-07

    This poster shows the progress in battery thermal characterization over the previous year. NREL collaborated with U.S. DRIVE and USABC battery developers to obtain thermal properties of their batteries, obtained heat capacity and heat generation of cells under various power profiles, obtained thermal images of the cells under various drive cycles, and used the measured results to validate thermal models. Thermal properties are used for the thermal analysis and design of improved battery thermal management systems to support achieve life and performance targets.

  12. Thermal management concepts for higher efficiency heavy vehicles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wambsganss, M. W.

    1999-05-19

    Thermal management is a cross-cutting technology that directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, aerodynamics, driver/passenger comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and component life. This review paper provides an assessment of thermal management for large trucks, particularly as it impacts these features. Observations arrived at from a review of the state of the art for thermal management for over-the-road trucks are highlighted and commented on. Trends in the large truck industry, pertinent engine truck design and performance objectives, and the implications of these relative to thermal management, are presented. Finally, new thermal management concepts for high efficiency vehicles are described.

  13. BUSINESS PROCESS RE-ENGINEERING: THE TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE DELIVERING SPEED OF SERVICE INDUSTRY IN TANZANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Joseph Sungau; Philibert C. Ndunguru; Joseph Kimeme

    2013-01-01

    Problem statement: Delivering speed is very critical in today’s business environment. In most cases, service organizations and customers are sensitive to time spent at delivering or receiving a service. Therefore, service organizations must change in order to meet this challenge. Overtime, service organizations have worked hard to identify techniques that enhance service delivering speed for improved performance. Business process re-engineering is one of such techniques that improves busines...

  14. Uncertainty in delivered dose resulting from the distribution of source activities in a Selectron LDR afterloader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, A.K.; Castiglione, Robert; Podgorsak, M.B.; Sibata, C.H.; Shin, K.H. (Roswell Park Cancer Inst., Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine)

    1994-11-01

    The uncertainty in the delivered dose resulting from the distribution of [sup 137]Cs source activity in a clinical Selectron LDR unit has been studied. A comparison is made of the dose delivered to a point 'A' in an implant with sources of equal activity to the actual dose delivered in the same implant with source activities randomly chosen from the population in the afterloader. (author).

  15. Topically applied methotrexate is rapidly delivered into skin by fractional laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth Hjardem; Lerche, Catharina Margrethe; Vissing, Anne-Cathrine; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Hannibal, Jens; D'Alvise, Janina; Hansen, Steen Honore; Janfelt, Christian; Paasch, Uwe; Anderson, Richard Rox; Haedersdal, Merete

    2015-07-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a chemotherapeutic and anti-inflammatory drug that may cause systemic adverse effects. This study investigated kinetics and biodistribution of MTX delivered topically by ablative fractional laser (AFXL). In vitro passive diffusion of 10 mg/ml MTX (1 w/v%) was measured from 0.25 to 24 h through AFXL-processed and intact porcine skin in Franz Cells (n = 46). A 2,940 nm fractional Erbium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser generated mid-dermal microchannels at 2.4% density, and 256 mJ/microchannel. HPLC quantified MTX-concentrations in extracts from mid-dermal skin sections, donor and receiver compartments. Fluorescence microscopy of UVC-activated MTX-fluorescence and desorption electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) evaluated MTX biodistribution. AFXL-processed skin facilitated rapid MTX delivery through cone-shaped microchannels of 690 µm ablation depth, lined by the 47 µm thermal coagulation zone (CZ). Quantitatively, MTX was detectable by HPLC in mid-dermis after 15 min, significantly exceeded deposition in intact skin after 1.5 h, and saturated skin after 7 h at a 10-fold increased MTX-deposition versus intact skin (3.08 vs 0.30 mg/cm(3), p = 0.002). Transdermal permeation was < 1.5% of applied MTX before skin saturation, and increased up to 8.0% after 24 h. Qualitatively, MTX distributed into CZ within 15 min (p = 0.015) and further into surrounding dermal tissue after 1.5 h (p = 0.004). After skin saturation at 7 h, MTX fluorescence intensities in CZ and tissue were similar and DESI-MSI confirmed MTX biodistribution throughout the mid-dermal skin section. MTX absorbs rapidly into mid-dermis of AFXL-processed skin with minimal transdermal permeation until skin saturation, suggesting a possible alternative to systemic MTX for some skin disorders.

  16. Introduction to thermal transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R. Phillpot

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The relentless increase in the thermal loads imposed on devices and materials structures is driving renewed interest among materials scientists and engineers in the area of thermal transport. Applications include thermal barrier coatings on turbine blades, thermoelectric coolers, high-performance thermal transfer liquids, and heat dissipation in microelectronics. These, and other applications, demand not only ever more efficient thermal management, but also a better fundamental understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms.

  17. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Ruger Porter

    Full Text Available Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange. Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT. Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory

  18. Vascular Patterns in Iguanas and Other Squamates: Blood Vessels and Sites of Thermal Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Ruger; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Squamates use the circulatory system to regulate body and head temperatures during both heating and cooling. The flexibility of this system, which possibly exceeds that of endotherms, offers a number of physiological mechanisms to gain or retain heat (e.g., increase peripheral blood flow and heart rate, cooling the head to prolong basking time for the body) as well as to shed heat (modulate peripheral blood flow, expose sites of thermal exchange). Squamates also have the ability to establish and maintain the same head-to-body temperature differential that birds, crocodilians, and mammals demonstrate, but without a discrete rete or other vascular physiological device. Squamates offer important anatomical and phylogenetic evidence for the inference of the blood vessels of dinosaurs and other extinct archosaurs in that they shed light on the basal diapsid condition. Given this basal positioning, squamates likewise inform and constrain the range of physiological thermoregulatory mechanisms that may have been found in Dinosauria. Unfortunately, the literature on squamate vascular anatomy is limited. Cephalic vascular anatomy of green iguanas (Iguana iguana) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection (DCDVI) technique and high-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally segmented to create a surface representation of vascular pathways. Known sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in brain and cephalic thermoregulation. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were investigated to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to the dural venous sinuses. Arteries within sites of thermal exchange were found to deliver blood directly and through collateral pathways. The venous drainage was found to have multiple pathways that could influence neurosensory tissue temperature

  19. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bajorek, Beata V; Lemay, Kate S; Magin, Parker J; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    ...) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence...

  20. Steam turbine overspeed protection scheme after a sudden large -scale thermal power generating units outgoing transmission line interrupted based on zero power facility%零功率装置的发电机组外送线路中断后超速保护方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余智

    2012-01-01

    Large - scale thermal power plant is in which output channel is break off, operational units will take place overspeed, even cause the equipment damaged. To avoid the accident happened , after analysis and discussion, considering using the way of zero power facility to generator triping , so as to ensure the safety outage of equipments.%大型火力发电厂在输出通道突然中断的情况下,运行的机组将会发生超速,甚至造成损坏,为避免此类事故的发生,经过分析论证,考虑采用零功率装置方式进行切机,以确保机组设备的安全停运。

  1. Frequency Activated Fast Power Reserve for Wind Power Plant Delivered from Stored Kinetic Energy in the Wind Turbine Inertia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüppel, Thyge; Thuring, P.; Kumar, S

    2011-01-01

    With increased penetration of converter interfaced generation, synchronous generators may start to be displaced to keep the overall power balance. As a consequence the resulting inertia in the system may decrease and make the power system more exposed to frequency excursions. Here, a control...... is proposed that delivers a short-term power reserve from the kinetic energy in the wind turbine (WT) inertia, while considering the inherent characteristics of a wind power plant. The aim is to contribute with a fast power reserve to stabilize the frequency drop during large and sudden production deficits...

  2. Delivering the promise of SFC: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskog, Maria A; Nelander, Hanna; Jonson, Anna C; Halvarsson, Torbjörn

    2014-10-01

    During the past years there has been a rapid development in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) instrumentation making it a highly efficient and robust technique. Although much is written about the advantages of SFC over liquid chromatography (LC), there are not many direct comparisons detailing the gain in purification throughput, the savings in solvent consumption and the reduced environmental impact for large-scale SFC applications. We will show that a research scale separation laboratory built to handle multigram amounts can be used for kilogram separations when moving from LC to SFC.

  3. Adaptation in Africa: the global failure to deliver on funding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Simon; Chandani, Achala

    2008-12-15

    Will Africa be steamrolled by climate change? The continent harbours 33 of the Least Developed Countries, is heavily reliant on agriculture and has limited economic resources to finance adaptation. Its geographic position and high sensitivity to climatic variability make it vulnerable. Large swathes of Africa already see more frequent and severe flooding and droughts, shrinking agricultural production, the spread of diseases and the rise of conflict over scarce resources. Meanwhile, African governments are poorly equipped to respond. Overcoming these challenges demands concerted international effort – yet a huge gap yawns between the global promises, and timely action on them.

  4. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, M.E.; Cameron, C.P. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Ghanbari, C.M. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm[sup 2] that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW[sub t]. The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m [times] 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm[sup 2] over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW[sub t]. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm[sup 2] over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW[sub t]. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm[sup 2] over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW[sub t]. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  5. Thermal effects testing at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, M.E.; Cameron, C.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ghanbari, C.M. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirkland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The permanent features of the facility include a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, two point-focus parabolic concentrators, and Engine Test Facility. The heliostat field contains 220 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm{sup 2} that is uniform over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW{sub t}. The solar beam has been used to simulate aerodynamic heating for several customers. Thermal nuclear blasts have also been simulated using a high-speed shutter in combination with heliostat control. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 m {times} 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel is also available in the Solar Tower. It provides simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, an attenuator, and a parabolic concentrator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm{sup 2} over and delivers a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW{sub t}. A second furnace produces flux levels up to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a 4 cm diameter and total power of 60 kW{sub t}. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11 m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm{sup 2} over a 2.5 cm diameter and total power of 75 kW{sub t}. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses.

  6. Hagedorn States and Thermalization

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    In recent years Hagedorn states have been used to explain the physics close to the critical temperature within a hadron gas. Because of their large decay widths these massive resonances lower $\\eta/s$ to near the AdS/CFT limit within the hadron gas phase. A comparison of the Hagedorn model to recent lattice results is made and it is found that for both Tc =176 MeV and Tc=196 MeV, the hadrons can reach chemical equilibrium almost immediately, well before the chemical freeze-out temperatures found in thermal fits for a hadron gas without Hagedorn states. In this paper we also observe the effects of Hagedorn States on the $K^+/\\pi^+$ horn seen at AGS, SPS, and RHIC.

  7. Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

    1998-12-01

    This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24

  8. Mars Exploration Rover thermal test program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Kinsella, Gary; Novak, Keith; Tsuyuki, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) landed on the surface of Mars to begin their mission as robotic geologists. A year prior to these historic landings, both rovers and the spacecraft that delivered them to Mars, were completing a series of environmental tests in facilities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper describes the test program undertaken to validate the thermal design and verify the workmanship integrity of both rovers and the spacecraft. The spacecraft, which contained the rover within the aeroshell, were tested in a 7.5 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber. Thermal balance was performed for the near earth (hot case) condition and for the near Mars (cold case) condition. A solar simulator was used to provide the solar boundary condition on the solar array. IR lamps were used to simulate the solar heat load on the aeroshell for the off-sun attitudes experienced by the spacecraft during its cruise to Mars. Each rover was tested separately in a 3.0 m diameter thermal vacuum chamber over conditions simulating the warmest and coldest expected Mars diurnal temperature cycles. The environmental tests were conducted in a quiescent nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 8 to 10 Torr. In addition to thermal balance testing, the science instruments on board the rovers were tested successfully in the extreme environmental conditions anticipated for the mission. A solar simulator was not used in these tests.

  9. Enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electric properties of graphene aerogels via supercritical ethanol drying and high-temperature thermal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yehong; Zhou, Shanbao; Hu, Ping; Zhao, Guangdong; Li, Yongxia; Zhang, Xinghong; Han, Wenbo

    2017-05-03

    Graphene aerogels with high surface areas, ultra-low densities and thermal conductivities have been prepared to exploit their wide applications from pollution adsorption to energy storage, supercapacitor, and thermal insulation. However, the low mechanical properties, poor thermal stability and electric conductivity restrict these aerogels' applications. In this paper, we prepared mechanically strong graphene aerogels with large BET surface areas, low thermal conductivities, high thermal stability and electric conductivities via hydrothermal reduction and supercritical ethanol drying. Annealing at 1500 °C resulted in slightly increased thermal conductivity and further improvement in mechanical properties, oxidation temperature and electric conductivity of the graphene aerogel. The large BET surface areas, together with strong mechanical properties, low thermal conductivities, high thermal stability and electrical conductivities made these graphene aerogels feasible candidates for use in a number of fields covering from batteries to sensors, electrodes, lightweight conductor and insulation materials.

  10. Thermal oxidation synthesis and magnetic properties of large-areaα-Fe2 O3 nanobelts%大面积α-Fe2O3纳米带的热氧化制备及其磁性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟明龙; 刘仲武; 焦东玲; 钟喜春; 余红雅; 曾德长

    2014-01-01

    Large-areaα-Fe2 O3 nanobelts were synthesized by heating the Fe film on silicon substrate in air,using a very simple hotplate technique.The morphologies,crystal structures,growth mechanism and magnetic prop-erties of the nanobelts were investigated.The results showed that single-crystalα-Fe2 O3 nanobelts grew per-pendicularly to the substrate along [110]direction with a very sharp tip about 10-50 nm.The length of the nanobelts were from hundreds nanometers to several micrometers.A diffusion mechanism was responsible for theα-Fe2 O3 nanostructure growth at relatively low temperatures.The Morin temperature TM and Néel temper-ature TN ofα-Fe2 O3 nanostructures were only 113 and 814 K,respectively,which were about 150 K lower than those for their bulk counterpart.%通过电热板在空气中直接加热氧化沉积在硅基片上的Fe膜,在其表面上获得大面积α-Fe2 O3纳米带,这一方法为制备大面积氧化物纳米结构提供了一种非常简单的工艺。研究了所制备的α-Fe2 O3纳米带的形貌、晶体结构、生长机制及其磁性能。α-Fe2 O3纳米带呈尖锐状并沿[110]方向垂直基片生长,其顶端为10~50 nm,长度为几百纳米至几微米。α-Fe2 O3纳米带在较低温度下的生长过程是一种扩散机制。α-Fe2 O3纳米结构的Morin温度TM、Néel温度TN 分别为113和814 K,与其块体材料相比均降低了150 K左右。

  11. Estimation of global plastic loads delivered by rivers into the sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Krauth, Tobias; Klöckner, Phillipp; Römer, Melina-Sophie; Stier, Britta; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Wagner, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    A considerable fraction of marine plastic debris likely originates from land-based sources. Transport of plastics by rivers is a potential mechanism that connects plastic debris generated on land with the marine environment. We analyze existing and experimental data of plastic loads in rivers and relate these to the amount of mismanaged plastic waste (MMPW) generated in the river catchments. We find a positive relationship between the plastic load in rivers and the amount of MMPW. Using our empirical MMPW-plastic river load-relationship we estimated the annual plastic load for 1494 rivers, ranging from small first order streams to large rivers, which have an outlet to the sea. We estimate that the global load of plastic debris delivered by rivers to the sea is 39000 tons per year with a large 95% prediction interval between 247 tons per year and 16.7 million tons per year, respectively. Our best estimate is considerably lower than the estimated total land-based inputs which range between 4.8-12.7 million tons anually (Jambeck et al. 2015). Approximately 75% of the total load is transported by the 10 top-ranked rivers which are predominantly located in Asia. These river catchments encompass countries with a large population and high economic growth but an insufficient waste infrastructure. Reducing the plastic loads in these rivers by 50% would reduce the global inputs by 37%. Of the total MMPW generated within river catchments, only a small fraction of about 0.05 % has been found to be mobile in rivers. Thus, either only a small fraction of MMPW enters the river systems, or a substantial fraction of plastic debris accumulates in river systems world wide. References: Jambeck, J. R., R. Geyer, C. Wilcox, T. R. Siegler, M. Perryman, A. Andrady, R. Narayan, and K. L. Law (2015), Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean, Science, 347(6223), 768-771, doi:10.1126/science.1260352.

  12. Solar thermal electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasemagha, Khairy Ramadan

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of modeling the thermal performance and economic feasibility of large (utility scale) and small solar thermal power plants for electricity generation. A number of solar concepts for power systems applications have been investigated. Each concept has been analyzed over a range of plant power ratings from 1 MW(sub e) to 300 MW(sub e) and over a range of capacity factors from a no-storage case (capacity factor of about 0.25 to 0.30) up to intermediate load capacity factors in the range of 0.46 to 0.60. The solar plant's economic viability is investigated by examining the effect of various parameters on the plant costs (both capital and O & M) and the levelized energy costs (LEC). The cost components are reported in six categories: collectors, energy transport, energy storage, energy conversion, balance of plant, and indirect/contingency costs. Concentrator and receiver costs are included in the collector category. Thermal and electric energy transport costs are included in the energy transport category. Costs for the thermal or electric storage are included in the energy storage category; energy conversion costs are included in the energy conversion category. The balance of plant cost category comprises the structures, land, service facilities, power conditioning, instrumentation and controls, and spare part costs. The indirect/contingency category consists of the indirect construction and the contingency costs. The concepts included in the study are (1) molten salt cavity central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-C-Salt); (2) molten salt external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Salt); (3) sodium external central receiver with sodium storage (PFCR/RE-Na); (4) sodium external central receiver with salt storage (PFCR/R-E-Na/Salt); (5) water/steam external central receiver with oil/rock storage (PFCR/R-E-W/S); (6) parabolic dish with stirling engine conversion and lead acid battery storage (PFDR/SLAB); (7) parabolic dish

  13. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research.

  14. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Rapid Thermal Design Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Charles; Cottingham, Christine; Garrison, Matthew; Melak, Tony; Peabody, Sharon; Powers, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) project had a rapid development schedule starting with project conception in spring of 2004, instrument and launch vehicle selection late in 2005 and then launch in early 2009. The lunar thermal environment is one of the harshest in our solar system with the heavy infrared loading of the moon due to low albedo, lack of lunar atmosphere, and low effective regolith conduction. This set of constraints required a thermal design which maximized performance (minimized radiator area and cold control heater power) and minimized thermal hardware build at the orbiter level (blanketing, and heater service). The orbiter design located most of the avionics on an isothermalized heat pipe panel called the IsoThermal Panel (ITP). The ITP was coupled by dual bore heat pipes to an Optical Solar Reflector (OSR) covered heat pipe radiator. By coupling all of the avionics to one system, the hardware was simplified. The seven instruments were mainly heritage instruments which resulted in their desired radiators being located by their heritage design. This minimized instrument redesigns and therefore allowed them to be delivered earlier, though it resulted in a more complex orbiter level blanket and heater service design. Three of the instruments were mounted on a tight pointing M55J optical bench that needed to be covered in heaters to maintain pointing. Two were mounted to spacecraft controlled radiators. One was mounted to the ITP Dual Bores. The last was mounted directly to the bus structure on the moon facing panel. The propulsion system utilized four-20 pound insertion thrusters and eight-5 pound attitude control thrusters (ACS) in addition to 1000 kg of fuel in two large tanks. The propulsion system had a heater cylinder and a heated mounting deck for the insertion thrusters which coupled most of the propulsion design together simplifying the heater design. The High Gain Antenna System (HGAS) and Solar Array System (SAS) used dual axis

  15. An experimental system for thermal performance test of large-scale air-cooling towers%大型间接空冷机组空冷塔热力性能实验系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席新铭; 郭永红; 杜小泽; 杨立军; 杨勇平

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of a 600 MW indirect air cooling unit,an experimental system for large-scale air-coo-ing tower was designed by means of the similarity principles,with a proportion of 1 to 30.This system con-sists of modeling air cooling tower,air cooling modeling radiator,heat load power control system and data collection system.During the experiment,the heat load can be regulated by the control system,according to the parameters'value and experimental purpose.The calculation shows the measurement error of heat transfer coefficient of this experimental system is less than 20%.Through this system,the flow and heat transfer characteristics at inside and outside of the dry-cooling tower under various environmental condi-tions can be measured.Moreover,the correlations of flow and heat transfer of air-cooled heat exchanger and the off-design performance of the indirect dry cooling system can be obtained.The hot plume recirculation flows,anti-freezing in winter and the thermo-hydraulic performances for stack and tower integration design can be investigated using this experimental system.The design principle,basic parameters and measuring errors were analyzed.%以某600 MW间接空冷机组的空冷塔为原型,按1∶30的比例,根据相似原理设计了1套自然环境条件下大型间接空冷塔的实验系统。该系统由模型空冷塔、空冷模型散热器、散热热负荷控制系统及数据采集系统等组成。实验期间可根据数值大小及实验目的利用控制系统调整热负荷。对实验数据计算及分析,表明:该空冷塔实验系统的换热系数测量误差小于20%;利用该实验系统,可获得不同环境气象条件下,空冷塔内部空气流场特性,以及散热负荷的空间分布规律;可进行间接空冷系统热空气回流、冬季防冻及烟塔合一条件下塔内气体流动传热机理的研究。

  16. Pilot point temperature regulation for thermal lesion control during ultrasound thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H L; Chen, Y Y; Yen, J Y; Lin, W L

    2004-03-01

    The fundamental goal of ultrasound thermal therapy is to provide proper thermal lesion formations for effective tumour treatment. The quality of the therapy depends mostly on its positional precision. To date, most ultrasound thermal therapy treatments have focused on the formation of power or temperature patterns. The non-linear and time-delay effects of thermal dose formation prohibit direct control of the thermal dose distribution. In the paper, the control of thermal lesions by regulation of the temperature of a pilot point is proposed. This scheme utilises the high correlation between temperature elevation and thermal dose at the forward boundary of thermal lesions. To verify the feasibility, a 2D ultrasound phased array system was used to generate thermal lesions of various sizes, and the temperature elevation required to generate a thermal dose threshold was investigated. Results showed that the required temperature elevation was found to be a reasonably constant value of 52.5 degrees C under differing conditions when the focal area was small. When the focal area under consideration was large, the required temperature elevation became a monotonic function of blood perfusion rate, ranging from 49.2 to 52.5 degrees C. When the reference temperature of the pilot point was set at a conservative value (52.5 degrees C), the thermal lesions were controlled precisely under a wide range of blood perfusion and power pattern changes, tested by using a more realistic model that takes into account thermal-induced attenuation and blood perfusion changes. This changed the complex thermal dose control problem into a simple temperature regulation problem, which makes implementation of thermal lesion control easier, giving the scheme a high potential for application to current ultrasound thermal therapy systems.

  17. CFRP lightweight structures for extremely large telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Niels Christian; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Schroll, J.

    2008-01-01

    Telescope structures are traditionally built out of steel. To improve the possibility of realizing the ambitious extremely large telescopes, materials with a higher specific stiffness and a lower coefficient of thermal expansion are needed. An important possibility is Carbon Fibre Reinforced...... Plastic (CFRP). The advantages of using CFRP for the secondary mirror support structure of the European overwhelmingly large telescope are discussed....

  18. Thermal conductivity enhancement in thermal grease containing different CuO structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Zhao, Junchang; Wang, Mingzhu; Hu, Yiheng; Chen, Lifei; Xie, Huaqing

    2015-01-01

    Different cupric oxide (CuO) structures have attracted intensive interest because of their promising applications in various fields. In this study, three kinds of CuO structures, namely, CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres, are synthesized by solution-based synthetic methods. The morphologies and crystal structures of these CuO structures are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffractometer, respectively. They are used as thermal conductive fillers to prepare silicone-based thermal greases, giving rise to great enhancement in thermal conductivity. Compared with pure silicone base, the thermal conductivities of thermal greases with CuO microdisks, CuO nanoblocks, and CuO microspheres are 0.283, 0256, and 0.239 W/mK, respectively, at filler loading of 9 vol.%, which increases 139%, 116%, and 99%, respectively. These thermal greases present a slight descendent tendency in thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. These experimental data are compared with Nan's model prediction, indicating that the shape factor has a great influence on thermal conductivity improvement of thermal greases with different CuO structures. Meanwhile, due to large aspect ratio of CuO microdisks, they can form thermal networks more effectively than the other two structures, resulting in higher thermal conductivity enhancement.

  19. Multiple thermal transitions and anisotropic thermal expansions of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'akobovitz, Assaf

    2016-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) hold the potential to play an instrumental role in a wide variety of applications in micro- and nano-devices and composites. However, their successful large-scale implementation in engineering systems requires a thorough understanding of their material properties, including their thermal behavior, which was the focus of the current study. Thus, the thermal expansion of as-grown VA-CNT microstructures was investigated while increasing the temperature from room temperature to 800 °C and then cooling it down. First thermal transition was observed at 191 ± 68 °C during heating, and an additional thermal transition was observed at 523 ± 138 °C during heating and at similar temperatures during cooling. Each thermal transition was characterized by a significant change in the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), which can be related to a morphological change in the VA-CNT microstructures. Measurements of the CTEs in the lateral directions revealed differences in the lateral thermal behaviors of the top, middle, and bottom portions of the VA-CNT microstructures, again indicating that their morphology dominates their thermal characteristics. A hysteretic behavior was observed, as the measured values of CTEs were altered due to the applied thermal loads and the height of the microstructures was slightly higher compared to its initial value. These findings provide an insight into the anisotropic thermal behavior of VA-CNT microstructures and shed light on the relationship between their morphology and thermal behavior.

  20. EU-NORSEWIND - Delivering Offshore Wind Speed Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldroyd, Andy; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Stickland, M.T.

    Offshore wind is the major growth area in the wind industry sector today, with a host of large projects being announced and innovative approaches being proposed. However, with all this investment and innovation there remains a key, fundamental missing element - a thorough understanding...... of the offshore wind climatology and likely wind resource. As the wind industry starts to look in detail at the wind regime offshore, the need for more physical data becomes apparent. As well as the normal AEP requirements for project finance, baseline data is required in order to better understand the local...... conditions with respect to shear and hence loading implications, and of equal concern directionality which can feed into important research areas such as offshore wake propagation. Indeed, a good baseline understanding of the wind flow regime is essential in being able to determine the accumulative impact...