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Sample records for deleterious mutation accumulation

  1. Deleterious mutation accumulation in asexual Timema stick insects.

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    Henry, Lee; Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is extremely widespread in spite of its presumed costs relative to asexual reproduction, indicating that it must provide significant advantages. One postulated benefit of sex and recombination is that they facilitate the purging of mildly deleterious mutations, which would accumulate in asexual lineages and contribute to their short evolutionary life span. To test this prediction, we estimated the accumulation rate of coding (nonsynonymous) mutations, which are expected to be deleterious, in parts of one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear (Actin and Hsp70) genes in six independently derived asexual lineages and related sexual species of Timema stick insects. We found signatures of increased coding mutation accumulation in all six asexual Timema and for each of the three analyzed genes, with 3.6- to 13.4-fold higher rates in the asexuals as compared with the sexuals. In addition, because coding mutations in the asexuals often resulted in considerable hydrophobicity changes at the concerned amino acid positions, coding mutations in the asexuals are likely associated with more strongly deleterious effects than in the sexuals. Our results demonstrate that deleterious mutation accumulation can differentially affect sexual and asexual lineages and support the idea that deleterious mutation accumulation plays an important role in limiting the long-term persistence of all-female lineages.

  2. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations Near Sexually Antagonistic Genes

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    Tim Connallon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation generates a steady supply of genetic variation that, while occasionally useful for adaptation, is more often deleterious for fitness. Recent research has emphasized that the fitness effects of mutations often differ between the sexes, leading to important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of genetic variation and long-term population viability. Some forms of sex-specific selection—i.e., stronger purifying selection in males than females—can help purge a population’s load of female-harming mutations and promote population growth. Other scenarios—e.g., sexually antagonistic selection, in which mutations that harm females are beneficial for males—inflate genetic loads and potentially dampen population viability. Evolutionary processes of sexual antagonism and purifying selection are likely to impact the evolutionary dynamics of different loci within a genome, yet theory has mostly ignored the potential for interactions between such loci to jointly shape the evolutionary genetic basis of female and male fitness variation. Here, we show that sexually antagonistic selection at a locus tends to elevate the frequencies of deleterious alleles at tightly linked loci that evolve under purifying selection. Moreover, haplotypes that segregate for different sexually antagonistic alleles accumulate different types of deleterious mutations. Haplotypes that carry female-benefit sexually antagonistic alleles preferentially accumulate mutations that are primarily male harming, whereas male-benefit haplotypes accumulate mutations that are primarily female harming. The theory predicts that sexually antagonistic selection should shape the genomic organization of genetic variation that differentially impacts female and male fitness, and contribute to sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fitness variation.

  3. Deleterious Mutation Accumulation in Asexual Timema Stick Insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, Lee; Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is extremely widespread in spite of its presumed costs relative to asexual reproduction, indicating that it must provide significant advantages. One postulated benefit of sex and recombination is that they facilitate the purging of mildly deleterious mutations, which would accumu

  4. Recurrent loss of sex is associated with accumulation of deleterious mutations in Oenothera.

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    Hollister, Jesse D; Greiner, Stephan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wright, Stephen I; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is nearly universal among eukaryotes. Theory predicts that the rarity of asexual eukaryotic species is in part caused by accumulation of deleterious mutations and heightened extinction risk associated with suppressed recombination and segregation in asexual species. We tested this prediction with a large data set of 62 transcriptomes from 29 species in the plant genus Oenothera, spanning ten independent transitions between sexual and a functionally asexual genetic system called permanent translocation heterozygosity. Illumina short-read sequencing and de novo transcript assembly yielded an average of 16.4 Mb of sequence per individual. Here, we show that functionally asexual species accumulate more deleterious mutations than sexual species using both population genomic and phylogenetic analysis. At an individual level, asexual species exhibited 1.8 × higher heterozygosity than sexual species. Within species, we detected a higher proportion of nonsynonymous polymorphism relative to synonymous variation within asexual compared with sexual species, indicating reduced efficacy of purifying selection. Asexual species also exhibited a greater proportion of transcripts with premature stop codons. The increased proportion of nonsynonymous mutations was also positively correlated with divergence time between sexual and asexual species, consistent with Muller's ratchet. Between species, we detected repeated increases in the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous divergence in asexual species compared with sexually reproducing sister taxa, indicating increased accumulation of deleterious mutations. These results confirm that an important advantage of sex is that it facilitates selection against deleterious alleles, which might help to explain the dearth of extant asexual species.

  5. Sex and deleterious mutations.

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    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  6. Efficient purging of deleterious mutations in plants with haploid selfing

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    Szovenyi, Peter [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Shaw, Jon [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Yang, Xiaohan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Devos, Nicolas [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-30

    In diploid organisms, selfing reduces the efficiency of selection in removing deleterious mutations from a population. This need not be the case for all organisms. Some plants, for example, undergo an extreme form of selfing known as intragametophytic selfing, which immediately exposes all recessive deleterious mutations in a parental genome to selective purging. Here we ask how effectively deleterious mutations are removed from such plants. Specifically, we study the extent to which deleterious mutations accumulate in a predominantly selfing and a predominantly outcrossing pair of moss species, using genome-wide transcriptome data. We find that the selfing species purge significantly more non-synonymous mutations, as well as a greater proportion of radical amino acid changes which alter physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, their purging of deleterious mutation is especially strong in conserved regions of protein-coding genes. Our observations show that selfing need not impede but can even accelerate the removal of deleterious mutations, and do so on a genome-wide scale.

  7. Purging deleterious mutations under self fertilization: paradoxical recovery in fitness with increasing mutation rate in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Levi T Morran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of deleterious mutations can drastically reduce population mean fitness. Self-fertilization is thought to be an effective means of purging deleterious mutations. However, widespread linkage disequilibrium generated and maintained by self-fertilization is predicted to reduce the efficacy of purging when mutations are present at multiple loci. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the ability of self-fertilizing populations to purge deleterious mutations at multiple loci by exposing obligately self-fertilizing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans to a range of elevated mutation rates and found that mutations accumulated, as evidenced by a reduction in mean fitness, in each population. Therefore, purging in obligate selfing populations is overwhelmed by an increase in mutation rate. Surprisingly, we also found that obligate and predominantly self-fertilizing populations exposed to very high mutation rates exhibited consistently greater fitness than those subject to lesser increases in mutation rate, which contradicts the assumption that increases in mutation rate are negatively correlated with fitness. The high levels of genetic linkage inherent in self-fertilization could drive this fitness increase. CONCLUSIONS: Compensatory mutations can be more frequent under high mutation rates and may alleviate a portion of the fitness lost due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations through epistatic interactions with deleterious mutations. The prolonged maintenance of tightly linked compensatory and deleterious mutations facilitated by self-fertilization may be responsible for the fitness increase as linkage disequilibrium between the compensatory and deleterious mutations preserves their epistatic interaction.

  8. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

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    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  9. The effect of deleterious mutations on neutral molecular variation

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    Charlesworth, B.; Morgan, M.T.; Charlesworth, D. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Selection against deleterious alleles maintained by mutation may cause a reduction in the amount of genetic variability at linked neutral sites. This is because a new neutral variant can remain in a large population for a long period of time only if it is maintained in gametes that are free of deleterious alleles, and hence are not destined for rapid elimination from the population by selection. Approximate formulas are derived for the reduction below classical neutral values resulting from such background selection against deleterious mutations, for the mean times of fixation and loss of new mutations, nucleotide site diversity, and number of segregating sites. These formulas apply to random-mating populations with no genetic recombination, and to populations reproducing exclusively asexually or by self-fertilization. For a given selection regime and mating system, the reduction is an exponential function of the total mutation rate to deleterious mutations for the section of the genome involved. Simulations show that the effect decreases rapidly with increasing recombination frequency or rate of outcrossing. The mean time to loss of new neutral mutations and the total number of segregating neutral sites are less sensitive to background selection than the other statistics, unless the population size is of the order of a hundred thousand or more. The stationary distribution of allele frequencies at the neutral sites is correspondingly skewed in favor of rare alleles, compared with the classical neutral result. Observed reductions in molecular variation in low recombination genomic regions of sufficiently large size, for instance in the centromere-proximal regions of Drosophila autosomes or in highly selfing plant populations, may be partly due to background selection against deleterious mutations. 58 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Parasites and deleterious mutations: interactions influencing the evolutionary maintenance of sex.

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    Park, A W; Jokela, J; Michalakis, Y

    2010-05-01

    The restrictive assumptions associated with purely genetic and purely ecological mechanisms suggest that neither of the two forces, in isolation, can offer a general explanation for the evolutionary maintenance of sex. Consequently, attention has turned to pluralistic models (i.e. models that apply both ecological and genetic mechanisms). Existing research has shown that combining mutation accumulation and parasitism allows restrictive assumptions about genetic and parasite parameter values to be relaxed while still predicting the maintenance of sex. However, several empirical studies have shown that deleterious mutations and parasitism can reduce fitness to a greater extent than would be expected if the two acted independently. We show how interactions between these genetic and ecological forces can completely reverse predictions about the evolution of reproductive modes. Moreover, we demonstrate that synergistic interactions between infection and deleterious mutations can render sex evolutionarily stable even when there is antagonistic epistasis among deleterious mutations, thereby widening the conditions for the evolutionary maintenance of sex.

  11. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

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    Liat Rockah-Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  12. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

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    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  13. Mate choice among yeast gametes can purge deleterious mutations.

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    Tazzyman, S J; Seymour, R M; Pomiankowski, A; Greig, D

    2012-08-01

    Meiosis in Saccharomyces yeast produces four haploid gametes that usually fuse with each other, an extreme form of self-fertilization among the products of a single meiosis known as automixis. The gametes signal to each other with sex pheromone. Better-quality gametes produce stronger signals and are preferred as mates. We suggest that the function of this signalling system is to enable mate choice among the four gametes from a single meiosis and so to promote the clearance of deleterious mutations. To support this claim, we construct a mathematical model that shows that signalling during automixis (i) improves the long-term fitness of a yeast colony and (ii) lowers its mutational load. We also show that the benefit to signalling is greater with larger numbers of segregating mutations.

  14. Inferring Deleterious-Mutation Parameters in Natural Daphnia Populations

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    Deng Hong-Wen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Deng and Lynch (1, 2 proposed to characterize deleterious genomic mutations from changes in the mean and genetic variance of fitness traits upon selfing in outcrossing populations. Such observations can be readily acquired in cyclical parthenogens. Selfing and life-table experiments were performed for two such Daphnia populations. A significant inbreeding depression and an increase of genetic variance for all traits analyzed were observed. Deng and Lynch's (2 procedures were employed to estimate the genomic mutation rate (U, mean dominance coefficient ( , mean selection coefficient ( , and scaled genomic mutational variance ( . On average, , , and (^ indicates an estimate are 0.84, 0.30, 0.14 and 4.6E-4 respectively. For the true values, the and are lower bounds, and and upper bounds.

  15. Dynamics of a sex-linked deleterious mutation in populations subject to sex reversal.

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    Markku Karhunen

    Full Text Available The heterogametic sex chromosomes (i.e. mammalian Y and avian W do not usually recombine with the homogametic sex chromosomes which is known to lead into rapid degeneration of Y and W due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. On the other hand, some 96% of amphibian species have homomorphic, i.e. non-degenerate Y chromosomes. Nicolas Perrin's fountain-of-youth hypothesis states that this is a result of recombination between X and Y chromosomes in sex-reversed individuals. In this study, I model the consequences of such recombination for the dynamics of a deleterious mutation occurring in Y chromosomes. As expected, even relatively low levels of sex reversal help to purge deleterious mutations. However, the population-dynamic consequences of this depend on the type of selection that operates on the population undergoing sex reversal. Under fecundity selection, sex reversal can be beneficial for some parameter values, whereas under survival selection, it seems to be always harmful.

  16. Dynamics of a Sex-Linked Deleterious Mutation in Populations Subject to Sex Reversal

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    Markku Karhunen

    2011-01-01

    The heterogametic sex chromosomes (i.e. mammalian Y and avian W) do not usually recombine with the homogametic sex chromosomes which is known to lead into rapid degeneration of Y and W due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. On the other hand, some 96% of amphibian species have homomorphic, i.e. non-degenerate Y chromosomes. Nicolas Perrin's fountain-of-youth hypothesis states that this is a result of recombination between X and Y chromosomes in sex-reversed individuals. In this study, ...

  17. Relative effectiveness of mating success and sperm competition at eliminating deleterious mutations in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Sean C A Clark

    Full Text Available Condition-dependence theory predicts that sexual selection will facilitate adaptation by selecting against deleterious mutations that affect the expression of sexually selected traits indirectly via condition. Recent empirical studies have provided support for this prediction; however, their results do not elucidate the relative effects of pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection on deleterious mutations. We used the Drosophila melanogaster model system to discern the relative contributions of pre- and postcopulatory processes to selection against deleterious mutations. To assess second-male ejaculate competition success (P2; measured as the proportion of offspring attributable to the experimental male and mating success, mutant and wild-type male D. melanogaster were given the opportunity to mate with females that were previously mated to a standard competitor male. This process was repeated for males subjected to a diet quality manipulation to test for effects of environmentally-manipulated condition on P2 and mating success. While none of the tested mutations affected P2, there was a clear effect of condition. Conversely, several of the mutations affected mating success, while condition showed no effect. Our results suggest that precopulatory selection may be more effective than postcopulatory selection at removing deleterious mutations. The opposite result obtained for our diet manipulation points to an interesting discrepancy between environmental and genetic manipulations of condition, which may be explained by the multidimensionality of condition. Establishing whether the various stages of sexual selection affect deleterious mutations differently, and to what extent, remains an important issue to resolve.

  18. The genomic load of deleterious mutations: relevance to death in infancy and childhood.

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    James Alfred Morris

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The human diploid genome has approximately 40,000 functioning conserved genes distributed within 6 billion base pairs of DNA. Most individuals carry a few heterozygous deleterious mutations and this leads to an increased risk of recessive disease in the offspring of cousin unions. Rare recessive disease is more common in the children of cousin marriages than in the general population, even though less than 1% of marriages in the Western World are between first cousins. But more than 90% of the children of cousin marriages do not have recessive disease and are as healthy as the rest of the population. A mathematical model based on these observations generates simultaneous equations linking the mean number of deleterious mutations in the genome of adults (M, the mean number of new deleterious mutations arising in gametogenesis and passed to the next generation (N and the number of genes in the human diploid genome (L. The best estimates are that M is less than 7 and N is approximately 1. The nature of meiosis indicates that deleterious mutations in zygotes will have a Poisson distribution with a mean of M + N. There must be strong selective pressure against zygotes at the upper end of the Poisson distribution otherwise the value of M would rise with each generation. It is suggested that this selection is based on synergistic interaction of heterozygous deleterious mutations acting in large complex highly redundant and robust genetic networks. To maintain the value of M in single figures over many thousands of generations means that the zygote loss must be of the order of 30%. Most of this loss will occur soon after conception but some will occur later; during fetal development, in infancy and even in childhood. Selection means genetic death and this is caused by disease to which the deleterious mutations predispose. In view of this genome sequencing should be undertaken in all infant deaths in which the cause of death is not ascertained by

  19. Markov models for accumulating mutations

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    Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a waiting time model for the accumulation of genetic changes. The continuous time conjunctive Bayesian network is defined by a partially ordered set of mutations and by the rate of fixation of each mutation. The partial order encodes constraints on the order in which mutations can fixate in the population, shedding light on the mutational pathways underlying the evolutionary process. We study a censored version of the model and derive equations for an EM algorithm to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters. We also show how to select the maximum likelihood poset. The model is applied to genetic data from different cancers and from drug resistant HIV samples, indicating implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  20. BRCA1/2 mutation analysis in 41 ovarian cell lines reveals only one functionally deleterious BRCA1 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stordal, Britta

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in BRCA1\\/2 increase the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Germline BRCA1\\/2 mutations occur in 8.6-13.7% of unselected epithelial ovarian cancers, somatic mutations are also frequent. BRCA1\\/2 mutated or dysfunctional cells may be sensitive to PARP inhibition by synthetic lethality. The aim of this study is to comprehensively characterise the BRCA1\\/2 status of a large panel of ovarian cancer cell lines available to the research community to assist in biomarker studies of novel drugs and in particular of PARP inhibitors. The BRCA1\\/2 genes were sequenced in 41 ovarian cell lines, mRNA expression of BRCA1\\/2 and gene methylation status of BRCA1 was also examined. The cytotoxicity of PARP inhibitors olaparib and veliparib was examined in 20 cell lines. The cell line SNU-251 has a deleterious BRCA1 mutation at 5564G > A, and is the only deleterious BRCA1\\/2 mutant in the panel. Two cell lines (UPN-251 and PEO1) had deleterious mutations as well as additional reversion mutations that restored the protein functionality. Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1\\/2 were relatively common, found in 14.6% of cell lines. BRCA1 was methylated in two cell lines (OVCAR8, A1847) and there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression. The BRCA1 methylated cell lines were more sensitive to PARP inhibition than wild-type cells. The SNU-251 deleterious mutant was more sensitive to PARP inhibition, but only in a long-term exposure to correct for its slow growth rate. Cell lines derived from metastatic disease are significantly more resistant to veliparib (2.0 fold p = 0.03) compared to those derived from primary tumours. Resistance to olaparib and veliparib was correlated Pearsons-R 0.5393, p = 0.0311. The incidence of BRCA1\\/2 deleterious mutations 1\\/41 cell lines derived from 33 different patients (3.0%) is much lower than the population incidence. The reversion mutations and high frequency of heterozygous mutations suggest that there is a selective

  1. A perspective on the evolution of germ-cell development and germinal mosaics of deleterious mutations.

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    Woodruff, Ronny C; Balinski, Michael A; Bouzat, Juan L

    2015-10-01

    In many animals a small number of primordial germ cells (PGCs) are set aside early in development, mitosis and mitochondrial DNA syntheses are arrested, transcription is stopped or reduced, and the PGCs migrate later to the emerging gonads and become germ cells. What could be the evolutionary advantage of sequestering non-dividing PGCs early in development? A commonly cited advantage is a reduction in the number of new deleterious mutations that would occur if there were additional divisions in PGCs early in development. We would like to add to this advantage the fact that these additional mutations in PGCs give rise to germinal mosaics (i.e., premeiotic clusters of mutation) in multiple progeny of the same individual, thus having a larger detrimental effect on the evolutionary fitness of their carriers. Here, we reviewed published studies providing evidence that germinal mosaics of deleterious mutant alleles are not rare, occur for all types of genetic damage, and have been observed in all tested organisms and in nature. We propose the hypothesis that PGC sequestration during early animal development may have evolved in part in response to selection for preventing the occurrence of premeiotic clusters of deleterious mutant alleles, and describe a series of predictions that would allow the assessment of the potential role of germinal mosaics on the evolution of PGC sequestration.

  2. Dominance effects of deleterious and beneficial mutations in a single gene of the RNA virus ϕ6.

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    Sarah B Joseph

    Full Text Available Most of our knowledge of dominance stems from studies of deleterious mutations. From these studies we know that most deleterious mutations are recessive, and that this recessivity arises from a hyperbolic relationship between protein function (i.e., protein concentration or activity and fitness. Here we investigate whether this knowledge can be used to make predictions about the dominance of beneficial and deleterious mutations in a single gene. We employed a model system--the bacteriophage φ6--that allowed us to generate a collection of mutations in haploid conditions so that it was not biased toward either dominant beneficial or recessive deleterious mutations. Screening for the ability to infect a bacterial host that does not permit infection by the wildtype φ6, we generated a collection of mutations in P3, a gene involved in attachment to the host and in phage particle assembly. The resulting collection contained mutations with both deleterious and beneficial effects on fitness. The deleterious mutations in our collection had additive effects on fitness and the beneficial mutations were recessive. Neither of these observations were predicted from previous studies of dominance. This pattern is not consistent with the hyperbolic (diminishing returns relationship between protein function and fitness that is characteristic of enzymatic genes, but could have resulted from a curve of increasing returns.

  3. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene.

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    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mohammed, Kaleemuddin; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu; Shaik, Noor Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Genetic mutations in MED12, a subunit of Mediator complex are seen in a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the underlying basis of how these pathogenic mutations elicit protein phenotype changes in terms of 3D structure, stability and protein binding sites remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the structural and functional impacts of MED12 mutations, using computational methods as an alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. The MED12 gene mutations details and their corresponding clinical associations were collected from different databases and by text-mining. Initially, diverse computational approaches were applied to categorize the different classes of mutations based on their deleterious impact to MED12. Then, protein structures for wild and mutant types built by integrative modeling were analyzed for structural divergence, solvent accessibility, stability, and functional interaction deformities. Finally, this study was able to identify that genetic mutations mapped to exon-2 region, highly conserved LCEWAV and Catenin domains induce biochemically severe amino acid changes which alters the protein phenotype as well as the stability of MED12-CYCC interactions. To better understand the deleterious nature of FS-IDs and Indels, this study asserts the utility of computational screening based on their propensity towards non-sense mediated decay. Current study findings may help to narrow down the number of MED12 mutations to be screened for mediator complex dysfunction associated genetic diseases. This study supports computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression and phenotype of proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2023-2035, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Inheritance of deleterious mutations at both BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an international sample of 32,295 women

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    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Mitra, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers have inherited a single (heterozygous) mutation. Transheterozygotes (TH) who have inherited deleterious mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are rare, and the consequences of transheterozygosity are poorly understood. METHODS: From 32,295 female BRCA...

  5. Conotruncal malformations and absent thymus due to a deleterious NKX2-6 mutation.

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    Ta-Shma, Asaf; El-lahham, Nael; Edvardson, Simon; Stepensky, Polina; Nir, Amiram; Perles, Zeev; Gavri, Sagui; Golender, Julius; Yaakobi-Simhayoff, Nurit; Shaag, Avraham; Rein, Azaria J J T; Elpeleg, Orly

    2014-04-01

    Truncus arteriosus (TA) accounts for ~1% of congenital heart defects. The aetiology of isolated TA is largely unknown but when occurring as part of a syndrome, it is mostly associated with chromosome 22q11 deletion. Vice versa, the most common congenital heart defects associated with chromosome 22q11 deletion are conotruncal malformations. In this study we investigated the cause of multiple conotruncal malformations accompanied by athymia in a consanguineous family. Whole exome analysis revealed a homozygous deleterious mutation in the NKX2-6 gene. NKX2-6 encodes a homeobox-containing protein which is expressed in mouse embryo at E8.0-E9.5 at the caudal pharyngeal arches and the outflow tract. A single missense mutation was previously implicated in the aetiology of familial isolated TA; however, null mice are entirely normal. The clear phenotype associated with a homozygous deleterious mutation in the present report, falls well within the spectrum of the cardiac defects seen in DiGeorge syndrome, is in agreement with NKX2-6 downstream location in the TBX1 signalling pathway and confirms NKX2-6 role in human cardiogenesis.

  6. Changes in protein expression due to deleterious mutations in the FA/BRCA pathway.

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    Salles, Daniela; Cabral, Rosa Estela Caseira; Pizzatti, Luciana; Bisch, Paulo M; Paixão, Julio Cesar; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Bonacossa; Seuánez, Héctor N; Cabral-Neto, Januario Bispo

    2007-12-28

    Inherited deleterious mutations in one of the Fanconi anemia genes lead to a disease, characterized by bone marrow failure, myeloid leukemia, and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. We identified proteins likely associated to the molecular signaling pathways involved in DNA repair of interstrand cross-link lesions and in mechanisms of genomic stability mediated by FA/BRCA pathways. We compared protein maps resolved by bidimensional electrophoresis and analyzed differentially expressed proteins, by mass spectrometry, between FA complementation group C (FANCC)-deficient cells, and their ectopically corrected counterpart in physiological conditions or after treatment with MMC. We found six differentially expressed proteins; among them, the checkpoint mediator protein MDC1 whose expression was disrupted in FANCC-/- cells. The potential role of differentially expressed proteins in FA phenotype is discussed.

  7. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

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    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  8. FDA Approval Summary: Rucaparib for the treatment of patients with deleterious BRCA mutation-associated advanced ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Beaver, Julia A; Horton, Sara; Fernandes, Laura L; Tang, Shenghui; Horne, Hisani N; Liu, Jinzhong; Liu, Chao; Schrieber, Sarah J; Yu, Jingyu; Song, Pengfei; Pierce, William; Robertson, Kim J; Palmby, Todd R; Chiu, Haw-Jyh; Lee, Eunice Y; Philip, Reena; Schuck, Robert; Charlab, Rosane; Banerjee, Anamitro; Chen, Xiao Hong; Wang, Xing; Goldberg, Kirsten B; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Kim, Geoffrey; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-07-27

    On December 19, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to rucaparib (RUBRACA, Clovis Oncology, Inc.) for the treatment of patients with deleterious BRCA mutation (germline and/or somatic) associated advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies. FDA also approved the FoundationFocus™ CDx BRCA test (Foundation Medicine Inc.), the first next-generation sequencing-based companion diagnostic, for identifying patients with advanced ovarian cancer eligible for treatment with rucaparib based on detection of deleterious BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutations in tumor tissue. Rucaparib's approval was based primarily on efficacy data from 106 patients with BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer who had prior treatment with two or more chemotherapies and safety data from 377 ovarian cancer patients, treated with rucaparib 600 mg orally twice daily on two open-label, single-arm trials. Investigator-assessed objective response rate was 54% (57/106; 95% CI: 44-64%), and median duration of response was 9.2 months (95% CI: 6.6, 11.7). The approved companion diagnostic verified tumor BRCA mutation status retrospectively in 96% (64/67) of patients. Common adverse reactions (≥20%) to rucaparib were nausea, fatigue, vomiting, anemia, abdominal pain, dysgeusia, constipation, decreased appetite, diarrhea, thrombocytopenia, and dyspnea. This article summarizes the FDA review and data supporting rucaparib's accelerated approval. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. A deleterious Nav1.1 mutation selectively impairs telencephalic inhibitory neurons derived from Dravet Syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yishan; Paşca, Sergiu P; Portmann, Thomas; Goold, Carleton; Worringer, Kathleen A; Guan, Wendy; Chan, Karen C; Gai, Hui; Vogt, Daniel; Chen, Ying-Jiun J; Mao, Rong; Chan, Karrie; Rubenstein, John Lr; Madison, Daniel V; Hallmayer, Joachim; Froehlich-Santino, Wendy M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2016-07-26

    Dravet Syndrome is an intractable form of childhood epilepsy associated with deleterious mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding neuronal sodium channel Nav1.1. Earlier studies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have produced mixed results regarding the importance of Nav1.1 in human inhibitory versus excitatory neurons. We studied a Nav1.1 mutation (p.S1328P) identified in a pair of twins with Dravet Syndrome and generated iPSC-derived neurons from these patients. Characterization of the mutant channel revealed a decrease in current amplitude and hypersensitivity to steady-state inactivation. We then differentiated Dravet-Syndrome and control iPSCs into telencephalic excitatory neurons or medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-like inhibitory neurons. Dravet inhibitory neurons showed deficits in sodium currents and action potential firing, which were rescued by a Nav1.1 transgene, whereas Dravet excitatory neurons were normal. Our study identifies biophysical impairments underlying a deleterious Nav1.1 mutation and supports the hypothesis that Dravet Syndrome arises from defective inhibitory neurons.

  10. Deleterious Germline BLM Mutations and the Risk for Early-onset Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoischen, A.; Gilissen, C.F.; Henkes, A.; Spruijt, L.; Zelst-Stams, W.A. van; Kets, C.M.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Schackert, H.K.; Kessel, A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Kuiper, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and increased cancer risk, caused by biallelic mutations in the RECQL-helicase gene BLM. Previous studies have led to conflicting conclusions as to whether carriers of heterozygous BLM mutations have an increa

  11. Deleterious Germline BLM Mutations and the Risk for Early-onset Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voer, R.M. de; Hahn, M.M.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoischen, A.; Gilissen, C.F.; Henkes, A.; Spruijt, L.; Zelst-Stams, W.A. van; Kets, C.M.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Schackert, H.K.; Kessel, A.G. van; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Kuiper, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and increased cancer risk, caused by biallelic mutations in the RECQL-helicase gene BLM. Previous studies have led to conflicting conclusions as to whether carriers of heterozygous BLM mutations have an increa

  12. A selective sweep on a deleterious mutation in CPT1A in Arctic populations

    KAUST Repository

    Clemente, Florian J.

    2014-11-01

    Arctic populations live in an environment characterized by extreme cold and the absence of plant foods for much of the year and are likely to have undergone genetic adaptations to these environmental conditions in the time they have been living there. Genome-wide selection scans based on genotype data from native Siberians have previously highlighted a 3 Mb chromosome 11 region containing 79 protein-coding genes as the strongest candidates for positive selection in Northeast Siberians. However, it was not possible to determine which of the genes might be driving the selection signal. Here, using whole-genome high-coverage sequence data, we identified the most likely causative variant as a nonsynonymous G>A transition (rs80356779; c.1436C>T [p.Pro479Leu] on the reverse strand) in CPT1A, a key regulator of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. Remarkably, the derived allele is associated with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and high infant mortality yet occurs at high frequency in Canadian and Greenland Inuits and was also found at 68% frequency in our Northeast Siberian sample. We provide evidence of one of the strongest selective sweeps reported in humans; this sweep has driven this variant to high frequency in circum-Arctic populations within the last 6-23 ka despite associated deleterious consequences, possibly as a result of the selective advantage it originally provided to either a high-fat diet or a cold environment.

  13. Deleterious mutation in FDX1L gene is associated with a novel mitochondrial muscle myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Halvardson, Jonatan; Soiferman, Devorah; Shaag, Avraham; Edvardson, Simon; Horovitz, Yoseph; Khayat, Morad; Shalev, Stavit A; Feuk, Lars; Elpeleg, Orly

    2014-07-01

    Isolated metabolic myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of disorders, with mitochondrial myopathies being a subgroup, with depleted skeletal muscle energy production manifesting either by recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria or progressive muscle weakness. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with adolescent onset autosomal recessive mitochondrial myopathy. Analysis of enzyme activities of the five respiratory chain complexes in our patients' skeletal muscle showed severely impaired activities of iron sulfur (Fe-S)-dependent complexes I, II and III and mitochondrial aconitase. We employed exome sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping to identify a homozygous mutation, c.1A>T, in the FDX1L gene, which encodes the mitochondrial ferredoxin 2 (Fdx2) protein. The mutation disrupts the ATG initiation translation site resulting in severe reduction of Fdx2 content in the patient muscle and fibroblasts mitochondria. Fdx2 is the second component of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis machinery, the first being IscU that is associated with isolated mitochondrial myopathy. We suggest adding genetic analysis of FDX1L in cases of mitochondrial myopathy especially when associated with reduced activity of the respiratory chain complexes I, II and III.

  14. Deleterious Mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene Cause Brittle Cornea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu, Almogit; Frydman, Moshe; Marek, Dina; Pras, Eran; Nir, Uri; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Pras, Elon

    2008-01-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a thin cornea that tends to perforate, causing progressive visual loss and blindness. Additional systemic symptoms such as joint hypermotility, hyperlaxity of the skin, and kyphoscoliosis place BCS among the connective-tissue disorders. Previously, we assigned the disease gene to a 4.7 Mb interval on chromosome 16q24. In order to clone the BCS gene, we first narrowed the disease locus to a 2.8 Mb interval and systematically sequenced genes expressed in connective tissue in this chromosomal segment. We have identified two frameshift mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 gene (ZNF469). In five unrelated patients of Tunisian Jewish ancestry, we found a 1 bp deletion at position 5943 (5943 delA), and in an inbred Palestinian family we detected a single-nucleotide deletion at position 9527 (9527 delG). The function of ZNF469 is unknown. However, a 30% homology to a number of collagens suggests that it could act as a transcription factor involved in the synthesis and/or organization of collagen fibers. PMID:18452888

  15. Seeking balance: decision support needs of women without cancer and a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Meghan L; Crotser, Cheryl B

    2014-06-01

    Recommendations for women with a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation include complex medical approaches related to cancer risk reduction and detection. Current science has not yet fully elucidated decision support needs that women face when living with medical consequences associated with known hereditary cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to describe health communication and decision support needs in healthy women with BRCA1/2 gene mutations. The original researchers completed an interpretive secondary qualitative data analysis of 23 phenomenological narratives collected between 2008 and 2010. The Ottawa Decision Support and Patient Centered Communication frameworks guided the study design and analysis. Women described a pattern wherein breast and ovarian cancer risk, health related recommendations and decisions, and personal values were prioritized over time based on life contexts. Knowing versus acting on cancer risk was not a static process but an ongoing balancing act of considering current and future personal and medical values, further compounded by the complexity of recommendations. Women shared stories of anticipatory, physical and psychosocial consequences of the decision making experience. The findings have potential to generate future research questions and guide intervention development. Importantly, findings indicate a need for ongoing, long-term, support from genetics professionals and decision support interventions, which challenges the current practice paradigm.

  16. Human spermatogenic failure purges deleterious mutation load from the autosomes and both sex chromosomes, including the gene DMRT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Lopes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal failure, along with early pregnancy loss and perinatal death, may be an important filter that limits the propagation of harmful mutations in the human population. We hypothesized that men with spermatogenic impairment, a disease with unknown genetic architecture and a common cause of male infertility, are enriched for rare deleterious mutations compared to men with normal spermatogenesis. After assaying genomewide SNPs and CNVs in 323 Caucasian men with idiopathic spermatogenic impairment and more than 1,100 controls, we estimate that each rare autosomal deletion detected in our study multiplicatively changes a man's risk of disease by 10% (OR 1.10 [1.04-1.16], p<2 × 10(-3, rare X-linked CNVs by 29%, (OR 1.29 [1.11-1.50], p<1 × 10(-3, and rare Y-linked duplications by 88% (OR 1.88 [1.13-3.13], p<0.03. By contrasting the properties of our case-specific CNVs with those of CNV callsets from cases of autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and intellectual disability, we propose that the CNV burden in spermatogenic impairment is distinct from the burden of large, dominant mutations described for neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified two patients with deletions of DMRT1, a gene on chromosome 9p24.3 orthologous to the putative sex determination locus of the avian ZW chromosome system. In an independent sample of Han Chinese men, we identified 3 more DMRT1 deletions in 979 cases of idiopathic azoospermia and none in 1,734 controls, and found none in an additional 4,519 controls from public databases. The combined results indicate that DMRT1 loss-of-function mutations are a risk factor and potential genetic cause of human spermatogenic failure (frequency of 0.38% in 1306 cases and 0% in 7,754 controls, p = 6.2 × 10(-5. Our study identifies other recurrent CNVs as potential causes of idiopathic azoospermia and generates hypotheses for directing future studies on the genetic basis of male infertility and IVF outcomes.

  17. Mutation-Structure-Function Relationship Based Integrated Strategy Reveals the Potential Impact of Deleterious Missense Mutations in Autophagy Related Proteins on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC: A Comprehensive Informatics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryal Mehwish Awan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved multifaceted lysosome-mediated bulk degradation system, plays a vital role in liver pathologies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Post-translational modifications (PTMs and genetic variations in autophagy components have emerged as significant determinants of autophagy related proteins. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic variations and PTMs of autophagy related proteins and their impact at molecular level will greatly expand our understanding of autophagy based regulation. In this study, we attempted to identify high risk missense mutations that are highly damaging to the structure as well as function of autophagy related proteins including LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1. Number of putative structural and functional residues, including several sites that undergo PTMs were also identified. In total, 16 high-risk SNPs in LC3A, 18 in LC3B, 40 in BECN1 and 43 in SCD1 were prioritized. Out of these, 2 in LC3A (K49A, K51A, 1 in LC3B (S92C, 6 in BECN1 (S113R, R292C, R292H, Y338C, S346Y, Y352H and 6 in SCD1 (Y41C, Y55D, R131W, R135Q, R135W, Y151C coincide with potential PTM sites. Our integrated analysis found LC3B Y113C, BECN1 I403T, SCD1 R126S and SCD1 Y218C as highly deleterious HCC-associated mutations. This study is the first extensive in silico mutational analysis of the LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1 proteins. We hope that the observed results will be a valuable resource for in-depth mechanistic insight into future investigations of pathological missense SNPs using an integrated computational platform.

  18. Selection against accumulating mutations in niche-preference genes can drive speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niclas Norrström

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of sympatric speciation is that it occurs primarily through disruptive selection on ecological genes driven by competition, followed by reproductive isolation through reinforcement-like selection against inferior intermediates/heterozygotes. Our evolutionary model of selection on resource recognition and preference traits suggests a new mechanism for sympatric speciation. We find speciation can occur in three phases. First a polymorphism of functionally different phenotypes is established through evolution of specialization. On the gene level, regulatory functions have evolved in which some alleles are conditionally switched off (i.e. are silent. These alleles accumulate harmful mutations that potentially may be expressed in offspring through recombination. Second mating associated with resource preference invades because harmful mutations in parents are not expressed in the offspring when mating assortatively, thereby dividing the population into two pre-zygotically isolated resource-specialist lineages. Third, silent alleles that evolved in phase one now accumulate deleterious mutations over the following generations in a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller fashion, establishing a post-zygotic barrier to hybridization.

  19. Fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana mutation accumulation lines whose spontaneous mutations are known.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Matthew T; Roles, Angela; Conner, Jeffrey K; Shaw, Ruth G; Shaw, Frank H; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Ossowski, Stephan; Weigel, Detlef; Fenster, Charles B

    2012-07-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of mutation to the evolutionary process, we have little knowledge of the direct consequences of specific spontaneous mutations to the fitness of the organism. Combining results of whole-genome sequencing with repeated field assays of survival and reproduction, we quantify the combined effects on fitness of spontaneous mutations identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the effects are beneficial, deleterious, or neutral depending on the environmental context. Some lines, bearing mutations disrupting known loci, differ strongly in fitness from the founder or premutation genotype. Those effects vary across environments, for example, a line with a major deletion spanning a transcription factor gene expressed lower fitness than the founder under most conditions but exceeded the founder's fitness in one environment. The large contribution of genotype by environment interaction (G × E) to mutation effects on fitness implies spatial and/or temporal variation in selection on new mutations and could contribute to the maintenance of standing genetic variation. © 2012 The Author(s).

  20. Mutation accumulation and the catastrophic senescence of Pacific salmon

    CERN Document Server

    Penna, T J P; Stauffer, D; Stauffer, Dietrich

    1995-01-01

    The bit-string model of biological aging is used to simulate the catastrophic senescence of Pacific Salmon. We have shown that reproduction occuring only once and at a fixed age is the only ingredient needed to explain the catastrophic senescence according the mutation accumulation theory. Several results are presented, some of them with up to 10^8 fishes, showing how the survival rates in catastrophic senescence are affected by changes in the parameters of the model.

  1. An exactly solvable, spatial model of mutation accumulation in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Chay; Nowak, Martin A.; Waclaw, Bartlomiej

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the accumulation of driver mutations which increase the net reproductive rate of cancer cells and allow them to spread. This process has been studied in mathematical models of well mixed populations, and in computer simulations of three-dimensional spatial models. But the computational complexity of these more realistic, spatial models makes it difficult to simulate realistically large and clinically detectable solid tumours. Here we describe an exactly solvable mathematical model of a tumour featuring replication, mutation and local migration of cancer cells. The model predicts a quasi-exponential growth of large tumours, even if different fragments of the tumour grow sub-exponentially due to nutrient and space limitations. The model reproduces clinically observed tumour growth times using biologically plausible rates for cell birth, death, and migration rates. We also show that the expected number of accumulated driver mutations increases exponentially in time if the average fitness gain per driver is constant, and that it reaches a plateau if the gains decrease over time. We discuss the realism of the underlying assumptions and possible extensions of the model.

  2. FDA Approval Summary: Olaparib Monotherapy in Patients with Deleterious Germline BRCA-Mutated Advanced Ovarian Cancer Treated with Three or More Lines of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geoffrey; Ison, Gwynn; McKee, Amy E; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Shenghui; Gwise, Thomas; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Lee, Eunice; Tzou, Abraham; Philip, Reena; Chiu, Haw-Jyh; Ricks, Tiffany K; Palmby, Todd; Russell, Anne Marie; Ladouceur, Gaetan; Pfuma, Elimika; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Liu, Qi; Venugopal, Rajesh; Ibrahim, Amna; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-10-01

    On December 19, 2014, the FDA approved olaparib capsules (Lynparza; AstraZeneca) for the treatment of patients with deleterious or suspected deleterious germline BRCA-mutated (gBRCAm) advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. The BRACAnalysis CDx (Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc.) was approved concurrently. An international multicenter, single-arm trial enrolled 137 patients with measurable gBRCAm-associated ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. Patients received olaparib at a dose of 400 mg by mouth twice daily until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The objective response rate (ORR) was 34% with median response duration of 7.9 months in this cohort. The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients treated with olaparib were anemia, nausea, fatigue (including asthenia), vomiting, diarrhea, dysgeusia, dyspepsia, headache, decreased appetite, nasopharyngitis/pharyngitis/upper respiratory infection, cough, arthralgia/musculoskeletal pain, myalgia, back pain, dermatitis/rash, and abdominal pain/discomfort. Myelodysplatic syndrome and/or acute myeloid leukemia occurred in 2% of the patients enrolled on this trial. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Genotyping of a family with a novel deleterious DPYD mutation supports the pretherapeutic screening of DPD deficiency with dihydrouracil/uracil ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, F; Hennebelle, I; Delmas, C; Lochon, I; Dhelens, C; Garnier Tixidre, C; Bonadona, A; Penel, N; Goncalves, A; Delord, J P; Toulas, C; Chatelut, E

    2016-02-01

    Despite the growing evidence that dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DPD, encoded by the DPYD gene) confers a higher risk of developing severe toxicity, most patients are not screened for DPD deficiency before fluoropyrimidine treatment. We report here the genetic and phenotypic analyses of DPD in a family related to a patient who died after a first cycle of 5-fluorouracil and in 15 additional retrospective patients having a partial DPD deficiency (as measured by plasma dihydrouracil/uracil ratio). The patient with lethal toxicity was found to be a compound heterozygote for two DPYD mutations: a novel 8-bp duplication (c.168_175dupGAATAATT, p.Phe59Ter) and c.1679T>G (Ile560Ser). The patient's dihydrouracil/uracil ratio indicates complete DPD deficiency. The novel mutation was found in two members of the patient's family. Deleterious DPYD mutations were identified in 9 out of the 15 patients. The relationship between genotype and dihydrouracil/uracil values in the 22 patients of the present study was significant (P = 0.01).

  4. Preventing AID, a physiological mutator, from deleterious activation: regulation of the genomic instability that is associated with antibody diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Tran, Thinh Huy; Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2010-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential and sufficient to accomplish class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, which are two genetic events required for the generation of antibody-mediated memory responses. However, AID can also introduce genomic instability, giving rise to chromosomal translocation and/or mutations in proto-oncogenes. It is therefore important for cells to suppress AID expression unless B lymphocytes are stimulated by pathogens. The mechanisms for avoiding the accidental activation of AID and thereby avoiding genomic instability can be classified into three types: (i) transcriptional regulation, (ii) post-transcriptional regulation and (iii) target specificity. This review summarizes the recently elucidated comprehensive transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the AID gene and the post-transcriptional regulation that may be critical for preventing excess AID activity. Finally, we discuss why AID targets not only Igs but also other proto-oncogenes. AID targets many genes but it is not totally promiscuous and the criteria that specify its targets are unclear. A recent finding that a non-B DNA structure forms upon a decrease in topoisomerase 1 expression may explain this paradoxical target specificity determination. Evolution has chosen AID as a mutator of Ig genes because of its efficient DNA cleavage activity, even though its presence increases the risk of genomic instability. This is probably because immediate protection against pathogens is more critical for species survival than complete protection from the slower acting consequences of genomic instability, such as tumor formation.

  5. Properties and modeling of GWAS when complex disease risk is due to non-complementing, deleterious mutations in genes of large effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Thornton

    Full Text Available Current genome-wide association studies (GWAS have high power to detect intermediate frequency SNPs making modest contributions to complex disease, but they are underpowered to detect rare alleles of large effect (RALE. This has led to speculation that the bulk of variation for most complex diseases is due to RALE. One concern with existing models of RALE is that they do not make explicit assumptions about the evolution of a phenotype and its molecular basis. Rather, much of the existing literature relies on arbitrary mapping of phenotypes onto genotypes obtained either from standard population-genetic simulation tools or from non-genetic models. We introduce a novel simulation of a 100-kilobase gene region, based on the standard definition of a gene, in which mutations are unconditionally deleterious, are continuously arising, have partially recessive and non-complementing effects on phenotype (analogous to what is widely observed for most Mendelian disorders, and are interspersed with neutral markers that can be genotyped. Genes evolving according to this model exhibit a characteristic GWAS signature consisting of an excess of marginally significant markers. Existing tests for an excess burden of rare alleles in cases have low power while a simple new statistic has high power to identify disease genes evolving under our model. The structure of linkage disequilibrium between causative mutations and significantly associated markers under our model differs fundamentally from that seen when rare causative markers are assumed to be neutral. Rather than tagging single haplotypes bearing a large number of rare causative alleles, we find that significant SNPs in a GWAS tend to tag single causative mutations of small effect relative to other mutations in the same gene. Our results emphasize the importance of evaluating the power to detect associations under models that are genetically and evolutionarily motivated.

  6. Rice PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE isoforms differentially accumulate during seed maturation to restrict deleterious isoAsp and reactive oxygen species accumulation and are implicated in seed vigor and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Kamble, Nitin Uttam; Kumar, Meenu; Verma, Pooja; Ghosh, Shraboni; Singh, Ajeet; Rao, Venkateswara; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Saxena, Saurabh Chandra; Majee, Manoj

    2016-07-01

    PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT) is a protein-repairing enzyme involved in seed vigor and longevity. However, the regulation of PIMT isoforms during seed development and the mechanism of PIMT-mediated improvement of seed vigor and longevity are largely unknown. In this study in rice (Oryza sativa), we demonstrate the dynamics and correlation of isoaspartyl (isoAsp)-repairing demands and PIMT activity, and their implications, during seed development, germination and aging, through biochemical, molecular and genetic studies. Molecular and biochemical analyses revealed that rice possesses various biochemically active and inactive PIMT isoforms. Transcript and western blot analyses clearly showed the seed development stage and tissue-specific accumulation of active isoforms. Immunolocalization studies revealed distinct isoform expression in embryo and aleurone layers. Further analyses of transgenic lines for each OsPIMT isoform revealed a clear role in the restriction of deleterious isoAsp and age-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation to improve seed vigor and longevity. Collectively, our data suggest that a PIMT-mediated, protein repair mechanism is initiated during seed development in rice, with each isoform playing a distinct, yet coordinated, role. Our results also raise the intriguing possibility that PIMT repairs antioxidative enzymes and proteins which restrict ROS accumulation, lipid peroxidation, etc. in seed, particularly during aging, thus contributing to seed vigor and longevity.

  7. N-carbamylglutamate enhancement of ureagenesis leads to discovery of a novel deleterious mutation in a newly defined enhancer of the NAGS gene and to effective therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibel, Sandra K; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Caldovic, Ljubica; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2011-10-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the conversion of glutamate and acetyl-CoA to NAG, the essential allosteric activator of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, the first urea cycle enzyme in mammals. A 17-year-old female with recurrent hyperammonemia attacks, the cause of which remained undiagnosed for 8 years in spite of multiple molecular and biochemical investigations, showed markedly enhanced ureagenesis (measured by isotope incorporation) in response to N-carbamylglutamate (NCG). This led to sequencing of the regulatory regions of the NAGS gene and identification of a deleterious single-base substitution in the upstream enhancer. The homozygous mutation (c.-3064C>A), affecting a highly conserved nucleotide within the hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binding site, was not found in single nucleotide polymorphism databases and in a screen of 1,086 alleles from a diverse population. Functional assays demonstrated that this mutation decreases transcription and binding of HNF-1 to the NAGS gene, while a consensus HNF-1 binding sequence enhances binding to HNF-1 and increases transcription. Oral daily NCG therapy restored ureagenesis in this patient, normalizing her biochemical markers, and allowing discontinuation of alternate pathway therapy and normalization of her diet with no recurrence of hyperammonemia. Inc.

  8. A deleterious mutation in DNAJC6 encoding the neuronal-specific clathrin-uncoating co-chaperone auxilin, is associated with juvenile parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Edvardson

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is caused by neuronal loss in the substantia nigra which manifests by abnormality of movement, muscle tone, and postural stability. Several genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease, but the underlying molecular basis is still unknown for ∼70% of the patients. Using homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing we identified a deleterious mutation in DNAJC6 in two patients with juvenile parkinsonism. The mutation was associated with abnormal transcripts and marked reduced DNAJC6 mRNA level. DNAJC6 encodes the HSP40 Auxilin, a protein which is selectively expressed in neurons and confers specificity to the ATPase activity of its partner Hcs70 in clathrin uncoating. In Auxilin null mice it was previously shown that the abnormally increased retention of assembled clathrin on vesicles and in empty cages leads to impaired synaptic vesicle recycling and perturbed clathrin mediated endocytosis. Endocytosis function, studied by transferring uptake, was normal in fibroblasts from our patients, likely because of the presence of another J-domain containing partner which co-chaperones Hsc70-mediated uncoating activity in non-neuronal cells. The present report underscores the importance of the endocytic/lysosomal pathway in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and other forms of parkinsonism.

  9. Compound heterozygosity of two functional null mutations in the ALPL gene associated with deleterious neurological outcome in an infant with hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, C; Liese, J; Schwarz, T; Kunzmann, S; Wirbelauer, J; Nowak, J; Hamann, J; Girschick, H; Graser, S; Dietz, K; Zeck, S; Jakob, F; Mentrup, B

    2013-07-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a heterogeneous rare, inherited disorder of bone and mineral metabolism caused by different mutations in the ALPL gene encoding the isoenzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). Prognosis is very poor in severe perinatal forms with most patients dying from pulmonary complications of their skeletal disease. TNAP deficiency, however, may also result in neurological symptoms such as neonatal seizures. The exact biological role of TNAP in the human brain is still not known and the pathophysiology of neurological symptoms due to TNAP deficiency in HPP is not understood in detail. In this report, we describe the clinical features and functional studies of a patient with severe perinatal HPP which presented with rapidly progressive encephalopathy caused by new compound heterozygous mutations in the ALPL gene which result in a functional ALPL "knock out", demonstrated in vitro. In contrast, an in vitro simulation of the genetic status of his currently asymptomatic parents who are both heterozygous for one mutation, showed a residual in vitro AP activity of above 50%. Interestingly, in our patient, the fatal outcome was due to progressive encephalopathy which was refractory to antiepileptic therapy including pyridoxine, rather than hypomineralization and respiratory insufficiency often seen in HPP patients. The patient's cranial MRI showed progressive cystic degradation of the cortex and peripheral white matter with nearly complete destruction of the cerebrum. To our knowledge, this is the first MRI-based report of a deleterious neurological clinical outcome due to a progressive encephalopathy in an infant harboring a functional human ALPL "knock out". This clinical course of disease suggests that TNAP is involved in development and may be responsible for multiple functions of the human brain. According to our data, a certain amount of residual TNAP activity might be mandatory for normal CNS function in newborns and early childhood.

  10. Mutation accumulation may be a minor force in shaping life history traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dańko, Maciej Jan; Kozłowski, Jan; Vaupel, James Walton;

    2012-01-01

    Is senescence the adaptive result of tradeoffs between younger and older ages or the nonadaptive burden of deleterious mutations that act at older ages? To shed new light on this unresolved question we combine adaptive and nonadaptive processes in a single model. Our model uses Penna's bit-string...

  11. p53 gene mutations, p53 protein accumulation and compartmentalization in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    p53 accumulation may occur in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Cytoplasmic accumulation has been reported to be an unfavorable, but not established, prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer. Different types of p53 intracellular compartmentalization could depend either on p53 gene mutations or on the interaction with p53 protein ligands. The purposes of our study were (1) to assess whether the different patterns of p53 accumulation are selectively associated with p53 mutation...

  12. Asexual genome evolution in the apomictic Ranunculus auricomus complex: examining the effects of hybridization and mutation accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellino, Marco; Hojsgaard, Diego; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Hörandl, Elvira; Vogel, Heiko; Sharbel, Timothy F

    2013-12-01

    Asexual lineages are thought to be prone to extinction because of deleterious mutation accumulation (Muller's ratchet). Here, we analyse genomic effects of hybridity, polyploidy and allelic divergence in apomictic plants, and identify loci under divergent selection among sexual/apomictic lineages. RNAseq was used to sequence the flower-specific transcriptomes of five genotypes of the Ranunculus auricomus complex, representing three sexual and two apomictic reproductive biotypes. The five sequence libraries were pooled and de novo assembly performed, and the resultant assembly was used as a backbone for a subsequent alignment of each separate library. High-quality single-nucleotide (SNP) and insertion-deletion (indel) polymorphisms were mined from each library. Annotated genes for which open reading frames (ORF) could be determined were analysed for signatures of divergent versus stabilizing selection. A comparison between all genotypes supports the hypothesis of Pleistocene hybrid origin of both apomictic genotypes from R. carpaticola and R. cassubicifolius, with subsequent allelic divergence of apomictic lineages (Meselson effect). Pairwise comparisons of nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitution rate ratios between apomictic and sexual genotypes for 1231 genes demonstrated similar distributions for all comparisons, although 324 genes demonstrated outlier (i.e. elevated) dN/dS ratios. Gene ontology analyses of these outliers revealed significant enrichment of genes associated with reproduction including meiosis and gametogenesis, following predictions of divergent selection between sexual and apomictic reproduction, although no significant signal of genome-wide mutation accumulation could be identified. The results suggest that gene function should be considered in order to understand effects of mutation accumulation in asexual lineages.

  13. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  14. Intra-organ variation in age-related mutation accumulation in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita A Busuttil

    Full Text Available Using a transgenic mouse model harboring chromosomally integrated lacZ mutational target genes, we previously demonstrated that mutations accumulate with age much more rapidly in the small intestine than in the brain. Here it is shown that in the small intestine point mutations preferentially accumulate in epithelial cells of the mucosa scraped off the underlying serosa. The mucosal cells are the differentiated villus cells that have undergone multiple cell divisions. A smaller age-related increase, also involving genome rearrangements, was observed in the serosa, which consists mainly of the remaining crypts and non-dividing smooth muscle cells. In the brain we observed an accumulation of only point mutations in no other areas than hypothalamus and hippocampus. To directly test for cell division as the determining factor in the generation of point mutations we compared mutation induction between mitotically active and quiescent embryonic fibroblasts from the same lacZ mice, treated with either UV (a point mutagen or hydrogen peroxide (a clastogen. The results indicate that while point mutations are highly replication-dependent, genome rearrangements are as easily induced in non-dividing cells as in mitotically active ones. This strongly suggests that the point mutations found to have accumulated in the mucosal part of the small intestine are the consequence of replication errors. The same is likely true for point mutations accumulating in hippocampus and hypothalamus of the brain since neurogenesis in these two areas continues throughout life. The observed intra-organ variation in mutation susceptibility as well as the variation in replication dependency of different types of mutations indicates the need to not only extend observations made on whole organs to their sub-structures but also take the type of mutations and mitotic activity of the cells into consideration. This should help elucidating the impact of genome instability and its

  15. PSO Algorithm Based on Accumulation Effect and Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wei Dong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Particle SwarmOptimization (PSO algorithm is a new swarm intelligence optimization   technique, because of its simplicity, fewerparameters and good effects, PSO has been widely used to solve various complexoptimization problems. particle swarm optimization(PSO exist the problems ofpremature and local convergence, we proposed an improved particle swarmoptimization based on aggregation effect and with mutation operator, whichdetermines whether the aggregation occurs in searching, if there is then theGaussian  mutation is detected to theglobal extremum , to overcome particle swarm optimization falling into localoptimal solution defects.  Testing thenew algorithm by a typical test function, the results show that , compared withthe conventional genetic algorithm(SGA, it improves the ability of globaloptimization, but also effectively avoid the premature convergence.

  16. An efficient method for the prediction of deleterious multiple-point mutations in the secondary structure of RNAs using suboptimal folding solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barash Danny

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNAmute is an interactive Java application which, given an RNA sequence, calculates the secondary structure of all single point mutations and organizes them into categories according to their similarity to the predicted structure of the wild type. The secondary structure predictions are performed using the Vienna RNA package. A more efficient implementation of RNAmute is needed, however, to extend from the case of single point mutations to the general case of multiple point mutations, which may often be desired for computational predictions alongside mutagenesis experiments. But analyzing multiple point mutations, a process that requires traversing all possible mutations, becomes highly expensive since the running time is O(nm for a sequence of length n with m-point mutations. Using Vienna's RNAsubopt, we present a method that selects only those mutations, based on stability considerations, which are likely to be conformational rearranging. The approach is best examined using the dot plot representation for RNA secondary structure. Results Using RNAsubopt, the suboptimal solutions for a given wild-type sequence are calculated once. Then, specific mutations are selected that are most likely to cause a conformational rearrangement. For an RNA sequence of about 100 nts and 3-point mutations (n = 100, m = 3, for example, the proposed method reduces the running time from several hours or even days to several minutes, thus enabling the practical application of RNAmute to the analysis of multiple-point mutations. Conclusion A highly efficient addition to RNAmute that is as user friendly as the original application but that facilitates the practical analysis of multiple-point mutations is presented. Such an extension can now be exploited prior to site-directed mutagenesis experiments by virologists, for example, who investigate the change of function in an RNA virus via mutations that disrupt important motifs in its secondary

  17. Identification of a new complex deleterious mutation in exon 18 of the BRCA2 gene in a hereditary male/female breast cancer family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Orland; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Masas, Miriam; Tenés, Anna; Yagüe, Carme; Arcusa, Angels; Llort, Gemma

    2010-09-01

    We report a novel complex mutation that consists of a deletion of 12 bp and an insertion of 2 bp (c.8402_8413del12ins2bp) in the exon 18 of the BRCA2 gene. This is a frameshift mutation that causes a disruption of the translational reading frame resulting in a stop codon downstream in the 2729 position of the BRCA2 protein. The mutation was present in a Spanish hereditary male/female breast cancer family.

  18. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  19. Environmentally responsive genome-wide accumulation of de novo Arabidopsis thaliana mutations and epimutations

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caifu

    2014-10-14

    Evolution is fueled by phenotypic diversity, which is in turn due to underlying heritable genetic (and potentially epigenetic) variation. While environmental factors are well known to influence the accumulation of novel variation in microorganisms and human cancer cells, the extent to which the natural environment influences the accumulation of novel variation in plants is relatively unknown. Here we use whole-genome and whole-methylome sequencing to test if a specific environmental stress (high-salinity soil) changes the frequency and molecular profile of accumulated mutations and epimutations (changes in cytosine methylation status) in mutation accumulation (MA) lineages of Arabidopsis thaliana. We first show that stressed lineages accumulate ∼100% more mutations, and that these mutations exhibit a distinctive molecular mutational spectrum (specific increases in relative frequency of transversion and insertion/deletion [indel] mutations). We next show that stressed lineages accumulate ∼45% more differentially methylated cytosine positions (DMPs) at CG sites (CG-DMPs) than controls, and also show that while many (∼75%) of these CG-DMPs are inherited, some can be lost in subsequent generations. Finally, we show that stress-associated CG-DMPs arise more frequently in genic than in nongenic regions of the genome. We suggest that commonly encountered natural environmental stresses can accelerate the accumulation and change the profiles of novel inherited variants in plants. Our findings are significant because stress exposure is common among plants in the wild, and they suggest that environmental factors may significantly alter the rates and patterns of incidence of the inherited novel variants that fuel plant evolution.

  20. Age- and temperature-dependent somatic mutation accumulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Garcia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a transgenic mouse model harboring a mutation reporter gene that can be efficiently recovered from genomic DNA, we previously demonstrated that mutations accumulate in aging mice in a tissue-specific manner. Applying a recently developed, similar reporter-based assay in Drosophila melanogaster, we now show that the mutation frequency at the lacZ locus in somatic tissue of flies is about three times as high as in mouse tissues, with a much higher fraction of large genome rearrangements. Similar to mice, somatic mutations in the fly also accumulate as a function of age, but they do so much more quickly at higher temperature, a condition which in invertebrates is associated with decreased life span. Most mutations were found to accumulate in the thorax and less in abdomen, suggesting the highly oxidative flight muscles as a possible source of genotoxic stress. These results show that somatic mutation loads in short-lived flies are much more severe than in the much longer-lived mice, with the mutation rate in flies proportional to biological rather than chronological aging.

  1. Novel BRCA1 deleterious mutation (c.1949_1950delTA) in a woman of Senegalese descent with triple-negative early-onset breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Orland; Pelegrí, Amadeu; Gadea, Neus; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Masas, Miriam; Tenés, Anna; Bosch, Nina; Balmaña, Judith; Graña, Begoña

    2011-11-01

    Limited information exists regarding BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing and genetic diversity in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in sub-Saharan African populations. We report a novel mutation that consists of a deletion of 2 bp (c.1949_1950delTA) in the exon 11 of the BRCA1 gene. This is a frameshift mutation that causes the disruption of the translational reading frame resulting in a premature stop codon downstream in the BRCA1 protein. The mutation was present in a Senegalese woman with a triple-negative breast tumor and a family history of breast cancer.

  2. Sexual selection and maintenance of sex: evidence from comparisons of rates of genomic accumulation of mutations and divergence of sex-related genes in sexual and hermaphroditic species of Caenorhabditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artieri, Carlo G; Haerty, Wilfried; Gupta, Bhagwati P; Singh, Rama S

    2008-05-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the persistence of dioecy despite the reproductive advantages conferred to hermaphrodites, including greater efficiency at purging deleterious mutations in the former. Dioecy can benefit from both mutation purging and accelerated evolution by bringing together beneficial mutations in the same individual via recombination and shuffling of genotypes. In addition, mathematical treatment has shown that sexual selection is also capable of mitigating the cost of maintaining separate sexes by increasing the overall fitness of sexual populations, and genomic comparisons have shown that sexual selection can lead to accelerated evolution. Here, we examine the advantages of dioecy versus hermaphroditism by comparing the rate of evolution in sex-related genes and the rate of accumulation of deleterious mutations using a large number of orthologs (11,493) in the dioecious Caenorhabditis remanei and the hermaphroditic Caenorhabditis briggsae. We have used this data set to estimate the deleterious mutation rate per generation, U, in both species and find that although it is significantly higher in hermaphrodites, both species are at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the value required to explain the persistence of sex by efficiency at purging deleterious mutations alone. We also find that genes expressed in sperm are evolving rapidly in both species; however, they show a greater increase in their rate of evolution relative to genes expressed in other tissues in C. remanei, suggesting stronger sexual selection pressure acting on these genes in dioecious species. Interestingly, the persistence of a signal of rapid evolution of sperm genes in C. briggsae suggests a recent evolutionary origin of hermaphrodism in this lineage. Our results provide empirical evidence of increased sexual selection pressure in dioecious animals, supporting the possibility that sexual selection may play an important role in the maintenance of sexual

  3. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli B Salinas

    Full Text Available Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California's racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance.We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C; those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC; and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown. Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared.Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78 and 11% of Unknown (27/244 met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing.While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed.

  4. Mutation accumulation and fitness effects in hybridogenetic populations: a comparison to sexual and asexual systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri Homayoun C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female only unisexual vertebrates that reproduce by hybridogenesis show an unusual genetic composition. They are of hybrid origin but show no recombination between the genomes of their parental species. Instead, the paternal genome is discarded from the germline prior to meiosis, and gametes (eggs only contain solely unrecombined maternal genomes. Hence hybridogens only transmit maternally inherited mutations. Hybridity is restored each generation by backcrossing with males of the sexual parental species whose genome was eliminated. In contrast, recombining sexual species propagate an intermixed pool of mutations derived from the maternal and paternal parts of the genome. If mutation rates are lower in female gametes than males, it raises the possibility for lower mutation accumulation in a hybridogenetic population, and consequently, higher population fitness than its sexual counterpart. Results We show through Monte-Carlo simulations that at higher male to female mutation ratios, and sufficiently large population sizes, hybridogenetic populations can carry a lower mutation load than sexual species. This effect is more pronounced with synergistic forms of epistasis. Mutations accumulate faster on the sexual part of the genome, and with the purifying effects of epistasis, it makes it more difficult for mutations to be transmitted on the clonal part of the genome. In smaller populations, the same mechanism reduces the speed of Muller's Ratchet and the number of fixed mutations compared to similar asexual species. Conclusion Since mutation accumulation can be less pronounced in hybridogenetic populations, the question arises why hybridogenetic organisms are so scarce compared to sexual species. In considering this, it is likely that comparison of population fitnesses is not sufficient. Despite competition with the sexual parental species, hybrid populations are dependent on the maintenance of – and contact with – their

  5. Estimating the dynamics and dependencies of accumulating mutations with applications to HIV drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Hesam; Günthard, Huldrych F; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a new model called the observed time conjunctive Bayesian network (OT-CBN) that describes the accumulation of genetic events (mutations) under partial temporal ordering constraints. Unlike other CBN models, the OT-CBN model uses sampling time points of genotypes in addition to genotypes themselves to estimate model parameters. We developed an expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain approximate maximum likelihood estimates by accounting for this additional information. In a simulation study, we show that the OT-CBN model outperforms the continuous time CBN (CT-CBN) (Beerenwinkel and Sullivant, 2009. Markov models for accumulating mutations. Biometrika 96: (3), 645-661), which does not take into account individual sampling times for parameter estimation. We also show superiority of the OT-CBN model on several datasets of HIV drug resistance mutations extracted from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database.

  6. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  7. Spectrum and characterisation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in high-risk Czech patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kosinova Veronika; Pavlu Hana; Coene Ilse; Navratilova Marie; Vasickova Petra; Lukesova Mirka; Foretova Lenka; Machackova Eva; Kuklova Jitka; Claes Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The incidence of breast cancer has doubled over the past 20 years in the Czech Republic. Hereditary factors may be a cause of young onset, bilateral breast or ovarian cancer, and familial accumulation of the disease. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for an important fraction of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. One thousand and ten unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer were analysed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation at t...

  8. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Galant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD, Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD. We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  9. A new mtDNA mutation showing accumulation with time and restriction to skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, K.; Wilson, J.N.; Taylor, L. [Middlesbrough General Hospital (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    We have identified a new mutation in mtDNA, involving tRNA{sup Leu(CUN)} in a patient manifesting an isolated skeletal myopathy. This heteroplasmic A{r_arrow}G transition at position 12320 affects the T{Psi}C loop at a conserved site and was not found in 120 controls. Analysis of cultured fibroblasts, white blood cells/platelets, and skeletal muscle showed that only skeletal muscle contained the mutation and that only this tissue demonstrated a biochemical defect of respiratory-chain activity. In a series of four muscle-biopsy specimens taken over a 12-year period, there was a gradual increase, from 70% to 90%, in the overall level of mutation, as well as a marked clinical deterioration. Single-fiber PCR confirmed that the proportion of mutant mtDNA was highest in cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. This study, which reports a mutation involving tRNA{sup Leu(CUN)}, demonstrates clearly that mtDNA point mutations can accumulate over time and may be restricted in their tissue distribution. Furthermore, clinical deterioration seemed to follow the increase in the level of mutation, although, interestingly, the appearance of fibers deficient in respiratory-chain activity showed a lag period. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Hepatic Copper Accumulation: A Novel Feature in Transient Infantile Liver Failure Due to TRMU Mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Z; Lewindon, P; Clousten, A; Shaag, A; Elpeleg, O; Coman, D

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain can induce a heterogeneous range of clinical and biochemical manifestations. Hepatic involvement includes acute fulminant hepatic failure, microvesicular steatosis, neonatal non-alloimmune haemochromatosis and cirrhosis. Recently pathogenic mutations in tRNA 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase (TRMU) gene (OMIM 610230) have been demonstrated to cause transient infantile liver failure (OMIM 613070). The human TRMU gene encodes a mitochondrial protein, 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase, whose molecular function is that of mitochondrial tRNA modification.We report an infant who presented with acute liver failure, in whom we observed hepatic copper intoxication and cirrhosis on liver biopsy. We postulate that the hepatic copper intoxication observed in our patient is most likely a secondary event associated with cholangiopathy. Periportal copper accumulation has been implicated in causing secondary mitochondrial dysfunction; the impact of copper accumulation in patients with TRMU mutations is unclear and warrants long-term clinical follow-up.

  11. Most of rare missense alleles in humans are deleterious:implications for evolution of complex disease and associationstudies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukov, Gregory V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2006-10-24

    The accumulation of mildly deleterious missense mutations inindividual human genomes has been proposed to be a genetic basis forcomplex diseases. The plausibility of this hypothesis depends onquantitative estimates of the prevalence of mildly deleterious de novomutations and polymorphic variants in humans and on the intensity ofselective pressure against them. We combined analysis of mutationscausing human Mendelian diseases, human-chimpanzee divergence andsystematic data on human SNPs and found that about 20 percent of newmissense mutations in humans result in a loss of function, while about 27percent are effectively neutral. Thus, more than half of new missensemutations have mildly deleterious effects. These mutations give rise tomany low frequency deleterious allelic variants in the human populationas evident from a new dataset of 37 genes sequenced in over 1,500individual human chromosomes. Surprisingly, up to 70 percent of lowfrequency missense alleles are mildly deleterious and associated with aheterozygous fitness loss in the range 0.001-0.003. Thus, the low allelefrequency of an amino acid variant can by itself serve as a predictor ofits functional significance. Several recent studies have reported asignificant excess of rare missense variants in disease populationscompared to controls in candidate genes or pathways. These studies wouldbe unlikely to work if most rare variants were neutral or if rarevariants were not a significant contributor to the genetic component ofphenotypic inheritance. Our results provide a justification for thesetypes of candidate gene (pathway) association studies and imply thatmutation-selection balance may be a feasible mechanism for evolution ofsome common diseases.

  12. N370S-GBA1 mutation causes lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Patricia; Orgaz, Lorena; Bueno-Gil, Guillermo; Espadas, Isabel; Rodríguez-Traver, Eva; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Gutierrez, Antonia; Dávila, José C; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes, José M; Mir, Pablo; Vicario, Carlos; Moratalla, Rosario

    2017-08-05

    Heterozygous mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase-1, increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the N370S-GBA1 mutation on cellular homeostasis and vulnerability in a patient-specific cellular model of PD. We isolated fibroblasts from 4 PD patients carrying the N370S/wild type GBA1 mutation and 6 controls to study the autophagy-lysosome pathway, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and Golgi apparatus structure by Western blot, immunofluorescence, LysoTracker and Filipin stainings, mRNA analysis, and electron microscopy. We evaluated cell vulnerability by apoptosis, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential with flow cytometry. The N370S mutation produced a significant reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase-1 protein and enzyme activity and β-glucocerebrosidase-1 retention within the endoplasmic reticulum, which interrupted its traffic to the lysosome. This led to endoplasmic reticulum stress activation and triggered unfolded protein response and Golgi apparatus fragmentation. Furthermore, these alterations resulted in autophagosome and p62/SQSTM1 accumulation. This impaired autophagy was a result of dysfunctional lysosomes, indicated by multilamellar body accumulation probably caused by increased cholesterol, enlarged lysosomal mass, and reduced enzyme activity. This phenotype impaired the removal of damaged mitochondria and reactive oxygen species production and enhanced cell death. Our results support a connection between the loss of β-glucocerebrosidase-1 function, cholesterol accumulation, and the disruption of cellular homeostasis in GBA1-PD. Our work reveals new insights into the cellular pathways underlying PD pathogenesis, providing evidence that GBA1-PD shares common features with lipid-storage diseases. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International

  13. Deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    1996-01-01


    In spite of decades of intense debate, the evolutionary reasons for sex are still unknown. In the light of the 'two-fold cost of sex' (Maynard Smith 1971; Williams 1975), a plausible short-term advantage to sex must be found to explain its maintenance. At present, two hypotheses seem to

  14. Deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    1996-01-01

    In spite of decades of intense debate, the evolutionary reasons for sex are still unknown. In the light of the 'two-fold cost of sex' (Maynard Smith 1971; Williams 1975), a plausible short-term advantage to sex must be found to explain its maintenance. At present, two hypotheses seem to predominate

  15. Rate of accumulation of thymidine analogue mutations in patients continuing to receive virologically failing regimens containing zidovudine or stavudine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Martinez-Picado, Javier;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because changes in antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings (RLSs) are delayed until patients experience immunological or clinical failure, it is important to be able to estimate the consequences in terms of accumulation of thymidine analogue (TA) mutations (TAMs). METHODS...... (vs homosexual) contacts were associated with a faster rate of TAM accumulation. CONCLUSIONS: Although the estimated rate of TAM accumulation was lower than anticipated, all possible efforts should be continued to increase the availability of drug options in RLSs....

  16. An experimental test of the accumulated copying error model of cultural mutation for Acheulean handaxe size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Marius; Lycett, Stephen; Mesoudi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Archaeologists interested in explaining changes in artifact morphology over long time periods have found it useful to create models in which the only source of change is random and unintentional copying error, or 'cultural mutation'. These models can be used as null hypotheses against which to detect non-random processes such as cultural selection or biased transmission. One proposed cultural mutation model is the accumulated copying error model, where individuals attempt to copy the size of another individual's artifact exactly but make small random errors due to physiological limits on the accuracy of their perception. Here, we first derive the model within an explicit mathematical framework, generating the predictions that multiple independently-evolving artifact chains should diverge over time such that their between-chain variance increases while the mean artifact size remains constant. We then present the first experimental test of this model in which 200 participants, split into 20 transmission chains, were asked to faithfully copy the size of the previous participant's handaxe image on an iPad. The experimental findings supported the model's prediction that between-chain variance should increase over time and did so in a manner quantitatively in line with the model. However, when the initial size of the image that the participants resized was larger than the size of the image they were copying, subjects tended to increase the size of the image, resulting in the mean size increasing rather than staying constant. This suggests that items of material culture formed by reductive vs. additive processes may mutate differently when individuals attempt to replicate faithfully the size of previously-produced artifacts. Finally, we show that a dataset of 2601 Acheulean handaxes shows less variation than predicted given our empirically measured copying error variance, suggesting that other processes counteracted the variation in handaxe size generated by perceptual

  17. Inferences on the role of insertion in a mutation accumulation experiment with Drosophila melanogaster using RAPDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, C; Nieto, B; Toro, M A; López-Fanjul, C; García-Dorado, A

    2005-01-01

    The genetic variability for RAPDs band pattern was studied in a set of 157 mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Drosophila melanogaster. These MA lines were derived from the same isogenic base population and subsequently maintained by full-sib mating during 132 generations. The ancestral pattern of the original isogenic base can be unambiguously established as the consensus pattern of the MA lines and, because these lines are expected to be homozygous, dominance for band pattern is not a concern. Only repeatable changes in band pattern were considered. The number of ancestral bands detected implies that nine-nucleotide targets are enough for repeatable PCR amplification. Compared with the ancestral pattern, one MA line lost one band and two MA lines gained a new one. These results can be accounted for by the insertion of transposable elements occurring at a rate 0.07 Idefix family is also active in the lines.

  18. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  19. Coding Microsatellite Frameshift Mutations Accumulate in Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Lesions: Evaluation of 26 Cases and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Carolin; Hakimi, Maani; Kloor, Matthias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Gross-Weissmann, Marie-Luise; Böckler, Dittmar; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Dihlmann, Susanne

    2015-06-09

    Somatic DNA alterations are known to occur in atherosclerotic carotid artery lesions; however, their significance is unknown. The accumulation of microsatellite mutations in coding DNA regions may reflect a deficiency of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Alternatively, accumulation of these coding microsatellite mutations may indicate that they contribute to the pathology. To discriminate between these two possibilities, we compared the mutation frequencies in coding microsatellites (likely functionally relevant) with those in noncoding microsatellites (likely neutral). Genomic DNA was isolated from carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens of 26 patients undergoing carotid surgery and from 15 nonatherosclerotic control arteries. Samples were analyzed by DNA fragment analysis for instability at three noncoding (BAT25, BAT26, CAT25) and five coding (AIM2, ACVR2, BAX, CASP5, TGFBR2) microsatellite loci, with proven validity for detection of microsatellite instability in neoplasms. We found an increased frequency of coding microsatellite mutations in CEA specimens compared with control specimens (34.6 versus 0%; p = 0.0013). Five CEA specimens exhibited more than one frameshift mutation, and ACVR2 and CASP5 were affected most frequently (5/26 and 6/26). Moreover, the rate of coding microsatellite alterations (15/130) differed significantly from that of noncoding alterations (0/78) in CEA specimens (p = 0.0013). In control arteries, no microsatellite alterations were observed, neither in coding nor in noncoding microsatellite loci. In conclusion, the specific accumulation of coding mutations suggests that these mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic carotid lesions, since the absence of mutations in noncoding microsatellites argues against general microsatellite instability, reflecting MMR deficiency.

  20. Muller's ratchet with compensatory mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Wakolbinger, Anton

    2011-01-01

    We consider an infinite dimensional system of stochastic differential equations which describes the evolution of type frequencies in a large population. Random reproduction is modeled by a Wright-Fisher noise whose inverse diffusion coefficient $N$ corresponds to the total population size. The type of an individual is the number $k$ of deleterious mutations it carries. We assume that fitness of individuals carrying $k$ mutations is decreased by $\\alpha k$ for some $\\alpha >0$. Along the individual lines of descent, (new) mutations accumulate at rate $\\lambda$ per generation, and each of these mutations has a small probability $\\gamma$ per generation to disappear. While the case $\\gamma =0 $ is known as (the Fleming-Viot version of) {\\em Muller's ratchet}, the case $\\gamma > 0$ is referred to as that of {\\em compensatory mutations} in the biological literature. In the former case ($\\gamma=0$), an ever increasing number of mutations is accumulated over time, while in the latter ($\\gamma > 0$) this is prevented ...

  1. Presenilin-2 Mutation Causes Early Amyloid Accumulation and Memory Impairment in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Toda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the pathophysiological role of presenilin-2 (PS2 carrying the Volga German Kindred mutation (N141I in a conventional mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD expressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish mutation (Tg2576 line, we generated a double transgenic mouse (PS2Tg2576 by crossbreeding the PS2 mutant with Tg2576 mice. Here, we demonstrate that the PS2 mutation induced the early deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ at 2-3 months of age and progressive accumulation at 4-5 months of age in the brains of the mutant mice. The PS2 mutation also accelerated learning and memory impairment associated with Aβ accumulation at 4-5 months of age in Tg2576 mice. These results suggest that the PS2 mutation causes early cerebral amyloid accumulation and memory dysfunction. PS2Tg2576 mice are a suitable mouse model for studying amyloid-lowering therapies.

  2. Massively parallel sequencing reveals an accumulation of de novo mutations and an activating mutation of LPAR1 in a patient with metastatic neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun S Wei

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is one of the most genomically heterogeneous childhood malignances studied to date, and the molecular events that occur during the course of the disease are not fully understood. Genomic studies in neuroblastoma have showed only a few recurrent mutations and a low somatic mutation burden. However, none of these studies has examined the mutations arising during the course of disease, nor have they systemically examined the expression of mutant genes. Here we performed genomic analyses on tumors taken during a 3.5 years disease course from a neuroblastoma patient (bone marrow biopsy at diagnosis, adrenal primary tumor taken at surgical resection, and a liver metastasis at autopsy. Whole genome sequencing of the index liver metastasis identified 44 non-synonymous somatic mutations in 42 genes (0.85 mutation/MB and a large hemizygous deletion in the ATRX gene which has been recently reported in neuroblastoma. Of these 45 somatic alterations, 15 were also detected in the primary tumor and bone marrow biopsy, while the other 30 were unique to the index tumor, indicating accumulation of de novo mutations during therapy. Furthermore, transcriptome sequencing on the 3 tumors demonstrated only 3 out of the 15 commonly mutated genes (LPAR1, GATA2, and NUFIP1 had high level of expression of the mutant alleles, suggesting potential oncogenic driver roles of these mutated genes. Among them, the druggable G-protein coupled receptor LPAR1 was highly expressed in all tumors. Cells expressing the LPAR1 R163W mutant demonstrated a significantly increased motility through elevated Rho signaling, but had no effect on growth. Therefore, this study highlights the need for multiple biopsies and sequencing during progression of a cancer and combinatorial DNA and RNA sequencing approach for systematic identification of expressed driver mutations.

  3. Age-Related Accumulation of Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Adult-Derived Human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunju; Wang, Xinjian; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Folmes, Clifford D L; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Lee, Yeonmi; Van Dyken, Crystal; Ahmed, Riffat; Li, Ying; Koski, Amy; Hayama, Tomonari; Luo, Shiyu; Harding, Cary O; Amato, Paula; Jensen, Jeffrey; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Terzic, Andre; Wolf, Don P; Huang, Taosheng; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2016-05-05

    The genetic integrity of iPSCs is an important consideration for therapeutic application. In this study, we examine the accumulation of somatic mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) mutations in skin fibroblasts, blood, and iPSCs derived from young and elderly subjects (24-72 years). We found that pooled skin and blood mtDNA contained low heteroplasmic point mutations, but a panel of ten individual iPSC lines from each tissue or clonally expanded fibroblasts carried an elevated load of heteroplasmic or homoplasmic mutations, suggesting that somatic mutations randomly arise within individual cells but are not detectable in whole tissues. The frequency of mtDNA defects in iPSCs increased with age, and many mutations were non-synonymous or resided in RNA coding genes and thus can lead to respiratory defects. Our results highlight a need to monitor mtDNA mutations in iPSCs, especially those generated from older patients, and to examine the metabolic status of iPSCs destined for clinical applications.

  4. Exome sequence reveals mutations in CoA synthase as a cause of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Haack, Tobias B; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Venco, Paola; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Goffrini, Paola; Tigano, Marco; Demchenko, Nikita; Wieland, Thomas; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Invernizzi, Federica; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Hamada, Jeffrey; Bettencourt, Conceição; Houlden, Henry; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zorzi, Giovanna; Kurian, Manju A; Nardocci, Nardo; Prokisch, Holger; Hayflick, Susan; Gout, Ivan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-02

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with progressive extrapyramidal signs and neurological deterioration, characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Exome sequencing revealed the presence of recessive missense mutations in COASY, encoding coenzyme A (CoA) synthase in one NBIA-affected subject. A second unrelated individual carrying mutations in COASY was identified by Sanger sequence analysis. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the final steps of CoA biosynthesis by coupling phosphopantetheine with ATP to form dephospho-CoA and its subsequent phosphorylation to generate CoA. We demonstrate alterations in RNA and protein expression levels of CoA synthase, as well as CoA amount, in fibroblasts derived from the two clinical cases and in yeast. This is the second inborn error of coenzyme A biosynthesis to be implicated in NBIA.

  5. Costs and benefits of mutational robustness in RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Adi; Bianco, Simone; Yeh, Ming Te; Wright, Caroline; Butcher, Kristin; Tang, Chao; Nielsen, Rasmus; Andino, Raul

    2014-08-21

    The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  6. Costs and Benefits of Mutational Robustness in RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Stern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  7. C19orf12 and FA2H mutations are rare in Italian patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteghini, Celeste; Zorzi, Giovanna; Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Reale, Chiara; Brunetti, Dario; Chiapparini, Luisa; Zibordi, Federica; Siegel, Birgit; Siegel, Brigitte; Garavaglia, Barbara; Simonati, Alessandro; Bertini, Enrico; Nardocci, Nardo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) defines a wide spectrum of clinical entities characterized by iron accumulation in specific regions of the brain, predominantly in the basal ganglia. We evaluated the presence of FA2H and C19orf12 mutations in a cohort of 46 Italian patients with early onset NBIA, which were negative for mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Follow-up molecular genetic and in vitro analyses were then performed. We did not find any mutations in the FA2H gene, although we identified 3 patients carrying novel mutations in the C19orf12 gene. The recent discovery of new genes responsible for NBIA extends the spectrum of the genetic investigation now available for these disorders and makes it possible to delineate a clearer clinical-genetic classification of different forms of this syndrome. A large fraction of patients still remain without a molecular genetics diagnosis, suggesting that additional NBIA genes are still to be discovered.

  8. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  9. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  10. The D1 and D2 proteins of dinoflagellates: unusually accumulated mutations which influence on PSII photoreaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Satoko; Kobiyama, Atsushi; Ogata, Takehiko; Murakami, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Plastid encoded genes of the dinoflagellates are rapidly evolving and most divergent. The importance of unusually accumulated mutations on structure of PSII core protein and photosynthetic function was examined in the dinoflagellates, Symbiodinium sp. and Alexandrium tamarense. Full-length cDNA sequences of psbA (D1 protein) and psbD (D2 protein) were obtained and compared with the other oxygen-evolving photoautotrophs. Twenty-three amino acid positions (7%) for the D1 protein and 34 positions (10%) for the D2 were mutated in the dinoflagellates, although amino acid residues at these positions were conserved in cyanobacteria, the other algae, and plant. Many mutations were likely to distribute in the N-terminus and the D-E interhelical loop of the D1 protein and helix B of D2 protein, while the remaining regions were well conserved. The different structural properties in these mutated regions were supported by hydropathy profiles. The chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics of the dinoflagellates was compared with Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in relation to the altered protein structure.

  11. A Cohort Study of p53 Mutations and Protein Accumulation in Benign Breast Tissue and Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kandel, Rita A; Glass, Andrew G; Jones, Joan G; Olson, Neal; Duggan, Catherine; Ginsberg, Mindy; Negassa, Abdissa; Rohan, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and accumulation of its protein in breast tissue are thought to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few studies have prospectively investigated the association of p53 immunopositivity and/or p53 alterations in women with benign breast disease in relation to the subsequent risk of invasive breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study nested within a large cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease in order to address this question. After exclusions, 491 breast cancer cases and 471 controls were available for analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Neither p53 immunopositivity nor genetic alterations in p53 (either missense mutations or polymorphisms) was associated with altered risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, the combination of both p53 immunopositivity and any p53 nucleotide change was associated with an approximate 5-fold nonsignificant increase in risk (adjusted OR 4.79, 95% CI 0.28-82.31) but the confidence intervals were extremely wide. Our findings raise the possibility that the combination of p53 protein accumulation and the presence of genetic alterations may identify a group at increased risk of breast cancer.

  12. A Cohort Study of p53 Mutations and Protein Accumulation in Benign Breast Tissue and Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Kabat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and accumulation of its protein in breast tissue are thought to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few studies have prospectively investigated the association of p53 immunopositivity and/or p53 alterations in women with benign breast disease in relation to the subsequent risk of invasive breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study nested within a large cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease in order to address this question. After exclusions, 491 breast cancer cases and 471 controls were available for analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Neither p53 immunopositivity nor genetic alterations in p53 (either missense mutations or polymorphisms was associated with altered risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, the combination of both p53 immunopositivity and any p53 nucleotide change was associated with an approximate 5-fold nonsignificant increase in risk (adjusted OR 4.79, 95% CI 0.28–82.31 but the confidence intervals were extremely wide. Our findings raise the possibility that the combination of p53 protein accumulation and the presence of genetic alterations may identify a group at increased risk of breast cancer.

  13. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Volko, Sigrid M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  14. Mutation of the glucosinolate biosynthesis enzyme cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase increases camalexin accumulation and powdery mildew resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simu eLiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1, which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  15. Accumulation of protease mutations among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy and response to salvage therapy in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly E Rawizza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines and programs in resource-limited settings (RLS have focused on 1(st- and 2(nd-line (2 L therapy. As programs approach a decade of implementation, policy regarding access to 3(rd-line (3 L ART is needed. We aimed to examine the impact of maintaining patients on failing 2 L ART on the accumulation of protease (PR mutations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From 2004-2011, the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR Program provided ART to >100,000 people in Nigeria. Genotypic resistance testing was performed on a subset of patients experiencing 2 L failure, defined as 2 consecutive viral loads (VL>1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months on 2 L. Of 6714 patients who received protease inhibitor (PI-based ART, 673 (10.0% met virologic failure criteria. Genotypes were performed on 61 samples. Patients on non-suppressive 2 L therapy for 24 months. Patients developed a median of 0.6 (IQR: 0-1.4 IAS PR mutations per 6 months on failing 2 L therapy. In 38% of failing patients no PR mutations were present. For patients failing >24 months, high- or intermediate-level resistance to lopinavir and atazanavir was present in 63%, with 5% to darunavir. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report assessing the impact of duration of non-suppressive 2 L therapy on the accumulation of PR resistance in a RLS. This information provides insight into the resistance cost of failing to switch non-suppressive 2 L regimens and highlights the issue of 3 L access.

  16. Exclusion of non-synonymous SNPs and a polyglutamine tract in SMRT/N-CoR2 as common deleterious mutation for bipolar disorder in the Sagnenay-Lac-St-Jean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shink, Eric; Harvey, Mario; Tremblay, Monique; Raymond, Catherine; Labbé, Michel; Gagné, Bernard; Barden, Nicholas

    2005-04-05

    Bipolar disorder (BP) is a psychiatric illness with both genetic and environmental components occurring with a prevalence of slightly more than 1%. Our previous linkage and case/control studies have pointed to a susceptibility locus for BP in the 12q24.31 chromosomal region. Here, we investigated the possible involvement of the SMRT/N-CoR2 gene, which encodes for the nuclear receptor co-repressor 2. SMRT/N-CoR2 was retained as a candidate gene for BP because of its location within our candidate gene region and its interactions with thyroid hormone receptors. We screened SMRT/N-CoR2 for the presence of polymorphism/mutation in coding sequences and exon-intron junctions. Four non-synonymous SNPs and a polyglutamine tract (CAG repeat) in the coding exon 14 were analyzed in a case/control sample from the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) area of Quebec (213 cases and 214 controls). Our data indicated no significant allelic/genotypic association between any of the five mutations and bipolar phenotype when they were considered either individually or as haplotypes. Finally, the CAG repeat observed in SMRT/N-CoR2 did not demonstrate allelic instability and consequently it is unlikely that this polymorphism could be involved in the anticipation phenomenon reported for BP. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Age-related decrease in the proportion of germinal center B cells from mouse Peyer's patches is accompanied by an accumulation of somatic mutations in their immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, A; Gilmore, D; Milstein, C

    1994-11-01

    Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes and the generation of memory B cells seems to take place in germinal centers, which are chronically present in Peyer's patches. Age-associated changes in the germinal center B cell compartment of Peyer's patches and in the mutations of a kappa light chain transgene were analyzed in unimmunized mice. Somatic mutations accumulate in germinal center B cells slowly and continuously to reach an apparent plateau when the animals are around 5 months old. In contrast, the proportion of germinal center B cells reaches a maximum in very young mice (about 2 months old) and decreases progressively thereafter. These results suggest that the highly mutated B cells in older mice arise by the successive accumulation of mutations in memory cells. The data also show that the optimum time for the analysis of hypermutation of transgenes in Peyer's patches is when the mice are about 5 months old.

  18. Feline congenital erythropoietic porphyria: two homozygous UROS missense mutations cause the enzyme deficiency and porphyrin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Giger, Urs; Haskins, Mark E; Desnick, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    The first feline model of human congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) due to deficient uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) activity was identified by its characteristic clinical phenotype, and confirmed by biochemical and molecular genetic studies. The proband, an adult domestic shorthair cat, had dark-red urine and brownish discolored teeth with red fluorescence under ultraviolet light. Biochemical studies demonstrated markedly increased uroporphyrinogen I in urine and plasma (2,650- and 10,700-fold greater than wild type, respectively), whereas urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen were lower than normal. Erythrocytic URO-synthase activity was UROS gene revealed two missense mutations, c.140C>T (p.S47F) in exon 3 and c.331G>A (p.G111S) in exon 6, both of which were homozygous, presumably owing to parental consanguinity. Neither was present in 100 normal cat alleles. Prokaryotic expression and thermostability studies of the purified monomeric wild-type, p.S47F, p.G111S, and p.S47F/G111S enzymes showed that the p.S47F enzyme had 100% of wild-type specific activity but ~50% decreased thermostability, whereas the p.G111S and p.S47F/G111S enzymes had about 60% and 20% of wild-type specific activity, respectively, and both were markedly thermolabile. Molecular modeling results indicated that the less active/less stable p.G111S enzyme was further functionally impaired by a structural interaction induced by the presence of the S47F substitution. Thus, the synergistic interaction of two rare amino acid substitutions in the URO-synthase polypeptide caused the feline model of human CEP.

  19. Chemical chaperone treatment reduces intracellular accumulation of mutant collagen IV and ameliorates the cellular phenotype of a COL4A2 mutation that causes haemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lydia S; Lu, Yinhui; Taggart, Aislynn; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Vilain, Catheline; Abramowicz, Marc; Kadler, Karl E; Van Agtmael, Tom

    2014-01-15

    Haemorrhagic stroke accounts for ∼20% of stroke cases and porencephaly is a clinical consequence of perinatal cerebral haemorrhaging. Here, we report the identification of a novel dominant G702D mutation in the collagen domain of COL4A2 (collagen IV alpha chain 2) in a family displaying porencephaly with reduced penetrance. COL4A2 is the obligatory protein partner of COL4A1 but in contrast to most COL4A1 mutations, the COL4A2 mutation does not lead to eye or kidney disease. Analysis of dermal biopsies from a patient and his unaffected father, who also carries the mutation, revealed that both display basement membrane (BM) defects. Intriguingly, defective collagen IV incorporation into the dermal BM was observed in the patient only and was associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of COL4A2 in primary dermal fibroblasts. This intracellular accumulation led to ER stress, unfolded protein response activation, reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Interestingly, the absence of ER retention of COL4A2 and ER stress in cells from the unaffected father indicate that accumulation and/or clearance of mutant COL4A2 from the ER may be a critical modifier for disease development. Our analysis also revealed that mutant collagen IV is degraded via the proteasome. Importantly, treatment of patient cells with a chemical chaperone decreased intracellular COL4A2 levels, ER stress and apoptosis, demonstrating that reducing intracellular collagen accumulation can ameliorate the cellular phenotype of COL4A2 mutations. Importantly, these data highlight that manipulation of chaperone levels, intracellular collagen accumulation and ER stress are potential therapeutic options for collagen IV diseases including haemorrhagic stroke.

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis drives a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and mitochondrial DNA deletion mutation accumulation in aged rat skeletal muscle fibers.

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    Allen Herbst

    Full Text Available Aged muscles possess dysfunctional fibers that contain intracellular expansions of somatically derived mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations. At high abundance, these mutations disrupt the expression of mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of the electron transport chain resulting in aerobic respiration deficient muscle fiber segments. These fiber segments atrophy and break contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function that occurs with age. By combining micro-dissection of individual muscle fibers with microarray analysis, we observed the response induced within these abnormal muscle fibers and detected an increase in many genes affecting metabolism and metabolic regulation. The transcriptional profile and subsequent protein validation suggested that a non-compensatory program of mitochondrial biogenesis was initiated. We hypothesized that this non-adaptive program of mitochondrial biogenesis was driving mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation. We tested this hypothesis by treating aged rats with β-Guanidinopropionic acid, a compound that stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis. β-Guanidinopropionic acid treatment increased muscle mitochondrial genome copy number and resulted in a 3.7 fold increase in the abundance of electron transport chain negative muscle fiber segments. We conclude that in electron transport system abnormal muscle fiber segments, a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and non-compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis drive mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation.

  1. Proportionally more deleterious genetic variation in European than in African populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Indap, Amit R; Schmidt, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying the number of deleterious mutations per diploid human genome is of crucial concern to both evolutionary and medical geneticists. Here we combine genome-wide polymorphism data from PCR-based exon resequencing, comparative genomic data across mammalian species, and protein structure...

  2. Mutations that alter a repeated ACCA element located at the 5' end of the Potato virus X genome affect RNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Ri; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Hong-Soo; Hemenway, Cynthia L; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2008-08-15

    The repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence and structural (SL1) elements in the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of the Potato virus X (PVX) RNA play vital roles in the PVX life cycle by controlling translation, RNA replication, movement, and assembly. It has already been shown that the repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence affect both gRNA and sgRNA accumulation, while not affecting minus-strand RNA accumulation, and are also required for host protein binding. The functional significance of the repeated ACCA sequence elements in the 5' NTR region was investigated by analyzing the effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on PVX replication in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and NT1 protoplasts. Substitution (ACCA into AAAA or UUUU) mutations introduced in the first (nt 10-13) element in the 5' NTR of the PVX RNA significantly affected viral replication, while mutations introduced in the second (nt 17-20) and third (nt 20-23) elements did not. The fourth (nt 29-32) ACCA element weakly affected virus replication, whereas mutations in the fifth (nt 38-41) significantly reduced virus replication due to the structure disruption of SL1 by AAAA and/or UUUU substitutions. Further characterization of the first ACCA element indicated that duplication of ACCA at nt 10-13 (nt 10-17, ACCAACCA) caused severe symptom development as compared to that of wild type, while deletion of the single element (nt 10-13), DeltaACCA) or tripling of this element caused reduced symptom development. Single- and double-nucleotide substitutions introduced into the first ACCA element revealed the importance of CC located at nt positions 11 and 12. Altogether, these results indicate that the first ACCA element is important for PVX replication.

  3. Distinct early molecular responses to mutations causing vLINCL and JNCL presage ATP synthase subunit C accumulation in cerebellar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cao

    Full Text Available Variant late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL, caused by CLN6 mutation, and juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL, caused by CLN3 mutation, share clinical and pathological features, including lysosomal accumulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit c, but the unrelated CLN6 and CLN3 genes may initiate disease via similar or distinct cellular processes. To gain insight into the NCL pathways, we established murine wild-type and CbCln6(nclf/nclf cerebellar cells and compared them to wild-type and CbCln3(Δex7/8/Δex7/8 cerebellar cells. CbCln6(nclf/nclf cells and CbCln3(Δex7/8/Δex7/8 cells both displayed abnormally elongated mitochondria and reduced cellular ATP levels and, as cells aged to confluence, exhibited accumulation of subunit c protein in Lamp 1-positive organelles. However, at sub-confluence, endoplasmic reticulum PDI immunostain was decreased only in CbCln6(nclf/nclf cells, while fluid-phase endocytosis and LysoTracker® labeled vesicles were decreased in both CbCln6(nclf/nclf and CbCln3(Δex7/8/Δex7/8 cells, though only the latter cells exhibited abnormal vesicle subcellular distribution. Furthermore, unbiased gene expression analyses revealed only partial overlap in the cerebellar cell genes and pathways that were altered by the Cln3(Δex7/8 and Cln6(nclf mutations. Thus, these data support the hypothesis that CLN6 and CLN3 mutations trigger distinct processes that converge on a shared pathway, which is responsible for proper subunit c protein turnover and neuronal cell survival.

  4. Congenital Cataract-Causing Mutation G129C in γC-Crystallin Promotes the Accumulation of Two Distinct Unfolding Intermediates That Form Highly Toxic Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yi-Bo; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Zhao, Wei-Jie; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2015-08-28

    Cataract is a lens opacification disease prevalent worldwide. Cataract-causing mutations in crystallins generally lead to the formation of light-scattering particles in the lens. However, it remains unclear for the detailed structural and pathological mechanisms of most mutations. In this study, we showed that the G129C mutation in γC-crystallin, which is associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract, perturbed the unfolding process by promoting the accumulation of two distinct aggregation-prone intermediates under mild denaturing conditions. The abnormally accumulated intermediates escaped from the chaperone-like function of αA-crystallin during refolding. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the mutation altered domain pairing geometry and allowed the penetration of extra solvent molecules into the domain binding interface, thereby weakening domain binding energy. Under mild denaturation conditions, the increased domain movements may facilitate the formation of non-native oligomers via domain swapping, which further assembled into amyloid-like fibrils. The intermediate that appeared at 1.6M guanidine hydrochloride was more compact and less aggregatory than the one populated at 0.9 M guanidine hydrochloride, which was caused by the increased solvation of acidic residues in the ion-pairing network via the competitive binding of guanidinium ions. More importantly, both the amyloid-like fibrils preformed in vitro and intracellular aggresomes formed by exogenously overexpressed mutant proteins significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death. The combined data from spectroscopic, structural and cellular studies strongly suggest that both the formation of light-scattering aggregates and the toxic effects of the aggregates may contribute to the onset and development of cataract.

  5. Increased Variation in Adh Enzyme Activity in Drosophila Mutation-Accumulation Experiment Is Not Due to Transposable Elements at the Adh Structural Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquadro, C. F.; Tachida, H.; Langley, C. H.; Harada, K.; Mukai, T.

    1990-01-01

    We present here a molecular analysis of the region surrounding the structural gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in 47 lines of Drosophila melanogaster that have each accumulated mutations for 300 generations. While these lines show a significant increase in variation of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity compared to control lines, we found no restriction map variation in a 13-kb region including the complete Adh structural gene and roughly 5 kb of both 5' and 3' sequences. Thus, the rapid accumulation of ADH activity variation after 28,200 allele generations does not appear to have been due to the mobilization of transposable elements into or out of the Adh structural gene region. PMID:1963870

  6. Nickel accumulation in lung tissues is associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Lee, Huei

    2014-10-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been associated with lung cancer. The correlation between high nickel levels and increased risk of lung cancer has been previously reported in a case-control study. This study assessed whether nickel exposure increased the occurrence of p53 mutations due to DNA repair inhibition by nickel. A total of 189 lung cancer patients were enrolled to determine nickel levels in tumor-adjacent normal lung tissues and p53 mutation status in lung tumors through atomic absorption spectrometry and direct sequencing, respectively. Nickel levels in p53 mutant patients were significantly higher than those in p53 wild-type patients. When patients were divided into high- and low-nickel subgroups by median nickel level, the high-nickel subgroup of patients had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.25 for p53 mutation risk relative to the low-nickel subgroup patients. The OR for p53 mutation risk of lifetime non-smokers, particularly females, in the high-nickel subgroup was greater than that in the low-nickel subgroup. To determine whether nickel affected DNA repair capacity, we conducted the host cell reactivation assay in A549 and H1975 lung cancer cells and showed that the DNA repair activity was reduced by nickel chloride in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with elevated production of hydrogen peroxide-induced 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Therefore, increased risk of p53 mutation due to defective DNA repair caused by high nickel levels in lung tissues may be one mechanism by which nickel exposure contributes to lung cancer development, especially in lifetime female non-smokers.

  7. Accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and over-expression of HIF1alpha in tumours which result from germline FH and SDH mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, P J; Brière, J J; Alam, N A; Barwell, J; Barclay, E; Wortham, N C; Hunt, T; Mitchell, M; Olpin, S; Moat, S J; Hargreaves, I P; Heales, S J; Chung, Y L; Griffiths, J R; Dalgleish, A; McGrath, J A; Gleeson, M J; Hodgson, S V; Poulsom, R; Rustin, P; Tomlinson, I P M

    2005-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded Krebs cycle enzymes, fumarate hydratase (FH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, -C and -D), act as tumour suppressors. Germline mutations in FH predispose individuals to leiomyomas and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), whereas mutations in SDH cause paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas (HPGL). In this study, we have shown that FH-deficient cells and tumours accumulate fumarate and, to a lesser extent, succinate. SDH-deficient tumours principally accumulate succinate. In situ analyses showed that these tumours also have over-expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), activation of HIF1alphatargets (such as vascular endothelial growth factor) and high microvessel density. We found no evidence of increased reactive oxygen species in our cells. Our data provide in vivo evidence to support the hypothesis that increased succinate and/or fumarate causes stabilization of HIF1alpha a plausible mechanism, inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases, has previously been suggested by in vitro studies. The basic mechanism of tumorigenesis in HPGL and HLRCC is likely to be pseudo-hypoxic drive, just as it is in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

  8. Parasites and mutational load: an experimental test of a pluralistic theory for the evolution of sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tim F.; Lenski, Richard E.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2005-01-01

    Ecological and mutational explanations for the evolution of sexual reproduction have usually been considered independently. Although many of these explanations have yielded promising theoretical results, experimental support for their ability to overcome a twofold cost of sex has been limited. For this reason, it has recently been argued that a pluralistic approach, combining effects from multiple models, may be necessary to explain the apparent advantage of sex. One such pluralistic model proposes that parasite load and synergistic epistasis between deleterious mutations might interact to create an advantage for recombination. Here, we test this proposal by comparing the fitness functions of parasitized and parasite-free genotypes of Escherichia coli bearing known numbers of transposon-insertion mutations. In both classes, we failed to detect any evidence for synergistic epistasis. However, the average effect of deleterious mutations was greater in parasitized than parasite-free genotypes. This effect might broaden the conditions under which another proposed model combining parasite–host coevolutionary dynamics and mutation accumulation can explain the maintenance of sex. These results suggest that, on average, deleterious mutations act multiplicatively with each other but in synergy with infection in determining fitness. PMID:15705557

  9. Posterior Accumulation of Tau and Concordant Hypometabolism in an Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Patient with Presenilin-1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ruben; Wibom, Moa; Olsson, Tomas; Hägerström, Douglas; Jögi, Jonas; Rabinovici, Gil D; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether the distribution of tau pathology differs between cases with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sporadic AD. We present positron emission tomography (PET) data from a young patient with a presenilin-1 mutation (Thr116Asn). 18F-flutemetamol PET showed a distribution of amyloid-β fibrils similar to sporadic AD. However, the pattern of tau pathology, revealed using 18F-AV1451 PET, showed higher uptake in posterior cingulate, precuneus, parietal and occipital cortices compared to late-onset sporadic AD. Further, the tau pathology, but not amyloid pathology, exhibited a very clear inverse relationship with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-metabolism, indicating neuronal hypometabolism in regions affected by tau aggregates.

  10. [Adult-onset case of idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation without mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Shinji; Sekine, Takeshi; Ueno, Yuji; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Takahashi, Junko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Kambe, Yasunori; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with a 15-year history of bipolar disorder treated with anti-depressants, lithium carbonate or neuroleptics was admitted because of marked difficulty in gait and speech. At the age 45, he was unable to walk without bilateral assists and became a wheel-chair state. There was no family history and his mother, father and younger sister were neurologically free. General physical examinations revealed no abnormalities. Neurologically, he was moderately demented (mini mental state examination: 18/30) and showed bilateral horizontal gaze nystagmus, parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and moderate spastic paraparesis. No involuntary movements were noted. Wet blood smear showed acanthocytes, while blood chemistries revealed no abnormalities including levels of serum creatine kinase, hepatic enzymes and blood beta-lipoprotein. Kell antigen expressions of the red blood cells were within normal limit. Western blot analysis with anti-chorein antibody detected normal chorein expression levels of the red blood cells. Cranial MRI showed severe symmetric atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes, caudate nuclei, putamen, and brainstem. Also, MRI-gradient echo showed symmetric iron accumulation in the medial portion of the globus pallidus without surrounding high intensity areas, so called "eye-of-the-tiger sign". Genetic analyses revealed no mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Therefore, he was diagnosed as idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). These findings suggest that NBIA is heterogeneous and other additional genes remain to be found.

  11. Exploration of structural stability in deleterious nsSNPs of the XPA gene: A molecular dynamics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N NagaSundaram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Distinguishing the deleterious from the massive number of non-functional nsSNPs that occur within a single genome is a considerable challenge in mutation research. In this approach, we have used the existing in silico methods to explore the mutation-structure-function relationship in the XPA gene. Materials and Methods: We used the Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT, Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen, I-Mutant 2.0, and the Protein Analysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships methods to predict the effects of deleterious nsSNPs on protein function and evaluated the impact of mutation on protein stability by Molecular Dynamics simulations. Results: By comparing the scores of all the four in silico methods, nsSNP with an ID rs104894131 at position C108F was predicted to be highly deleterious. We extended our Molecular dynamics approach to gain insight into the impact of this non-synonymous polymorphism on structural changes that may affect the activity of the XPA gene. Conclusion: Based on the in silico methods score, potential energy, root-mean-square deviation, and root-mean-square fluctuation, we predict that deleterious nsSNP at position C108F would play a significant role in causing disease by the XPA gene. Our approach would present the application of in silico tools in understanding the functional variation from the perspective of structure, evolution, and phenotype.

  12. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy.

  13. Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations in Picoeukaryotic Marine Green Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovec, Marc; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Grimsley, Nigel; Salmeron, Christophe; Pecqueur, David; Piganeau, Gwenael; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie

    2016-07-07

    Estimates of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations are important for understanding the adaptive potential of species. Here, we present the results of mutation accumulation experiments over 265-512 sequential generations in four species of marine unicellular green algae, Ostreococcus tauri RCC4221, Ostreococcus mediterraneus RCC2590, Micromonas pusilla RCC299, and Bathycoccus prasinos RCC1105. Cell division rates, taken as a proxy for fitness, systematically decline over the course of the experiment in O. tauri, but not in the three other species where the MA experiments were carried out over a smaller number of generations. However, evidence of mutation accumulation in 24 MA lines arises when they are exposed to stressful conditions, such as changes in osmolarity or exposure to herbicides. The selection coefficients, estimated from the number of cell divisions/day, varies significantly between the different environmental conditions tested in MA lines, providing evidence for advantageous and deleterious effects of spontaneous mutations. This suggests a common environmental dependence of the fitness effects of mutations and allows the minimum mutation/genome/generation rates to be inferred at 0.0037 in these species. Copyright © 2016 Krasovec et al.

  14. A review on the origin and spread of deleterious mutants of the beta-globin gene in Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S K; Talukder, G

    2001-01-01

    Deleterious mutations of the human beta-globin gene are responsible for beta-thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies, which are the most common genetic diseases in Indian populations. A highly heterogeneous distribution of those mutations is observed in India and certain mutations are restricted to some extent to particular groups only. The reasons behind the geographical clustering and origin of the mutations in India is a highly debated issue and the evidence is conflicting. Our present article aims at tracing the origin of the deleterious beta-globin mutation and evaluates the role of different evolutionary forces responsible for the spread and present distribution of those mutations in Indian populations, using data from molecular biology and statistical methods. Mutations are generated essentially randomly, but "hot-spot" sites for mutation are reported for the beta-globin gene cluster, indicating sequence dependency of mutation. A single origin of a deleterious beta-globin mutation, followed by recombination (in a hot spot region) and/or interallelic gene conversion (within beta-globin gene) through time is the most plausible hypothesis to explain the association of those mutations with multiple haplotype backgrounds and frameworks. It is suggested that India is the place of origin of HbE and HbD mutations and that they dispersed to other parts of the would by migration. HbS mutants present in Indian populations are not of Middle East origin but rather a fresh mutation is the probable explanation for the prevalence among tribal groups. beta-thalassaemia represents a heterogeneous group of mutant alleles in India. Five common and twelve rare mutations have been reported in variable frequencies among different Indian populations. Gene flow of those mutant alleles from different populations of the world by political, military and commercial interactions possibly accounts for the heterogenous nature of beta-thalassaemia among Indians. A multiple allelic

  15. Direct estimation of the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Haag-Liautard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variants are widely used in evolutionary genetics as markers for population history and to estimate divergence times among taxa. Inferences of species history are generally based on phylogenetic comparisons, which assume that molecular evolution is clock-like. Between-species comparisons have also been used to estimate the mutation rate, using sites that are thought to evolve neutrally. We directly estimated the mtDNA mutation rate by scanning the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster lines that had undergone approximately 200 generations of spontaneous mutation accumulation (MA. We detected a total of 28 point mutations and eight insertion-deletion (indel mutations, yielding an estimate for the single-nucleotide mutation rate of 6.2 x 10(-8 per site per fly generation. Most mutations were heteroplasmic within a line, and their frequency distribution suggests that the effective number of mitochondrial genomes transmitted per female per generation is about 30. We observed repeated occurrences of some indel mutations, suggesting that indel mutational hotspots are common. Among the point mutations, there is a large excess of G-->A mutations on the major strand (the sense strand for the majority of mitochondrial genes. These mutations tend to occur at nonsynonymous sites of protein-coding genes, and they are expected to be deleterious, so do not become fixed between species. The overall mtDNA mutation rate per base pair per fly generation in Drosophila is estimated to be about 10x higher than the nuclear mutation rate, but the mitochondrial major strand G-->A mutation rate is about 70x higher than the nuclear rate. Silent sites are substantially more strongly biased towards A and T than nonsynonymous sites, consistent with the extreme mutation bias towards A+T. Strand-asymmetric mutation bias, coupled with selection to maintain specific nonsynonymous bases, therefore provides an explanation for the extreme base

  16. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  17. Accumulating mutations in series of haplotypes at the KIT and MITF loci are major determinants of white markings in Franches-Montagnes horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Bianca; Signer-Hasler, Heidi; Binns, Matthew M; Obexer-Ruff, Gabriela; Hauswirth, Regula; Bellone, Rebecca R; Burger, Dominik; Rieder, Stefan; Wade, Claire M; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-01-01

    Coat color and pattern variations in domestic animals are frequently inherited as simple monogenic traits, but a number are known to have a complex genetic basis. While the analysis of complex trait data remains a challenge in all species, we can use the reduced haplotypic diversity in domestic animal populations to gain insight into the genomic interactions underlying complex phenotypes. White face and leg markings are examples of complex traits in horses where little is known of the underlying genetics. In this study, Franches-Montagnes (FM) horses were scored for the occurrence of white facial and leg markings using a standardized scoring system. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for several white patterning traits in 1,077 FM horses. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the white marking score with p-values p≤10(-4) were identified. Three loci, MC1R and the known white spotting genes, KIT and MITF, were identified as the major loci underlying the extent of white patterning in this breed. Together, the seven loci explain 54% of the genetic variance in total white marking score, while MITF and KIT alone account for 26%. Although MITF and KIT are the major loci controlling white patterning, their influence varies according to the basic coat color of the horse and the specific body location of the white patterning. Fine mapping across the MITF and KIT loci was used to characterize haplotypes present. Phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes were calculated to assess their selective and evolutionary influences on the extent of white patterning. This novel approach shows that KIT and MITF act in an additive manner and that accumulating mutations at these loci progressively increase the extent of white markings.

  18. Co-mutation of p53, K-ras genes and accumulation of p53 protein and its correlation to clinicopathological features in rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Zhong Pan; De-Sen Wan; Gong Chen; Li-Ren Li; Zhen-Hai Lu; Bi-Jun Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of p53 gene mutations predicted by overexpression of p53 protein immunohistochemically,and to investigate the co-mutation of p53 and K-rasgenes in rectal cancer and its effect on promoting malignant biologic behaviors of tumors.METHODS: Ninety-seven specimens of rectal cancer were surgically resected in our hospital from August 1996 to October 1997. The hot mutation areas of p53 gene (in exons 5-8) and K-ras gene (in codon 5/12 and 13) were detected with polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and overexpression of p53 protein was detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the 97 specimens of rectal cancer. Correlation between gene mutations and tumor clinicopathologic factors was studied, and survival analysis was penfomed as well.RESULTS: There were 36 cases of p53 gene mutations in 61 p53 protein positive cases, and 21 cases of p53 gene non-mutation in 36 p53 protein negative cases respectively.The coincidence rate of p53 gene mutation by IHC method with PCR-SSCP method was 58.8% (57/97). The mutation rate of p53 gene was 52.6% (51/97), while K-ras gene mutation was observed in codons 12 and 13 in 61 cases with a mutation rate of 62.9% (61/97). Single gene mutation of p53 or K-raswas found in 32 cases. Both p53 and K-ras gene mutation were found in 48 cases. Statistical analysis showed that p53 and K-rasgene mutations were not related to the clinicopathologic factors, including tumor size, gross tumor type, histological classification, differentiation, invasion to intestinal veins, lymphatics and nerves, invasive depth to wall, lymph node metastasis, and Dukes' stages (P>0.05).The survival in patients with no gene mutation, single gene mutation and both gene mutations were similar (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: IHC has a certain false positive and false negative rate in detecting p53 gene mutations. Malignant biological behaviours of rectal cancer are not enhanced by p53 and K-rasgene mutations. Co-mutation

  19. Computational and Structural Investigation of Deleterious Functional SNPs in Breast Cancer BRCA2 Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajasekaran R; George Priya Doss; Sudandiradoss C; Ramanathan K; Rituraj Purohit; Rao Sethumadhavan

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we have analyzed the genetic variation that can alter the expression and the function in BRCA2 gene using computational methods. Out of the total 534 SNPs, 101 were found to be non synonymous (nsSNPs). Among the 7 SNPs in the untranslated region, 3 SNPs were found in 5′ and 4 SNPs were found in 3′ un-translated regions (UTR). Of the nsSNPs 20.7% were found to be damaging by both SIFT and PolyPhen server among the 101 nsSNPs investigated. UTR resource tool suggested that 2 SNPs in the 5′ UTR region and 4 SNPs in the 3′ UTR regions might change the protein expression levels. The mutation from asparagine to isoleucine at the position 3124 of the native protein of BRCA2 gene was most deleterious by both SIFT and PolyPhen servers. A structural analysis of this mutated protein and the native protein was made which had an RMSD value of 0.301 nm. Based on this work, we proposed that this most deleterious nsSNP with an SNPid rs28897759 is an important candidate for the cause of breast cancer by BRCA2 gene.

  20. Rates and genomic consequences of spontaneous mutational events in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrider, Daniel R; Houle, David; Lynch, Michael; Hahn, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Because spontaneous mutation is the source of all genetic diversity, measuring mutation rates can reveal how natural selection drives patterns of variation within and between species. We sequenced eight genomes produced by a mutation-accumulation experiment in Drosophila melanogaster. Our analysis reveals that point mutation and small indel rates vary significantly between the two different genetic backgrounds examined. We also find evidence that ∼2% of mutational events affect multiple closely spaced nucleotides. Unlike previous similar experiments, we were able to estimate genome-wide rates of large deletions and tandem duplications. These results suggest that, at least in inbred lines like those examined here, mutational pressures may result in net growth rather than contraction of the Drosophila genome. By comparing our mutation rate estimates to polymorphism data, we are able to estimate the fraction of new mutations that are eliminated by purifying selection. These results suggest that ∼99% of duplications and deletions are deleterious--making them 10 times more likely to be removed by selection than nonsynonymous mutations. Our results illuminate not only the rates of new small- and large-scale mutations, but also the selective forces that they encounter once they arise.

  1. Computational identification and structural analysis of deleterious functional SNPs in MLL gene causing acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Priya Doss, C; Rajasekaran, R; Sethumadhavan, Rao

    2010-09-01

    A promising application of the huge amounts of data from the Human Genome Project currently available offers new opportunities for identifying the genetic predisposition and developing a better understanding of complex diseases such as cancers. The main focus of cancer genetics is the study of mutations that are causally implicated in tumorigenesis. The identification of such causal mutations does not only provide insight into cancer biology but also presents anticancer therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers. In this study, we evaluated the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that can alter the expression and the function in MLL gene through computational methods. We applied an evolutionary perspective to screen the SNPs using a sequence homologybased SIFT tool, suggested that 10 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) (50%) were found to be deleterious. Structure based approach PolyPhen server suggested that 5 nsSNPS (25%) may disrupt protein function and structure. PupaSuite tool predicted the phenotypic effect of SNPs on the structure and function of the affected protein. Structure analysis was carried out with the major mutations that occurred in the native protein coded by MLL gene is at amino acid positions Q1198P and K1203Q. The solvent accessibility results showed that 7 residues changed from exposed state in the native type protein to buried state in Q1198P mutant protein and remained unchanged in the case of K1203Q. From the overall results obtained, nsSNP with id (rs1784246) at the amino acid position Q1198P could be considered as deleterious mutation in the acute leukemia caused by MLL gene.

  2. Disease-associated mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin B cause cytoplasmic focal accumulations correlating with disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Philip B; Morgan, Tim; Alanay, Yasemin;

    2012-01-01

    repeats surrounding the flexible hinge 1 region of the FLNB rod domain. Despite being positioned in domains that bind actin, it is unknown if these mutations perturb cytoskeletal structure. Expression of several full-length FLNB constructs containing ABD mutations resulted in the appearance of actin...

  3. Genetic contribution to aging: deleterious and helpful genes define life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J I; Montoriol, C; Morer, I; Beyer, K

    2005-12-01

    For the best understanding of aging, we must consider a genetic pool in which genes with negative effects (deleterious genes that shorten the life span) interact with genes with positive effects (helpful genes that promote longevity) in a constant epistatic relationship that results in a modulation of the final expression under particular environmental influences. Examples of deleterious genes affecting aging (predisposition to early-life pathology and disease) are those that confer risk for developing vascular disease in the heart, brain, or peripheral vessels (APOE, ACE, MTFHR, and mutation at factor II and factor V genes), a gene associated with sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (APOE E4), a polymorphism (COLIA1 Sp1) associated with an increased fracture risk, and several genetic polymorphisms involved in hormonal metabolism that affect adverse reactions to estrogen replacement in postmenopausal women. In summary, the process of aging can be regarded as a multifactorial trait that results from an interaction between stochastic events and sets of epistatic alleles that have pleiotropic age-dependent effects. Lacking those alleles that predispose to disease and having the longevity-enabling genes (those beneficial genetic variants that confer disease resistance) are probably both important to such a remarkable survival advantage.

  4. Deleterious effects of recombination and possible nonrecombinatorial advantages of sex in a fungal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Villavicencio, M; Debets, A J M; Slakhorst, M; Giraud, T; Schoustra, S E

    2013-09-01

    Why sexual reproduction is so prevalent in nature remains a major question in evolutionary biology. Most of the proposed advantages of sex rely on the benefits obtained from recombination. However, it is still unclear whether the conditions under which these recombinatorial benefits would be sufficient to maintain sex in the short term are met in nature. Our study addresses a largely overlooked hypothesis, proposing that sex could be maintained in the short term by advantages due to functions linked with sex, but not related to recombination. These advantages would be so essential that sex could not be lost in the short term. Here, we used the fungus Aspergillus nidulans to experimentally test predictions of this hypothesis. Specifically, we were interested in (i) the short-term deleterious effects of recombination, (ii) possible nonrecombinatorial advantages of sex particularly through the elimination of mutations and (iii) the outcrossing rate under choice conditions in a haploid fungus able to reproduce by both outcrossing and haploid selfing. Our results were consistent with our hypotheses: we found that (i) recombination can be strongly deleterious in the short term, (ii) sexual reproduction between individuals derived from the same clonal lineage provided nonrecombinatorial advantages, likely through a selection arena mechanism, and (iii) under choice conditions, outcrossing occurs in a homothallic species, although at low rates.

  5. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  6. The spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations, ubiquitous in human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hunter Shain

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF is a multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complex that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition nucleosomes, thereby modulating gene expression. Accumulating evidence suggests that SWI/SNF functions as a tumor suppressor in some cancers. However, the spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations across human cancers has not been systematically investigated. Here, we mined whole-exome sequencing data from 24 published studies representing 669 cases from 18 neoplastic diagnoses. SWI/SNF mutations were widespread across diverse human cancers, with an excess of deleterious mutations, and an overall frequency approaching TP53 mutation. Mutations occurred most commonly in the SMARCA4 enzymatic subunit, and in subunits thought to confer functional specificity (ARID1A, ARID1B, PBRM1, and ARID2. SWI/SNF mutations were not mutually-exclusive of other mutated cancer genes, including TP53 and EZH2 (both previously linked to SWI/SNF. Our findings implicate SWI/SNF as an important but under-recognized tumor suppressor in diverse human cancers, and provide a key resource to guide future investigations.

  7. The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope are a mutational cold spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Ron; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Cuevas, José M.; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    In RNA viruses, mutations occur fast and have large fitness effects. While this affords remarkable adaptability, it can also endanger viral survival due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. How RNA viruses reconcile these two opposed facets of mutation is still unknown. Here we show that, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), spontaneous mutations are not randomly located along the viral genome. We find that the viral mutation rate experiences a threefold reduction in the region encoding the most external domains of the viral envelope, which are strongly targeted by neutralizing antibodies. This contrasts with the hypermutation mechanisms deployed by other, more slowly mutating pathogens such as DNA viruses and bacteria, in response to immune pressure. We show that downregulation of the mutation rate in HIV-1 is exerted by the template RNA through changes in sequence context and secondary structure, which control the activity of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (A3)-mediated cytidine deamination and the fidelity of the viral reverse transcriptase. PMID:26450412

  8. The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope are a mutational cold spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Ron; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Cuevas, José M; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2015-10-09

    In RNA viruses, mutations occur fast and have large fitness effects. While this affords remarkable adaptability, it can also endanger viral survival due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. How RNA viruses reconcile these two opposed facets of mutation is still unknown. Here we show that, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), spontaneous mutations are not randomly located along the viral genome. We find that the viral mutation rate experiences a threefold reduction in the region encoding the most external domains of the viral envelope, which are strongly targeted by neutralizing antibodies. This contrasts with the hypermutation mechanisms deployed by other, more slowly mutating pathogens such as DNA viruses and bacteria, in response to immune pressure. We show that downregulation of the mutation rate in HIV-1 is exerted by the template RNA through changes in sequence context and secondary structure, which control the activity of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (A3)-mediated cytidine deamination and the fidelity of the viral reverse transcriptase.

  9. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Stewart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems.

  10. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems. PMID:26125550

  11. Rats with a missense mutation in Atm display neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration subsequent to accumulation of cytosolic DNA following unrepaired DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Hazel; Luff, John; Cheung, KaGeen; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatei, Magtouf; Lee, C Soon; Bellingham, Mark C; Noakes, Peter G; Lim, Yi Chieh; Barnett, Nigel L; Dingwall, Steven; Wolvetang, Ernst; Mashimo, Tomoji; Roberts, Tara L; Lavin, Martin F

    2016-11-28

    Mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)-mutated (ATM) gene give rise to the human genetic disorder A-T, characterized by immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, and neurodegeneration. Whereas a series of animal models recapitulate much of the A-T phenotype, they fail to present with ataxia or neurodegeneration. We describe here the generation of an Atm missense mutant [amino acid change of leucine (L) to proline (P) at position 2262 (L2262P)] rat by intracytoplasmic injection (ICSI) of mutant sperm into oocytes. Atm-mutant rats (Atm(L2262P/L2262P)) expressed low levels of ATM protein, suggesting a destabilizing effect of the mutation, and had a significantly reduced lifespan compared with Atm(+/+) Whereas these rats did not show cerebellar atrophy, they succumbed to hind-limb paralysis (45%), and the remainder developed tumors. Closer examination revealed the presence of both dsDNA and ssDNA in the cytoplasm of cells in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and spinal cord of Atm(L2262P/L2262P) rats. Significantly increased levels of IFN-β and IL-1β in all 3 tissues were indicative of DNA damage induction of the type 1 IFN response. This was further supported by NF-κB activation, as evidenced by p65 phosphorylation (P65) and translocation to the nucleus in the spinal cord and parahippocampus. Other evidence of neuroinflammation in the brain and spinal cord was the loss of motor neurons and the presence of increased activation of microglia. These data provide support for a proinflammatory phenotype that is manifested in the Atm mutant rat as hind-limb paralysis. This mutant represents a useful model to investigate the importance of neuroinflammation in A-T .

  12. A Selective Sweep on a Deleterious Mutation in CPT1A in Arctic Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemente, Florian J.; Cardona, Alexia; Inchley, Charlotte E.

    2014-01-01

    Arctic populations live in an environment characterized by extreme cold and the absence of plant foods for much of the year and are likely to have undergone genetic adaptations to these environmental conditions in the time they have been living there. Genome-wide selection scans based on genotype...

  13. A Selective Sweep on a Deleterious Mutation in CPT1A in Arctic Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemente, Florian J.; Cardona, Alexia; Inchley, Charlotte E.

    2014-01-01

    Arctic populations live in an environment characterized by extreme cold and the absence of plant foods for much of the year and are likely to have undergone genetic adaptations to these environmental conditions in the time they have been living there. Genome-wide selection scans based on genotype...

  14. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  15. Relation between Angle Class II malocclusion and deleterious oral habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tarcísio Lima Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral habits may interfere on the growth and development of the stomatognathic system and orofacial myofunctional conditions, producing changes in the position of teeth in their dental arches. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to verify the presence of deleterious oral habits in individuals with malocclusion and see if there is a predominance of Class II malocclusion in these individuals. METHODS: The records of 140 patients treated at the Clinic of Preventive Orthodontics FORP-USP who had already completed treatment were randomly selected and analyzed. Their ages ranged from 6 to 10 years and 11 months. Associations were made between the presence or absence of deleterious oral habits, type and number of habits found in each individual and the type of malocclusion according to Angle classification. The statistical analysis used was the Chi-square test with a significance level of 5%. History of deleterious oral habits was found in 67.1% of individuals. RESULTS: The Class I malocclusion was most frequent (82.9%, followed by Class II malocclusion (12.1% and Class III (5%. CONCLUSION: There was a predominance of Class II malocclusion in individuals with a history of deleterious oral habits.INTRODUÇÃO: hábitos bucais podem interferir no crescimento e desenvolvimento do sistema estomatognático e nas condições miofuncionais bucofaciais, acarretando alterações no posicionamento dos dentes nas respectivas arcadas dentárias. OBJETIVO: o objetivo dessa pesquisa foi verificar a presença de hábitos bucais deletérios em indivíduos portadores de má oclusão e observar se existe predominância de má oclusão Classe II de Angle nesses indivíduos. MÉTODOS: foram selecionadas, aleatoriamente, e analisadas 140 fichas de pacientes atendidos na Clínica de Ortodontia Preventiva da FORP-USP, que já haviam recebido alta no tratamento. A faixa etária variou dos 6 anos a 10 anos e 11 meses. Foram realizadas associações entre

  16. Paradoxical Roles of the Neutrophil in Sepsis: Protective and Deleterious

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Leite, Caio Abner Vitorino Gonçalves; Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Colón, David Fernando; Borges, Vanessa de Fátima; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, an overwhelming inflammatory response syndrome secondary to infection, is one of the costliest and deadliest medical conditions worldwide. Neutrophils are classically considered to be essential players in the host defense against invading pathogens. However, several investigations have shown that impairment of neutrophil migration to the site of infection, also referred to as neutrophil paralysis, occurs during severe sepsis, resulting in an inability of the host to contain and eliminate the infection. On the other hand, the neutrophil antibacterial arsenal contributes to tissue damage and the development of organ dysfunction during sepsis. In this review, we provide an overview of the main events in which neutrophils play a beneficial or deleterious role in the outcome of sepsis. PMID:27199981

  17. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli paradigm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Jayaraman

    2009-12-01

    Mutators (also called hypermutators) are mutants which show higher than normal spontaneous mutation frequencies, ranging from 10–20 fold to 100–1000 fold higher, or sometimes even more, than wild-type cells. Being a mutator is advantageous to the organism when adapting to environmental changes or stressful situations, such as moving from one habitat to another, one host to another, exposure to antibiotics etc. However, this advantage is only a short-term benefit. In the long run, hypermutability leads to a fitness disadvantage due to accumulation of deleterious mutations or antagonistic pleiotropy or both. Contrary to intuitive expectations, hypermutability is commonly encountered in natural bacterial populations, especially among clinical isolates. It is believed to be involved in the emergence of antibiotic resistance and a hindrance to the treatment of infectious diseases. Here, I review the state of knowledge on the common mechanisms of hypermutability such as errors/defects in DNA replication, proof reading, mismatch repair, oxidative DNA damage, mistranslation etc., as well as phenomena associated with these processes, using Escherichia coli as a paradigmatic organism.

  18. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a “physical tethering” model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface.

  19. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  20. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer.

  1. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  2. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields Joshua A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA.

  3. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan [School of Biotechnology, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Li, Yi-Xue, E-mail: yxli@sibs.ac.cn [School of Biotechnology, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Ye, Zhi-Qiang, E-mail: yezq@pkusz.edu.cn [Laboratory of Chemical Genomics, School of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  4. Hsp90 is important for fecundity, longevity, and buffering of cryptic deleterious variation in wild fly populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bing

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the laboratory, the Drosophila melanogaster heat shock protein Hsp90 can buffer the phenotypic effects of genetic variation. Laboratory experiments either manipulate Hsp90 activity pharmacologically, or they induce mutations with strong effects in the gene Hsp83, the single-copy fly gene encoding Hsp90. It is unknown whether observations from such laboratory experiments are relevant in the wild. Results We here study naturally occurring mutations in Hsp83, and their effects on fitness and phenotypic buffering in flies derived from wild populations. We examined more than 4500 flies from 42 Drosophila populations distributed world-wide for insertions or deletions of mobile DNA in or near the Hsp83 gene. The insertions we observed occur at low population frequencies, and reduce Hsp83 gene expression. In competition experiments, mutant flies performed much more poorly than wild-type flies. Mutant flies were also significantly less fecund and shorter-lived than wild-type flies, as well as less well buffered against cryptic deleterious variation, as we show through inbreeding experiments. Specifically, in Hsp83 mutant flies female fecundity dropped to much lower levels after inbreeding than in wild-type flies. At even slightly elevated temperatures, inbred mutant Hsp83 populations went extinct, whereas inbred wild-type populations persisted. Conclusions Our work shows that Hsp90, a regulator of the stress response and of signaling, helps buffer deleterious variation in fruit flies derived from wild population, and that its buffering role becomes even more important under heat stress.

  5. Mitophagy Failure in Fibroblasts and iPSC-Derived Neurons of Alzheimer’s Disease-Associated Presenilin 1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Martín-Maestro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD is clearly related with the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ and its deleterious effect on mitochondrial function is well established. Anomalies in autophagy have also been described in these patients. In the present work, functional analyses have been performed to study mitochondrial recycling process in patient-derived fibroblasts and neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells harboring the presenilin 1 mutation A246E. Mitophagy impairment was observed due to a diminished autophagy degradation phase associated with lysosomal anomalies, thus causing the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria labeled by Parkin RBR E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (PARK2. The failure of mitochondrial recycling by autophagy was enhanced in the patient-derived neuronal model. Our previous studies have demonstrated similar mitophagy impairment in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD; therefore, our data indicate that mitophagy deficiency should be considered a common nexus between familial and sporadic cases of the disease.

  6. A MATE-family efflux pump rescues the Escherichia coli 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient mutator phenotype and protects against H(2O(2 killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier R Guelfo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypermutation may accelerate bacterial evolution in the short-term. In the long-term, however, hypermutators (cells with an increased rate of mutation can be expected to be at a disadvantage due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. Therefore, in theory, hypermutators are doomed to extinction unless they compensate the elevated mutational burden (deleterious load. Different mechanisms capable of restoring a low mutation rate to hypermutators have been proposed. By choosing an 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient (GO-deficient Escherichia coli strain as a hypermutator model, we investigated the existence of genes able to rescue the hypermutable phenotype by multicopy suppression. Using an in vivo-generated mini-MudII4042 genomic library and a mutator screen, we obtained chromosomal fragments that decrease the rate of mutation in a mutT-deficient strain. Analysis of a selected clone showed that the expression of NorM is responsible for the decreased mutation rate in 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient (mutT, mutY, and mutM mutY strains. NorM is a member of the multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE family of efflux pumps whose role in E. coli cell physiology remains unknown. Our results indicate that NorM may act as a GO-system backup decreasing AT to CG and GC to TA transversions. In addition, the ability of NorM to reduce the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in a GO-deficient strain and protect the cell from oxidative stress, including protein carbonylation, suggests that it can extrude specific molecules-byproducts of bacterial metabolism-that oxidize the guanine present in both DNA and nucleotide pools. Altogether, our results indicate that NorM protects the cell from specific ROS when the GO system cannot cope with the damage.

  7. Understanding and predicting the fitness decline of shrunk populations: inbreeding, purging, mutation, and standard selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dorado, Aurora

    2012-04-01

    The joint consequences of inbreeding, natural selection, and deleterious mutation on mean fitness after population shrinkage are of great importance in evolution and can be critical to the conservation of endangered populations. I present simple analytical equations that predict these consequences, improving and extending a previous heuristic treatment. Purge is defined as the "extra" selection induced by inbreeding, due to the "extra" fitness disadvantage (2d) of homozygotes for (partially) recessive deleterious alleles. Its effect is accounted for by using, instead of the classical inbreeding coefficient f, a purged inbreeding coefficient g that is weighed by the reduction of the frequency of deleterious alleles caused by purging. When the effective size of a large population is reduced to a smaller stable value N (with Nd ≥ 1), the purged inbreeding coefficient after t generations can be predicted as g(t) ≈ [(1 - 1/2N) g(t)(-1) + 1/2N](1 - 2d f(t)(-1)), showing how purging acts upon previously accumulated inbreeding and how its efficiency increases with N. This implies an early fitness decay, followed by some recovery. During this process, the inbreeding depression rate shifts from its ancestral value (δ) to that of the mutation-selection-drift balance corresponding to N (δ*), and standard selection cancels out the inbreeding depression ascribed to δ*. Therefore, purge and inbreeding operate only upon the remaining δ - δ*. The method is applied to the conservation strategy in which family contributions to the breeding pool are equal and is extended to make use of genealogical information. All these predictions are checked using computer simulation.

  8. Avoiding dangerous missense: thermophiles display especially low mutation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Drake

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rates of spontaneous mutation have been estimated under optimal growth conditions for a variety of DNA-based microbes, including viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes. When expressed as genomic mutation rates, most of the values were in the vicinity of 0.003-0.004 with a range of less than two-fold. Because the genome sizes varied by roughly 10(4-fold, the mutation rates per average base pair varied inversely by a similar factor. Even though the commonality of the observed genomic rates remains unexplained, it implies that mutation rates in unstressed microbes reach values that can be finely tuned by evolution. An insight originating in the 1920s and maturing in the 1960s proposed that the genomic mutation rate would reflect a balance between the deleterious effect of the average mutation and the cost of further reducing the mutation rate. If this view is correct, then increasing the deleterious impact of the average mutation should be countered by reducing the genomic mutation rate. It is a common observation that many neutral or nearly neutral mutations become strongly deleterious at higher temperatures, in which case they are called temperature-sensitive mutations. Recently, the kinds and rates of spontaneous mutations were described for two microbial thermophiles, a bacterium and an archaeon. Using an updated method to extrapolate from mutation-reporter genes to whole genomes reveals that the rate of base substitutions is substantially lower in these two thermophiles than in mesophiles. This result provides the first experimental support for the concept of an evolved balance between the total genomic impact of mutations and the cost of further reducing the basal mutation rate.

  9. Likely role of APOBEC3G-mediated G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 evolution and drug resistance.

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    Patric Jern

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of APOBEC3 (A3 protein family members in inhibiting retrovirus infection and mobile element retrotransposition is well established. However, the evolutionary effects these restriction factors may have had on active retroviruses such as HIV-1 are less well understood. An HIV-1 variant that has been highly G-to-A mutated is unlikely to be transmitted due to accumulation of deleterious mutations. However, G-to-A mutated hA3G target sequences within which the mutations are the least deleterious are more likely to survive selection pressure. Thus, among hA3G targets in HIV-1, the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous changes will increase with virus generations, leaving a footprint of past activity. To study such footprints in HIV-1 evolution, we developed an in silico model based on calculated hA3G target probabilities derived from G-to-A mutation sequence contexts in the literature. We simulated G-to-A changes iteratively in independent sequential HIV-1 infections until a stop codon was introduced into any gene. In addition to our simulation results, we observed higher ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutation at hA3G targets in extant HIV-1 genomes than in their putative ancestral genomes, compared to random controls, implying that moderate levels of A3G-mediated G-to-A mutation have been a factor in HIV-1 evolution. Results from in vitro passaging experiments of HIV-1 modified to be highly susceptible to hA3G mutagenesis verified our simulation accuracy. We also used our simulation to examine the possible role of A3G-induced mutations in the origin of drug resistance. We found that hA3G activity could have been responsible for only a small increase in mutations at known drug resistance sites and propose that concerns for increased resistance to other antiviral drugs should not prevent Vif from being considered a suitable target for development of new drugs.

  10. Missense UROS mutations causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria reduce UROS homeostasis that can be rescued by proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Sasso, Emma; Esteve, Julie; Ged, Cécile; Lalanne, Magalie; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Urquiza, Pedro; de Verneuil, Hubert; Millet, Oscar; Richard, Emmanuel

    2017-02-21

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an inborn error of heme biosynthesis characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in deleterious porphyrin accumulation in blood cells responsible for hemolytic anemia and cutaneous photosensitivity. We analyzed here the molecular basis of UROS impairment associated with twenty nine UROS missense mutations actually described in CEP patients. Using a computational and biophysical joint approach we predicted that most disease-causing mutations would affect UROS folding and stability. Through the analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged versions of UROS enzyme we experimentally confirmed these data and showed that thermodynamic instability and premature protein degradation is a major mechanism accounting for the enzymatic deficiency associated with twenty UROS mutants in human cells. Since the intracellular loss in protein homeostasis is in excellent agreement with the in vitro destabilization, we used molecular dynamic simulation to rely structural 3D modification with UROS disability. We found that destabilizing mutations could be clustered within three types of mechanism according to side chain rearrangements or contact alterations within the pathogenic UROS enzyme so that the severity degree correlated with cellular protein instability. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition using bortezomib, a clinically available drug, significantly enhanced proteostasis of each unstable UROS mutant. Finally, we show evidence that abnormal protein homeostasis is a prevalent mechanism responsible for UROS deficiency and that modulators of UROS proteolysis such as proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones may represent an attractive therapeutic option to reduce porphyrin accumulation and prevent skin photosensitivity in CEP patients when the genotype includes a missense variant.

  11. The Effect of an Extreme and Prolonged Population Bottleneck on Patterns of Deleterious Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Casper-Emil T; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Grarup, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    to a markedly more extreme distribution of allele frequencies than seen for any other human population, making the Inuit the perfect population for investigating the effect of a bottleneck on patterns of deleterious variation. When comparing proxies for genetic load that assume an additive effect of deleterious......The genetic consequences of population bottlenecks on patterns of deleterious genetic variation in human populations are of tremendous interest. Based on exome sequencing of 18 Greenlandic Inuit here we show that the Inuit have undergone a severe ~20,000 year long bottleneck. This has led...... alleles, the Inuit show, at most, a slight increase in load compared to European, East Asian, and African populations. Specifically, we observe

  12. Somatic mutations favorable to patient survival are predominant in ovarian carcinomas.

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    Wensheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Somatic mutation accumulation is a major cause of abnormal cell growth. However, some mutations in cancer cells may be deleterious to the survival and proliferation of the cancer cells, thus offering a protective effect to the patients. We investigated this hypothesis via a unique analysis of the clinical and somatic mutation datasets of ovarian carcinomas published by the Cancer Genome Atlas. We defined and screened 562 macro mutation signatures (MMSs for their associations with the overall survival of 320 ovarian cancer patients. Each MMS measures the number of mutations present on the member genes (except for TP53 covered by a specific Gene Ontology (GO term in each tumor. We found that somatic mutations favorable to the patient survival are predominant in ovarian carcinomas compared to those indicating poor clinical outcomes. Specially, we identified 19 (3 predictive MMSs that are, usually by a nonlinear dose-dependent effect, associated with good (poor patient survival. The false discovery rate for the 19 "positive" predictors is at the level of 0.15. The GO terms corresponding to these MMSs include "lysosomal membrane" and "response to hypoxia", each of which is relevant to the progression and therapy of cancer. Using these MMSs as features, we established a classification tree model which can effectively partition the training samples into three prognosis groups regarding the survival time. We validated this model on an independent dataset of the same disease (Log-rank p-value < 2.3 × 10(-4 and a dataset of breast cancer (Log-rank p-value < 9.3 × 10(-3. We compared the GO terms corresponding to these MMSs and those enriched with expression-based predictive genes. The analysis showed that the GO term pairs with large similarity are mainly pertinent to the proteins located on the cell organelles responsible for material transport and waste disposal, suggesting the crucial role of these proteins in cancer mortality.

  13. Identification and Functional Characterization of GAA Mutations in Colombian Patients Affected by Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, Mónica Yasmín; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Fonseca, Dora Janeth; Kroos, Marian A; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Mejía, Juan Fernando; Uribe, Jesús Alfredo; Reuser, Arnold J J; Laissue, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a recessive metabolic disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues, especially in skeletal muscles. PD clinical course is mainly determined by the nature of the GAA mutations. Although ~400 distinct GAA sequence variations have been described, the genotype-phenotype correlation is not always evident.In this study, we describe the first clinical and genetic analysis of Colombian PD patients performed in 11 affected individuals. GAA open reading frame sequencing revealed eight distinct mutations related to PD etiology including two novel missense mutations, c.1106 T > C (p.Leu369Pro) and c.2236 T > C (p.Trp746Arg). In vitro functional studies showed that the structural changes conferred by both mutations did not inhibit the synthesis of the 110 kD GAA precursor form but affected the processing and intracellular transport of GAA. In addition, analysis of previously described variants located at this position (p.Trp746Gly, p.Trp746Cys, p.Trp746Ser, p.Trp746X) revealed new insights in the molecular basis of PD. Notably, we found that p.Trp746Cys mutation, which was previously described as a polymorphism as well as a causal mutation, displayed a mild deleterious effect. Interestingly and by chance, our study argues in favor of a remarkable Afro-American and European ancestry of the Colombian population. Taken together, our report provides valuable information on the PD genotype-phenotype correlation, which is expected to facilitate and improve genetic counseling of affected individuals and their families.

  14. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    OpenAIRE

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Engin YILMAZ; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary fo...

  15. Mutation-selection balance and mixed mating with asexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriage, Tara N; Orive, Maria E

    2012-09-07

    The effects of asexual reproduction on both the number of deleterious mutations per gamete and the mean fitness under mutation-selection balance are investigated. We use two simulation models, considering both finite and infinite populations. The two models incorporate asexual reproduction with varying levels of outcrossing and selfing, degrees of dominance and selection coefficients. The values for mean fitness and number of deleterious mutations per gamete are compared within and among finite and infinite populations to identify the effect of asexual reproduction on levels of load, and how asexual reproduction may interact with genetic drift (population size). Increasing asexual reproduction resulted in an increase in mean fitness and a decrease in the average number of deleterious mutations per gamete for both nearly recessive and additive alleles in both the infinite and finite simulations. Increased mean fitness with increasing asexuality is possibly due to two interacting forces: a greater opportunity for selection to act on heterozygous versus homozygous mutations and the shielding of a proportion of the population from meiotic mutations due to asexual reproduction. The results found here highlight the need to consider asexual reproduction along with mixed mating in models of genetic load and mutation-selection balance.

  16. Can GPS Be Used to Detect Deleterious Progression in Training Volume Among Runners?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Rasmus O.; Cederholm, Peter; Buist, Ida; Sorensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Nielsen, RO, Cederholm, P, Buist, I, SOrensen, H, Lind, M, and Rasmussen, S. Can GPS be used to detect deleterious progression in training volume among runners? J Strength Cond Res 27(6): 1471-1478, 2013There is a need to ascertain if an association exists between excessive progression in weekly vol

  17. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of

  18. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of vasopre

  19. Can GPS Be Used to Detect Deleterious Progression in Training Volume Among Runners?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Rasmus O.; Cederholm, Peter; Buist, Ida; Sorensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Nielsen, RO, Cederholm, P, Buist, I, SOrensen, H, Lind, M, and Rasmussen, S. Can GPS be used to detect deleterious progression in training volume among runners? J Strength Cond Res 27(6): 1471-1478, 2013There is a need to ascertain if an association exists between excessive progression in weekly vol

  20. Incomplete dominance of deleterious alleles contributes substantially to trait variation and heterosis in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleterious alleles have long been proposed to play an important role in patterning phenotypic variation and are central to commonly held ideas explaining the hybrid vigor observed in the offspring by crossing two inbred parents. We test these ideas using evolutionary measures of sequence conservati...

  1. Genetic Factors of the Disease Course After Sepsis: Rare Deleterious Variants Are Predictive

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    Stefan Taudien

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis patients with favorable disease course after sepsis, even in the case of unfavorable preconditions, seem to be affected more often by rare deleterious SNVs in cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways, suggesting a protective role of impairments in these processes against a poor disease course.

  2. Separating multiple, short-term deleterious effects of saline solutions to the growth of cowpea seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reductions in plant growth due to salinity are of global importance in natural and agricultural landscapes. Short-term (48 h) solution culture experiments studied 404 treatments with seedlings of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. cv. Caloona) to examine the multiple deleterious effects of Ca, Mg...

  3. Similarity of Deleterious Effects of Divorce on Chinese and American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Xin, Tao

    2001-01-01

    Reviews and contrasts the effects of divorce on Chinese children's adjustment to American children of divorce. Results indicate that the deleterious effects of divorce on children's academic and social functioning appear to be similar to that experienced by American children. (Contains 23 references.) (GCP)

  4. Rhizoplane colonisation of peas by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae and a deleterious Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berggren, I.; Alstrom, S.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Martensson, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain angstrom 313, a deleterious rhizosphere bacterium, reduced pea nitrogen content when inoculated alone or in combination with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae on plants in the presence of soil under greenhouse conditions. When plants were grown gnotobiotically in liquid me

  5. Identification of pathway-biased and deleterious melatonin receptor mutants in autism spectrum disorders and in the general population.

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    Pauline Chaste

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant and a synchronizer of many physiological processes. Alteration of the melatonin pathway has been reported in circadian disorders, diabetes and autism spectrum disorders (ASD. However, very little is known about the genetic variability of melatonin receptors in humans. Here, we sequenced the melatonin receptor MTNR1A and MTNR1B, genes coding for MT1 and MT2 receptors, respectively, in a large panel of 941 individuals including 295 patients with ASD, 362 controls and 284 individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. We also sequenced GPR50, coding for the orphan melatonin-related receptor GPR50 in patients and controls. We identified six non-synonymous mutations for MTNR1A and ten for MTNR1B. The majority of these variations altered receptor function. Particularly interesting mutants are MT1-I49N, which is devoid of any melatonin binding and cell surface expression, and MT1-G166E and MT1-I212T, which showed severely impaired cell surface expression. Of note, several mutants possessed pathway-selective signaling properties, some preferentially inhibiting the adenylyl cyclase pathway, others preferentially activating the MAPK pathway. The prevalence of these deleterious mutations in cases and controls indicates that they do not represent major risk factor for ASD (MTNR1A case 3.6% vs controls 4.4%; MTNR1B case 4.7% vs 3% controls. Concerning GPR50, we detected a significant association between ASD and two variations, Delta502-505 and T532A, in affected males, but it did not hold up after Bonferonni correction for multiple testing. Our results represent the first functional ascertainment of melatonin receptors in humans and constitute a basis for future structure-function studies and for interpreting genetic data on the melatonin pathway in patients.

  6. Spontaneous mutation parameters for Arabidopsis thaliana measured in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Matthew T; Shaw, Frank H; Fenster, Charles B

    2010-06-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic diversity and their contributions to evolutionary process depend critically on their rate and their effects on traits, notably fitness. Mutation rate and mutation effect can be measured simultaneously through the use of mutation accumulation lines, and previous mutation accumulation studies measuring these parameters have been performed in laboratory conditions. However, estimation of mutation parameters for fitness in wild populations requires assays in environments where mutations are exposed to natural selection and natural environmental variation. Here we quantify mutation parameters in both the wild and greenhouse environments using 100 25th generation Arabidopsis thaliana mutation accumulation lines. We found significantly greater mutational variance and a higher mutation rate for fitness under field conditions relative to greenhouse conditions. However, our field estimates were low when scaled to natural environmental variation. Many of the mutation accumulation lines have increased fitness, counter to the expectation that nearly all mutations decrease fitness. A high mutation rate and a low mutational contribution to phenotypic variation may explain observed levels of natural genetic variation. Our findings indicate that mutation parameters are not fixed, but are variables whose values may reflect the specific environment in which mutations are tested.

  7. Romidepsin-induced HIV-1 viremia during effective antiretroviral therapy contains identical viral sequences with few deleterious mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckelmann, Anni; Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Schlub, Timothy E.; Shao, Wei; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.; Tolstrup, Martin; Palmer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the origin of the HIV-1 viremia induced by the latency-reversing agent romidepsin. Design: Six individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy received romidepsin administered intravenously once weekly for 3 consecutive weeks. CD4+ T cells were obtained at baseline, following the second and third romidepsin infusion, and 10 weeks after the final romidepsin treatment. Plasma samples were collected 24 and 72 h after romidepsin infusions. Methods: Single-genome sequencing of the env and p24-RT region was used to genetically characterize the virus from proviral DNA, the transcribed cell-associated RNA and the plasma RNA pool. Results: In three of six participants with available plasma samples we identified plasma HIV-1 RNA sequences that were identical to DNA and/or cell-associated RNA sequences from peripheral blood CD4+ T cells. In two participants, plasma RNA sequences contained expansions of identical sequences, corresponding to 62 and 100% of the total sequences, respectively. Plasma HIV-1 RNA had very low amounts of defective viruses compared to cell-associated RNA (odds ratio 20.85, P < 0.001) and to DNA (odds ratio 7.07, P = 0.011) during romidepsin therapy. Conclusions: Romidepsin induced transcription from proviruses in peripheral blood cells, which contributed to viremia in patients on suppressive therapy. The intermingling of these cell-associated HIV-1 RNA with DNA sequences indicates transcription from a diverse range of proviruses, but the expansions of identical viral plasma sequences with few defects indicate that the romidepsin-induced viremia arises from intact proviruses with highly similar or identical genetic backgrounds. PMID:28272134

  8. Exome sequencing of senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) reveals deleterious mutations in degenerative disease-causing genes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) are a series of mouse strains originally derived from unexpected crosses between AKR/J and unknown mice, from which phenotypically distinct senescence-prone (SAMP) and -resistant (SAMR) inbred strains were subsequently established. Although SAMP strains have been widely used for aging research focusing on their short life spans and various age-related phenotypes, such as immune dysfunction, osteoporosis, and brain atrophy, the responsible gene muta...

  9. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather;

    2008-01-01

    on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...

  10. Tanshinol Attenuates the Deleterious Effects of Oxidative Stress on Osteoblastic Differentiation via Wnt/FoxO3a Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is now increasing evidence which suggests a pivotal role for oxidative stress in the development and progression of osteoporosis. We confirm herein the protective effects of natural antioxidant Tanshinol against oxidative stress in osteoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, decrease in cell viability, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a caspase-3-dependent manner, and inhibition of osteoblastic differentiation. Tanshinol reverses these deleterious consequence triggered by oxidative stress. Moreover, under the condition of oxidative stress, Tanshinol suppresses the activation of FoxO3a transcription factor and expressions of its target genes Gadd45a and catalase (CAT and simultaneously counteracts the inhibition of Wnt signalling and expressions of target genes Axin2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and Osteoprotegerin (OPG. The findings are further consolidated using FoxO3a siRNA interference and overexpression of Tcf4. The results illustrate that Tanshinol attenuates oxidative stress via down-regulation of FoxO3a signaling, and rescues the decrease of osteoblastic differentiation through upregulation of Wnt signal under oxidative stress. The present findings suggest that the beneficial effects of Tanshinol may be adopted as a novel therapeutic approach in recently recognized conditions of niche targeting osteoporosis.

  11. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments.

  12. MutS and MutL are dispensable for maintenance of the genomic mutation rate in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

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    Courtney R Busch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 encodes for homologs of MutS and MutL, which are key proteins of a DNA mismatch repair pathway conserved in Bacteria and Eukarya. Mismatch repair is essential for retaining the fidelity of genetic information and defects in this pathway result in the deleterious accumulation of mutations and in hereditary diseases in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We calculated the spontaneous genomic mutation rate of H. salinarum NRC-1 using fluctuation tests targeting genes of the uracil monophosphate biosynthesis pathway. We found that H. salinarum NRC-1 has a low incidence of mutation suggesting the presence of active mechanisms to control spontaneous mutations during replication. The spectrum of mutational changes found in H. salinarum NRC-1, and in other archaea, appears to be unique to this domain of life and might be a consequence of their adaption to extreme environmental conditions. In-frame targeted gene deletions of H. salinarum NRC-1 mismatch repair genes and phenotypic characterization of the mutants demonstrated that the mutS and mutL genes are not required for maintenance of the observed mutation rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We established that H. salinarum NRC-1 mutS and mutL genes are redundant to an alternative system that limits spontaneous mutation in this organism. This finding leads to the puzzling question of what mechanism is responsible for maintenance of the low genomic mutation rates observed in the Archaea, which for the most part do not have MutS and MutL homologs.

  13. Direct Measurements of Human Colon Crypt Stem Cell Niche Genetic Fidelity: The Role of Chance in Non-Darwinian Mutation Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeyoun eKang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Perfect human stem cell genetic fidelity would prevent aging and cancer. However, perfection would be difficult to achieve, and aging is universal and cancers common. A hypothesis is that because mutations are inevitable over a human lifetime, downstream mechanisms have evolved to manage the deleterious effects of beneficial and lethal mutations. In the colon, a crypt stem cell architecture reduces the number of mitotic cells at risk for mutation accumulation, and multiple niche stem cells ensure that a lethal mutation within any single stem cell does not lead to crypt death. In addition, the architecture of the colon crypt stem cell niche may harness probability or chance to randomly discard many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer. An analysis of somatic chromosome copy number alterations (CNAs reveals a lack of perfect fidelity in individual normal human crypts, with age-related increases and higher frequencies in ulcerative colitis, a proliferative, inflammatory disease. The age-related increase in somatic CNAs appears consistent with relatively normal replication error and cell division rates. Surprisingly, and similar to point mutations in cancer genomes, the types of crypt mutations were more consistent with random fixation rather than selection. In theory, a simple non-Darwinian way to nullify selection is to reduce the size of the reproducing population. Fates are more determined by chance rather than selection in very small populations, and therefore selection may be minimized within small crypt niches. The desired effect is that many beneficial mutations that might lead to cancer are randomly lost by drift rather than fixed by selection. The subdivision of the colon into multiple very small stem cell niches may trade Darwinian evolution for non-Darwinian somatic cell evolution, capitulating to aging but reducing cancer risks.

  14. Three new BLM gene mutations associated with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira; Dubois-d'Enghien, Catherine; Laugé, Anthony; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chadli, Elbekkay; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Benjelloun, Meriem; Flori, Elisabeth; Doray, Bérénice; Laugel, Vincent; Lourenço, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Rui; Sousa, Silvia; Couturier, Jérôme; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique

    2008-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease predisposing patients to all types of cancers affecting the general population. BS cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the rate of sister chromatid exchanges, currently the only objective criterion for BS diagnosis. We have developed a method for screening the BLM gene for mutations based on direct genomic DNA sequencing. A questionnaire based on clinical information, cytogenetic features, and family history was addressed to physicians prescribing BS genetic screening, with the aim of confirming or guiding diagnosis. We report here four BLM gene mutations, three of which have not been described before. Three of the mutations are frameshift mutations, and the fourth is a nonsense mutation. All these mutations introduce a stop codon, and may therefore be considered to have deleterious biological effect. This approach should make it possible to identify new mutations and to correlate them with clinical information.

  15. Malocclusion and deleterious oral habits among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz; Maria Cristina Teixeira Cangussu; Ana Marlúcia Oliveira Assis

    2013-01-01

    Although malocclusions represent a serious public health issue, there is insufficient information about this problem in adolescents in Brazil, especially in poorer areas. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of facial alterations, dental malocclusions, and deleterious oral habits (DOH) among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil and to test the hypothesis that the occurrence of DOH in infancy is associated with DOH during adolescence. The ...

  16. The grain grading model and prediction of deleterious porosity of cement-based materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi; LIU Jun-zhe

    2008-01-01

    The calculating model for the packing degree of spherical particles system was modified. The grain grading model of cement-based materials was established and could be applied in the global grading system as well as in the nano-fiber reinforced system. According to the grain grading model, two kinds of mortar were de-signed by using the global grain materials and nano-fiber materials such as fly ash, silica fume and NR powder.In this paper, the densities of two above systems cured for 90d were tested and the relationship of deleterious porosity and the total porosity of hardened mortar was discussed. Research results show that nano-fiber materialsuch as NR powder can increase the density of cement-based materials. The relationship of deleterious porosity and the total porosity of hardened mortar accords with logarithmic curve. The deleterious porosity and the ration-ality of the grading can be roughly predicted through calculating the packing degree by the grain grading model of cement-based materials.

  17. Genetic Factors of the Disease Course After Sepsis: Rare Deleterious Variants Are Predictive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudien, Stefan; Lausser, Ludwig; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Sponholz, Christoph; Schöneweck, Franziska; Felder, Marius; Schirra, Lyn-Rouven; Schmid, Florian; Gogos, Charalambos; Groth, Susann; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Huse, Klaus; Zipfel, Peter F; Kurzai, Oliver; Moepps, Barbara; Gierschik, Peter; Bauer, Michael; Scherag, André; Kestler, Hans A; Platzer, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host response to infection. For its clinical course, host genetic factors are important and rare genomic variants are suspected to contribute. We sequenced the exomes of 59 Greek and 15 German patients with bacterial sepsis divided into two groups with extremely different disease courses. Variant analysis was focusing on rare deleterious single nucleotide variants (SNVs). We identified significant differences in the number of rare deleterious SNVs per patient between the ethnic groups. Classification experiments based on the data of the Greek patients allowed discrimination between the disease courses with estimated sensitivity and specificity>75%. By application of the trained model to the German patients we observed comparable discriminatory properties despite lower population-specific rare SNV load. Furthermore, rare SNVs in genes of cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways were identified as classifiers discriminating between the sepsis courses. Sepsis patients with favorable disease course after sepsis, even in the case of unfavorable preconditions, seem to be affected more often by rare deleterious SNVs in cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways, suggesting a protective role of impairments in these processes against a poor disease course. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Malocclusion and deleterious oral habits in a north Indian adolescent population: A correlational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Pruthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of malocclusion and deleterious oral habits among 12 and 15-year-old school children in Shimla city, India and to find, if any correlation exists between the two. Design: Correlational study design. Setting: Twelve schools in Shimla city, India. Materials and Methods: Prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need was assessed using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI among a sample of 961, 12 and 15-year-old school children in Shimla city, who received no orthodontic treatment before or during the study. Subjects were also assessed for deleterious oral habits. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the correlation of habits with mean DAI score and malocclusion traits. Results: Mean DAI score was 26.81±5.25. Nearly 53% of the study sample presented with malocclusion, ranging from ′definite′ to ′handicapping′ based on the DAI scores. The prevalence of various deleterious oral habits was 25.9%. About 29% of children with any oral habit developed malocclusion as compared to those without any habit (P value=0.023. Tongue thrusting, mouth breathing and thumb sucking habits had a significant impact on malocclusion. Conclusion: There was high prevalence of malocclusion (52.7%. Abnormal oral habits, particularly mouth breathing and tongue thrusting had a significant impact on malocclusion, resulting in higher frequency of crowding in anterior teeth, open bite, and spacing.

  19. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  20. Efficient algorithms for probing the RNA mutation landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Waldispühl

    Full Text Available The diversity and importance of the role played by RNAs in the regulation and development of the cell are now well-known and well-documented. This broad range of functions is achieved through specific structures that have been (presumably optimized through evolution. State-of-the-art methods, such as McCaskill's algorithm, use a statistical mechanics framework based on the computation of the partition function over the canonical ensemble of all possible secondary structures on a given sequence. Although secondary structure predictions from thermodynamics-based algorithms are not as accurate as methods employing comparative genomics, the former methods are the only available tools to investigate novel RNAs, such as the many RNAs of unknown function recently reported by the ENCODE consortium. In this paper, we generalize the McCaskill partition function algorithm to sum over the grand canonical ensemble of all secondary structures of all mutants of the given sequence. Specifically, our new program, RNAmutants, simultaneously computes for each integer k the minimum free energy structure MFE(k and the partition function Z(k over all secondary structures of all k-point mutants, even allowing the user to specify certain positions required not to mutate and certain positions required to base-pair or remain unpaired. This technically important extension allows us to study the resilience of an RNA molecule to pointwise mutations. By computing the mutation profile of a sequence, a novel graphical representation of the mutational tendency of nucleotide positions, we analyze the deleterious nature of mutating specific nucleotide positions or groups of positions. We have successfully applied RNAmutants to investigate deleterious mutations (mutations that radically modify the secondary structure in the Hepatitis C virus cis-acting replication element and to evaluate the evolutionary pressure applied on different regions of the HIV trans-activation response

  1. Establishment of mouse model of MYH9 disorders: heterozygous R702C mutation provokes macrothrombocytopenia with leukocyte inclusion bodies, renal glomerulosclerosis and hearing disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Kunishima, Shinji; Ikejiri, Makoto; Maruyama, Shoichi; Sone, Michihiko; Takagi, Akira; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Saito, Hidehiko; Naoe, Tomoki; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHCIIA) encoded by MYH9 is associated with autosomal dominantly inherited diseases called MYH9 disorders. MYH9 disorders are characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and very characteristic inclusion bodies in granulocytes. MYH9 disorders frequently cause nephritis, sensorineural hearing disability and cataracts. One of the most common and deleterious mutations causing these disorders is the R702C missense mutation. We generated knock-in mice expressing the Myh9 R702C mutation. R702C knock-in hetero mice (R702C+/- mice) showed macrothrombocytopenia. We studied megakaryopoiesis of cultured fetal liver cells of R702C+/- mice and found that proplatelet formation was impaired: the number of proplatelet tips was decreased, proplatelet size was increased, and proplatelet shafts were short and enlarged. Although granulocyte inclusion bodies were not visible by May-Grünwald Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence analysis indicated that NMMHCIIA proteins aggregated and accumulated in the granulocyte cytoplasm. In other organs, R702C+/- mice displayed albuminuria which increased with age. Renal pathology examination revealed glomerulosclerosis. Sensory hearing loss was indicated by lowered auditory brainstem response. These findings indicate that Myh9 R702C knock-in mice mirror features of human MYH9 disorders arising from the R702C mutation.

  2. Biallelic DICER1 mutations occur in Wilms tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M K; Sabbaghian, N; Xu, B; Addidou-Kalucki, S; Bernard, C; Zou, D; Reeve, A E; Eccles, M R; Cole, C; Choong, C S; Charles, A; Tan, T Y; Iglesias, D M; Goodyer, P R; Foulkes, W D

    2013-06-01

    DICER1 is an endoribonuclease central to the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Germline mutations in DICER1 have been associated with a pleiotropic tumour predisposition syndrome and Wilms tumour (WT) is a rare manifestation of this syndrome. Three WTs, each in a child with a deleterious germline DICER1 mutation, were screened for somatic DICER1 mutations and were found to bear specific mutations in either the RNase IIIa (n = 1) or the RNase IIIb domain (n = 2). In the two latter cases, we demonstrate that the germline and somatic DICER1 mutations were in trans, suggesting that the two-hit hypothesis of tumour formation applies for these examples of WT. Among 191 apparently sporadic WTs, we identified five different missense or deletion somatic DICER1 mutations (2.6%) in four individual WTs; one tumour had two very likely deleterious somatic mutations in trans in the RNase IIIb domain (c.5438A>G and c.5452G>A). In vitro studies of two somatic single-base substitutions (c.5429A>G and c.5438A>G) demonstrated exon 25 skipping from the transcript, a phenomenon not previously reported in DICER1. Further we show that DICER1 transcripts lacking exon 25 can be translated in vitro. This study has demonstrated that a subset of WTs exhibits two 'hits' in DICER1, suggesting that these mutations could be key events in the pathogenesis of these tumours.

  3. SDS, a structural disruption score for assessment of missense variant deleteriousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanawadee ePreeprem

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel structure-based evaluation for missense variants that explicitly models protein structure and amino acid properties to predict the likelihood that a variant disrupts protein function. A structural disruption score (SDS is introduced as a measure to depict the likelihood that a case variant is functional. The score is constructed using characteristics that distinguish between causal and neutral variants within a group of proteins. The SDS score is correlated with standard sequence-based deleteriousness, but shows promise for improving discrimination between neutral and causal variants at less conserved sites.The prediction was performed on 3-dimentional structures of 57 gene products whose homozygous SNPs were identified as case-exclusive variants in an exome sequencing study of epilepsy disorders. We contrasted the candidate epilepsy variants with scores for likely benign variants found in the EVS database, and for positive control variants in the same genes that are suspected to promote a range of diseases. To derive a characteristic profile of damaging SNPs, we transformed continuous scores into categorical variables based on the score distribution of each measurement, collected from all possible SNPs in this protein set, where extreme measures were assumed to be deleterious. A second epilepsy dataset was used to replicate the findings. Causal variants tend to receive higher sequence-based deleterious scores, induce larger physico-chemical changes between amino acid pairs, locate in protein domains, buried sites or on conserved protein surface clusters, and cause protein destabilization, relative to negative controls. These measures were agglomerated for each variant. A list of nine high-priority putative functional variants for epilepsy was generated. Our newly developed SDS protocol facilitates SNP prioritization for experimental validation.

  4. High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet: deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular effects depend on age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vessieres, Emilie; Vibert, Francoise; Ayer, Audrey; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Henrion, Daniel; Paul, Jean-Louis; Noble, Florence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    High-protein-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diets have become widespread. Yet their deleterious consequences, especially on glucose metabolism and arteries, have already been underlined. Our previous study (2) has already shown glucose intolerance with major arterial dysfunction in very old mice subjected to an HP-LC diet. The hypothesis of this work was that this diet had an age-dependent deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular outcome. Two groups of mice, young and adult (3 and 6 mo old), were subjected for 12 wk to a standard or to an HP-LC diet. Glucose and lipid metabolism was studied. The cardiovascular system was explored from the functional stage with Doppler-echography to the molecular stage (arterial reactivity, mRNA, immunohistochemistry). Young mice did not exhibit any significant metabolic modification, whereas adult mice presented marked glucose intolerance associated with an increase in resistin and triglyceride levels. These metabolic disturbances were responsible for cardiovascular damages only in adult mice, with decreased aortic distensibility and left ventricle dysfunction. These seemed to be the consequence of arterial dysfunctions. Mesenteric arteries were the worst affected with a major oxidative stress, whereas aorta function seemed to be maintained with an appreciable role of cyclooxygenase-2 to preserve endothelial function. This study highlights for the first time the age-dependent deleterious effects of an HP-LC diet on metabolism, with glucose intolerance and lipid disorders and vascular (especially microvessels) and cardiac functions. This work shows that HP-LC lead to equivalent cardiovascular alterations, as observed in very old age, and underlines the danger of such diet.

  5. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes.

  6. Absence of loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 in a renal tumor from a BRCA1 germline mutation carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Alanee, Shaheen; Shah, Sohela; Murali, Rajmohan; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Kasmintan A Schrader; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene and germline and somatic mutations in this gene have been shown to be associated with many types of cancer. We report the first tumor study of renal cell carcinoma in a carrier of the deleterious BRCA1 mutation-c.68_69delAG.

  7. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, van W.F.; Greyling, B.J.; Getz, W.M.; Helden, P.D.; Zwaan, B.J.; Bastos, A.D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

  8. Acquired epileptic opercular syndrome related to a heterozygous deleterious substitution in GRIN2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculier, Claudine; Tilmant, Anne-Sophie; De Tiège, Xavier; Giurgea, Sanda; Paquier, Philippe; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lesca, Gaetan; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2017-08-23

    Epileptic encephalopathies with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep (CSWS) are characterized by cognitive or language impairment, and are occasionally associated with pathogenic variants of the GRIN2A gene. In these disorders, speech dysfunction could be either related to cerebral dysfunction caused by the GRIN2A deleterious variant or intense interictal epileptic activity. Here, we present a patient with apraxia of speech, clearly linked to severity of epilepsy, carrying a GRIN2A variant. A 6-year-old boy developed acute regression of expressive language following epileptic seizures, leading to complete mutism, at which time EEG revealed CSWS. MEG showed bilateral superior parietal and opercular independent CSWS onsets and PET with fluorodeoxyglucose demonstrated significant increase in relative glucose metabolism in bilateral superior parietal regions. Corticosteroids induced a regression of CSWS together with impressive improvement in speech abilities. This case supports the hypothesis of a triggering role for epileptic discharges in speech deterioration observed in children carrying a deleterious variant of GRIN2A. When classic antiepileptic drugs fail to control epileptic activity, corticosteroids should be considered. Multimodal functional neuroimaging suggests a role for opercular and superior parietal areas in acquired epileptic opercular syndrome. [Published with video sequences on www.epilepticdisorders.com].

  9. Identification of novel CELSR1 mutations in spina bifida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunping Lei

    Full Text Available Spina bifida is one of the most common neural tube defects (NTDs with a complex etiology. Variants in planar cell polarity (PCP genes have been associated with NTDs including spina bifida in both animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we sequenced all exons of CELSR1 in 192 spina bifida patients from a California population to determine the contribution of CELSR1 mutations in the studied population. Novel and rare variants identified in these patients were subsequently genotyped in 190 ethnically matched control individuals. Six missense mutations not found in controls were predicted to be deleterious by both SIFT and PolyPhen. Two TG dinucleotide repeat variants were individually detected in 2 spina bifida patients but not detected in controls. In vitro functional analysis showed that the two TG dinucleotide repeat variants not only changed subcellular localization of the CELSR1 protein, but also impaired the physical association between CELSR1 and VANGL2, and thus diminished the ability to recruit VANGL2 for cell-cell contact. In total, 3% of our spina bifida patients carry deleterious or predicted to be deleterious CELSR1 mutations. Our findings suggest that CELSR1 mutations contribute to the risk of spina bifida in a cohort of spina bifida patients from California.

  10. Identification of novel CELSR1 mutations in spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yunping; Zhu, Huiping; Yang, Wei; Ross, M Elizabeth; Shaw, Gary M; Finnell, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Spina bifida is one of the most common neural tube defects (NTDs) with a complex etiology. Variants in planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have been associated with NTDs including spina bifida in both animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we sequenced all exons of CELSR1 in 192 spina bifida patients from a California population to determine the contribution of CELSR1 mutations in the studied population. Novel and rare variants identified in these patients were subsequently genotyped in 190 ethnically matched control individuals. Six missense mutations not found in controls were predicted to be deleterious by both SIFT and PolyPhen. Two TG dinucleotide repeat variants were individually detected in 2 spina bifida patients but not detected in controls. In vitro functional analysis showed that the two TG dinucleotide repeat variants not only changed subcellular localization of the CELSR1 protein, but also impaired the physical association between CELSR1 and VANGL2, and thus diminished the ability to recruit VANGL2 for cell-cell contact. In total, 3% of our spina bifida patients carry deleterious or predicted to be deleterious CELSR1 mutations. Our findings suggest that CELSR1 mutations contribute to the risk of spina bifida in a cohort of spina bifida patients from California.

  11. A BRCA2 mutation incorrectly mapped in the original BRCA2 reference sequence, is a common West Danish founder mutation disrupting mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Vogel, Ida;

    2011-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The authors have identified a mutation in BRCA2, 7845+1G>A (c.7617+1G>A), not previously regarded as deleterious because of incorrect mapping of the splice junction in the originally...... common BRCA2 mutation in West Denmark, while it is rare in Central and East Denmark and not identified in South Sweden. Haplotype analysis using dense SNP arrays indicated a common founder of the mutation approximately 1,500 years ago....

  12. Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations: characterization of neuroendocrine phenotypes and novel mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Francou

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH (OMIM #146110. In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. RESULTS: From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%. We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001 higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. CONCLUSION: The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations.

  13. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... synonymous variant. The remaining 24 variants were identified in BRCA2, including 10 deleterious mutants (6 frame-shift and 4 nonsense), 2 intronic variants, 10 missense mutations and 2 synonymous variants. The frequency of the variants of unknown significance was examined in control individuals. Moreover...

  14. Cellular and behavioral effects of stilbene resveratrol analogues: implications for reducing the deleterious effects of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, James A; Fisher, Derek R; Cheng, Vivian; Rimando, Agnes M; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2008-11-26

    Research suggests that polyphenolic compounds contained in fruits and vegetables that are rich in color may have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present studies determined if stilbene (e.g., resveratrol) compounds would be efficacious in reversing the deleterious effects of aging in 19 month old Fischer 344 rats. Experiment I utilized resveratrol and six resveratrol analogues and examined their efficacies in preventing dopamine-induced decrements in calcium clearance following oxotremorine-induced depolarization in COS-7 cells transfected with M1 muscarinic receptors (MAChR) that we have shown previously to be sensitive to oxidative stressors. Experiment II utilized the most efficacious analogue (pterostilbene) from experiment I and fed aged rats a diet with a low (0.004%) or a high (0.016%) concentration of pterostilbene. Results indicated that pterostilbene was effective in reversing cognitive behavioral deficits, as well as dopamine release, and working memory was correlated with pterostilbene levels in the hippocampus.

  15. Can GPS Be Used to Detect Deleterious Progression in Training Volume Among Runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Cederholm, Jens Peter; Buist, Ida;

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to ascertain if an association exists between excessive progression in weekly volume and development of running-related injuries (RRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate if GPS can be used to detect deleterious progression in weekly training volume among 60 novice runners...... included in a 10-week prospective study. All participants used GPS to quantify training volume while running. In case of injury, participants attended a clinical examination. The 13 runners who sustained injuries during follow-up had a significantly higher weekly progression in total training volume...... in the week before the injury origin (86% [95% confidence interval: 12.9-159.9], p = 0.026) compared with other weeks. Although not significant, participants with injuries had an increase in weekly training volume of 31.6% compared with a 22.1% increase among the healthy participants. The error of the GPS...

  16. Genome-wide Polygenic Burden of Rare Deleterious Variants in Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costin Leu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP represents the most severe degree of the spectrum of epilepsy severity and is the commonest cause of epilepsy-related premature mortality. The precise pathophysiology and the genetic architecture of SUDEP remain elusive. Aiming to elucidate the genetic basis of SUDEP, we analysed rare, protein-changing variants from whole-exome sequences of 18 people who died of SUDEP, 87 living people with epilepsy and 1479 non-epilepsy disease controls. Association analysis revealed a significantly increased genome-wide polygenic burden per individual in the SUDEP cohort when compared to epilepsy (P = 5.7 × 10−3 and non-epilepsy disease controls (P = 1.2 × 10−3. The polygenic burden was driven both by the number of variants per individual, and over-representation of variants likely to be deleterious in the SUDEP cohort. As determined by this study, more than a thousand genes contribute to the observed polygenic burden within the framework of this study. Subsequent gene-based association analysis revealed five possible candidate genes significantly associated with SUDEP or epilepsy, but no one single gene emerges as common to the SUDEP cases. Our findings provide further evidence for a genetic susceptibility to SUDEP, and suggest an extensive polygenic contribution to SUDEP causation. Thus, an overall increased burden of deleterious variants in a highly polygenic background might be important in rendering a given individual more susceptible to SUDEP. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing in people with epilepsy might eventually contribute to generating SUDEP risk estimates, promoting stratified medicine in epilepsy, with the eventual aim of reducing an individual patient's risk of SUDEP.

  17. Screening and Evaluation of Deleterious SNPs in APOE Gene of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Ahmad Masoodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Apolipoprotein E (APOE is an important risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD and is present in 30–50% of patients who develop late-onset AD. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are present in APOE gene which act as the biomarkers for exploring the genetic basis of this disease. The objective of this study is to identify deleterious nsSNPs associated with APOE gene. Methods. The SNPs were retrieved from dbSNP. Using I-Mutant, protein stability change was calculated. The potentially functional nonsynonymous (ns SNPs and their effect on protein was predicted by PolyPhen and SIFT, respectively. FASTSNP was used for functional analysis and estimation of risk score. The functional impact on the APOE protein was evaluated by using Swiss PDB viewer and NOMAD-Ref server. Results. Six nsSNPs were found to be least stable by I-Mutant 2.0 with DDG value of >−1.0. Four nsSNPs showed a highly deleterious tolerance index score of 0.00. Nine nsSNPs were found to be probably damaging with position-specific independent counts (PSICs score of ≥2.0. Seven nsSNPs were found to be highly polymorphic with a risk score of 3-4. The total energies and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD values were higher for three mutant-type structures compared to the native modeled structure. Conclusion. We concluded that three nsSNPs, namely, rs11542041, rs11542040, and rs11542034, to be potentially functional polymorphic.

  18. Methylphenidate and environmental enrichment ameliorate the deleterious effects of prenatal stress on attention functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubedat, Salman; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Cymerblit-Sabba, Adi; Ritter, Ami; Nachmani, Maayan; Avital, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Either pre- or post-natal environmental factors seem to play a key role in brain and behavioral development and to exert long-term effects. Increasing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal stress (PS) leads to motor and learning deficits and elevated anxiety, while enriched environment (EE) shows protective effects. The dopaminergic system is also sensitive to environmental life circumstances and affects attention functioning, which serves as the preliminary gate to cognitive processes. However, the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on the dopaminergic system and attentional functioning, in the context of these life experiences, remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the effects of EE or PS on distinct types of attention, along with possible effects of MPH exposure. We found that PS impaired selective attention as well as partial sustained attention, while EE had beneficial effects. Both EE and MPH ameliorated the deleterious effects of PS on attention functioning. Considering the possible psychostimulant effect of MPH, we examined both anxiety-like behavior as well as motor learning. We found that PS had a clear anxiogenic effect, whereas EE had an anxiolytic effect. Nevertheless, the treatment with both MPH and/or EE recovered the deleterious effects of PS. In the motor-learning task, the PS group showed superior performance while MPH led to impaired motor learning. Performance decrements were prevented in both the PS + MPH and EE + MPH groups. This study provides evidence that peripubertal exposure to EE (by providing enhanced sensory, motor, and social opportunities) or MPH treatments might be an optional therapeutic intervention in preventing the PS long-term adverse consequences.

  19. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  20. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. PMID:27729506

  1. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Legrand, Mélanie

    2016-10-11

    The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  2. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Feri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4, including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  3. Evolution of mutation rates in hypermutable populations of Escherichia coli propagated at very small effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanya; Hyun, Meredith; Sniegowski, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of the genetic variation-including variation for mutation rate itself-that fuels evolution. Natural selection can raise or lower the genomic mutation rate of a population by changing the frequencies of mutation rate modifier alleles associated with beneficial and deleterious mutations. Existing theory and observations suggest that where selection is minimized, rapid systematic evolution of mutation rate either up or down is unlikely. Here, we report systematic evolution of higher and lower mutation rates in replicate hypermutable Escherichia coli populations experimentally propagated at very small effective size-a circumstance under which selection is greatly reduced. Several populations went extinct during this experiment, and these populations tended to evolve elevated mutation rates. In contrast, populations that survived to the end of the experiment tended to evolve decreased mutation rates. We discuss the relevance of our results to current ideas about the evolution, maintenance and consequences of high mutation rates.

  4. Mutations in LPIN1 Cause Recurrent Acute Myoglobinuria in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2–7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-spec...

  5. Mutations in LPIN1 Cause Recurrent Acute Myoglobinuria in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Hindi, Tareq; De Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2–7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-spec...

  6. Emergence of Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori: Multiple Mutational Changes in 16S Ribosomal DNA and Other Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailidiene, Daiva; Bertoli, M. Teresita; Miciuleviciene, Jolanta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Dailide, Giedrius; Pascasio, Mario Alberto; Kupcinskas, Limas; Berg, Douglas E.

    2002-01-01

    Tetracycline is useful in combination therapies against the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. We found 6 tetracycline-resistant (Tetr) strains among 159 clinical isolates (from El Salvador, Lithuania, and India) and obtained the following four results: (i) 5 of 6 Tetr isolates contained one or two nucleotide substitutions in one part of the primary tetracycline binding site in 16S rRNA (AGA965-967 [Escherichia coli coordinates] changed to gGA, AGc, guA, or gGc [lowercase letters are used to represent the base changes]), whereas the sixth (isolate Ind75) retained AGA965-967; (ii) PCR products containing mutant 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) alleles transformed recipient strains to Tetr phenotypes, but transformants containing alleles with single substitutions (gGA and AGc) were less resistant than their Tetr parents; (iii) each of 10 Tetr mutants of reference strain 26695 (in which mutations were induced with metronidazole, a mutagenic anti-H. pylori agent) contained the normal AGA965-967 sequence; and (iv) transformant derivatives of Ind75 and of one of the Tetr 26695 mutants that had acquired mutant rDNA alleles were resistant to tetracycline at levels higher than those to which either parent strain was resistant. Thus, tetracycline resistance in H. pylori results from an accumulation of changes that may affect tetracycline-ribosome affinity and/or other functions (perhaps porins or efflux pumps). We suggest that the rarity of tetracycline resistance among clinical isolates reflects this need for multiple mutations and perhaps also the deleterious effects of such mutations on fitness. Formally equivalent mutations with small but additive effects are postulated to contribute importantly to traits such as host specificity and virulence and to H. pylori's great genetic diversity. PMID:12435699

  7. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Expanded Under Ambient Oxygen Concentration Accumulate Oxidative DNA Lesions and Experience Procarcinogenic DNA Replication Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétous, Rémy; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Hoede, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Jones, Natalie; Longy, Michel; Sensebé, Luc; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have led to growing interest in cell-based therapy because they can be easily harvested from an abundant tissue. ADSCs must be expanded in vitro before transplantation. This essential step causes concerns about the safety of adult stem cells in terms of potential transformation. Tumorigenesis is driven in its earliest step by DNA replication stress, which is characterized by the accumulation of stalled DNA replication forks and activation of the DNA damage response. Thus, to evaluate the safety of ADSCs during ex vivo expansion, we monitored DNA replication under atmospheric (21%) or physiologic (1%) oxygen concentration. Here, by combining immunofluorescence and DNA combing, we show that ADSCs cultured under 21% oxygen accumulate endogenous oxidative DNA lesions, which interfere with DNA replication by increasing fork stalling events, thereby leading to incomplete DNA replication and fork collapse. Moreover, we found by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that culture of ADSCs under atmospheric oxygen concentration leads to misexpression of cell cycle and DNA replication genes, which could contribute to DNA replication stress. Finally, analysis of acquired small nucleotide polymorphism shows that expansion of ADSCs under 21% oxygen induces a mutational bias toward deleterious transversions. Overall, our results suggest that expanding ADSCs at a low oxygen concentration could reduce the risk for DNA replication stress-associated transformation, as occurs in neoplastic tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:68-76.

  8. Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions within dopaminergic neurons triggers neuroprotective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perier, Celine; Bender, Andreas; García-Arumí, Elena; Melià, Ma Jesus; Bové, Jordi; Laub, Christoph; Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Mounsey, Ross B; Teismann, Peter; Prolla, Tomas; Andreu, Antoni L; Vila, Miquel

    2013-08-01

    Acquired alterations in mitochondrial DNA are believed to play a pathogenic role in Parkinson's disease. In particular, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions has been observed in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Also, mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma result in multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions that can be associated with levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and severe substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, whether mitochondrial DNA deletions play a causative role in the demise of dopaminergic neurons remains unknown. Here we assessed the potential pathogenic effects of mitochondrial DNA deletions on the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system by using mutant mice possessing a proofreading-deficient form of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLGD257A), which results in a time-dependent accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in several tissues, including the brain. In these animals, we assessed the occurrence of mitochondrial DNA deletions within individual substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons, by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and determined the potential deleterious effects of such mitochondrial DNA alterations on mitochondrial function and dopaminergic neuronal integrity, by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry and quantitative morphology. Nigral dopaminergic neurons from POLGD257A mice accumulate mitochondrial DNA deletions to a similar extent (∼40-60%) as patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Despite such high levels of mitochondrial DNA deletions, the majority of substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from these animals did not exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction or degeneration. Only a few individual substantia nigra pars compacta neurons appeared as cytochrome c oxidase-negative, which exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial DNA

  9. Distance from sub-Saharan Africa predicts mutational load in diverse human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Brenna M; Botigué, Laura R; Peischl, Stephan; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Lipatov, Mikhail; Maples, Brian K; Martin, Alicia R; Musharoff, Shaila; Cann, Howard; Snyder, Michael P; Excoffier, Laurent; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-01-26

    The Out-of-Africa (OOA) dispersal ∼ 50,000 y ago is characterized by a series of founder events as modern humans expanded into multiple continents. Population genetics theory predicts an increase of mutational load in populations undergoing serial founder effects during range expansions. To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced full genomes and high-coverage exomes from seven geographically divergent human populations from Namibia, Congo, Algeria, Pakistan, Cambodia, Siberia, and Mexico. We find that individual genomes vary modestly in the overall number of predicted deleterious alleles. We show via spatially explicit simulations that the observed distribution of deleterious allele frequencies is consistent with the OOA dispersal, particularly under a model where deleterious mutations are recessive. We conclude that there is a strong signal of purifying selection at conserved genomic positions within Africa, but that many predicted deleterious mutations have evolved as if they were neutral during the expansion out of Africa. Under a model where selection is inversely related to dominance, we show that OOA populations are likely to have a higher mutation load due to increased allele frequencies of nearly neutral variants that are recessive or partially recessive.

  10. De Novo Mutations in CHAMP1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempel, Maja; Cremer, Kirsten; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Denecke, Jonas; Haack, Tobias B.; Zink, Alexander M.; Becker, Jessica; Wohlleber, Eva; Johannsen, Jessika; Alhaddad, Bader; Pfundt, Rolph; Fuchs, Sigrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M.; van Gassen, Koen L. I.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kubisch, Christian; Engels, Hartmut; Lessel, Davor

    2015-01-01

    CHAMP1 encodes a protein with a function in kinetochore-microtubule attachment and in the regulation of chromosome segregation, both of which are known to be important for neurodevelopment. By trio whole-exome sequencing, we have identified de novo deleterious mutations in CHAMP1 in five unrelated i

  11. Seemingly neutral polymorphic variants may confer immunity to splicing-inactivating mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Bork; Sørensen, Suzette; Cartegni, Luca

    2007-01-01

    a juxtaposed exonic splicing silencer (ESS) and is necessary to define a suboptimal 3' splice site. Remarkably, a synonymous polymorphic variation in MCAD exon 5 inactivates the ESS, and, although this has no effect on splicing by itself, it makes splicing immune to deleterious mutations in the ESE...

  12. Mutation Induced Extinction in Finite Populations: Lethal Mutagenesis and Lethal Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    C Scott Wylie; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate “semi-conservatively,” e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathoge...

  13. Phenotypic effect of mutations in evolving populations of RNA molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manrubia Susanna C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secondary structure of folded RNA sequences is a good model to map phenotype onto genotype, as represented by the RNA sequence. Computational studies of the evolution of ensembles of RNA molecules towards target secondary structures yield valuable clues to the mechanisms behind adaptation of complex populations. The relationship between the space of sequences and structures, the organization of RNA ensembles at mutation-selection equilibrium, the time of adaptation as a function of the population parameters, the presence of collective effects in quasispecies, or the optimal mutation rates to promote adaptation all are issues that can be explored within this framework. Results We investigate the effect of microscopic mutations on the phenotype of RNA molecules during their in silico evolution and adaptation. We calculate the distribution of the effects of mutations on fitness, the relative fractions of beneficial and deleterious mutations and the corresponding selection coefficients for populations evolving under different mutation rates. Three different situations are explored: the mutation-selection equilibrium (optimized population in three different fitness landscapes, the dynamics during adaptation towards a goal structure (adapting population, and the behavior under periodic population bottlenecks (perturbed population. Conclusions The ratio between the number of beneficial and deleterious mutations experienced by a population of RNA sequences increases with the value of the mutation rate μ at which evolution proceeds. In contrast, the selective value of mutations remains almost constant, independent of μ, indicating that adaptation occurs through an increase in the amount of beneficial mutations, with little variations in the average effect they have on fitness. Statistical analyses of the distribution of fitness effects reveal that small effects, either beneficial or deleterious, are well described by a Pareto

  14. Long tract of untranslated CAG repeats is deleterious in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Jun Hsu

    Full Text Available The most frequent trinucleotide repeat found in human disorders is the CAG sequence. Expansion of CAG repeats is mostly found in coding regions and is thought to cause diseases through a protein mechanism. Recently, expanded CAG repeats were shown to induce toxicity at the RNA level in Drosophila and C. elegans. These findings raise the possibility that CAG repeats may trigger RNA-mediated pathogenesis in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing EGFP transcripts with long CAG repeats in the 3' untranslated region develop pathogenic features. Expression of the transgene was directed to the muscle in order to compare the resulting phenotype to that caused by the CUG expansion, as occurs in myotonic dystrophy. Transgenic mice expressing 200, but not those expressing 0 or 23 CAG repeats, showed alterations in muscle morphology, histochemistry and electrophysiology, as well as abnormal behavioral phenotypes. Expression of the expanded CAG repeats in testes resulted in reduced fertility due to defective sperm motility. The production of EGFP protein was significantly reduced by the 200 CAG repeats, and no polyglutamine-containing product was detected, which argues against a protein mechanism. Moreover, nuclear RNA foci were detected for the long CAG repeats. These data support the notion that expanded CAG repeat RNA can cause deleterious effects in mammals. They also suggest the possible involvement of an RNA mechanism in human diseases with long CAG repeats.

  15. Is the deleterious effect of cryotherapy on proprioception mitigated by exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F; Moreira, S; Neto, J; Oliveira, J

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the acute effects of cryotherapy on knee position sense and to determine the time period necessary to normalize joint position sense when exercising after cryotherapy. 12 subjects visited the laboratory twice, once for cryotherapy followed by 30 min of exercise on a cycloergometer and once for cryotherapy followed by 30 min of rest. Sessions were randomly determined and separated by 48 h. Cryotherapy was applied in the form of ice bag, filled with 1 kg of crushed ice, for 20 min. Knee position sense was measured at baseline, after cryotherapy and every 5 min after cryotherapy removal until a total of 30 min. The main effect of cryotherapy was significant showing an increase in absolute (F7,154=43.76, pcryotherapy. The intervention after cryotherapy (rest vs. exercise) revealed a significant main effect only for absolute error (F7,154=4.05, pcryotherapy, the proprioceptive acuity reached the baseline values faster (10 min vs. 15 min). Our results indicated that the deleterious effect of cryotherapy on proprioception is mitigated by low intensity exercise, being the time necessary to normalize knee position sense reduced from 15 to 10 min.

  16. Rare deleterious variants in GRHL3 are associated with human spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Philippe; De Marco, Patrizia; Emond, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Laurent, Sandra; Merello, Elisa; Accogli, Andrea; Rouleau, Guy A; Capra, Valeria; Kibar, Zoha

    2017-03-08

    Neural tube defects, including spina bifida, are among the most common birth defects caused by failure of neural tube closure during development. They have a complex etiology involving largely undetermined environmental and genetic factors. Previous studies in mouse models have implicated the transcription factor Grhl3 as an important factor in the pathogenesis of spina bifida. In the present study, we conducted a resequencing analysis of GRHL3 in a cohort of 233 familial and sporadic cases of spina bifida. We identified two novel truncating variants: one homozygous frameshift variant, p.Asp16Aspfs*10, in two affected siblings and one heterozygous intronic splicing variant, p.Ala318Glyfs*26. We also identified five missense variants, one of which was demonstrated to reduce the activation of gene targets in a luciferase reporter assay. With the previously identified p.Arg391Cys variant, eight variants were found in GRHL3. Comparison of the variant rate between our cohort and the ExAC database identified a significant enrichment of deleterious variants in GRHL3 in the whole gene and the transactivation region in spina bifida patients. These data provide strong evidence for a role of GRHL3 as a predisposing factor to spina bifida and will help dissect the complex etiology and pathogenic mechanisms of these malformations.

  17. Deleterious Effects of Increased Intra-Abdominal Pressure on Kidney Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Armaly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP occurs in many clinical settings, including sepsis, severe acute pancreatitis, acute decompensated heart failure, hepatorenal syndrome, resuscitation with large volume, mechanical ventilation with high intrathoracic pressure, major burns, and acidosis. Although increased IAP affects several vital organs, the kidney is very susceptible to the adverse effects of elevated IAP. Kidney dysfunction is among the earliest physiological consequences of increased IAP. In the last two decades, laparoscopic surgery is rapidly replacing the open approach in many areas of surgery. Although it is superior at many aspects, laparoscopic surgery involves elevation of IAP, due to abdominal insufflation with carbonic dioxide (pneumoperitoneum. The latter has been shown to cause several deleterious effects where the most recognized one is impairment of kidney function as expressed by oliguria and reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR and renal blood flow (RBF. Despite much research in this field, the systemic physiologic consequences of elevated IAP of various etiologies and the mechanisms underlying its adverse effects on kidney excretory function and renal hemodynamics are not fully understood. The current review summarizes the reported adverse renal effects of increased IAP in edematous clinical settings and during laparoscopic surgery. In addition, it provides new insights into potential mechanisms underlying this phenomenon and therapeutic approaches to encounter renal complications of elevated IAP.

  18. Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 Plays a Deleterious Role During Influenza A Virus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherniuk, Sergey; Cenac, Nicolas; Comte, Marjorie; Frouard, Julie; Errazuriz-Cerda, Elisabeth; Galabov, Angel; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Riteau, Béatrice

    2016-07-15

    The pathogenesis of influenza A virus (IAV) infections is a multifactorial process that includes the replication capacity of the virus and a harmful inflammatory response to infection. Formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) emerges as a central receptor in inflammatory processes controlling resolution of acute inflammation. Its role in virus pathogenesis has not been investigated yet. We used pharmacologic approaches to investigate the role of FPR2 during IAV infection in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, FPR2 expressed on A549 cells was activated by IAV, which harbors its ligand, annexin A1, in its envelope. FPR2 activation by IAV promoted viral replication through an extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway. In vivo, activating FPR2 by administering the agonist WKYMVm-NH2 decreased survival and increased viral replication and inflammation after IAV infection. This effect was abolished by treating the mice with U0126, a specific ERK pathway inhibitor, showing that, in vivo, the deleterious role of FPR2 also occurs through an ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, administration of the FPR2 antagonist WRW4 protected mice from lethal IAV infections. These data show that viral replication and IAV pathogenesis depend on FPR2 signaling and suggest that FPR2 may be a promising novel strategy to treat influenza. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Female rats are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Shabani, Mohammad

    2012-03-17

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) may alter subsequent learning and memory capacity. There are differences in both the intensity and direction of responses of the male and female species to the same environmental stimuli and experimental conditions. In the present study, we examined the extent of the effects of PSD for 72h on spatial learning and memory, anxiety-like behavior, corticosterone levels, and the body weight in male as well as in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats. Multiple platform method was used for PSD induction. Spatial learning and memory and anxiety-like behavior were determined using Morris water maze (MWM) task and open field test, respectively. The data showed that PSD could not significantly affect subsequent spatial learning and short-term memory in male rats, while it significantly impaired the performance of the intact and OVX female rats. The PSD-intact and -OVX female rats showed more memory impairment than the PSD-male animals. Those impairments do not appear to be due to elevated stress level, since the plasma corticosterone did not significantly change following PSD induction. The open field data showed that PSD significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in all experimental groups. In addition, PSD had a reducing effect on the mean body weight of female groups. Such results suggest that the female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep loss on cognitive performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Malocclusion and deleterious oral habits among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca Thomaz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although malocclusions represent a serious public health issue, there is insufficient information about this problem in adolescents in Brazil, especially in poorer areas. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of facial alterations, dental malocclusions, and deleterious oral habits (DOH among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil and to test the hypothesis that the occurrence of DOH in infancy is associated with DOH during adolescence. The study included a probabilistic population-based sample of 2,060 Brazilian students aged 12-15 years. Facial characteristics (type of facial profile, facial symmetry, and passive lip sealing and malocclusions (Angle and Dental Aesthetic Index, DAI were evaluated. DOH in infancy and adolescence were evaluated by interviews with the parents and adolescents. Most adolescents presented with normal facial characteristics. The malocclusion prevalence (Angle was 83%. The DAI ranged from 13 to 69 (mean ± SD: 25.9 ± 7.7. Orthodontic treatment was necessary in 45.1% of the sample. The most prevalent DOH in adolescents were nail biting, object biting, cheek/lip biting, and bruxism, which were associated with finger sucking during infancy (P < 0.05. We conclude that malocclusions and DOH are common among Brazilian adolescents and that finger sucking during infancy may be a good predictor of DOH occurrence during adolescence.

  1. Malocclusion and deleterious oral habits among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Cangussu, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Assis, Ana Marlúcia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Although malocclusions represent a serious public health issue, there is insufficient information about this problem in adolescents in Brazil, especially in poorer areas. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of facial alterations, dental malocclusions, and deleterious oral habits (DOH) among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil and to test the hypothesis that the occurrence of DOH in infancy is associated with DOH during adolescence. The study included a probabilistic population-based sample of 2,060 Brazilian students aged 12-15 years. Facial characteristics (type of facial profile, facial symmetry, and passive lip sealing) and malocclusions (Angle and Dental Aesthetic Index, DAI) were evaluated. DOH in infancy and adolescence were evaluated by interviews with the parents and adolescents. Most adolescents presented with normal facial characteristics. The malocclusion prevalence (Angle) was 83%. The DAI ranged from 13 to 69 (mean ± SD: 25.9 ± 7.7). Orthodontic treatment was necessary in 45.1% of the sample. The most prevalent DOH in adolescents were nail biting, object biting, cheek/lip biting, and bruxism, which were associated with finger sucking during infancy (P adolescents and that finger sucking during infancy may be a good predictor of DOH occurrence during adolescence.

  2. Deleterious effects of obesity upon the hormonal and molecular mechanisms controlling spermatogenesis and male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lien M; Millar, Kate; Jones, Celine; Fatum, Muhammad; Coward, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Worldwide obesity rates have nearly doubled since 1980 and currently over 10% of the population is obese. In 2008, over 1.4 billion adults aged 20 years and older had a body mass index or BMI above a healthy weight and of these, over 200 million men and nearly 300 million women were obese. While obesity can have many ramifications upon adult life, one growing area of concern is that of reproductive capacity. Obesity affects male infertility by influencing the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, thus causing detrimental effects upon spermatogenesis and subsequent fertility. In particular, evidence indicates that excess adipose tissue can alter the relative ratio of testosterone and oestrogen. Additional effects involve the homeostatic disruption of insulin, sex-hormone-binding-globulin, leptin and inhibin B, leading to diminished testosterone production and impairment to spermatogenesis. Aberrant spermatogenesis arising from obesity is associated with downstream changes in key semen parameters, defective sperm capacitation and binding, and deleterious effects on sperm chromatin structure. More recent investigations into trans-generational epigenetic inheritance further suggest that molecular changes in sperm that arise from obesity-related impaired spermatogenesis, such as modified sperm RNA levels, DNA methylation, protamination and histone acetylation, can impact upon the development of offspring. Here, we summarise our current understanding of how obesity exerts influence over spermatogenesis and subsequent fertility status, and make recommendations for future investigative research.

  3. Failure to replicate the deleterious effects of safety behaviors in exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Jennifer T; Dixon, Laura J; Lickel, James J; Nelson, Elizabeth A; Deacon, Brett J

    2011-05-01

    The current study attempted to replicate the finding obtained by Powers, Smits, and Telch (2004; Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72, 448-545) that both the availability and utilization of safety behaviors interfere with the efficacy of exposure therapy. An additional goal of the study was to evaluate which explanatory theories about the detrimental effects of safety behaviors best account for this phenomenon. Undergraduate students (N=58) with high claustrophobic fear were assigned to one of three treatment conditions: (a) exposure only, (b) exposure with safety behavior availability, and (c) exposure with safety behavior utilization. Participants in each condition improved substantially, and there were no significant between-group differences in fear reduction. Unexpectedly, exposure with safety behavior utilization led to significantly greater improvement in self-efficacy and claustrophobic cognitions than exposure only. The extent to which participants inferred danger from the presence of safety aids during treatment was associated with significantly less improvement on all outcome measures. The findings call into question the hypothesized deleterious effects of safety behaviors on the outcome of exposure therapy and highlight a possible mechanism through which the mere presence of safety cues during exposure trials might affect treatment outcomes depending on participants' perceptions of the dangerousness of exposure stimuli. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Deleterious effects of maternal ingestion of cocoa upon fetal ductus arteriosus in late pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo eZielinsky

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa powder has twice more antioxidants than red wine and three times more than green tea. Ten prcent of its weight is made up of flavonoids. Cocoa has antioxidant and antiinflamatory effects by downregulating cyclooxigenase-2 receptors expression in the endothelium and enhancing nitric oxide bioavailability. There are evidences that while polyphenols ingestion have cardioprotective effects in the adult, it may have deleterious effect on the fetus if ingested by the mother on the third trimester of pregnancy, causing intrauterine fetal ductus arteriosus constriction.Polyphenols present in many foods and their anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities have been shown to be as or more powerful than those of indomethacin. These effects are dependent on the inhibition of modulation of the arachidonic acid and the synthesis of prostaglandins, especially E-2, which is responsible for fetal ductus arteriosus patency. So, we hypothesized that this same mechanism is responsible for the harmful effect of polyphenol-rich foods, such as cocoa, upon the fetal ductus arteriosus after maternal intake of such substances in the third trimester of pregnancy, thereby rising the perspective of a note of caution for pregnant women diet.

  5. Deleterious epistatic interactions between electron transport system protein-coding loci in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2006-07-01

    The nature of epistatic interactions between genes encoding interacting proteins in hybrid organisms can have important implications for the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation and speciation. At this point very little is known about the fitness differences caused by specific closely interacting but evolutionarily divergent proteins in hybrids between populations or species. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus provides an excellent model in which to study such interactions because the species range includes numerous genetically divergent populations that are still capable of being crossed in the laboratory. Here, the effect on fitness due to the interactions of three complex III proteins of the electron transport system in F2 hybrid copepods resulting from crosses of a pair of divergent populations is examined. Significant deviations from Mendelian inheritance are observed for each of the three genes in F2 hybrid adults but not in nauplii (larvae). The two-way interactions between these genes also have a significant impact upon the viability of these hybrid copepods. Dominance appears to play an important role in mediating the interactions between these loci as deviations are caused by heterozygote/homozygote deleterious interactions. These results suggest that the fitness consequences of the interactions of these three complex III-associated genes could influence reproductive isolation in this system.

  6. Rapid Detection of Rare Deleterious Variants by Next Generation Sequencing with Optional Microarray SNP Genotype Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Gurgel-Gianetti, Juliana; Harrison, Sally M; Daly, Catherine; Antanavicuite, Agne; Lascelles, Carolina; Markham, Alexander F; Pena, Sergio D J; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    Autozygosity mapping is a powerful technique for the identification of rare, autosomal recessive, disease-causing genes. The ease with which this category of disease gene can be identified has greatly increased through the availability of genome-wide SNP genotyping microarrays and subsequently of exome sequencing. Although these methods have simplified the generation of experimental data, its analysis, particularly when disparate data types must be integrated, remains time consuming. Moreover, the huge volume of sequence variant data generated from next generation sequencing experiments opens up the possibility of using these data instead of microarray genotype data to identify disease loci. To allow these two types of data to be used in an integrated fashion, we have developed AgileVCFMapper, a program that performs both the mapping of disease loci by SNP genotyping and the analysis of potentially deleterious variants using exome sequence variant data, in a single step. This method does not require microarray SNP genotype data, although analysis with a combination of microarray and exome genotype data enables more precise delineation of disease loci, due to superior marker density and distribution.

  7. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Forsberg, R

    2001-01-01

    of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations might be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...

  8. Reversion of a live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine investigated by parallel mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette S.; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Forsberg, R.

    2001-01-01

    of these parallel mutations were direct reversions to the parental VR2332 sequence and were situated in a papain-like cysteine protease domain and in the helicase domain. The remaining parallel mutations mig ht be seen as second-site compensatory mutations for one or more of the mutations that accumulated...

  9. Host-parasite arms race in mutation modifications: indefinite escalation despite a heavy load?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Y; Sasaki, A

    1996-11-21

    If constantly changing genotypes are favorable in host and parasite coevolution, an indefinite escalation of mutation rates would result despite heavy mutational loads. We theoretically study this possibility by examining the mutation modifier dynamics of host and parasite that engage in genotype-specific epidemiological interaction. In the first model, we study the evolutionarily stable (ESS) mutation rate or switching rate if two alleles in a single locus are subjected to frequency-dependent selection favoring the rarer of the two. Mutation modifier locus is either tightly linked or unlinked to the selected locus. Sufficiently strong frequency-dependent selection may cause cycles in allele frequencies and a modifier with higher mutation rate enjoys the long-term advantage by randomizing the genotype of their offspring. Through the repeated events of invasion and replacement of mutation modifiers, the mutation rate continues to increase until the allele frequencies are stabilized. If some fraction of mutations are deleterious, there is no longer a pure ESS mutation rate: the evolutionarily stable population then consists of multiple strains concerning mutation modifier, typically one with a very high mutation rate and the other with a very low rate, stably coexisting and fighting off invasion by any other modifiers. These results are almost independent of the linkage between the selected and the modifier loci. In the second model, we consider the joint evolution of host and parasite mutation modifiers, assuming that a specific pair of host and parasite genotype densities change following the Nicholson-Bailey type model. If there is no cost of deleterious mutations, mutation rates of both species are escalated indefinitely by modifier evolution until they completely suppress the fluctuation of genotype densities. However, a small cost of deleterious mutation is enough to collapse this coevolutionary equilibrium of inflated mutations. Typical coevolutionary outcome

  10. The functional importance of disease-associated mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Teri E

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, scientists believed that point mutations in genes are the genetic switches for somatic and inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria and cancer. Some of these mutations likely alter a protein's function in a manner that is deleterious, and they should occur in functionally important regions of the protein products of genes. Here we show that disease-associated mutations occur in regions of genes that are conserved, and can identify likely disease-causing mutations. Results To show this, we have determined conservation patterns for 6185 non-synonymous and heritable disease-associated mutations in 231 genes. We define a parameter, the conservation ratio, as the ratio of average negative entropy of analyzable positions with reported mutations to that of every analyzable position in the gene sequence. We found that 84.0% of the 231 genes have conservation ratios less than one. 139 genes had eleven or more analyzable mutations and 88.0% of those had conservation ratios less than one. Conclusions These results indicate that phylogenetic information is a powerful tool for the study of disease-associated mutations. Our alignments and analysis has been made available as part of the database at http://cancer.stanford.edu/mut-paper/. Within this dataset, each position is annotated with the analysis, so the most likely disease-causing mutations can be identified.

  11. Mutations in planar cell polarity gene SCRIB are associated with spina bifida.

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    Yunping Lei

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs (OMIM #182940 including anencephaly, spina bifida and craniorachischisis, are severe congenital malformations that affect 0.5-1 in 1,000 live births in the United States, with varying prevalence around the world. Mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP genes are believed to cause a variety of NTDs in both mice and humans. SCRIB is a PCP-associated gene. Mice that are homozygous for the Scrib p.I285K and circletail (Crc mutations, present with the most severe form of NTDs, namely craniorachischisis. A recent study reported that mutations in SCRIB were associated with craniorachischisis in humans, but whether SCRIB mutations contribute to increased spina bifida risk is still unknown. We sequenced the SCRIB gene in 192 infants with spina bifida and 190 healthy controls. Among the spina bifida patients, we identified five novel missense mutations that were predicted-to-be-deleterious by the PolyPhen software. Of these five mutations, three of them (p.P1043L, p.P1332L, p.L1520R significantly affected the subcellular localization of SCRIB. In addition, we demonstrated that the craniorachischisis mouse line-90 mutation I285K, also affected SCRIB subcellular localization. In contrast, only one novel missense mutation (p.A1257T was detected in control samples, and it was predicted to be benign. This study demonstrated that rare deleterious mutations of SCRIB may contribute to the multifactorial risk for human spina bifida.

  12. The role of mitochondrial DNA mutations and free radicals in disease and ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagouge, M; Larsson, N-G

    2013-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been made to understand the role of oxidative stress in age-related diseases and ageing. The mitochondrial free radical theory of ageing, which proposes that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and other macromolecules caused by the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during cellular respiration drives ageing, has for a long time been the central hypothesis in the field. However, in contrast with this theory, evidence from an increasing number of experimental studies has suggested that mtDNA mutations may be generated by replication errors rather than by accumulated oxidative damage. Furthermore, interventions to modulate ROS levels in humans and animal models have not produced consistent results in terms of delaying disease progression and extending lifespan. A number of recent experimental findings strongly question the mitochondrial free radical theory of ageing, leading to the emergence of new theories of how age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction may lead to ageing. These new hypotheses are mainly based on the underlying notion that, despite their deleterious role, ROS are essential signalling molecules that mediate stress responses in general and the stress response to age-dependent damage in particular. This novel view of ROS roles has a clear impact on the interpretation of studies in which antioxidants have been used to treat human age-related diseases commonly linked to oxidative stress. PMID:23432181

  13. The role of mitochondrial DNA mutations and free radicals in disease and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagouge, M; Larsson, N-G

    2013-06-01

    Considerable efforts have been made to understand the role of oxidative stress in age-related diseases and ageing. The mitochondrial free radical theory of ageing, which proposes that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and other macromolecules caused by the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during cellular respiration drives ageing, has for a long time been the central hypothesis in the field. However, in contrast with this theory, evidence from an increasing number of experimental studies has suggested that mtDNA mutations may be generated by replication errors rather than by accumulated oxidative damage. Furthermore, interventions to modulate ROS levels in humans and animal models have not produced consistent results in terms of delaying disease progression and extending lifespan. A number of recent experimental findings strongly question the mitochondrial free radical theory of ageing, leading to the emergence of new theories of how age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction may lead to ageing. These new hypotheses are mainly based on the underlying notion that, despite their deleterious role, ROS are essential signalling molecules that mediate stress responses in general and the stress response to age-dependent damage in particular. This novel view of ROS roles has a clear impact on the interpretation of studies in which antioxidants have been used to treat human age-related diseases commonly linked to oxidative stress. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  14. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum and familial hypercholesterolemia: a deleterious combination of cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, Livia; Tarugi, Patrizia; Borrini, Claudia; Bellocchio, Antonella; Fresa, Raffaele; Guerra, Deanna; Quaglino, Daniela; Ronchetti, Ivonne; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum (PXE), an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in ABCC6 gene, is characterised by fragmentation of elastic fibres with involvement of the cardiovascular system. We investigated a 60-year-old female with angina pectoris found to have PXE, associated with elevated plasma LDL-C suspected to be due to autosomal-co-dominant hypercholesterolemia. ABCC6, LDLR, PCSK9 and exon 26 of APOB genes were re-sequenced. Cardiovascular involvement was assessed by coronary angiography, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and ultrasound examination. The patient was a compound heterozygous for two ABCC6 mutations (p.S317R and p.R1141X) and heterozygous for a novel LDLR mutation (p.R574H). She had severe coronary stenosis and calcification of the arteries of the lower limbs. Treatment with ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/60mg/day, maintained over a 4.5-year period, reduced of LDL-C and the myocardial ischemic area. In PXE patients LDL-lowering treatment might contribute to delay macrovascular complications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  16. Computational Analysis of Breast Cancer GWAS Loci Identifies the Putative Deleterious Effect of STXBP4 and ZNF404 Gene Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Tariq Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Vaidyanathan, Venkatesh; Talluri, Venkateswar R; Shaik, Noor A

    2017-04-19

    The genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled us in identifying different breast cancer (BC) susceptibility loci. However, majority of these are non-coding variants with no annotated biological function. We investigated such 78 noncoding genome wide associated SNPs of BC and further expanded the list to 2,162 variants with strong linkage-disequilibrium (LD, r(2) ≥0.8). Using multiple publically available algorithms such as CADD, GWAVA, and FATHAMM, we classified all these variants into deleterious, damaging, or benign categories. Out of total 2,241 variants, 23 (1.02%) variants were extreme deleterious (rank 1), 70 (3.12%) variants were deleterious (rank 2), and 1,937 (86.43%) variants were benign (rank 3). The results show 14% of lead or associated variants are under strong negative selection (GERP++ RS ≥2), and ∼22% are under balancing selection (Tajima's D score >2) in CEU population of 1KGP-the regions being positively selected (GERP++ RS <0) in mammalian evolution. The expression quantitative trait loci of highest deleteriously ranked genes were tested on relevant adipose and breast tissues, the results of which were extended for protein expression on breast tissues. From the concordance analysis of ranking system of GWAVA, CADD, and FATHMM, eQTL and protein expression, we identified the deleterious SNPs localized in STXBP4 and ZNF404 genes which might play a role in BC development by dysregulating its gene expression. This simple approach will be easier to implement and to prioritize large scale GWAS data for variety of diseases and link to the potentially unrecognized functional roles of genes. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-12, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Review: Bucephalus minimus, a deleterious trematode parasite of cockles Cerastoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, L; Freitas, R; de Montaudouin, X

    2015-04-01

    Trematodes are the most prevalent and abundant macroparasites in coastal waters. They display a complex life cycle with alternation of free-living and parasitic stages generally involving three host species. The most deleterious stage is in the first intermediate host (a mollusc) where the parasite penetrates as miracidium larvae and asexually multiplicates in sporocysts/rediae to provide cercariae larvae. However, due to basic low prevalence in ecosystems, this system remains difficult to study. Taking the example of the cockle (Cerastoderma edule), an exploited bivalve along North-Eastern Atlantic coasts, and Bucephalus minimus, its most prevalent parasite as first intermediate host, we summarised the 51 most relevant papers (1887-2015). Besides, a 16-year monthly monitoring was performed at Banc d'Arguin (Atlantic coast of France), and allowed to obtain a sufficient number of infected cockles (276 out of 5,420 individuals) in order to provide new information concerning this parasite/host system. Sporocysts (diameter 80-500 μm) and developing cercariae (length 300-500 μm) are not visible before cockle reaches 16-mm shell length and then prevalence increases with host size. Seasonality of infection was not observed but variation of prevalence was significant among years and negatively correlated to the temperature of the former year, which could correspond to the period of infection by miracidium. Seven other species of trematode were identified in cockles as second intermediate host. For six of them, metacercariae abundance per individual was 2 to 12 folds higher in B. minimus-infected cockles, exacerbating the potential negative impact on host. From the parasite point of view, metacercariae can be considered as hitchhikers, taking advantage of the abnormal migration of B. minimus-infected cockles to the sediment surface where they become more vulnerable to predators that are also the final hosts of many of these parasites.

  18. Extracellular localization of galectin-3 has a deleterious role in joint tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelle-Montcalm, Audrée; Boileau, Christelle; Poirier, Françoise; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Guévremont, Mélanie; Duval, Nicolas; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reboul, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    In this study we examine the extracellular role of galectin-3 (gal-3) in joint tissues. Following intra-articular injection of gal-3 or vehicle in knee joints of mice, histological evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone was performed. Further studies were then performed using human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes and subchondral bone osteoblasts, in which the effect of gal-3 (0 to 10 microg/ml) was analyzed. Osteoblasts were incubated in the presence of vitamin D3 (50 nM), which is an inducer of osteocalcin, encoded by an osteoblast terminal differentiation gene. Genes of interest mainly expressed in either chondrocytes or osteoblasts were analyzed with real-time RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays. Signalling pathways regulating osteocalcin were analyzed in the presence of gal-3. Intra-articular injection of gal-3 induced knee swelling and lesions in both cartilage and subchondral bone. On human OA chondrocytes, gal-3 at 1 microg/ml stimulated ADAMTS-5 expression in chondrocytes and, at higher concentrations (5 and 10 microg/ml), matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression. Experiments performed with osteoblasts showed a weak but bipolar effect on alkaline phosphatase expression: stimulation at 1 microg/ml or inhibition at 10 microg/ml. In the absence of vitamin D3, type I collagen alpha 1 chain expression was inhibited by 10 microg/ml of gal-3. The vitamin D3 induced osteocalcin was strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of gal-3, at both the mRNA and protein levels. This inhibition was mainly mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. These findings indicate that high levels of extracellular gal-3, which could be encountered locally during the inflammatory process, have deleterious effects in both cartilage and subchondral bone tissues.

  19. Multiple deleterious effects of experimentally aged sperm in a monogamous bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J.; Wagner, R.H.; Helfenstein, F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Mulard, Hervé; Naves, L.C.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Sperm aging is known to be detrimental to reproductive performance. However, this apparently general phenomenon has seldom been studied in an evolutionary context. The negative impact of sperm aging on parental fitness should constitute a strong selective pressure for adaptations to avoid its effects. We studied the impact of sperm aging on black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), a monogamous seabird. Kittiwakes comprise a model system because (i) of evidence that females eject their mates' sperm to prevent fertilization by sperm that would be old and degraded by the time of fertilization and result in reduced reproductive performance and (ii) the lack of extra-pair fertilization in this species makes cryptic female choice an unlikely explanation of postcopulatory sperm ejection by females. We experimentally manipulated the age of the sperm fertilizing kittiwake eggs by fitting males with anti-insemination rings for variable periods of time preceding egg-laying. We found evidence that sperm aging negatively affected four sequential stages of reproduction: fertilization potential, rate of embryonic development, embryonic mortality, and chick condition at hatching. These results may be produced by a continuum of a single process of sperm aging that differentially affects various aspects of development, depending on the degree of damage incurred to the spermatozoa. The marked impact of sperm age on female fitness may thus drive postcopulatory sperm ejection by females. These results provide experimental evidence of deleterious effects of sperm aging on a nondomestic vertebrate, underlining its taxonomic generality and its potential to select for a wide array of adaptations. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  20. Long-term low carbohydrate diet leads to deleterious metabolic manifestations in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Keiko; Inukai, Kouichi; Onuma, Hirohisa; Kudo, Akihiko; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Tsugawa, Kazue; Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Kawakami, Hayato; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated long-term effects of low carbohydrate diets on wild type mice, streptozotocin-injected and KKAy obese diabetic mice. These mice were pair-fed three different types of diets, standard chow (SC, C∶P∶F = 63∶15∶22), a low carbohydrate (LC, C∶P∶F = 38∶25∶37) diet and a severely carbohydrate restricted (SR, C∶P∶F = 18∶45∶37) diet for 16 weeks. Despite comparable body weights and serum lipid profiles, wild type and diabetic mice fed the low carbohydrate diets exhibited lower insulin sensitivity and this reduction was dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the diet. When serum fatty acid compositions were investigated, monounsaturation capacity, i.e. C16:1/C16:0 and C18:1/C18:0, was impaired in all murine models fed the low carbohydrate diets, consistent with the decreased expression of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1). Interestingly, both the hepatic expressions and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), which might be related to longevity, were markedly decreased in both wild type and KKAy mice fed the SR diet. Taking into consideration that fat compositions did not differ between the LC and SR diets, we conclude that low carbohydrate diets have deleterious metabolic effects in both wild type and diabetic mice, which may explain the association between diets relatively low in carbohydrate and the elevated risk of cardiovascular events observed in clinical studies.

  1. Long-term low carbohydrate diet leads to deleterious metabolic manifestations in diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Handa

    Full Text Available We investigated long-term effects of low carbohydrate diets on wild type mice, streptozotocin-injected and KKAy obese diabetic mice. These mice were pair-fed three different types of diets, standard chow (SC, C∶P∶F = 63∶15∶22, a low carbohydrate (LC, C∶P∶F = 38∶25∶37 diet and a severely carbohydrate restricted (SR, C∶P∶F = 18∶45∶37 diet for 16 weeks. Despite comparable body weights and serum lipid profiles, wild type and diabetic mice fed the low carbohydrate diets exhibited lower insulin sensitivity and this reduction was dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the diet. When serum fatty acid compositions were investigated, monounsaturation capacity, i.e. C16:1/C16:0 and C18:1/C18:0, was impaired in all murine models fed the low carbohydrate diets, consistent with the decreased expression of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1. Interestingly, both the hepatic expressions and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21, which might be related to longevity, were markedly decreased in both wild type and KKAy mice fed the SR diet. Taking into consideration that fat compositions did not differ between the LC and SR diets, we conclude that low carbohydrate diets have deleterious metabolic effects in both wild type and diabetic mice, which may explain the association between diets relatively low in carbohydrate and the elevated risk of cardiovascular events observed in clinical studies.

  2. Association between protective and deleterious HLA alleles with multiple sclerosis in Central East Sardinia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pastorino

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex on chromosome 6p21 has been unambiguously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS. The complex features of the HLA region, especially its high genic content, extreme polymorphism, and extensive linkage disequilibrium, has prevented to resolve the nature of HLA association in MS. We performed a family based association study on the isolated population of the Nuoro province (Sardinia to clarify the role of HLA genes in MS. The main stage of our study involved an analysis of the ancestral haplotypes A2Cw7B58DR2DQ1 and A30Cw5B18DR3DQ2. On the basis of a multiplicative model, the effect of the first haplotype is protective with an odds ratio (OR = 0.27 (95% confidence interval CI 0.13-0.57, while that of the second is deleterious, OR 1.78 (95% CI 1.26-2.50. We found both class I (A, Cw, B and class II (DR, DQ loci to have an effect on MS susceptibility, but we saw that they act independently from each other. We also performed an exploratory analysis on a set of 796 SNPs in the same HLA region. Our study supports the claim that Class I and Class II loci act independently on MS susceptibility and this has a biological explanation. Also, the analysis of SNPs suggests that there are other HLA genes involved in MS, but replication is needed. This opens up new perspective on the study of MS.

  3. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni SH, Mollamohammadi M. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation: An Overview. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4: 1-8.AbstractObjectiveNeurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a group of neurodegenerative disorder with deposition of iron in the brain (mainly Basal Ganglia leading to a progressive Parkinsonism, spasticity, dystonia, retinal degeneration, optic atrophy often accompanied by psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline. 8 of the 10 genetically defined NBIA types are inherited as autosomal recessive and the remaining two by autosomal dominant and X-linked dominant manner. Brain MRI findings are almost specific and show abnormal brain iron deposition in basal ganglia some other related anatomicallocations. In some types of NBIA cerebellar atrophy is the major finding in MRI.ReferencesShevel M. Racial hygiene, activeeuthanasia, and Julius Hallervorden. Neurology 1992;42:2214-2219.HayflickSJ. Neurodegeneration with brain Iron accumulation: from genes to pathogenesis.Semin Pediatr Neurol 2006;13:182-185.Zhou B, Westawy SK, Levinson B, et al. A novel pantothenate kinase gene(PANK2 is defective in Hallervorden-Spatzsyndrome. Nat Genet 2001;28:345- 349.www.ncbi.nlm.nihgov/NBK111Y/university of Washington, seattle. Allison Gregory and Susan Hayflick.Paisan-Ruiz C, Li A, Schneider SA, et al. Widesread Levy body and tau accumulation in childhood and adult onset dystonia-parkinsonism cases with PLA2G6 mutations. Neurobiol Aging 2012;33:814-823.Dick KJ, Eckhardt M, Paison-Ruiz C, et al. Mutation of FA2H underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia(SPG 35. Hum Mutat 31: E1251-E1260.Edvardson S, Hama H, Shaag A, et al. Mutation in the fatty acid 2-Hydroxylase gene are associated with leukodystrophy with spastic paraparesis and dystonia. Am I Hum Genet 2008;83:647-648.Schneider SA, Aggarwal A, Bhatt m, et al. Severe tongue protrusion dystonia: clinical syndromes

  4. Novel ATRX gene damaging missense mutation c.6740A>C segregates with profound to severe intellectual deficiency without alpha thalassaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Bouazzi

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The novel mutation c.6740A>C was identified within the ATRX gene helicase domain and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the three affected males as well as in the mother and her two daughters. This mutation was predicted to be damaging and deleterious. The novel mutation segregated with the phenotype without alpha-thalassaemia and with non-skewed X chromosome.

  5. Variability in mutational fitness effects prevents full lethal transitions in large quasispecies populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Simó, Carles; Martínez, Regina; Solé, Ricard V.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-04-01

    The distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is crucial to the evolutionary fate of quasispecies. In this article we analyze the effect of the DMFE on the dynamics of a large quasispecies by means of a phenotypic version of the classic Eigen's model that incorporates beneficial, neutral, deleterious, and lethal mutations. By parameterizing the model with available experimental data on the DMFE of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Tobacco etch virus (TEV), we found that increasing mutation does not totally push the entire viral quasispecies towards deleterious or lethal regions of the phenotypic sequence space. The probability of finding regions in the parameter space of the general model that results in a quasispecies only composed by lethal phenotypes is extremely small at equilibrium and in transient times. The implications of our findings can be extended to other scenarios, such as lethal mutagenesis or genomically unstable cancer, where increased mutagenesis has been suggested as a potential therapy.

  6. The deleterious effect of metabolic acidosis on nutritional status of hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Soleymanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main causes of protein-energy malnutrition in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD is metabolic acidosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metabolic acidosis on nutritional status in a group of MHD patients with adequately delivered dialysis treatment. Of 165 eligible anuric MHD outpatients with Kt/V ≥ 1 and no underlying inflammatory diseases, 47 subjects were enrolled. In order to evaluate the effect of different parameters on serum albumin, we measured the pre-dialysis serum albumin, blood pH, serum bicarbonate (HCO 3‾ , Kt/V, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR and body mass index (BMI in these patients. The mean age of the study patients was 55 ± 13.8 years; there were 22 females and six diabetics. The average Kt/V was 1.22 ± 0.16, pH was 7.40 ± 0.15, serum HCO 3‾ was 23.18 ± 2.38 mEq/L, serum albumin was 4.03 ± 0.56 g/dL, nPCR was 1.00 ± 0.16 g/kg/day, post-dialysis body weight was 58.50 ± 11.50 kg and BMI was 23.47 ± 2.70 kg/m 2 . There was a statistically significant direct correlation between serum albumin and BMI (r = 0.415, P = 0.004, and between serum albumin and serum HCO 3 (r = 0.341, P = 0.019. On multiple regression analysis, the predictors of serum albumin were serum HCO3‾ and BMI (direct effect and nPCR (inverse effect. In 17 patients on MHD with serum HCO3‾ 22 mEq/L (P = 0.046. These data demonstrate that patients on MHD with metabolic acidosis had a lower serum albumin concentration despite adequate dialysis treatment. The inverse effect of nPCR on serum albumin concentration in acidotic MHD patients may be due to hypercatabolism in the setting of metabolic acidosis, leading to deleterious effects on the nutritional status of patients on MHD.

  7. A frameshift mutation in GON4L is associated with proportionate dwarfism in Fleckvieh cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Wurmser, Christine; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Misurova, Lubica; Jung, Simone; Langenmayer, Martin C; Schnieke, Angelika; Knubben-Schweizer, Gabriela; Fries, Ruedi; Pausch, Hubert

    2016-03-31

    Low birth weight and postnatal growth restriction are the most evident symptoms of dwarfism. Accompanying skeletal aberrations may compromise the general condition and locomotion of affected individuals. Several paternal half-sibs with a low birth weight and a small size were born in 2013 in the Fleckvieh cattle population. Affected calves were strikingly underweight at birth in spite of a normal gestation length and had craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated narrow heads and brachygnathia inferior. In spite of a normal general condition, their growth remained restricted during rearing. We genotyped 27 affected and 10,454 unaffected animals at 44,672 single nucleotide polymorphisms and performed association tests followed by homozygosity mapping, which allowed us to map the locus responsible for growth failure to a 1.85-Mb segment on bovine chromosome 3. Analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data from one affected and 289 unaffected animals revealed a 1-bp deletion (g.15079217delC, rs723240647) in the coding region of the GON4L gene that segregated with the dwarfism-associated haplotype. We showed that the deletion induces intron retention and premature termination of translation, which can lead to a severely truncated protein that lacks domains that are likely essential to normal protein function. The widespread use of an undetected carrier bull for artificial insemination has resulted in a tenfold increase in the frequency of the deleterious allele in the female population. A frameshift mutation in GON4L is associated with autosomal recessive proportionate dwarfism in Fleckvieh cattle. The mutation has segregated in the population for more than 50 years without being recognized as a genetic disorder. However, the widespread use of an undetected carrier bull for artificial insemination caused a sudden accumulation of homozygous calves with dwarfism. Our findings provide the basis for genome-based mating strategies to avoid the inadvertent mating of carrier

  8. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... interpreted as pathogenic, 3 missense mutations were suggested to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis, 6 mutations were suggested to be benign since they were identified in patients together with a well-known disease-causing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, while 12 were variants of unknown significance....

  9. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, van W.F.; Greyling, B.J.; Getz, W.M.; Helden, P.D.; Zwaan, B.J.; Bastos, A.D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) populati

  10. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, van W.F.; Greyling, B.J.; Getz, W.M.; Helden, van P.D.; Zwaan, B.J.; Bastos, A.D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) populati

  11. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eEmperador

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative.Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal.In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, these species also carry a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA.

  12. Normal physical activity obliterates the deleterious effects of high-caloric intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Maria; Solomon, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- scans, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with stable isotopes were performed before and after the intervention. Both study groups gained the same amount of body weight. However, the inactive group accumulated significantly more....... Therefore, healthy individuals on a high caloric intake were randomized to either 10,000 or 1,500 steps per day for 14 days. Step-number, total energy expenditure, dietary records, neuropsychological tests, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)- and abdominal...

  13. Liver X receptors interfere with the deleterious effect of diethylstilbestrol on testicular physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oumeddour, Abdelkader [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Génétique Reproduction et Développement, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6293, GReD, F-63171 Aubiere (France); INSERM, UMR 1103, GReD, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Laboratoire de Neuroendocrinologie Appliquée, Université Badji Mokhtar Annaba, BP12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Viennois, Emilie; Caira, Françoise; Decourbey, Clélia [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Génétique Reproduction et Développement, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6293, GReD, F-63171 Aubiere (France); INSERM, UMR 1103, GReD, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Maqdasy, Salwan [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Génétique Reproduction et Développement, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6293, GReD, F-63171 Aubiere (France); INSERM, UMR 1103, GReD, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d’Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Service d’endocrinologie, diabétologie et maladies métaboliques, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, F-63003 Clermont-Ferrand (France); and others

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Part of the neonatal effect of DES on testis needs the presence of Lxrα/β. • Some DES-induced pathways are blocked in Lxr-deficient mice. • Lxr-deficient mice analysis defines DES-target genes protected by Lxr. - Abstract: Liver X receptors LXRα (NR1H3) and LXRβ (NR1H2) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, activated by specific oxysterols, oxidized derivatives of cholesterol. These receptors are involved in the regulation of testis physiology. Lxr-deficient mice pointed to the physiological roles of these nuclear receptors in steroid synthesis, lipid homeostasis and germ cell apoptosis and proliferation. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen considered as an endocrine disruptor that affects the functions of the testis. Various lines of evidences have made a clear link between estrogens, their nuclear receptors ERα (NR3A1) and ERβ (NR3A2), and Lxrα/β. As LXR activity could also be regulated by the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0A2) and DES could act through SHP, we wondered whether LXR could be targeted by estrogen-like endocrine disruptors such as DES. For that purpose, wild-type and Lxr-deficient mice were daily treated with 0.75 μg DES from days 1 to 5 after birth. The effects of DES were investigated at 10 or 45 days of age. We demonstrated that DES induced a decrease of the body mass at 10 days only in the Lxr-deficient mice suggesting a protective effect of Lxr. We defined three categories of DES-target genes in testis: those whose accumulation is independent of Lxr; those whose accumulation is enhanced by the lack of both Lxrα/β; those whose accumulation is repressed by the absence of Lxrα/β. Lipid accumulation is also modified by neonatal DES injection. Lxr-deficient mice present different lipid profiles, demonstrating that DES could have its effects in part due to Lxrα/β. Altogether, our study shows that both nuclear receptors Lxrα and Lxrβ are not only

  14. Estimate of the penetrance of BRCA mutation and the COS software for the assessment of BRCA mutation probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrino, Jacopo; Berrino, Franco; Francisci, Silvia; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Pensotti, Valeria; Radice, Paolo; Pasanisi, Patrizia; Manoukian, Siranoush

    2015-03-01

    We have designed the user-friendly COS software with the intent to improve estimation of the probability of a family carrying a deleterious BRCA gene mutation. The COS software is similar to the widely-used Bayesian-based BRCAPRO software, but it incorporates improved assumptions on cancer incidence in women with and without a deleterious mutation, takes into account relatives up to the fourth degree and allows researchers to consider an hypothetical third gene or a polygenic model of inheritance. Since breast cancer incidence and penetrance increase over generations, we estimated birth-cohort-specific incidence and penetrance curves. We estimated breast and ovarian cancer penetrance in 384 BRCA1 and 229 BRCA2 mutated families. We tested the COS performance in 436 Italian breast/ovarian cancer families including 79 with BRCA1 and 27 with BRCA2 mutations. The area under receiver operator curve (AUROC) was 84.4 %. The best probability threshold for offering the test was 22.9 %, with sensitivity 80.2 % and specificity 80.3 %. Notwithstanding very different assumptions, COS results were similar to BRCAPRO v6.0.

  15. Evolutionary constraints and the neutral theory. [mutation-caused nucleotide substitutions in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukes, T. H.; Kimura, M.

    1984-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution postulates that nucleotide substitutions inherently take place in DNA as a result of point mutations followed by random genetic drift. In the absence of selective constraints, the substitution rate reaches the maximum value set by the mutation rate. The rate in globin pseudogenes is about 5 x 10 to the -9th substitutions per site per year in mammals. Rates slower than this indicate the presence of constraints imposed by negative (natural) selection, which rejects and discards deleterious mutations.

  16. Pathogenic mutations in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng-King; Skipper, Lisa M

    2007-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD; Parkinson's) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies. Increasing evidence suggests that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) dysfunction may represent the principal molecular pathways that commonly underlie the pathogenesis. The relative role of genetic and environmental factors has been the focus of research and debate. The recent discovery of a number of disease-causing genes (SNCA, Parkin/PARK2, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ1/PARK7, and LRRK2) in familial and sporadic forms of PD has provided considerable insights into the pathophysiology of this complex disorder. The frequency of these gene mutations may vary according to ethnicity and to the specific gene. A gene dosage effect is observed in some cases, and the phenotype of some of the mutation carriers closely resembles typical PD. Penetrance of some of the recurrent mutations is incomplete and may vary with age. Further research to unravel the etiopathology could identify biochemical or genetic markers for potential neuroprotective trials. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Association between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and survival in women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Kelly L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Goh, Cindy;

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) carry deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. A recent article suggested that BRCA2-related EOC was associated with an improved prognosis, but the effect of BRCA1 remains unclear....

  18. Evaluation of two different models to predict BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a cohort of Danish hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, D G; Thomassen, M;

    2006-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis, a robust system for selecting families who have a higher chance of a mutation has become important. Several models have been developed to help predict which samples are more likely to be mutation positive than others. We have...... undertaken a complete BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis in 267 Danish families with high-risk family history. We found deleterious mutations in 28% (76) of the families, 68% (52) of those in BRCA1 and 32% (24) in BRCA2. We compared our results with two popular manual models developed to estimate the chance...

  19. CF Mutation Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutation Analysis; CFTR Mutation Analysis Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation ... an elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) or positive sweat chloride test , to confirm the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. ...

  20. Mutations in antiquitin in individuals with pyridoxine-dependent seizures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, P.B.; Struys, E.A.; Jakobs, C.; Plecko, B.; Baxter, P.; Baumgartner, M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Omran, H.; Tacke, U.; Uhlenberg, B.; Weschke, B.; Clayton, P.T.

    2006-01-01

    We show here that children with pyridoxine-dependent seizures (PDS) have mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, which encodes antiquitin; these mutations abolish the activity of antiquitin as a delta1-piperideine-6-carboxylate (P6C)-alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alpha-AASA) dehydrogenase. The accumulating

  1. Novel mutations, including a novel G659A missense mutation, of the FUT1 gene are responsible for the para-Bombay phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C F; Lo, M D; Lee, C H; Chu, D C

    2000-10-01

    Para-Bombay phenotype, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 8000 in Taiwanese residents based on serological analysis, is caused by aberrant alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase function and hence diminished H-antigen synthesis. In an individual with para-Bombay phenotype, DNA sequencing revealed two missense mutations previously reported C658T mutation and a novel G659A mutation. Haplotype analysis with restriction enzyme digestion showed that the two mutations are located on opposing alleles of the H (FUT1) gene and lead to compound heterozygosity. Since no other known genetic changes were evident, it appears that the new missense mutation, G659A, is deleterious to the alpha(1,2)-fucosyltransferase function encoded by the H (FUT1) gene.

  2. Bioinformatic Analysis of Deleterious Non-Synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (nsSNPs in the Coding Regions of Human Prion Protein Gene (PRNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Bamdad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Single nucleotide polymorphisms are the cause of genetic variation to living organisms. Single nucleotide polymorphisms alter residues in the protein sequence. In this investigation, the relationship between prion protein gene polymorphisms and its relevance to pathogenicity was studied. Material & Method: Amino acid sequence of the main isoform from the human prion protein gene (PRNP was extracted from UniProt database and evaluated by FoldAmyloid and AmylPred servers. All non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs from SNP database (dbSNP were further analyzed by bioinformatics servers including SIFT, PolyPhen-2, I-Mutant-3.0, PANTHER, SNPs & GO, PHD-SNP, Meta-SNP, and MutPred to determine the most damaging nsSNPs. Results: The results of the first structure analyses by FoldAmyloid and AmylPerd servers implied that regions including 5-15, 174-178, 180-184, 211-217, and 240-252 were the most sensitive parts of the protein sequence to amyloidosis. Screening all nsSNPs of the main protein isoform using bioinformatic servers revealed that substitution of Aspartic acid with Valine at position 178 (ID code: rs11538766 was the most deleterious nsSNP in the protein structure. Conclusion:  Substitution of the Aspartic acid with Valine at position 178 (D178V was the most pathogenic mutation in the human prion protein gene. Analyses from the MutPred server also showed that beta-sheets’ increment in the secondary structure was the main reason behind the molecular mechanism of the prion protein aggregation.

  3. Accumulation by Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büscher, Bram; Fletcher, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Following the financial crisis and its aftermath, it is clear that the inherent contradictions of capitalist accumulation have become even more intense and plunged the global economy into unprecedented turmoil and urgency. Governments, business leaders and other elite agents are frantically searchin

  4. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  5. Duration of sexual harassment and generalized harassment in the workplace over ten years: effects on deleterious drinking outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Meredith; Richman, Judith A; Rospenda, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Although harassment in the workplace has been linked to deleterious drinking outcomes, researchers have yet to examine the long-term effects of chronic workplace harassment. During a 10-year longitudinal mail survey, university employees (N = 2,265) were administered measures of sexual harassment, generalized workplace harassment, and problematic drinking. Using growth mixture modeling, two latent classes of workplace harassment emerged: infrequent and chronic. Demographic characteristics (gender, age, and race) predicted the shape of the trajectories and likelihood of class membership. As hypothesized, membership in the chronic harassment classes was linked to future problematic drinking, even after controlling for previous drinking.

  6. Vitamin E prevents deleterious effects of di (2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer used in PVC blood storage bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanya, C R; Gayathri, N S; Mithra, K; Nair, K V Neelakantan; Kurup, P A

    2004-09-01

    Vitamin E administration prevented DEHP induced deleterious effects like (i) degenerative changes in the brain and thyroid, (ii) decrease in the activity of neuronal membrane Na+ - K+ ATPase, (iii) decrease in the concentration of insulin, cortisol and TSH, and (iv) the increase in T3 and T4 in female Albino rats. The results suggest use of vitamin E to prevent harmful effects of repeated transfusion of DEHP containing blood as in thalassemia patient. The possibility of using vitamin E to prevent the harmful effects of repeated transfusion of DEHP containing blood, as in thalassemia patients, is discussed.

  7. N-CARBAMYLGLUTAMATE ENHANCEMENT OF UREAGENESIS LEADS TO DISCOVERY OF A NOVEL DELETERIOUS MUTATION IN A NEWLY DEFINED ENHANCER OF THE NAGS GENE AND TO EFFECTIVE THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Heibel, Sandra K.; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Caldovic, Ljubica; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Yudkoff, Marc; Tuchman, Mendel

    2011-01-01

    NAGS catalyzes the conversion of glutamate and acetyl-CoA to N-acetylglutamate (NAG) the essential allosteric activator of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, the first urea cycle enzyme in mammals. A 17-year-old female with recurrent hyperammonemia attacks, the cause of which remained undiagnosed for 8 years in spite of multiple molecular and biochemical investigations, showed markedly enhanced ureagenesis (measured by isotope incorporation) in response to N-carbamylglutamate (NCG). This led to...

  8. Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1980-01-01

    The AA in its final stage of construction, before it disappeared from view under concrete shielding. Antiprotons were first injected, stochastically cooled and accumulated in July 1980. From 1981 on, the AA provided antiprotons for collisions with protons, first in the ISR, then in the SPS Collider. From 1983 on, it also sent antiprotons, via the PS, to the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). The AA was dismantled in 1997 and shipped to Japan.

  9. Genome sequencing of normal cells reveals developmental lineages and mutational processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behjati, Sam; Huch, Meritxell; van Boxtel, Ruben; Karthaus, Wouter; Wedge, David C; Tamuri, Asif U; Martincorena, Iñigo; Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Roerink, Sophie; Blokker, Joyce; Maddison, Mark; Mudie, Laura; Robinson, Ben; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter; Goldman, Nick; van de Wetering, Marc; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans; Stratton, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The somatic mutations present in the genome of a cell accumulate over the lifetime of a multicellular organism. These mutations can provide insights into the developmental lineage tree, the number of divisions that each cell has undergone and the mutational processes that have been operative. Here w

  10. Mutational characteristics of ANK1 and SPTB genes in hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Jeong, D-C; Yoo, J; Jang, W; Chae, H; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Lee, J W; Chung, N-G; Kim, M; Kim, Y

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mutational characteristics in Korean hereditary spherocytosis (HS) patients. Relevant literatures including genetically confirmed cases with well-documented clinical summaries and relevant information were also reviewed to investigate the mutational gene- or domain-specific laboratory and clinical association. Twenty-five HS patients carried one heterozygous mutation of ANK1 (n = 13) or SPTB (n = 12) but not in SPTA1, SLC4A1, or EPB42. Deleterious mutations including frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations were identified in 91% (21/23), and non-hotspot mutations were dispersed across multiple exons. Genotype-phenotype correlation was clarified after combined analysis of the cases and the literature review; anemia was most severe in HS patients with mutations on the ANK1 spectrin-binding domain (p < 0.05), and SPTB mutations in HS patients spared the tetramerization domain in which mutations of hereditary elliptocytosis and pyropoikilocytosis are located. Splenectomy (17/75) was more frequent in ANK1 mutant HS (32%) than in HS with SPTB mutation (10%) (p = 0.028). Aplastic crisis occurred in 32.0% of the patients (8/25; 3 ANK1 and 5 SPTB), and parvovirus B19 was detected in 88%. The study clarifies ANK1 or SPTB mutational characteristics in HS Korean patients. The genetic association of laboratory and clinical aspects suggests comprehensive considerations for genetic-based management of HS.

  11. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  12. Synchronous lung tumours in a patient with metachronous colorectal carcinoma and a germline MSH2 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Canney, A

    2012-02-01

    Mutations of DNA mismatch repair genes are characterised by microsatellite instability and are implicated in carcinogenesis. This mutation susceptible phenotype has been extensively studied in patients with hereditary non-polyposis colon carcinoma, but little is known of the contribution of such mutations in other tumour types, particularly non-small-cell lung carcinoma. This report describes the occurrence of two synchronous lung tumours, one mimicking a metastatic colon carcinoma, in a male patient with a history of metachronous colonic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry supported a pulmonary origin for both lesions. Mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry showed loss of MSH2 and MSH6 expression in both colonic tumours and in one lung tumour showing enteric differentiation. Subsequent mutational analysis demonstrated a deleterious germline mutation of the MSH2 mismatch repair gene. The significance of these findings and the practical diagnostic difficulties encountered in this case are discussed.

  13. Oxidative Stress Is Related to the Deleterious Effects of Heme Oxygenase-1 in an In Vivo Neuroinflammatory Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Tronel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction is associated with beneficial or deleterious effects depending on the experimental conditions adopted and the neurodegenerative rodent models used. The present study aimed first to evaluate the effects of cerebral HO-1 induction in an in vivo rat model of neuroinflammation by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA and secondly to explore the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS and free iron (Fe2+ derived from heme catabolism promoted by HO-1. Chronic I.P. treatment with the HO-1 inductor and substrate hemin was responsible for a significant dose-related increase of cerebral HO-1 production. Brain tissue loss, microglial activation, and neuronal death were significantly higher in rats receiving QA plus hemin (H-QA versus QA and controls. Significant increase of ROS production in H-QA rat brain was inhibited by the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP which supports the idea that ROS level augmentation in hemin-treated animals is a direct consequence of HO-1 induction. The cerebral tissue loss and ROS level in hemin-treated rats receiving the iron chelator deferoxamine were significantly decreased, demonstrating the involvement of Fe2+in brain ROS production. Therefore, the deleterious effects of HO-1 expression in this in vivo neuroinflammatory model were linked to a hyperproduction of ROS, itself promoted by free iron liberation.

  14. Complex deleterious interactions associated with malic enzyme may contribute to reproductive isolation in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Willett

    Full Text Available Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities can result from the interactions of more than a single pair of interacting genes and there are several different models of how such complex interactions can be structured. Previous empirical work has identified complex conspecific epistasis as a form of complex interaction that has contributed to postzygotic reproductive isolation between taxa, but other forms of complexity are also possible. Here, I probe the genetic basis of reproductive isolation in crosses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus by looking at the impact of markers in genes encoding metabolic enzymes in F(2 hybrids. The region of the genome associated with the locus ME2 is shown to have strong, repeatable impacts on the fitness of hybrids in crosses and epistatic interactions with another chromosomal region marked by the GOT2 locus in one set of crosses. In a cross between one of these populations and a third population, these two regions do not appear to interact despite the continuation of a large effect of the ME2 region itself in both crosses. The combined results suggest that the ME2 chromosomal region is involved in incompatibilities with several unique partners. If these deleterious interactions all stem from the same factor in this region, that would suggest a different form of complexity from complex conspecific epistasis, namely, multiple independent deleterious interactions stemming from the same factor. Confirmation of this idea will require more fine-scale mapping of the interactions of the ME2 region of the genome.

  15. Complex deleterious interactions associated with malic enzyme may contribute to reproductive isolation in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities can result from the interactions of more than a single pair of interacting genes and there are several different models of how such complex interactions can be structured. Previous empirical work has identified complex conspecific epistasis as a form of complex interaction that has contributed to postzygotic reproductive isolation between taxa, but other forms of complexity are also possible. Here, I probe the genetic basis of reproductive isolation in crosses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus by looking at the impact of markers in genes encoding metabolic enzymes in F(2) hybrids. The region of the genome associated with the locus ME2 is shown to have strong, repeatable impacts on the fitness of hybrids in crosses and epistatic interactions with another chromosomal region marked by the GOT2 locus in one set of crosses. In a cross between one of these populations and a third population, these two regions do not appear to interact despite the continuation of a large effect of the ME2 region itself in both crosses. The combined results suggest that the ME2 chromosomal region is involved in incompatibilities with several unique partners. If these deleterious interactions all stem from the same factor in this region, that would suggest a different form of complexity from complex conspecific epistasis, namely, multiple independent deleterious interactions stemming from the same factor. Confirmation of this idea will require more fine-scale mapping of the interactions of the ME2 region of the genome.

  16. Deleterious effects on MDAMB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cell lineage submitted to Ho-166 radioactive seeds at very low activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Patricia L.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Sarmento, Eduardo V. [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Cuperschmid, Ethel M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (CEMEMOR/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, BR (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Centro de Memoria da Medicina

    2011-07-01

    Herein, the deleterious effect of ionizing radiation provided by Ho-166 radioactive seeds at low activity were addressed, based on experimental in vitro assays at the MDA MB231 cell lineage, a breast adenocarcinoma, compared to PBMC - peripheral blood cells. The methodology involves of the MDBMB-231 and PBMC expansion in culture in suitable environment in 30mm well plates and T-25 flasks. Seeds were synthesized with Ho-165 incorporated and characterized previously. Activation was processed at IPR1 reactor at the peripheral table, at 8h exposition. Three groups of seeds were tested: 0,34 mCi, 0,12 mCi activity, and control group. Such seeds were placed on culture and held to a period of 05 half-lives of the radionuclide. The biological responses at these exposure were documented by inverse microscopic photographic in time. Also, MTT essay were performed. A fast response in producing deleterious effects at cancer cell was observed even if for the low activity seeds. Also, a biological response dependent to a radial distance of the seed was observed. At conclusion, viability clonogenic control of MDAMB231 is identified at the exposition to Ho-166 ceramic seeds, even if at low activity of 0,1 to 0,3mCi. (author)

  17. Deleterious role of trace elements - Silica and lead in the development of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Starlaine; Mutnuri, Srikanth; Ganguly, Anasuya

    2017-06-01

    -levels, by apoptosis-mediated-cell-death resulting in tubular-atrophy, interstitial-fibrosis and irreversible renal-damage (CKD). Thus this study provides novel-insights into nephrotoxic-potential of trace-geogenic-element-silica in CKDu causation. It highlights direct-indirect nephrotoxicity exhibited by lead at low-levels due to its bio-accumulative-capacity. Silica's nephrotoxic-potential can be considered when deciphering etiology of CKDu-problem in developing-countries (relying on groundwater). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sandy Chan; Sears, Renee L.; Lemos, Roberta R.; Quintáns, Beatriz; Huang, Alden; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Nevarez, Lisette; Mamah, Catherine; Zatz, Mayana; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Fullerton, Janice M.; Adair, John C.; Berner, Jon E.; Bower, Matthew; Brodaty, Henry; Carmona, Olga; Dobricić, Valerija; Fogel, Brent L.; García-Estevez, Daniel; Goldman, Jill; Goudreau, John L.; Hopfer, Suellen; Janković, Milena; Jaumà, Serge; Jen, Joanna C.; Kirdlarp, Suppachok; Klepper, Joerg; Kostić, Vladimir; Lang, Anthony E.; Linglart, Agnès; Maisenbacher, Melissa K.; Manyam, Bala V.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Miedzybrodzka, Zofia; Mitarnun, Witoon; Mitchell, Philip B.; Mueller, Jennifer; Novaković, Ivana; Paucar, Martin; Paulson, Henry; Simpson, Sheila A.; Svenningsson, Per; Tuite, Paul; Vitek, Jerrold; Wetchaphanphesat, Suppachok; Williams, Charles; Yang, Michele; Schofield, Peter R.; de Oliveira, João R. M.; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) or Fahr’s disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions, which is associated with neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms. Familial IBGC is genetically heterogeneous and typically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. We performed a mutational analysis of SLC20A2, the first gene found to cause IBGC, to assess its genetic contribution to familial IBGC. We recruited 218 subjects from 29 IBGC-affected families of varied ancestry and collected medical history, neurological exam, and head CT scans to characterize each patient’s disease status. We screened our patient cohort for mutations in SLC20A2. Twelve novel (nonsense, deletions, missense, and splice site) potentially pathogenic variants, one synonymous variant, and one previously reported mutation were identified in 13 families. Variants predicted to be deleterious cosegregated with disease in five families. Three families showed nonsegregation with clinical disease of such variants, but retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging data strongly suggested previous misclassification. Overall, mutations in SLC20A2 account for as many as 41 % of our familial IBGC cases. Our screen in a large series expands the catalog of SLC20A2 mutations identified to date and demonstrates that mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial IBGC. Non-perfect segregation patterns of predicted deleterious variants highlight the challenges of phenotypic assessment in this condition with highly variable clinical presentation. PMID:23334463

  19. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Calabrese, Peter; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Shinde, Deepali Narendra; Yoon, Song-Ro; Gelfand, David; Bauer, Keith; Arnheim, Norman

    2007-09-01

    The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G) in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3) to >10(4) times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6)) the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model). This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp) carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation deleterious to an

  20. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    deleterious to an offspring, thereby unfavorably altering the mutational load in humans. Studying the anatomical distribution of germline mutations can provide new insights into genetic disease and evolutionary change.

  1. Genome-wide survey of artificial mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma rays in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and gamma irradiation in the tomato Micro-Tom genome were identified by a whole-genome shotgun sequencing analysis to estimate the spectrum and distribution of whole-genome DNA mutations and the frequency of deleterious mutations. A total of ~370 Gb of paired-end reads for four EMS-induced mutants and three gamma-ray-irradiated lines as well as a wild-type line were obtained by next-generation sequencing technology. Using bioinformatics analyses, we identified 5920 induced single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. The predominant mutations in the EMS mutants were C/G to T/A transitions, while in the gamma-ray mutants, C/G to T/A transitions, A/T to T/A transversions, A/T to G/C transitions and deletion mutations were equally common. Biases in the base composition flanking mutations differed between the mutagenesis types. Regarding the effects of the mutations on gene function, >90% of the mutations were located in intergenic regions, and only 0.2% were deleterious. In addition, we detected 1,140,687 spontaneous single nucleotide polymorphisms and indel polymorphisms in wild-type Micro-Tom lines. We also found copy number variation, deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments in both the mutant and wild-type lines. The results provide helpful information not only for mutation research, but also for mutant screening methodology with reverse-genetic approaches.

  2. The Slavic NBN Founder Mutation: A Role for Reproductive Fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemanova, Eva; Varon, Raymonda; Vejvalka, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H.; Digweed, Martin; Resnick, Igor; Kremensky, Ivo; Saar, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Karbasiyan, Mohsen; Ghani, Mehdi; Barić, Ivo; Tekin, Mustafa; Kovacs, Peter; Krawczak, Michael; Reis, André; Sperling, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are of Slavic origin and carry a deleterious deletion (c.657del5; rs587776650) in the NBN gene on chromosome 8q21. This mutation is essentially confined to Slavic populations and may thus be considered a Slavic founder mutation. Notably, not a single parenthood of a homozygous c.657del5 carrier has been reported to date, while heterozygous carriers do reproduce but have an increased cancer risk. These observations seem to conflict with the considerable carrier frequency of c.657del5 of 0.5% to 1% as observed in different Slavic populations because deleterious mutations would be eliminated quite rapidly by purifying selection. Therefore, we propose that heterozygous c.657del5 carriers have increased reproductive success, i.e., that the mutation confers heterozygote advantage. In fact, in our cohort study of the reproductive history of 24 NBS pedigrees from the Czech Republic, we observed that female carriers gave birth to more children on average than female non-carriers, while no such reproductive differences were observed for males. We also estimate that c.657del5 likely occurred less than 300 generations ago, thus supporting the view that the original mutation predated the historic split and subsequent spread of the ‘Slavic people’. We surmise that the higher fertility of female c.657del5 carriers reflects a lower miscarriage rate in these women, thereby reflecting the role of the NBN gene product, nibrin, in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and their processing in immune gene rearrangements, telomere maintenance, and meiotic recombination, akin to the previously described role of the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. PMID:27936167

  3. The Mutational Landscape of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals an Interacting Network of Co-Occurrences and Recurrent Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Ibáñez

    Full Text Available Preliminary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL whole exome sequencing (WES studies have identified a huge number of somatic mutations affecting more than a hundred different genes mainly in a non-recurrent manner, suggesting that APL is a heterogeneous disease with secondary relevant changes not yet defined. To extend our knowledge of subtle genetic alterations involved in APL that might cooperate with PML/RARA in the leukemogenic process, we performed a comprehensive analysis of somatic mutations in APL combining WES with sequencing of a custom panel of targeted genes by next-generation sequencing. To select a reduced subset of high confidence candidate driver genes, further in silico analysis were carried out. After prioritization and network analysis we found recurrent deleterious mutations in 8 individual genes (STAG2, U2AF1, SMC1A, USP9X, IKZF1, LYN, MYCBP2 and PTPN11 with a strong potential of being involved in APL pathogenesis. Our network analysis of multiple mutations provides a reliable approach to prioritize genes for additional analysis, improving our knowledge of the leukemogenesis interactome. Additionally, we have defined a functional module in the interactome of APL. The hypothesis is that the number, or the specific combinations, of mutations harbored in each patient might not be as important as the disturbance caused in biological key functions, triggered by several not necessarily recurrent mutations.

  4. The Mutational Landscape of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals an Interacting Network of Co-Occurrences and Recurrent Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Mariam; Carbonell-Caballero, José; García-Alonso, Luz; Such, Esperanza; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Vidal, Enrique; Barragán, Eva; López-Pavía, María; LLop, Marta; Martín, Iván; Gómez-Seguí, Inés; Montesinos, Pau; Sanz, Miguel A; Dopazo, Joaquín; Cervera, José

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have identified a huge number of somatic mutations affecting more than a hundred different genes mainly in a non-recurrent manner, suggesting that APL is a heterogeneous disease with secondary relevant changes not yet defined. To extend our knowledge of subtle genetic alterations involved in APL that might cooperate with PML/RARA in the leukemogenic process, we performed a comprehensive analysis of somatic mutations in APL combining WES with sequencing of a custom panel of targeted genes by next-generation sequencing. To select a reduced subset of high confidence candidate driver genes, further in silico analysis were carried out. After prioritization and network analysis we found recurrent deleterious mutations in 8 individual genes (STAG2, U2AF1, SMC1A, USP9X, IKZF1, LYN, MYCBP2 and PTPN11) with a strong potential of being involved in APL pathogenesis. Our network analysis of multiple mutations provides a reliable approach to prioritize genes for additional analysis, improving our knowledge of the leukemogenesis interactome. Additionally, we have defined a functional module in the interactome of APL. The hypothesis is that the number, or the specific combinations, of mutations harbored in each patient might not be as important as the disturbance caused in biological key functions, triggered by several not necessarily recurrent mutations.

  5. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  6. Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażej, Paweł; Miasojedow, Błażej; Grabińska, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Most mutations are deleterious and require energetically costly repairs. Therefore, it seems that any minimization of mutation rate is beneficial. On the other hand, mutations generate genetic diversity indispensable for evolution and adaptation of organisms to changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is expected that a spontaneous mutational pressure should be an optimal compromise between these two extremes. In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. The artificial matrices were optimized on real protein-coding sequences based on Evolutionary Strategies approach to minimize or maximize the probability of non-synonymous substitutions and costs of amino acid replacements depending on their physicochemical properties. The results show that the empirical matrices have a tendency to minimize the effects of mutations rather than maximize their costs on the amino acid level. They were also similar to the optimized artificial matrices in the nucleotide substitution pattern, especially the high transitions/transversions ratio. We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. The findings indicate that the empirical mutational matrices are rather adapted to minimize mutational costs in the studied organisms in comparison to other matrices with similar mathematical constraints.

  7. Computational and molecular approaches for predicting unreported causal missense mutations in Belgian patients with haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannoy, N; Abinet, I; Bosmans, A; Lambert, C; Vermylen, C; Hermans, C

    2012-05-01

    Haemophilia A (HA) is caused by widespread mutations in the factor VIII gene. The high spontaneous mutation rate of this gene means that roughly 40% of HA mutations are private. This study aimed to describe the approaches used to confirm private disease-causing mutations in a cohort of Belgian HA patients. We studied 148 unrelated HA families for the presence of intron 22 and intron 1 inversion by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay was used to detect large genomic rearrangements. Detection of point mutations was performed by DNA sequencing. Predicting the causal impact of new non-synonymous changes was studied by two general strategies: (i) molecular approaches such as family cosegregation, evaluation of the implicated codon based on phylogenic separated species and absence of the mutation in the general Belgian population, and (ii) bioinformatics approaches to analyse the potential functional consequences of missense mutations. Among the 148 HA patients, in addition to common intron 22 and intron 1 inversions as well as large deletions or duplications, 67 different point mutations were identified, of which 42 had been reported in the HAMSTeRS database, and 25 were novel including 10 null variants for which RNA analyses confirmed the causal effect of mutations located in a splice site consensus and 15 missense mutations whose causality was demonstrated by molecular approaches and bioinformatics. This article reports several strategies to evaluate the deleterious consequences of unreported F8 substitutions in a large cohort of HA patients.

  8. Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Błażej

    Full Text Available Most mutations are deleterious and require energetically costly repairs. Therefore, it seems that any minimization of mutation rate is beneficial. On the other hand, mutations generate genetic diversity indispensable for evolution and adaptation of organisms to changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is expected that a spontaneous mutational pressure should be an optimal compromise between these two extremes. In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. The artificial matrices were optimized on real protein-coding sequences based on Evolutionary Strategies approach to minimize or maximize the probability of non-synonymous substitutions and costs of amino acid replacements depending on their physicochemical properties. The results show that the empirical matrices have a tendency to minimize the effects of mutations rather than maximize their costs on the amino acid level. They were also similar to the optimized artificial matrices in the nucleotide substitution pattern, especially the high transitions/transversions ratio. We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. The findings indicate that the empirical mutational matrices are rather adapted to minimize mutational costs in the studied organisms in comparison to other matrices with similar mathematical constraints.

  9. The effect of induced mutations on quantitative traits in Arabidopsis thaliana: Natural versus artificial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Frank W; Fenster, Charles B

    2016-12-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of all genetic variations. New mutations are expected to affect quantitative traits differently depending on the extent to which traits contribute to fitness and the environment in which they are tested. The dogma is that the preponderance of mutations affecting fitness will be skewed toward deleterious while their effects on nonfitness traits will be bidirectionally distributed. There are mixed views on the role of stress in modulating these effects. We quantify mutation effects by inducing mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia accession) using the chemical ethylmethane sulfonate. We measured the effects of new mutations relative to a premutation founder for fitness components under both natural (field) and artificial (growth room) conditions. Additionally, we measured three other quantitative traits, not expected to contribute directly to fitness, under artificial conditions. We found that induced mutations were equally as likely to increase as decrease a trait when that trait was not closely related to fitness (traits that were neither survivorship nor reproduction). We also found that new mutations were more likely to decrease fitness or fitness-related traits under more stressful field conditions than under relatively benign artificial conditions. In the benign condition, the effect of new mutations on fitness components was similar to traits not as closely related to fitness. These results highlight the importance of measuring the effects of new mutations on fitness and other traits under a range of conditions.

  10. Polymorphism, recombination, and mutations in HIV type 1 gag-infecting Peruvian male sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Carlos Augusto; Salvatierra, Javier; Quijano, Eberth

    2008-11-01

    HIV genetic diversity in female sex workers (FSW) has been previously described in Peru; however this information is not yet available for male sex workers (MSW). Therefore, purified peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 147 HIV-infected subjects identified as MSW and FSW was used to amplify a 460-bp fragment corresponding to the p24-p7 region of the gag gene. The PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes to identify genetic polymorphism. Later, a random group of samples (n = 19) was sequenced to perform phylogenetic analysis, intragenic recombination analysis, and deleterious mutations leading to a nonfunctional protein in conservative regions of the Gag protein. RFLP analysis revealed 11 genetic variants for AluI and five for MspI. A group of nonsex workers (NSW) used for comparison showed different RFLP genetic variant distributions. Of interest, nine cases of mixed genetic variants were observed for MSW, one case for FSW, and none for NSW. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all HIV-1 species were subtype B. Intragenic recombination analysis showed a B/C recombination case from an FSW (boostrap = 1000; p value < 0.05). Of interest, deleterious mutations were observed in three cases of conservative D2 zinc domains for Gag 3/19 and one case of the high homology region (1/19). This study shows that gag of HIV circulating from MSW has high genetic polymorphism involving deleterious mutations in conserved domains from the p24-p7 gag region.

  11. The three faces of riboviral spontaneous mutation: spectrum, mode of genome replication, and mutation rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad García-Villada

    Full Text Available Riboviruses (RNA viruses without DNA replication intermediates are the most abundant pathogens infecting animals and plants. Only a few riboviral infections can be controlled with antiviral drugs, mainly because of the rapid appearance of resistance mutations. Little reliable information is available concerning i kinds and relative frequencies of mutations (the mutational spectrum, ii mode of genome replication and mutation accumulation, and iii rates of spontaneous mutation. To illuminate these issues, we developed a model in vivo system based on phage Qß infecting its natural host, Escherichia coli. The Qß RT gene encoding the Read-Through protein was used as a mutation reporter. To reduce uncertainties in mutation frequencies due to selection, the experimental Qß populations were established after a single cycle of infection and selection against RT(- mutants during phage growth was ameliorated by plasmid-based RT complementation in trans. The dynamics of Qß genome replication were confirmed to reflect the linear process of iterative copying (the stamping-machine mode. A total of 32 RT mutants were detected among 7,517 Qß isolates. Sequencing analysis of 45 RT mutations revealed a spectrum dominated by 39 transitions, plus 4 transversions and 2 indels. A clear template•primer mismatch bias was observed: A•C>C•A>U•G>G•U> transversion mismatches. The average mutation rate per base replication was ≈9.1×10(-6 for base substitutions and ≈2.3×10(-7 for indels. The estimated mutation rate per genome replication, μ(g, was ≈0.04 (or, per phage generation, ≈0.08, although secondary RT mutations arose during the growth of some RT mutants at a rate about 7-fold higher, signaling the possible impact of transitory bouts of hypermutation. These results are contrasted with those previously reported for other riboviruses to depict the current state of the art in riboviral mutagenesis.

  12. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Section 06 - 08*) of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A vacuum-tank, two bending magnets (BST06 and BST07 in blue) with a quadrupole (QDN07, in red) in between, another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and a further tank . The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of BST06 contained the stack core pickup for stochastic cooling (see 7906193, 7906190, 8005051), the two other tanks served mainly as vacuum chambers in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on BST06. *) see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984)

  13. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  14. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  15. Contribution of Germline Mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D Genes to Ovarian Cancer in the Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Honglin; Dicks, Ed; Ramus, Susan J;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D genes to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population and in a screening trial of individuals at high risk of ovarian cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The coding s...

  16. Tongue-placed tactile biofeedback suppresses the deleterious effects of muscle fatigue on joint position sense at the ankle

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Whereas the acuity of the position sense at the ankle can be disturbed by muscle fatigue, it recently also has been shown to be improved, under normal ankle neuromuscular state, through the use of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback. The underlying principle of this biofeedback consisted of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of their matching ankle position relative to their reference ankle position through electrotactile stimulation of the tongue. Within this context, the purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether this biofeedback could mitigate the deleterious effect of muscle fatigue on joint position sense at the ankle. To address this objective, sixteen young healthy university students were asked to perform an active ankle-matching task in two conditions of No-fatigue and Fatigue of the ankle muscles and two conditions of No-biofeedback and Biofeedback. Measures of the overall accuracy and the variability of the positioning were determin...

  17. Bounding The Rate of Adaptation In A Large Asexually Reproducing Population With Fast Mutation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We consider a model of asexually reproducing individuals. The birth and death rates of the individuals are affected by a fitness parameter. The rate of mutations that cause the fitnesses to change is proportional to the population size, $N$. The mutations may be either beneficial or deleterious. In a paper by Yu, Etheridge and Cuthbertson (2009) it was shown that the average rate at which the mean fitness increases in this model is bounded below by $\\log^{1-\\delta} N$ for any $\\delta > 0$. We achieve an upper bound on the average rate at which the mean fitness increases of $O(\\log N/\\log \\log N)$.

  18. Modeling Impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    personalize” the management and treatment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, to enhance the quality of life of women who harbor deleterious mutations. Supported by DAMD W81XWH-10-1-0720 to MEK. ...lines, called MCK cells, from women opting for prophylactic mastectomy . These lines have been isolated from pre-neoplastic breast tissue that is not...breast cancer have been identified. We proposed to create a model system of BRCA1 and BRCA2 heterozygous cell lines from women opting for prophylactic

  19. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K; Al-Obaisi, Khadija A S; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2016-09-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost-effective screening strategy.

  20. Robustness and epistasis in mutation-selection models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Andrea; Krug, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the fitness advantage associated with the robustness of a phenotype against deleterious mutations using deterministic mutation-selection models of a quasispecies type equipped with a mesa-shaped fitness landscape. We obtain analytic results for the robustness effect which become exact in the limit of infinite sequence length. Thereby, we are able to clarify a seeming contradiction between recent rigorous work and an earlier heuristic treatment based on mapping to a Schrödinger equation. We exploit the quantum mechanical analogy to calculate a correction term for finite sequence lengths and verify our analytic results by numerical studies. In addition, we investigate the occurrence of an error threshold for a general class of epistatic landscapes and show that diminishing epistasis is a necessary but not sufficient condition for error threshold behaviour.

  1. Rapid detection of common mutations in the arylsulfatase A gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter-Mackie, M.B. [Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)]|[CPRI, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease results from a deficiency of arylsulfatase A activity. This disease is usually fatal within a few years of onset in the pediatric age group. A pseuodeficiency occurs in up to 15% of alleles in the general population which significantly decreases enzyme activity. Although there is no clinical phenotype associated with the pseudodeficiency, the decreased enzyme activity can complicate interpretation of biochemical assay results particularly in the case of potential heterozygous carriers of MLD. Two mutations have been found to be simultaneously associated with the pseudodeficiency: one at a glycosylatin site in exon 6 and one in the polyA addition signal. Another mutation, the `I` allele has been reported in up to 50% of alleles in the severe infantile onset form of MLD. The deleterious mutation in this case is in the +1 position of intron 2. In order to screen for these commonly occurring mutations in the arylsulfatase A gene, a simple combination of PCR amplification from genomic DNA and restriction enzyme digestions was developed for each situation. In the case of the pseuodeficiency mutations, oligonucleotide primers were designed which incorporated a single base mismatch 3 bases upstream from the 3{prime} end of the primer so that the presence of the mutation created new MaeIII restriction site in the case of the glycosylation site or an RsaI site in the case of the polyA site. The `I` allele mutation creates a new MvaI site without the use of mismatches. These tests have successfully detected the mutations in individuals suspected of having the pseudodeficiency on the basis of biochemical assay. The `I` allele was detected in 1 of 16 MLD alleles analyzed.

  2. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Kishimoto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated lineages. The cells from the continuously fitness-increasing evolutionary process were subjected to genome sequencing and analyzed at both the population and single-colony levels. Although the dynamics of genome mutation fixation were complicated by the combination of the stochastic appearance of adaptive mutations and clonal interference, the mutation fixation in the population was simply linear over generations. Each genome in the population accumulated 1.6 synonymous and 3.1 non-synonymous neutral mutations, on average, by the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate, while only a single genome in the population occasionally acquired an adaptive mutation. The neutral mutations that preexisted on the single genome hitchhiked on the domination of the adaptive mutation. The successive fixation processes of the 128 mutations demonstrated that hitchhiking and not genetic drift were responsible for the coincidence of the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate in the genome with the fixation rate of neutral mutations in the population. The molecular clock of neutral mutations to the fitness-increasing evolution suggests that the numerous neutral mutations observed in molecular phylogenetic trees may not always have been fixed in fitness-steady evolution but in adaptive evolution.

  3. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Toshihiko; Ying, Bei-Wen; Tsuru, Saburo; Iijima, Leo; Suzuki, Shingo; Hashimoto, Tomomi; Oyake, Ayana; Kobayashi, Hisaka; Someya, Yuki; Narisawa, Dai; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated lineages. The cells from the continuously fitness-increasing evolutionary process were subjected to genome sequencing and analyzed at both the population and single-colony levels. Although the dynamics of genome mutation fixation were complicated by the combination of the stochastic appearance of adaptive mutations and clonal interference, the mutation fixation in the population was simply linear over generations. Each genome in the population accumulated 1.6 synonymous and 3.1 non-synonymous neutral mutations, on average, by the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate, while only a single genome in the population occasionally acquired an adaptive mutation. The neutral mutations that preexisted on the single genome hitchhiked on the domination of the adaptive mutation. The successive fixation processes of the 128 mutations demonstrated that hitchhiking and not genetic drift were responsible for the coincidence of the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate in the genome with the fixation rate of neutral mutations in the population. The molecular clock of neutral mutations to the fitness-increasing evolution suggests that the numerous neutral mutations observed in molecular phylogenetic trees may not always have been fixed in fitness-steady evolution but in adaptive evolution.

  4. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  5. Maize Mutator transposon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijun WANG; Mingliang XU; Dexiang DENG; Yunlong BIAN

    2008-01-01

    Transposable elements are widely distributed in eukaryotes. Due to its high copy numbers, high forward mutation rate and preferential insertion into low-copy DNA sequences, among others, the Mutator system has been widely used as a mutagen in genomic research. The discovery, classification, transposition specificity and epige-netic regulation of Mutator transposons were described. The application of Mutator tagging in plant genomic research was also presented. The role of Mu-like elements in genome evolution was briefly depicted. Moreover, the direction of Mutator transposon research in the future was discussed.

  6. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  7. The Antiproton Accumulator (AA)

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A section of the AA where the dispersion (and hence the horizontal beam size) is large. One can distinguish (left to right): A large vacuum-tank, a quadrupole (QDN09*), a bending magnet (BST08), another vacuum-tank, a wide quadrupole (QFW08) and (in the background) a further bending magnet (BST08). The tanks are covered with heating tape for bake-out. The tank left of QDN09 contained the kickers for stochastic pre-cooling (see 790621, 8002234, 8002637X), the other one served mainly as vacuum chamber in the region where the beam was large. Peter Zettwoch works on QFW08. * see: H. Koziol, Antiproton Accumulator Parameter List, PS/AA/Note 84-2 (1984) See under 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261 and 8202324. For photos of the AA in different phases of completion (between 1979 and 1982) see: 7911303, 7911597X, 8004261, 8004608X, 8005563X, 8005565X, 8006716X, 8006722X, 8010939X, 8010941X, 8202324, 8202658X, 8203628X .

  8. ITER helium ash accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  9. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens – focus on cotton dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor

  10. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor) that cause

  11. Interpreting the Dependence of Mutation Rates on Age and Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyue Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations can originate from the chance misincorporation of nucleotides during DNA replication or from DNA lesions that arise between replication cycles and are not repaired correctly. We introduce a model that relates the source of mutations to their accumulation with cell divisions, providing a framework for understanding how mutation rates depend on sex, age, and cell division rate. We show that the accrual of mutations should track cell divisions not only when mutations are replicative in origin but also when they are non-replicative and repaired efficiently. One implication is that observations from diverse fields that to date have been interpreted as pointing to a replicative origin of most mutations could instead reflect the accumulation of mutations arising from endogenous reactions or exogenous mutagens. We further find that only mutations that arise from inefficiently repaired lesions will accrue according to absolute time; thus, unless life history traits co-vary, the phylogenetic "molecular clock" should not be expected to run steadily across species.

  12. Cancer-Associated IDH1 Mutations Produce 2-hydroxyglutarate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, L.; White, D; Gross, S; Bennett, B; Bittinger, M; Driggers, E; Fantin, V; Jang, H; Jin, S; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the enzyme cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are a common feature of a major subset of primary human brain cancers. These mutations occur at a single amino acid residue of the IDH1 active site, resulting in loss of the enzyme's ability to catalyse conversion of isocitrate to {alpha}-ketoglutarate. However, only a single copy of the gene is mutated in tumours, raising the possibility that the mutations do not result in a simple loss of function. Here we show that cancer-associated IDH1 mutations result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of {alpha}-ketoglutarate to R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Structural studies demonstrate that when arginine 132 is mutated to histidine, residues in the active site are shifted to produce structural changes consistent with reduced oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and acquisition of the ability to convert {alpha}-ketoglutarate to 2HG. Excess accumulation of 2HG has been shown to lead to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumours in patients with inborn errors of 2HG metabolism. Similarly, in human malignant gliomas harbouring IDH1 mutations, we find markedly elevated levels of 2HG. These data demonstrate that the IDH1 mutations result in production of the onco-metabolite 2HG, and indicate that the excess 2HG which accumulates in vivo contributes to the formation and malignant progression of gliomas.

  13. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Yilmaz, Engin

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy. PMID:21903995

  14. Exome sequencing reveals cubilin mutation as a single-gene cause of proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H; Yilmaz, Engin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-10-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B(12)-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy.

  15. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence and clinical characteristics of a population-based series of ovarian cancer cases from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, M.; Kjaer, S.K.; Cox, M.;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and associations with clinical correlates of disease in a population-based series of ovarian cancer cases from Denmark. METHODS: DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis were used to analyze...... the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for coding sequence mutations and large genomic rearrangements in 445 confirmed cases of ovarian cancer. We evaluated associations between mutation status and clinical characteristics, including cancer risks for first-degree relatives and clinicopathologic features of tumors....... RESULTS: Deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were identified in 26 cases; thus, mutations in these genes are responsible for at least 5.8% of ovarian cancer cases in this population. Five different mutations were identified in more than one individual, suggesting that they may be founder mutations...

  16. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  17. Mutation Rate at Commonly Used Forensic STR Loci: Paternity Testing Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Aşıcıoğlua

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Paternity tests are carried out by the analysis of hypervariable short tandem repeat DNA loci. These microsatellite sequences mutate at a higher rate than that of bulk DNA. The occurrence of germline mutations at STR loci posses problems in interpretation of resulting genetic profiles. We recently analyzed 59–159 parent/child allele transfers at 13 microsatellite loci. We identified 12 mutations in 7 microsatellite loci. No mutations were occurred in other 6 loci. The highest mutation rate was observed with 5 mutations at D8S1179 locus at different alleles. The event was always single repeat related. The mutation rate was between 0 and 1.5 x 10-2 per locus per gamete per generation. The mutation event is very crucial for forensic DNA testing and accumulation of STR mutation data is extremely important for genetic profile interpretation.

  18. Integrated optical fiber lattice accumulators

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, Adam F

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sigma-delta modulators track a signal by accumulating the error between an input signal and a feedback signal. The accumulated energy is amplitude analyzed by a comparator. The comparator output signal is fed back and subtracted from the input signal. This thesis is primarily concerned with designing accumulators for inclusion in an optical sigma-delta modulator. Fiber lattice structures with optical amplifiers are used to perform the...

  19. Prognostic impact of mismatch repair genes germline defects in colorectal cancer patients: are all mutations equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bianchi, Francesca; Belvederesi, Laura; Brugiati, Cristiana; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Del Prete, Michela; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome, caused by germline mutations in MisMatch Repair (MMR) genes, particularly in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Patients with LS seem to have a more favourable prognosis than those with sporadic CRC, although the prognostic impact of different mutation types is unknown. Aim of our study is to compare survival outcomes of different types of MMR mutations in patients with LS-related CRC. Methods 302 CRC patients were prospectively selected on the basis of Amsterdam or Revised Bethesda criteria to undergo genetic testing: direct sequencing of DNA and MLPA were used to examine the entire MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 coding sequence. Patients were classified as mutation-positive or negative according to the genetic testing result. Results A deleterious MMR mutation was found in 38/302 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher in mutation-positive vs mutation-negative patients (102.6 vs 77.7 months, HR:0.63, 95%CI:0.46–0.89, p = 0.0083). Different types of mutation were significantly related with OS: missense or splicing-site mutations were associated with better OS compared with rearrangement, frameshift or non-sense mutations (132.5 vs 82.5 months, HR:0.46, 95%CI:0.16–0.82, p = 0.0153). Conclusions Our study confirms improved OS for LS-patients compared with mutation-negative CRC patients. In addition, not all mutations could be considered equal: the better prognosis in CRC patients with MMR pathogenic missense or splicing site mutation could be due to different functional activity of the encoded MMR protein. This matter should be investigated by use of functional assays in the future. PMID:26485756

  20. Germline mutation analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 in Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohd Nizam Zahary; Gurjeet Kaur; Muhammad Radzi Abu Hassan; Harjinder Singh; Venkatesh R Naik; Ravindran Ankathil

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the protein expression profile of mismatch repair (MMR) genes in suspected cases of Lynch syndrome and to characterize the associated germline mutations.METHODS:Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples was performed to determine the protein expression profile of MMR protein.Germline mutation screening was carried out on peripheral blood samples.The entire exon regions of MLH1 and MSH2 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction,screened by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and analyzed by DNA sequencing to characterize the germline mutations.RESULTS:Three out of 34 tissue samples (8.8%) and four out of 34 tissue samples (11.8%) showed loss of nuclear staining by immunohistochemistry,indicating the absence of MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression in carcinoma cells,respectively.dHPLC analysis followed by DNA sequencing showed these samples to have germline mutations of MSH2 gene.However,no deleterious mutations were identified in any of the 19 exons or coding regions of MLH1 gene,but we were able to identify MLH1 promoter polymorphism,-93G >A (rs1800734),in 21 out of 34 patients (61.8%).We identified one novel mutation,transversion mutation c.2005G > C,which resulted in a missense mutation (Gly669Arg),a transversion mutation in exon 1,c.142G > T,which resulted in a nonsense mutation (Glu48Stop)and splice-site mutation,c.2006-6T > C,which was adjacent to exon 13 of MSH2 gene.CONCLUSION:Germline mutations were identified in four Malaysian Lynch syndrome patients.Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue proved to be a good pre-screening test before proceeding to germline mutation analysis of DNA MMR genes.

  1. Role of epistasis on the fixation probability of a non-mutator in an adapted asexual population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ananthu

    2016-10-21

    The mutation rate of a well adapted population is prone to reduction so as to have a lower mutational load. We aim to understand the role of epistatic interactions between the fitness affecting mutations in this process. Using a multitype branching process, the fixation probability of a single non-mutator emerging in a large asexual mutator population is analytically calculated here. The mutator population undergoes deleterious mutations at constant, but at a much higher rate than that of the non-mutator. We find that antagonistic epistasis lowers the chances of mutation rate reduction, while synergistic epistasis enhances it. Below a critical value of epistasis, the fixation probability behaves non-monotonically with variation in the mutation rate of the background population. Moreover, the variation of this critical value of the epistasis parameter with the strength of the mutator is discussed in the appendix. For synergistic epistasis, when selection is varied, the fixation probability reduces overall, with damped oscillations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative stress is not a major contributor to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

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    Leslie S Itsara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10(-5, an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations.

  3. Full-exon pyrosequencing screening of BRCA germline mutations in Mexican women with inherited breast and ovarian cancer.

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    Felipe Vaca-Paniagua

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer comprises 10% of all breast cancers. The most prevalent genes causing this pathology are BRCA1 and BRCA2 (breast cancer early onset 1 and 2, which also predispose to other cancers. Despite the outstanding relevance of genetic screening of BRCA deleterious variants in patients with a history of familial cancer, this practice is not common in Latin American public institutions. In this work we assessed mutations in the entire exonic and splice-site regions of BRCA in 39 patients with breast and ovarian cancer and with familial history of breast cancer or with clinical features suggestive for BRCA mutations by massive parallel pyrosequencing. First we evaluated the method with controls and found 41-485 reads per sequence in BRCA pathogenic mutations. Negative controls did not show deleterious variants, confirming the suitability of the approach. In patients diagnosed with cancer we found 4 novel deleterious mutations (c.2805_2808delAGAT and c.3124_3133delAGCAATATTA in BRCA1; c.2639_2640delTG and c.5114_5117delTAAA in BRCA2. The prevalence of BRCA mutations in these patients was 10.2%. Moreover, we discovered 16 variants with unknown clinical significance (11 in exons and 5 in introns; 4 were predicted as possibly pathogenic by in silico analyses, and 3 have not been described previously. This study illustrates how massive pyrosequencing technology can be applied to screen for BRCA mutations in the whole exonic and splice regions in patients with suspected BRCA-related cancers. This is the first effort to analyse the mutational status of BRCA genes on a Mexican-mestizo population by means of pyrosequencing.

  4. Novel mutations in PXDN cause microphthalmia and anterior segment dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Alex; Lao, Richard; Ling-Fung Tang, Paul; Wan, Eunice; Mayer, Wasima; Bardakjian, Tanya; Shaw, Gary M; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schneider, Adele; Slavotinek, Anne

    2015-03-01

    We used exome sequencing to study a non-consanguineous family with two children who had anterior segment dysgenesis, sclerocornea, microphthalmia, hypotonia and developmental delays. Sanger sequencing verified two Peroxidasin (PXDN) mutations in both sibs--a maternally inherited, nonsense mutation, c.1021C>T predicting p.(Arg341*), and a paternally inherited, 23-basepair deletion causing a frameshift and premature protein truncation, c.2375_2397del23, predicting p.(Leu792Hisfs*67). We re-examined exome data from 20 other patients with structural eye defects and identified two additional PXDN mutations in a sporadic male with bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts and anterior segment dysgenesis--a maternally inherited, frameshift mutation, c.1192delT, predicting p.(Tyr398Thrfs*40) and a paternally inherited, missense substitution that was predicted to be deleterious, c.947 A>C, predicting p.(Gln316Pro). Mutations in PXDN were previously reported in three families with congenital cataracts, microcornea, sclerocornea and developmental glaucoma. The gene is expressed in corneal epithelium and is secreted into the extracellular matrix. Defective peroxidasin has been shown to impair sulfilimine bond formation in collagen IV, a constituent of the basement membrane, implying that the eye defects result because of loss of basement membrane integrity in the developing eye. Our finding of a broader phenotype than previously appreciated for PXDN mutations is typical for exome-sequencing studies, which have proven to be highly effective for mutation detection in patients with atypical presentations. We conclude that PXDN sequencing should be considered in microphthalmia with anterior segment dysgenesis.

  5. Imipramine protects against the deleterious effects of chronic corticosterone on depression-like behavior, hippocampal reelin expression, and neuronal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Erin Y; Fournier, Neil M; Lussier, April L; Romay-Tallon, Raquel; Caruncho, Hector J; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2015-07-03

    We have hypothesized that a downregulation of reelin and deficient maturation of adult-born hippocampal neurons are important factors in the pathogenesis of depression. This hypothesis is based on previous work showing that depression-like behavior in rats treated with protracted corticosterone develops in concert with decreased dendritic complexity in newborn hippocampal granule neurons and decreased reelin expression in the proliferative subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In addition, heterozygous reeler mice with approximately 50% of normal brain levels of reelin are more vulnerable to the depressogenic effects of corticosterone than wild-type mice. The purpose of this experiment was to provide pharmacological validation for the link between reelin, neuronal maturation, and depression by examining whether the deleterious effects of corticosterone on these measures could be prevented by co-administration of the antidepressant imipramine. Rats received corticosterone injections, corticosterone injections plus either 10 or 15mg/kg imipramine injections, or vehicle injections for 21 consecutive days. They were then subjected to the forced swim test to assess depression-like behavior and sacrificed for immunohistochemical examination of immature neuron number and dendritic complexity and the presence of reelin+cells. We found that corticosterone increases depression-like behavior, decreases the number of reelin+cells in the subgranular zone, and decreases the number and complexity of immature neurons in the granule cell layer. All of these behavioral and cellular phenotypes were prevented by imipramine, providing further support for the idea that reelin is involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  6. BCG and BCG/DNAhsp65 Vaccinations Promote Protective Effects without Deleterious Consequences for Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

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    Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves Zorzella-Pezavento

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A prime-boost strategy conserving BCG is considered the most promising vaccine to control tuberculosis. A boost with a DNA vaccine containing the mycobacterial gene of a heat shock protein (pVAXhsp65 after BCG priming protected mice against experimental tuberculosis. However, anti-hsp65 immunity could worsen an autoimmune disease due to molecular mimicry. In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of a previous BCG or BCG/pVAXhsp65 immunization on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE development. Female Lewis rats were immunized with BCG or BCG followed by pVAXhsp65 boosters. The animals underwent EAE induction and were daily evaluated for weight loss and clinical score. They were euthanized during recovery phase to assess immune response and inflammatory infiltration at the central nervous system. Previous immunization did not aggravate or accelerate clinical score or weight loss. In addition, this procedure clearly decreased inflammation in the brain. BCG immunization modulated the host immune response by triggering a significant reduction in IL-10 and IFN-γ levels induced by myelin basic protein. These data indicated that vaccination protocols with BCG or BCG followed by boosters with pVAXhsp65 did not trigger a deleterious effect on EAE evolution.

  7. Three kinds of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Thomas, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    For a finite dimensional hereditary algebra, we consider: exceptional sequences in the category of finite dimensional modules, silting objects in the bounded derived category, and m-cluster tilting objects in the m-cluster category. There are mutation operations on both the set of m-cluster tilting objects and the set of exceptional sequences. It is also possible to define a mutation operation for silting objects. We compare these three different notions of mutation.

  8. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in Malaysian women with early-onset breast cancer without a family history.

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    Gaik Theng Toh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Asia, breast cancer is characterised by an early age of onset: In Malaysia, approximately 50% of cases occur in women under the age of 50 years. A proportion of these cases may be attributable, at least in part, to genetic components, but to date, the contribution of genetic components to breast cancer in many of Malaysia's ethnic groups has not been well-characterised. METHODOLOGY: Given that hereditary breast carcinoma is primarily due to germline mutations in one of two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, we have characterised the spectrum of BRCA mutations in a cohort of 37 individuals with early-onset disease (Mutational analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was conducted by full sequencing of all exons and intron-exon junctions. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we report a total of 14 BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 sequence alterations, of which eight are novel (3 BRCA1 and 5 BRCA2. One deleterious BRCA1 mutation and 2 deleterious BRCA2 mutations, all of which are novel mutations, were identified in 3 of 37 individuals. This represents a prevalence of 2.7% and 5.4% respectively, which is consistent with other studies in other Asian ethnic groups (4-9%.

  9. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

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    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  10. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

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    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  11. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  12. Late-onset episodic ataxia associated with SLC1A3 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Jen, Joanna C; Choi, Seo Young; Shin, Jin-Hong; Kim, Hyang-Sook; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2017-03-01

    Episodic ataxia type 6 (EA6) is caused by mutations in SLC1A3 that encodes excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1), a glial glutamate transporter. EAAT1 regulates the extent and durations of glutamate-mediated signal by the clearance of glutamate after synaptic release. In addition, EAAT1 also has an anion channel activity that prevents additional glutamate release. We identified a missense mutation in SLC1A3 in a family with EA. The proband exhibited typical EA2-like symptoms such as recurrent ataxia, slurred speech with a duration of several hours, interictal nystagmus and response to acetazolamide, but had late-onset age of sixth decade. Whole-exome sequencing detected a heterozygous c.1177G>A mutation in SLC1A3. This mutation predicted a substitution of isoleucine for a highly conserved valine residue in the seventh transmembrane domain of EAAT1. The mutation was not present in 100 controls, a large panel of in-house genome data and various mutation databases. Most functional prediction scores revealed to be deleterious. Same heterozygous mutation was identified in one clinically affected family member and two asymptomatic members. Our data expand the mutation spectrum of SLC1A3 and the clinical phenotype of EA6.

  13. Finnish Fanconi anemia mutations and hereditary predisposition to breast and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantere, T; Haanpää, M; Hanenberg, H; Schleutker, J; Kallioniemi, A; Kähkönen, M; Parto, K; Avela, K; Aittomäki, K; von Koskull, H; Hartikainen, J M; Kosma, V-M; Laasanen, S-L; Mannermaa, A; Pylkäs, K; Winqvist, R

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in downstream Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, BRCA2, PALB2, BRIP1 and RAD51C, explain part of the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility, but the contribution of other FA genes has remained questionable. Due to FA's rarity, the finding of recurrent deleterious FA mutations among breast cancer families is challenging. The use of founder populations, such as the Finns, could provide some advantage in this. Here, we have resolved complementation groups and causative mutations of five FA patients, representing the first mutation confirmed FA cases in Finland. These patients belonged to complementation groups FA-A (n = 3), FA-G (n = 1) and FA-I (n = 1). The prevalence of the six FA causing mutations was then studied in breast (n = 1840) and prostate (n = 565) cancer cohorts, and in matched controls (n = 1176 females, n = 469 males). All mutations were recurrent, but no significant association with cancer susceptibility was observed for any: the prevalence of FANCI c.2957_2969del and c.3041G>A mutations was even highest in healthy males (1.7%). This strengthens the exclusive role of downstream genes in cancer predisposition. From a clinical point of view, current results provide fundamental information of the mutations to be tested first in all suspected FA cases in Finland. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The role of population size, pleiotropy and fitness effects of mutations in the evolution of overlapping gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A

    2000-03-01

    Sheltered from deleterious mutations, genes with overlapping or partially redundant functions may be important sources of novel gene functions. While most partially redundant genes originated in gene duplications, it is much less clear why genes with overlapping functions have been retained, in some cases for hundreds of millions of years. A case in point is the many partially redundant genes in vertebrates, the result of ancient gene duplications in primitive chordates. Their persistence and ubiquity become surprising when it is considered that duplicate and original genes often diversify very rapidly, especially if the action of natural selection is involved. Are overlapping gene functions perhaps maintained because of their protective role against otherwise deleterious mutations? There are two principal objections against this hypothesis, which are the main subject of this article. First, because overlapping gene functions are maintained in populations by a slow process of "second order" selection, population sizes need to be very high for this process to be effective. It is shown that even in small populations, pleiotropic mutations that affect more than one of a gene's functions simultaneously can slow the mutational decay of functional overlap after a gene duplication by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, brief and transient increases in population size may be sufficient to maintain functional overlap. The second objection regards the fact that most naturally occurring mutations may have much weaker fitness effects than the rather drastic "knock-out" mutations that lead to detection of partially redundant functions. Given weak fitness effects of most mutations, is selection for the buffering effect of functional overlap strong enough to compensate for the diversifying force exerted by mutations? It is shown that the extent of functional overlap maintained in a population is not only independent of the mutation rate, but also independent of the average fitness

  15. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  16. Mitochondrial DNA: Radically free of free-radical driven mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Johanna H K; Stewart, James B

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA has long been posited as a likely target of oxidative damage induced mutation during the ageing process. Research over the past decades has uncovered the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in association with a mosaic pattern of cells displaying mitochondrial dysfunction in ageing individuals. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanisms are far less straightforward than originally anticipated. Recent research on mitochondria reveals that these genomes are far less helpless than originally envisioned. Additionally, new technologies have allowed us to analyze the mutational signatures of many more somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations, revealing surprising patterns that are inconsistent with a DNA-oxidative damage based hypothesis. In this review, we will discuss these recent observations and new insights into the eccentricities of mitochondrial genetics, and their impact on our understanding of mitochondrial mutations and their role in the ageing process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Aging.

  17. Desiccation induces accumulations of antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin in intertidal macro-alga Ulva pertusa (Chlorophyta.

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    Xiujun Xie

    Full Text Available For plants and algae, exposure to high light levels is deleterious to their photosynthetic machineries. It also can accelerate water evaporation and thus potentially lead to drought stress. Most photosynthetic organisms protect themselves against high light caused photodamages by xanthophyll cycle-dependent thermal energy dissipation. It is generally accepted that high light activates xanthophyll cycle. However, the relationship between xanthophyll cycle and drought stress remains ambiguous. Herein, Ulva pertusa (Chlorophyta, a representative perennial intertidal macro-algae species with high drought-tolerant capabilities and simple structures, was used to investigate the operation of xanthophyll cycle during desiccation in air. The results indicate that desiccation under dim light induced accumulation of antheraxanthin (Ax and zeaxanthin (Zx at the expense of violaxanthin (Vx. This accumulation could be arrested by dithiothreitol completely and by uncoupler (carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone partially, implying the participation of Vx de-epoxidase in conversion of Vx to Ax and Zx. Treatment with inhibitors of electron transport along thylakoid membrane, e.g. DCMU, PG and DBMIB, did not significantly arrest desiccation-induced accumulation of Ax and Zx. We propose that for U. pertusa, besides excess light, desiccation itself could also induce accumulation of Ax and Zx. This accumulation could proceed without electron transport along thylakoid membrane, and is possibly resulting from the reduction of thylakoid lumen volume during desiccation. Considering the pleiotropic effects of Ax and Zx, accumulated Ax and Zx may function in protecting thylakoid membrane and enhancing thermal quenching during emersion in air.

  18. Harnessing Mechanistic Knowledge on Beneficial Versus Deleterious IFN-I Effects to Design Innovative Immunotherapies Targeting Cytokine Activity to Specific Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Elena; Pollet, Emeline; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Uzé, Gilles; Dalod, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) were identified over 50 years ago as cytokines critical for host defense against viral infections. IFN-I promote anti-viral defense through two main mechanisms. First, IFN-I directly reinforce or induce de novo in potentially all cells the expression of effector molecules of intrinsic anti-viral immunity. Second, IFN-I orchestrate innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. However, IFN-I responses can be deleterious for the host in a number of circumstances, including secondary bacterial or fungal infections, several autoimmune diseases, and, paradoxically, certain chronic viral infections. We will review the proposed nature of protective versus deleterious IFN-I responses in selected diseases. Emphasis will be put on the potentially deleterious functions of IFN-I in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, and on the respective roles of IFN-I and IFN-III in promoting resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We will then discuss how the balance between beneficial versus deleterious IFN-I responses is modulated by several key parameters including (i) the subtypes and dose of IFN-I produced, (ii) the cell types affected by IFN-I, and (iii) the source and timing of IFN-I production. Finally, we will speculate how integration of this knowledge combined with advanced biochemical manipulation of the activity of the cytokines should allow designing innovative immunotherapeutic treatments in patients. Specifically, we will discuss how induction or blockade of specific IFN-I responses in targeted cell types could promote the beneficial functions of IFN-I and/or dampen their deleterious effects, in a manner adapted to each disease.

  19. Harnessing mechanistic knowledge on beneficial versus deleterious IFN-I effects to design innovative immunotherapies targeting cytokine activity to specific cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eDALOD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I were identified over 50 years ago as cytokines critical for host defense against viral infections. IFN-I promote antiviral defense through two main mechanisms. First, IFN-I directly reinforce or induce de novo in potentially all cells the expression of effector molecules of intrinsic antiviral immunity. Second, IFN-I orchestrate innate and adaptive antiviral immunity. However, IFN-I responses can be deleterious for the host in a number of circumstances, including secondary bacterial or fungal infections, several autoimmune diseases, and, paradoxically, certain chronic viral infections. We will review the proposed nature of protective versus deleterious IFN-I responses in selected diseases. Emphasis will be put on the potentially deleterious functions of IFN-I in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection, and on the respective roles of IFN-I and IFN-III in promoting resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. We will then discuss how the balance between beneficial versus deleterious IFN-I responses is modulated by several key parameters including i the subtypes and dose of IFN-I produced, ii the cell types affected by IFN-I and iii the source and timing of IFN-I production. Finally we will speculate how integration of this knowledge combined with advanced biochemical manipulation of the activity of the cytokines should allow designing innovative immunotherapeutic treatments in patients. Specifically, we will discuss how induction or blockade of specific IFN-I responses in targeted cell types could promote the beneficial functions of IFN-I and/or dampen their deleterious effects, in a manner adapted to each disease.

  20. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J; Getz, Wayne M; van Helden, Paul D; Zwaan, Bas J; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  1. Positive Selection of Deleterious Alleles through Interaction with a Sex-Ratio Suppressor Gene in African Buffalo: A Plausible New Mechanism for a High Frequency Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Pim; Greyling, Ben J.; Getz, Wayne M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Zwaan, Bas J.; Bastos, Armanda D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations), we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has important

  2. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  3. Mutations in DDX3X are a common cause of unexplained intellectual disability with gender-specific effects on wnt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Snijders Blok, Lot; Madsen, Erik; Juusola, Jane; Gilissen, Christian; Baralle, Diana; Reijnders, Margot R F; Venselaar, Hanka; Helsmoortel, Céline; Cho, Megan T.; Hoischen, Alexander; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Koemans, Tom S.; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn; Eichler, Evan E.; Romano, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) affects approximately 1%–3% of humans with a gender bias toward males. Previous studies have identified mutations in more than 100 genes on the X chromosome in males with ID, but there is less evidence for de novo mutations on the X chromosome causing ID in females. In this study we present 35 unique deleterious de novo mutations in DDX3X identified by whole exome sequencing in 38 females with ID and various other features including hypotonia, movement disorders, ...

  4. Deleterious effects of water-soluble fraction of petroleum, diesel and gasoline on marine pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ricardo Vieira [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Aquicultura, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Miranda-Filho, Kleber Campos, E-mail: kleber08@gmail.com [Instituto de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96210-030, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Gusmao, Emeline Pereira; Moreira, Caue Bonucci [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Aquicultura, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Romano, Luis Alberto; Sampaio, Luis Andre [Instituto de Oceanografia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Laboratorio de Piscicultura Estuarina e Marinha, CEP 96210-030, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2010-04-01

    Accidental discharges and oil spills are frequent around the world. Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons are considered one of the main pollutants of aquatic ecosystem. The importance of petroleum and refined fuels is notorious because today's society depends on them. Researches related to the toxic water-soluble fraction (WSF) of petroleum and derivatives to aquatic biota are scarce. For this reason, deleterious effects of WSF of Brazilian petroleum, automotive diesel and unleaded gasoline to marine pejerrey Odontesthes argentinensis larvae were studied employing toxicity tests and histopathological examination. Each WSF was generated in a laboratory by mixing four parts of seawater with one part of pollutant by approximately 22 h. Larvae were exposed during 96 h to different concentrations of WSF of petroleum, diesel, and gasoline, plus a control. After 96 h of exposure to the different WSFs, three larvae were sampled for histopathological studies. The median lethal concentration after 96 h (LC50) of exposure for WSF of petroleum was equal to 70.68%, it was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the values for WSF of diesel and gasoline, which were 13.46% and 5.48%, respectively. The histological examination of pejerrey larvae exposed to WSF of petroleum, diesel and gasoline after 96 h revealed a variety of lesions in the larvae. The gills, pseudobranchs and esophagus presented epithelial hyperplasia, and the liver presented dilatation of hepatic sinusoids, hepatocitomegaly, bi-nucleated and nuclear degeneration of hepatocytes, such as pyknotic nuclei. The acute toxicity of diesel and gasoline is at least fivefold higher than Brazilian petroleum. However, all toxicants induced histopathological abnormalities in pejerrey larvae. The results are of importance since much attention has been paid to large visible surfaces of petroleum spills instead of potential toxic effects of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons, which are more available to marine biota.

  5. Overexpression of human and fly frataxins in Drosophila provokes deleterious effects at biochemical, physiological and developmental levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Friedreich's ataxia (FA, the most frequent form of inherited ataxias in the Caucasian population, is caused by a reduced expression of frataxin, a highly conserved protein. Model organisms have contributed greatly in the efforts to decipher the function of frataxin; however, the precise function of this protein remains elusive. Overexpression studies are a useful approach to investigate the mechanistic actions of frataxin; however, the existing literature reports contradictory results. To further investigate the effect of frataxin overexpression, we analyzed the consequences of overexpressing human (FXN and fly (FH frataxins in Drosophila. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained transgenic flies that overexpressed human or fly frataxins in a general pattern and in different tissues using the UAS-GAL4 system. For both frataxins, we observed deleterious effects at the biochemical, histological and behavioral levels. Oxidative stress is a relevant factor in the frataxin overexpression phenotypes. Systemic frataxin overexpression reduces Drosophila viability and impairs the normal embryonic development of muscle and the peripheral nervous system. A reduction in the level of aconitase activity and a decrease in the level of NDUF3 were also observed in the transgenic flies that overexpressed frataxin. Frataxin overexpression in the nervous system reduces life span, impairs locomotor ability and causes brain degeneration. Frataxin aggregation and a misfolding of this protein have been shown not to be the mechanism that is responsible for the phenotypes that have been observed. Nevertheless, the expression of human frataxin rescues the aconitase activity in the fh knockdown mutant. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide in vivo evidence of a functional equivalence for human and fly frataxins and indicate that the control of frataxin expression is important for treatments that aim to increase frataxin levels.

  6. Overexpression of Human and Fly Frataxins in Drosophila Provokes Deleterious Effects at Biochemical, Physiological and Developmental Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Sirena; Botella, José A.; Schneuwly, Stephan; Martínez-Sebastián, María J.; Moltó, María D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Friedreich's ataxia (FA), the most frequent form of inherited ataxias in the Caucasian population, is caused by a reduced expression of frataxin, a highly conserved protein. Model organisms have contributed greatly in the efforts to decipher the function of frataxin; however, the precise function of this protein remains elusive. Overexpression studies are a useful approach to investigate the mechanistic actions of frataxin; however, the existing literature reports contradictory results. To further investigate the effect of frataxin overexpression, we analyzed the consequences of overexpressing human (FXN) and fly (FH) frataxins in Drosophila. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained transgenic flies that overexpressed human or fly frataxins in a general pattern and in different tissues using the UAS-GAL4 system. For both frataxins, we observed deleterious effects at the biochemical, histological and behavioral levels. Oxidative stress is a relevant factor in the frataxin overexpression phenotypes. Systemic frataxin overexpression reduces Drosophila viability and impairs the normal embryonic development of muscle and the peripheral nervous system. A reduction in the level of aconitase activity and a decrease in the level of NDUF3 were also observed in the transgenic flies that overexpressed frataxin. Frataxin overexpression in the nervous system reduces life span, impairs locomotor ability and causes brain degeneration. Frataxin aggregation and a misfolding of this protein have been shown not to be the mechanism that is responsible for the phenotypes that have been observed. Nevertheless, the expression of human frataxin rescues the aconitase activity in the fh knockdown mutant. Conclusion/Significance Our results provide in vivo evidence of a functional equivalence for human and fly frataxins and indicate that the control of frataxin expression is important for treatments that aim to increase frataxin levels. PMID:21779322

  7. Dose-dependent deleterious and salutary actions of the Nrf2 inducer dh404 in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Farzaneh, Seyed H; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the progression and complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are, in part, due to impairment of the Nrf2 system, which regulates the expression of antioxidant and detoxifying molecules. Natural Nrf2-inducing phytochemicals have been shown to ameliorate kidney disease in experimental animals. However, owing to adverse outcomes a clinical trial of a synthetic Nrf2 activator, bardoxolone methyl (BARD), in CKD patients was terminated. BARD activates Nrf2 via covalent modification of reactive cysteine residues in the Nrf2 repressor molecule, Keap1. In addition to Nrf2, Keap1 suppresses IKKB, the positive regulator of NF-κB. Treatment with a BARD analog, dh404, at 5-20mg/kg/day in diabetic obese Zucker rats exacerbates, whereas its use at 2mg/kg/day in 5/6 nephrectomized rats attenuates, CKD progression. We, therefore, hypothesized that deleterious effects of high-dose BARD are mediated by the activation of NF-κB. CKD (5/6 nephrectomized) rats were randomized to receive dh404 (2 or 10mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 12 weeks. The vehicle-treated group exhibited glomerulosclerosis; interstitial fibrosis and inflammation; activation of NF-κB; upregulation of oxidative, inflammatory, and fibrotic pathways; and suppression of Nrf2 activity and its key target gene products. Treatment with low-dose dh404 restored Nrf2 activity and expression of its target genes, attenuated activation of NF-κB and fibrotic pathways, and reduced glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and inflammation. In contrast, treatment with a high dh404 dosage intensified proteinuria, renal dysfunction, and histological abnormalities; amplified upregulation of NF-κB and fibrotic pathways; and suppressed the Nrf2 system. Thus therapy with BARD analogs exerts a dose-dependent dimorphic impact on CKD progression.

  8. An Excess of Deleterious Variants in VEGF-A Pathway Genes in Down-Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Christine; Locke, Adam E.; Feingold, Eleanor; Reshey, Benjamin; Espana, Karina; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Bean, Lora J.H.; Dooley, Kenneth J.; Cua, Clifford L.; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    About half of people with trisomy 21 have a congenital heart defect (CHD), whereas the remainder have a structurally normal heart, demonstrating that trisomy 21 is a significant risk factor but is not causal for abnormal heart development. Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are the most commonly occurring heart defects in Down syndrome (DS), and ∼65% of all AVSD is associated with DS. We used a candidate-gene approach among individuals with DS and complete AVSD (cases = 141) and DS with no CHD (controls = 141) to determine whether rare genetic variants in genes involved in atrioventricular valvuloseptal morphogenesis contribute to AVSD in this sensitized population. We found a significant excess (p < 0.0001) of variants predicted to be deleterious in cases compared to controls. At the most stringent level of filtering, we found potentially damaging variants in nearly 20% of cases but fewer than 3% of controls. The variants with the highest probability of being damaging in cases only were found in six genes: COL6A1, COL6A2, CRELD1, FBLN2, FRZB, and GATA5. Several of the case-specific variants were recurrent in unrelated individuals, occurring in 10% of cases studied. No variants with an equal probability of being damaging were found in controls, demonstrating a highly specific association with AVSD. Of note, all of these genes are in the VEGF-A pathway, even though the candidate genes analyzed in this study represented numerous biochemical and developmental pathways, suggesting that rare variants in the VEGF-A pathway might contribute to the genetic underpinnings of AVSD in humans. PMID:23040494

  9. Quality of the Exotic Parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) Does Not Show Deleterious Effects after Inbreeding for 10 Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Maíra; De Bortoli, Sergio A.; Vacari, Alessandra M.; Laurentis, Valéria L.; Ramalho, Dagmara G.

    2016-01-01

    Although the parasitoid Cotesia flavipes (Cameron) has proven effective in controlling sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius) for many years, concern has arisen over the quality of individuals produced at large scales. The parasitoid has been reared in laboratories in Brazil for more than 40 years, with no new introductions of new populations during that period. Since the quality of the parasitoids was not verified at the time of the species' introduction in Brazil, we do not know if there has been any reduction in quality so far. However, it is possible to determine whether the parasitoid could reduce in quality in future generations. Thus, the objective of this research was to assess the quality of these insects over 10 generations and look for evidence of any loss in quality. We used two populations: one from a biofactory that has been maintained in the laboratory for over 40 years, and an inbred laboratory population. Both were bred, and compared for 10 generations. We wanted to determine what happened to the quality of the parasitoid after 10 generations in an extreme inbreeding situation. To assure inbreeding, newly emerged females were forced to mate with a sibling. Individual females were then allowed to parasitize larvae of D. saccharalis. We performed evaluations for each generation until the tenth generation, and recorded the sex ratio, percentage emergence, number of offspring/females, and longevity of both males and females. Results of the measurements of biological characteristics demonstrated random significant differences between populations; best results were obtained intermittently for both the biofactory population and the inbred population. No significant differences across generations for the same population were observed. Thus, rearing of a C. flavipes population subjected to inbreeding for 10 generations was not sufficient to reveal any deleterious effects of inbreeding. PMID:27509087

  10. In silico mutation analysis of non-structural protein-5 (NS5) dengue virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, R. D.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2017-04-01

    Dengue fever is a world disease. It is endemic in more than 100 countries. Information about the effect of mutations in the virus is important in drug design and development. In this research, we studied the effect of mutation on NS5 dengue virus. NS5 is the large protein containing 67% amino acid similarity in DENV 1-4 and has multifunctional enzymatic activities. Dengue virus is an RNA virus that has very high mutation frequency with an average of 100 times higher than DNA mutations, and the accumulation of mutations will be possible to generate the new serotype. In this study, we report that mutation occurs in NS5 of DENV serotype 3, glutamine mutates into methionine at position 10 and threonine mutates into isoleucine at position 55. These residues are part of the domain named S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine-Dependent Methyltransferase (IPR029063).

  11. Mutation and premating isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  12. Optimized p53 immunohistochemistry is an accurate predictor of TP53 mutation in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbel, Martin; Piskorz, Anna M; Lee, Sandra; Lui, Shuhong; LePage, Cecile; Marass, Francesco; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Mes Masson, Anne-Marie; Brenton, James D

    2016-10-01

    TP53 mutations are ubiquitous in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOC), and the presence of TP53 mutation discriminates between high and low-grade serous carcinomas and is now an important biomarker for clinical trials targeting mutant p53. p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is widely used as a surrogate for TP53 mutation but its accuracy has not been established. The objective of this study was to test whether improved methods for p53 IHC could reliably predict TP53 mutations independently identified by next generation sequencing (NGS). Four clinical p53 IHC assays and tagged-amplicon NGS for TP53 were performed on 171 HGSOC and 80 endometrioid carcinomas (EC). p53 expression was scored as overexpression (OE), complete absence (CA), cytoplasmic (CY) or wild type (WT). p53 IHC was evaluated as a binary classifier where any abnormal staining predicted deleterious TP53 mutation and as a ternary classifier where OE, CA or WT staining predicted gain-of-function (GOF or nonsynonymous), loss-of-function (LOF including stopgain, indel, splicing) or no detectable TP53 mutations (NDM), respectively. Deleterious TP53 mutations were detected in 169/171 (99%) HGSOC and 7/80 (8.8%) EC. The overall accuracy for the best performing IHC assay for binary and ternary prediction was 0.94 and 0.91 respectively, which improved to 0.97 (sensitivity 0.96, specificity 1.00) and 0.95 after secondary analysis of discordant cases. The sensitivity for predicting LOF mutations was lower at 0.76 because p53 IHC detected mutant p53 protein in 13 HGSOC with LOF mutations. CY staining associated with LOF was seen in 4 (2.3%) of HGSOC. Optimized p53 IHC can approach 100% specificity for the presence of TP53 mutation and its high negative predictive value is clinically useful as it can exclude the possibility of a low-grade serous tumour. 4.1% of HGSOC cases have detectable WT staining while harboring a TP53 LOF mutation, which limits sensitivity for binary prediction of mutation to 96%.

  13. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  14. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  15. Modeling IRA Accumulation and Withdrawals

    OpenAIRE

    Sabelhaus, John

    2000-01-01

    Empirical analysis of IRA accumulation and withdrawal patterns is limited because information about IRA balances and flows is not available for a sample of taxpayers. This paper combines survey data on IRA balances with individual tax return data on IRA flows to study IRA accumulation and withdrawal patterns across cohorts. The analysis shows that IRA rules such as penalties for early withdrawals and minimum distribution requirements have predictable effects on IRA flows. The estimated propen...

  16. High mutational rates of large-scale duplication and deletion in Daphnia pulex

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Nathan; Tucker, Abraham E.; Jackson, Craig E.; Sung, Way; Lucas Lledó, José Ignacio; Schrider, Daniel R.; Schaack, Sarah; DUDYCHA, JEFFRY L.; Ackerman, Matthew; Andrew J. Younge; Shaw, Joseph R.; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genome-wide rate and spectrum of mutations is necessary to understand the origin of disease and the genetic variation driving all evolutionary processes. Here, we provide a genome-wide analysis of the rate and spectrum of mutations obtained in two Daphnia pulex genotypes via separate mutation-accumulation (MA) experiments. Unlike most MA studies that utilize haploid, homozygous, or self-fertilizing lines, D. pulex can be propagated ameiotically while maintaining a naturally h...

  17. Evolution meets disease: penetrance and functional epistasis of mitochondrial tRNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Ferrín, Gustavo; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Gallardo, M Esther; Viscomi, Carlo; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Zeviani, Massimo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2011-04-01

    About half of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations causing diseases in humans occur in tRNA genes. Particularly intriguing are those pathogenic tRNA mutations than can reach homoplasmy and yet show very different penetrance among patients. These mutations are scarce and, in addition to their obvious interest for understanding human pathology, they can be excellent experimental examples to model evolution and fixation of mitochondrial tRNA mutations. To date, the only source of this type of mutations is human patients. We report here the generation and characterization of the first mitochondrial tRNA pathological mutation in mouse cells, an m.3739G>A transition in the mitochondrial mt-Ti gene. This mutation recapitulates the molecular hallmarks of a disease-causing mutation described in humans, an m.4290T>C transition affecting also the human mt-Ti gene. We could determine that the pathogenic molecular mechanism, induced by both the mouse and the human mutations, is a high frequency of abnormal folding of the tRNA(Ile) that cannot be charged with isoleucine. We demonstrate that the cells harboring the mouse or human mutant tRNA have exacerbated mitochondrial biogenesis triggered by an increase in mitochondrial ROS production as a compensatory response. We propose that both the nature of the pathogenic mechanism combined with the existence of a compensatory mechanism can explain the penetrance pattern of this mutation. This particular behavior can allow a scenario for the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs in which the fixation of two alleles that are individually deleterious can proceed in two steps and not require the simultaneous mutation of both.

  18. Are medullary breast cancers an indication for BRCA1 mutation screening? A mutation analysis of 42 cases of medullary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iau, P T C; Marafie, M; Ali, A; Sng, J H; Macmillan, R D; Pinder, S; Denley, H E; Ellis, I O; Wenzyck, P; Scott, N; Cross, G; Blamey, R W

    2004-05-01

    Recommended guidelines have limited breast cancer gene ( BRCA1 ) mutation testing to individuals with a personal or family history of early onset breast and/or ovarian cancer, and those with multiple affected close relatives. Such large breast cancer families are rare in the general population, limiting the clinical application of the BRCA1 discovery. Previous reports have suggested an association between medullary breast cancer and BRCA1 mutation carriers. To test the feasibility of using these rare histological subtypes as an alternative to epidemiological factors, 42 cases of medullary cancer unselected for family history were screened for BRCA1 point mutations and large exon rearrangements. The large majority (83%) of these patients did not have significant family of breast or ovarian cancer. Two deleterious mutations resulting in a premature stop codon, and one exon 13 duplication were found. All mutations were detected in patients with typical medullary cancer, who had family history of multiple breast and ovarian cancers. Our findings suggest that medullary breast cancers are not an indication for BRCA1 mutation screening in the absence of significant family risk factors.

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator intracellular processing, trafficking, and opportunities for mutation-specific treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogan, Mark P

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in basic science have greatly expanded our understanding of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the chloride and bicarbonate channel that is encoded by the gene, which is mutated in patients with CF. We review the structure, function, biosynthetic processing, and intracellular trafficking of CFTR and discuss the five classes of mutations and their impact on the CF phenotype. The therapeutic discussion is focused on the significant progress toward CFTR mutation-specific therapies. We review the results of encouraging clinical trials examining orally administered therapeutics, including agents that promote read-through of class I mutations (premature termination codons); correctors, which overcome the CFTR misfolding that characterizes the common class II mutation F508del; and potentiators, which enhance the function of class III or IV mutated CFTR at the plasma membrane. Long-term outcomes from successful mutation-specific treatments could finally answer the question that has been lingering since and even before the CFTR gene discovery: Will therapies that specifically restore CFTR-mediated chloride secretion slow or arrest the deleterious cascade of events leading to chronic infection, bronchiectasis, and end-stage lung disease?

  20. From molecular genetics to phylodynamics: evolutionary relevance of mutation rates across viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Sanjuán

    Full Text Available Although evolution is a multifactorial process, theory posits that the speed of molecular evolution should be directly determined by the rate at which spontaneous mutations appear. To what extent these two biochemical and population-scale processes are related in nature, however, is largely unknown. Viruses are an ideal system for addressing this question because their evolution is fast enough to be observed in real time, and experimentally-determined mutation rates are abundant. This article provides statistically supported evidence that the mutation rate determines molecular evolution across all types of viruses. Properties of the viral genome such as its size and chemical composition are identified as major determinants of these rates. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis reveals that, as expected, evolution rates increase linearly with mutation rates for slowly mutating viruses. However, this relationship plateaus for fast mutating viruses. A model is proposed in which deleterious mutations impose an evolutionary speed limit and set an extinction threshold in nature. The model is consistent with data from replication kinetics, selection strength and chemical mutagenesis studies.

  1. Frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene can cause nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Maiko; Hatsuse, Hiromi; Shiohama, Tadashi; Uchikawa, Hideki; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by developmental defects and tumorigenesis. The gene responsible for NBCCS is PTCH1, encoding a receptor for the secreted protein, sonic hedgehog. Recently, a Chinese family with NBCCS carrying a missense mutation in PTCH2, a close homolog of PTCH1, was reported. However, the pathological significance of missense mutations should be discussed cautiously. Here, we report a 13-year-old girl diagnosed with NBCCS based on multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors and rib anomalies carrying a frameshift mutation in the PTCH2 gene (c.1172_1173delCT). Considering the deleterious nature of the frameshift mutation, our study further confirmed a causative role for the PTCH2 mutation in NBCCS. The absence of typical phenotypes in this case such as palmar/plantar pits, macrocephaly, falx calcification, hypertelorism and coarse face, together with previously reported cases, suggested that individuals with NBCCS carrying a PTCH2 mutation may have a milder phenotype than those with a PTCH1 mutation.

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Update and Analysis of New Mutations around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; González-Valdez, Abigail; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key regulatory enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway which produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to maintain an adequate reducing environment in the cells and is especially important in red blood cells (RBC). Given its central role in the regulation of redox state, it is understandable that mutations in the gene encoding G6PD can cause deficiency of the protein activity leading to clinical manifestations such as neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia. Recently, an extensive review has been published about variants in the g6pd gene; recognizing 186 mutations. In this work, we review the state of the art in G6PD deficiency, describing 217 mutations in the g6pd gene; we also compile information about 31 new mutations, 16 that were not recognized and 15 more that have recently been reported. In order to get a better picture of the effects of new described mutations in g6pd gene, we locate the point mutations in the solved three-dimensional structure of the human G6PD protein. We found that class I mutations have the most deleterious effects on the structure and stability of the protein. PMID:27941691

  3. First molecular analysis of F8 gene in algeria: identification of two novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Meriem; Zemani-Fodil, Faouzia; Fodil, Mostefa; Aberkane, Meriem Samia; Touhami, Hadj; Saidi-Mehtar, Nadhira; Costa, Catherine; Boudjema, Abdallah

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the genetic alterations in the Factor 8 gene in 26 patients from Western Algeria. We detected the presence of "intron 22 inversion" with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Negative patients for this inversion were analyzed for "intron 1 inversion" using multiplex PCR. Patients who were negative for both inversions were analyzed using a direct sequencing. Deleterious effects of novel mutations on protein were assayed with bioinformatics tools. Causing mutations were identified in 85.71% of the families, including 11 "intron 22 inversion," 1 "intron 1 inversion," and 6 different point mutations (2 nonsense, 1 splice site, and 3 missense mutations). Among these mutations, c.2189G > A (p.Cys711Tyr) and c.5219+1G>T are novel. This is the first study that reports spectrum of mutations in the Factor 8 gene in the Western Algerian population. Knowledge of these mutations is important for genetic counseling and medical care of affected families.

  4. Mutations and polymorphisms in the human N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Tuchman, Mendel

    2007-08-01

    N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder, is the last urea cycle disorder for which molecular testing became available. This is the first comprehensive report of 21 mutations that cause NAGS deficiency and of commonly found polymorphisms in the NAGS gene. Five mutations are reported here for the first time. A total of 10 disease-causing mutations are associated with acute neonatal hyperammonemia; the remaining mutations were found in patients with late onset disease. Residual enzymatic activities are included in this report and the deleterious effects of eight mutations were confirmed by expression studies. Mutations in the NAGS gene are distributed throughout its reading frame. No mutations have been found in exon 1, which encodes for the putative mitochondrial targeting signal and variable segment of NAGS. Three polymorphisms have been found. Early, accurate, and specific diagnosis of NAGS deficiency is critical since this condition can be successfully treated with N-carbamylglutamate (NCG, Carbaglu; Orphan Europe). Treatment with NCG should be initiated as soon as a patient is suspected of having NAGS deficiency. Molecular testing represents the most reliable method of diagnosis.

  5. From molecular genetics to phylodynamics: evolutionary relevance of mutation rates across viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Although evolution is a multifactorial process, theory posits that the speed of molecular evolution should be directly determined by the rate at which spontaneous mutations appear. To what extent these two biochemical and population-scale processes are related in nature, however, is largely unknown. Viruses are an ideal system for addressing this question because their evolution is fast enough to be observed in real time, and experimentally-determined mutation rates are abundant. This article provides statistically supported evidence that the mutation rate determines molecular evolution across all types of viruses. Properties of the viral genome such as its size and chemical composition are identified as major determinants of these rates. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis reveals that, as expected, evolution rates increase linearly with mutation rates for slowly mutating viruses. However, this relationship plateaus for fast mutating viruses. A model is proposed in which deleterious mutations impose an evolutionary speed limit and set an extinction threshold in nature. The model is consistent with data from replication kinetics, selection strength and chemical mutagenesis studies.

  6. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Update and Analysis of New Mutations around the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD is a key regulatory enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway which produces nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH to maintain an adequate reducing environment in the cells and is especially important in red blood cells (RBC. Given its central role in the regulation of redox state, it is understandable that mutations in the gene encoding G6PD can cause deficiency of the protein activity leading to clinical manifestations such as neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia. Recently, an extensive review has been published about variants in the g6pd gene; recognizing 186 mutations. In this work, we review the state of the art in G6PD deficiency, describing 217 mutations in the g6pd gene; we also compile information about 31 new mutations, 16 that were not recognized and 15 more that have recently been reported. In order to get a better picture of the effects of new described mutations in g6pd gene, we locate the point mutations in the solved three-dimensional structure of the human G6PD protein. We found that class I mutations have the most deleterious effects on the structure and stability of the protein.

  7. A novel mtDNA ND6 gene mutation associated with LHON in a Caucasian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadanov, Sergey I; Atamanov, Vasily V; Zhadanov, Nikolay I; Oleinikov, Oleg V; Osipova, Ludmila P; Schurr, Theodore G

    2005-07-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a frequent cause of inherited blindness. A routine screening for common mtDNA mutations constitutes an important first in its diagnosis. However, a substantial number of LHON patients do not harbor known variants, both pointing to the genetic heterogeneity of LHON and bringing into question its genetic diagnosis. We report a familial case that exhibited typical features of LHON but lacked any of the common mutations. Genetic analysis revealed a novel pathogenic defect in the ND6 gene at 14279A that was not detected in any haplogroup-matched controls screened for it, nor has it been previously reported. This mutation causes a substantial conformational change in the secondary structure of the polypeptide matrix coil and may explain the LHON expression. Thus, it expands the spectrum of deleterious changes affecting ND6-encoding subunit and further highlights the functional significance of this gene, providing additional clues to the disease pathogenesis.

  8. ANGDelMut – a web-based tool for predicting and analyzing functional loss mechanisms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated angiogenin mutations [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2yt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya K Padhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available ANGDelMut is a web-based tool for predicting the functional consequences of missense mutations in the angiogenin (ANG protein, which is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Missense mutations in ANG result in loss of either ribonucleolytic activity or nuclear translocation activity or both of these functions, and in turn cause ALS. However, no web-based tools are available to predict whether a newly identified ANG mutation will possibly lead to ALS. More importantly, no web-implemented method is currently available to predict the mechanisms of loss-of-function(s of ANG mutants. In light of this observation, we developed the ANGDelMut web-based tool, which predicts whether an ANG mutation is deleterious or benign. The user selects certain attributes from the input panel, which serves as a query to infer whether a mutant will exhibit loss of ribonucleolytic activity or nuclear translocation activity or whether the overall stability will be affected. The output states whether the mutation is deleterious or benign, and if it is deleterious, gives the possible mechanism(s of loss-of-function. This web-based tool, freely available at http://bioschool.iitd.ernet.in/DelMut/, is the first of its kind to provide a platform for researchers and clinicians, to infer the functional consequences of ANG mutations and correlate their possible association with ALS ahead of experimental findings.

  9. Germline and somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes predict platinum response and survival in ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher C; Rendi, Mara H; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S; Agnew, Kathy J; Pritchard, Colin C; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination DNA repair genes is uncertain. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the homologous recombination pathway. Thirty-one percent of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 homologous recombination genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Nonserous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of homologous recombination mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, P = 0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic homologous recombination mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (P = 0.0002) and improved overall survival (P = 0.0006), with a median overall survival of 66 months in germline homologous recombination mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic homologous recombination mutation, and 41 months for cases without a homologous recombination mutation. Germline or somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes are present in almost one third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and nonserous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of homologous recombination mutations in nonserous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. ©2013 AACR.

  10. De novo COX2 mutation in a LHON family of Caucasian origin: implication for the role of mtDNA polymorphism in human pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadanov, Sergey I; Atamanov, Vasiliy V; Zhadanov, Nikolay I; Schurr, Theodore G

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that certain mutations with phylogeographic importance as haplogroup markers may also influence the phenotypic expression of particular mitochondrial disorders. One such disorder, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), demonstrates a clear expression bias in mtDNAs belonging to haplogroup J, a West Eurasian maternal lineage defined by polymorphic markers that have been called 'secondary' disease mutations. In this report, we present evidence for a de novo heteroplasmic COX2 mutation associated with a LHON clinical phenotype. This particular mutation-at nucleotide position 7,598-occurs in West Eurasian haplogroup H, the most common maternal lineage among individuals of European descent, whereas previous studies have detected this mutation only in East Eurasian haplogroup E. A review of the available mtDNA sequence data indicates that the COX2 7598 mutation occurs as a homoplasic event at the tips of these phylogenetic branches, suggesting that it could be a variant that is rapidly eliminated by selection. This finding points to the potential background influence of polymorphisms on the expression of mild deleterious mutations such as LHON mtDNA defects and further highlights the difficulties in distinguishing deleterious mtDNA changes from neutral polymorphisms and their significance in the development of mitochondriopathies.

  11. EVALUATION OF PHYTOTOXIC EFFECT OF DELETERIOUS RHIZOBACTERIA ON THE ROOT GROWTH OF AXONOPUS AFFINIS (CHASE AND LENS ESCULENTA (MOENCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.J Pacheco-Hernández

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Las malezas ocasionan una gran pérdida en las tierras agrícolas y comúnmente, las medidas de manejo y contención de estas especies se dan con la aplicación de herbicidas, sin embargo; en años recientes se ha presentado un interés en establecer mecanismos de biocontrol seguros, con el empleo de bacterias inhibidoras del crecimiento conocidas como rizobacterias deletéreas (Deleterious rhizobacteria: DRBque se consideran generalmente como no parasíticas, y causan, de manera sutil, efectos deletéreos a través de la producción de metabolitos dañinos a las plantas. El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo caracterizar la producción de ácido cianhídrico de pseudomonas rizobacterianas de malezas de un cultivo de alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. y evaluar el efecto fitotóxico de éstas sobre el crecimiento radical de plántulas de Axonopus affinis (Chase y Lens esculenta (Moench. De acuerdo con los resultados obtenidos con relación a la evidencia de que los aislados de pseudomonadas son rizobacterias cianogénicas y de su efecto fitotóxico medido sobre las especies vegetales bajo estudio; se sugieren a éstas como posibles agentes de biocontrol con pastos que sean considerados malezas; ya que en general se observó que inhiben su crecimiento radical; sin embargo, un enfoque particular lo tiene la rizobacteria Pseudomonas sp. A52, la cual presentó no solamente actividad como una DRB sino también como una rizobacteria promotora del crecimiento vegetal; lo que la hace más importante de analizar en cuanto a su potencial y espectro de acción; tanto para malezas monocotiledóneas como para dicotiledóneas, recomendable como un posible agente de biocontrol con actividad múltiple.

  12. Long-term excessive magnesium supplementation is deleterious whereas suboptimal supply is beneficial for bones in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riond, J L; Hartmann, P; Steiner, P; Ursprung, R; Wanner, M; Forrer, R; Spichiger, U E; Thomsen, J S; Mosekilde, L

    2000-12-01

    the parameters indicators of bone health whereas the long-term supplementation was deleterious.

  13. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel P Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  14. Mutations and epimutations in the origin of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltomaeki, Paeivi, E-mail: Paivi.Peltomaki@Helsinki.Fi

    2012-02-15

    Cancer is traditionally viewed as a disease of abnormal cell proliferation controlled by a series of mutations. Mutations typically affect oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes thereby conferring growth advantage. Genomic instability facilitates mutation accumulation. Recent findings demonstrate that activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, as well as genomic instability, can be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms as well. Unlike genetic mutations, epimutations do not change the base sequence of DNA and are potentially reversible. Similar to genetic mutations, epimutations are associated with specific patterns of gene expression that are heritable through cell divisions. Knudson's hypothesis postulates that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes requires two hits, with the first hit occurring either in somatic cells (sporadic cancer) or in the germline (hereditary cancer) and the second one always being somatic. Studies on hereditary and sporadic forms of colorectal carcinoma have made it evident that, apart from genetic mutations, epimutations may serve as either hit or both. Furthermore, recent next-generation sequencing studies show that epigenetic genes, such as those encoding histone modifying enzymes and subunits for chromatin remodeling systems, are themselves frequent targets of somatic mutations in cancer and can act like tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. This review discusses genetic vs. epigenetic origin of cancer, including cancer susceptibility, in light of recent discoveries. Situations in which mutations and epimutations occur to serve analogous purposes are highlighted.

  15. Evolution of mutational robustness in an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Montville

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutational (genetic robustness is phenotypic constancy in the face of mutational changes to the genome. Robustness is critical to the understanding of evolution because phenotypically expressed genetic variation is the fuel of natural selection. Nonetheless, the evidence for adaptive evolution of mutational robustness in biological populations is controversial. Robustness should be selectively favored when mutation rates are high, a common feature of RNA viruses. However, selection for robustness may be relaxed under virus co-infection because complementation between virus genotypes can buffer mutational effects. We therefore hypothesized that selection for genetic robustness in viruses will be weakened with increasing frequency of co-infection. To test this idea, we used populations of RNA phage phi6 that were experimentally evolved at low and high levels of co-infection and subjected lineages of these viruses to mutation accumulation through population bottlenecking. The data demonstrate that viruses evolved under high co-infection show relatively greater mean magnitude and variance in the fitness changes generated by addition of random mutations, confirming our hypothesis that they experience weakened selection for robustness. Our study further suggests that co-infection of host cells may be advantageous to RNA viruses only in the short term. In addition, we observed higher mutation frequencies in the more robust viruses, indicating that evolution of robustness might foster less-accurate genome replication in RNA viruses.

  16. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  17. The evolution of two mutations during clonal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeno, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Yoh; Michor, Franziska

    2007-12-01

    Knudson's two-hit hypothesis proposes that two genetic changes in the RB1 gene are the rate-limiting steps of retinoblastoma. In the inherited form of this childhood eye cancer, only one mutation emerges during somatic cell divisions while in sporadic cases, both alleles of RB1 are inactivated in the growing retina. Sporadic retinoblastoma serves as an example of a situation in which two mutations are accumulated during clonal expansion of a cell population. Other examples include evolution of resistance against anticancer combination therapy and inactivation of both alleles of a metastasis-suppressor gene during tumor growth. In this article, we consider an exponentially growing population of cells that must evolve two mutations to (i) evade treatment, (ii) make a step toward (invasive) cancer, or (iii) display a disease phenotype. We calculate the probability that the population has evolved both mutations before it reaches a certain size. This probability depends on the rates at which the two mutations arise; the growth and death rates of cells carrying none, one, or both mutations; and the size the cell population reaches. Further, we develop a formula for the expected number of cells carrying both mutations when the final population size is reached. Our theory establishes an understanding of the dynamics of two mutations during clonal expansion.

  18. The relationship between glucocerebrosidase mutations and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdalska-Richards, Anna; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease, whereas Gaucher disease (GD) is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder caused by homozygous mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene. Increased risk of developing PD has been observed in both GD patients and carriers. It has been estimated that GBA1 mutations confer a 20- to 30-fold increased risk for the development of PD, and that at least 7-10% of PD patients have a GBA1 mutation. To date, mutations in the GBA1 gene constitute numerically the most important risk factor for PD. The type of PD associated with GBA1 mutations (PD-GBA1) is almost identical to idiopathic PD, except for a slightly younger age of onset and a tendency to more cognitive impairment. Importantly, the pathology of PD-GBA1 is identical to idiopathic PD, with nigral dopamine cell loss, Lewy bodies, and neurites containing alpha-synuclein. The mechanism by which GBA1 mutations increase the risk for PD is still unknown. However, given that clinical manifestation and pathological findings in PD-GBA1 patients are almost identical to those in idiopathic PD individuals, it is likely that, as in idiopathic PD, alpha-synuclein accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagic impairment, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress may contribute to the development and progression of PD-GBA1. Here, we review the GBA1 gene, its role in GD, and its link with PD. The impact of glucocerebrosidase 1 (GBA1) mutations on functioning of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), lysosomes, and mitochondria. GBA1 mutations resulting in production of misfolded glucocerebrosidase (GCase) significantly affect the ER functioning. Misfolded GCase trapped in the ER leads to both an increase in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the ER stress. The presence of ER stress triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and/or endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The prolonged activation of UPR and ERAD

  19. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  20. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  2. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  3. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  5. Hypothesis: Obesity Is Associated with a Lower Mutation Threshold in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic progression requires accumulation of several mutations (mutation threshold). We hypothesize that obesity raises the risk of microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancer (CC) at least in part by decreasing the mutation threshold. Thus, we posit that obese patients require fewer mutations, particularly driver mutations, compared to their normal BMI counterparts. Further, we suggest that the reduced number of required mutations in obese patients could be due to several factors, including the high levels of cytokines that accompany obesity. Cytokine-activated ERK, AKT, and JAK/STAT signaling could synergize with CC-initiating mutations to promote intestinal neoplastic development. Therefore, driver mutations that induce these specific pathways may not be "required" for neoplastic development in obesity; alteration in cell signaling consequent to obesity can substitute for some driver mutations in neoplastic progression. This hypothesis is supported by preliminary analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Thus, we observed that, compared to normal weight patients, cancer genomes of obese MSS CC patients exhibit fewer somatic mutations, and correspondingly lower numbers of mutations in driver genes (P = 0.026).The most striking observation was the lower number of KRAS mutations detected in patients with high body-mass index (BMI). These intriguing observations require further validation with increased number of patients, taking into account all possible confounding factors. If the hypothesis is confirmed, future studies should also address several possible explanations for the observed lower mutation threshold in obese MSS CC patients.

  6. Novel insight into mutational landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Gaykalova

    Full Text Available Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46% studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection.

  7. A nonsense mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene causes Pompe disease in Finnish and Swedish Lapphunds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, Eija H; Reuser, Arnold J J; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease is a recessively inherited and often fatal disorder caused by the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, an enzyme encoded by the GAA gene and needed to break down glycogen in lysosomes. This glycogen storage disease type II has been reported also in Swedish Lapphund dogs. Here we describe the genetic defect in canine Pompe disease and show that three related breeds from Scandinavia carry the same mutation. The affected dogs are homozygous for the GAA c.2237G>A mutation leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid position 746. The corresponding mutation has previously been reported in humans and causes infantile Pompe disease in combination with a second fully deleterious mutation. The affected dogs from both the Finnish as well as the Swedish breed mimic infantile-onset Pompe disease genetically, but also clinico-pathologically. Therefore this canine model provides a valuable tool for preclinical studies aimed at the development of gene therapy in Pompe disease.

  8. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  9. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  10. Pollitt syndrome patients carry mutation in TTDN1

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    Sigrid M.A. Swagemakers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Complete human genome sequencing was used to identify the causative mutation in a family with Pollitt syndrome (MIM #275550, comprising two non-consanguineous parents and their two affected children. The patient's symptoms were reminiscent of the non-photosensitive form of recessively inherited trichothiodystrophy (TTD. A mutation in the TTDN1/C7orf11 gene, a gene that is known to be involved in non-photosensitive TTD, had been excluded by others by Sanger sequencing. Unexpectedly, we did find a homozygous single-base pair deletion in the coding region of this gene, a mutation that is known to cause non-photosensitive TTD. The deleterious variant causing a frame shift at amino acid 93 (C326delA followed the right mode of inheritance in the family and was independently validated using conventional DNA sequencing. We expect this novel DNA sequencing technology to help redefine phenotypic and genomic variation in patients with (mono genetic disorders in an unprecedented manner.

  11. Analysing the Effect of Mutation on Protein Function and Discovering Potential Inhibitors of CDK4: Molecular Modelling and Dynamics Studies.

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    Nagasundaram N

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4-cyclin D1 complex plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to S phase of the cell cycle. Among the CDKs, CDK4 is one of the genes most frequently affected by somatic genetic variations that are associated with various forms of cancer. Thus, because the abnormal function of the CDK4-cyclin D1 protein complex might play a vital role in causing cancer, CDK4 can be considered a genetically validated therapeutic target. In this study, we used a systematic, integrated computational approach to identify deleterious nsSNPs and predict their effects on protein-protein (CDK4-cyclin D1 and protein-ligand (CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. This analysis resulted in the identification of possible inhibitors of mutant CDK4 proteins that bind the conformations induced by deleterious nsSNPs. Using computational prediction methods, we identified five nsSNPs as highly deleterious: R24C, Y180H, A205T, R210P, and R246C. From molecular docking and molecular dynamic studies, we observed that these deleterious nsSNPs affected CDK4-cyclin D1 and CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. Furthermore, in a virtual screening approach, the drug 5_7_DIHYDROXY_ 2_ (3_4_5_TRI HYDROXYPHENYL _4H_CHROMEN_ 4_ONE displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations R24C or R246C, the drug diosmin displayed good binding affinity for the protein with the mutation Y180H, and the drug rutin displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations A205T and R210P. Overall, this computational investigation of the CDK4 gene highlights the link between genetic variation and biological phenomena in human cancer and aids in the discovery of molecularly targeted therapies for personalized treatment.

  12. Subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic

    CERN Document Server

    Warkentin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Quiver mutation plays a crucial role in the definition of cluster algebras by Fomin and Zelevinsky. It induces an equivalence relation on the set of all quivers without loops and two-cycles. A quiver is called mutation-acyclic if it is mutation-equivalent to an acyclic quiver. The aim of this note is to show that full subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic.

  13. The rate of beneficial mutations surfing on the wave of a range expansion.

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    Rémi Lehe

    Full Text Available Many theoretical and experimental studies suggest that range expansions can have severe consequences for the gene pool of the expanding population. Due to strongly enhanced genetic drift at the advancing frontier, neutral and weakly deleterious mutations can reach large frequencies in the newly colonized regions, as if they were surfing the front of the range expansion. These findings raise the question of how frequently beneficial mutations successfully surf at shifting range margins, thereby promoting adaptation towards a range-expansion phenotype. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the surfing statistics of recurrent beneficial mutations on wave-like range expansions in linear habitats. We show that the rate of surfing depends on two strongly antagonistic factors, the probability of surfing given the spatial location of a novel mutation and the rate of occurrence of mutations at that location. The surfing probability strongly increases towards the tip of the wave. Novel mutations are unlikely to surf unless they enjoy a spatial head start compared to the bulk of the population. The needed head start is shown to be proportional to the inverse fitness of the mutant type, and only weakly dependent on the carrying capacity. The precise location dependence of surfing probabilities is derived from the non-extinction probability of a branching process within a moving field of growth rates. The second factor is the mutation occurrence which strongly decreases towards the tip of the wave. Thus, most successful mutations arise at an intermediate position in the front of the wave. We present an analytic theory for the tradeoff between these factors that allows to predict how frequently substitutions by beneficial mutations occur at invasion fronts. We find that small amounts of genetic drift increase the fixation rate of beneficial mutations at the advancing front, and thus could be important for adaptation during species invasions.

  14. The rate of beneficial mutations surfing on the wave of a range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehe, Rémi; Hallatschek, Oskar; Peliti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Many theoretical and experimental studies suggest that range expansions can have severe consequences for the gene pool of the expanding population. Due to strongly enhanced genetic drift at the advancing frontier, neutral and weakly deleterious mutations can reach large frequencies in the newly colonized regions, as if they were surfing the front of the range expansion. These findings raise the question of how frequently beneficial mutations successfully surf at shifting range margins, thereby promoting adaptation towards a range-expansion phenotype. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the surfing statistics of recurrent beneficial mutations on wave-like range expansions in linear habitats. We show that the rate of surfing depends on two strongly antagonistic factors, the probability of surfing given the spatial location of a novel mutation and the rate of occurrence of mutations at that location. The surfing probability strongly increases towards the tip of the wave. Novel mutations are unlikely to surf unless they enjoy a spatial head start compared to the bulk of the population. The needed head start is shown to be proportional to the inverse fitness of the mutant type, and only weakly dependent on the carrying capacity. The precise location dependence of surfing probabilities is derived from the non-extinction probability of a branching process within a moving field of growth rates. The second factor is the mutation occurrence which strongly decreases towards the tip of the wave. Thus, most successful mutations arise at an intermediate position in the front of the wave. We present an analytic theory for the tradeoff between these factors that allows to predict how frequently substitutions by beneficial mutations occur at invasion fronts. We find that small amounts of genetic drift increase the fixation rate of beneficial mutations at the advancing front, and thus could be important for adaptation during species invasions.

  15. Incidence and Prognostic Impact of DNMT3A Mutations in Korean Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

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    Sang Hyuk Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A mutation was recently introduced as a prognostic indicator in normal karyotype (NK AML and we evaluated the incidence and prognostic impact of DNMT3A mutations in Korean NK AML patients. Methods. Total 67 NK AML patients diagnosed during the recent 10 years were enrolled. DNMT3A mutations were analyzed by direct sequencing and categorized into nonsynonymous variations (NSV, deleterious mutations (DM, and R882 mutation based on in silico analysis results. Clinical features and prognosis were compared with respect to DNMT3A mutation status. Results. Three novel (I158M, K219V, and E177V and two known (R736H and R882H NSVs were identified and the latter three were predicted as DMs. DNMT3A NSVs, DMs, and R882 mutation were identified in 14.9%–17.9%, 10.3%–10.4%, and 7.5% of patients, respectively. DNMT3A mutations were frequently detected in FLT3 ITD mutated patients (P = 0.054, 0.071, and 0.071 in NSV, DMs, and R882 mutation, resp. but did not affect clinical features and prognosis significantly. Conclusions. Incidences of DNMT3A NSVs, DMs, and R882 mutation are 14.9%–17.9%, 10.3%–10.4%, and 7.5%, respectively, in Korean NK AML patients. DNMT3A mutations are associated with FLT3 ITD mutations but do not affect clinical outcome significantly in Korean NK AML patients.

  16. The role of mutation in the new cancer paradigm

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    Prehn Richmond T

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The almost universal belief that cancer is caused by mutation may gradually be giving way to the belief that cancer begins as a cellular adaptation that involves the local epigenetic silencing of various genes. In my own interpretation of the new epigenetic paradigm, the genes epigenetically suppressed are genes that normally serve in post-embryonic life to suppress and keep suppressed those other genes upon which embryonic development depends. Those other genes, if not silenced or suppressed in the post-embryonic animal, become, I suggest, the oncogenes that are the basis of neoplasia. Mutations that occur in silenced genes supposedly go unrepaired and are, therefore, postulated to accumulate, but such mutations probably play little or no causative role in neoplasia because they occur in already epigenetically silenced genes. These mutations probably often serve to make the silencing, and therefore the cancer, epigenetically irreversible.

  17. Plasmodesmal Targeting and Accumulation of TMV Movement Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kathryn M; Chapman, Sean; Roberts, Alison G

    2007-05-01

    The interaction between tobacco mosaic virus and its host plant cells has been intensively studied as a model for macromolecular trafficking. The observation that GFP-labelled TMV movement protein localises to microtubules led to the suggestion that microtubules are required for the cell to cell movement of the virus. In a recent paper we have demonstrated that the targeting of TMV movement protein to plasmodesmata requires the actin and ER networks, which supports previous evidence from our laboratory that showed that disruption of microtubules did not prevent cell to cell movement of TMV virus, and that a mutated movement protein, which did not localise to micro-tubules, showed enhanced viral movement. In this addendum we speculate where the TMV movement protein accumulates within plasmodesmata, and the relationship of this accumulation to the cell to cell movement of the virus.

  18. Completeness of the Accumulation Calculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    虞慧群; 孙永强; 等

    1998-01-01

    The accumulation calculs(AC for short)is an interval based temporal logic to specify and reason about hybrid real-time systems.This paper presents a formal proof system for AC,and proves that the system is complete relative to that of Interval Temporal Logic(ITL for short)on real domain.

  19. Stem cell microvesicles transfer cystinosin to human cystinotic cells and reduce cystine accumulation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iglesias, D.M.; El-Kares, R.; Taranta, A.; Bellomo, F.; Emma, F.; Besouw, M.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Toelen, J.; Heuvel, L.P. van den; Chu, L.; Zhao, J.; Young, Y.K.; Eliopoulos, N.; Goodyer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare disease caused by homozygous mutations of the CTNS gene, encoding a cystine efflux channel in the lysosomal membrane. In Ctns knockout mice, the pathologic intralysosomal accumulation of cystine that drives progressive organ damage can be reversed by infusion of wildtype bone ma

  20. Stem cell microvesicles transfer cystinosin to human cystinotic cells and reduce cystine accumulation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iglesias, D.M.; El-Kares, R.; Taranta, A.; Bellomo, F.; Emma, F.; Besouw, M.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Toelen, J.; Heuvel, L.P. van den; Chu, L.; Zhao, J.; Young, Y.K.; Eliopoulos, N.; Goodyer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare disease caused by homozygous mutations of the CTNS gene, encoding a cystine efflux channel in the lysosomal membrane. In Ctns knockout mice, the pathologic intralysosomal accumulation of cystine that drives progressive organ damage can be reversed by infusion of wildtype bone

  1. Profilin 1 mutants form aggregates that induce accumulation of prion-like TDP-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-07-03

    Mutations in the profilin 1 (PFN1) gene have been identified as a cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and neuropathological studies indicate that TDP-43 is accumulated in brains of patients with PFN1 mutation. Here, we investigated the role of PFN1 mutations in the formation of prion-like abnormal TDP-43. Expression of PFN1 with pathogenic mutations resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates positive for p62 and ubiquitin, and these aggregates sequestered endogenous TDP-43. TDP-43 accumulation was facilitated in the presence of proteasome or lysosome inhibitor. Co-expression of mutant PFN1 and TDP-43 increased the levels of detergent-insoluble and phosphorylated TDP-43, and this increase required the C-terminal region of TDP-43. Moreover, detergent-insoluble fractions prepared from cells expressing ALS-linked mutant PFN1 induced seed-dependent accumulation of TDP-43. These findings indicate that expression of PFN1 mutants induces accumulation of TDP-43, and promotes conversion of normal TDP-43 into an abnormal form. These results provide new insight into the mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathies and other diseases associated with amyloid-like protein deposition.

  2. A simple algebraic cancer equation: calculating how cancers may arise with normal mutation rates

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    Shibata Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article is to present a relatively easy to understand cancer model where transformation occurs when the first cell, among many at risk within a colon, accumulates a set of driver mutations. The analysis of this model yields a simple algebraic equation, which takes as inputs the number of stem cells, mutation and division rates, and the number of driver mutations, and makes predictions about cancer epidemiology. Methods The equation [p = 1 - (1 - (1 - (1 - udkNm ] calculates the probability of cancer (p and contains five parameters: the number of divisions (d, the number of stem cells (N × m, the number of critical rate-limiting pathway driver mutations (k, and the mutation rate (u. In this model progression to cancer "starts" at conception and mutations accumulate with cell division. Transformation occurs when a critical number of rate-limiting pathway mutations first accumulates within a single stem cell. Results When applied to several colorectal cancer data sets, parameter values consistent with crypt stem cell biology and normal mutation rates were able to match the increase in cancer with aging, and the mutation frequencies found in cancer genomes. The equation can help explain how cancer risks may vary with age, height, germline mutations, and aspirin use. APC mutations may shorten pathways to cancer by effectively increasing the numbers of stem cells at risk. Conclusions The equation illustrates that age-related increases in cancer frequencies may result from relatively normal division and mutation rates. Although this equation does not encompass all of the known complexity of cancer, it may be useful, especially in a teaching setting, to help illustrate relationships between small and large cancer features.

  3. Genomewide Mutational Diversity in Escherichia coli Population Evolving in Prolonged Stationary Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chib, Savita; Ali, Farhan; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2017-01-01

    Prolonged stationary phase is an approximation of natural environments presenting a range of stresses. Survival in prolonged stationary phase requires alternative metabolic pathways for survival. This study describes the repertoire of mutations accumulating in starving Escherichia coli populations in lysogeny broth. A wide range of mutations accumulates over the course of 1 month in stationary phase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute 64% of all mutations. A majority of these mutations are nonsynonymous and are located at conserved loci. There is an increase in genetic diversity in the evolving populations over time. Computer simulations of evolution in stationary phase suggest that the maximum frequency of mutations observed in our experimental populations cannot be explained by neutral drift. Moreover, there is frequent genetic parallelism across populations, suggesting that these mutations are under positive selection. Finally, functional analysis of mutations suggests that regulatory mutations are frequent targets of selection. IMPORTANCE Prolonged stationary phase in bacteria, contrary to its name, is highly dynamic, with extreme nutrient limitation as a predominant stress. Stationary-phase cultures adapt by rapidly selecting a mutation(s) that confers a growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP). The phenotypic diversity of starving E. coli populations has been studied in detail; however, only a few mutations that accumulate in prolonged stationary phase have been described. This study documented the spectrum of mutations appearing in Escherichia coli during 28 days of prolonged starvation. The genetic diversity of the population increases over time in stationary phase to an extent that cannot be explained by random, neutral drift. This suggests that prolonged stationary phase offers a great model system to study adaptive evolution by natural selection.

  4. Evolutionary loss of the rdar morphotype in Salmonella as a result of high mutation rates during laboratory passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Carla J; White, Aaron P; Surette, Michael G

    2008-03-01

    Rapid evolution of microbes under laboratory conditions can lead to domestication of environmental or clinical strains. In this work, we show that domestication due to laboratory passage in rich medium is extremely rapid. Passaging of wild-type Salmonella in rich medium led to diversification of genotypes contributing to the loss of a spatial phenotype, called the rdar morphotype, within days. Gene expression analysis of the rdar regulatory network demonstrated that mutations were primarily within rpoS, indicating that the selection pressure for scavenging during stationary phase had the secondary effect of impairing this highly conserved phenotype. If stationary phase was omitted from the experiment, radiation of genotypes and loss of the rdar morphotype was also demonstrated, but due to mutations within the cellulose biosynthesis pathway and also in an unknown upstream regulator. Thus regardless of the selection pressure, rapid regulatory changes can be observed on laboratory timescales. The speed of accumulation of rpoS mutations during daily passaging could not be explained by measured fitness and mutation rates. A model of mutation accumulation suggests that to generate the observed accumulation of sigma 38 mutations, this locus must experience a mutation rate of approximately 10(-4) mutations/gene/generation. Sequencing and gene expression of population isolates indicated that there were a wide variety of sigma 38 phenotypes within each population. This suggests that the rpoS locus is highly mutable by an unknown pathway, and that these mutations accumulate rapidly under common laboratory conditions.

  5. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

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    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  6. Phthalate-Induced Liver Protection against Deleterious Effects of the Th1 Response: A Potentially Serious Health Hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Mostafa Z; Shnyra, Alexander; Zoubine, Mikhail; Norkin, Maxim; Herndon, Betty; Quinn, Tim; Miranda, Roberto N; Cunningham, Michael L; Molteni, Agostino

    2007-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) induces pulmonary immunopathology mediated by classical Th1 type of acquired immunity with hepatic involvement in up to 80% of disseminated cases. Since PPAR agonists cause immune responses characterized by a decrease in the secretion of Th1 cytokines, we investigated the impact of activating these receptors on hepatic pathology associated with a well-characterized model of Th1-type pulmonary response. Male Fischer 344 rats were either maintained on a drug-free diet (groups I and II), or a diet containing diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP), a compound transformed in vivo to metabolites known to activate PPARs, for 21 days (groups III and IV). Subsequently, animals were primed with Mycobacterium bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) in a Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Fifteen days later, animals in groups II and IV were challenged with Sepharose 4B beads covalently coupled with PPD, while animals in groups I and III received blank Sepharose beads. Animals with Th1 response (group II) showed a marked structural disruption in the hepatic lobule. Remarkably, these alterations were conspicuously absent in animals which received DEHP (group IV), despite noticeable accumulation of T cells in the periportal triads. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy revealed hepatic accumulation of IFNgamma+ Th1 and IL-4+ Th2 cells in animals from groups II and IV, respectively. Our data suggest a PPARalpha-mediated suppression of the development of a Th1 immune response in the liver, resulting in hepatoprotective effect. However, potentially negative consequences of PPAR activation, such as decreased ability of the immune system to fight infection and interference with the efficacy of vaccines designed to evoke Th1 immune responses, remain to be investigated.

  7. GJB2 mutation spectrum in deaf population in a typical southeastern area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Pu; YOU Yi-wen; CUI Jing-hong; YU Fei; HAN Bing; KANG Dong-yang; YUAN Hui-jun; HAN Dong-yi

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in GJB2 gene are the most frequently found mutations in patients with nonsyndromic hearing impairment. However, the spectrum and prevalence of mutations in this gene vary among different ethnic groups. In China, 30,000 infants are born with congenital hearing impairment annually. In order to provide appropriate genetic testing and counseling to the families, we investigated the molecular etiology of nonsyndromic deafness in 103 unrelated school children attending Nantong School for the Deaf and Mute in Jiangsu Province, China. The coding exon of the GJB2 gene was PCR amplified and sequenced. Sixty two GJB2 mutant alleles were identified in 35.9% (37/103) of the patients. Twenty five patients carried two pathogenic mutations and 12 patients carried one mutant allele. The 235delC was the most common mutation accounting for 69.4% (43/62) of GJB2 mutant alleles.The GJB2 mutant alleles accounted for 30.1% (62/206) of all chromosomes responsible for nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Testing of the 3 most prevalent deleterious frame shift mutations in this cohort detected 100% of all GJB2 mutant alleles. These results demonstrate that an effective genetic testing of GJB2 gene for patients and families with nonsyndromic hearing impairment is possible.

  8. Mutational effects and population dynamics during viral adaptation challenge current models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig R; Joyce, Paul; Wichman, Holly A

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation in haploid organisms has been extensively modeled but little tested. Using a microvirid bacteriophage (ID11), we conducted serial passage adaptations at two bottleneck sizes (10(4) and 10(6)), followed by fitness assays and whole-genome sequencing of 631 individual isolates. Extensive genetic variation was observed including 22 beneficial, several nearly neutral, and several deleterious mutations. In the three large bottleneck lines, up to eight different haplotypes were observed in samples of 23 genomes from the final time point. The small bottleneck lines were less diverse. The small bottleneck lines appeared to operate near the transition between isolated selective sweeps and conditions of complex dynamics (e.g., clonal interference). The large bottleneck lines exhibited extensive interference and less stochasticity, with multiple beneficial mutations establishing on a variety of backgrounds. Several leapfrog events occurred. The distribution of first-step adaptive mutations differed significantly from the distribution of second-steps, and a surprisingly large number of second-step beneficial mutations were observed on a highly fit first-step background. Furthermore, few first-step mutations appeared as second-steps and second-steps had substantially smaller selection coefficients. Collectively, the results indicate that the fitness landscape falls between the extremes of smooth and fully uncorrelated, violating the assumptions of many current mutational landscape models.

  9. The dynamics of mitochondrial mutations causing male infertility in spatially structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Guillaume, Frédéric; Engelstädter, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are usually inherited maternally and therefore there is no direct selection against mutations that have deleterious effects in males only (mother's curse). This is true in particular for mitochondrial mutations that reduce the fertility of their male carriers, as has been reported in a number of species. Using both analytical methods and computer simulations, we demonstrate that spatial population structure can induce strong selection against such male infertility mutations. This is because (1) infertile males may reduce the fecundity of the females they mate with and (2) population structure induces increased levels of inbreeding, so that the fitness of females carrying the mutation is more strongly reduced than the fitness of wild-type females. Selection against mitochondrial male infertility mutations increases with decreasing deme size and migration rates, and in particular with female migration rates. On the other hand, the migration model (e.g., island or stepping stone model) has generally only minor effects on the fate of the mitochondrial mutations. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Epistasis as a determinant of the HIV-1 protease's robustness to mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Capel

    Full Text Available The robustness of phenotypes to mutation is critical to protein evolution; robustness may be an adaptive trait if it promotes evolution. We hypothesised that native proteins subjected to natural selection in vivo should be more robust than proteins generated in vitro in the absence of natural selection. We compared the mutational robustness of two human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 proteases with comparable catalytic efficiencies, one isolated from an infected individual and the second generated in vitro via random mutagenesis. Single mutations in the protease (82 and 60 in the wild-type and mutant backgrounds, respectively were randomly generated in vitro and the catalytic efficiency of each mutant was determined. No differences were observed between these two protease variants when lethal, neutral, and deleterious mutations were compared (P = 0.8025, chi-squared test. Similarly, average catalytic efficiency (-72.6% and -64.5%, respectively did not significantly differ between protease mutant libraries (P = 0.3414, Mann Whitney test. Overall, the two parental proteins displayed similar mutational robustness. Importantly, strong and widespread epistatic interactions were observed when the effect of the same mutation was compared in both proteases, suggesting that epistasis can be a key determinant of the robustness displayed by the in vitro generated protease.

  11. RNF43 is a tumour suppressor gene mutated in mucinous tumours of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Georgina L; Hunter, Sally M; Doyle, Maria A; Rowley, Simone M; Christie, Michael; Allan, Prue E; Bowtell, David D L; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2013-02-01

    Mucinous carcinomas represent a distinct morphological subtype which can arise from several organ sites, including the ovary, and their genetic characteristics are largely under-described. Exome sequencing of 12 primary mucinous ovarian tumours identified RNF43 as the most frequently somatically mutated novel gene, secondary to KRAS and mutated at a frequency equal to that of TP53 and BRAF. Further screening of RNF43 in a larger cohort of ovarian tumours identified additional mutations, with a total frequency of 2/22 (9%) in mucinous ovarian borderline tumours and 6/29 (21%) in mucinous ovarian carcinomas. Seven mutations were predicted to truncate the protein and one missense mutation was predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. Six tumours had allelic imbalance at the RNF43 locus, with loss of the wild-type allele. The mutation spectrum strongly suggests that RNF43 is an important tumour suppressor gene in mucinous ovarian tumours, similar to its reported role in mucinous pancreatic precancerous cysts.

  12. Co-infection Weakens Selection Against Epistatic Mutations in RNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Rémy; Wilke, Claus O.; Montville, Rebecca; Remold, Susanna K.; Chao, Lin; Turner, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Co-infection may be beneficial in large populations of viruses because it permits sexual exchange between viruses that is useful in combating the mutational load. This advantage of sex should be especially substantial when mutations interact through negative epistasis. In contrast, co-infection may be detrimental because it allows virus complementation, where inferior genotypes profit from superior virus products available within the cell. The RNA bacteriophage φ6 features a genome divided into three segments. Co-infection by multiple φ6 genotypes produces hybrids containing reassorted mixtures of the parental segments. We imposed a mutational load on φ6 populations by mixing the wild-type virus with three single mutants, each harboring a deleterious mutation on a different one of the three virus segments. We then contrasted the speed at which these epistatic mutations were removed from virus populations in the presence and absence of co-infection. If sex is a stronger force, we predicted that the load should be purged faster in the presence of co-infection. In contrast, if complementation is more important we hypothesized that mutations would be eliminated faster in the absence of co-infection. We found that the load was purged faster in the absence of co-infection, which suggests that the disadvantages of complementation can outweigh the benefits of sex, even in the presence of negative epistasis. We discuss our results in light of virus disease management and the evolutionary advantage of haploidy in biological populations. PMID:15454523

  13. Identification of Two Novel HOXB13 Germline Mutations in Portuguese Prostate Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Sofia; Cardoso, Marta; Pinto, Pedro; Pinheiro, Manuela; Santos, Catarina; Peixoto, Ana; Bento, Maria José; Oliveira, Jorge; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2015-01-01

    The HOXB13 germline variant G84E (rs138213197) was recently described in men of European descent, with the highest prevalence in Northern Europe. The G84E mutation has not been found in patients of African or Asian ancestry, which may carry other HOXB13 variants, indicating allelic heterogeneity depending on the population. In order to gain insight into the full scope of coding HOXB13 mutations in Portuguese prostate cancer patients, we decided to sequence the entire coding region of the HOXB13 gene in 462 early-onset or familial/hereditary cases. Additionally, we searched for somatic HOXB13 mutations in 178 prostate carcinomas to evaluate their prevalence in prostate carcinogenesis. Three different patients were found to carry in their germline DNA two novel missense variants, which were not identified in 132 control subjects. Both variants are predicted to be deleterious by different in silico tools. No somatic mutations were found. These findings further support the hypothesis that different rare HOXB13 mutations may be found in different ethnic groups. Detection of mutations predisposing to prostate cancer may require re-sequencing rather than genotyping, as appropriate to the population under investigation. PMID:26176944

  14. Osteogenesis imperfecta type 3 in South Africa: Causative mutations in FKBP10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvera Vorster

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. A relatively high frequency of autosomal recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta (OI type 3 (OI-3 is present in the indigenous black southern African population. Affected persons may be severely handicapped as a result of frequent fractures, progressive deformity of the tubular bones and spinal malalignment. Objective. To delineate the molecular basis for the condition. Methods. Molecular investigations were performed on 91 affected persons from seven diverse ethnolinguistic groups in this population. Results. Following polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct cycle sequencing, FKBP10 mutations were identified in 45.1% (41/91 OI-3-affected persons. The homozygous FKBP10 c.831dupC frameshift mutation was confirmed in 35 affected individuals in the study cohort. Haplotype analysis suggests that this mutation is identical among these OI-3-affected persons by descent, thereby confirming that they had a common ancestor. Compound heterozygosity of this founder mutation was observed, in combination with three different deleterious FKBP10 mutations, in six additional persons in the cohort. Four of these individuals had the c.831delC mutation. Conclusion. The burden of the disorder, both in frequency and severity, warrants the establishment of a dedicated service for molecular diagnostic confirmation and genetic management of persons and families with OI in southern Africa.

  15. PMCA4 (ATP2B4 mutation in familial spastic paraplegia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaoxin Li

    Full Text Available Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized primarily by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 50 disease loci have been described with different modes of inheritance. In this study, we identified a novel missense mutation (c.803G>A, p.R268Q in the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA4, or ATP2B4 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant FSP using whole-exome sequencing and confirmed with Sanger sequencing. This mutation co-segregated with the phenotype in the six family members studied and is predicted to be pathogenic when multiple deleteriousness predictions were combined. This novel R268Q mutation was not present in over 7,000 subjects in public databases, and over 1,000 Han Chinese in our database. Prediction of potential functional consequence of R268Q mutation on PMCA4 by computational modeling revealed that this mutation is located in protein aggregation-prone segment susceptible to protein misfolding. Analysis for thermodynamic protein stability indicated that this mutation destabilizes the PMCA4 protein structure with higher folding free energy. As PMCA4 functions to maintain neuronal calcium homeostasis, our result showed that calcium dysregulation may be associated with the pathogenesis of FSP.

  16. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  17. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  18. BRCA somatic mutations and epigenetic BRCA modifications in serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, M; George, A; Kaye, S B; Banerjee, S

    2016-08-01

    The significant activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the treatment of germline BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer, which represents ∼15% of HGS cases, has recently led to European Medicines Agency and food and drug administration approval of olaparib. Accumulating evidence suggests that PARP inhibitors may have a wider application in the treatment of sporadic ovarian cancers. Up to 50% of HGS ovarian cancer patients may exhibit homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) through mechanisms including germline BRCA mutations, somatic BRCA mutations, and BRCA promoter methylation. In this review, we discuss the role of somatic BRCA mutations and BRCA methylation in ovarian cancer. There is accumulating evidence for routine somatic BRCA mutation testing, but the relevance of BRCA epigenetic modifications is less clear. We explore the challenges that need to be addressed if the full potential of these markers of HRD is to be utilised in clinical practice.

  19. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  20. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Rattray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3 placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts. Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  1. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Rattray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3 placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts. Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  2. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 point mutations and large rearrangements in breast and ovarian cancer families in Northern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajska, Magdalena; Brozek, Izabela; Senkus-Konefka, Elzbieta; Jassem, Jacek; Stepnowska, Magdalena; Palomba, Grazia; Pisano, Marina; Casula, Milena; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Borg, Ake; Limon, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Sixty-four Polish families with a history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were screened for mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes using a combination of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and sequencing. Two thirds (43/64; 67%) of the families were found to carry deleterious mutations, of which the most frequent were BRCA1 5382insC (n=22/43; 51%) and Cys61Gly (n=9/43; 20%). Two other recurrent mutations were BRCA1 185delAG (n=3) and 3819del5 (n=4), together accounting for 16% of the 43 mutation-positive cases. We also found three novel mutations (BRCA1 2991del5, BRCA2 6238ins2del21 and 8876delC) which combined with findings from our earlier study of 60 Northern Polish families. Moreover, screening of 43 BRCA1/2 negative families for the presence of large rearrangements by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) resulted in the finding of two additional BRCA1 mutations: a deletion of exons 1A, 1B and 2, and a deletion of exons 17-19, both present in single families. We conclude that the Polish population has a diverse mutation spectrum influenced by strong founder effects. However, families with strong breast/ovarian cancer history who are negative for these common mutations should be offered a complete BRCA gene screening, including MLPA analysis.

  4. Novel germline mutation (Leu512Met) in the thyrotropin receptor gene (TSHR) leading to sporadic non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephanie A; Moon, Jennifer E; Dauber, Andrew; Smith, Jessica R

    2017-03-01

    Primary nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism is a rare cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism. This results from an activating mutation in the thyrotropin-receptor (TSHR). It can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner or occur sporadically as a de novo mutation. Affected individuals display a wide phenotype from severe neonatal to mild subclinical hyperthyroidism. We describe a 6-month-old boy with a de novo mutation in the TSHR gene who presented with accelerated growth, enlarging head circumference, tremor and thyrotoxicosis. Genomic DNA from the patient's and parents' peripheral blood leukocytes was extracted. Exons 9 and 10 of the TSHR gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Sequencing exon 10 of the TSHR gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation substituting cytosine to adenine at nucleotide position 1534 in the patient's peripheral blood leukocytes. This leads to a substitution of leucine to methionine at amino acid position 512. The mutation was absent in the parents. In silico modeling by PolyPhen-2 and SIFT predicted the mutation to be deleterious. The p.Leu512Met mutation (c.1534C>A) of the TSHR gene has not been previously described in germline or somatic mutations. This case presentation highlights the possibility of mild thyrotoxicosis in affected individuals and contributes to the understanding of sporadic non-autoimmune primary hyperthyroidism.

  5. Interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations in genetic disease: review of the literature and guidelines for information-theoretical analysis [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha G. Caminsky

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of genomic variants has become one of the paramount challenges in the post-genome sequencing era. In this review we summarize nearly 20 years of research on the applications of information theory (IT to interpret coding and non-coding mutations that alter mRNA splicing in rare and common diseases. We compile and summarize the spectrum of published variants analyzed by IT, to provide a broad perspective of the distribution of deleterious natural and cryptic splice site variants detected, as well as those affecting splicing regulatory sequences. Results for natural splice site mutations can be interrogated dynamically with Splicing Mutation Calculator, a companion software program that computes changes in information content for any splice site substitution, linked to corresponding publications containing these mutations. The accuracy of IT-based analysis was assessed in the context of experimentally validated mutations. Because splice site information quantifies binding affinity, IT-based analyses can discern the differences between variants that account for the observed reduced (leaky versus abolished mRNA splicing. We extend this principle by comparing predicted mutations in natural, cryptic, and regulatory splice sites with observed deleterious phenotypic and benign effects. Our analysis of 1727 variants revealed a number of general principles useful for ensuring portability of these analyses and accurate input and interpretation of mutations. We offer guidelines for optimal use of IT software for interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations.

  6. Interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations in genetic disease: review of the literature and guidelines for information-theoretical analysis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4nq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Caminsky

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of genomic variants has become one of the paramount challenges in the post-genome sequencing era. In this review we summarize nearly 20 years of research on the applications of information theory (IT to interpret coding and non-coding mutations that alter mRNA splicing in rare and common diseases. We compile and summarize the spectrum of published variants analyzed by IT, to provide a broad perspective of the distribution of deleterious natural and cryptic splice site variants detected, as well as those affecting splicing regulatory sequences. Results for natural splice site mutations can be interrogated dynamically with Splicing Mutation Calculator, a companion software program that computes changes in information content for any splice site substitution, linked to corresponding publications containing these mutations. The accuracy of IT-based analysis was assessed in the context of experimentally validated mutations. Because splice site information quantifies binding affinity, IT-based analyses can discern the differences between variants that account for the observed reduced (leaky versus abolished mRNA splicing. We extend this principle by comparing predicted mutations in natural, cryptic, and regulatory splice sites with observed deleterious phenotypic and benign effects. Our analysis of 1727 variants revealed a number of general principles useful for ensuring portability of these analyses and accurate input and interpretation of mutations. We offer guidelines for optimal use of IT software for interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations.

  7. Silting mutation in triangulated categories

    CERN Document Server

    Aihara, Takuma

    2010-01-01

    In representation theory of algebras the notion of `mutation' often plays important roles, and two cases are well known, i.e. `cluster tilting mutation' and `exceptional mutation'. In this paper we focus on `tilting mutation', which has a disadvantage that it is often impossible, i.e. some of summands of a tilting object can not be replaced to get a new tilting object. The aim of this paper is to take away this disadvantage by introducing `silting mutation' for silting objects as a generalization of `tilting mutation'. We shall develope a basic theory of silting mutation. In particular, we introduce a partial order on the set of silting objects and establish the relationship with `silting mutation' by generalizing the theory of Riedmann-Schofield and Happel-Unger. We show that iterated silting mutation act transitively on the set of silting objects for local, hereditary or canonical algebras. Finally we give a bijection between silting subcategories and certain t-structures.

  8. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  9. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  10. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  11. BRCA Mutations Increase Fertility in Families at Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Kwiatkowski

    Full Text Available Deleterious mutations in the BRCA genes are responsible for a small, but significant, proportion of breast and ovarian cancers (5 - 10 %. Proof of de novo mutations in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC families is rare, in contrast to founder mutations, thousands of years old, that may be carried by as much as 1 % of a population. Thus, if mutations favoring cancer survive selection pressure through time, they must provide advantages that compensate for the loss of life expectancy.This hypothesis was tested within 2,150 HBOC families encompassing 96,325 individuals. Parameters included counts of breast/ovarian cancer, age at diagnosis, male breast cancer and other cancer locations. As expected, well-known clinical parameters discriminated between BRCA-mutated families and others: young age at breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer and male breast cancer. The major fertility differences concerned men in BRCA-mutated families: they had lower first and mean age at paternity, and fewer remained childless. For women in BRCA families, the miscarriage rate was lower. In a logistic regression including clinical factors, the different miscarriage rate and men's mean age at paternity remained significant.Fertility advantages were confirmed in a subgroup of 746 BRCA mutation carriers and 483 non-carriers from BRCA mutated families. In particular, female carriers were less often nulliparous (9.1 % of carriers versus 16.0 %, p = 0.003 and had more children (1.8 ± 1.4 SD versus 1.5 ± 1.3, p = 0.002 as well as male carriers (1.7 ± 1.3 versus 1.4 ± 1.3, p = 0.024.Although BRCA mutations shorten the reproductive period due to cancer mortality, they compensate by improving fertility both in male and female carriers.

  12. Prevalence of TP53 germ line mutations in young Pakistani breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad U; Gull, Sidra; Asghar, Kashif; Muhammad, Noor; Amin, Asim; Hamann, Ute

    2012-06-01

    Women from Pakistan and India are more often diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer than Caucasian women. Given that only 12% of Pakistani women diagnosed with breast cancer at or before 30 years of age have previously been shown to harbor germ line mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, the genetic causes of the majority of early-onset cases are unexplained. Since germ line mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 predispose women to early-onset breast cancer, we assessed the prevalence of TP53 mutations in 105 early-onset breast cancer patients from Pakistan, who had previously been found to be negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ line mutations. The patient group included 67 women diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer at or before age 30 with no family history of breast or ovarian cancer (EO30NFH group) and 38 women diagnosed with breast cancer at or before age 40 with one or more first- or second-degree relatives with breast or ovarian cancer (EO40FH group). Mutation analysis of the complete TP53 coding region was performed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, followed by DNA sequencing of variant fragments. One deleterious mutation, c.499-500delCA in exon 5, was identified in the 105 breast cancer patients (1%). This mutation is novel in the germ line and has not been described in other populations. It was detected in a 28-year-old patient with no family history of breast or ovarian cancer. This mutation is rare as it was not detected in additional 157 recently recruited non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2-associated early-onset breast cancer patients. Our findings show that TP53 mutations may account for a minimal portion of early-onset breast cancer in Pakistan.

  13. Mutations distribution and correlation with phenotypes in steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency Italian patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, P.; Volorio, S.; Ferran, M. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is recessively inherited and accounts for over 90% of the genetic disorders of steroidogenesis (CAH). We previously described the distribution of the whole deletion (14.4%) and large scale gene conversion (7.8%) at the P450c21-B locus in our population. In this study we determined the distribution of seven point mutations and searched for new mutations in patients where large rearrangements were not found. For this purpose we have studied 45 Italian families using a P450c21-B-specific PCR in combination with either dot blot analysis and allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization or by cloning and sequencing. Molecular results have indicated a high frequency of point mutations (61%) corresponding to deleterious sequences normally present in the pseudogene. In particular, only 3 of them were prominent: the splicing mutation at codon 281 (9/16) was the most common within the non-classic form. By cloning and sequencing we detected a deletion of the C2029 residue causing a frameshift and the downstream insertion of a stop codon (2124-2126). This mutation was found in a non-classical patient who is a compound heterozygote for the mutation 281. Family genotyping revealed 5 de novo mutations, and in 8 asymptomatic parents, we detected causative mutations in both alleles. These data suggest that phenotype is not always correlated to allelic variations in P450c21-B genes. For this reason, in these families prenatal diagnosis should be performed by direct detection of mutations instead of linkage analysis.

  14. A Systematic Analysis of Coal Accumulation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Aiguo

    2008-01-01

    Formation of coal seam and coal-rich zone is an integrated result of a series of factors in coal accumulation process. The coal accumulation system is an architectural aggregation of coal accumulation factors. It can be classified into 4 levels: the global coal accumulation super-system, the coal accumulation domain mega.system, the coal accumulation basin system, and the coal seam or coal seam set sub-system. The coal accumulation process is an open, dynamic, and grey system, and is meanwhile a system with such natures as aggregation, relevance, entirety, purpose-orientated, hierarchy, and environment adaptability. In this paper, we take coal accumulation process as a system to study origin of coal seam and coal-rich zone; and we will discuss a methodology of the systematic analysis of coal accumulation process. As an example, the Ordos coal basin was investigated to elucidate the application of the method of the coal accumulation system analysis.

  15. Metal accumulating plants: Medium's role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabier, J.; Prudent, P.; Szymanska, B.; Mevy, J.-P.

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate phytoremediation potentialities by metal accumulation in tolerant plants, trials are carried out using in vitro cultures. Organie compounds influence on metal accumulation is studied with metals supplemented media. The tested compounds on zinc and lead absorption by Brassica juncea, are chelating agents (EDTA, citric acid) and soluble organic fractions of compost. EDTA seems to enhance the transfer of lead in plant but it is the opposite in the case of zinc. Citric acid stimulates root absorption for both zinc and lead. For the aqueous extracts of compost, variable effects are obtained according to the origin of compost (green wastes and food wastes). In'all tested conditions of cultures, zinc is mainly exported towards shoot while lead is stored in root.

  16. Bacterial accumulation in viscosity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbord, Nicolas; Guasto, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Cell motility is greatly modified by fluid rheology. In particular, the physical environments in which cells function, are often characterized by gradients of viscous biopolymers, such as mucus and extracellular matrix, which impact processes ranging from reproduction to digestion to biofilm formation. To understand how spatial heterogeneity of fluid rheology affects the motility and transport of swimming cells, we use hydrogel microfluidic devices to generate viscosity gradients in a simple, polymeric, Newtonian fluid. Using video microscopy, we characterize the random walk motility patterns of model bacteria (Bacillus subtilis), showing that both wild-type ('run-and-tumble') cells and smooth-swimming mutants accumulate in the viscous region of the fluid. Through statistical analysis of individual cell trajectories and body kinematics in both homogeneous and heterogeneous viscous environments, we discriminate passive, physical effects from active sensing processes to explain the observed cell accumulation at the ensemble level.

  17. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic trigl...

  18. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-28

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD.

  19. DOES RURAL-TO-URBAN MIGRATION PLACE ADOLESCENTS AT RISK OF DELETERIOUS SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH OUTCOMES? EVIDENCE FROM HAITI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckert, Jessica

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the links between migration and sexual and reproductive health among rural-to-urban migrant youth in Haiti. It evaluates behavioural, knowledge and attitudinal components from the perspective of three competing explanations for migrants' behaviours: adaptation, disruption and selection. Discrete-time event history analysis is employed to compare these hypotheses using Haiti Demographic and Health Survey data (N=1215 adolescent girls, N=829 adolescent boys). Multi-level models are used to compare changes in knowledge and attitudes in individuals using data from the Haiti Youth Transitions Study (N=223). The findings reveal that disruption is the most plausible explanation for the timing of migration and first sex among girls. However, contrary to the assumption that migrant youth risk experiencing first sex earlier, girls are less likely to experience first sex near the time they migrate, and rural-to-urban migrant boys may experience first sex at later ages. The high aspirations of migrant youth provide a likely explanation for these findings. Furthermore, male migrants accumulate less protective knowledge, which is consistent with the disruption hypothesis, and migrants endorse premarital sex similarly to non-migrants. Sexual and reproductive health curricula should be adapted to the unique needs of migrant youth, and youth should be targeted before they migrate.

  20. Msx1 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Kong, H.; Mues, G.; D’Souza, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

  1. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  2. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  3. Novel mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene in Indian cases of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Mehta, Bhakti; Menon, Shyla R; Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, almost exclusively affecting females and characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Both the classic and atypical forms of Rett syndrome are primarily due to mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been identified in patients with atypical Rett syndrome, X-linked infantile spasms sharing common features of generally early-onset seizures and mental retardation. CDKL5 is known as serine/threonine protein kinase 9 (STK9) and is mapped to the Xp22 region. It has a conserved serine/threonine kinase domain within its amino terminus and a large C-terminal region. Disease-causing mutations are distributed in both the amino terminal domain and in the large C-terminal domain. We have screened the CDKL5 gene in 44 patients with atypical Rett syndrome who had tested negative for MECP2 gene mutations and have identified 6 sequence variants, out of which three were novel and three known mutations. Two of these novel mutations p.V966I and p.A1011V were missense and p.H589H a silent mutation. Other known mutations identified were p.V999M, p.Q791P and p.T734A. Sequence homology for all the mutations revealed that the two mutations (p.Q791P and p.T734A) were conserved across species. This indicated the importance of these residues in structure and function of the protein. The damaging effects of these mutations were analysed in silico using PolyPhen-2 online software. The PolyPhen-2 scores of p.Q791P and p.T734A were 0.998 and 0.48, revealing that these mutations could be deleterious and might have potential functional effect. All other mutations had a low score suggesting that they might not alter the activity of CDKL5. We have also analysed the position of the mutations in the CDKL5 protein and found that all the mutations were present in the C-terminal domain of the protein. The C-terminal domain is required for

  4. New approaches for effective mutation induction in gamma field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki [National Institute of Agrobiological Resources, Institute of Radiation Breeding, Omiya, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of the report is to clarify the effects of chronic irradiation using in vitro culture on inducing the mutation of two model plants. Culture technique combined with irradiation can overcome the problem of chimera formation and provided 10 times greater mutation efficiency than conventional method. Proper mutagenic treatment using cultured materials is indispensable to effective mutation induction. The chronic culture method showed the widest color spectrum in chrysanthemum and extended toward not only the negative but positive direction. However, the acute culture methods indicated a relatively low mutation rate and a very limited flower color spectrum. Flower color mutation of the regenerations could be induced more from petals and buds than from leaves. These facts is supposed that the gene loci fully expressed on floral organs may be unstable for mutation by mutagenesis or culture. It may be likely to control a direction of desired mutation. One possible reason why the chronic culture methods showed higher frequencies is that most of the cells composing the tissue and organs continually irradiated into a cell division which was highly sensitive and more mutable to irradiation. Under these conditions, many mutated sectors may accumulate in the cells of the growing organs. Regenerated mutant lines show remarkable decrease of chromosome numbers by irradiation. It is a proper indicator to monitor radiation damage. In this study, the six flower color mutant varieties registered were derived from chronic irradiation. The combined method of chronic irradiation with floral organ cultures proved to be of particularly great practical use in mutation breeding for not only flower species but any other species. (author)

  5. The emerging role of SMPD1 mutations in Parkinson's disease: Implications for future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Alcalay, Roy N; Bressman, Susan; Giladi, Nir; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-10-01

    Recently, an additional study confirmed the association between SMPD1 mutations and Parkinson's disease (PD). While the first study on SMPD1 and PD suggested that only one SMPD1 mutations is responsible for the association to PD, the recent study argued that all SMPD1 mutations may be associated with an increased risk for PD. Since SMPD1 mutations are being routinely screened in some populations with high carrier frequencies, and since it will be further screened in additional PD populations, it is important to better define the association between SMPD1 and PD. We reanalyzed the data from the recent and previous papers, and we show that the association between SMPD1 and PD is indeed not driven by only one mutation, but it is also not driven by all SMPD1 mutations. In the Ashkenazi-Jewish population, the p.fs330P (OR = 3.03, p = 0.0026) and p.L302P (OR = 9.62, p < 0.0001) are associated with PD, and the p.R496L mutation is not (OR = 0.84, p = 0.71), and similar observation was noted in the Chinese population. Thus, we conclude that similar to the GBA gene where different mutations have differential effects, SMPD1 mutations also have a differential effects on the risk for PD. Future studies should therefore examine the association by mutation and not by accumulative risk of all mutations.

  6. Exome sequencing reveals AMER1 as a frequently mutated gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Lázaro, Kira; Bellido, Fernando; Alonso, M. Henar; Aussó, Susanna; Guinó, Elisabet; Beltrán, Sergi; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Gut, Marta; Sanjuan, Xavier; Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Morón-Duran, Francisco D.; Soriano, Antonio; Salazar, Ramón; Valle, Laura; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Somatic mutations occur at early stages of adenoma and accumulate throughout colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutational landscape of stage II tumors and to search for novel recurrent mutations likely implicated in CRC tumorigenesis. DESIGN The exomic DNA of 42 stage II, microsatellite stable, colon tumors and their paired mucosae were sequenced. Other molecular data available in the discovery dataset (gene expression, methylation, and CNV) was used to further characterize these tumors. Additional datasets comprising 553 CRC samples were used to validate the discovered mutations. RESULTS As a result, 4,886 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were found. Almost all SNVs were private changes, with few mutations shared by more than one tumor, thus revealing tumor-specific mutational landscapes. Nevertheless, these diverse mutations converged into common cellular pathways such as cell cycle or apoptosis. Among this mutational heterogeneity, variants resulting in early stop-codons in the AMER1 (also known as FAM123B or WTX) gene emerged as recurrent mutations in CRC. Loses of AMER1 by other mechanisms apart from mutations such as methylation and copy number aberrations were also found. Tumors lacking this tumor suppressor gene exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by inhibition of the canonical Wnt pathway. CONCLUSION In silico and experimental validation in independent datasets confirmed the existence of functional mutations in AMER1 in approximately 10% of analyzed CRC tumors. Moreover, these tumors exhibited a characteristic phenotype. PMID:26071483

  7. Evolutionary Stability Against Multiple Mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Anirban; Shaiju, A J

    2012-01-01

    It is known (see e.g. Weibull (1995)) that ESS is not robust against multiple mutations. In this article, we introduce robustness against multiple mutations and study some equivalent formulations and consequences.

  8. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate incidence, clinicopathological features and prognosis of BRAF-mutated conjunctival melanoma in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine BRAF mutations in paired premalignant lesions and evaluate immunohistochemical BRAF V600E oncoprotein detection. Methods: Data from 139 patients...

  9. The Arabidopsis AN3-YDA Gene Cascade Induces Anthocyanin Accumulation by Regulating Sucrose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Sheng Meng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin accumulation specifically depends on sucrose (Suc signalling/levels. However, the gene cascades specifically involved in the Suc signalling/level-mediated anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway are still unknown. Arabidopsis ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3, a transcription coactivator, is involved in the regulation of leaf shape and drought tolerance. Recently, an AN3-CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 gene cascade has been reported to regulate the light signalling-mediated anthocyanin accumulation. Target gene analysis indicates that AN3 is associated with the YODA (YDA promoter, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase, in vivo for inducing anthocyanin accumulation. Indeed, loss-of-function mutants of YDA showed significantly increased anthocyanin accumulation. YDA mutation can also suppress the decrease in an3-4 anthocyanin accumulation. Further analysis indicates that the mutations of AN3 and YDA disrupt the normal Suc levels because of the changes of invertase activity in mutants of an3 or yda, which in turn induces the alterations of anthocyanin accumulation in mutants of an3 or yda via unknown regulatory mechanisms.

  10. TP53 and Beta-catenin mutations in liver tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hainaut

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    HBV and HCV play key roles in the etiopathogenesis of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC . Studies mostly based on cases from Western countries suggest distinct genetic pathways of carcinogenesis involving either TP53 or CTTNB1 mutations. Inappropriate reactivation of Wnt pathway due to mutations in CTNNB1 (Beta-Catenin gene itself is also frequently reported. Mutant Beta-catenin escapes to ubiquitination and down regulation by GSK3-B, it accumulates and trans-activates variety of oncogenes involved in neoplasmic transformation mimicking Wnt pathway activation. Taking into consideration viral infection, chromosome instability and TP53 /Beta-catenin alterations, Laurent-Puig et al. described two distinct HCC profiles in a serie of 137 HCC cases , the first one associates HBV infection with frequent chromosomal alteration and distributes with TP53 mutations, the second would be observed in HBV negative large sized tumors and distributes with Beta-catenin mutations. We have investigated the status of HBV and HCV infections and of genetic alterations in TP53 and CTTNB1 in 26 patients with HCC from Thailand. In tumours, HBV DNA was found in 19 cases (73% and HCV RNA in 4 cases (15.4% cases, 3 of whom were co-infected. Among the 19 HBV positive cases, sequencing of S gene showed genotype C in 82% and genotype B in 18%. Furthermore, 5/19 cases were negative for HBsAg and were categorized as occult HBV infections. TP53 mutations were detected in 9 cases (34,6% including 7 mutations at codon 249 (AGG to AGT, arginine to serine, considered as ";fingerprint"; of mutagenesis by aflatoxin metabolites. All cases with 249ser mutation had overt HBV infection.

    CTNNB1 mutations were found in 6/26 cases (23%, 4 of whom also had TP53 mutation. There was no significant association between CTTNB1

  11. Mitochondria-specific accumulation of amyloid β induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Han, Sun-Ho; Son, Sung Min; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Young-Ju; Byun, Jayoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are best known as the essential intracellular organelles that host the homeostasis required for cellular survival, but they also have relevance in diverse disease-related conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is the key molecule in AD pathogenesis, and has been highlighted in the implication of mitochondrial abnormality during the disease progress. Neuronal exposure to Aβ impairs mitochondrial dynamics and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial Aβ accumulation has been detected in the AD brain. However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain, and it is questionable whether mitochondrial Aβ accumulation followed by mitochondrial dysfunction leads directly to neuronal toxicity. This study demonstrated that an exogenous Aβ(1-42) treatment, when applied to the hippocampal cell line of mice (specifically HT22 cells), caused a deleterious alteration in mitochondria in both morphology and function. A clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocker rescued the exogenous Aβ(1-42)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the mitochondria-targeted accumulation of Aβ(1-42) in HT22 cells using Aβ(1-42) with a mitochondria-targeting sequence induced the identical morphological alteration of mitochondria as that observed in the APP/PS AD mouse model and exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. In addition, subsequent mitochondrial dysfunctions were demonstrated in the mitochondria-specific Aβ(1-42) accumulation model, which proved indistinguishable from the mitochondrial impairment induced by exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Finally, cellular toxicity was directly induced by mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation, which mimics the apoptosis process in exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation is the necessary and sufficient condition for Aβ-mediated mitochondria impairments, and leads

  12. p53 Mutations and Protein Overexpression in Primary Colorectal Cancer and its Liver Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To compare p53 status in primary and hepatic metastatic colorectal cancer in 34 patients. Methods: p53 gene status (exons 5- 9) was examined by PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and automated sequencing. P53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody DO-7. Results: p53 mutations were found in exons 5 through 9 in 21 of 34 patients (61.8%). Among them, 5 patients had mutation in liver metastasis but not in their primary tumors while in the other patients the same mutations were found in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. In no patients was p53 mutation exclusively found in the primary colorectal tumors. Moreover, additional mutation was detected in the metastatic lesions in two cases. Of the 37 mutations within the exons examined, 73% was missense mutation and 16% was nonsense mutation. There were 4 microinsertions. P53 protein was overexpressed in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers with p53 gene mutations. The presence of p53 mutation significantly correlated with p53 protein accumulation (r=0.96, p< 0.001). However, in 4 patients with p53 nonsense mutation, immunohistochemical staining was negative. In three patients who showed no p53 mutation of the primary tumor, p53 protein was consistently overexpressed. Conclusion: In colorectal cancers, p53 gene mutation usually appears first in the primary tumor and maintains as such but is more prominent when metastasized to the liver. However, p53 gene mutation may occur only after being metastasized.Although p53 gene mutation and p53 protein overexpression correlate with each other, either parameter examined alone may lead to false positive or negative results.

  13. Testing the ability of non-methylamine osmolytes present in kidney cells to counteract the deleterious effects of urea on structure, stability and function of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeza Khan

    Full Text Available Human kidney cells are under constant urea stress due to its urine concentrating mechanism. It is believed that the deleterious effect of urea is counteracted by methylamine osmolytes (glycine betaine and glycerophosphocholine present in kidney cells. A question arises: Do the stabilizing osmolytes, non-methylamines (myo-inositol, sorbitol and taurine present in the kidney cells also counteract the deleterious effects of urea? To answer this question, we have measured structure, thermodynamic stability (ΔG D (o and functional activity parameters (K m and k cat of different model proteins in the presence of various concentrations of urea and each non-methylamine osmolyte alone and in combination. We observed that (i for each protein myo-inositol provides perfect counteraction at 1∶2 ([myo-inositol]:[urea] ratio, (ii any concentration of sorbitol fails to refold urea denatured proteins if it is six times less than that of urea, and (iii taurine regulates perfect counteraction in a protein specific manner; 1.5∶2.0, 1.2∶2.0 and 1.0∶2.0 ([taurine]:[urea] ratios for RNase-A, lysozyme and α-lactalbumin, respectively.

  14. Testing the Ability of Non-Methylamine Osmolytes Present in Kidney Cells to Counteract the Deleterious Effects of Urea on Structure, Stability and Function of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sheeza; Bano, Zehra; Singh, Laishram R.; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2013-01-01

    Human kidney cells are under constant urea stress due to its urine concentrating mechanism. It is believed that the deleterious effect of urea is counteracted by methylamine osmolytes (glycine betaine and glycerophosphocholine) present in kidney cells. A question arises: Do the stabilizing osmolytes, non-methylamines (myo-inositol, sorbitol and taurine) present in the kidney cells also counteract the deleterious effects of urea? To answer this question, we have measured structure, thermodynamic stability (ΔGDo) and functional activity parameters (Km and kcat) of different model proteins in the presence of various concentrations of urea and each non-methylamine osmolyte alone and in combination. We observed that (i) for each protein myo-inositol provides perfect counteraction at 1∶2 ([myo-inositol]:[urea]) ratio, (ii) any concentration of sorbitol fails to refold urea denatured proteins if it is six times less than that of urea, and (iii) taurine regulates perfect counteraction in a protein specific manner; 1.5∶2.0, 1.2∶2.0 and 1.0∶2.0 ([taurine]:[urea]) ratios for RNase-A, lysozyme and α-lactalbumin, respectively. PMID:24039776

  15. A noncoding, regulatory mutation implicates HCFC1 in nonsyndromic intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lingli; Jolly, Lachlan A; Willis-Owen, Saffron; Gardner, Alison; Kumar, Raman; Douglas, Evelyn; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Tzschach, Andreas; Cohen, Monika; Hackett, Anna; Field, Michael; Froyen, Guy; Hu, Hao; Haas, Stefan A; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Corbett, Mark A; Gecz, Jozef

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of mutations causing human disease has so far been biased toward protein-coding regions. Having excluded all annotated coding regions, we performed targeted massively parallel resequencing of the nonrepetitive genomic linkage interval at Xq28 of family MRX3. We identified in the binding site of transcription factor YY1 a regulatory mutation that leads to overexpression of the chromatin-associated transcriptional regulator HCFC1. When tested on embryonic murine neural stem cells and embryonic hippocampal neurons, HCFC1 overexpression led to a significant increase of the production of astrocytes and a considerable reduction in neurite growth. Two other nonsynonymous, potentially deleterious changes have been identified by X-exome sequencing in individuals with intellectual disability, implicating HCFC1 in normal brain function.

  16. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild.

  17. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome: novel mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene in a French cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarret, Catherine; Rigal, Mélanie; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Dorboz, Imen; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Combes, Patricia; Giraud, Geneviève; Wanders, Ronald J A; Afenjar, Alexandra; Francannet, Christine; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-01-15

    Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation due a defect of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), related to mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. In this study, we screened a French cohort of patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) for mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. The five unrelated patients with typical SLS all present mutations in this gene. Three novel mutations were identified whereas three other ones were previously described. We also realized functional analyses at the mRNA level for two splice site mutations to study their deleterious consequences. Two of the previously described mutations had already been identified in the same region of Europe, suggesting a putative founder effect. We suggest that, (1) when clinical and MR features are present, direct sequencing of the ALDH3A2 gene in SLS is of particular interest without necessity of a skin biopsy for enzymatic assay in order to propose genetic counsel and (2) identification of mutations already described in the same population with putative founder effects may simplify genetic analysis in this context.

  18. International distribution and age estimation of the Portuguese BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Pinheiro, Manuela; Pinto, Pedro; Soares, Maria José; Rocha, Patrícia; Gusmão, Leonor; Amorim, António; van der Hout, Annemarie; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Cruger, Dorthe; Sunde, Lone; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Cornil, Lucie; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Pertesi, Maroulio; Narod, Steven; Royer, Robert; Costa, Maurício M; Lazaro, Conxi; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Graña, Begoña; Blanco, Ignacio; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldés, Trinidad; Maillet, Philippe; Benais-Pont, Gaelle; Pardo, Bruno; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Velasco, Eladio A; Durán, Mercedes; Miramar, Maria-Dolores; Valle, Ana Rodriguez; Calvo, María-Teresa; Vega, Ana; Blanco, Ana; Diez, Orland; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Balmaña, Judith; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Alonso, Carmen; Baiget, Montserrat; Foulkes, William; Tischkowitz, Marc; Kyle, Rachel; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Ewald, Ingrid P; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Giannini, Giuseppe; Gulino, Alberto; Achatz, Maria I; Carraro, Dirce M; de Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac; Remenieras, Audrey; Benson, Cindy; Casadei, Silvia; King, Mary-Claire; Teugels, Erik; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2011-06-01

    The c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation has so far only been reported in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families of Portuguese origin. Since this mutation is not detectable using the commonly used screening methodologies and must be specifically sought, we screened for this rearrangement in a total of 5,443 suspected HBOC families from several countries. Whereas the c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation was detected in 11 of 149 suspected HBOC families from Portugal, representing 37.9% of all deleterious mutations, in other countries it was detected only in one proband living in France and in four individuals requesting predictive testing living in France and in the USA, all being Portuguese immigrants. After performing an extensive haplotype study in carrier families, we estimate that this founder mutation occurred 558 ± 215 years ago. We further demonstrate significant quantitative differences regarding the production of the BRCA2 full length RNA and the transcript lacking exon 3 in c.156_157insAlu BRCA2 mutation carriers and in controls. The cumulative incidence of breast cancer in carriers did not differ from that of other BRCA2 and BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We recommend that all suspected HBOC families from Portugal or with Portuguese ancestry are specifically tested for this rearrangement.

  19. Complement drives glucosylceramide accumulation and tissue inflammation in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manoj K; Burrow, Thomas A; Rani, Reena; Martin, Lisa J; Witte, David; Setchell, Kenneth D; Mckay, Mary A; Magnusen, Albert F; Zhang, Wujuan; Liou, Benjamin; Köhl, Jörg; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2017-03-02

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in GBA1, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). GBA1 mutations drive extensive accumulation of glucosylceramide (GC) in multiple innate and adaptive immune cells in the spleen, liver, lung and bone marrow, often leading to chronic inflammation. The mechanisms that connect excess GC to tissue inflammation remain unknown. Here we show that activation of complement C5a and C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1) controls GC accumulation and the inflammatory response in experimental and clinical Gaucher disease. Marked local and systemic complement activation occurred in GCase-deficient mice or after pharmacological inhibition of GCase and was associated with GC storage, tissue inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine production. Whereas all GCase-inhibited mice died within 4-5 weeks, mice deficient in both GCase and C5aR1, and wild-type mice in which GCase and C5aR were pharmacologically inhibited, were protected from these adverse effects and consequently survived. In mice and humans, GCase deficiency was associated with strong formation of complement-activating GC-specific IgG autoantibodies, leading to complement activation and C5a generation. Subsequent C5aR1 activation controlled UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase production, thereby tipping the balance between GC formation and degradation. Thus, extensive GC storage induces complement-activating IgG autoantibodies that drive a pathway of C5a generation and C5aR1 activation that fuels a cycle of cellular GC accumulation, innate and adaptive immune cell recruitment and activation in Gaucher disease. As enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapies are expensive and still associated with inflammation, increased risk of cancer and Parkinson disease, targeting C5aR1 may serve as a treatment option for patients with Gaucher disease and, possibly, other lysosomal storage diseases.

  20. The rate of accumulation of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen containing an NNRTI*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Paredes, R; Phillips, A N

    2012-01-01

    Virological failure of first-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) can compromise the efficacy of etravirine as a result of the accumulation of NNRTI resistance mutations. How quickly NNRTI resistance accumulates in patients with a delayed switch from nevirapine or ef...

  1. Further insight into the phenotype associated with a mutation in the ORC6 gene, causing Meier-Gorlin syndrome 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Stavit Allon; Khayat, Morad; Etty, Daniel-Spiegl; Elpeleg, Orly

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex subunits cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The disease manifests a triad of short stature, small ears, and small and/or absent patellae with variable expressivity. We report on the identification of a homozygous deleterious mutation in the ORC6 gene in previously described fetuses at the severe end of the Meier-Gorlin spectrum. The phenotype included severe intrauterine growth retardation, dislocation of knees, gracile bones, clubfeet, and small mandible and chest. To date, the clinical presentation of ORC6-associated Meier-Gorlin syndrome has been mild compared to other the phenotype associated with other loci. The present report expands the clinical phenotype associated with ORC6 mutations to include severely abnormal embryological development suggesting a possible genotype-phenotype correlation.

  2. A missense mutation in MKRN3 in a Danish girl with central precocious puberty and her brother with early puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Känsäkoski, Johanna; Raivio, Taneli; Juul, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic central precocious puberty (ICPP) results from the premature reactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to development of secondary sexual characteristics prior to 8 y in girls or 9 y in boys. Since the initial discovery of mutations in the maternally...... hypothalamic complementary DNA (cDNA) was investigated by PCR. RESULTS: One paternally inherited rare variant, c.1034G>A (p.Arg345His), was identified in one girl with ICPP and in her brother with early puberty. The variant is predicted to be deleterious by three different in silico prediction programs....... Expression of MKRN3 was confirmed in adult human hypothalamus. CONCLUSION: Our results are in line with previous studies in which paternally inherited MKRN3 mutations have been found both in males and in females with ICPP or early puberty. Our report further expands the set of MKRN3 mutations identified...

  3. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    Decoding of genetic information occurs upon interaction of an mRNA codon-tRNA anticodon complex with the small subunit of the ribosome. The ribosomal decoding region is associated with highly conserved sequences near the 3' end of 16 S rRNA. The decoding process is perturbed by the aminoglycoside...... of universally conserved nucleotides at 1406 to 1408 and 1494 to 1495 in the decoding region of plasmid-encoded bacterial 16 S rRNA. Phenotypic changes range from the benign effect of U1406-->A or A1408-->G substitutions, to the highly deleterious 1406G and 1495 mutations that assemble into 30 S subunits...... but are defective in forming functional ribosomes. Changes in the local conformation of the decoding region caused by these mutations were identified by chemical probing of isolated 30 S subunits. Ribosomes containing 16 S rRNA with mutations at positions 1408, 1407+1494, or 1495 had reduced affinity...

  4. Mutational analysis of single circulating tumor cells by next generation sequencing in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardi, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Gabellini, Stefano; Simi, Lisa; Mancini, Irene; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Leo, Angelo; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) represent a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor potentially allowing real-time monitoring of cancer biology and therapies in individual patients. The purpose of the study was to explore the applicability of a protocol for the molecular characterization of single CTCs by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) in order to investigate cell heterogeneity and provide a tool for a personalized medicine approach. CTCs were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch in blood from four metastatic breast cancer patients and singularly isolated by DEPArray. Upon whole genome amplification 3–5 single CTCs per patient were analyzed by NGS for 50 cancer-related genes. We found 51 sequence variants in 25 genes. We observed inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in the mutational status of CTCs. The highest number of somatic deleterious mutations was found in the gene TP53, whose mutation is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The discordance between the mutational status of the primary tumor and CTCs observed in 3 patients suggests that, in advanced stages of cancer, CTC characteristics are more closely linked to the dynamic modifications of the disease status. In one patient the mutational profiles of CTCs before and during treatment shared only few sequence variants. This study supports the applicability of a non-invasive approach based on the liquid biopsy in metastatic breast cancer patients which, in perspective, should allow investigating the clonal evolution of the tumor for the development of new therapeutic strategies in precision medicine. PMID:27034166

  5. An Evolutionary Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Foo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease that can successfully be treated with drugs targeting mutant onco-proteins has motivated whole-genome sequencing efforts in many human cancer types. However, only a subset of mutations found within the genomic landscape of cancer is likely to provide a fitness advantage to the cell. Distinguishing such "driver" mutations from innocuous "passenger" events is critical for prioritizing the validation of candidate mutations in disease-relevant models. We design a novel statistical index, called the Hitchhiking Index, which reflects the probability that any observed candidate gene is a passenger alteration, given the frequency of alterations in a cross-sectional cancer sample set, and apply it to a mutational data set in colorectal cancer. Our methodology is based upon a population dynamics model of mutation accumulation and selection in colorectal tissue prior to cancer initiation as well as during tumorigenesis. This methodology can be used to aid in the prioritization of candidate mutations for functional validation and contributes to the process of drug discovery.

  6. The evolution of cellular deficiency in GATA2 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Rachel E.; Milne, Paul; Jardine, Laura; Zandi, Sasan; Swierczek, Sabina I.; McGovern, Naomi; Cookson, Sharon; Ferozepurwalla, Zaveyna; Langridge, Alexander; Pagan, Sarah; Gennery, Andrew; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Hämäläinen, Sari; Seppänen, Mikko; Helbert, Matthew; Tholouli, Eleni; Gambineri, Eleonora; Reykdal, Sigrún; Gottfreðsson, Magnús; Thaventhiran, James E.; Morris, Emma; Hirschfield, Gideon; Richter, Alex G.; Jolles, Stephen; Bacon, Chris M.; Hambleton, Sophie; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Bryceson, Yenan; Allen, Carl; Prchal, Josef T.; Dick, John E.; Bigley, Venetia

    2014-01-01

    Constitutive heterozygous GATA2 mutation is associated with deafness, lymphedema, mononuclear cytopenias, infection, myelodysplasia (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we describe a cross-sectional analysis of 24 patients and 6 relatives with 14 different frameshift or substitution mutations of GATA2. A pattern of dendritic cell, monocyte, B, and natural killer (NK) lymphoid deficiency (DCML deficiency) with elevated Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) was observed in all 20 patients phenotyped, including patients with Emberger syndrome, monocytopenia with Mycobacterium avium complex (MonoMAC), and MDS. Four unaffected relatives had a normal phenotype indicating that cellular deficiency may evolve over time or is incompletely penetrant, while 2 developed subclinical cytopenias or elevated Flt3L. Patients with GATA2 mutation maintained higher hemoglobin, neutrophils, and platelets and were younger than controls with acquired MDS and wild-type GATA2. Frameshift mutations were associated with earlier age of clinical presentation than substitution mutations. Elevated Flt3L, loss of bone marrow progenitors, and clonal myelopoiesis were early signs of disease evolution. Clinical progression was associated with increasingly elevated Flt3L, depletion of transitional B cells, CD56bright NK c