WorldWideScience

Sample records for deleterious host responses

  1. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  2. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas’ disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts’ immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host’s immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite–host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites–hosts–vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  3. Beneficial and Deleterious Bacterial - Host Interactions in Chronic Wound Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-02

    Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were shown to protect human keratinocytes from S. aureus-induced cell death when applied prior to... Lactobacillus spp. did not provide any protection to the host skin cells.66 In another recent study, when L. rhamnosus was simultaneously incubated with S...specific. Two retrospective studies comprising a total of 260 cases of Lactobacillus septicemia noted that the top causative strain was L. rhamnosus .77,78

  4. Host response to biomaterials the impact of host response on biomaterial selection

    CERN Document Server

    Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Host Response to Biomaterials: The Impact of Host Response on Biomaterial Selection explains the various categories of biomaterials and their significance for clinical applications, focusing on the host response to each biomaterial. It is one of the first books to connect immunology and biomaterials with regard to host response. The text also explores the role of the immune system in host response, and covers the regulatory environment for biomaterials, along with the benefits of synthetic versus natural biomaterials, and the transition from simple to complex biomaterial solutions. Fiel

  5. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host-pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections.

  6. Host response to Eimeria infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, W.J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Eimeria is responsible for the disease coccidiosis and has a worldwide distribution. Intestinal Eimeria infections are the dominating class of diseases in poultry causing great economical damage and considerably affecting animal welfare. In the Netherlands in chickens raised f

  7. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE PATHOLOGY AS A HOST RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J.; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by dementia and neuropathologically by accumulation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Identification of their constituents in the mid 1980s led to an exponential expansion of knowledge pertaining to metabolic pathways of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, in terms of normal human physiology and pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. Forgotten is the fact that our experience with AD pathology is based on end-stage lesions that have an imperfect correlation with clinical dementia in terms of lesion burden and affected brain region, and that the an AD is based on lesions that also occur in cognitively intact elderly. Attempts at addressing this fundamental defect now focus on toxic intermediates, namely Aβ oligomers, and their potential direct involvement of the synapse. Current thinking on AD pathology includes the concept that hallmark lesions may be non-toxic- something we have long been suggesting. We favor the interpretation that AD pathology represents a host response to an upstream pathophysiological process, and targeting lesions, including toxic intermediates, will not likely be beneficial so long as the host response is directly deleterious. Therefore, renewed efforts directed at basic age-related processes, such as oxidative stress and/or inflammatory mediators, are warranted. PMID:18520771

  8. Monitoring host responses to the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Joshua S; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Elias, Joshua E

    2015-09-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) ecosystem is increasingly understood to be a fundamental component of health, and has been identified as a new focal point for diagnosing, correcting and preventing countless disorders. Shotgun DNA sequencing has emerged as the dominant technology for determining the genetic and microbial composition of the gut microbiota. This technology has linked microbiota dysbioses to numerous GI diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and allergy, and to non-GI diseases like autism and depression. The importance of establishing causality in the deterioration of the host-microbiota relationship is well appreciated; however, discovery of candidate molecules and pathways that underlie mechanisms remains a major challenge. Targeted approaches, transcriptional assays, cytokine panels and imaging analyses, applied to animals, have yielded important insight into host responses to the microbiota. However, non-invasive, hypothesis-independent means of measuring host responses in humans are necessary to keep pace with similarly unbiased sequencing efforts that monitor microbes. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has served this purpose in many other fields, but stool proteins exist in such diversity and dynamic range as to overwhelm conventional proteomics technologies. Focused analysis of host protein secretion into the gut lumen and monitoring proteome-level dynamics in stool provides a tractable route toward non-invasively evaluating dietary, microbial, surgical or pharmacological intervention efficacies. This review is intended to guide GI biologists and clinicians through the methods currently used to elucidate host responses in the gut, with a specific focus on mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics applied to the study of host protein dynamics within the GI ecosystem.

  9. Inflammasomes in host response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Dario S; Lima-Junior, Djalma S

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric complexes of proteins that are assembled in the host cell cytoplasm in response to specific stress signals or contamination of the cytoplasm by microbial molecules. The canonical inflammasomes are composed of at least three main components: an inflammatory caspase (caspase-1, caspase-11), an adapter molecule (such as ASC), and a sensor protein (such as NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP12, NAIP1, NAIP2, NAIP5, or AIM2). The sensor molecule determines the inflammasome specificity by detecting specific microbial products or cell stress signals. Upon activation, these molecular platforms facilitate restriction of microbial replication and trigger an inflammatory form of cell death called pyroptosis, thus accounting for the genesis of inflammatory processes. Inflammasome activation has been widely reported in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, recent reports have highlighted the important role of the inflammasomes in the host response to the pathogenesis of infections caused by intracellular protozoan parasites. Herein, we review the activation and specific roles of inflammasomes in recognition and host responses to intracellular protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., and Leishmania spp.

  10. TNFα Impairs Rhabdoviral Clearance by Inhibiting the Host Autophagic Antiviral Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Espín-Palazón

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available TNFα is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine with a key role in the activation of the immune system to fight viral infections. Despite its antiviral role, a few viruses might utilize the host produced TNFα to their benefit. Some recent reports have shown that anti-TNFα therapies could be utilized to treat certain viral infections. However, the underlying mechanisms by which TNFα can favor virus replication have not been identified. Here, a rhabdoviral infection model in zebrafish allowed us to identify the mechanism of action by which Tnfa has a deleterious role for the host to combat certain viral infections. Our results demonstrate that Tnfa signals through its receptor Tnfr2 to enhance viral replication. Mechanistically, Tnfa does not affect viral adhesion and delivery from endosomes to the cytosol. In addition, the host interferon response was also unaffected by Tnfa levels. However, Tnfa blocks the host autophagic response, which is required for viral clearance. This mechanism of action provides new therapeutic targets for the treatment of SVCV-infected fish, and advances our understanding of the previously enigmatic deleterious role of TNFα in certain viral infections.

  11. TNFα Impairs Rhabdoviral Clearance by Inhibiting the Host Autophagic Antiviral Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Martínez-López, Alicia; Roca, Francisco J; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Candel, Sergio; García-Moreno, Diana; Falco, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Estepa, Amparo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-06-01

    TNFα is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine with a key role in the activation of the immune system to fight viral infections. Despite its antiviral role, a few viruses might utilize the host produced TNFα to their benefit. Some recent reports have shown that anti-TNFα therapies could be utilized to treat certain viral infections. However, the underlying mechanisms by which TNFα can favor virus replication have not been identified. Here, a rhabdoviral infection model in zebrafish allowed us to identify the mechanism of action by which Tnfa has a deleterious role for the host to combat certain viral infections. Our results demonstrate that Tnfa signals through its receptor Tnfr2 to enhance viral replication. Mechanistically, Tnfa does not affect viral adhesion and delivery from endosomes to the cytosol. In addition, the host interferon response was also unaffected by Tnfa levels. However, Tnfa blocks the host autophagic response, which is required for viral clearance. This mechanism of action provides new therapeutic targets for the treatment of SVCV-infected fish, and advances our understanding of the previously enigmatic deleterious role of TNFα in certain viral infections.

  12. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  13. Sex and deleterious mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  14. Phthalate-Induced Liver Protection against Deleterious Effects of the Th1 Response: A Potentially Serious Health Hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Mostafa Z; Shnyra, Alexander; Zoubine, Mikhail; Norkin, Maxim; Herndon, Betty; Quinn, Tim; Miranda, Roberto N; Cunningham, Michael L; Molteni, Agostino

    2007-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) induces pulmonary immunopathology mediated by classical Th1 type of acquired immunity with hepatic involvement in up to 80% of disseminated cases. Since PPAR agonists cause immune responses characterized by a decrease in the secretion of Th1 cytokines, we investigated the impact of activating these receptors on hepatic pathology associated with a well-characterized model of Th1-type pulmonary response. Male Fischer 344 rats were either maintained on a drug-free diet (groups I and II), or a diet containing diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP), a compound transformed in vivo to metabolites known to activate PPARs, for 21 days (groups III and IV). Subsequently, animals were primed with Mycobacterium bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) in a Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Fifteen days later, animals in groups II and IV were challenged with Sepharose 4B beads covalently coupled with PPD, while animals in groups I and III received blank Sepharose beads. Animals with Th1 response (group II) showed a marked structural disruption in the hepatic lobule. Remarkably, these alterations were conspicuously absent in animals which received DEHP (group IV), despite noticeable accumulation of T cells in the periportal triads. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy revealed hepatic accumulation of IFNgamma+ Th1 and IL-4+ Th2 cells in animals from groups II and IV, respectively. Our data suggest a PPARalpha-mediated suppression of the development of a Th1 immune response in the liver, resulting in hepatoprotective effect. However, potentially negative consequences of PPAR activation, such as decreased ability of the immune system to fight infection and interference with the efficacy of vaccines designed to evoke Th1 immune responses, remain to be investigated.

  15. Microbiota and host immune responses: a love-hate relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkovich, Sarah; Jobin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A complex relationship between the microbiota and the host emerges early at birth and continues throughout life. The microbiota includes the prokaryotes, viruses and eukaryotes living among us, all of which interact to different extents with various organs and tissues in the body, including the immune system. Although the microbiota is most dense in the lower intestine, its influence on host immunity extends beyond the gastrointestinal tract. These interactions with the immune system operate through the actions of various microbial structures and metabolites, with outcomes ranging from beneficial to deleterious for the host. These differential outcomes are dictated by host factors, environment, and the type of microbes or products present in a specific ecosystem. It is also becoming clear that the microbes are in turn affected and respond to the host immune system. Disruption of this complex dialogue between host and microbiota can lead to immune pathologies such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes and obesity. This review will discuss recent advances regarding the ways in which the host immune system and microbiota interact and communicate with one another.

  16. The ‘Goldilocks Zone’ from a redox perspective - Adaptive versus deleterious responses to oxidative stress in striated muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick J Alleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consequences of oxidative stress may be beneficial or detrimental in physiological systems. An organ system’s position on the ‘hormetic curve’ is governed by the source and temporality of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, proximity of ROS to moieties most susceptible to damage, and the capacity of the endogenous cellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. Most importantly, the resilience of the tissue (the capacity to recover from damage is a decisive factor, and this is reflected in the disparate response to ROS in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In myocytes, a high oxidative capacity invariably results in a significant ROS burden which in homeostasis, is rapidly neutralized by the robust antioxidant network. The up-regulation of key pathways in the antioxidant network is a central component of the hormetic response to ROS. Despite such adaptations, persistent oxidative stress over an extended time-frame (e.g. months to years inevitably leads to cumulative damages, maladaptation and ultimately the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Indeed, persistent oxidative stress in heart and skeletal muscle has been repeatedly demonstrated to have causal roles in the etiology of heart disease and insulin resistance, respectively. Deciphering the mechanisms that underlie the divergence between adaptive and maladaptive responses to oxidative stress remains an active area of research for basic scientists and clinicians alike, as this would undoubtedly lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we provide an overview of major types of ROS in striated muscle and the divergent adaptations that occur in response to them. Emphasis is placed on highlighting newly uncovered areas of research on this topic, with particular focus on the mitochondria, and the diverging roles that ROS play in muscle health (e.g., exercise or preconditioning and disease (e.g., cardiomyopathy, ischemia, metabolic syndrome.

  17. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    presents a significantly host immune and inflammatory response to the microbial challenge that determine of susceptibility to develop the destructive/progressive periodontitis under the influence of multiple behavioral, environmental and genetic factors. PMID:26221929

  18. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora SILVA

    2015-06-01

    a stage that presents a significantly host immune and inflammatory response to the microbial challenge that determine of susceptibility to develop the destructive/progressive periodontitis under the influence of multiple behavioral, environmental and genetic factors.

  19. Using host response modifiers in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, M John; Donley, Timothy G

    2002-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of a complex interaction between microbial plaque, the host's inflammatory response to the plaque, and host modifying factors (e.g., smoking, diabetes, genetics) that may have an impact on the disease process. It is known that plaque initiates periodontal disease but that the host response is responsible for the destruction of periodontal tissues. This article describes why host response modifiers may be used to help control inflammation and tissue destruction as part of the initial phase of periodontal therapy in selected patient groups.

  20. Proteomic Characterization of Host Response to Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chromy, B; Perkins, J; Heidbrink, J; Gonzales, A; Murhpy, G; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-05-11

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  1. Pathogenesis and host response in Syrian hamsters following intranasal infection with Andes virus.

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    David Safronetz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS, also referred to as hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, is a rare but frequently fatal disease caused by New World hantaviruses. In humans HPS is associated with severe pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock; however, the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclear largely due to a lack of suitable animal models for the study of disease progression. In this study we monitored clinical, virological, pathophysiological parameters and host immunological responses to decipher pathological factors and events in the lethal Syrian hamster model of HPS following intranasal inoculation of Andes virus. Transcriptional profiling of the host gene responses demonstrated a suppression of innate immune responses in most organs analyzed during the early stage of infection, except for in the lung which had low level activation of several pro-inflammatory genes. During this phase Andes virus established a systemic infection in hamsters, with viral antigen readily detectable in the endothelium of the majority of tissues analyzed by 7-8 days post-inoculation. Despite wide-spread infection, histological analysis confirmed pathological abnormalities were almost exclusively found in the lungs. Immediately preceding clinical signs of disease, intense activation of pro-inflammatory and Th1/Th2 responses were observed in the lungs as well as the heart, but not in peripheral organs, suggesting that localized immune-modulations by infection is paramount to pathogenesis. Throughout the course of infection a strong suppression of regulatory T-cell responses was noted and is hypothesized to be the basis of the aberrant immune activations. The unique and comprehensive monitoring of host immune responses to hantavirus infection increases our understanding of the immuno-pathogenesis of HPS and will facilitate the development of treatment strategies targeting deleterious host immunological responses.

  2. Host Control of Insect Endogenous Retroviruses: Small RNA Silencing and Immune Response

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    Marie Fablet

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancient infections from retroviruses that managed to integrate into the genome of germline cells and remained vertically transmitted from parent to progeny. Subsequent to the endogenization process, these sequences can move and multiply in the host genome, which can have deleterious consequences and disturb genomic stability. Natural selection favored the establishment of silencing pathways that protect host genomes from the activity of endogenous retroviruses. RNA silencing mechanisms are involved, which utilize piRNAs. The response to exogenous viral infections uses siRNAs, a class of small RNAs that are generated via a distinct biogenesis pathway from piRNAs. However, interplay between both pathways has been identified, and interactions with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal immune responses are also suspected. This review focuses on Diptera (Arthropods and intends to compile pieces of evidence showing that the RNA silencing pathway of endogenous retrovirus regulation is not independent from immunity and the response to infections. This review will consider the mechanisms that allow the lasting coexistence of viral sequences and host genomes from an evolutionary perspective.

  3. Divergence in olfactory host plant preference in D. mojavensis in response to cactus host use.

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    Date, Priya; Dweck, Hany K M; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Shann, Jodi; Hansson, Bill S; Rollmann, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Divergence in host adaptive traits has been well studied from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, but identification of the proximate mechanisms underlying such divergence is less well understood. Behavioral preferences for host plants are often mediated by olfaction and shifts in preference may be accompanied by changes in the olfactory system. In this study, we examine the evolution of host plant preferences in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that feeds and breeds on different cacti throughout its range. We show divergence in electrophysiological responses and olfactory behavior among populations with host plant shifts. Specifically, significant divergence was observed in the Mojave Desert population that specializes on barrel cactus. Differences were observed in electrophysiological responses of the olfactory organs and in behavioral responses to barrel cactus volatiles. Together our results suggest that the peripheral nervous system has changed in response to different ecological environments and that these changes likely contribute to divergence among D. mojavensis populations.

  4. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Oanh H.; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participat...

  5. Paradoxical Roles of the Neutrophil in Sepsis: Protective and Deleterious

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sônego, Fabiane; Castanheira, Fernanda Vargas e Silva; Ferreira, Raphael Gomes; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Leite, Caio Abner Vitorino Gonçalves; Nascimento, Daniele Carvalho; Colón, David Fernando; Borges, Vanessa de Fátima; Alves-Filho, José Carlos; Cunha, Fernando Queiróz

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, an overwhelming inflammatory response syndrome secondary to infection, is one of the costliest and deadliest medical conditions worldwide. Neutrophils are classically considered to be essential players in the host defense against invading pathogens. However, several investigations have shown that impairment of neutrophil migration to the site of infection, also referred to as neutrophil paralysis, occurs during severe sepsis, resulting in an inability of the host to contain and eliminate the infection. On the other hand, the neutrophil antibacterial arsenal contributes to tissue damage and the development of organ dysfunction during sepsis. In this review, we provide an overview of the main events in which neutrophils play a beneficial or deleterious role in the outcome of sepsis. PMID:27199981

  6. Arenavirus evasion of host anti-viral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Melissa; Salvato, Maria

    2012-10-17

    The innate response to infection by an Old World arenavirus is initiated and mediated by extracellular and intracellular receptors, and effector molecules. In response, the invading virus has evolved to inhibit these responses and create the best environment possible for replication and spread. Here, we will discuss both the host's response to infection with data from human infection and lessons learned from animal models, as well as the multitude of ways the virus combats the resulting immune response. Finally, we will highlight recent work identifying TLR2 as an innate sensor for arenaviruses and how the TLR2-dependent response differs depending on the pathogenicity of the strain.

  7. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  8. The host immune response to Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common infectious cause of healthcare-acquired diarrhoea. Outcomes of C. difficile colonization are varied, from asymptomatic carriage to fulminant colitis and death, due in part to the interplay between the pathogenic virulence factors of the bacterium and the counteractive immune responses of the host. Secreted toxins A and B are the major virulence factors of C. difficile and induce a profound inflammatory response by intoxicating intestinal epithelial cells causing proinflammatory cytokine release. Host cell necrosis, vascular permeability and neutrophil infiltration lead to an elevated white cell count, profuse diarrhoea and in severe cases, dehydration, hypoalbuminaemia and toxic megacolon. Other bacterial virulence factors, including surface layer proteins and flagella proteins, are detected by host cell surface signal molecules that trigger downstream cell-mediated immune pathways. Human studies have identified a role for serum and faecal immunoglobulin levels in protection from disease, but the recent development of a mouse model of CDI has enabled studies into the precise molecular interactions that trigger the immune response during infection. Key effector molecules have been identified that can drive towards a protective anti-inflammatory response or a damaging proinflammatory response. The limitations of current antimicrobial therapies for CDI have led to the development of both active and passive immunotherapies, none of which have, as yet been formally approved for CDI. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of host immune protection against CDI may provide an exciting opportunity for novel therapeutic developments in the future. PMID:25165542

  9. Sepsis in HIV-infected patients; epidemiology and host response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, M.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we examined the impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology (Part I) of sepsis, and host response (Part II) to sepsis. We studied sepsis patients in Gabon, a setting with a high prevalence of HIV, and in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). In Part I, we found that HIV positive patient

  10. Sepsis in HIV-infected patients; epidemiology and host response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, M.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we examined the impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology (Part I) of sepsis, and host response (Part II) to sepsis. We studied sepsis patients in Gabon, a setting with a high prevalence of HIV, and in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). In Part I, we found that HIV positive

  11. Host Immune Responses That Promote Initial HIV Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    been observed that Treg cells from hosts infected with HIV and FIV ( feline immunodeficiency virus) suppress antiviral responses during the chronic stage...E. R. Galemore, S. VandeWoude, and G. Dean. Regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter...T cells is associated with improved antiviral responses in cats chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus. Virology, 403(2):163–72, 2010

  12. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaradilokrat, S; Li, J; Wu, J; Qi, Y; Eastman, R T; Zilversmit, M; Nair, S C; Huaman, M C; Quinones, M; Jiang, H; Li, N; Zhu, J; Zhao, K; Kaneko, O; Long, C A; Su, X-z

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate the effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CCs) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12 and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosomes 7 and 13 had significant (P<0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5 and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (P=0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for a better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection.

  13. Host responses to the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and beneficial microbes exhibit host sex specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, K Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-08-01

    Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes-a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51-and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n=5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M.avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) betweenthe sexes included interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex.

  14. Alphacoronavirus protein 7 modulates host innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jazmina L G; Becares, Martina; Sola, Isabel; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis; Zúñiga, Sonia

    2013-09-01

    Innate immune response is the first line of antiviral defense resulting, in most cases, in pathogen clearance with minimal clinical consequences. Viruses have developed diverse strategies to subvert host defense mechanisms and increase their survival. In the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) as a model, we previously reported that accessory gene 7 counteracts the host antiviral response by associating with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). In the present work, the effect of the absence of gene 7 on the host cell, during infection, was further analyzed by transcriptomic analysis. The pattern of gene expression of cells infected with a recombinant mutant TGEV, lacking gene 7 expression (rTGEV-Δ7), was compared to that of cells infected with the parental virus (rTGEV-wt). Genes involved in the immune response, the interferon response, and inflammation were upregulated during TGEV infection in the absence of gene 7. An exacerbated innate immune response during infection with rTGEV-Δ7 virus was observed both in vitro and in vivo. An increase in macrophage recruitment and activation in lung tissues infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus was observed compared to cells infected with the parental virus. In summary, the absence of protein 7 both in vitro and in vivo led to increased proinflammatory responses and acute tissue damage after infection. In a porcine animal model, which is immunologically similar to humans, we present a novel example of how viral proteins counteract host antiviral pathways to determine the infection outcome and pathogenesis.

  15. Host response to Clostridium difficile infection: Diagnostics and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usacheva, Elena A; Jin, Jian-P; Peterson, Lance R

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant healthcare concern worldwide, and C. difficile is recognised as the most frequent aetiological agent of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adult patients. The clinical manifestation of CDI varies from self-limited diarrhoea to life-threatening colitis. Such a broad disease spectrum can be explained by the impact of host factors. Currently, a complex CDI aetiology is widely accepted, acknowledging the interaction between bacteria and the host. C. difficile strains producing clostridial toxins A and B are considered toxigenic and can cause disease; those not producing the toxins are non-pathogenic. A person colonised with a toxigenic strain will not necessarily develop CDI. It is imperative to recognise patients with active disease from those only colonised with this pathogen and to implement appropriate treatment. This can be achieved by diagnostics that rely on host factors specific to CDI. This review will focus on major aspects of CDI pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms, describing host factors in disease progression and assessment of the host response in order to facilitate the development of CDI-specific diagnostics.

  16. Host response to nontuberculous mycobacterial infections of current clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J

    2014-09-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences.

  17. Host response to Brucella infection: review and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfaki, Mohamed G; Alaidan, Alwaleed Abdullah; Al-Hokail, Abdullah Abdulrahman

    2015-07-30

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic and contagious infectious disease caused by infection with Brucella species. The infecting brucellae are capable of causing a devastating multi-organ disease in humans with serious health complications. The pathogenesis of Brucella infection is influenced largely by host factors, Brucella species/strain, and the ability of invading brucellae to survive and replicate within mononuclear phagocytic cells, preferentially macrophages (Mf). Consequently, the course of human infection may appear as an acute fatal or progress into chronic debilitating infection with periodical episodes that leads to bacteremia and death. The existence of brucellae inside Mf represents one of the strategies used by Brucella to evade the host immune response and is responsible for treatment failure in certain human populations treated with anti-Brucella drugs. Moreover, the persistence of brucellae inside Mf complicates the diagnosis and may affect the host cell signaling pathways with consequent alterations in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, there is an urgent need to pursue the development of novel drugs and/or vaccine targets against human brucellosis using high throughput technologies in genomics, proteomics, and immunology.

  18. Building the interaction interfaces: host responses upon infection with microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Research fields of plant symbiosis and plant immunity were relatively ignorant with each other until a little while ago. Recently, however, increasing intercommunications between those two fields have begun to provide novel aspects and knowledge for understanding relationships between plants and microorganisms. Here, we review recent reports on plant-microbe interactions, focusing on the infection processes, in order to elucidate plant cellular responses that are triggered by both symbionts and pathogens. Highlighting the core elements of host responses over biotic interactions will provide insights into general mechanisms of plant-microbe interactions.

  19. Genetic Factors of the Disease Course After Sepsis: Rare Deleterious Variants Are Predictive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taudien, Stefan; Lausser, Ludwig; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Sponholz, Christoph; Schöneweck, Franziska; Felder, Marius; Schirra, Lyn-Rouven; Schmid, Florian; Gogos, Charalambos; Groth, Susann; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Huse, Klaus; Zipfel, Peter F; Kurzai, Oliver; Moepps, Barbara; Gierschik, Peter; Bauer, Michael; Scherag, André; Kestler, Hans A; Platzer, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host response to infection. For its clinical course, host genetic factors are important and rare genomic variants are suspected to contribute. We sequenced the exomes of 59 Greek and 15 German patients with bacterial sepsis divided into two groups with extremely different disease courses. Variant analysis was focusing on rare deleterious single nucleotide variants (SNVs). We identified significant differences in the number of rare deleterious SNVs per patient between the ethnic groups. Classification experiments based on the data of the Greek patients allowed discrimination between the disease courses with estimated sensitivity and specificity>75%. By application of the trained model to the German patients we observed comparable discriminatory properties despite lower population-specific rare SNV load. Furthermore, rare SNVs in genes of cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways were identified as classifiers discriminating between the sepsis courses. Sepsis patients with favorable disease course after sepsis, even in the case of unfavorable preconditions, seem to be affected more often by rare deleterious SNVs in cell signaling and innate immunity related pathways, suggesting a protective role of impairments in these processes against a poor disease course. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Host Cell Autophagy in Immune Response to Zoonotic Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Skendros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  1. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  2. Yersinia type Ⅲ effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khavong Pha; Lorena Navarro

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type Ⅲ secretion system(T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp.(Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gramnegative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3 SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins(YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia effector

  3. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  4. Dynamics of the microbiota in response to host infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Belzer

    Full Text Available Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiologic responses in vivo. Employing a murine model of infectious colitis with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, we generated a 2-month time-series of 16S rDNA gene profiles, and quantitatively cultured commensals, from multiple intestinal sites in infected and uninfected mice. We developed a computational framework to discover time-varying signatures for individual taxa, and to automatically group signatures to identify microbial sub-communities within the larger gut ecosystem that demonstrate common behaviors. Application of this model to the 16S rDNA dataset revealed dynamic alterations in the microbiota at multiple levels of resolution, from effects on systems-level metrics to changes across anatomic sites for individual taxa and species. These analyses revealed unique, time-dependent microbial signatures associated with host responses at different stages of colitis. Signatures included a Mucispirillum OTU associated with early disruption of the colonic surface mucus layer, prior to the onset of symptomatic colitis, and members of the Clostridiales and Lactobacillales that increased with successful resolution of inflammation, after clearance of the pathogen. Quantitative culture data validated findings for predominant species, further refining and strengthening model predictions. These findings provide new insights into the complex behaviors found within host ecosystems, and define several time-dependent microbial signatures that may be leveraged in studies of other infectious or inflammatory conditions.

  5. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  6. New insights about host response to smallpox using microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Rodrigo A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smallpox is a lethal disease that was endemic in many parts of the world until eradicated by massive immunization. Due to its lethality, there are serious concerns about its use as a bioweapon. Here we analyze publicly available microarray data to further understand survival of smallpox infected macaques, using systems biology approaches. Our goal is to improve the knowledge about the progression of this disease. Results We used KEGG pathways annotations to define groups of genes (or modules, and subsequently compared them to macaque survival times. This technique provided additional insights about the host response to this disease, such as increased expression of the cytokines and ECM receptors in the individuals with higher survival times. These results could indicate that these gene groups could influence an effective response from the host to smallpox. Conclusion Macaques with higher survival times clearly express some specific pathways previously unidentified using regular gene-by-gene approaches. Our work also shows how third party analysis of public datasets can be important to support new hypotheses to relevant biological problems.

  7. The overlapping host responses to bacterial cyclic dinucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Plumlee, Courtney; Levi, Assaf; Schreiber, Michael T; Lee, Carolyn; Shuman, Howard; Beaucage, Serge L; Schindler, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Macrophages respond to infection with Legionella pneumophila by the induction of inflammatory mediators, including type I Interferons (IFN-Is). To explore whether the bacterial second messenger cyclic 3'-5' diguanylate (c-diGMP) activates some of these mediators, macrophages were infected with L. pneumophila strains in which the levels of bacterial c-diGMP had been altered. Intriguingly, there was a positive correlation between c-diGMP levels and IFN-I expression. Subsequent studies with synthetic derivatives of c-diGMP, and newly described cyclic 3'-5' diadenylate (c-diAMP), determined that these molecules activate overlapping inflammatory responses in human and murine macrophages. Moreover, UV crosslinking studies determined that both dinucleotides physically associate with a shared set of host proteins. Fractionation of macrophage extracts on a biotin-c-diGMP affinity matrix led to the identification of a set of candidate host binding proteins. These studies suggest that mammalian macrophages can sense and mount a specific inflammatory response to bacterial dinucleotides.

  8. Host immune response in returning travellers infected with malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMullin Gregory

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical observations suggest that Canadian-born (CB travellers are prone to more severe malaria, characterized by higher parasite density in the blood, and severe symptoms, such as cerebral malaria and renal failure, than foreign-born travellers (FB from areas of malaria endemicity. It was hypothesized that host cytokine and chemokine responses differ significantly in CB versus FB patients returning with malaria, contributing to the courses of severity. A more detailed understanding of the profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and endothelial activation may be useful in developing biomarkers and novel therapeutic approaches for malaria. Materials and methods The patient population for the study (n = 186 was comprised of travellers returning to Toronto, Canada between 2007 and 2011. The patient blood samples’ cytokine, chemokine and angiopoietin concentrations were determined using cytokine multiplex assays, and ELISA assays. Results Significantly higher plasma cytokine levels of IL-12 (p40 were observed in CB compared to FB travellers, while epidermal growth factor (EGF was observed to be higher in FB than CB travellers. Older travellers (55 years old or greater with Plasmodium vivax infections had significantly higher mean cytokine levels for IL-6 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF than other adults with P. vivax (ages 18–55. Patients with P. vivax infections had significantly higher mean cytokine levels for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, and M-CSF than patients with Plasmodium falciparum. Angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2 was higher for patients infected with P. falciparum than P. vivax, especially when comparing just the FB groups. IL-12 (p40 was higher in FB patients with P. vivax compared to P. falciparum. Il-12 (p40 was also higher in patients infected with P. vivax than those infected with Plasmodium ovale. For patients travelling to West Africa, IFN-γ and IL-6 was lower than for patients who were in other

  9. Host Response of Ornamental Palms to Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, R N; Dunn, R A; Vovlas, N

    1994-12-01

    The responses of 20 species of ornamental palms and one cycad (Cycas revoluta) to two populations of the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, from southern Florida were studied in two greenhouse experiments conducted in 1989-1991 and 1991-92. Ornamental palms in pots were exposed to initial population densities of 400 and 1,500 R. reniformis/l00 cm(3) soil for 16 and 15 months, respectively. Nematode reproduction occurred on Acoelorrhaphe wrightii and Washingtonia robusta, but not on the other palms or the cycad. In both experiments, nematode numbers on A. wrightii and W. robusta were significantly smaller than those on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a susceptible host of the nematode used as a control in these experiments. Nematodes surviving in pots containing nonhost palms for 16 months retained infectivity and were able to reproduce on susceptible cowpea in a bioassay. Sections from Washingtonia robusta roots infected by R. reniformis females showed the nematode feeding on syncytia formed by endodermal, pericyclic, and vascular parenchyma cells in a manner similar to that reported for other monocot hosts of the reniform nematode.

  10. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Ling

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut, while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1, CCL8 (MCP-2, CXCL10 (IP-10 and CCL3 (MIP-1α, antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1, desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1. Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease.

  11. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina O. Igboin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  13. Potentiation of epithelial innate host responses by intercellular communication.

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    Tamas Dolowschiak

    Full Text Available The epithelium efficiently attracts immune cells upon infection despite the low number of pathogenic microbes and moderate levels of secreted chemokines per cell. Here we examined whether horizontal intercellular communication between cells may contribute to a coordinated response of the epithelium. Listeria monocytogenes infection, transfection, and microinjection of individual cells within a polarized intestinal epithelial cell layer were performed and activation was determined at the single cell level by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Surprisingly, chemokine production after L. monocytogenes infection was primarily observed in non-infected epithelial cells despite invasion-dependent cell activation. Whereas horizontal communication was independent of gap junction formation, cytokine secretion, ion fluxes, or nitric oxide synthesis, NADPH oxidase (Nox 4-dependent oxygen radical formation was required and sufficient to induce indirect epithelial cell activation. This is the first report to describe epithelial cell-cell communication in response to innate immune activation. Epithelial communication facilitates a coordinated infectious host defence at the very early stage of microbial infection.

  14. Inhibition of host-seeking response and olfactory responsiveness in Anopheles gambiae following blood feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Adam, W.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a single blood meal on the host-seeking response of Anopheles gambiae was investigated in the laboratory using a behavioural bioassay, whereas possible changes at the chemosensory level were monitored using electroantennogram recording (EAG). To avoid the possible confounding effect of

  15. Host Microbiota Contributes to Health and Response to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurora, Rajeev; Sanford, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that normal microbiota interacts with the host through four mechanisms: the normal microbiome acts as a barrier against pathogens; second, as modulators of the permeability of host mucosa; third, as modulators of energy extraction from, and metabolic utilization of ingested food; and lastly, as modulators of the immune system. An alteration of the normal microbiota increases predisposition of the host to diseases through these four mechanisms.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of host immune and cell death responses associated with the influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Le Goffic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Airway inflammation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of influenza viruses and can lead to a fatal outcome. One of the challenging objectives in the field of influenza research is the identification of the molecular bases associated to the immunopathological disorders developed during infection. While its precise function in the virus cycle is still unclear, the viral protein PB1-F2 is proposed to exert a deleterious activity within the infected host. Using an engineered recombinant virus unable to express PB1-F2 and its wild-type homolog, we analyzed and compared the pathogenicity and host response developed by the two viruses in a mouse model. We confirmed that the deletion of PB1-F2 renders the virus less virulent. The global transcriptomic analyses of the infected lungs revealed a potent impact of PB1-F2 on the response developed by the host. Thus, after two days post-infection, PB1-F2 invalidation severely decreased the number of genes activated by the host. PB1-F2 expression induced an increase in the number and level of expression of activated genes linked to cell death, inflammatory response and neutrophil chemotaxis. When generating interactive gene networks specific to PB1-F2, we identified IFN-γ as a central regulator of PB1-F2-regulated genes. The enhanced cell death of airway-recruited leukocytes was evidenced using an apoptosis assay, confirming the pro-apoptotic properties of PB1-F2. Using a NF-kB luciferase adenoviral vector, we were able to quantify in vivo the implication of NF-kB in the inflammation mediated by the influenza virus infection; we found that PB1-F2 expression intensifies the NF-kB activity. Finally, we quantified the neutrophil recruitment within the airways, and showed that this type of leukocyte is more abundant during the infection of the wild-type virus. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PB1-F2 strongly influences the early host response during IAV infection and provides new insights into the

  17. Grapevine Pathogenic Microorganisms: Understanding Infection Strategies and Host Response Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Grace; Schlechter, Rudolf; Agurto, Mario; Muñoz, Daniela; Nuñez, Constanza; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is one of the most important fruit crop worldwide. Commercial cultivars are greatly affected by a large number of pathogenic microorganisms that cause diseases during pre- and/or post-harvest periods, affecting production, processing and export, along with fruit quality. Among the potential threats, we can find bacteria, fungi, oomycete, or viruses with different life cycles, infection mechanisms and evasion strategies. While plant-pathogen interactions are cycles of resistance and susceptibility, resistance traits from natural resources are selected and may be used for breeding purposes and for a sustainable agriculture. In this context, here we summarize some of the most important diseases affecting V. vinifera together with their causal agents. The aim of this work is to bring a comprehensive review of the infection strategies deployed by significant types of pathogens while understanding the host response in both resistance and susceptibility scenarios. New approaches being used to uncover grapevine status during biotic stresses and scientific-based procedures needed to control plant diseases and crop protection are also addressed.

  18. Host responses associated with chronic staphylococcal mastitis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Irene; Ferrian, Selena; Penadés, Mariola; García-Quirós, Ana; Pascual, Juan J; Selva, Laura; Viana, David; Corpa, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcal infection causes substantial economic losses in commercial rabbit production systems, and is associated with a wide variety of lesions, including chronic suppurative mastitis, which mainly affects breeding females. Most chronic staphylococcal infections in rabbits are caused by the ST121 lineage of Staphylococcus aureus, although other less common lineages, such as ST96 can also be involved. The aims of the present study were to characterise the host immune response in natural cases of mastitis in rabbits caused by S. aureus, to evaluate any relationship between peripheral and local immunity and to investigate the effect of different S. aureus genotypes on these immune responses. Adult multiparous female rabbits that were affected with chronic staphylococcal mastitis (n = 204) were enrolled into the study. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of mammary glands were undertaken, as well as flow cytometric analyses of blood. S. aureus isolates from the mammary glands were identified by multilocus sequence typing. Differences in the number of infiltrating cells were detected, depending on the type of pathology, with more immature lesions demonstrating greater cellularity, characterised by greater numbers of T lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. A relationship was seen between the cells in blood and mammary tissues, the most notable being the positive correlation between monocytes and tissue macrophages. When glands were infected with ST96 strains, fewer granulocytes (P < 0.01) and greater numbers of B cells (P < 0.01), T cells (P < 0.001), CD4(+) T cells (P < 0.001) and CD8(+) T cells (P < 0.01) were detected, compared with mammary glands that were infected by ST121 strains of S. aureus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fungal strategies for overcoming host innate immune response.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Netea, M.G.; Vonk, A.G.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    A successful pathogen is one that is able to effectively survive and evade detection by the host innate immune defense. Fungal pathogens have adopted strategies which evade host defense and eventually cause disease in at-risk patients. Shielding of stimulatory surface recognition molecules, shedding

  20. Host transcript accumulation during lytic KSHV infection reveals several classes of host responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chandriani

    Full Text Available Lytic infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is associated with an extensive shutoff of host gene expression, mediated chiefly by accelerated mRNA turnover due to expression of the viral SOX protein. We have previously identified a small number of host mRNAs that can escape SOX-mediated degradation. Here we present a detailed, transcriptome-wide analysis of host shutoff, with careful microarray normalization to allow rigorous determination of the magnitude and extent of transcript loss. We find that the extent of transcript reduction represents a continuum of susceptibilities of transcripts to virus-mediated shutoff. Our results affirm that the levels of over 75% of host transcripts are substantially reduced during lytic infection, but also show that another approximately 20% of cellular mRNAs declines only slightly (less than 2-fold during the course of infection. Approximately 2% of examined cellular genes are strongly upregulated during lytic infection, most likely due to transcriptional induction of mRNAs that display intrinsic SOX-resistance.

  1. Dynamics of the Microbiota in Response to Host Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzer, C.; Gerber, G.K.; Roeselers, G.; Delaney, M.; DuBois, A.; Liu, Q.; Belavusava, V.; Yeliseyev, V.; Houseman, A.; Onderdonk, A.; Cavanaugh, C.; Bry, L.

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiolo

  2. Dynamics of the microbiota in response to host infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzer, C.; Gerber, G.K.; Roeselers, G.; Delaney, M.; DuBois, A.; Liu, Q.; Belavusava, V.; Yeliseyev, V.; Houseman, A.; Onderdonk, A.; Cavanaugh, C.; Bry, L.

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiolo

  3. DMPD: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14620137 Macrophage migration inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses to...microbes. Calandra T. Scand J Infect Dis. 2003;35(9):573-6. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage migration... inhibitory factor and host innate immune responses tomicrobes. PubmedID 14620137 Title Macrophage migration

  4. Quantotypic Properties of QconCAT Peptides Targeting Bovine Host Response to Streptococcus uberis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Stine Lønnerup; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    2012-01-01

    with host response to pathogens remains a challenging task. In this paper we present a targeted proteome analysis of a panel of 20 proteins that are widely believed to be key players and indicators of bovine host response to mastitis pathogens. Stable isotope labeled variants of two concordant proteotypic...

  5. Thrombocytopenia is associated with a dysregulated host response in critically ill sepsis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claushuis, Theodora A M; van Vught, Lonneke A; Scicluna, Brendon P; Wiewel, Maryse A; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Ong, David S Y; Cremer, Olaf L; Horn, Janneke; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bonten, Marc J M; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that platelets influence the host response during sepsis. We sought to assess the association of admission thrombocytopenia with the presentation, outcome, and host response in patients with sepsis. Nine hundred thirty-one consecutive sepsis patients were stratifie

  6. DMPD: The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10669111 The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysa...ccharide. Qureshi ST, Gros P, Malo D. Inflamm Res. 1999 Dec;48(12):613-20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The... Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. PubmedID 10669111 Title The

  7. Harnessing Mechanistic Knowledge on Beneficial Versus Deleterious IFN-I Effects to Design Innovative Immunotherapies Targeting Cytokine Activity to Specific Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Elena; Pollet, Emeline; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Uzé, Gilles; Dalod, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) were identified over 50 years ago as cytokines critical for host defense against viral infections. IFN-I promote anti-viral defense through two main mechanisms. First, IFN-I directly reinforce or induce de novo in potentially all cells the expression of effector molecules of intrinsic anti-viral immunity. Second, IFN-I orchestrate innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. However, IFN-I responses can be deleterious for the host in a number of circumstances, including secondary bacterial or fungal infections, several autoimmune diseases, and, paradoxically, certain chronic viral infections. We will review the proposed nature of protective versus deleterious IFN-I responses in selected diseases. Emphasis will be put on the potentially deleterious functions of IFN-I in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, and on the respective roles of IFN-I and IFN-III in promoting resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We will then discuss how the balance between beneficial versus deleterious IFN-I responses is modulated by several key parameters including (i) the subtypes and dose of IFN-I produced, (ii) the cell types affected by IFN-I, and (iii) the source and timing of IFN-I production. Finally, we will speculate how integration of this knowledge combined with advanced biochemical manipulation of the activity of the cytokines should allow designing innovative immunotherapeutic treatments in patients. Specifically, we will discuss how induction or blockade of specific IFN-I responses in targeted cell types could promote the beneficial functions of IFN-I and/or dampen their deleterious effects, in a manner adapted to each disease.

  8. Harnessing mechanistic knowledge on beneficial versus deleterious IFN-I effects to design innovative immunotherapies targeting cytokine activity to specific cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eDALOD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I were identified over 50 years ago as cytokines critical for host defense against viral infections. IFN-I promote antiviral defense through two main mechanisms. First, IFN-I directly reinforce or induce de novo in potentially all cells the expression of effector molecules of intrinsic antiviral immunity. Second, IFN-I orchestrate innate and adaptive antiviral immunity. However, IFN-I responses can be deleterious for the host in a number of circumstances, including secondary bacterial or fungal infections, several autoimmune diseases, and, paradoxically, certain chronic viral infections. We will review the proposed nature of protective versus deleterious IFN-I responses in selected diseases. Emphasis will be put on the potentially deleterious functions of IFN-I in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection, and on the respective roles of IFN-I and IFN-III in promoting resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. We will then discuss how the balance between beneficial versus deleterious IFN-I responses is modulated by several key parameters including i the subtypes and dose of IFN-I produced, ii the cell types affected by IFN-I and iii the source and timing of IFN-I production. Finally we will speculate how integration of this knowledge combined with advanced biochemical manipulation of the activity of the cytokines should allow designing innovative immunotherapeutic treatments in patients. Specifically, we will discuss how induction or blockade of specific IFN-I responses in targeted cell types could promote the beneficial functions of IFN-I and/or dampen their deleterious effects, in a manner adapted to each disease.

  9. Neosporosis. Aspects of epidemiology and host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, E A; Buxton, D; Maley, S; Wright, S; Marks, J; Esteban, I; Rae, A; Schock, A; Wastling, J

    2000-01-01

    Neospora caninum is a recently recognized protozoan parasite which has been described as causing a neuromuscular paralysis in dogs and is emerging as a major cause of bovine infertility and abortion worldwide. The parasite is known to infect a range of warm blooded animals but the disease predominates in dogs and cattle. It is not yet known if N. caninum can infect and cause disease in people. The dog has recently been identified as the definitive host and the parasite may be transmitted through the ingestion of oocysts or congenitally from mother to fetus. N. caninum is known to infect red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans) and the role of wildlife species as reservoirs of infection requires further investigation. Little is known about the range of parasite genotypes within the environment or the variation in virulence between different strains. RAPD-PCR analysis of geographically distinct bovine and canine isolates has revealed little genetic variation. Epidemiological studies from different areas of the world have investigated the importance of N. caninum as an abortifacient agent and longitudinal studies have shown the high rate (approximately 80%) of congenital transmission within infected herds. Information on the rates of repeat abortion due to neosporosis are less well defined however current estimates put this at 5% suggesting that cattle may develop some form of protective immunity against N. caninum-induced abortion. Diagnosis of the disease is based upon detection of the parasite in the tissues, most commonly using immunohistochemistry with additional information provided by serology. However, although positive fetal serology is a strong indicator of exposure to the parasite, care should be taken in the interpretation of maternal serology. As we understand more about the epidemiology of neosporosis we are also better able to interpret the results of diagnostic tests. The mere presence of the parasite does not necessarily infer that this

  10. Host and Non-Host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eFiorilli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR and fine lateral (FLR roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR.We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant.

  11. Host and non-host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Vallino, Marta; Biselli, Chiara; Faccio, Antonella; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR) and fine lateral (FLR) roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR. We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant.

  12. Yersinia versus host immunity: how a pathogen evades or triggers a protective response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Lawton K; Bliska, James B

    2016-02-01

    The human pathogenic Yersinia species cause diseases that represent a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Despite this, specific mechanisms underlying Yersinia pathogenesis and protective host responses remain poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that Yersinia disrupt cell death pathways, perturb inflammatory processes and exploit immune cells to promote disease. The ensuing host responses following Yersinia infection include coordination of innate and adaptive immune responses in an attempt to control bacterial replication. Here, we highlight current advances in our understanding of the interactions between the pathogenic yersiniae and host cells, as well as the protective host responses mobilized to counteract these pathogens. Together, these studies enhance our understanding of Yersinia pathogenesis and highlight the ongoing battle between host and microbe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Yersinia vs. host Immunity: how a pathogen evades or triggers a protective response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Lawton K.; Bliska, James B.

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogenic Yersinia species cause diseases that represent a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Despite this, specific mechanisms underlying Yersinia pathogenesis and protective host responses remain poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that Yersinia disrupt cell death pathways, perturb inflammatory processes and exploit immune cells to promote disease. The ensuing host responses following Yersinia infection include coordination of innate and adaptive immune responses in an attempt to control bacterial replication. Here, we highlight current advances in our understanding of the interactions between the pathogenic yersiniae and host cells, as well as the protective host responses mobilized to counteract these pathogens. Together, these studies enhance our understanding of Yersinia pathogenesis and highlight the ongoing battle between host and microbe. PMID:26638030

  14. Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data Using Predictive Regulatory Network Models of Host Response to Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Chasman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian host response to pathogenic infections is controlled by a complex regulatory network connecting regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and signaling proteins to target genes. An important challenge in infectious disease research is to understand molecular similarities and differences in mammalian host response to diverse sets of pathogens. Recently, systems biology studies have produced rich collections of omic profiles measuring host response to infectious agents such as influenza viruses at multiple levels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory network driving host response to multiple infectious agents, we integrated host transcriptomes and proteomes using a network-based approach. Our approach combines expression-based regulatory network inference, structured-sparsity based regression, and network information flow to infer putative physical regulatory programs for expression modules. We applied our approach to identify regulatory networks, modules and subnetworks that drive host response to multiple influenza infections. The inferred regulatory network and modules are significantly enriched for known pathways of immune response and implicate apoptosis, splicing, and interferon signaling processes in the differential response of viral infections of different pathogenicities. We used the learned network to prioritize regulators and study virus and time-point specific networks. RNAi-based knockdown of predicted regulators had significant impact on viral replication and include several previously unknown regulators. Taken together, our integrated analysis identified novel module level patterns that capture strain and pathogenicity-specific patterns of expression and helped identify important regulators of host response to influenza infection.

  15. Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data Using Predictive Regulatory Network Models of Host Response to Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasman, Deborah; Walters, Kevin B; Lopes, Tiago J S; Eisfeld, Amie J; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Roy, Sushmita

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian host response to pathogenic infections is controlled by a complex regulatory network connecting regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and signaling proteins to target genes. An important challenge in infectious disease research is to understand molecular similarities and differences in mammalian host response to diverse sets of pathogens. Recently, systems biology studies have produced rich collections of omic profiles measuring host response to infectious agents such as influenza viruses at multiple levels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory network driving host response to multiple infectious agents, we integrated host transcriptomes and proteomes using a network-based approach. Our approach combines expression-based regulatory network inference, structured-sparsity based regression, and network information flow to infer putative physical regulatory programs for expression modules. We applied our approach to identify regulatory networks, modules and subnetworks that drive host response to multiple influenza infections. The inferred regulatory network and modules are significantly enriched for known pathways of immune response and implicate apoptosis, splicing, and interferon signaling processes in the differential response of viral infections of different pathogenicities. We used the learned network to prioritize regulators and study virus and time-point specific networks. RNAi-based knockdown of predicted regulators had significant impact on viral replication and include several previously unknown regulators. Taken together, our integrated analysis identified novel module level patterns that capture strain and pathogenicity-specific patterns of expression and helped identify important regulators of host response to influenza infection.

  16. Infection strategies of intestinal parasite pathogens and host cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Martorell Di Genova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium spp. and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading cause worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, Giardiasis, Cryptosporidiosis and Amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these tree pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways and cell death.

  17. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko, E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  18. Functional response, host stage preference and interference of two whitefly parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Yun; Yang, Nian-Wan; Duan, Min; Wan, Fang-Hao

    2016-02-01

    The functional responses of two parasitoids, Eretmocerus hayati Zolnerowich & Rose and Encarsia sophia Girault & Dodd, of whitefly Bemisia tabaci Gennadius Middle East-Asia Minor 1 were studied under laboratory conditions. In addition, the influence of host density and host stage on the competitive interactions between the two parasitoids, and biological control effect on whitefly were evaluated. In the functional response study, adult parasitoids were tested individually, with a conspecific or heterospecific competitor. Both Er. hayati and En. sophia exhibited a type II response to increasing host density, whether a conspecific or heterospecific competitor was present or not. Difference of searching rates and handling times between treatments suggested interference interactions existed between two parasitoid species. In the host stage preference study, two parasitoid species were jointly tested. Er. hayati had a competitive advantage over En. sophia when provided young host instars (first and second instar), whereas no advantage was found on old host instars (third and fourth instar). The biological control effect of Er. hayati and En. sophia in different introductions varied with host density. However, the effect of host instar on host mortality was not significant. These findings provide information for the practice of biological control and give better insight into how parasitoid species may coexist in diverse environments.

  19. Arenavirus Evasion of Host Anti-Viral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Hayes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The innate response to infection by an Old World arenavirus is initiated and mediated by extracellular and intracellular receptors, and effector molecules. In response, the invading virus has evolved to inhibit these responses and create the best environment possible for replication and spread. Here, we will discuss both the host’s response to infection with data from human infection and lessons learned from animal models, as well as the multitude of ways the virus combats the resulting immune response. Finally, we will highlight recent work identifying TLR2 as an innate sensor for arenaviruses and how the TLR2-dependent response differs depending on the pathogenicity of the strain.

  20. Hybridization in endophyte symbionts alters host response to moisture and nutrient treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Cyd E; Dowling, Thomas E; Faeth, Stanley H

    2010-05-01

    When a host organism is infected by a symbiont, the resulting symbiotum has a phenotype distinct from uninfected hosts. Genotypic interactions between the partners may increase phenotypic variation of the host at the population level. Neotyphodium is an asexual, vertically transmitted endophytic symbiont of grasses often existing in hybrid form. Hybridization in Neotyphodium rapidly increases the symbiotum's genomic content and is likely to increase the phenotypic variation of the host. This phenotypic variation is predicted to enhance host performance, especially in stressful environments. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the growth, survival, and resource allocation of hybrid and nonhybrid infected host plants exposed to controlled variation in soil moisture and nutrients. Infection by a hybrid endophyte did not fit our predictions of comparatively higher root and total biomass production under low moisture/low nutrient treatments. Regardless of whether the host was infected by a hybrid or nonhybrid endophyte, both produced significantly higher root/total biomass when both nutrient and moisture were high compared to limited nutrient/moisture treatments. However, infection by hybrid Neotyphodium did result in significantly higher total biomass and host survival compared to nonhybrid infected hosts, regardless of treatment. Endophyte hybridization alters host strategies in response to stress by increasing survival in depauperate habitats and thus, potentially increasing the relative long-term host fitness.

  1. Micro array analysis of the intestinal host response in Giardia duodenalis assemblage E infected cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most commonly found intestinal pathogens in humans and animals. However, little is known about the host-parasite interaction in its natural hosts. The objective of this study was to investigate the intestinal response in calves following a G. duodenalis infection, us...

  2. Not to be suppressed? Rethinking the host response at a root-parasite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Derek B; Miyazawa, Hikota; Mar, Jessica C; Sato, Masanao

    2013-12-01

    Root-knot nematodes are highly efficient plant parasites that establish permanent feeding sites within host roots. The initiation of this feeding site is critical for parasitic success and requires an interaction with multiple signaling pathways involved in plant development and environmental response. Resistance against root-knot nematodes is relatively rare amongst their broad host range and they remain a major threat to agriculture. The development of effective and sustainable control strategies depends on understanding how host signaling pathways are manipulated during invasion of susceptible hosts. It is generally understood that root-knot nematodes either suppress host defense signaling during infestation or are able to avoid detection altogether, explaining their profound success as parasites. However, when compared to the depth of knowledge from other well-studied pathogen interactions, the published data on host responses to root-knot nematode infestation do not yet provide convincing support for this hypothesis and alternative explanations also exist. It is equally possible that defense-like signaling responses are actually induced and required during the early stages of root-knot nematode infestation. We describe how defense-signaling is highly context-dependent and that caution is necessary when interpreting transcriptional responses in the absence of appropriate control data or stringent validation of gene annotation. Further hypothesis-driven studies on host defense-like responses are required to account for these limitations and advance our understanding of root-knot nematode parasitism of plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genomic profiling of host responses to Lassa virus: therapeutic potential from primate to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan C; Salvato, Maria S

    2015-03-13

    Lassa virus infection elicits distinctive changes in host gene expression and metabolism. We focus on changes in host gene expression that may be biomarkers that discriminate individual pathogens or may help to provide a prognosis for disease. In addition to assessing mRNA changes, functional studies are also needed to discriminate causes of disease from mechanisms of host resistance. Host responses that drive pathogenesis are likely to be targets for prevention or therapy. Host responses to Lassa or its related arenaviruses have been monitored in cell culture, in animal models of hemorrhagic fever, in Lassa-infected nonhuman primates and, to a limited extent, in infected human beings. Here, we describe results from those studies and discuss potential targets for reducing virus replication and mitigating disease.

  4. The Polysaccharide Capsule of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176 Modulates the Host Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    REPORT The Polysaccharide Capsule of Campylobacter jejuni Modulates the Host Immune Response 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Campylobacter ...COVERED (From - To) Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - The Polysaccharide Capsule of Campylobacter jejuni Modulates the Host...Immune Response Report Title ABSTRACT Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial diarrheal disease worldwide. The organism is characterized by

  5. Behavioral Strategies of Phorid Parasitoids and Responses of Their Hosts, the Leaf-Cutting Ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, Luciana; Folgarait, Patricia Julia

    2012-01-01

    Host-searching and oviposition behaviors of parasitoids, and defensive responses of the hosts, are fundamental in shaping the ecology of host-parasitoid interactions. In order to uncover key behavioral features for the little known interactions between phorid parasitoids (Diptera: Phoridae) and their leaf-cutting ant hosts (Formicidae: Attini), host-related behavioral strategies (i.e., host searching and oviposition) for 13 phorid species, and host defensive responses (i.e., hitchhikers and particular body postures) for 11 ant species, were studied. Data was collected at 14 localities, one of them characterized by its high species richness for this host-parasitoid system. Phorid species showed both great variation and specificity in attacking behaviors. Some chose their hosts using either an ambush or an actively searching strategy, while some species attacked ants on different body parts, and specialized on ants performing different tasks, such as when ants were foraging, removing wastes to refuse piles, or repairing the nest. Combining all the behaviors recorded, most phorid species differed in performance in at least one, making it possible to recognize species in the field through their behavior. Phorid species that attacked hosts with greater activity levels showed overall higher attack rates, although there was no significant correlation between attack rates by most phorid species and ant activity outside the nest while parasitoids were attacking. The presence of phorids was a significant determinant for the presence of defensive behaviors by the ants. Although ant species varied in the incidence levels of these defensive behaviors, most ant species reacted against different phorids by utilizing similar behaviors, in contrast to what parasitoids do. General features of the observed phorid-ant interactions were parasitoid specialization and corresponding high interspecific variation in their behaviors, while their hosts showed generalized responses to attacks

  6. Stress responses in Streptococcus species and their effects on the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Park, Sang-Sang; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-11-01

    Streptococci cause a variety of diseases, such as dental caries, pharyngitis, meningitis, pneumonia, bacteremia, endocarditis, erysipelas, and necrotizing fasciitis. The natural niche of this genus of bacteria ranges from the mouth and nasopharynx to the skin, indicating that the bacteria will inevitably be subjected to environmental changes during invasion into the host, where it is exposed to the host immune system. Thus, the Streptococcus-host interaction determines whether bacteria are cleared by the host's defenses or whether they survive after invasion to cause serious diseases. If this interaction was to be deciphered, it could aid in the development of novel preventive and therapeutic agents. Streptococcus species possess many virulent factors, such as peroxidases and heat-shock proteins (HSPs), which play key roles in protecting the bacteria from hostile host environments. This review will discuss insights into the mechanism(s) by which streptococci adapt to host environments. Additionally, we will address how streptococcal infections trigger host stress responses; however, the mechanism by which bacterial components modulate host stress responses remains largely unknown.

  7. Virulence Factors and Strategies of Leptopilina spp.: Selective Responses in Drosophila Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark J.; Kalamarz, Marta E.; Paddibhatla, Indira; Small, Chiyedza; Rajwani, Roma; Govind, Shubha

    2010-01-01

    To ensure survival, parasitic wasps of Drosophila have evolved strategies to optimize host development to their advantage. They also produce virulence factors that allow them to overcome or evade host defense. Wasp infection provokes cellular and humoral defense reactions, resulting in alteration in gene expression of the host. The activation of these reactions is controlled by conserved mechanisms shared by other invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Application of genomics and bioinformatics approaches is beginning to reveal comparative host gene expression changes after infection by different parasitic wasps. We analyze this comparison in the context of host physiology and immune cells, as well as the biology of the venom factors that wasps introduce into their hosts during oviposition. We compare virulence strategies of Leptopilina boulardi and L. heterotoma, in relation to genome-wide changes in gene expression in the fly hosts after infection. This analysis highlights fundamental differences in the changes that the host undergoes in its immune and general physiology in response to the two parasitic wasps. Such a comparative approach has the potential of revealing mechanisms governing the evolution of pathogenicity and how it impacts host range. PMID:19773069

  8. Host response to Candida albicans bloodstream infection and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Seána; Leonhardt, Ines; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of bloodstream infection which may present as sepsis and septic shock - major causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. After invasion of the pathogen, innate mechanisms govern the early response. Here, we outline the models used to study these mechanisms and summarize our current understanding of innate immune responses during Candida bloodstream infection. This includes protective immunity as well as harmful responses resulting in Candida induced sepsis. Neutrophilic granulocytes are considered principal effector cells conferring protection and recognize C. albicans mainly via complement receptor 3. They possess a range of effector mechanisms, contributing to elimination of the pathogen. Neutrophil activation is closely linked to complement and modulated by activated mononuclear cells. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms will help in creating an individualized approach to patients suffering from systemic candidiasis and aid in optimizing clinical management. PMID:25785541

  9. Autophagy suppresses host adaptive immune responses toward Borrelia burgdorferi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buffen, Kathrin; Oosting, Marije; Li, Yang; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of autophagy increases the severity of murine Lyme arthritis and human adaptive immune responses against B. burgdorferi. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy increased the Borrelia burgdorferi induced innate cytokine production in vitro, but little is known regardi

  10. Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses from copepod hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Amalia A; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    Copepods are abundant crustaceans that harbor diverse bacterial communities, yet the nature of their interactions with microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we report that Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses in the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis We pre-treated E. affinis with an antibiotic cocktail and exposed them to either a zooplankton specialist (Vibrio sp. F10 9ZB36) or a free-living species (Vibrio ordalii 12B09) for 24 h. We then identified via RNA-Seq a total of 78 genes that were differentially expressed following Vibrio exposure, including homologs of C-type lectins, chitin-binding proteins and saposins. The response differed between the two Vibrio treatments, with the greatest changes elicited upon inoculation with V. sp. F10 We suggest that these differentially regulated genes play important roles in cuticle integrity, the innate immune response, and general stress response, and that their expression may enable E. affinis to recognize and regulate symbiotic vibrios. We further report that V. sp. F10 culturability is specifically altered upon colonization of E. affinis These findings suggest that rather than acting as passive environmental vectors, copepods discriminately interact with vibrios, which may ultimately impact the abundance and activity of copepod-associated bacteria.

  11. Differences in Host Innate Responses among Coccidioides Isolates in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Eric R G; David, Victoria R; Doyle, Adina L; Rajabi, Khadijeh; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Pirrotte, Patrick; Barker, Bridget M

    2015-10-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are soil-dwelling fungi and the causative agents of coccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic to certain semiarid regions in the Americas. The most common route of infection is by inhalation of airborne Coccidioides arthroconidia. Once a susceptible host inhales the conidia, a transition to mature endosporulated spherules can occur within the first 5 days of infection. For this study, we examined the host response in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis during a time period of infection that has not been well characterized. We collected lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from BALB/c mice that were infected with a C. immitis pure strain, a C. immitis hybrid strain, or a C. posadasii strain as well as uninfected mice. We compared the host responses to the Coccidioides strains used in this study by assessing the level of transcription of selected cytokine genes in lung tissues and characterized host and fungal proteins present in BALF. Host response varied depending on the Coccidioides strain that was used and did not appear to be overly robust. This study provides a foundation to begin to dissect the host immune response early in infection, to detect abundant Coccidioides proteins, and to develop diagnostics that target these early time points of infection.

  12. Host immune status and response to hepatitis E virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krain, Lisa J; Nelson, Kenrad E; Labrique, Alain B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available.

  13. Review of osteoimmunology and the host response in endodontic and periodontal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana T. Graves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Both lesions of endodontic origin and periodontal diseases involve the host response to bacteria and the formation of osteolytic lesions. Important for both is the upregulation of inflammatory cytokines that initiate and sustain the inflammatory response. Also important are chemokines that induce recruitment of leukocyte subsets and bone-resorptive factors that are largely produced by recruited inflammatory cells. However, there are differences also. Lesions of endodontic origin pose a particular challenge since that bacteria persist in a protected reservoir that is not readily accessible to the immune defenses. Thus, experiments in which the host response is inhibited in endodontic lesions tend to aggravate the formation of osteolytic lesions. In contrast, bacteria that invade the periodontium appear to be less problematic so that blocking arms of the host response tend to reduce the disease process. Interestingly, both lesions of endodontic origin and periodontitis exhibit inflammation that appears to inhibit bone formation. In periodontitis, the spatial location of the inflammation is likely to be important so that a host response that is restricted to a subepithelial space is associated with gingivitis, while a host response closer to bone is linked to bone resorption and periodontitis. However, the persistence of inflammation is also thought to be important in periodontitis since inflammation present during coupled bone formation may limit the capacity to repair the resorbed bone.

  14. Interplay between Human Cytomegalovirus and Intrinsic/Innate Host Responses: A Complex Bidirectional Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Rossini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and its host is a complex process that begins with viral attachment and entry into host cells, culminating in the development of a specific adaptive response that clears the acute infection but fails to eradicate HCMV. We review the viral and cellular partners that mediate early host responses to HCMV with regard to the interaction between structural components of virions (viral glycoproteins and cellular receptors (attachment/entry receptors, toll-like receptors, and other nucleic acid sensors or intrinsic factors (PML, hDaxx, Sp100, viperin, interferon inducible protein 16, the reactions of innate immune cells (antigen presenting cells and natural killer cells, the numerous mechanisms of viral immunoevasion, and the potential exploitation of events that are associated with early phases of virus-host interplay as a therapeutic strategy.

  15. Do host species evolve a specific response to slave-making ants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delattre Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social parasitism is an important selective pressure for social insect species. It is particularly the case for the hosts of dulotic (so called slave-making ants, which pillage the brood of host colonies to increase the worker force of their own colony. Such raids can have an important impact on the fitness of the host nest. An arms race which can lead to geographic variation in host defenses is thus expected between hosts and parasites. In this study we tested whether the presence of a social parasite (the dulotic ant Myrmoxenus ravouxi within an ant community correlated with a specific behavioral defense strategy of local host or non-host populations of Temnothorax ants. Social recognition often leads to more or less pronounced agonistic interactions between non-nestmates ants. Here, we monitored agonistic behaviors to assess whether ants discriminate social parasites from other ants. It is now well-known that ants essentially rely on cuticular hydrocarbons to discriminate nestmates from aliens. If host species have evolved a specific recognition mechanism for their parasite, we hypothesize that the differences in behavioral responses would not be fully explained simply by quantitative dissimilarity in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles, but should also involve a qualitative response due to the detection of particular compounds. We scaled the behavioral results according to the quantitative chemical distance between host and parasite colonies to test this hypothesis. Results Cuticular hydrocarbon profiles were distinct between species, but host species did not show a clearly higher aggression rate towards the parasite than toward non-parasite intruders, unless the degree of response was scaled by the chemical distance between intruders and recipient colonies. By doing so, we show that workers of the host and of a non-host species in the parasitized site displayed more agonistic behaviors (bites and ejections towards parasite

  16. Modulation of host responses by oral commensal bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre A. Devine

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunomodulatory commensal bacteria are proposed to be essential for maintaining healthy tissues, having multiple roles including priming immune responses to ensure rapid and efficient defences against pathogens. The default state of oral tissues, like the gut, is one of inflammation which may be balanced by regulatory mechanisms and the activities of anti-inflammatory resident bacteria that modulate Toll-like receptor (TLR signalling or NF-κB activation, or influence the development and activities of immune cells. However, the widespread ability of normal resident organisms to suppress inflammation could impose an unsustainable burden on the immune system and compromise responses to pathogens. Immunosuppressive resident bacteria have been isolated from the mouth and, for example, may constitute 30% of the resident streptococci in plaque or on the tongue. Their roles in oral health and dysbiosis remain to be determined. A wide range of bacterial components and/or products can mediate immunomodulatory activity, raising the possibility of development of alternative strategies for therapy and health promotion using probiotics, prebiotics, or commensal-derived immunomodulatory molecules.

  17. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Peter S Askovich; III, Armand Bankhead; Bolles, Meagen; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean; Clauss, Therese R.W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe...

  18. Alterations of the Host Microbiome Affect Behavioral Responses to Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Drew D.; Walker, Deena M.; Calipari, Erin S.; Labonte, Benoit; Issler, Orna; Pena, Catherine J.; Ribeiro, Efrain A.; Russo, Scott J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to cocaine and other psychostimulants represents a major public health crisis. The development and persistence of addictive behaviors comes from a complex interaction of genes and environment - the precise mechanisms of which remain elusive. In recent years a surge of evidence has suggested that the gut microbiome can have tremendous impact on behavioral via the microbiota-gut-brain axis. In this study we characterized the influence of the gut microbiota on cocaine-mediated behaviors. Groups of mice were treated with a prolonged course of non-absorbable antibiotics via the drinking water, which resulted in a substantial reduction of gut bacteria. Animals with reduced gut bacteria showed an enhanced sensitivity to cocaine reward and enhanced sensitivity to the locomotor-sensitizing effects of repeated cocaine administration. These behavioral changes were correlated with adaptations in multiple transcripts encoding important synaptic proteins in the brain’s reward circuitry. This study represents the first evidence that alterations in the gut microbiota affect behavioral response to drugs of abuse. PMID:27752130

  19. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K Terra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT, as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  20. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Jill K; France, Bryan; Cote, Christopher K; Jenkins, Amy; Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan L; Bhargava, Ragini; Ho, Chi-Lee; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; LeVine, Steven M; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT), as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  1. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  2. Shigella manipulates host immune responses by delivering effector proteins with specific roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi eAshida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium deploys multiple defense systems against microbial infection to sense bacterial components and danger alarms, as well as to induce intracellular signal transduction cascades that trigger both the innate and adaptive immune system, which are pivotal for bacterial elimination. However, many enteric bacterial pathogens, including Shigella, deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS that enable bacterial evasion from host immune systems; consequently, these pathogens are able to efficiently colonize the intestinal epithelium. In this review, we present select recently discovered examples of interactions between Shigella and host immune responses, with particular emphasis on strategies that bacteria use to manipulate inflammatory outputs of host cell responses such as cell death, membrane trafficking, and innate and adaptive immune responses.

  3. Shigella Manipulates Host Immune Responses by Delivering Effector Proteins with Specific Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium deploys multiple defense systems against microbial infection to sense bacterial components and danger alarms, as well as to induce intracellular signal transduction cascades that trigger both the innate and the adaptive immune systems, which are pivotal for bacterial elimination. However, many enteric bacterial pathogens, including Shigella, deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) via the type III secretion system (T3SS) that enable bacterial evasion from host immune systems; consequently, these pathogens are able to efficiently colonize the intestinal epithelium. In this review, we present and select recently discovered examples of interactions between Shigella and host immune responses, with particular emphasis on strategies that bacteria use to manipulate inflammatory outputs of host-cell responses such as cell death, membrane trafficking, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25999954

  4. Host-response: understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of host-microbial interactions - consensus of the Seventh European Workshop on Periodontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinane, D.F.; Preshaw, P.M.; Loos, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: Major challenges in periodontology include understanding the pathophysiology, the interplay between various components of the host response, parallels with other diseases and identifying biomarkers of the disease. Objectives: Four reviews were compiled with the aim of better und

  5. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann-Gow, Travis K; King, Benjamin J; El-Ghannam, Ahmed;

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel...... agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety...

  6. Antagonism of host antiviral responses by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF45.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiu Zhu

    Full Text Available Virus infection of a cell generally evokes an immune response by the host to defeat the intruder in its effort. Many viruses have developed an array of strategies to evade or antagonize host antiviral responses. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is demonstrated in this report to be able to prevent activation of host antiviral defense mechanisms upon infection. Cells infected with wild-type KSHV were permissive for superinfection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, suggesting that KSHV virions fail to induce host antiviral responses. We previously showed that ORF45, a KSHV immediate-early protein as well as a tegument protein of virions, interacts with IRF-7 and inhibits virus-mediated type I interferon induction by blocking IRF-7 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (Zhu et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 99:5573-5578, 2002. Here, using an ORF45-null recombinant virus, we demonstrate a profound role of ORF45 in inhibiting host antiviral responses. Infection of cells with an ORF45-null mutant recombinant KSHV (BAC-stop45 triggered an immune response that resisted VSV super-infection, concomitantly associated with appreciable increases in transcription of type I IFN and downstream anti-viral effector genes. Gain-of-function analysis showed that ectopic expression of ORF45 in human fibroblast cells by a lentivirus vector decreased the antiviral responses of the cells. shRNA-mediated silencing of IRF-7, that predominantly regulates both the early and late phase induction of type I IFNs, clearly indicated its critical contribution to the innate antiviral responses generated against incoming KSHV particles. Thus ORF45 through its targeting of the crucial IRF-7 regulated type I IFN antiviral responses significantly contributes to the KSHV survival immediately following a primary infection allowing for progression onto subsequent stages in its life-cycle.

  7. Distinct Pathogenesis and Host Responses during Infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoqui, Javier E.; Troemel, Emily R.; Feinbaum, Rhonda L.; Luhachack, Lyly G.; Cezairliyan, Brent O.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus–triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with

  8. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fros, Jelke J; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-06-11

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus-host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly.

  9. Multispecies biofilms and host responses: "discriminating the trees from the forest".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Ebersole, J L

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases reflect a tissue destructive process of the hard and soft tissues of the periodontium that are initiated by the accumulation of multispecies bacterial biofilms in the subgingival sulcus. This accumulation, in both quantity and quality of bacteria, results in a chronic immunoinflammatory response of the host to control this noxious challenge, leading to collateral damage of the tissues. As knowledge of the characteristics of the host-bacterial interactions in the oral cavity has expanded, new knowledge has become available on the complexity of the microbial challenge and the repertoire of host responses to this challenge. Recent results from the Human Microbiome Project continue to extend the array of taxa, genera, and species of bacteria that inhabit the multiple niches in the oral cavity; however, there is rather sparse information regarding variations in how host cells discriminate commensal from pathogenic species, as well as how the host response is affected by the three-dimensional architecture and interbacterial interactions that occur in the oral biofilms. This review provides some insights into these processes by including existing literature on the biology of nonoral bacterial biofilms, and the more recent literature just beginning to document how the oral cavity responds to multispecies biofilms.

  10. Roles of the host oxidative immune response and bacterial antioxidant rubrerythrin during Porphyromonas gingivalis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Mydel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The efficient clearance of microbes by neutrophils requires the concerted action of reactive oxygen species and microbicidal components within leukocyte secretory granules. Rubrerythrin (Rbr is a nonheme iron protein that protects many air-sensitive bacteria against oxidative stress. Using oxidative burst-knockout (NADPH oxidase-null mice and an rbr gene knockout bacterial strain, we investigated the interplay between the phagocytic oxidative burst of the host and the oxidative stress response of the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Rbr ensured the proliferation of P. gingivalis in mice that possessed a fully functional oxidative burst response, but not in NADPH oxidase-null mice. Furthermore, the in vivo protection afforded by Rbr was not associated with the oxidative burst responses of isolated neutrophils in vitro. Although the phagocyte-derived oxidative burst response was largely ineffective against P. gingivalis infection, the corresponding oxidative response to the Rbr-positive microbe contributed to host-induced pathology via potent mobilization and systemic activation of neutrophils. It appeared that Rbr also provided protection against reactive nitrogen species, thereby ensuring the survival of P. gingivalis in the infected host. The presence of the rbr gene in P. gingivalis also led to greater oral bone loss upon infection. Collectively, these results indicate that the host oxidative burst paradoxically enhances the survival of P. gingivalis by exacerbating local and systemic inflammation, thereby contributing to the morbidity and mortality associated with infection.

  11. Shigella flexneri infection in Caenorhabditis elegans: cytopathological examination and identification of host responses.

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    Divya T George

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Shigella flexneri is the causative agent of shigellosis, a diarrhoeal disease also known as bacillary dysentery. S. flexneri infects the colonic and rectal epithelia of its primate host and induces a cascade of inflammatory responses that culminates in the destruction of the host intestinal lining. Molecular characterization of host-pathogen interactions in this infection has been challenging due to the host specificity of S. flexneri strains, as it strictly infects humans and non-human primates. Recent studies have shown that S. flexneri infects the soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, however, the interactions between S. flexneri and C. elegans at the cellular level and the cause of nematode death are unknown. Here we attempt to gain insight into the complex host-pathogen interactions between S. flexneri and C. elegans. Using transmission electron microscopy, we show that live S. flexneri cells accumulate in the nematode intestinal lumen, produce outer membrane vesicles and invade nematode intestinal cells. Using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis we identified host proteins that are differentially expressed in response to S. flexneri infection. Four of the identified genes, aco-1, cct-2, daf-19 and hsp-60, were knocked down using RNAi and ACO-1, CCT-2 and DAF-19, which were identified as up-regulated in response to S. flexneri infection, were found to be involved in the infection process. aco-1 RNAi worms were more resistant to S. flexneri infection, suggesting S. flexneri-mediated disruption of host iron homeostasis. cct-2 and daf-19 RNAi worms were more susceptible to infection, suggesting that these genes are induced as a protective mechanism by C. elegans. These observations further our understanding of the processes involved in S. flexneri infection of C. elegans, which is immensely beneficial to the routine use of this new in vivo model to study S. flexneri pathogenesis.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-operonic PE32/PPE65 proteins alter host immune responses by hampering Th1 response

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    Mohd eKhubaib

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PE/PPE genes, present in cluster with ESAT-6 like genes, are suspected to have a role in antigenic variation and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their roles in immune evasion and immune modulation of host are also well documented. We present evidence that PE32/PPE65 present within the RD8 region are co-operonic, co-transcribed and co-translated, and play role in modulating host immune responses. Experiments with macrophage cell lines revealed that this protein complex suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 whereas also inducing high expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Immunization of mice with these recombinant proteins dampens an effective Th1 response as evident from reduced frequency of IFN-g and IL-2 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. IgG sub-typing from serum of immunized mice revealed high levels of IgG1 when compared with IgG2a and IgG2b. Further IgG1/IgG2a ratio clearly demonstrated that the protein complex manipulates the host immune response favourable to the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the co-transcribed and co-translated PE32 and PPE65 antigens are involved specifically in modulating anti-mycobacterial host immune response by hampering Th1 response.

  13. Stimuli-responsive host-guest systems based on the recognition of cryptands by organic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Xuzhou; Huang, Feihe; Niu, Zhenbin; Gibson, Harry W

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: As the star compounds in host-guest chemistry, the syntheses of crown ethers proclaimed the birth of supramolecular chemistry. Crown ether-based host-guest systems have attracted great attention in self-assembly processes because of their good selectivity, high efficiency, and convenient responsiveness, enabling their facile application to the "bottom-up" approach for construction of functional molecular aggregates, such as artificial molecular machines, drug delivery materials, and supramolecular polymers. Cryptands, as preorganized derivatives of crown ethers, not only possess the above-mentioned properties but also have three-dimensional spatial structures and higher association constants compared with crown ethers. More importantly, the introduction of the additional arms makes cryptand-based host-guest systems responsive to more stimuli, which is crucial for the construction of adaptive or smart materials. In the past decade, we designed and synthesized crown ether-based cryptands as a new type of host for small organic guests with the purpose of greatly increasing the stabilities of the host-guest complexes and preparing mechanically interlocked structures and large supramolecular systems more efficiently while retaining or increasing their stimuli-responsiveness. Organic molecules such as paraquat derivatives and secondary ammonium salts have been widely used in the fabrication of functional supramolecular aggregates. Many host molecules including crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils, pillararenes, and cryptands have been used in the preparation of self-assembled structures with these guest molecules, but among them cryptands exhibit the best stabilities with paraquat derivatives in organic solvents due to their preorganization and additional and optimized binding sites. They enable the construction of sophisticated molecules or supramolecules in high yields, affording a very efficient way to fabricate stimuli-responsive

  14. Septate endophyte colonization and host responses of grasses and forbs native to a tallgrass prairie.

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    Mandyam, Keerthi; Fox, Chad; Jumpponen, Ari

    2012-02-01

    Native tallgrass prairies support distinct dark septate endophyte (DSE) communities exemplified by Periconia macrospinosa and Microdochium sp. that were recently identified as common root symbionts in this system. Since these DSE fungi were repeatedly isolated from grasses and forbs, we aimed to test their abilities to colonize different hosts. One Microdochium and three Periconia strains were screened for colonization and growth responses using five native grasses and six forbs in an in vitro system. Previously published data for an additional grass (Andropogon gerardii) were included and reanalyzed. Presence of indicative inter- and intracellular structures (melanized hyphae, microsclerotia, and chlamydospores) demonstrated that all plant species were colonized by the DSE isolates albeit to varying degrees. Microscopic observations suggested that, compared to forbs, grasses were colonized to a greater degree in vitro. Host biomass responses varied among the host species. In broad comparisons, more grass species than forbs tended to respond positively to colonization, whereas more forb species tended to be non-responsive. Based on the suspected differences in the levels of colonization, we predicted that tallgrass prairie grasses would support greater DSE colonization than forbs in the field. A survey of field-collected roots from 15 native species supported this hypothesis. Our study supports the "broad host range" of DSE fungi, although the differences in the rates of colonization in the laboratory and in the field suggest a greater compatibility between grasses and DSE fungi. Furthermore, host responses to DSE range from mutualism to parasitism, suggesting a genotype-level interplay between the fungi and their hosts that determines the outcome of this symbiosis.

  15. The Host Response in Patients with Sepsis Developing Intensive Care Unit-acquired Secondary Infections.

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    van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Frencken, Jos F; Scicluna, Brendon P; Klouwenberg, Peter M C Klein; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Lutter, Rene; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc M J; Cremer, Olaf L; van der Poll, Tom

    2017-08-15

    Sepsis can be complicated by secondary infections. We explored the possibility that patients with sepsis developing a secondary infection while in the intensive care unit (ICU) display sustained inflammatory, vascular, and procoagulant responses. To compare systemic proinflammatory host responses in patients with sepsis who acquire a new infection with those who do not. Consecutive patients with sepsis with a length of ICU stay greater than 48 hours were prospectively analyzed for the development of ICU-acquired infections. Twenty host response biomarkers reflective of key pathways implicated in sepsis pathogenesis were measured during the first 4 days after ICU admission and at the day of an ICU-acquired infection or noninfectious complication. Of 1,237 admissions for sepsis (1,089 patients), 178 (14.4%) admissions were complicated by ICU-acquired infections (at Day 10 [6-13], median with interquartile range). Patients who developed a secondary infection showed higher disease severity scores and higher mortality up to 1 year than those who did not. Analyses of biomarkers in patients who later went on to develop secondary infections revealed a more dysregulated host response during the first 4 days after admission, as reflected by enhanced inflammation, stronger endothelial cell activation, a more disturbed vascular integrity, and evidence for enhanced coagulation activation. Host response reactions were similar at the time of ICU-acquired infectious or noninfectious complications. Patients with sepsis who developed an ICU-acquired infection showed a more dysregulated proinflammatory and vascular host response during the first 4 days of ICU admission than those who did not develop a secondary infection.

  16. Transcriptomics of host-virus interactions: immune responses to avian influenza virus in chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reemers, S.S.N.

    2010-01-01

    Upon entry of the respiratory tract avian influenza virus (AIV) triggers early immune responses in the host that are aimed to prevent or in case of already established infection control this infection. Although much research is performed to elucidate the course of events that follow after AIV infect

  17. Transcriptional response of bronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa: identification of early mediators of host defense.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.B.; Sterkenburg, M.A. van; Rabe, K.F.; Schalkwijk, J.; Hiemstra, P.S.; Datson, N.A.

    2005-01-01

    The airway epithelium responds to microbial exposure by altering expression of a variety of genes to increase innate host defense. We aimed to delineate the early transcriptional response in human primary bronchial epithelial cells exposed for 6 h to a mixture of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha or heat-inact

  18. Host responses in life-history traits and tolerance to virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Israel Pagán

    Full Text Available Knowing how hosts respond to parasite infection is paramount in understanding the effects of parasites on host populations and hence host-parasite co-evolution. Modification of life-history traits in response to parasitism has received less attention than other defence strategies. Life-history theory predicts that parasitised hosts will increase reproductive effort and accelerate reproduction. However, empirical analyses of these predictions are few and mostly limited to animal-parasite systems. We have analysed life-history trait responses in 18 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana infected at two different developmental stages with three strains of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Accessions were divided into two groups according to allometric relationships; these groups differed also in their tolerance to CMV infection. Life-history trait modification upon virus infection depended on the host genotype and the stage at infection. While all accessions delayed flowering, only the more tolerant allometric group modified resource allocation to increase the production of reproductive structures and progeny, and reduced the length of reproductive period. Our results are in agreement with modifications of life-history traits reported for parasitised animals and with predictions from life-history theory. Thus, we provide empirical support for the general validity of theoretical predictions. In addition, this experimental approach allowed us to quantitatively estimate the genetic determinism of life-history trait plasticity and to evaluate the role of life-history trait modification in defence against parasites, two largely unexplored issues.

  19. RNAseq reveals hypervirulence-specific host responses to M. tuberculosis infection.

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    Leisching, Gina; Pietersen, Ray-Dean; van Heerden, Carel; van Helden, Paul; Wiid, Ian; Baker, Bienyameen

    2017-08-18

    The distinguishing factors that characterize the host response to infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) are largely confounding. We present an infection study with 2 genetically closely related M.tb strains that have vastly different pathogenic characteristics. The early host response to infection with these detergent-free cultured strains was analyzed through RNAseq in an attempt to provide information on the subtleties which may ultimately contribute to the virulent phenotype. Murine bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) were infected with either a hyper- (R5527) or hypovirulent (R1507) Beijing M. tuberculosis clinical isolate. RNAseq revealed 69 differentially expressed host genes in BMDMs during comparison of these 2 transcriptomes. Pathway analysis revealed activation of the stress-induced and growth inhibitory Gadd45 signaling pathway in hypervirulent infected BMDMs. Upstream regulators of interferon activation such as and IRF3 and IRF7 were predicted to be upregulated in hypovirulent-infected BMDMs. Additional analysis of the host immune response through ELISA and qPCR included the use of human THP-1 macrophages where a robust proinflammatory response was observed after infection with the hypervirulent strain. RNAseq revealed 2 early-response genes (ier3 and saa3) and 2 host-defense genes (oasl1 and slpi) that were significantly upregulated by the hypervirulent strain. The role of these genes under M.tb infection conditions are largely unknown but here we provide validation of their presence with use of qPCR and Western blot. Further analysis into their biological role during infection with virulent M.tb is required.

  20. Host response to cuckoo song is predicted by the future risk of brood parasitism.

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    Kleindorfer, Sonia; Evans, Christine; Colombelli-Négrel, Diane; Robertson, Jeremy; Griggio, Matteo; Hoi, Herbert

    2013-05-22

    Risk assessment occurs over different temporal and spatial scales and is selected for when individuals show an adaptive response to a threat. Here, we test if birds respond to the threat of brood parasitism using the acoustical cues of brood parasites in the absence of visual stimuli. We broadcast the playback of song of three brood parasites (Chalcites cuckoo species) and a sympatric non-parasite (striated thornbill, Acanthiza lineata) in the territories of superb fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) during the peak breeding period and opportunistic breeding period. The three cuckoo species differ in brood parasite prevalence and the probability of detection by the host, which we used to rank the risk of parasitism (high risk, moderate risk, low risk). Host birds showed the strongest response to the threat of cuckoo parasitism in accordance with the risk of parasitism. Resident wrens had many alarm calls and close and rapid approach to the playback speaker that was broadcasting song of the high risk brood parasite (Horsfield's bronze-cuckoo, C. basalis) across the year (peak and opportunistic breeding period), some response to the moderate risk brood parasite (shining bronze-cuckoo, C. lucidus) during the peak breeding period, and the weakest response to the low risk brood parasite (little bronze-cuckoo, C. minutillus). Playback of the familiar control stimulus in wren territories evoked the least response. Host response to the threat of cuckoo parasitism was assessed using vocal cues of the cuckoo and was predicted by the risk of future parasitism.

  1. Differential responses of the coral host and their algal symbiont to thermal stress.

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    William Leggat

    Full Text Available The success of any symbiosis under stress conditions is dependent upon the responses of both partners to that stress. The coral symbiosis is particularly susceptible to small increases of temperature above the long term summer maxima, which leads to the phenomenon known as coral bleaching, where the intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts are expelled. Here we for the first time used quantitative PCR to simultaneously examine the gene expression response of orthologs of the coral Acropora aspera and their dinoflagellate symbiont Symbiodinium. During an experimental bleaching event significant up-regulation of genes involved in stress response (HSP90 and HSP70 and carbon metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase from the coral host were observed. In contrast in the symbiont, HSP90 expression decreased, while HSP70 levels were increased on only one day, and only the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression levels were found to increase. In addition the changes seen in expression patterns of the coral host were much larger, up to 10.5 fold, compared to the symbiont response, which in all cases was less than 2-fold. This targeted study of the expression of key metabolic and stress genes demonstrates that the response of the coral and their symbiont vary significantly, also a response in the host transcriptome was observed prior to what has previously been thought to be the temperatures at which thermal stress events occur.

  2. Allicin enhances host pro-inflammatory immune responses and protects against acute murine malaria infection

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    Feng Yonghui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malaria infection, multiple pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, TNF and nitric oxide (NO play a crucial role in the protection against the parasites. Modulation of host immunity is an important strategy to improve the outcome of malaria infection. Allicin is the major biologically active component of garlic and shows anti-microbial activity. Allicin is also active against protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, which is thought to be mediated by inhibiting cysteine proteases. In this study, the immunomodulatory activities of allicin were assessed during acute malaria infection using a rodent malaria model Plasmodium yoelii 17XL. Methods To determine whether allicin modulates host immune responses against malaria infection, mice were treated with allicin after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Mortality was checked daily and parasitaemia was determined every other day. Pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-4 were quantified by ELISA, while NO level was determined by the Griess method. The populations of dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, CD4+ T and regulatory T cells (Treg were assessed by FACS. Results Allicin reduced parasitaemia and prolonged survival of the host in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is at least partially due to improved host immune responses. Results showed that allicin treatment enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12p70 and NO. The absolute numbers of CD4+ T cells, DCs and macrophages were significantly higher in allicin-treated mice. In addition, allicin promoted the maturation of CD11c+ DCs, whereas it did not cause major changes in IL-4 and the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Conclusions Allicin could partially protect host against P. yoelii 17XL through enhancement of the host innate and adaptive immune responses.

  3. Influenza-Omics and the Host Response: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

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    Joshua D. Powell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAV continually evolve and have the capacity to cause global pandemics. Because IAV represents an ongoing threat, identifying novel therapies and host innate immune factors that contribute to IAV pathogenesis is of considerable interest. This review summarizes the relevant literature as it relates to global host responses to influenza infection at both the proteome and transcriptome level. The various-omics infection systems that include but are not limited to ferrets, mice, pigs, and even the controlled infection of humans are reviewed. Discussion focuses on recent advances, remaining challenges, and knowledge gaps as it relates to influenza-omics infection outcomes.

  4. Gut microbiota signatures predict host and microbiota responses to dietary interventions in obese individuals.

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    Katri Korpela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interactions between the diet and intestinal microbiota play a role in health and disease, including obesity and related metabolic complications. There is great interest to use dietary means to manipulate the microbiota to promote health. Currently, the impact of dietary change on the microbiota and the host metabolism is poorly predictable and highly individual. We propose that the responsiveness of the gut microbiota may depend on its composition, and associate with metabolic changes in the host. METHODOLOGY: Our study involved three independent cohorts of obese adults (n = 78 from Belgium, Finland, and Britain, participating in different dietary interventions aiming to improve metabolic health. We used a phylogenetic microarray for comprehensive fecal microbiota analysis at baseline and after the intervention. Blood cholesterol, insulin and inflammation markers were analyzed as indicators of host response. The data were divided into four training set - test set pairs; each intervention acted both as a part of a training set and as an independent test set. We used linear models to predict the responsiveness of the microbiota and the host, and logistic regression to predict responder vs. non-responder status, or increase vs. decrease of the health parameters. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our models, based on the abundance of several, mainly Firmicute species at baseline, predicted the responsiveness of the microbiota (AUC  =  0.77-1; predicted vs. observed correlation  =  0.67-0.88. Many of the predictive taxa showed a non-linear relationship with the responsiveness. The microbiota response associated with the change in serum cholesterol levels with an AUC of 0.96, highlighting the involvement of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic health. CONCLUSION: This proof-of-principle study introduces the first potential microbial biomarkers for dietary responsiveness in obese individuals with impaired metabolic health, and reveals the

  5. Gut Microbiota Signatures Predict Host and Microbiota Responses to Dietary Interventions in Obese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Katri; Flint, Harry J.; Johnstone, Alexandra M.; Lappi, Jenni; Poutanen, Kaisa; Dewulf, Evelyne; Delzenne, Nathalie; de Vos, Willem M.; Salonen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Interactions between the diet and intestinal microbiota play a role in health and disease, including obesity and related metabolic complications. There is great interest to use dietary means to manipulate the microbiota to promote health. Currently, the impact of dietary change on the microbiota and the host metabolism is poorly predictable and highly individual. We propose that the responsiveness of the gut microbiota may depend on its composition, and associate with metabolic changes in the host. Methodology Our study involved three independent cohorts of obese adults (n = 78) from Belgium, Finland, and Britain, participating in different dietary interventions aiming to improve metabolic health. We used a phylogenetic microarray for comprehensive fecal microbiota analysis at baseline and after the intervention. Blood cholesterol, insulin and inflammation markers were analyzed as indicators of host response. The data were divided into four training set – test set pairs; each intervention acted both as a part of a training set and as an independent test set. We used linear models to predict the responsiveness of the microbiota and the host, and logistic regression to predict responder vs. non-responder status, or increase vs. decrease of the health parameters. Principal Findings Our models, based on the abundance of several, mainly Firmicute species at baseline, predicted the responsiveness of the microbiota (AUC  =  0.77–1; predicted vs. observed correlation  =  0.67–0.88). Many of the predictive taxa showed a non-linear relationship with the responsiveness. The microbiota response associated with the change in serum cholesterol levels with an AUC of 0.96, highlighting the involvement of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic health. Conclusion This proof-of-principle study introduces the first potential microbial biomarkers for dietary responsiveness in obese individuals with impaired metabolic health, and reveals the potential of

  6. Bacterial immunostat: Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipids and their role in the host immune response.

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    Queiroz, Adriano; Riley, Lee W

    2017-01-01

    The lipid-rich cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a dynamic structure that is involved in the regulation of the transport of nutrients, toxic host-cell effector molecules, and anti-tuberculosis drugs. It is therefore postulated to contribute to the long-term bacterial survival in an infected human host. Accumulating evidence suggests that M. tuberculosis remodels the lipid composition of the cell wall as an adaptive mechanism against host-imposed stress. Some of these lipid species (trehalose dimycolate, diacylated sulphoglycolipid, and mannan-based lipoglycans) trigger an immunopathologic response, whereas others (phthiocerol dimycocerosate, mycolic acids, sulpholipid-1, and di-and polyacyltrehalose) appear to dampen the immune responses. These lipids appear to be coordinately expressed in the cell wall of M. tuberculosis during different phases of infection, ultimately determining the clinical fate of the infection. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the metabolism, transport, and homeostatic or immunostatic regulation of the cell wall lipids, and their orchestrated interaction with host immune responses that results in bacterial clearance, persistence, or tuberculosis.

  7. Coxiella burnetii and Leishmania mexicana residing within similar parasitophorous vacuoles elicit disparate host responses

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    Jess A Millar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is a bacterium that thrives in an acidic parasitophorous vacuole (PV derived from lysosomes. Leishmania mexicana, a eukaryote, has also independently evolved to live in a morphologically similar PV. As Coxiella and Leishmania are highly divergent organisms that cause different diseases, we reasoned that their respective infections would likely elicit distinct host responses despite producing phenotypically similar parasite-containing vacuoles. The objective of this study was to investigate, at the molecular level, the macrophage response to each pathogen. Infection of THP-1 (human monocyte/macrophage cells with Coxiella and Leishmania elicited disparate host responses. At 5 days post-infection, when compared to uninfected cells, 1057 genes were differentially expressed (746 genes up- and 311 genes down-regulated in C. burnetii infected cells, whereas 698 genes (534 genes up- and 164 genes down-regulated were differentially expressed in L. mexicana infected cells. Interestingly, of the 1755 differentially expressed genes identified in this study, only 126 genes (~7% are common to both infections. We also discovered that 1090 genes produced mRNA isoforms at significantly different levels under the two infection conditions, suggesting that alternate proteins encoded by the same gene might have important roles in host response to each infection. Additionally, we detected 257 micro RNAs (miRNAs that were expressed in THP-1 cells and identified miRNAs that were specifically expressed during Coxiella or Leishmania infections. Collectively, this study identified host mRNAs and miRNAs that were influenced by Coxiella and/or Leishmania infections. Intriguingly, our data indicate that although their PVs are morphologically similar, Coxiella and Leishmania have evolved different strategies that perturb distinct host processes to create and thrive within their respective intracellular niches.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Host Response and Innate Resilience to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William E; Suchindran, Sunil; Nicholson, Bradly P; McClain, Micah T; Burke, Thomas; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Harro, Clayton D; Chakraborty, Subhra; Sack, David A; Woods, Christopher W; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2016-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a globally prevalent cause of diarrhea. Though usually self-limited, it can be severe and debilitating. Little is known about the host transcriptional response to infection. We report the first gene expression analysis of the human host response to experimental challenge with ETEC. We challenged 30 healthy adults with an unattenuated ETEC strain, and collected serial blood samples shortly after inoculation and daily for 8 days. We performed gene expression analysis on whole peripheral blood RNA samples from subjects in whom severe symptoms developed (n = 6) and a subset of those who remained asymptomatic (n = 6) despite shedding. Compared with baseline, symptomatic subjects demonstrated significantly different expression of 406 genes highlighting increased immune response and decreased protein synthesis. Compared with asymptomatic subjects, symptomatic subjects differentially expressed 254 genes primarily associated with immune response. This comparison also revealed 29 genes differentially expressed between groups at baseline, suggesting innate resilience to infection. Drug repositioning analysis identified several drug classes with potential utility in augmenting immune response or mitigating symptoms. There are statistically significant and biologically plausible differences in host gene expression induced by ETEC infection. Differential baseline expression of some genes may indicate resilience to infection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  10. Antimicrobial growth promoters modulate host responses in mice with a defined intestinal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirsty; Zaytsoff, Sarah J. M.; Uwiera, Richard R. E.; Inglis, G. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics can promote growth in livestock (antimicrobial growth promoters, AGPs), however lack of knowledge regarding mechanisms has hampered the development of effective non-antibiotic alternatives. Antibiotics affect eukaryotic cells at therapeutic concentrations, yet effects of AGPs on host physiology are relatively understudied, partially due to the complexity of host-microorganism interactions within the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the direct effects of AGPs on the host, we generated Altered Schaedler Flora (ASF) mice, and administered chlortetracycline (CTC) and tylosin phosphate (TYL) in feed. Mice were challenged with Citrobacter rodentium to determine how AGPs alter host responses to physiological stress. Although CTC and TYL had inconsistent effects on the ASF taxa, AGPs protected mice from weight loss following C. rodentium inoculation. Mice treated with either CTC or TYL had lower expression of βd1 and Il17a in the intestine and had a robust induction of Il17a and Il10. Furthermore, AGP administration resulted in a lower hepatic expression of acute phase proteins (Saa1, Hp, and Cp) in liver tissue, and ameliorated C. rodentium-induced reductions in the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Hmgcl and Fabp1). Collectively, this indicates that AGPs directly affect host physiology, and highlights important considerations in the development of non-antibiotic alternatives. PMID:27929072

  11. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aevermann, Brian D; Pickett, Brett E; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagen; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean; Clauss, Therese R W; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H; Eisfeld, Amie J; Ellis, Amy; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T; Gralinski, Lisa E; Green, Richard R; Gritsenko, Marina A; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A; Jacobs, Jon M; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M; Kelly, Sara; Law, G Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L; Matzke, Melissa; McDermott, Jason; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O; Mitchell, Hugh; Monroe, Matthew E; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L; Purvine, Samuel O; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Sanders, Catherine J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Shukla, Anil K; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Thomas, Paul G; Tilton, Susan C; Totura, Allison; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D; Waters, Katrina M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  12. A spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by host immune responses against Epstein-Barr virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwatsuki K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, or human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4, infects the vast majority of adults worldwide, and establishes both nonproductive (latent and productive (lytic infections. Host immune responses directed against both the lytic and latent cycle-associated EBV antigens induce a diversity of clinical symptoms in patients with chronic active EBV infections who usually contain an oligoclonal pool of EBV-infected lymphocyte subsets in their blood. Episomal EBV genes in the latent infection utilize an array of evasion strategies from host immune responses: the minimized expression of EBV antigens targeted by host cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, the down-regulation of cell adhesion molecule expression, and the release of virokines to inhibit the host CTLs. The oncogenic role of latent EBV infection is not yet fully understood, but latent membrane proteins (LMPs expressed during the latency cycle have essential biological properties leading to cellular gene expression and immortalization, and EBV-encoded gene products such as viral interleukin-10 (vIL-10 and bcl-2 homologue function to survive the EBV-infected cells. The subsequent oncogenic DNA damage may lead to the development of neoplasms. EBV-associated NK/T cell lymphoproliferative disorders are prevalent in Asia, but quite rare in Western countries. The genetic immunological background, therefore, is closely linked to the development of EBV-associated neoplasms.

  13. Response of the bacterial symbiont Holospora caryophila to different growth conditions of its host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Michele; Lanzoni, Olivia; Fokin, Sergei I; Schrallhammer, Martina; Petroni, Giulio

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies on bacterial symbionts of ciliates have shown that some symbionts can be maintained relatively well under standard laboratory conditions whereas others are frequently lost, especially when the host is cultivated at a high division rate. In this study, the variation in infection level by the endosymbiont Holospora caryophila within its host population Paramecium octaurelia was investigated in response to three alimentary treatments and a subsequent starvation phase. The response of the ciliates was determined as a nearly exponential growth rate with different slopes in each treatment, proportional to the amount of food received. The initial infection level was higher than 90%. After 24 days of exponential host's growth, the prevalence remained stable at approximately 90% in all treatments, even after a subsequent starvation phase of 20 days. However, at intermediate time-points in both the feeding and the starvation phase, fluctuations in the presence of the intracellular bacteria were observed. These results show that H. caryophila is able to maintain its infection under the tested range of host growth conditions, also due to the possibility of an effective re-infection in case of partial loss.

  14. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann-Gow, Travis K.; King, Benjamin J.; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M.; Krhut, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile. PMID:27688751

  15. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis K. Mann-Gow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10 and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile.

  16. Herbivore Oral Secreted Bacteria Trigger Distinct Defense Responses in Preferred and Non-Preferred Host Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chung, Seung Ho; Peiffer, Michelle; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Zeng, Rensen; Felton, Gary W

    2016-06-01

    Insect symbiotic bacteria affect host physiology and mediate plant-insect interactions, yet there are few clear examples of symbiotic bacteria regulating defense responses in different host plants. We hypothesized that plants would induce distinct defense responses to herbivore- associated bacteria. We evaluated whether preferred hosts (horsenettle) or non-preferred hosts (tomato) respond similarly to oral secretions (OS) from the false potato beetle (FPB, Leptinotarsa juncta), and whether the induced defense triggered by OS was due to the presence of symbiotic bacteria in OS. Both horsenettle and tomato damaged by antibiotic (AB) treated larvae showed higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity than those damaged by non-AB treated larvae. In addition, application of OS from AB treated larvae induced higher PPO activity compared with OS from non-AB treated larvae or water treatment. False potato beetles harbor bacteria that may provide abundant cues that can be recognized by plants and thus mediate corresponding defense responses. Among all tested bacterial isolates, the genera Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia were found to suppress PPO activity in tomato, while only Pantoea sp. among these four isolates was observed to suppress PPO activity in horsenettle. The distinct PPO suppression caused by symbiotic bacteria in different plants was similar to the pattern of induced defense-related gene expression. Pantoea inoculated FPB suppressed JA-responsive genes and triggered a SA-responsive gene in both tomato and horsenettle. However, Enterobacter inoculated FPB eliminated JA-regulated gene expression and elevated SA-regulated gene expression in tomato, but did not show evident effects on the expression levels of horsenettle defense-related genes. These results indicate that suppression of plant defenses by the bacteria found in the oral secretions of herbivores may be a more widespread phenomenon than previously indicated.

  17. Addressing the Inflammatory Response to Clinically Relevant Polymers by Manipulating the Host Response Using ITIM Domain-Containing Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua B. Slee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue contacting surfaces of medical devices initiate a host inflammatory response, characterized by adsorption of blood proteins and inflammatory cells triggering the release of cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, in an attempt to clear or isolate the foreign object from the body. This normal host response contributes to device-associated pathophysiology and addressing device biocompatibility remains an unmet need. Although widespread attempts have been made to render the device surfaces unreactive, the establishment of a completely bioinert coating has been untenable and demonstrates the need to develop strategies based upon the molecular mechanisms that define the interaction between host cells and synthetic surfaces. In this review, we discuss a family of transmembrane receptors, known as immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM-containing receptors, which show promise as potential targets to address aberrant biocompatibility. These receptors repress the immune response and ensure that the intensity of an immune response is appropriate for the stimuli. Particular emphasis will be placed on the known ITIM-containing receptor, Signal Regulatory Protein Alpha (SIRPα, and its cognate ligand CD47. In addition, this review will discuss the potential of other ITIM-containing proteins as targets for addressing the aberrant biocompatibility of polymeric biomaterials.

  18. Host control of malaria infections: constraints on immune and erythropoeitic response kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip G McQueen

    Full Text Available The two main agents of human malaria, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, can induce severe anemia and provoke strong, complex immune reactions. Which dynamical behaviors of host immune and erythropoietic responses would foster control of infection, and which would lead to runaway parasitemia and/or severe anemia? To answer these questions, we developed differential equation models of interacting parasite and red blood cell (RBC populations modulated by host immune and erythropoietic responses. The model immune responses incorporate both a rapidly responding innate component and a slower-responding, long-term antibody component, with several parasite developmental stages considered as targets for each type of immune response. We found that simulated infections with the highest parasitemia tended to be those with ineffective innate immunity even if antibodies were present. We also compared infections with dyserythropoiesis (reduced RBC production during infection to those with compensatory erythropoiesis (boosted RBC production or a fixed basal RBC production rate. Dyserythropoiesis tended to reduce parasitemia slightly but at a cost to the host of aggravating anemia. On the other hand, compensatory erythropoiesis tended to reduce the severity of anemia but with enhanced parasitemia if the innate response was ineffective. For both parasite species, sharp transitions between the schizont and the merozoite stages of development (i.e., with standard deviation in intra-RBC development time response, though P. vivax attacks a much smaller subset of RBCs. Since most P. vivax infections are nonlethal (if debilitating clinically, this suggests that P

  19. Host plant peptides elicit a transcriptional response to control the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle during symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penterman, Jon; Abo, Ryan P; De Nisco, Nicole J; Arnold, Markus F F; Longhi, Renato; Zanda, Matteo; Walker, Graham C

    2014-03-04

    The α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti establishes a chronic intracellular infection during the symbiosis with its legume hosts. Within specialized host cells, S. meliloti differentiates into highly polyploid, enlarged nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This differentiation is driven by host cells through the production of defensin-like peptides called "nodule-specific cysteine-rich" (NCR) peptides. Recent research has shown that synthesized NCR peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity at high concentrations but cause bacterial endoreduplication at sublethal concentrations. We leveraged synchronized S. meliloti populations to determine how treatment with a sublethal NCR peptide affects the cell cycle and physiology of bacteria at the molecular level. We found that at sublethal levels a representative NCR peptide specifically blocks cell division and antagonizes Z-ring function. Gene-expression profiling revealed that the cell division block was produced, in part, through the substantial transcriptional response elicited by sublethal NCR treatment that affected ∼15% of the genome. Expression of critical cell-cycle regulators, including ctrA, and cell division genes, including genes required for Z-ring function, were greatly attenuated in NCR-treated cells. In addition, our experiments identified important symbiosis functions and stress responses that are induced by sublethal levels of NCR peptides and other antimicrobial peptides. Several of these stress-response pathways also are found in related α-proteobacterial pathogens and might be used by S. meliloti to sense host cues during infection. Our data suggest a model in which, in addition to provoking stress responses, NCR peptides target intracellular regulatory pathways to drive S. meliloti endoreduplication and differentiation during symbiosis.

  20. Modeling Within-Host Dynamics of Influenza Virus Infection Including Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Pawelek, Kasia A.; Huynh, Giao T; Michelle Quinlivan; Ann Cullinane; Libin Rong; Perelson, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus infection remains a public health problem worldwide. The mechanisms underlying viral control during an uncomplicated influenza virus infection are not fully understood. Here, we developed a mathematical model including both innate and adaptive immune responses to study the within-host dynamics of equine influenza virus infection in horses. By comparing modeling predictions with both interferon and viral kinetic data, we examined the relative roles of target cell availability, ...

  1. Dominance effects of deleterious and beneficial mutations in a single gene of the RNA virus ϕ6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Joseph

    Full Text Available Most of our knowledge of dominance stems from studies of deleterious mutations. From these studies we know that most deleterious mutations are recessive, and that this recessivity arises from a hyperbolic relationship between protein function (i.e., protein concentration or activity and fitness. Here we investigate whether this knowledge can be used to make predictions about the dominance of beneficial and deleterious mutations in a single gene. We employed a model system--the bacteriophage φ6--that allowed us to generate a collection of mutations in haploid conditions so that it was not biased toward either dominant beneficial or recessive deleterious mutations. Screening for the ability to infect a bacterial host that does not permit infection by the wildtype φ6, we generated a collection of mutations in P3, a gene involved in attachment to the host and in phage particle assembly. The resulting collection contained mutations with both deleterious and beneficial effects on fitness. The deleterious mutations in our collection had additive effects on fitness and the beneficial mutations were recessive. Neither of these observations were predicted from previous studies of dominance. This pattern is not consistent with the hyperbolic (diminishing returns relationship between protein function and fitness that is characteristic of enzymatic genes, but could have resulted from a curve of increasing returns.

  2. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. The Role of BAFF System Molecules in Host Response to Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Jiro; Akkoyunlu, Mustafa

    2017-10-01

    The two ligands B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and the three receptors BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), and B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) are members of the "BAFF system molecules." BAFF system molecules are primarily involved in B cell homeostasis. The relevance of BAFF system molecules in host responses to microbial assaults has been investigated in clinical studies and in mice deficient for each of these molecules. Many microbial products modulate the expression of these molecules. Data from clinical studies suggest a correlation between increased expression levels of BAFF system molecules and elevated B cell responses. Depending on the pathogen, heightened B cell responses may strengthen the host response or promote susceptibility. Whereas pathogen-mediated increases in the expression levels of the ligands and/or the receptors appear to promote microbial clearance, certain pathogens have evolved to ablate B cell responses by suppressing the expression of TACI and/or BAFF-R on B cells. Other than its well-established role in B cell responses, the TACI-mediated activation of macrophages is also implicated in resistance to intracellular pathogens. An improved understanding of the role that BAFF system molecules play in infection may assist in devising novel strategies for vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Pathogenic Leptospires Modulate Protein Expression and Post-translational Modifications in Response to Mammalian Host Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarlath E. Nally

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic species of Leptospira cause leptospirosis, a bacterial zoonotic disease with a global distribution affecting over one million people annually. Reservoir hosts of leptospirosis, including rodents, dogs, and cattle, exhibit little to no signs of disease but shed large numbers of organisms in their urine. Transmission occurs when mucosal surfaces or abraded skin come into contact with infected urine or urine-contaminated water or soil. Whilst little is known about how Leptospira adapt to and persist within a reservoir host, in vitro studies suggest that leptospires alter their transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in response to environmental signals encountered during mammalian infection. We applied the dialysis membrane chamber (DMC peritoneal implant model to compare the whole cell proteome of in vivo derived leptospires with that of leptospires cultivated in vitro at 30°C and 37°C by 2-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE. Of 1,735 protein spots aligned across 9 2-D DIGE gels, 202 protein spots were differentially expressed (p < 0.05, fold change >1.25 or < −1.25 across all three conditions. Differentially expressed proteins were excised for identification by mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006995. The greatest differences were detected when DMC-cultivated leptospires were compared with IV30- or IV37-cultivated leptospires, including the increased expression of multiple isoforms of Loa22, a known virulence factor. Unexpectedly, 20 protein isoforms of LipL32 and 7 isoforms of LipL41 were uniformly identified by DIGE as differentially expressed, suggesting that unique post-translational modifications (PTMs are operative in response to mammalian host conditions. To test this hypothesis, a rat model of persistent renal colonization was used to isolate leptospires directly from the urine of experimentally infected rats. Comparison of urinary derived leptospires to IV30

  5. Beyond SHM and CSR: AID and related cytidine deaminases in the host response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Brad R; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2007-01-01

    As the primary effector of immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) serves an important function in the adaptive immune response. Recent advances have demonstrated that AID and a group of closely related cytidine deaminases, the APOBEC3 proteins, also act in the innate host response to viral infection. Antiviral activity was first attributed to APOBEC3G as a potent inhibitor of HIV. It is now apparent that the targets of the APOBEC3 proteins extend beyond HIV, with family members acting against a wide variety of viruses as well as host-encoded retrotransposable genetic elements. Although it appears to function through a different mechanism, AID also possesses antiviral properties. Independent of its antibody diversification functions, AID protects against transformation by Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV), an oncogenic retrovirus. Additionally, AID has been implicated in the host response to other pathogenic viruses. These emerging roles for the AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminases in viral infection suggest an intriguing evolutionary connection of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms.

  6. Microarray analysis of human monocytes infected with Francisella tularensis identifies new targets of host response subversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Butchar

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative facultative bacterium that causes the disease tularemia, even upon exposure to low numbers of bacteria. One critical characteristic of Francisella is its ability to dampen or subvert the host immune response. In order to help understand the mechanisms by which this occurs, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis on transcripts from blood monocytes infected with the virulent Type A Schu S4 strain. Results showed that expression of several host response genes were reduced such as those associated with interferon signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, autophagy and phagocytosis. When compared to microarrays from monocytes infected with the less virulent F. tularensis subsp. novicida, we found qualitative differences and also a general pattern of quantitatively reduced pro-inflammatory signaling pathway genes in the Schu S4 strain. Notably, the PI3K/Akt1 pathway appeared specifically down-regulated following Schu S4 infection and a concomitantly lower cytokine response was observed. This study identifies several new factors potentially important in host cell subversion by the virulent Type A F. tularensis that may serve as novel targets for drug discovery.

  7. Host defense peptides as effector molecules of the innate immune response: a sledgehammer for drug resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula M; Hirsch, Tobias; Kesting, Marco; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2009-09-09

    Host defense peptides can modulate the innate immune response and boost infection-resolving immunity, while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses. Both antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are an integral part of the process of innate immunity, which itself has many of the hallmarks of successful anti-infective therapies, namely rapid action and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. This gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections. This review details the role and activities of these peptides, and examines their applicability as development candidates for use against bacterial infections.

  8. Host response to simultaneous infections with Eimeria acervulina, maxima and tenella: A cumulation of single responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Swinkels, W.J.C.; Boersma, W.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that broilers may be infected by different Eimeria strains at the same time and that different species infect specific parts of the gut. Cell mediated responses play a major role in the immune response in broilers after infection with Eimeria species. The cell mediated responses cou

  9. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelke J. Fros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus–host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly.

  10. Relationship between Host Survival and the Type of Immune Response in Different Organs during Disseminated Candidiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To examine the relationship between host survival and the type of immune response in different organs during disseminated candidiasis, the murine model of disseminated candidiasis was established by injection with Candida albicans via tail vein. The survival time was observed for up to 60 days. And the expression levels of cytokines in the spleen and kidney, including IFN-γ and IL-4, were determined with RT-PCR. Our results showed that in the spleen, both non-fatal and fatal inoculum caused a type Ⅱ immune response with steady expression levels of IFN-γ and the obviously increased levels of IL-4. While in the kidney, non-fatal inoculum induced a type Ⅰ immune response with the obviously increased levels of IFN-γ and the steady expression levels of IL-4. However, fatal inoculum induced a type Ⅱ immune response with a constant expression of IFN-γ and the evidently increased levels of IL-4. It is concluded that in disseminated candidiasis, host survival is associated with the type of immune responses in the kidney, but not in the spleen.

  11. The landscape of host transcriptional response programs commonly perturbed by bacterial pathogens: towards host-oriented broad-spectrum drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Yared H; Lawrence, Christopher; Murali, T M

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant pathogen strains and new infectious agents pose major challenges to public health. A promising approach to combat these problems is to target the host's genes or proteins, especially to discover targets that are effective against multiple pathogens, i.e., host-oriented broad-spectrum (HOBS) drug targets. An important first step in the discovery of such drug targets is the identification of host responses that are commonly perturbed by multiple pathogens. In this paper, we present a methodology to identify common host responses elicited by multiple pathogens. First, we identified host responses perturbed by each pathogen using a gene set enrichment analysis of publicly available genome-wide transcriptional datasets. Then, we used biclustering to identify groups of host pathways and biological processes that were perturbed only by a subset of the analyzed pathogens. Finally, we tested the enrichment of each bicluster in human genes that are known drug targets, on the basis of which we elicited putative HOBS targets for specific groups of bacterial pathogens. We identified 84 up-regulated and three down-regulated statistically significant biclusters. Each bicluster contained a group of pathogens that commonly dysregulated a group of biological processes. We validated our approach by checking whether these biclusters correspond to known hallmarks of bacterial infection. Indeed, these biclusters contained biological process such as inflammation, activation of dendritic cells, pro- and anti- apoptotic responses and other innate immune responses. Next, we identified biclusters containing pathogens that infected the same tissue. After a literature-based analysis of the drug targets contained in these biclusters, we suggested new uses of the drugs Anakinra, Etanercept, and Infliximab for gastrointestinal pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori kx2 strain, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and the drug Simvastatin for

  12. The landscape of host transcriptional response programs commonly perturbed by bacterial pathogens: towards host-oriented broad-spectrum drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yared H Kidane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogen strains and new infectious agents pose major challenges to public health. A promising approach to combat these problems is to target the host's genes or proteins, especially to discover targets that are effective against multiple pathogens, i.e., host-oriented broad-spectrum (HOBS drug targets. An important first step in the discovery of such drug targets is the identification of host responses that are commonly perturbed by multiple pathogens. RESULTS: In this paper, we present a methodology to identify common host responses elicited by multiple pathogens. First, we identified host responses perturbed by each pathogen using a gene set enrichment analysis of publicly available genome-wide transcriptional datasets. Then, we used biclustering to identify groups of host pathways and biological processes that were perturbed only by a subset of the analyzed pathogens. Finally, we tested the enrichment of each bicluster in human genes that are known drug targets, on the basis of which we elicited putative HOBS targets for specific groups of bacterial pathogens. We identified 84 up-regulated and three down-regulated statistically significant biclusters. Each bicluster contained a group of pathogens that commonly dysregulated a group of biological processes. We validated our approach by checking whether these biclusters correspond to known hallmarks of bacterial infection. Indeed, these biclusters contained biological process such as inflammation, activation of dendritic cells, pro- and anti- apoptotic responses and other innate immune responses. Next, we identified biclusters containing pathogens that infected the same tissue. After a literature-based analysis of the drug targets contained in these biclusters, we suggested new uses of the drugs Anakinra, Etanercept, and Infliximab for gastrointestinal pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica, Helicobacter pylori kx2 strain, and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia

  13. Ex Vivo Host and Parasite Response to Antileishmanial Drugs and Immunomodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic response in infectious disease involves host as well as microbial determinants. Because the immune and inflammatory response to Leishmania (Viannia) species defines the outcome of infection and efficacy of treatment, immunomodulation is considered a promising therapeutic strategy. However, since Leishmania infection and antileishmanial drugs can themselves modulate drug transport, metabolism and/or immune responses, immunotherapeutic approaches require integrated assessment of host and parasite responses. Methodology To achieve an integrated assessment of current and innovative therapeutic strategies, we determined host and parasite responses to miltefosine and meglumine antimoniate alone and in combination with pentoxifylline or CpG 2006 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. Parasite survival and secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-13 were evaluated concomitantly in PBMCs infected with Luc-L. (V.) panamensis exposed to meglumine antimoniate (4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 μg SbV/mL) or miltefosine (2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 μM HePC). Concentrations of 4 μM of miltefosine and 8 μg SbV/mL were selected for evaluation in combination with immunomodulators based on the high but partial reduction of parasite burden by these antileishmanial concentrations without affecting cytokine secretion of infected PBMCs. Intracellular parasite survival was determined by luminometry and cytokine secretion measured by ELISA and multiplex assays. Principal Findings Anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of L. (V.) panamensis infection were evaluable concomitantly with viability of Leishmania within monocyte-derived macrophages present in PBMC cultures. Both antileishmanial drugs reduced the parasite load of macrophages; miltefosine also suppressed IL-10 and IL-13 secretion in a dose dependent manner. Pentoxifylline did not affect parasite survival or alter antileishmanial effects of miltefosine or meglumine

  14. Activation and manipulation of host responses by a Gram-positive bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Vasudevan

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) represents a model pathosystem to study the interplay between the virulence determinants of a Gram-positive bacterium and the attempt of a crop plant to counteract pathogen invasion. To investigate plant responses activated during this compatible interaction, we recently analyzed gene expression profiles of tomato stems infected with Cmm. This analysis revealed activation of basal defense responses that are typically observed upon plant perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In addition, Cmm infection upregulated the expression of host genes related to ethylene synthesis and response. Further analysis of tomato plants impaired in ethylene perception and production demonstrated an important role for ethylene in the development of disease symptoms. Here we discuss possible molecular strategies used by the plant to recognize Cmm infection and possible mechanisms employed by the pathogen to interfere with the activation of plant defense responses and promote disease. PMID:19704516

  15. Local innate host response and filamentous fungi in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roilides, Emmanuel; Simitsopoulou, Maria

    2010-11-01

    Filamentous fungi especially Aspergillus spp. and Scedosporium spp. can colonize the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infection by these organisms may cause deterioration of lung function, mycetomas or local invasive disease. Although CF patients exert an excessive inflammatory response to inhaled bacteria, very little is known about the local innate immune response to filamentous fungi. In this paper, we review the innate immune response of respiratory tract of healthy individuals to filamentous fungi with some inference to CF patients and link the latter to existing data. We also report some preliminary findings on the in vitro antifungal responses of human phagocytes against Aspergillus spp. isolated from CF patients. Translation of these in vitro findings to appropriate in vivo systems and into clinical trials of immunomodulatory treatments may lead to improved strategies for appropriate innate host defenses in CF patients persistently infected with filamentous fungi.

  16. Transcription factor ATF3 links host adaptive response to breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Chris C.; McConoughey, Stephen J.; Jalgaonkar, Swati P.; Leon, Marino; Merchant, Anand S.; Dominick, Johnna L.; Yin, Xin; Chang, Yiseok; Zmuda, Erik J.; O’Toole, Sandra A.; Millar, Ewan K.A.; Roller, Stephanie L.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Hai, Tsonwin

    2013-01-01

    Host response to cancer signals has emerged as a key factor in cancer development; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a hub of the cellular adaptive response network, plays an important role in host cells to enhance breast cancer metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of patient tumor samples revealed that expression of ATF3 in stromal mononuclear cells, but not cancer epithelial cells, is correlated with worse clinical outcomes and is an independent predictor for breast cancer death. This finding was corroborated by data from mouse models showing less efficient breast cancer metastasis in Atf3-deficient mice than in WT mice. Further, mice with myeloid cell–selective KO of Atf3 showed fewer lung metastases, indicating that host ATF3 facilitates metastasis, at least in part, by its function in macrophage/myeloid cells. Gene profiling analyses of macrophages from mouse tumors identified an ATF3-regulated gene signature that could distinguish human tumor stroma from distant stroma and could predict clinical outcomes, lending credence to our mouse models. In conclusion, we identified ATF3 as a regulator in myeloid cells that enhances breast cancer metastasis and has predictive value for clinical outcomes. PMID:23921126

  17. Pathobiology of Salmonella, intestinal microbiota, and the host innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lima Santos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella is a relevant pathogen under a clinical and public health perspective. Therefore, there has been a significant scientific effort to learn about pathogenic determinants of this pathogen. The clinical relevance of the disease, associated with the molecular tools available to study Salmonella as well as suitable animal models for salmonellosis, have provided optimal conditions to drive the scientific community to generate a large expansion of our knowledge about the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enterocolitis that took place during the past two decades. This research effort has also generated a wealth of information on the host immune mechanisms that complements gaps in the fundamental research in this area. This review focus on how the interaction between Salmonella, the microbiota and intestinal innate immunity leads to disease manifestation. As a highly successful enteropathogen, Salmonella actively elicits a robust acute intestinal inflammatory response from the host, which could theoretically lead to the pathogen demise. However, Salmonella has evolved redundant molecular machineries that renders this pathogen highly adapted to the inflamed intestinal environment, in which Salmonella is capable of outcompete resident commensal organisms. The adaptation of Salmonella to the inflamed intestinal lumen associated with the massive inflammatory response that leads to diarrhea, generate perfect conditions for transmission of the pathogen. These conditions illustrate the complexity of the co-evolution and ecology of the pathogen, commensals and the host.

  18. Production of hydrogen peroxide and expression of ROS generating genes in peach flower petals in response to host and non-host pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play dual roles in plant-microbe interactions in that they can either stimulate host resistance or benefit pathogen virulence. Accumulation of ROS was determined in peach petals in response to Monilinia fructicola (a compatible pathogen) and Penicillium digitatum (an i...

  19. The Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei) Invades Hawaii: Preliminary Investigations on Trap Response and Alternate Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Russell H

    2012-07-11

    In August 2010 the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, was first reported to have invaded the Kona coffee growing region of Hawaii, posing a severe economic challenge to the fourth largest agricultural commodity in the State. Despite its long and widespread occurrence throughout the tropics as the most serious pest of coffee, there are still discrepancies in the literature regarding several basic aspects of berry borer biology relevant to its control. In Kona coffee plantations, we investigated the beetles' response to several trap and lure formulations, and examined the occurrence of beetles in seeds of alternate host plants occurring adjacent to coffee farms. While traps were shown to capture significant numbers of beetles per day, and the occurrence of beetles in alternate hosts was quite rare, the unique situation of coffee culture in Hawaii will make this pest extremely challenging to manage in the Islands.

  20. SPOC1-Mediated Antiviral Host Cell Response Is Antagonized Early in Human Adenovirus Type 5 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Kinkley, Sarah; Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Wimmer, Peter; Schubert, Tobias; Groitl, Peter; Will, Hans; Dobner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about immediate phases after viral infection and how an incoming viral genome complex counteracts host cell defenses, before the start of viral gene expression. Adenovirus (Ad) serves as an ideal model, since entry and onset of gene expression are rapid and highly efficient, and mechanisms used 24–48 hours post infection to counteract host antiviral and DNA repair factors (e.g. p53, Mre11, Daxx) are well studied. Here, we identify an even earlier host cell target for Ad, the chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader, SPOC1, recently found recruited to double strand breaks, and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its functional association with the Ad major core protein pVII that enters with the viral genome, followed by E1B-55K/E4orf6-dependent proteasomal degradation of SPOC1. Mimicking removal of SPOC1 in the cell, knock down of this cellular restriction factor using RNAi techniques resulted in significantly increased Ad replication, including enhanced viral gene expression. However, depletion of SPOC1 also reduced the efficiency of E1B-55K transcriptional repression of cellular promoters, with possible implications for viral transformation. Intriguingly, not exclusive to Ad infection, other human pathogenic viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV) also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host cells should provide new perspectives for developing antiviral agents and therapies. Conversely, for Ad vectors used in gene therapy, counteracting mechanisms eradicating incoming

  1. Pathogenesis, tissue distribution and host response to Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis infection in rough woodlouse Porcellio scaber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjšek, Rok; Pirc Marolt, Tinkara

    2015-02-01

    Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis is a known intracellular pathogen in digestive glands of the terrestrial isopod crustacean Porcellio scaber. To describe the pathogenesis, tissue distribution and host response to R. porcellionis, we conducted microscopic observations and localization of infection in tissues by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH). Digestive glands were confirmed as the primary site of infection. From there, R. porcellionis disseminates either through the apical membrane of infected cells into the lumen of digestive glands and further throughout the digestive tract or into the surrounding hemocoel by rupture of the basal membrane and lamina of infected digestive gland cells. Once in the hemocoel, R. porcellionis infects hindgut cells, hemocytes and hemopoetic tissues while the ventral nerve cord and gonads seem to be devoid of infection despite the presence of rhabdochlamydia on the surface of these organs. The host response to R. porcellionis includes aggregation of hemocytes around the infected cells and formation of multilayered melanized nodules exhibiting endogenous fluorescence. The structure of nodules is asymmetric when hemocytes are deposited on the basal side of infected gut and digestive glands cells, or symmetric, when nodules entrapping clusters of rhabdochlamydiae are deposited on other organs in the hemocoel. The study also revealed a high prevalence of infection in P. scaber populations (up to 27%) and confirmed its detrimental effect on the host. Although agility, behavior and molting cycle of infected animals appear unaffected, in the later stages R. porcellionis infection manifests as severe damage to the digestive system and decreased feeding, which eventually lead to the death of the host organism.

  2. Dimerization Controls Marburg Virus VP24-dependent Modulation of Host Antioxidative Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Britney; Li, Jing; Adhikari, Jagat; Edwards, Megan R; Zhang, Hao; Schwarz, Toni; Leung, Daisy W; Basler, Christopher F; Gross, Michael L; Amarasinghe, Gaya K

    2016-08-28

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the Filoviridae family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV), causes lethal hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates that have exceeded 50% in some outbreaks. Within an infected cell, there are numerous host-viral interactions that contribute to the outcome of infection. Recent studies identified MARV protein 24 (mVP24) as a modulator of the host antioxidative responses, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using a combination of biochemical and mass spectrometry studies, we show that mVP24 is a dimer in solution that directly binds to the Kelch domain of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) to regulate nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). This interaction between Keap1 and mVP24 occurs through the Kelch interaction loop (K-Loop) of mVP24 leading to upregulation of antioxidant response element transcription, which is distinct from other Kelch binders that regulate Nrf2 activity. N-terminal truncations disrupt mVP24 dimerization, allowing monomeric mVP24 to bind Kelch with higher affinity and stimulate higher antioxidative stress response element (ARE) reporter activity. Mass spectrometry-based mapping of the interface revealed overlapping binding sites on Kelch for mVP24 and the Nrf2 proteins. Substitution of conserved cysteines, C209 and C210, to alanine in the mVP24 K-Loop abrogates Kelch binding and ARE activation. Our studies identify a shift in the monomer-dimer equilibrium of MARV VP24, driven by its interaction with Keap1 Kelch domain, as a critical determinant that modulates host responses to pathogenic Marburg viral infections.

  3. Dimerization Controls Marburg Virus VP24-dependent Modulation of Host Antioxidative Stress Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Britney; Li, Jing; Adhikari, Jagat; Edwards, Megan R.; Zhang, Hao; Schwarz, Toni; Leung, Daisy W.; Basler, Christopher F.; Gross, Michael L.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2016-08-04

    Marburg virus (MARV), a member of the Filoviridae family that also includes Ebola virus (EBOV), causes lethal hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates that have exceeded 50% in some outbreaks. Within an infected cell, there are numerous host-viral interactions that contribute to the outcome of infection. Recent studies identified MARV protein 24 (mVP24) as a modulator of the host antioxidative responses, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using a combination of biochemical and mass spectrometry studies, we show that mVP24 is a dimer in solution that directly binds to the Kelch domain of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) to regulate nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). This interaction between Keap1 and mVP24 occurs through the Kelch interaction loop (K-Loop) of mVP24 leading to upregulation of antioxidant response element transcription, which is distinct from other Kelch binders that regulate Nrf2 activity. N-terminal truncations disrupt mVP24 dimerization, allowing monomeric mVP24 to bind Kelch with higher affinity and stimulate higher antioxidative stress response element (ARE) reporter activity. Mass spectrometry-based mapping of the interface revealed overlapping binding sites on Kelch for mVP24 and the Nrf2 proteins. Substitution of conserved cysteines, C209 and C210, to alanine in the mVP24 K-Loop abrogates Kelch binding and ARE activation. Our studies identify a shift in the monomer-dimer equilibrium of MARV VP24, driven by its interaction with Keap1 Kelch domain, as a critical determinant that modulates host responses to pathogenic Marburg viral infections.

  4. Olfactory receptor neuron responses of a longhorned beetle, Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), to pheromone, host, and non-host volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Colin A; Sweeney, Jon D; Hillier, N Kirk

    2015-12-01

    Longhorn wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) use olfactory cues to find mates and hosts for oviposition. Tetropium fuscum (Fabr.) is an invasive longhorned wood-boring beetle originating from Europe that has been established in Nova Scotia, Canada, since at least 1990. This study used single sensillum recordings (SSR) to determine the response of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the antennal sensilla of male and female T. fuscum to different kinds of olfactory cues, namely host volatiles, non-host volatiles, the aggregation pheromone of T. fuscum (fuscumol), and an aggregation pheromone emitted by other species of longhorn beetles (3-hydroxyhexan-2-one). Each compound had been previously shown to elicit antennal activity in T. fuscum using electroantennography or had been shown to elicit behavioral activity in T. fuscum or other cerambycids. There have been very few SSR studies done on cerambycids, and ours is the first to compare response profiles of pheromone components as well as host and non-host volatiles. Based on SSR studies with other insects, we predicted we would find ORNs that responded to the pheromone alone (pheromone-specialists), as well as ORNs that responded only to host or non-host volatiles, i.e., separation of olfactory cue perception at the ORN level. Also, because male T. fuscum emerge earlier than females and are the pheromone-emitting sex, we predicted that the number of pheromone-sensitive ORNs would be greater in females than males. We found 140 ORNs housed within 97 sensilla that responded to at least one of the 13 compounds. Fuscumol-specific ORNs made up 15% (21/140) of all recordings, but contrary to our prediction, an additional 22 ORNs (16%) responded to fuscumol plus at least one other compound; in total, fuscumol elicited a response from 43/140 (31%) of ORNs with fuscumol-specific ORNs accounting for half of these. Thus, our prediction that pheromone reception would be segregated on specialist ORNs was only partially

  5. Carcinoma cells misuse the host tissue damage response to invade the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Ning; van Rossum, Denise; Sieger, Dirk; Siam, Laila; Klemm, Florian; Bleckmann, Annalen; Bayerlová, Michaela; Farhat, Katja; Scheffel, Jörg; Schulz, Matthias; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stadelmann, Christine; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The metastatic colonization of the brain by carcinoma cells is still barely understood, in particular when considering interactions with the host tissue. The colonization comes with a substantial destruction of the surrounding host tissue. This leads to activation of damage responses by resident innate immune cells to protect, repair, and organize the wound healing, but may distract from tumoricidal actions. We recently demonstrated that microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, assist carcinoma cell invasion. Here we report that this is a fatal side effect of a physiological damage response of the brain tissue. In a brain slice coculture model, contact with both benign and malignant epithelial cells induced a response by microglia and astrocytes comparable to that seen at the interface of human cerebral metastases. While the glial damage response intended to protect the brain from intrusion of benign epithelial cells by inducing apoptosis, it proved ineffective against various malignant cell types. They did not undergo apoptosis and actually exploited the local tissue reaction to invade instead. Gene expression and functional analyses revealed that the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and WNT signaling were involved in this process. Furthermore, CXCR4-regulated microglia were recruited to sites of brain injury in a zebrafish model and CXCR4 was expressed in human stroke patients, suggesting a conserved role in damage responses to various types of brain injuries. Together, our findings point to a detrimental misuse of the glial damage response program by carcinoma cells resistant to glia-induced apoptosis. PMID:23832647

  6. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Kinetics of disease progression and host response in a rat model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbane, Florent; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Gowen, Brian B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Plague, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, primarily affects rodents but is also an important zoonotic disease of humans. Bubonic plague in humans follows transmission by infected fleas and is characterized by an acute, necrotizing lymphadenitis in the regional lymph nodes that drain the intradermal flea bite site. Septicemia rapidly follows with spread to spleen, liver, and other organs. We developed a model of bubonic plague using the inbred Brown Norway strain of Rattus norvegicus to characterize the progression and kinetics of infection and the host immune response after intradermal inoculation of Y. pestis. The clinical signs and pathology in the rat closely resembled descriptions of human bubonic plague. The bacteriology; histopathology; host cellular response in infected lymph nodes, blood, and spleen; and serum cytokine levels were analyzed at various times after infection to determine the kinetics and route of disease progression and to evaluate hypothesized Y. pestis pathogenic mechanisms. Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease.

  8. Reinitiation at the lambda DNA origin accompanies the host SOS response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnoes, M.I.; Inman, R.B.

    1987-06-01

    Abnormal reinitiation of replication from lambda origins has previously been found during infection in the presence of caffeine or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cis-Pt) or when lambda infects a P2 lysogen. It was further shown that the reinitiations arising from cis-Pt treatment took place during the SOS response induced by the template damage caused by the drug. It is now shown that SOS induction by uv irradiation of the host also results in reinitiation events and that it is the SOS response itself rather than some other direct effect of the damaged host template that is responsible for the phenomenon. Parental sections of lambda replicative intermediates can supercoil, whereas daughter segments cannot. To explain the control that prevents reinitiation, it is proposed that normally the origin sequence has to be under superhelical tension to be a suitable substrate for the initiating machinery; once a round is in progress, the daughter origin sequences would not be under such tension and would therefore be inactive. It is shown that in an SOS environment the proposed requirement for a superhelical origin sequence is relaxed and consequently the control against reinitiation lost. Under such conditions, primary growing points that have encountered template lesions terminate and a new wave of replication initiates.

  9. The Role of IL-33 in Host Response to Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rodríguez-Cerdeira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Interleukin (IL 33 is a recently identified pleiotropic cytokine that influences the activity of multiple cell types and orchestrates complex innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods. We performed an extensive review of the literature published between 2005 and 2013 on IL-33 and related cytokines, their functions, and their regulation of the immune system following Candida albicans colonization. Our literature review included cross-references from retrieved articles and specific data from our own studies. Results. IL-33 (IL-1F11 is a recently identified member of the IL-1 family of cytokines. Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of the IL-33/ST2 axis in host immune defense against fungal pathogens, including C. albicans. IL-33 induces a Th2-type inflammatory response and activates both innate and adaptive immunity. Studies in animal models have shown that Th2 inflammatory responses have a beneficial role in immunity against gastrointestinal and systemic infections by Candida spp. Conclusions. This review summarizes the most important clinical studies and case reports describing the beneficial role of IL-33 in immunity and host defense mechanisms against pathogenic fungi. The finding that the IL-33/ST2 axis is involved in therapeutic target has implications for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic candidiasis.

  10. Phylogeny affects host's weight, immune response and parasitism in damselflies and dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilvonen, Jaakko J; Suhonen, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Host-parasite interactions are an intriguing part of ecology, and understanding how hosts are able to withstand parasitic attacks, e.g. by allocating resources to immune defence, is important. Damselflies and dragonflies show a variety of parasitism patterns, but large-scale comparative immune defence studies are rare, and it is difficult to say what the interplay is between their immune defence and parasitism. The aim of this study was to find whether there are differences in immune response between different damselfly and dragonfly species and whether these could explain their levels of gregarine and water mite parasitism. Using an artificial pathogen, a piece of nylon filament, we measured the encapsulation response of 22 different damselfly and dragonfly species and found that (i) there are significant encapsulation differences between species, (ii) body mass has a strong association with encapsulation and parasite prevalences, (iii) body mass shows a strong phylogenetic signal, whereas encapsulation response and gregarine and water mite prevalences show weak signals, and (iv) associations between the traits are affected by phylogeny. We do not know what the relationship is between these four traits, but it seems clear that phylogeny plays a role in determining parasitism levels of damselflies and dragonflies.

  11. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  12. Quantification of the host response proteome after mammalian reovirus T1L infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia R Berard

    Full Text Available All viruses are dependent upon host cells for replication. Infection can induce profound changes within cells, including apoptosis, morphological changes, and activation of signaling pathways. Many of these alterations have been analyzed by gene arrays to measure the cellular "transcriptome." We used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, combined with high-throughput 2-D HPLC/mass spectrometry, to determine relative quantitative differences in host proteins at 6 and 24 hours after infecting HEK293 cells with reovirus serotype 1 Lang (T1L. 3,076 host proteins were detected at 6 hpi, of which 132 and 68 proteins were significantly up or down regulated, respectively. 2,992 cellular proteins, of which 104 and 49 were up or down regulated, respectively, were identified at 24 hpi. IPA and DAVID analyses indicated proteins involved in cell death, cell growth factors, oxygen transport, cell structure organization and inflammatory defense response to virus were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in apoptosis, isomerase activity, and metabolism were down-regulated. These proteins and pathways may be suitable targets for intervention to either attenuate virus infection or enhance oncolytic potential.

  13. Foreign Body Infection Models to Study Host-Pathogen Response and Antimicrobial Tolerance of Bacterial Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Nowakowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted medical devices is steadily increasing and has become an effective intervention improving life quality, but still carries the risk of infection. These infections are mainly caused by biofilm-forming staphylococci that are difficult to treat due to the decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. To understand the particular pathogenesis and treatment tolerance of implant-associated infection (IAI animal models that closely resemble human disease are needed. Applications of the tissue cage and catheter abscess foreign body infection models in the mouse will be discussed herein. Both models allow the investigation of biofilm and virulence of various bacterial species and a comprehensive insight into the host response at the same time. They have also been proven to serve as very suitable tools to study the anti-adhesive and anti-infective efficacy of different biomaterial coatings. The tissue cage model can additionally be used to determine pharmacokinetics, efficacy and cytotoxicity of antimicrobial compounds as the tissue cage fluid can be aspirated repeatedly without the need to sacrifice the animal. Moreover, with the advance in innovative imaging systems in rodents, these models may offer new diagnostic measures of infection. In summary, animal foreign body infection models are important tools in the development of new antimicrobials against IAI and can help to elucidate the complex interactions between bacteria, the host immune system, and prosthetic materials.

  14. Behavioural response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae to host plant volatiles and synthetic blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasembe, Vincent O; Teal, Peter E A; Mukabana, Wolfgang R; Tumlinson, James H; Torto, Baldwyn

    2012-10-15

    Sugar feeding is critical for survival of malaria vectors and, although discriminative plant feeding previously has been shown to occur in Anopheles gambiae s.s., little is known about the cues mediating attraction to these plants. In this study, we investigated the role of olfaction in An. gambiae discriminative feeding behaviour. Dual choice olfactometer assays were used to study odour discrimination by An. gambiae to three suspected host plants: Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae), Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae) and Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae). Sugar content of the three plant species was determined by analysis of their trimethylsilyl derivatives by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and confirmed with authentic standards. Volatiles from intact plants of the three species were collected on Super Q and analyzed by coupled GC-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and GC-MS to identify electrophysiologically-active components whose identities were also confirmed with authentic standards. Active compounds and blends were formulated using dose-response olfactory bioassays. Responses of females were converted into preference indices and analyzed by chi-square tests. The amounts of common behaviourally-active components released by the three host plants were compared with one-way ANOVA. Overall, the sugar contents were similar in the two Asteraceae plants, P. hysterophorus and B. pilosa, but richer in R. communis. Odours released by P. hysterophorus were the most attractive, with those from B. pilosa being the least attractive to females in the olfactometer assays. Six EAD-active components identified were consistently detected by the antennae of adult females. The amounts of common antennally-active components released varied with the host plant, with the highest amounts released by P. hysterophorus. In dose-response assays, single compounds and blends of these components were attractive to females but to varying levels, with one of the blends

  15. Biological response modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  16. Identification of microRNAs Involved in the Host Response to Enterovirus 71 Infection by a Deep Sequencing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunbiao Cui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of microRNA (miRNA has been highlighted in pathogen-host interactions recently. To identify cellular miRNAs involved in the host response to enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection, we performed a comprehensive miRNA profiling in EV71-infected Hep2 cells through deep sequencing. 64 miRNAs were found whose expression levels changed for more than 2-fold in response to EV71 infection. Gene ontology analysis revealed that many of these mRNAs play roles in neurological process, immune response, and cell death pathways, which are known to be associated with the extreme virulence of EV71. To our knowledge, this is the first study on host miRNAs expression alteration response to EV71 infection. Our findings supported the hypothesis that certain miRNAs might be essential in the host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Responsiveness of cardiometabolic-related microbiota to diet is influenced by host genetics

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connor, Annalouise; Quizon, Pamela M.; Albright, Jody E.; Lin, Fred T.; Brian J Bennett

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal microbial community structure is driven by host genetics in addition to environmental factors such as diet. In comparison with environmental influences, the effect of host genetics on intestinal microbiota, and how host-driven differences alter host metabolism is unclear. Additionally, the interaction between host genetics and diet, and the impact on the intestinal microbiome and possible down-stream effect on host metabolism is not fully understood, but represents another aspects ...

  18. Impact of Stromal Sensitivity on Radiation Response of Tumors Implanted in SCID Hosts Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barros, Mónica; Thin, Tin Htwe; Maj, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice carry a germ-line mutation in DNA-PK, associated with deficiency in recognition and repair DNA double strand breaks. Thus, SCID cells and tissues display increased sensitivity to radiation-induced post-mitotic (clonogenic) cell death. Nonetheless, the single radiation doses required for 50% permanent local control (TCD50) of tumors implanted in SCID mice are not significantly different from the TCD50 values of the same tumors in wild-type hosts. Whereas the tumor stroma is derived from the host, the observation that tumors implanted in SCID mice do not exhibit hypersensitivity to radiation might imply that stromal endothelial elements do not contribute substantially to tumor cure by ionizing radiation. Here we challenge this notion, testing the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)-mediated endothelial apoptosis, which results from plasma membrane alterations, not DNA damage, is a crucial element in the cure of tumors in SCID mice by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). We show that endothelium in MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16 melanomas exhibit a wild-type apoptotic phenotype in SCID hosts, abrogated in tumors in SCIDasmase−/− littermates, which also acquire resistance to SDRT. Conversion into a radioresistant tumor phenotype when implanted in SCIDasmase−/− hosts provides compelling evidence that cell membrane ASMase-mediated microvascular dysfunction, rather than DNA damage-mediated endothelial clonogenic lethality, plays a mandatory role in the complex pathophysiologic mechanism of tumor cure by SDRT, and provides an explanation for the wild-type SDRT responses reported in tumors implanted in SCID mice. PMID:20924105

  19. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  20. Host responses to persistent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in surgically isolated bovine ileal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Fries, Patrick; Gomis, Susantha; Doig, Kimberley; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    A lack of appropriate disease models has limited our understanding of the pathogenesis of persistent enteric infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A model was developed for the controlled delivery of a defined dose of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves. The stable intestinal segments enabled the characterization of host responses to persistent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections after a 9-month period, including an analysis of local mucosal immune responses relative to an adjacent uninfected intestinal compartment. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained localized at the initial site of intestinal infection and was not detected by PCR in the mesenteric lymph node. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T cell proliferative responses included both CD4 and γδ T cell receptor (γδTcR) T cell responses in the draining mesenteric lymph node. The levels of CD8(+) and γδTcR(+) T cells increased significantly (P avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon secretion by lamina propria leukocytes was also significantly (P avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. In conclusion, surgically isolated ileal segments provided a model system for the establishment of a persistent and localized enteric M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle and facilitated the analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific changes in mucosal leukocyte phenotype and function. The accumulation of DC subpopulations in the lamina propria suggests that further investigation of mucosal DCs may provide insight into host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and improve vaccine strategies to prevent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

  1. Murinization of internalin extends its receptor repertoire, altering Listeria monocytogenes cell tropism and host responses.

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    Yu-Huan Tsai

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes (Lm is an invasive foodborne pathogen that leads to severe central nervous system and maternal-fetal infections. Lm ability to actively cross the intestinal barrier is one of its key pathogenic properties. Lm crosses the intestinal epithelium upon the interaction of its surface protein internalin (InlA with its host receptor E-cadherin (Ecad. InlA-Ecad interaction is species-specific, does not occur in wild-type mice, but does in transgenic mice expressing human Ecad and knock-in mice expressing humanized mouse Ecad. To study listeriosis in wild-type mice, InlA has been "murinized" to interact with mouse Ecad. Here, we demonstrate that, unexpectedly, murinized InlA (InlA(m mediates not only Ecad-dependent internalization, but also N-cadherin-dependent internalization. Consequently, InlA(m-expressing Lm targets not only goblet cells expressing luminally-accessible Ecad, as does Lm in humanized mice, but also targets villous M cells, which express luminally-accessible N-cadherin. This aberrant Lm portal of entry results in enhanced innate immune responses and intestinal barrier damage, both of which are not observed in wild-type Lm-infected humanized mice. Murinization of InlA therefore not only extends the host range of Lm, but also broadens its receptor repertoire, providing Lm with artifactual pathogenic properties. These results challenge the relevance of using InlA(m-expressing Lm to study human listeriosis and in vivo host responses to this human pathogen.

  2. Dynamic Response of Graphitic Flakes in Nematic Liquid Crystals: Confinement and Host Effect

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    Weiwei Tie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric field-induced reorientation of suspended graphitic (GP flakes and its relaxation back to the original state in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC host are of interest not only in academia, but also in industrial applications, such as polarizer-free and optical film-free displays, and electro-optic light modulators. As the phenomenon has been demonstrated by thorough observation, the detailed study of the physical properties of the host NLC (the magnitude of dielectric anisotropy, elastic constants, and rotational viscosity, the size of the GP flakes, and cell thickness, are urgently required to be explored and investigated. Here, we demonstrate that the response time of GP flakes reorientation associated with an NLC host can be effectively enhanced by controlling the physical properties. In a vertical field-on state, higher dielectric anisotropy and higher elasticity of NLC give rise to quicker reorientation of the GP flakes (switching from planar to vertical alignment due to the field-induced coupling effect of interfacial Maxwell-Wagner polarization and NLC reorientation. In a field off-state, lower rotational viscosity of NLC and lower cell thickness can help to reduce the decay time of GP flakes reoriented from vertical to planar alignment. This is mainly attributed to strong coupling between GP flakes and NLC originating from the strong π-π interaction between benzene rings in the honeycomb-like graphene structure and in NLC molecules. The high-uniformity of reoriented GP flakes exhibits a possibility of new light modulation with a relatively faster response time in the switching process and, thus, it can show potential application in field-induced memory and modulation devices.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes infection in macrophages induces vacuolar-dependent host miRNA response.

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    Anna K D Schnitger

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen, causing serious illness in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women. Upon detection by macrophages, which are key players of the innate immune response against infection, L. monocytogenes induces specific host cell responses which need to be tightly controlled at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we ask whether and how host miRNAs, which represent an important mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation in a wide array of biological processes, are altered by a model pathogen upon live infection of murine bone marrow derived macrophages. We first report that L. monocytogenes subverts the host genome-wide miRNA profile of macrophages in vitro. Specifically, we show that miR-155, miR-146a, miR-125a-3p/5p and miR-149 were amongst the most significantly regulated miRNAs in infected macrophages. Strikingly, these miRNAs were highly upregulated upon infection with the Listeriolysin-deficient L. monocytogenes mutant Δhly, that cannot escape from the phagosome thus representing a vacuolar-contained infection. The vacuolar miRNA response was significantly reduced in macrophages deficient for MyD88. In addition, miR-146a and miR-125a-3p/5p were regulated at transcriptional levels upon infection, and miR-125a-3p/5p were found to be TLR2 responsive. Furthermore, miR-155 transactivation in infection was regulated by NF-κB p65, while miR-146a and miR-125a-3p/5p expression was unaffected in p65-deficient primary macrophages upon L. monocytogenes infection. Our results demonstrate that L. monocytogenes promotes significant changes in the miRNA expression profile in macrophages, and reveal a vacuolar-dependent miRNA signature, listeriolysin-independent and MyD88-dependent. These miRNAs are predicted to target immune genes and are therefore most likely involved in regulation of the macrophage innate immune response against infection at post

  4. Lipid Bodies: Inflammatory Organelles Implicated in Host-Trypanosoma cruzi Interplay during Innate Immune Responses

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    Heloisa D'Avila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flagellated protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. Acute Chagas' disease elicits a strong inflammatory response. In order to control the parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defense. A distinguishing feature of Chagas' disease-triggered macrophages is the presence of increased numbers of distinct cytoplasmic organelles termed lipid bodies or lipid droplets. These organelles are actively formed in response to the parasite and are sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators. This review covers current knowledge on lipid bodies elicited by the acute Chagas' disease within inflammatory macrophages and discusses the role of these organelles in inflammation. The increased knowledge of lipid bodies in pathogenic mechanisms of infections may not only contribute to the understanding of pathogen-host interactions but may also identify new targets for intervention.

  5. Treating the host response to emerging virus diseases: lessons learned from sepsis, pneumonia, influenza and Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedson, David S

    2016-11-01

    There is an ongoing threat of epidemic or pandemic diseases that could be caused by influenza, Ebola or other emerging viruses. It will be difficult and costly to develop new drugs that target each of these viruses. Statins and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been effective in treating patients with sepsis, pneumonia and influenza, and a statin/ARB combination appeared to dramatically reduce mortality during the recent Ebola outbreak. These drugs target (among other things) the endothelial dysfunction found in all of these diseases. Most scientists work on new drugs that target viruses, and few accept the idea of treating the host response with generic drugs. A great deal of research will be needed to show conclusively that these drugs work, and this will require the support of public agencies and foundations. Investigators in developing countries should take an active role in this research. If the next Public Health Emergency of International Concern is caused by an emerging virus, a "top down" approach to developing specific new drug treatments is unlikely to be effective. However, a "bottom up" approach to treatment that targets the host response to these viruses by using widely available and inexpensive generic drugs could reduce mortality in any country with a basic health care system. In doing so, it would make an immeasurable contribution to global equity and global security.

  6. Exacerbated Innate Host Response to SARS-CoV in Aged Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Saskia L.; de Lang, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Andeweg, Arno C.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of viral respiratory pathogens with pandemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and influenza A H5N1, urges the need for deciphering their pathogenesis to develop new intervention strategies. SARS-CoV infection causes acute lung injury (ALI) that may develop into life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with advanced age correlating positively with adverse disease outcome. The molecular pathways, however, that cause virus-induced ALI/ARDS in aged individuals are ill-defined. Here, we show that SARS-CoV-infected aged macaques develop more severe pathology than young adult animals, even though viral replication levels are similar. Comprehensive genomic analyses indicate that aged macaques have a stronger host response to virus infection than young adult macaques, with an increase in differential expression of genes associated with inflammation, with NF-κB as central player, whereas expression of type I interferon (IFN)-β is reduced. Therapeutic treatment of SARS-CoV-infected aged macaques with type I IFN reduces pathology and diminishes pro-inflammatory gene expression, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels, without affecting virus replication in the lungs. Thus, ALI in SARS-CoV-infected aged macaques developed as a result of an exacerbated innate host response. The anti-inflammatory action of type I IFN reveals a potential intervention strategy for virus-induced ALI. PMID:20140198

  7. Characterization of and host response to tyramine substituted-hyaluronan enriched fascia extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, LiKang; Calabro, Anthony; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Tan, Carmela D.; Walker, Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Naturally-occurring biomaterial scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix (ECM) have been previously investigated for soft tissue repair. We propose to enrich fascia ECM with high molecular weight tyramine substituted-hyaluronan (TS-HA) to modulate inflammation associated with implantation and enhance fibroblast infiltration. As critical determinants of constructive remodeling, the host inflammatory response and macrophage polarization to TS-HA enriched fascia were characterized in a rat abdominal wall model. TS-HA treated fascia with cross-linking had a similar lymphocyte (P = 0.11) and plasma cell (P = 0.13) densities, greater macrophage (P = 0.001) and giant cell (P fascia, with or without cross-linking, exhibited a predominantly M2 pro-remodeling macrophage profile similar to water controls (P = 0.82), which is suggestive of constructive tissue remodeling. Our findings demonstrated that HA augmentation can alter the host response to an ECM, but the appropriate concentration and molecular weight needed to minimize chronic inflammation within the scaffold remains to be determined. PMID:21553156

  8. Chemokine Binding Protein M3 of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Modulates the Host Response to Infection in a Natural Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David J.; Kipar, Anja; Leeming, Gail H.; Bennett, Elaine; Howarth, Deborah; Cummerson, Joanne A.; Papoula-Pereira, Rita; Flanagan, Brian F.; Sample, Jeffery T.; Stewart, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) infection of Mus musculus-derived strains of mice is an attractive model of γ-herpesvirus infection. Surprisingly, however, ablation of expression of MHV-68 M3, a secreted protein with broad chemokine-binding properties in vitro, has no discernable effect during experimental infection via the respiratory tract. Here we demonstrate that M3 indeed contributes significantly to MHV-68 infection, but only in the context of a natural host, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). Specifically, M3 was essential for two features unique to the wood mouse: virus-dependent inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) in the lung and highly organized secondary follicles in the spleen, both predominant sites of latency in these organs. Consequently, lack of M3 resulted in substantially reduced latency in the spleen and lung. In the absence of M3, splenic germinal centers appeared as previously described for MHV-68-infected laboratory strains of mice, further evidence that M3 is not fully functional in the established model host. Finally, analyses of M3's influence on chemokine and cytokine levels within the lungs of infected wood mice were consistent with the known chemokine-binding profile of M3, and revealed additional influences that provide further insight into its role in MHV-68 biology. PMID:21445235

  9. Chemokine binding protein M3 of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 modulates the host response to infection in a natural host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hughes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68 infection of Mus musculus-derived strains of mice is an attractive model of γ-herpesvirus infection. Surprisingly, however, ablation of expression of MHV-68 M3, a secreted protein with broad chemokine-binding properties in vitro, has no discernable effect during experimental infection via the respiratory tract. Here we demonstrate that M3 indeed contributes significantly to MHV-68 infection, but only in the context of a natural host, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus. Specifically, M3 was essential for two features unique to the wood mouse: virus-dependent inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT in the lung and highly organized secondary follicles in the spleen, both predominant sites of latency in these organs. Consequently, lack of M3 resulted in substantially reduced latency in the spleen and lung. In the absence of M3, splenic germinal centers appeared as previously described for MHV-68-infected laboratory strains of mice, further evidence that M3 is not fully functional in the established model host. Finally, analyses of M3's influence on chemokine and cytokine levels within the lungs of infected wood mice were consistent with the known chemokine-binding profile of M3, and revealed additional influences that provide further insight into its role in MHV-68 biology.

  10. Electrophysiological and Behavioral Responses of Adult Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) to Volatile Components of Host-Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Hui; Li Jiquan; Jin Youju

    2003-01-01

    Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of adult A. glabripennis (Motsch.) to volatiles from ashleaf maple(Acer negundo L.) were investigated to identify semiochemicals involved in host location. Measurable electroantennogram (EAG)responses were elicited to all compounds tested, the most effective antennal stimulants were trans-2-hexen-1-al,decyl aldehyde andtrans-2-hexen-1-ol.These profiles were similar between males and females. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays, above three com-pounds with certain concentration, trans-2-hexen-1-al (1%), trans-2-hexen-1-ol (1%) and decyl aldehyde (10%), were significantlyattractive to the adults in laboratory. The results show that either EAG or olfactory responding to a particular volatile compound aremarkedly influenced by the concentration.

  11. Host response dynamics following lethal infection of rhesus macaques with Zaire ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Hideki; Rockx, Barry; Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Brining, Douglas; LaCasse, Rachel A; Gardner, Don; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    To gain further insight into the interdependent pathogenic processes in Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), we have examined the dynamics of host responses in individual rhesus macaques infected with Zaire ebolavirus over the entire disease course. Examination of coagulation parameters revealed that decreased coagulation inhibitor activity triggered severe coagulopathy as indicated by prolonged coagulation times and decreased fibrinogen levels. This has been proposed as one of the significant mechanisms underlying disseminated intravascular coagulation in EHF patients. Furthermore, monitoring of expression levels for cytokines/chemokines suggested a mixed anti-inflammatory response syndrome (MARS), which indicates that a catastrophic uncontrolled immunological status contributes to the development of fatal hemorrhagic fever. These results highlight the pathological analogies between EHF and severe sepsis and not only contribute to our understanding of the pathogenic process, but will also help to establish novel postexposure treatment modalities.

  12. Efficient responses to host and bacterial signals during Vibrio cholerae colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenbacher, Francesca P; Zhu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the microorganism responsible for the diarrheal disease cholera, is able to sense and respond to a variety of changing stimuli in both its aquatic and human gastrointestinal environments. Here we present a review of research efforts aimed toward understanding the signals this organism senses in the human host. V. cholerae’s ability to sense and respond to temperature and pH, bile, osmolarity, oxygen and catabolite levels, nitric oxide, and mucus, as well as the quorum sensing signals produced in response to these factors will be discussed. We also review the known quorum sensing regulatory pathways and discuss their importance with regard to the regulation of virulence and colonization during infection. PMID:24256715

  13. Mechanism of Aulacophora femoralis chinensis Weise feeding behavior and chemical response of host Cucumis sativus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Chuihua; LIANG Wenju; YANG Xiao; ZHANG Maoxin; HU Fei

    2004-01-01

    When beetle Aulacophora femoralis chinensis Weise fed on cucumber seedlings, it first chewed a circular trench on their leaves and then nibbled the leaf tissues isolated by the trench, but when it was fed with the detached fresh cotyledons of cucumber, such an interesting trenching behavior did not occur, which indicated that the feeding behavior of the beetle was obviously correlated with the chemical response of the cucumber to the herbivory. Within 60 min after feeding, the level of cucurbitacin C in fed cotyledons of the cucumber seedling increased 10 fold or more.Cucurbitacin I was also detected 15 min after feeding, which reached 75 μg/g within 60 min. The high levels of cucurbitacins C and Ⅰ in fed cotyledons could be maintained for at least 24 h. A. Femoralis chinensis was strongly stimulated to take food by cucurbitacin C at a concentration between 10and 250 μg/g, and the feeding deterrent activity was observed at >250 μg/g, while the feeding deterrent threshold of A.femoralis chinensis to cucurbitacin I was 50 μg/g. The mixture of cucurbitacins C and Ⅰ had a much stronger feeding deterrent activity than single cucurbitacin I. The results suggested that cucumber could elicit chemical response to the beetle herbivory, its leaf being induced to produce more kinds of cucurbitacins and make them reach the levels of feeding deterrent activity on the beetle, while the trenching behavior of A. Femoralis chinensis was its strategy to answer the chemical response of cucumber. The trenching behavior of the beetle not only stopped the cucurbitacins biosynthesis in cucumber leaf tissues, but also blocked the translocation of cucurbitacins to the feeding sites. The trenching behavior of the beetle and the chemical response of host cucumber were the mutual adaptive strategies for protecting the host plant and the beetle themselves.

  14. Host Active Defense Responses Occur within 24 Hours after Pathogen Inoculation in the Rice Blast System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-hua; JIA Yu-lin; LIN Hui; Adair INTERN; Barbara VALENT; J. Neil RUTGER

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypical, cytological and molecular responses of rice to the fungus Magnaporthe grisea were studied using rice cultivars and lesion mimic plants. The cultivar Katy was susceptible to several virulent M. grisea isolates, and a Sekiguchi like-lesion mimic mutant of Katy (LmmKaty) showed enhanced resistance to these isolates. Lesion mimic phenotype of LmmKaty was rapidly induced by virulent M. grisea isolates or by avirulent ones only at high levels of inoculum.Autofluorescence (a sign of an active defense response) was visible under ultraviolet light 24 h after localized inoculation in the incompatible interaction, whereas, not evident in the compatible interaction. Autofluorescence was also observed in LmmKaty 20 h after pathogen inoculation, indicating that rapid cell death is a mechanism of LmmKaty to restrict pathogen invasion. Rapid accumulations of defense related (DR) gene transcripts, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and β-glucanase,were observed beginning at 6 h and were obvious at 16 h and 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction. Rapid transcript accumulations of PR-1 and chitinase had occurred by 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction.Accumulations of these transcripts were delayed in the compatible interaction. These results indicate that host active defense responses occur 24 h after pathogen inoculation and that LmmKaty exhibits enhanced resistance to M. grisea. It is suggested that the autofluorescence and expression of the DR genes after heavy inoculation are important cytological and molecular markers respectively for early determination of the host response to M. grisea in the rice blast system.

  15. Caspase-11 activation in response to bacterial secretion systems that access the host cytosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cierra N Casson

    Full Text Available Inflammasome activation is important for antimicrobial defense because it induces cell death and regulates the secretion of IL-1 family cytokines, which play a critical role in inflammatory responses. The inflammasome activates caspase-1 to process and secrete IL-1β. However, the mechanisms governing IL-1α release are less clear. Recently, a non-canonical inflammasome was described that activates caspase-11 and mediates pyroptosis and release of IL-1α and IL-1β. Caspase-11 activation in response to Gram-negative bacteria requires Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF-dependent interferon production. Whether additional bacterial signals trigger caspase-11 activation is unknown. Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into the cytosol of host cells. These secretion systems can also deliver flagellin into the cytosol, which triggers caspase-1 activation and pyroptosis. However, even in the absence of flagellin, these secretion systems induce inflammasome activation and the release of IL-1α and IL-1β, but the inflammasome pathways that mediate this response are unclear. We observe rapid IL-1α and IL-1β release and cell death in response to the type IV or type III secretion systems of Legionella pneumophila and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Unlike IL-1β, IL-1α secretion does not require caspase-1. Instead, caspase-11 activation is required for both IL-1α secretion and cell death in response to the activity of these secretion systems. Interestingly, whereas caspase-11 promotes IL-1β release in response to the type IV secretion system through the NLRP3/ASC inflammasome, caspase-11-dependent release of IL-1α is independent of both the NAIP5/NLRC4 and NLRP3/ASC inflammasomes as well as TRIF and type I interferon signaling. Furthermore, we find both overlapping and non-redundant roles for IL-1α and IL-1β in mediating neutrophil recruitment

  16. Host identity matters in the amphibian-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis system: fine-scale patterns of variation in responses to a multi-host pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasi, Stephanie; Gondhalekar, Carmen; Olson, Deanna H; Blaustein, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    Species composition within ecological assemblages can drive disease dynamics including pathogen invasion, spread, and persistence. In multi-host pathogen systems, interspecific variation in responses to infection creates important context dependency when predicting the outcome of disease. Here, we examine the responses of three sympatric host species to a single fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which is associated with worldwide amphibian population declines and extinctions. Using an experimental approach, we show that amphibian species from three different genera display significant differences in patterns of pathgen-induced mortality as well as the magnitude and temporal dynamics of infection load. We exposed amphibians to one of four inoculation dose treatments at both larval and post- metamorphic stages and quantified infection load on day 8 and day 15 post-inoculation. Of the three species examined, only one (the Pacific treefrog; Pseudacris regilla) displayed "dose-dependent" responses; survival was reduced and infection load was elevated as inoculation dose was increased. We observed a reduction in survival but no differences in infection load across pathogen treatments in Cascades frogs (Rana cascadae). Western toads (Anaxyrus boreas) displayed differences in infection load but no differences in survival across pathogen treatments. Within species, responses to the pathogen varied with life history stage, and the most heavily infected species at the larval stage was different from the most heavily infected species at the post-metamorphic stage. Temporal changes in infection load were species and life history stage-specific. We show that variation in susceptibility to this multi-host pathogen is complex when viewed at a fine-scale and may be mediated through intrinsic host traits.

  17. Host identity matters in the amphibian-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis system: fine-scale patterns of variation in responses to a multi-host pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Gervasi

    Full Text Available Species composition within ecological assemblages can drive disease dynamics including pathogen invasion, spread, and persistence. In multi-host pathogen systems, interspecific variation in responses to infection creates important context dependency when predicting the outcome of disease. Here, we examine the responses of three sympatric host species to a single fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which is associated with worldwide amphibian population declines and extinctions. Using an experimental approach, we show that amphibian species from three different genera display significant differences in patterns of pathgen-induced mortality as well as the magnitude and temporal dynamics of infection load. We exposed amphibians to one of four inoculation dose treatments at both larval and post- metamorphic stages and quantified infection load on day 8 and day 15 post-inoculation. Of the three species examined, only one (the Pacific treefrog; Pseudacris regilla displayed "dose-dependent" responses; survival was reduced and infection load was elevated as inoculation dose was increased. We observed a reduction in survival but no differences in infection load across pathogen treatments in Cascades frogs (Rana cascadae. Western toads (Anaxyrus boreas displayed differences in infection load but no differences in survival across pathogen treatments. Within species, responses to the pathogen varied with life history stage, and the most heavily infected species at the larval stage was different from the most heavily infected species at the post-metamorphic stage. Temporal changes in infection load were species and life history stage-specific. We show that variation in susceptibility to this multi-host pathogen is complex when viewed at a fine-scale and may be mediated through intrinsic host traits.

  18. Purging deleterious mutations under self fertilization: paradoxical recovery in fitness with increasing mutation rate in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Levi T Morran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of deleterious mutations can drastically reduce population mean fitness. Self-fertilization is thought to be an effective means of purging deleterious mutations. However, widespread linkage disequilibrium generated and maintained by self-fertilization is predicted to reduce the efficacy of purging when mutations are present at multiple loci. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the ability of self-fertilizing populations to purge deleterious mutations at multiple loci by exposing obligately self-fertilizing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans to a range of elevated mutation rates and found that mutations accumulated, as evidenced by a reduction in mean fitness, in each population. Therefore, purging in obligate selfing populations is overwhelmed by an increase in mutation rate. Surprisingly, we also found that obligate and predominantly self-fertilizing populations exposed to very high mutation rates exhibited consistently greater fitness than those subject to lesser increases in mutation rate, which contradicts the assumption that increases in mutation rate are negatively correlated with fitness. The high levels of genetic linkage inherent in self-fertilization could drive this fitness increase. CONCLUSIONS: Compensatory mutations can be more frequent under high mutation rates and may alleviate a portion of the fitness lost due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations through epistatic interactions with deleterious mutations. The prolonged maintenance of tightly linked compensatory and deleterious mutations facilitated by self-fertilization may be responsible for the fitness increase as linkage disequilibrium between the compensatory and deleterious mutations preserves their epistatic interaction.

  19. Paracoccidioides spp. catalases and their role in antioxidant defense against host defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Diana; Muñoz, José F; Almeida, Agostinho J; Puerta, Juan D; Restrepo, Ángela; Cuomo, Christina A; McEwen, Juan G; Hernández, Orville

    2017-03-01

    Dimorphic human pathogenic fungi interact with host effector cells resisting their microbicidal mechanisms. Yeast cells are able of surviving within the tough environment of the phagolysosome by expressing an antioxidant defense system that provides protection against host-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). This includes the production of catalases (CATs). Here we identified and analyzed the role of CAT isoforms in Paracoccidioides, the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Firstly, we found that one of these isoforms was absent in the closely related dimorphic pathogen Coccidioides and dermatophytes, but all of them were conserved in Paracoccidioides, Histoplasma and Blastomyces species. We probed the contribution of CATs in Paracoccidioides by determining the gene expression levels of each isoform through quantitative RT-qPCR, in both the yeast and mycelia phases, and during the morphological switch (transition and germination), as well as in response to oxidative agents and during interaction with neutrophils. PbCATP was preferentially expressed in the pathogenic yeast phase, and was associated to the response against exogenous H2O2. Therefore, we created and analyzed the virulence defects of a knockdown strain for this isoform, and found that CATP protects yeast cells from H2O2 generated in vitro and is relevant during lung infection. On the other hand, CATA and CATB seem to contribute to ROS homeostasis in Paracoccidioides cells, during endogenous oxidative stress. CAT isoforms in Paracoccidioides might be coordinately regulated during development and dimorphism, and differentially expressed in response to different stresses to control ROS homeostasis during the infectious process, contributing to the virulence of Paracoccidioides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral microbiota and host innate immune response in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Smruti Pushalkar; Deepak Saxena; Xin Li; Zoya Kurago; Lalitha V Ramanathapuram; Satoko Matsumura; Kenneth E Fleisher; Robert Glickman; Wenbo Yan; Yihong Li

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have emerged as potential critical triggers in the pathogenesis of bisphosphonate (BP)-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) or BRONJ. BRONJ lesions have shown to be heavily colonized by oral bacteria, most of these difficult to cultivate and presents many clinical challenges. The purpose of this study was to characterize the bacterial diversity in BRONJ lesions and to determine host immune response. We examined tissue specimens from three cohorts (n530);patients with periodontal disease without a history of BP therapy (Control, n510), patients with periodontal disease having history of BP therapy but without ONJ (BP, n55) and patients with BRONJ (BRONJ, n515). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed less bacterial diversity in BRONJ than BP and Control cohorts. Sequence analysis detected six phyla with predominant affiliation to Firmicutes in BRONJ (71.6%), BP (70.3%) and Control (59.1%). Significant differences (P,0.05) in genera were observed, between Control/BP, Control/BRONJ and BP/BRONJ cohorts. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results indicated that the levels of myeloperoxidase were significantly lower, whereas interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were moderately elevated in BRONJ patients as compared to Controls. PCR array showed significant changes in BRONJ patients with downregulation of host genes, such as nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing protein 2, and cathepsin G, the key modulators for antibacterial response and upregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, proteinase 3 and conserved helix–loop–helix ubiquitous kinase. The results suggest that colonization of unique bacterial communities coupled with deficient innate immune response is likely to impact the pathogenesis of ONJ.

  1. Non-host defense response in a novel Arabidopsis-Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri pathosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanfu An

    Full Text Available Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus. Progress of breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties is modest due to limited resistant germplasm resources and lack of candidate genes for genetic manipulation. The objective of this study is to establish a novel heterologous pathosystem between Xcc and the well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana for defense mechanism dissection and resistance gene identification. Our results indicate that Xcc bacteria neither grow nor decline in Arabidopsis, but induce multiple defense responses including callose deposition, reactive oxygen species and salicylic aicd (SA production, and defense gene expression, indicating that Xcc activates non-host resistance in Arabidopsis. Moreover, Xcc-induced defense gene expression is suppressed or attenuated in several well-characterized SA signaling mutants including eds1, pad4, eds5, sid2, and npr1. Interestingly, resistance to Xcc is compromised only in eds1, pad4, and eds5, but not in sid2 and npr1. However, combining sid2 and npr1 in the sid2npr1 double mutant compromises resistance to Xcc, suggesting genetic interactions likely exist between SID2 and NPR1 in the non-host resistance against Xcc in Arabidopsis. These results demonstrate that the SA signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating non-host defense against Xcc in Arabidopsis and suggest that the SA signaling pathway genes may hold great potential for breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties through modern gene transfer technology.

  2. Histone Deacetylase 2 Is a Component of Influenza A Virus-Induced Host Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth T. Nagesh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Host cells produce variety of antiviral factors that create an antiviral state and target various stages of influenza A virus (IAV life cycle to inhibit infection. However, IAV has evolved various strategies to antagonize those antiviral factors. Recently, we reported that a member of class I host histone deacetylases (HDACs, HDAC1 possesses an anti-IAV function. Herein, we provide evidence that HDAC2, another class I member and closely related to HDAC1 in structure and function, also possesses anti-IAV properties. In turn, IAV, like HDAC1, dysregulates HDAC2, mainly at the polypeptide level through proteasomal degradation to potentially minimize its antiviral effect. We found that IAV downregulated the HDAC2 polypeptide level in A549 cells in an H1N1 strain-independent manner by up to 47%, which was recovered to almost 100% level in the presence of proteasome-inhibitor MG132. A further knockdown in HDAC2 expression by up to 90% via RNA interference augmented the growth kinetics of IAV in A549 cells by more than four-fold after 24 h of infection. Furthermore, the knockdown of HDAC2 expression decreased the IAV-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription I (STAT1 and the expression of interferon-stimulated gene, viperin in infected cells by 41 and 53%, respectively. The role of HDAC2 in viperin expression was analogous to that of HDAC1, but it was not in the phosphorylation of STAT1. This indicated that, like HDAC1, HDAC2 is a component of IAV-induced host innate antiviral response and performs both redundant and non-redundant functions vis-a-vis HDAC1; however, IAV dysregulates them both in a redundant manner.

  3. Species and sexual differences in behavioural responses of a specialist and generalist parasitoid species to host-related volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngumbi, E; Fadamiro, H

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the degree of specialization of parasitoids and their responses to host-related volatiles is an important and current evolutionary question. Specialist parasitoids which have evolved to attack fewer host species are predicted to be more responsive to host-related volatiles than generalists. We tested the above prediction by comparing behavioural responses of both sexes of two parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) with different degrees of host specificity, Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (specialist) and Cotesia marginiventris (generalist), to different suites of synthetic host-related volatile compounds. The compounds tested at two doses (1 and 100 μg) include two green leaf volatiles (GLVs: hexanal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol) and four herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs: (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, linalool, (Z)-3-hexenyl butyrate and (E,E)-α-farnesene). Two hypotheses were tested: (i) M. croceipes (specialist) would show relatively greater behavioural responses to the HIPVs, whereas C. marginiventris (generalist) would show greater behavioural responses to the GLVs, and (ii) females of both species would show greater responses than conspecific males to the host-related volatiles. At the low dose (1 μg), females of the specialist showed significantly greater responses than females of the generalist to three of the tested HIPVs, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, linalool and (Z)-3-hexenyl butyrate. In contrast, females of the generalist showed relatively greater responses to the GLVs. The same trends were recorded at the high dose but fewer significant differences were detected. In general, similar results were recorded for males, with the exception of linalool (an HIPV) which elicited significantly greater response in the generalist than the specialist. Comparing the sexes, females of both species showed greater responses than conspecific males to most of the tested volatiles. The ecological significance of these findings is discussed.

  4. Modeling within-host dynamics of influenza virus infection including immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasia A Pawelek

    Full Text Available Influenza virus infection remains a public health problem worldwide. The mechanisms underlying viral control during an uncomplicated influenza virus infection are not fully understood. Here, we developed a mathematical model including both innate and adaptive immune responses to study the within-host dynamics of equine influenza virus infection in horses. By comparing modeling predictions with both interferon and viral kinetic data, we examined the relative roles of target cell availability, and innate and adaptive immune responses in controlling the virus. Our results show that the rapid and substantial viral decline (about 2 to 4 logs within 1 day after the peak can be explained by the killing of infected cells mediated by interferon activated cells, such as natural killer cells, during the innate immune response. After the viral load declines to a lower level, the loss of interferon-induced antiviral effect and an increased availability of target cells due to loss of the antiviral state can explain the observed short phase of viral plateau in which the viral level remains unchanged or even experiences a minor second peak in some animals. An adaptive immune response is needed in our model to explain the eventual viral clearance. This study provides a quantitative understanding of the biological factors that can explain the viral and interferon kinetics during a typical influenza virus infection.

  5. Saccharomyces boulardii modifies Salmonella typhimurium traffic and host immune responses along the intestinal tract.

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    Rodolphe Pontier-Bres

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST is an enteropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium that causes infection following oral ingestion. ST spreads rapidly along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and invades the intestinal epithelium to ultimately reach internal body organs. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii BIOCODEX (S.b-B is prescribed for prophylaxis of diarrheal infectious diseases. We previously showed that S.b-B prevents weight loss in ST-infected mice and significantly decreases bacterial translocation to the spleen and liver. This study was designed to investigate the effect of S.b-B on ST migration along the GIT and the impact of the yeast on the host's early innate immune responses. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI was used to evaluate the effect of S.b-B on the progression of luminescent Salmonella Typhimurium (ST-lux in the GIT of mice pretreated with streptomycin. Photonic emission (PE was measured in GIT extracts (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon at various time periods post-infection (PI. PE analysis revealed that, 45 min PI, ST-lux had migrated slightly faster in the mice treated with S.b-B than in the untreated infected animals. At 90 min PI, ST-lux had reached the cecum in both groups of mice. Adhesion of ST to S.b-B was visualized in the intestines of the mice and probably accounts for (1 the faster elimination of ST-lux in the feces, and (2 reduced translocation of ST to the spleen and liver. In the early phase of infection, S.b-B also modifies the host's immune responses by (1 increasing IFN-γ gene expression and decreasing IL-10 gene expression in the small intestine, and (2 elevating both IFN-γ, and IL-10 mRNA levels in the cecum. BLI revealed that S.b-B modifies ST migration and the host immune response along the GIT. Study findings shed new light on the protective mechanisms of S.b-B during the early phase of Salmonella pathogenesis.

  6. Behavioural response of female Culex pipiens pallens to common host plant volatiles and synthetic blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bao-Ting; Ding, Yan-Mei; Mo, Jian-Chu

    2015-11-17

    Most mosquito species need to obtain sugar from host plants. Little is known about the chemical cues that Culex pipiens pallens use during their orientation to nectar host plants. In this study, we investigated the behavioural responses of female Cx. pipiens pallens to common floral scent compounds and their blends. Behavioural responses of female Cx. pipiens pallens to 18 individual compounds at different concentrations were determined in the olfactometer bioassays. A synthetic blend composed of behaviourally active compounds was formulated, and its attractiveness to mosquitoes was tested. Several most attractive compounds constituted a reduced blend, and its attractiveness was tested against the solvent and the full blend, respectively. Mosquito response in the olfactometer was analyzed by comparing the percentages of mosquitoes caught in the two arms by χ(2) test (observed versus expected). Fifteen of the 18 compounds were attractive to female Cx. pipiens pallens in the dose-dependent bioassays, with the exception of β-pinene, acetophenone and nonanal. (68.00 ± 2.49) % mosquitoes responded to the full blend composed of these 15 compounds on their optimal doses when tested against the solvent, with the preference index at 46.11 ± 3.57. Six individual compounds whose preference indices were over 40 constituted the reduced blend, and it attracted (68.00 ± 1.33) % mosquitoes when tested against the solvent while its preference index was 42.00 ± 3.54. When tested against the full blend simultaneously in the olfactometer, the reduced blend could attract (45.00 ± 2.69) % of released mosquitoes, which was as attractive as the full blend. Our results demonstrate that female Cx. pipiens pallens is differentially attracted by a variety of compounds at different concentrations. Alteration of the concentration strongly affects the attractiveness of the synthetic blend. Several floral scent volatiles might be the universal olfactory cues for various

  7. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  8. Efficient purging of deleterious mutations in plants with haploid selfing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szovenyi, Peter [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Shaw, Jon [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Yang, Xiaohan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Devos, Nicolas [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-30

    In diploid organisms, selfing reduces the efficiency of selection in removing deleterious mutations from a population. This need not be the case for all organisms. Some plants, for example, undergo an extreme form of selfing known as intragametophytic selfing, which immediately exposes all recessive deleterious mutations in a parental genome to selective purging. Here we ask how effectively deleterious mutations are removed from such plants. Specifically, we study the extent to which deleterious mutations accumulate in a predominantly selfing and a predominantly outcrossing pair of moss species, using genome-wide transcriptome data. We find that the selfing species purge significantly more non-synonymous mutations, as well as a greater proportion of radical amino acid changes which alter physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, their purging of deleterious mutation is especially strong in conserved regions of protein-coding genes. Our observations show that selfing need not impede but can even accelerate the removal of deleterious mutations, and do so on a genome-wide scale.

  9. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the MetacoreTM database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  10. Analysis of differences between Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 and 2011 strains using the host calcium spiking response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wais, Rebecca J; Wells, Derek H; Long, Sharon R

    2002-12-01

    In the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, compatible partners recognize each other through an exchange of signals. Plant inducers act together with bacterial transcriptional activators, the NodD proteins, to regulate the expression of bacterial biosynthetic nodulation (nod) genes. These genes direct the synthesis of a lipochito-oligosaccharide signal called Nod factor (NF). NFs elicit an early host response, root hair calcium spiking, that is initiated in root hair cells within 15 min of NF or live Rhizobium inoculation. We used calcium spiking as an assay to compare two closely related strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti, Rm1021 and Rm2011, derived from the same field isolate. We found that the two strains show a kinetic difference in the calcium spiking assay: Rm1021 elicits calcium spiking in host root hairs as rapidly as purified NF, whereas Rm2011 shows a significant delay. This difference can be overcome by raising expression levels of either the NodD transcriptional activators or GroEL, a molecular chaperone that affects expression of the biosynthetic nod genes. We further demonstrate that the delay in triggering calcium spiking exhibited by Rm2011 is correlated with a reduced amount of nod gene expression compared with Rm1021. Therefore, calcium spiking is a useful tool in detecting subtle differences in bacterial gene expression that affect the early stages of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

  11. Splenic autotransplantation in rabbits: no restoration of response to host defense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective:TO explore the effectiveness of splenic tissue autotransplantation in restoring host defense. Methods: Rabbits were divided into three groups,Sham Operation(SO), Splenic Autotransplantation(SA)and Total Splenectomy(TS), and dynamic changes in histology and immunology were observed for over 24 weeks. Results: Histologic study shows that the white pulps were poorly developed and central arterioles disappeared in the regenerated splenic tissue. The weight of regenerated spleens recovered six months later in SA was 11% of that in SO, and was significantly reduced comparing with the implanted weight( P <0.05). Tere were no significant difference in the number of T lymphocytes and the levels of serum lysozyme among the three groups. A poor antibody response by the rabbits of SA and TS as compared to those of SO was noted after the primary intravenous administration with sheep red blood cells. After the challenge with type 3 pneumococci intravenously, pneumococcal clearance from bloodstream in SA did not differ significantly from that in TS,but was marKedly delayed compared with that in SO(P<0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that the low quantity and poor quality of the regenerated spleens may contribute to the inferior immunoprotective ability of 1/3 splenic autotransplantation. Therefore, it implies that the regenerated spleens can not fully compensate the original one in im-munology, especially, host resistance to infection.

  12. TLR9 Activation Dampens the Early Inflammatory Response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Impacting Host Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menino, João Filipe; Saraiva, Margarida; Gomes-Alves, Ana G.; Lobo-Silva, Diogo; Sturme, Mark; Gomes-Rezende, Jéssica; Saraiva, Ana Laura; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Romani, Luigina; Pedrosa, Jorge; Castro, António Gil; Rodrigues, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes paracoccidioidomycosis, one of the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Thus, understanding the characteristics of the protective immune response to P. brasiliensis is of interest, as it may reveal targets for disease control. The initiation of the immune response relies on the activation of pattern recognition receptors, among which are TLRs. Both TLR2 and TLR4 have been implicated in the recognition of P. brasiliensis and regulation of the immune response. However, the role of TLR9 during the infection by this fungus remains unclear. Methodology/Principal findings We used in vitro and in vivo models of infection by P. brasiliensis, comparing wild type and TLR9 deficient (−/−) mice, to assess the contribution of TLR9 on cytokine induction, phagocytosis and outcome of infection. We show that TLR9 recognizes either the yeast form or DNA from P. brasiliensis by stimulating the expression/production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow derived macrophages, also increasing their phagocytic ability. We further show that TLR9 plays a protective role early after intravenous infection with P. brasiliensis, as infected TLR9−/− mice died at higher rate during the first 48 hours post infection than wild type mice. Moreover, TLR9−/− mice presented tissue damage and increased expression of several cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. The increased pattern of cytokine expression was also observed during intraperitoneal infection of TLR9−/− mice, with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils. The phenotype of TLR9−/− hosts observed during the early stages of P. brasiliensis infection was reverted upon a transient, 48 hours post-infection, neutrophil depletion. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that TLR9 activation plays an early protective role against P. brasiliensis, by avoiding a deregulated type of inflammatory response associated to neutrophils that may lead to tissue damage. Thus

  13. Function of Membrane Rafts in Viral Lifecycles and Host Cellular Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane rafts are small (10–200 nm sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts play an important role in viral infection cycles and viral virulence. Viruses are divided into four main classes, enveloped DNA virus, enveloped RNA virus, nonenveloped DNA virus, and nonenveloped RNA virus. General virus infection cycle is also classified into two sections, the early stage (entry process and the late stage (assembly, budding, and release processes of virus particles. In the viral cycle, membrane rafts act as a scaffold of many cellular signal transductions, which are associated with symptoms caused by viral infections. In this paper, we describe the functions of membrane rafts in viral lifecycles and host cellular response according to each virus classification, each stage of the virus lifecycle, and each virus-induced signal transduction.

  14. Host response in tumor diagnosis and prognosis: importance of immunologists and pathologists alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Olivera J

    2012-12-01

    Pathologists and immunologists have collaborated over many years in their efforts to understand and properly diagnose cancer. The ability of pathologists to correctly diagnose this disease was facilitated by the development of immunohistology that utilized specificity of antibodies to distinguish between normal cells and cancer cells. Further boost was provided through the advent of monoclonal antibodies. The two disciplines are now together on the brink of a paradigm shift resulting from a better understanding of the importance for cancer diagnosis and prognosis to consider not only the characteristics of the cancer cells, but also the cancer microenvironment reflecting the host response to the disease. This new immunology and pathology alliance named "Immunoscore" will advance research in both disciplines as well as benefit patients.

  15. SARS coronavirus pathogenesis: host innate immune responses and viral antagonism of interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totura, Allison L; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-06-01

    SARS-CoV is a pathogenic coronavirus that emerged from a zoonotic reservoir, leading to global dissemination of the virus. The association SARS-CoV with aberrant cytokine, chemokine, and Interferon Stimulated Gene (ISG) responses in patients provided evidence that SARS-CoV pathogenesis is at least partially controlled by innate immune signaling. Utilizing models for SARS-CoV infection, key components of innate immune signaling pathways have been identified as protective factors against SARS-CoV disease, including STAT1 and MyD88. Gene transcription signatures unique to SARS-CoV disease states have been identified, but host factors that regulate exacerbated disease phenotypes still remain largely undetermined. SARS-CoV encodes several proteins that modulate innate immune signaling through the antagonism of the induction of Interferon and by avoidance of ISG effector functions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A multifunctional AAV-CRISPR-Cas9 and its host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Wei Leong; Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Cheng, Jason K W; Mali, Prashant; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Ng, Alex H M; Zhu, Kexian; Wagers, Amy J; Church, George M

    2016-10-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) holds promise for gene therapy but faces critical barriers on account of its potential immunogenicity and limited payload capacity. Here, we demonstrate genome engineering in postnatal mice using AAV-split-Cas9, a multifunctional platform customizable for genome editing, transcriptional regulation, and other previously impracticable applications of AAV-CRISPR-Cas9. We identify crucial parameters that impact efficacy and clinical translation of our platform, including viral biodistribution, editing efficiencies in various organs, antigenicity, immunological reactions, and physiological outcomes. These results reveal that AAV-CRISPR-Cas9 evokes host responses with distinct cellular and molecular signatures, but unlike alternative delivery methods, does not induce extensive cellular damage in vivo. Our study provides a foundation for developing effective genome therapeutics.

  17. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Alyssa Lundgren; Teoh, Jeffrey; Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The MHC class I D(k) molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds D(k), are required to control viral spread. The extent of D(k)-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust D(k)-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen.

  18. A Bioinformatics Method for the Design of Live Attenuated Virus Vaccine Utilizing Host MicroRNA Response Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadakul, Duangdao

    2016-01-01

    The host microRNA machinery has been employed to control viral replication. To improve safety for live attenuated virus vaccines, the binding sites of the host microRNAs, so-called microRNA response elements (MREs), were incorporated into the virus sequences. These MREs were typically designed for a specific host microRNA and virus sequence with the effectiveness evaluated by experimental trials. Here, we describe a computational flow that can be used to simultaneously design and prioritize the effective MREs in large-scale.

  19. Early host gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the intestine of chickens with different genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smith, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    So far the responses of chickens to Salmonella have not been studied in vivo on a whole genome-wide scale. Furthermore, the influence of the host genetic background on gene expression responses is unknown. In this study gene expression profiles in the chicken (Gallus gallus) intestine of two genetic

  20. Comparison of host response mechanisms evoked by extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL)- and non-ESBL-producing uropathogenic E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Infections caused by extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)-producing bacteria have been emerging worldwide and the majority of ESBL-producing E. coli strains are isolated from patients with urinary tracts infections. The purpose of this study was to compare the host-response mechanisms in human polymorphonucleated leukocytes (PMN) and renal epithelial cells when stimulated by ESBL- or non-ESBL-producing uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates. The host-pathogen interaction of thes...

  1. Culicoides midge bites modulate the host response and impact on bluetongue virus infection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pages, Nonito; Bréard, Emmanuel; Urien, Céline; Talavera, Sandra; Viarouge, Cyril; Lorca-Oro, Cristina; Jouneau, Luc; Charley, Bernard; Zientara, Stéphan; Bensaid, Albert; Solanes, David; Pujols, Joan; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Many haematophagous insects produce factors that help their blood meal and coincidently favor pathogen transmission. However nothing is known about the ability of Culicoides midges to interfere with the infectivity of the viruses they transmit. Among these, Bluetongue Virus (BTV) induces a hemorrhagic fever- type disease and its recent emergence in Europe had a major economical impact. We observed that needle inoculation of BTV8 in the site of uninfected C. nubeculosus feeding reduced viraemia and clinical disease intensity compared to plain needle inoculation. The sheep that developed the highest local inflammatory reaction had the lowest viral load, suggesting that the inflammatory response to midge bites may participate in the individual sensitivity to BTV viraemia development. Conversely compared to needle inoculation, inoculation of BTV8 by infected C. nubeculosus bites promoted viraemia and clinical symptom expression, in association with delayed IFN- induced gene expression and retarded neutralizing antibody responses. The effects of uninfected and infected midge bites on BTV viraemia and on the host response indicate that BTV transmission by infected midges is the most reliable experimental method to study the physio-pathological events relevant to a natural infection and to pertinent vaccine evaluation in the target species. It also leads the way to identify the promoting viral infectivity factors of infected Culicoides in order to possibly develop new control strategies against BTV and other Culicoides transmitted viruses.

  2. Culicoides midge bites modulate the host response and impact on bluetongue virus infection in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonito Pages

    Full Text Available Many haematophagous insects produce factors that help their blood meal and coincidently favor pathogen transmission. However nothing is known about the ability of Culicoides midges to interfere with the infectivity of the viruses they transmit. Among these, Bluetongue Virus (BTV induces a hemorrhagic fever- type disease and its recent emergence in Europe had a major economical impact. We observed that needle inoculation of BTV8 in the site of uninfected C. nubeculosus feeding reduced viraemia and clinical disease intensity compared to plain needle inoculation. The sheep that developed the highest local inflammatory reaction had the lowest viral load, suggesting that the inflammatory response to midge bites may participate in the individual sensitivity to BTV viraemia development. Conversely compared to needle inoculation, inoculation of BTV8 by infected C. nubeculosus bites promoted viraemia and clinical symptom expression, in association with delayed IFN- induced gene expression and retarded neutralizing antibody responses. The effects of uninfected and infected midge bites on BTV viraemia and on the host response indicate that BTV transmission by infected midges is the most reliable experimental method to study the physio-pathological events relevant to a natural infection and to pertinent vaccine evaluation in the target species. It also leads the way to identify the promoting viral infectivity factors of infected Culicoides in order to possibly develop new control strategies against BTV and other Culicoides transmitted viruses.

  3. Host response biomarkers in the diagnosis of sepsis: a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlato, Marianna; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Critically ill patients who display a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) are prone to develop nosocomial infections. The challenge remains to distinguish as early as possible among SIRS patients those who are developing sepsis. Following a sterile insult, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released by damaged tissues and necrotic cells initiate an inflammatory response close to that observed during sepsis. During sepsis, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) trigger the release of host mediators involved in innate immunity and inflammation through identical receptors as DAMPs. In both clinical settings, a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) is concomitantly initiated. The exacerbated production of pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators allows their detection in biological fluids and particularly within the bloodstream. Some of these mediators can be used as biomarkers to decipher among the patients those who developed sepsis, and eventually they can be used as prognosis markers. In addition to plasma biomarkers, the analysis of some surface markers on circulating leukocytes or the study of mRNA and miRNA can be helpful. While there is no magic marker, a combination of few biomarkers might offer a high accuracy for diagnosis.

  4. Phylogeny affects host's weight, immune response and parasitism in damselflies and dragonflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Host–parasite interactions are an intriguing part of ecology, and understanding how hosts are able to withstand parasitic attacks, e.g. by allocating resources to immune defence, is important. Damselflies and dragonflies show a variety of parasitism patterns, but large-scale comparative immune defence studies are rare, and it is difficult to say what the interplay is between their immune defence and parasitism. The aim of this study was to find whether there are differences in immune response between different damselfly and dragonfly species and whether these could explain their levels of gregarine and water mite parasitism. Using an artificial pathogen, a piece of nylon filament, we measured the encapsulation response of 22 different damselfly and dragonfly species and found that (i) there are significant encapsulation differences between species, (ii) body mass has a strong association with encapsulation and parasite prevalences, (iii) body mass shows a strong phylogenetic signal, whereas encapsulation response and gregarine and water mite prevalences show weak signals, and (iv) associations between the traits are affected by phylogeny. We do not know what the relationship is between these four traits, but it seems clear that phylogeny plays a role in determining parasitism levels of damselflies and dragonflies. PMID:28018621

  5. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil modulates the host cellular and inflammatory responses to Trypanosoma congolense infection.

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    Shiby Kuriakose

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma congolense are extracellular and intravascular blood parasites that cause debilitating acute or chronic disease in cattle and other domestic animals. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil has been widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for trypanosomiasis in livestock since 1955. As in livestock, treatment of infected highly susceptible BALB/c mice with Berenil leads to rapid control of parasitemia and survival from an otherwise lethal infection. The molecular and biochemical mechanisms of action of Berenil are still not very well defined and its effect on the host immune system has remained relatively unstudied. Here, we investigated whether Berenil has, in addition to its trypanolytic effect, a modulatory effect on the host immune response to Trypanosoma congolense. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with T. congolense, treated with Berenil and the expression of CD25 and FoxP3 on splenic cells was assessed directly ex vivo. In addition, serum levels and spontaneous and LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by splenic and hepatic CD11b⁺ cells were determined by ELISA. Berenil treatment significantly reduced the percentages of CD25⁺ cells, a concomitant reduction in the percentage of regulatory (CD4⁺Foxp3⁺ T cells and a striking reduction in serum levels of disease exacerbating pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-12, TNF and IFN-γ. Furthermore, Berenil treatment significantly suppressed spontaneous and LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by splenic and liver macrophages and significantly ameliorated LPS-induced septic shock and the associated cytokine storm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results provide evidence that in addition to its direct trypanolytic effect, Berenil also modulates the host immune response to the parasite in a manner that dampen excessive immune activation and production of pathology

  6. Strengthening insights into host responses to mastitis infection in ruminants by combining heterogeneous microarray data sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    biological functions and provided evidence that E. coli caused a stronger host response. Conclusions This meta-analysis approach reinforces previous findings but also reveals several novel themes, including the involvement of genes, biological functions, and pathways that were not identified in individual studies. As such, it provides an interesting proof of principle for future studies combining information from diverse heterogeneous sources. PMID:21569310

  7. Strengthening insights into host responses to mastitis infection in ruminants by combining heterogeneous microarray data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisoni Giuliano

    2011-05-01

    the same altered biological functions and provided evidence that E. coli caused a stronger host response. Conclusions This meta-analysis approach reinforces previous findings but also reveals several novel themes, including the involvement of genes, biological functions, and pathways that were not identified in individual studies. As such, it provides an interesting proof of principle for future studies combining information from diverse heterogeneous sources.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF HOST PLANT DEFENSE RESPONSES TO PARASITIZATION BY Orobanche aegyptiaca

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Orobanche (spp.) are parasitic plants that attack the roots of many important crops. O. aegyptiaca penetrates the host root (aided by digestive enzymes) and forms connections to the host vascular tissue, from which it will withdraw all of its water and nutrient requirements. In order to control this weed, it is important to understand the relationship between the host and the parasite. To investigate how parasitism effects host defense pathways, we are studying the patterns of expression o...

  9. Pteromalus puparum venom impairs host cellular immune responses by decreasing expression of its scavenger receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect host/parasitoid interactions are co-evolved systems in which host defenses are balanced by parasitoid mechanisms to disable or hide from host immune effectors. Although there is a rich literature on these systems, parasitoid immune-disabling mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here we ...

  10. TLR-dependent control of Francisella tularensis infection and host inflammatory responses.

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    Allison L Abplanalp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia and is classified as a Category A select agent. Recent studies have implicated TLR2 as a critical element in the host protective response to F. tularensis infection, but questions remain about whether TLR2 signaling dominates the response in all circumstances and with all species of Francisella and whether F. tularensis PAMPs are predominantly recognized by TLR2/TLR1 or TLR2/TLR6. To address these questions, we have explored the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the host response to infections with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and F. tularensis subspecies (subsp. novicida in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57BL/6 (B6 control mice and TLR- or MyD88-deficient mice were infected intranasally (i.n. or intradermally (i.d. with F. tularensis LVS or with F. tularensis subsp. novicida. B6 mice survived >21 days following infection with LVS by both routes and survival of TLR1(-/-, TLR4(-/-, and TLR6(-/- mice infected i.n. with LVS was equivalent to controls. Survival of TLR2(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice, however, was significantly reduced compared to B6 mice, regardless of the route of infection or the subspecies of F. tularensis. TLR2(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice also showed increased bacterial burdens in lungs, liver, and spleen compared to controls following i.n. infection. Primary macrophages from MyD88(-/- and TLR2(-/- mice were significantly impaired in the ability to secrete TNF and other pro-inflammatory cytokines upon ex vivo infection with LVS. TNF expression was also impaired in vivo as demonstrated by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and by in situ immunofluorescent staining. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude from these studies that TLR2 and MyD88, but not TLR4, play critical roles in the innate immune response to F. tularensis infection regardless of the route of infection or the subspecies. Moreover, signaling through TLR2 does not depend exclusively

  11. Expression of immune-response genes in lepidopteran host is suppressed by venom from an endoparasitoid, Pteromalus puparum

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    Fang Qi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationships between parasitoids and their insect hosts have attracted attention at two levels. First, the basic biology of host-parasitoid interactions is of fundamental interest. Second, parasitoids are widely used as biological control agents in sustainable agricultural programs. Females of the gregarious endoparasitoid Pteromalus puparum (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae inject venom along with eggs into their hosts. P. puparum does not inject polydnaviruses during oviposition. For this reason, P. puparum and its pupal host, the small white butterfly Pieris rapae (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, comprise an excellent model system for studying the influence of an endoparasitoid venom on the biology of the pupal host. P. puparum venom suppresses the immunity of its host, although the suppressive mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences host gene expression in the two main immunity-conferring tissues, hemocytes and fat body. Results At 1 h post-venom injection, we recorded significant decreases in transcript levels of 217 EST clones (revealing 113 genes identified in silico, including 62 unknown contigs derived from forward subtractive libraries of host hemocytes and in transcript levels of 288 EST clones (221 genes identified in silico, including 123 unknown contigs from libraries of host fat body. These genes are related to insect immune response, cytoskeleton, cell cycle and apoptosis, metabolism, transport, stress response and transcriptional and translational regulation. We verified the reliability of the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH data with semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of randomly selected genes. This analysis showed that most of the selected genes were down-regulated after venom injection. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that P. puparum venom influences gene expression in host hemocytes and fat body. Specifically

  12. Anastomotic leaks after bariatric surgery: it is the host response that matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabah, Salman; Ladouceur, Martin; Christou, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Anastomotic leaks after bariatric surgery can lead to severe complications and adverse outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that not all patients with an anastomotic leak after bariatric surgery present with clinical symptoms and that their outcome is dependent on the aggressiveness of the host inflammatory response. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected clinical data from 2384 bariatric surgeries from 1983 to 2006. All anastomotic leaks were identified from the database, and the vital signs, hematologic and biochemical data, mode of diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were recorded and analyzed. We identified 55 anastomotic leaks (2.3%) at a median of 4 days (range 1-26) after surgery. In 37 patients (67.3%), the leaks were identified at a median of 5 days (range 1-26) postoperatively because of clinical signs and symptoms of a systemic inflammatory response (SIRS leaks). In contrast, in 18 patients (32.7%), the leaks were identified at a median of 1.5 days (range 1-16) postoperatively only after routine contrast studies (non-SIRS leaks). Treatment included antibiotics and open drainage in 41.8%, laparoscopic drainage in 21.8%, computed tomography-guided drainage in 12.7%, conservative treatment in 14.5%, and other in 9.2%. All 6 deaths (4 men and 2 women, 10.9%) occurred in the SIRS group. Using logistic regression analysis, temperature (inflammatory response) and body mass index were independent predictors of mortality. The results of our study have shown that one third of patients with anastomotic leaks after bariatric surgery present with minimal clinical symptoms (non-SIRS) and are only detected if contrast studies are performed. Such leaks are unlikely to lead to death. Two thirds of patients with anastomotic leaks present with a systemic inflammatory response to the leak. Such leaks require urgent treatment that might not always prevent death.

  13. Specific Mutations in H5N1 Mainly Impact the Magnitude and Velocity of the Host Response in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchitchek, Nicholas; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Josset, Laurence; Gralinski, Lisa; Becavin, Christophe; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Ferris, Martin T.; Totura, Allison L.; Li, Chengjun; Neumann, Gabriele; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.

    2013-07-29

    Influenza infection causes respiratory disease that can lead to death. The complex interplay between virus-encoded and host-specific pathogenicity regulators is not well-understood. By analyzing a collection of mouse lung samples infected by A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1; VN1203) influenza, we characterized a signature of transcripts and proteins associated with the kinetics of the host response. Using a new geometrical representation method and two criteria, we show that infection concentrations and four specific mutations in VN1203 mainly impact on the magnitude and velocity of the host response kinetics, rather than on specific sets of genes up- and down-regulated. We observed similar kinetic effects using A/California/04/2009 (H1N1)-infected samples, and we show that these effects correlate with mice morbidity and viral titer measurements. Speed and extent of changes in the host response between days 1 and 2 post-infection were attenuated for each VN1203 mutant compared to the wild-type, except for PB1-F2 deletion at a high dose, which was associated with high virulence. This indicates that the host response in that time frame is critical and that immunomodulatory therapeutics should specifically be applied during the early days post-infection.

  14. Deleterious mutation accumulation in asexual Timema stick insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lee; Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is extremely widespread in spite of its presumed costs relative to asexual reproduction, indicating that it must provide significant advantages. One postulated benefit of sex and recombination is that they facilitate the purging of mildly deleterious mutations, which would accumulate in asexual lineages and contribute to their short evolutionary life span. To test this prediction, we estimated the accumulation rate of coding (nonsynonymous) mutations, which are expected to be deleterious, in parts of one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear (Actin and Hsp70) genes in six independently derived asexual lineages and related sexual species of Timema stick insects. We found signatures of increased coding mutation accumulation in all six asexual Timema and for each of the three analyzed genes, with 3.6- to 13.4-fold higher rates in the asexuals as compared with the sexuals. In addition, because coding mutations in the asexuals often resulted in considerable hydrophobicity changes at the concerned amino acid positions, coding mutations in the asexuals are likely associated with more strongly deleterious effects than in the sexuals. Our results demonstrate that deleterious mutation accumulation can differentially affect sexual and asexual lineages and support the idea that deleterious mutation accumulation plays an important role in limiting the long-term persistence of all-female lineages.

  15. Innate immune memory: Implications for host responses to damage-associated molecular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crișan, Tania O; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the innate immune system build immunological memory via epigenetic reprogramming after stimulations with microbial ligands. This functional readjustment allows for enhanced nonspecific inflammatory responses upon secondary challenges, a process termed "trained immunity." The epigenomic blueprint of trained monocytes has been recently reported, which revealed several important immunologic and metabolic mechanisms that underlie these changes. Interestingly, similar long-term reprogramming of cytokine production has also been described to be induced by endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Here, we present an overview of the novel data showing that endogenous alarm signals associated with tissue damage and sterile inflammation can induce trained immunity through epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs. We describe new and old evidence of persistent effects of DAMPs in driving inflammation and enforce the concept that the influence of tissue-derived signals is critical in adjusting the magnitude and type of immune response built by the host. The better characterization of trained immunity for the persistence of inflammation induced by DAMPs would provide new possibilities for intervention in aging and autoinflammatory disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Leukotoxin: A Powerful Tool with Capacity to Cause Imbalance in the Host Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Johansson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been described as a member of the indigenous oral microbiota of humans, and is involved in the pathology of periodontitis and various non-oral infections. This bacterium selectively kills human leukocytes through expression of leukotoxin, a large pore-forming protein that belongs to the Repeat in Toxin (RTX family. The specificity of the toxin is related to its prerequisite for a specific target cell receptor, LFA-1, which is solely expressed on leukocytes. The leukotoxin causes death of different leukocyte populations in a variety of ways. It activates a rapid release of lysosomal enzymes and MMPs from neutrophils and causes apoptosis in lymphocytes. In the monocytes/macrophages, the toxin activates caspase-1, a cysteine proteinase, which causes a proinflammatory response by the activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18. A specific clone (JP2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans with enhanced leukotoxin expression significantly correlates to disease onset in infected individuals. Taken together, the mechanisms by which this toxin kills leukocytes are closely related to the pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory disorders, such as periodontitis. Therapeutic strategies targeting the cellular and molecular inflammatory host response in periodontal diseases might be a future treatment alternative.

  17. Characterization and monitoring of host immune responses to infectious agents: what a future for microbiological diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dolcetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying microbial pathogenesis and host-microbe interactions has greatly improved over the last decade. In particular, the development of new and specific analytical methods has allowed the detailed characterization of innate and adaptive immune responses against clinically relevant microbial infections. Immunogenetic studies are continuously providing new insights on the genetic bases of individual differences in susceptibility to specific pathogens and most of the genetic markers identified so far include polymorphisms in genes controlling both innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, new standardized T cell assays allow reliable and reproducible evaluations of T cell phenotype and functions (i.e.: ELISPOT, including the identification of distinct functional signatures that are associated with the control of the infection.Although the number of these assays currently used in clinical practice is limited, a considerable increase is foreseen for the near future.This perspective constitutes an unprecedented opportunity for Clinical Microbiologists, who may now develop and apply integrated microbiologic/immunologic assays that may be useful for a more precise diagnostic definition and a more accurate clinical monitoring of the disease.

  18. Patterns of early gut colonization shape future immune responses of the host.

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    Camilla Hartmann Friis Hansen

    Full Text Available The most important trigger for immune system development is the exposure to microbial components immediately after birth. Moreover, targeted manipulation of the microbiota can be used to change host susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases. Our aim was to analyze how differences in early gut colonization patterns change the composition of the resident microbiota and future immune system reactivity. Germ-free (GF mice were either inoculated by single oral gavage of caecal content or let colonized by co-housing with specific pathogen-free (SPF mice at different time points in the postnatal period. The microbiota composition was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis for 16S rRNA gene followed by principal component analysis. Furthermore, immune functions and cytokine concentrations were analyzed using flow cytometry, ELISA or multiplex bead assay. We found that a single oral inoculation of GF mice at three weeks of age permanently changed the gut microbiota composition, which was not possible to achieve at one week of age. Interestingly, the ex-GF mice inoculated at three weeks of age were also the only mice with an increased pro-inflammatory immune response. In contrast, the composition of the gut microbiota of ex-GF mice that were co-housed with SPF mice at different time points was similar to the gut microbiota in the barrier maintained SPF mice. The existence of a short GF postnatal period permanently changed levels of systemic regulatory T cells, NK and NKT cells, and cytokine production. In conclusion, a time window exists that enables the artificial colonization of GF mice by a single oral dose of caecal content, which may modify the future immune phenotype of the host. Moreover, delayed microbial colonization of the gut causes permanent changes in the immune system.

  19. Complexity of Host Micro-RNA Response to Cytomegalovirus Reactivation After Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, A; Lisboa, L F; O'Shea, D; Asberg, A; Mueller, T; Emery, V; Kumar, D; Humar, A

    2016-02-01

    Human (Homo sapiens) micro-RNAs (hsa-miRNAs) regulate virus and host-gene translation, but the biological impact in patients with human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection is not well defined in a clinically relevant model. First, we compared hsa-miRNA expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 35 transplant recipients with and without CMV viremia by using a microarray chip covering 847 hsa-miRNAs. This approach demonstrated a set of 142 differentially expressed hsa-miRNAs. Next, we examined the effect of each of these miRNAs on viral growth by using human fibroblasts (human foreskin fibroblast-1) infected with the hCMV Towne strain, identifying a subset of proviral and antiviral hsa-miRNAs. miRNA-target prediction software indicated potential binding sites within the hCMV genome (e.g., hCMV-UL52 and -UL100 [UL = unique long]) and host-genes (e.g., interleukin-1 receptor, IRF1). Luciferase-expressing plasmid constructs and immunoblotting confirmed several predicted miRNA targets. Finally, we determined the expression of selected proviral and antiviral hsa-miRNAs in 242 transplant recipients with hCMV-viremia. We measured hsa-miRNAs before and after antiviral therapy and correlated hsa-miRNA expression levels to hCMV-replication dynamics. One of six antiviral hsa-miRNAs showed a significant increase during treatment, concurrent with viral decline. In contrast, six of eight proviral hsa-miRNAs showed a decrease during viral decline. Our results indicate that a complex and multitargeted hsa-miRNA response occurs during CMV replication in immunosuppressed patients. This study provides mechanistic insight and potential novel biomarkers for CMV replication. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Microbiome of prebiotic-treated mice reveals novel targets involved in host response during obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Amandine; Lazarevic, Vladimir; Gaïa, Nadia; Johansson, Maria; Ståhlman, Marcus; Backhed, Fredrik; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Cani, Patrice D

    2014-10-01

    The gut microbiota is involved in metabolic and immune disorders associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We previously demonstrated that prebiotic treatment may significantly improve host health by modulating bacterial species related to the improvement of gut endocrine, barrier and immune functions. An analysis of the gut metagenome is needed to determine which bacterial functions and taxa are responsible for beneficial microbiota-host interactions upon nutritional intervention. We subjected mice to prebiotic (Pre) treatment under physiological (control diet: CT) and pathological conditions (high-fat diet: HFD) for 8 weeks and investigated the production of intestinal antimicrobial peptides and the gut microbiome. HFD feeding significantly decreased the expression of regenerating islet-derived 3-gamma (Reg3g) and phospholipase A2 group-II (PLA2g2) in the jejunum. Prebiotic treatment increased Reg3g expression (by ∼50-fold) and improved intestinal homeostasis as suggested by the increase in the expression of intectin, a key protein involved in intestinal epithelial cell turnover. Deep metagenomic sequencing analysis revealed that HFD and prebiotic treatment significantly affected the gut microbiome at different taxonomic levels. Functional analyses based on the occurrence of clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) of proteins also revealed distinct profiles for the HFD, Pre, HFD-Pre and CT groups. Finally, the gut microbiota modulations induced by prebiotics counteracted HFD-induced inflammation and related metabolic disorders. Thus, we identified novel putative taxa and metabolic functions that may contribute to the development of or protection against the metabolic alterations observed during HFD feeding and HFD-Pre feeding.

  1. A genome-wide survey for host response of silkworm, Bombyx mori during pathogen Bacillus bombyseptieus infection.

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    Lulin Huang

    Full Text Available Host-pathogen interactions are complex relationships, and a central challenge is to reveal the interactions between pathogens and their hosts. Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb which can produces spores and parasporal crystals was firstly separated from the corpses of the infected silkworms (Bombyx mori. Bb naturally infects the silkworm can cause an acute fuliginosa septicaemia and kill the silkworm larvae generally within one day in the hot and humid season. Bb pathogen of the silkworm can be used for investigating the host responses after the infection. Gene expression profiling during four time-points of silkworm whole larvae after Bb infection was performed to gain insight into the mechanism of Bb-associated host whole body effect. Genome-wide survey of the host genes demonstrated many genes and pathways modulated after the infection. GO analysis of the induced genes indicated that their functions could be divided into 14 categories. KEGG pathway analysis identified that six types of basal metabolic pathway were regulated, including genetic information processing and transcription, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, metabolism of cofactors and vitamins, and xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism. Similar to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, Bb can also induce a silkworm poisoning-related response. In this process, genes encoding midgut peritrophic membrane proteins, aminopeptidase N receptors and sodium/calcium exchange protein showed modulation. For the first time, we found that Bb induced a lot of genes involved in juvenile hormone synthesis and metabolism pathway upregulated. Bb also triggered the host immune responses, including cellular immune response and serine protease cascade melanization response. Real time PCR analysis showed that Bb can induce the silkworm systemic immune response, mainly by the Toll pathway. Anti-microorganism peptides (AMPs, including of Attacin, Lebocin, Enbocin, Gloverin

  2. Type IV secretion-dependent activation of host MAP kinases induces an increased proinflammatory cytokine response to Legionella pneumophila.

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    Sunny Shin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune system must discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic microbes in order to initiate an appropriate response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs detect microbial components common to both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, whereas Nod-like receptors (NLRs sense microbial components introduced into the host cytosol by the specialized secretion systems or pore-forming toxins of bacterial pathogens. The host signaling pathways that respond to bacterial secretion systems remain poorly understood. Infection with the pathogen Legionella pneumophila, which utilizes a type IV secretion system (T4SS, induced an increased proinflammatory cytokine response compared to avirulent bacteria in which the T4SS was inactivated. This enhanced response involved NF-kappaB activation by TLR signaling as well as Nod1 and Nod2 detection of type IV secretion. Furthermore, a TLR- and RIP2-independent pathway leading to p38 and SAPK/JNK MAPK activation was found to play an equally important role in the host response to virulent L. pneumophila. Activation of this MAPK pathway was T4SS-dependent and coordinated with TLR signaling to mount a robust proinflammatory cytokine response to virulent L. pneumophila. These findings define a previously uncharacterized host response to bacterial type IV secretion that activates MAPK signaling and demonstrate that coincident detection of multiple bacterial components enables immune discrimination between virulent and avirulent bacteria.

  3. Effects of an entomopathogen nematode on the immune response of the insect pest red palm weevil: Focus on the host antimicrobial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binda-Rossetti, Simona; Mastore, Maristella; Protasoni, Marina; Brivio, Maurizio F

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between parasites and hosts can be drastic, depending on the balance between parasite strategies and the efficiency of the host immune response. In the case of entomopathogenic nematodes and their insect hosts, we must also consider the role of bacterial symbionts, as the interaction among them is tripartite and each component plays a critical role in death or survival. We analyzed the effects induced by the nematode-bacteria complex Steinernema carpocapsae, against red palm weevil (RPW) larvae, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. We examined the antimicrobial response of the insect when in the presence of nematocomplexes or of its symbionts, Xenorhabdus nematophila. In detail, we investigated the potential interference of live and dead S. carpocapsae, their isolated cuticles, live or dead bacterial symbionts and their lipopolysaccharides, on the synthesis and activity of host antimicrobial peptides. Our data indicate that both live nematodes and live bacterial symbionts are able to depress the host antimicrobial response. When nematodes or symbionts were killed, they lacked inhibitory properties, as detected by the presence of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the host hemolymph and by assays of antimicrobial activity. Moreover, we isolated S. carpocapsae cuticles; when cuticles were injected into hosts they revealed evasive properties because they were not immunogenic and were not recognized by the host immune system. We observed that weevil AMPs did not damage X. nematophila, and the lipopolysaccharides purified from symbionts seemed to be non-immunogenic. We believe that our data provide more information on the biology of entomopathogenic nematodes, in particular concerning their role and the activity mediated by symbionts in the relationship with insect hosts.

  4. BCG and BCG/DNAhsp65 Vaccinations Promote Protective Effects without Deleterious Consequences for Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves Zorzella-Pezavento

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A prime-boost strategy conserving BCG is considered the most promising vaccine to control tuberculosis. A boost with a DNA vaccine containing the mycobacterial gene of a heat shock protein (pVAXhsp65 after BCG priming protected mice against experimental tuberculosis. However, anti-hsp65 immunity could worsen an autoimmune disease due to molecular mimicry. In this investigation, we evaluated the effect of a previous BCG or BCG/pVAXhsp65 immunization on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE development. Female Lewis rats were immunized with BCG or BCG followed by pVAXhsp65 boosters. The animals underwent EAE induction and were daily evaluated for weight loss and clinical score. They were euthanized during recovery phase to assess immune response and inflammatory infiltration at the central nervous system. Previous immunization did not aggravate or accelerate clinical score or weight loss. In addition, this procedure clearly decreased inflammation in the brain. BCG immunization modulated the host immune response by triggering a significant reduction in IL-10 and IFN-γ levels induced by myelin basic protein. These data indicated that vaccination protocols with BCG or BCG followed by boosters with pVAXhsp65 did not trigger a deleterious effect on EAE evolution.

  5. Gene expression studies of host response to Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 experimental infections in Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus subtype-3 (SAV-3 infection in Atlantic salmon is exclusively found in Norway. The salmonid alphaviruses have been well characterized at the genome level but there is limited information about the host-pathogen interaction phenomena. This study was undertaken to characterize the replication and spread of SAV-3 in internal organs of experimentally infected Atlantic salmon and the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, suitability of a cohabitation challenge model for this virus was also examined. Groups of fish were infected by intramuscular injection (IM, cohabited (CO or kept uninfected in a separate tank. Samples of pancreas, kidney, spleen, heart and skeletal muscles were collected at 2, 4 and 8 weeks post infection (wpi. Pathological changes were assessed by histology concurrently with viral loads and mRNA expression of immune genes by real time RT-PCR. Pathological changes were only observed in the pancreas and heart (target organs of both IM and CO groups, with changes appearing first in the pancreas (2 wpi in the former. Lesions with increasing severity over time coincided with high viral loads despite significant induction of IFN-α, Mx and ISG15. IFN-γ and MHC-I were expressed in all tissues examined and their induction appeared in parallel with that of IL-10. Inflammatory genes TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-8 were only induced in the heart during pathology while T cell-related genes CD3ε, CD4, CD8, TCR-α and MHC-II were expressed in target organs at 8 wpi. These findings suggest that the onset of innate responses came too late to limit virus replication. Furthermore, SAV-3 infections in Atlantic salmon induce Th1/cytotoxic responses in common with other alphaviruses infecting higher vertebrates. Our findings demonstrate that SAV-3 can be transmitted via the water making it suitable for a cohabitation challenge model.

  6. Gene expression studies of host response to Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 experimental infections in Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Guo, Tz-Chun; Mutoloki, Stephen; Haugland, Oyvind; Evensen, Oystein

    2012-11-01

    Salmonid alphavirus subtype-3 (SAV-3) infection in Atlantic salmon is exclusively found in Norway. The salmonid alphaviruses have been well characterized at the genome level but there is limited information about the host-pathogen interaction phenomena. This study was undertaken to characterize the replication and spread of SAV-3 in internal organs of experimentally infected Atlantic salmon and the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, suitability of a cohabitation challenge model for this virus was also examined. Groups of fish were infected by intramuscular injection (IM), cohabited (CO) or kept uninfected in a separate tank. Samples of pancreas, kidney, spleen, heart and skeletal muscles were collected at 2, 4 and 8 weeks post infection (wpi). Pathological changes were assessed by histology concurrently with viral loads and mRNA expression of immune genes by real time RT-PCR. Pathological changes were only observed in the pancreas and heart (target organs) of both IM and CO groups, with changes appearing first in the pancreas (2 wpi) in the former. Lesions with increasing severity over time coincided with high viral loads despite significant induction of IFN-α, Mx and ISG15. IFN-γ and MHC-I were expressed in all tissues examined and their induction appeared in parallel with that of IL-10. Inflammatory genes TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-8 were only induced in the heart during pathology while T cell-related genes CD3ε, CD4, CD8, TCR-α and MHC-II were expressed in target organs at 8 wpi. These findings suggest that the onset of innate responses came too late to limit virus replication. Furthermore, SAV-3 infections in Atlantic salmon induce Th1/cytotoxic responses in common with other alphaviruses infecting higher vertebrates. Our findings demonstrate that SAV-3 can be transmitted via the water making it suitable for a cohabitation challenge model.

  7. Multifunctional roles of leader protein of foot-and-mouth disease viruses in suppressing host antiviral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingqi; Zhu, Zixiang; Zhang, Miaotao; Zheng, Haixue

    2015-10-28

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader protein (L(pro)) is a papain-like proteinase, which plays an important role in FMDV pathogenesis. L(pro) exists as two forms, Lab and Lb, due to translation being initiated from two different start codons separated by 84 nucleotides. L(pro) self-cleaves from the nascent viral polyprotein precursor as the first mature viral protein. In addition to its role as a viral proteinase, L(pro) also has the ability to antagonize host antiviral effects. To promote FMDV replication, L(pro) can suppress host antiviral responses by three different mechanisms: (1) cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 γ (eIF4G) to shut off host protein synthesis; (2) inhibition of host innate immune responses through restriction of interferon-α/β production; and (3) L(pro) can also act as a deubiquitinase and catalyze deubiquitination of innate immune signaling molecules. In the light of recent functional and biochemical findings regarding L(pro), this review introduces the basic properties of L(pro) and the mechanisms by which it antagonizes host antiviral responses.

  8. Genome-Wide Host-Pathogen Interaction Unveiled by Transcriptomic Response of Diamondback Moth to Fungal Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Jian Chu

    Full Text Available Genome-wide insight into insect pest response to the infection of Beauveria bassiana (fungal insect pathogen is critical for genetic improvement of fungal insecticides but has been poorly explored. We constructed three pairs of transcriptomes of Plutella xylostella larvae at 24, 36 and 48 hours post treatment of infection (hptI and of control (hptC for insight into the host-pathogen interaction at genomic level. There were 2143, 3200 and 2967 host genes differentially expressed at 24, 36 and 48 hptI/hptC respectively. These infection-responsive genes (~15% of the host genome were enriched in various immune processes, such as complement and coagulation cascades, protein digestion and absorption, and drug metabolism-cytochrome P450. Fungal penetration into cuticle and host defense reaction began at 24 hptI, followed by most intensive host immune response at 36 hptI and attenuated immunity at 48 hptI. Contrastingly, 44% of fungal genes were differentially expressed in the infection course and enriched in several biological processes, such as antioxidant activity, peroxidase activity and proteolysis. There were 1636 fungal genes co-expressed during 24-48 hptI, including 116 encoding putative secretion proteins. Our results provide novel insights into the insect-pathogen interaction and help to probe molecular mechanisms involved in the fungal infection to the global pest.

  9. Characterization of the host response to pichinde virus infection in the Syrian golden hamster by species-specific kinome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Shane; Gowen, Brian B; Trost, Brett; Napper, Scott; Kusalik, Anthony; Johnson, Reed F; Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Jahrling, Peter B; Kindrachuk, Jason

    2015-03-01

    The Syrian golden hamster has been increasingly used to study viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) pathogenesis and countermeasure efficacy. As VHFs are a global health concern, well-characterized animal models are essential for both the development of therapeutics and vaccines as well as for increasing our understanding of the molecular events that underlie viral pathogenesis. However, the paucity of reagents or platforms that are available for studying hamsters at a molecular level limits the ability to extract biological information from this important animal model. As such, there is a need to develop platforms/technologies for characterizing host responses of hamsters at a molecular level. To this end, we developed hamster-specific kinome peptide arrays to characterize the molecular host response of the Syrian golden hamster. After validating the functionality of the arrays using immune agonists of defined signaling mechanisms (lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α), we characterized the host response in a hamster model of VHF based on Pichinde virus (PICV(1)) infection by performing temporal kinome analysis of lung tissue. Our analysis revealed key roles for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL) responses, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in the response to PICV infection. These findings were validated through phosphorylation-specific Western blot analysis. Overall, we have demonstrated that hamster-specific kinome arrays are a robust tool for characterizing the species-specific molecular host response in a VHF model. Further, our results provide key insights into the hamster host response to PICV infection and will inform future studies with high-consequence VHF pathogens.

  10. Host plant peptides elicit a transcriptional response to control the Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle during symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Penterman, Jon; Abo, Ryan P.; De Nisco, Nicole J.; Markus F F Arnold; Longhi, Renato; ZANDA, Matteo; Walker, Graham C.

    2014-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti and its legume hosts establish a symbiosis in which bacterial fixed nitrogen is exchanged for plant carbon compounds. We study this symbiosis because it is agriculturally and ecologically important and to identify mechanisms used in host–microbe interactions. S. meliloti is internalized in specialized host nodule cells that then use small, cysteine-rich peptides to drive their differentiation into polyploid cells that fix nitrogen. We found that a representative host pe...

  11. Host-specific response to HCV infection in the chimeric SCID-beige/Alb-uPA mouse model: role of the innate antiviral immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie-Anne Walters

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The severe combined immunodeficiency disorder (SCID-beige/albumin (Alb-urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA mouse containing a human-mouse chimeric liver is currently the only small animal model capable of supporting hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. This model was utilized to characterize the host transcriptional response to HCV infection. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the genetic component of the host response to HCV infection and also to distinguish virus-induced gene expression changes from adaptive HCV-specific immune-mediated effects. Gene expression profiles from HCV-infected mice were also compared to those from HCV-infected patients. Analyses of the gene expression data demonstrate that host factors regulate the response to HCV infection, including the nature of the innate antiviral immune response. They also indicate that HCV mediates gene expression changes, including regulation of lipid metabolism genes, which have the potential to be directly cytopathic, indicating that liver pathology may not be exclusively mediated by HCV-specific adaptive immune responses. This effect appears to be inversely related to the activation of the innate antiviral immune response. In summary, the nature of the initial interferon response to HCV infection may determine the extent of viral-mediated effects on host gene expression.

  12. Nanovesicles from Malassezia sympodialis and host exosomes induce cytokine responses--novel mechanisms for host-microbe interactions in atopic eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Gehrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intercellular communication can occur via the release of membrane vesicles. Exosomes are nanovesicles released from the endosomal compartment of cells. Depending on their cell of origin and their cargo they can exert different immunoregulatory functions. Recently, fungi were found to produce extracellular vesicles that can influence host-microbe interactions. The yeast Malassezia sympodialis which belongs to our normal cutaneous microbial flora elicits specific IgE- and T-cell reactivity in approximately 50% of adult patients with atopic eczema (AE. Whether exosomes or other vesicles contribute to the inflammation has not yet been investigated. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if M. sympodialis can release nanovesicles and whether they or endogenous exosomes can activate PBMC from AE patients sensitized to M. sympodialis. METHODS: Extracellular nanovesicles isolated from M. sympodialis, co-cultures of M. sympodialis and dendritic cells, and from plasma of patients with AE and healthy controls (HC were characterised using flow cytometry, sucrose gradient centrifugation, Western blot and electron microscopy. Their ability to stimulate IL-4 and TNF-alpha responses in autologous CD14, CD34 depleted PBMC was determined using ELISPOT and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: We show for the first time that M. sympodialis releases extracellular vesicles carrying allergen. These vesicles can induce IL-4 and TNF-α responses with a significantly higher IL-4 production in patients compared to HC. Exosomes from dendritic cell and M. sympodialis co-cultures induced IL-4 and TNF-α responses in autologous CD14, CD34 depleted PBMC of AE patients and HC while plasma exosomes induced TNF-α but not IL-4 in undepleted PBMC. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular vesicles from M. sympodialis, dendritic cells and plasma can contribute to cytokine responses in CD14, CD34 depleted and undepleted PBMC of AE patients and HC. These novel observations have implications for

  13. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  14. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Deiser

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7 is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+ host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7 therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  15. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  16. Cruzipain, a major Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, conditions the host immune response in favor of parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, Laura; Guiñazú, Natalia; Stempin, Cinthia; Fretes, Ricardo; Cerbán, Fabio; Gea, Susana

    2002-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that humoral immune response to cruzipain, a major antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi parasite, is implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental Chagas' disease. In the present study, the spleen cell phenotype and the cytokine profile induced by cruzipain in immunized mice were analyzed. The results showed that cruzipain increases the number of spleen cells with large size and granularity. Splenocyte populations with CD19(+), Mac-1(+), Gr-1(+) and CD11c(+) positive surface markers significantly increased in immune mice compared to controls ones. Histological study revealed the presence of high number of megacariocyte and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, indicating extramedullary hemopoiesis in spleens of immune mice. The finding of high levels of IL-4, IL5 and IL-10 and low levels of IFN-gamma and IL-12 in supernatants of immune cells stimulated with cruzipain indicates a preferential activation of T2 type cells in immune animals. To investigate the role of innate immunity cells, the classical and alternative metabolic pathways of spleen macrophages from immune mice stimulated by cruzipain were also studied. The results showed an increase of urea associated with a decrease of nitrite levels, suggesting that cruzipain up-regulates the arginase way. Therefore, cruzipain leads to T2 type cytokine profile which may enhance the arginase via in the macrophages promoting a susceptible mechanism to infection. Thus, we postulate that during T. cruzi infection, cruzipain could be used by the parasite to spread inside the host.

  17. The relationship between pericoronitis, wisdom teeth, putative periodontal pathogens and the host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Justin; Stassen, Leo F A

    2008-01-01

    To review the literature concerning pericoronitis, in particular the nature of the lesion and its aetiology, what factors may be used to predict if some patients would benefit from early removal of third molars, and if a scoring system can be developed for this purpose. A literature search using PubMed and the facilities of the Dublin Dental Hospital (DDH) library were used to gather the relevent information. PubMed lists all of the journals available in the DDH library and was used to identify relevent papers, which were then retrieved from the shelves and stacks with the help of library staff. The key word used was 'pericoronitis'. The studies reviewed assert that the bacteriology of pericoronitis is predominantly anaerobic in character, yet no causative species has been identified. Marker organisms for periodontitis were not generally isolated. Host factors examined in various studies were the inflammatory markers interleukin 1b and prostaglandin E2, and the immunological responses of neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells, T cells, helper T cells and suppressor/cytotoxic T cells. While all of these factors, with the exception of prostaglandin E2, tend to be elevated in cases of pericoronitis, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, no clearcut measurable entity has emerged that can be used as a predictive marker. A hypothesised scoring system to predict which patients would benefit from early removal of asymptomatic impacted lower third molars would be clinically advantageous in justifying prophylactic third molar surgery, but is not yet feasible or proven.

  18. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  19. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Modeling and analysis of innate immune responses induced by the host cells against hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Ayesha; Ahmad, Jamil; Naz, Anam; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Anjum, Sadia; Raza, Abida; Baumbach, Jan; Ali, Amjad

    2015-05-01

    An in-depth understanding of complex systems such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and host immunomodulatory response is an open challenge for biologists. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in immune evasion by HCV, we present a simplified formalization of the highly dynamic system consisting of HCV, its replication cycle and host immune responses at the cellular level using hybrid Petri net (HPN). The approach followed in this study comprises of step wise simulation, model validation and analysis of host immune response. This study was performed with an objective of making correlations among viral RNA levels, interferon (IFN) production and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) induction. The results correlate with the biological data verifying that the model is very useful in predicting the dynamic behavior of the signaling proteins in response to a stimulus. This study implicates that HCV infection is dependent upon several key factors of the host immune response. The effect of host proteins on limiting viral infection is effectively overruled by the viral pathogen. This study also analyzes activity levels of RNase L, miR-122, IFN, ISGs and PKR induction and inhibition of TLR3/RIG1 mediated pathways in response to targeted manipulation in the presence of HCV. The results are in complete agreement at the time of writing with the published expression studies and western blot experiments. Our model also provides some biological insights regarding the role of PKR in the acute infection of HCV. It might help to explain why many patients fail to clear acute HCV infection while others, with low ISG basal levels, clear HCV spontaneously. The described methodology can easily be reproduced, which suitably supports the study of other viral infections in a formal, automated and expressive manner. The Petri net-based modeling approach applied here may provide valuable insights for study design and analyses to evaluate other disease associated integrated pathways

  1. The effect of temperature on the impedimetric response of bioreceptor hosting hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; Koch, Lauren; Finley, Stephen H; Wnek, Gary E

    2011-01-15

    Biocompatible hydrogels that serve as the hosting membrane for various bioreceptors contribute to the response of impedimetric biosensors. The temperature response of poly(2-hydroxymethacrylate) [p(HEMA)]-based hydrogel networks prepared with poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) for enhanced biocompatibility and with N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl] acrylamide (HMMA) was studied. Hydrogels were cross-linked with tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate (TEGDA) and synthesized by UV initiation (2M% DMPA photoinitiator). The p(HEMA-co-PEGMA-co-HMMA) based hydrogels were fabricated as discrete gel pads (D=2.5 mm, H=2 mm and V=9.82 μL) on top of 250 μm diameter cysteamine modified and acryloyl (polyethylene glycol)(110) N-hydroxy succinamide ester (acryloyl-PEG-NHS) derivatized gold microelectrodes set within 8-well (8W1E) cell culture biochips. Gel pads were fabricated with cross-link densities corresponding to 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 12 M% TEGDA and were studied by frequency dependent 3-electrode electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (1 mHz to 100 kHz; 50 mV p-t-p) and by temporal 2-electrode impedimetry (64 kHz; 50 mV p-t-p) over the temperature range 30-45°C at 90% RH or in aqueous 0.1 M Tris/KCl at pH 7.2 buffer. The p(HEMA-co-PEGMA-co-HMMA) hydrogels showed an increase in the real component of impedance with increasing cross-link density and demonstrated activation energies for impedimetric transport that ranged from 15 kJ/mol (3 M%) to 20 kJ/mol (12 M%) confirming the dominance of proton migration in the impedance of the hydrogels.

  2. Filarial-specific antibody response in East African bancroftian filariasis: effects of host infection, clinical disease, and filarial endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaoko, Walter G; Simonsen, Paul E; Meyrowitsch, Dan W;

    2006-01-01

    The effect of host infection, chronic clinical disease, and transmission intensity on the patterns of specific antibody responses in Bancroftian filariasis was assessed by analyzing specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE profiles among adults from two communities with high and low Wuchereria ba...

  3. Dietary sodium selenite on host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. The present study was conducted to evaluate the supplementary effects of dietary Selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chickens were fed from hatch with a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with ...

  4. Modeling and analysis of innate immune responses induced by the host cells against hepatitis C virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obaid, Ayesha; Ahmad, Jamil; Naz, Anam; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Anjum, Sadia; Raza, Abida; Baumbach, Jan; Ali, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of complex systems such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and host immunomodulatory response is an open challenge for biologists. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in immune evasion by HCV, we present a simplified formalization of the highly dynamic system c

  5. A1/A2-Diamino-Substituted Pillar[5]arene-Based Acid-Base-Responsive Host-Guest System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Bo; Hu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Xiao-Li; Liu, Yahu A; Li, Jiu-Sheng; Jiang, Biao; Wen, Ke

    2016-05-06

    An acid-base-responsive supramolecular host-guest system based on a planarly chiral A1/A2-diamino-substituted pillar[5]arene (1)/imidazolium ion recognition motif was created. The pillar[4]arene[1]diaminobenzene 1 can bring an electron-deficient imidazolium cation into its cylindrically shaped cavity under neutral or basic conditions and release it under acidic conditions.

  6. An ion signal responsive dynamic protein nano-spring constructed by high ordered host-guest recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Chengye; Li, Jiaxi; Luo, Quan; Hou, Chunxi; Pan, Tiezheng; Li, Hongbin; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-02-18

    A protein self-assembly nano-spring was developed through host-guest interactions between cucurbit[8]uril and tripeptide FGG tags of fusion protein FGG-recoverin-GST. Fine control of the conformational changes of the Ca(2+)-responsive domain allows for a 50% stretch of the protein nano-spring as it switches from the contracted state to the extended state.

  7. Deep sequencing analysis reveals a TMV mutant with a poly(A) tract reduces host defense responses in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Wong, Sek-Man

    2017-07-15

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) possesses an upstream pseudoknotted domain (UPD), which is important for replication. After substituting the UPD with an internal poly(A) tract (43 nt), a mutant TMV-43A was constructed. TMV-43A replicated slower than TMV and induced a non-lethal mosaic symptom in Nicotiana benthamiana. In this study, deep sequencing was performed to detect the differences of small RNA profiles between TMV- and TMV-43A-infected N. benthamiana. The results showed that TMV-43A produced lesser amount of virus-derived interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) than that of TMV. However, the distributions of vsiRNAs generation hotspots between TMV and TMV-43A were similar. Expression of genes related to small RNA biogenesis in TMV-43A-infected N. benthamiana was significantly lower than that of TMV, which leads to generation of lesser vsiRNAs. The expressions of host defense response genes were up-regulated after TMV infection, as compared to TMV-43A-infected plants. Host defense response to TMV-43A infection was lower than that to TMV. The absence of UPD might contribute to the reduced host response to TMV-43A. Our study provides valuable information in the role of the UPD in eliciting host response genes after TMV infection in N. benthamiana. (187 words). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A generalist brood parasite modifies use of a host in response to reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louder, Matthew I M; Schelsky, Wendy M; Albores, Amber N; Hoover, Jeffrey P

    2015-09-07

    Avian obligate brood parasites, which rely solely on hosts to raise their young, should choose the highest quality hosts to maximize reproductive output. Brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) are extreme host generalists, yet female cowbirds could use information based on past reproductive outcomes to make egg-laying decisions thus minimizing fitness costs associated with parasitizing low-quality hosts. We use a long-term (21 years) nest-box study of a single host, the prothonotary warbler (Protonotaria citrea), to show that local cowbird reproductive success, but not host reproductive success, was positively correlated with the probability of parasitism the following year. Experimental manipulations of cowbird success corroborated that female cowbirds make future decisions about which hosts to use based on information pertaining to past cowbird success, both within and between years. The within-year pattern, in particular, points to local cowbird females selecting hosts based on past reproductive outcomes. This, coupled with high site fidelity of female cowbirds between years, points to information use, rather than cowbird natal returns alone, increasing parasitism rates on highly productive sites between years.

  9. Quantifying the dynamics of viruses and the cellular immune response of the host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Althaus, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Infections can be caused by viruses, which attack certain cells within an infected host. However, the immune system of the host has evolved remarkable defense mechanisms that counter against an infection. In particular, so-called cytotoxic T lymphocytes can recognize and eliminate infected cells. Th

  10. Secretome of fungus-infected aphids documents high pathogen activity and weak host response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Olsen, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of novel secretome proteins contributes to the understanding of host-pathogen interactions. Here we report a rich diversity of secreted proteins from the interaction between grain aphids (host, insect order Hemiptera) and fungi of the order Entomophthorales (insect pathogens), made poss...

  11. Host response to Foot- and Mouth Disease infection in cattle; possible implications for the development of “carriers”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    in the cornified stratified squamous epithelia of the coronary bands and oral cavity within a few days of infection. Viremia occurs within 2-3 days of infection, but is rapidly cleared through the effect of circulating antibodies generated by the adaptive immune response. The host response involves initial...... activation of the innate immune response, with activation and recruitment of effector-cells, and subsequent activation of T- and B-cells, leading to the production of circulating antibodies, as well as activation of cytotoxic T-cells. Previous experiments have indicated that the site of persistent...... replication of FMDV is located in pharyngeal lymphoid tissue, as well as the basal epithelia of the dorsal soft palate. A series of animal experiments, with the aim of investigating the host immune response, and sites of viral replication at different time points during both acute and persistent phases...

  12. Comprehensive Assessment of Host Responses to 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis through Transcriptomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy plays an important role in current cancer therapy; however, several problems remain unsolved on the issue of host-therapeutics interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the host responses after 5-flurouracil (5-FU administration and to find the target genes and their relationship with other cytokines in the 5-FU-induced oral mucositis (OM mouse model through transcriptomic analysis.Thirty-six 6 to 8 week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the control group and 5-FU-treated group. In the 5-FU group, mice received 5-FU (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on day 1, day 8, day 15, day 22, and day 29, respectively. We evaluated the oral mucosal change under macroanalysis and histological examination at indicated periods, and then applied transcriptomic analysis of gene expression profile and Immunohistochemical stain to identify the target molecules related to 5-FU-induced OM.The most prominent histological change in this model was observed in the fifth week. The gene expression of Bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, related sequence 1 (Bglap-rs1 (-12.69-fold and Chitinase 3-like 4 (Chi3l4 (-6.35-fold were significantly down-regulated in this phase. The quantitative real-time PCR results also revealed the expression levels were 0.62-fold in Bglap-rs1 and 0.13-fold in Chi3l4 compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical stain showed significant expression of cluster of differentiation 11b (p<0.01, interleukin-1β (p<0.001 and tumor necrosis factor-α (p<0.05, and down-regulation of Bglap-rs1 (p<0.01 compared with the control group. By Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis, there were twenty-three pathways significantly participated in this study (p<0.05.Through comprehensively transcriptomic analysis and IHC stain, we discovered several valuable pathways, verified the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and revealed two significantly down-regulated genes in the 5-FU-induced OM model. These

  13. Lytic infection of Lactococcus lactis by bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 triggers alternative transcriptional host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Zomer, Aldert; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-08-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed throughout lytic infection. Whole-genome microarrays performed at various time points postinfection demonstrated a rather modest impact on host transcription. The majority of changes in the host transcriptome occur during late infection stages; few changes in host gene transcription occur during the immediate and early infection stages. Alterations in the L. lactis UC509.9 transcriptome during lytic infection appear to be phage specific, with relatively few differentially transcribed genes shared between cells infected with Tuc2009 and those infected with c2. Despite the apparent lack of a coordinated general phage response, three themes common to both infections were noted: alternative transcription of genes involved in catabolic flux and energy production, differential transcription of genes involved in cell wall modification, and differential transcription of genes involved in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The transcriptional profiles of both bacteriophages during lytic infection generally correlated with the findings of previous studies and allowed the confirmation of previously predicted promoter sequences. In addition, the host transcriptional response to lysogenization with Tuc2009 was monitored along with tiling array analysis of Tuc2009 in the lysogenic state. Analysis identified 44 host genes with altered transcription during lysogeny, 36 of which displayed levels of transcription significantly reduced from those for uninfected cells.

  14. Growth but not photosynthesis response of a host plant to infection by a holoparasitic plant depends on nitrogen supply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Shen

    Full Text Available Parasitic plants can adversely influence the growth of their hosts by removing resources and by affecting photosynthesis. Such negative effects depend on resource availability. However, at varied resource levels, to what extent the negative effects on growth are attributed to the effects on photosynthesis has not been well elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis responses of the host plant Mikania micrantha to infection by the holoparasite Cuscuta campestris by focusing on the interaction of nitrogen and infection. Mikania micrantha plants fertilized at 0.2, 1 and 5 mM nitrate were grown with and without C. campestris infection. We observed that the infection significantly reduced M. micrantha growth at each nitrate fertilization and more severely at low than at high nitrate. Such alleviation at high nitrate was largely attributed to a stronger influence of infection on root biomass at low than at high nitrate fertilization. However, although C. campestris altered allometry and inhibited host photosynthesis, the magnitude of the effects was independent of nitrate fertilizations. The infection reduced light saturation point, net photosynthesis at saturating irradiances, apparent quantum yield, CO2 saturated rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco, and maximum light-saturated rate of electron transport, and increased light compensation point in host leaves similarly across nitrate levels, corresponding to a similar magnitude of negative effects of the parasite on host leaf soluble protein and Rubisco concentrations, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency and stomatal conductance across nitrate concentrations. Thus, the more severe inhibition in host growth at low than at high nitrate supplies cannot be attributed to a greater parasite-induced reduction in host photosynthesis, but the result of a higher proportion of host resources

  15. Growth but not photosynthesis response of a host plant to infection by a holoparasitic plant depends on nitrogen supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Xu, Shu-Jun; Hong, Lan; Wang, Zhang-Ming; Ye, Wan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic plants can adversely influence the growth of their hosts by removing resources and by affecting photosynthesis. Such negative effects depend on resource availability. However, at varied resource levels, to what extent the negative effects on growth are attributed to the effects on photosynthesis has not been well elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of nitrogen supply on the growth and photosynthesis responses of the host plant Mikania micrantha to infection by the holoparasite Cuscuta campestris by focusing on the interaction of nitrogen and infection. Mikania micrantha plants fertilized at 0.2, 1 and 5 mM nitrate were grown with and without C. campestris infection. We observed that the infection significantly reduced M. micrantha growth at each nitrate fertilization and more severely at low than at high nitrate. Such alleviation at high nitrate was largely attributed to a stronger influence of infection on root biomass at low than at high nitrate fertilization. However, although C. campestris altered allometry and inhibited host photosynthesis, the magnitude of the effects was independent of nitrate fertilizations. The infection reduced light saturation point, net photosynthesis at saturating irradiances, apparent quantum yield, CO2 saturated rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, the maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco, and maximum light-saturated rate of electron transport, and increased light compensation point in host leaves similarly across nitrate levels, corresponding to a similar magnitude of negative effects of the parasite on host leaf soluble protein and Rubisco concentrations, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency and stomatal conductance across nitrate concentrations. Thus, the more severe inhibition in host growth at low than at high nitrate supplies cannot be attributed to a greater parasite-induced reduction in host photosynthesis, but the result of a higher proportion of host resources transferred to the parasite at

  16. Deleterious Mutation Accumulation in Asexual Timema Stick Insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, Lee; Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is extremely widespread in spite of its presumed costs relative to asexual reproduction, indicating that it must provide significant advantages. One postulated benefit of sex and recombination is that they facilitate the purging of mildly deleterious mutations, which would accumu

  17. Review: Bucephalus minimus, a deleterious trematode parasite of cockles Cerastoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, L; Freitas, R; de Montaudouin, X

    2015-04-01

    Trematodes are the most prevalent and abundant macroparasites in coastal waters. They display a complex life cycle with alternation of free-living and parasitic stages generally involving three host species. The most deleterious stage is in the first intermediate host (a mollusc) where the parasite penetrates as miracidium larvae and asexually multiplicates in sporocysts/rediae to provide cercariae larvae. However, due to basic low prevalence in ecosystems, this system remains difficult to study. Taking the example of the cockle (Cerastoderma edule), an exploited bivalve along North-Eastern Atlantic coasts, and Bucephalus minimus, its most prevalent parasite as first intermediate host, we summarised the 51 most relevant papers (1887-2015). Besides, a 16-year monthly monitoring was performed at Banc d'Arguin (Atlantic coast of France), and allowed to obtain a sufficient number of infected cockles (276 out of 5,420 individuals) in order to provide new information concerning this parasite/host system. Sporocysts (diameter 80-500 μm) and developing cercariae (length 300-500 μm) are not visible before cockle reaches 16-mm shell length and then prevalence increases with host size. Seasonality of infection was not observed but variation of prevalence was significant among years and negatively correlated to the temperature of the former year, which could correspond to the period of infection by miracidium. Seven other species of trematode were identified in cockles as second intermediate host. For six of them, metacercariae abundance per individual was 2 to 12 folds higher in B. minimus-infected cockles, exacerbating the potential negative impact on host. From the parasite point of view, metacercariae can be considered as hitchhikers, taking advantage of the abnormal migration of B. minimus-infected cockles to the sediment surface where they become more vulnerable to predators that are also the final hosts of many of these parasites.

  18. The effect of deleterious mutations on neutral molecular variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlesworth, B.; Morgan, M.T.; Charlesworth, D. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Selection against deleterious alleles maintained by mutation may cause a reduction in the amount of genetic variability at linked neutral sites. This is because a new neutral variant can remain in a large population for a long period of time only if it is maintained in gametes that are free of deleterious alleles, and hence are not destined for rapid elimination from the population by selection. Approximate formulas are derived for the reduction below classical neutral values resulting from such background selection against deleterious mutations, for the mean times of fixation and loss of new mutations, nucleotide site diversity, and number of segregating sites. These formulas apply to random-mating populations with no genetic recombination, and to populations reproducing exclusively asexually or by self-fertilization. For a given selection regime and mating system, the reduction is an exponential function of the total mutation rate to deleterious mutations for the section of the genome involved. Simulations show that the effect decreases rapidly with increasing recombination frequency or rate of outcrossing. The mean time to loss of new neutral mutations and the total number of segregating neutral sites are less sensitive to background selection than the other statistics, unless the population size is of the order of a hundred thousand or more. The stationary distribution of allele frequencies at the neutral sites is correspondingly skewed in favor of rare alleles, compared with the classical neutral result. Observed reductions in molecular variation in low recombination genomic regions of sufficiently large size, for instance in the centromere-proximal regions of Drosophila autosomes or in highly selfing plant populations, may be partly due to background selection against deleterious mutations. 58 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. A balanced IL-1β activity is required for host response to Citrobacter rodentium infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misagh Alipour

    Full Text Available Microbial sensing plays essential roles in the innate immune response to pathogens. In particular, NLRP3 forms a multiprotein inflammasome complex responsible for the maturation of interleukin (IL-1β. Our aim was to delineate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages, and the contribution of IL-1β to the host defense against Citrobacter rodentium acute infection in mice. Nlrp3(-/- and background C57BL/6 (WT mice were infected by orogastric gavage, received IL-1β (0.5 µg/mouse; ip on 0, 2, and 4 days post-infection (DPI, and assessed on 6 and 10 DPI. Infected Nlrp3(-/- mice developed severe colitis; IL-1β treatments reduced colonization, abrogated dissemination of bacteria to mesenteric lymph nodes, and protected epithelial integrity of infected Nlrp3(-/- mice. In contrast, IL-1β treatments of WT mice had an opposite effect with increased penetration of bacteria and barrier disruption. Microscopy showed reduced damage in Nlrp3(-/- mice, and increased severity of disease in WT mice with IL-1β treatments, in particular on 10 DPI. Secretion of some pro-inflammatory plasma cytokines was dissipated in Nlrp3(-/- compared to WT mice. IL-1β treatments elevated macrophage infiltration into infected crypts in Nlrp3(-/- mice, suggesting that IL-1β may improve macrophage function, as exogenous administration of IL-1β increased phagocytosis of C. rodentium by peritoneal Nlrp3(-/- macrophages in vitro. As well, the exogenous administration of IL-1β to WT peritoneal macrophages damaged the epithelial barrier of C. rodentium-infected polarized CMT-93 cells. Treatment of Nlrp3(-/- mice with IL-1β seems to confer protection against C. rodentium infection by reducing colonization, protecting epithelial integrity, and improving macrophage activity, while extraneous IL-1β appeared to be detrimental to WT mice. Together, these findings highlight the importance of balanced cytokine responses as IL-1β improved bacterial clearance in Nlrp3(-/- mice

  20. Toxoplasma exports dense granule proteins beyond the vacuole to the host cell nucleus and rewires the host genome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Tardieux, Isabelle; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most widespread apicomplexan parasite and occupies a large spectrum of niches by infecting virtually any warm-blooded animals. As an obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma has evolved a repertoire of strategies to fine-tune the cellular environment in an optimal way to promote growth and persistence in host tissues hence increasing the chance to be transmitted to new hosts. Short and long-term intracellular survival is associated with Toxoplasma ability to both evade the host deleterious immune defences and to stimulate a beneficial immune balance by governing host cell gene expression. It is only recently that parasite proteins responsible for driving these transcriptional changes have been identified. While proteins contained in the apical secretory Rhoptry organelle have already been identified as bona fide secreted effectors that divert host signalling pathways, recent findings revealed that dense granule proteins should be added to the growing list of effectors as they reach the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus and target various host cell pathways in the course of cell infection. Herein, we emphasize on a novel subfamily of dense granule residentproteins, exemplified with the GRA16 and GRA24 members we recently discovered as both are exported beyond the vacuole-containing parasites and reach the host cell nucleus to reshape the host genome expression.

  1. Muscovy duck reovirus infection rapidly activates host innate immune signaling and induces an effective antiviral immune response involving critical interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhilong; Luo, Guifeng; Wang, Quanxi; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yifan; Wei, Haitao; Wu, Baocheng; Huang, Shile; Chen, Ji-Long

    2015-02-25

    Muscovy duck reovirus (MDRV) is a highly pathogenic virus in waterfowl and causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry worldwide. Because the host innate immunity plays a key role in defending against virus invasion, more and more attentions have been paid to the immune response triggered by viral infection. Here we found that the genomic RNA of MDRV was able to rapidly induce the production of interferons (IFNs) in host. Mechanistically, MDRV infection induced robust expression of IFNs in host mainly through RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, we observed that silencing VISA expression in 293T cells could significantly inhibit the secretion of IFNs. Remarkably, the production of IFNs was reduced by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB or knocking down the expression of IRF-7. Furthermore, our study showed that treatment of 293T cells and Muscovy duck embryo fibroblasts with IFNs markedly impaired MDRV replication, suggesting that these IFNs play an important role in antiviral response during the MDRV infection. Importantly, we also detected the induced expression of RIG-I, MDA5, TLR3 and type I IFN in Muscovy ducks infected with MDRV at different time points post infection. The results from in vivo studies were consistent with those in 293T cells infected with MDRV. Taken together, our findings reveal that the host can resist MDRV invasion by activating innate immune response involving RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3-dependent signaling pathways that govern IFN production.

  2. Responses of the two‐spotted oak buprestid, Agrilus biguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to host tree volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Christine M; Sumner, Mary E; Caulfield, John C; Reed, Katy; Inward, Daegan JG; Leather, Simon R; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Denman, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Agrilus bigutattus (Fabricius) is a forest pest of increasing importance in the United Kingdom. The larvae damage weakened native oaks and are thought to contribute to premature tree death. Suspected links with acute oak decline (AOD) are not yet confirmed, but AOD‐predisposed trees appear to become more susceptible to A. biguttatus attack. Thus, management may be necessary for control of this insect. To explore the possibility of monitoring beetle populations by baited traps, the host tree volatiles regulating A. biguttatus–oak interactions were studied. RESULTS Biologically active volatile organic compounds in dynamic headspace extracts of oak foliage and bark were identified initially by coupled gas chromatography–electroantennography (GC‐EAG) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC‐MS), and the structures were confirmed by GC coinjection with authentic compounds. Of two synthetic blends of these compounds comprising the active leaf volatiles, the simpler one containing three components evoked strongly positive behavioural responses in four‐arm olfactometer tests with virgin females and males, although fresh leaf material was more efficient than the blend. The other blend, comprising a five‐component mixture made up of bark volatiles, proved to be as behaviourally active for gravid females as bark tissue. CONCLUSIONS These initial results on A. biguttatus chemical ecology reveal aspects of the role of attractive tree volatiles in the host‐finding of beetles and underpin the development of semiochemically based surveillance strategies for this forest insect. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26663022

  3. Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on CFTR chloride secretion and the host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-04-01

    In the healthy lung the opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is rapidly eliminated by mucociliary clearance, a process that is dependent on the activity of the CFTR anion channel that, in concert with a number of other transport proteins, regulates the volume and composition of the periciliary surface liquid. This fluid layer is essential to enable cilia to clear pathogens from the lungs. However, in cystic fibrosis (CF), mutations in the CFTR gene reduce Cl(-) and [Formula: see text] secretion, thereby decreasing periciliary surface liquid volume and mucociliary clearance of bacteria. In CF this leads to persistent infection with the opportunistic pathogen, P. aeruginosa, which is the cause of reduced lung function and death in ~95% of CF patients. Others and we have conducted studies to elucidate the effects of P. aeruginosa on wild-type and Phe508del-CFTR Cl(-) secretion as well as on the host immune response. These studies have demonstrated that Cif (CFTR inhibitory factor), a virulence factor secreted by P. aeruginosa, is associated with reduced lung function in CF and induces the ubiquitination and degradation of wt-CFTR as well as TAP1, which plays a key role in viral and bacterial antigen presentation. Cif also enhances the degradation of Phe508del-CFTR that has been rescued by ORKAMBI, a drug approved for CF patients homozygous for the Phe508del-CFTR mutation, thereby reducing drug efficacy. This review is based on the Hans Ussing Distinguished Lecture at the 2016 Experimental Biology Meeting given by the author.

  4. Conserved host response to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in human cell culture, mouse and macaque model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Jason E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding host response to influenza virus infection will facilitate development of better diagnoses and therapeutic interventions. Several different experimental models have been used as a proxy for human infection, including cell cultures derived from human cells, mice, and non-human primates. Each of these systems has been studied extensively in isolation, but little effort has been directed toward systematically characterizing the conservation of host response on a global level beyond known immune signaling cascades. Results In the present study, we employed a multivariate modeling approach to characterize and compare the transcriptional regulatory networks between these three model systems after infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype. Using this approach we identified functions and pathways that display similar behavior and/or regulation including the well-studied impact on the interferon response and the inflammasome. Our results also suggest a primary response role for airway epithelial cells in initiating hypercytokinemia, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses. We further demonstrate that we can use a transcriptional regulatory model from the human cell culture data to make highly accurate predictions about the behavior of important components of the innate immune system in tissues from whole organisms. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a global regulatory network modeling conserved host response between in vitro and in vivo models.

  5. Unique and shared responses of the gut microbiota to prolonged fasting: a comparative study across five classes of vertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kevin D; Amaya, James; Passement, Celeste A; Dearing, M Denise; McCue, Marshall D

    2014-12-01

    Many animals face unpredictable food sources and periods of prolonged fasting, which likely present significant challenges to gut microorganisms. While several studies have demonstrated that fasting impacts the gut microbiota, experiments have not been carried out in a comparative context. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to document changes in colonic and cecal microbiomes of animals representing five classes of vertebrates at four time points through prolonged fasting: tilapia, toads, geckos, quail, and mice. We found differences in the starvation-induced changes in the microbiome across host species and across gut regions. Microbial phylogenetic diversity increased as a result of fasting in the colons of fish, toads, and mice, while quail exhibited a decrease in diversity; geckos exhibited no change. Microbial diversity in the cecum decreased in fish and exhibited no change in mice. Alterations in relative abundances of microbial taxa varied across hosts. Fish exhibited the most significant changes due to fasting, while geckos maintained a stable community over 28 days of fasting. We uncovered several shared responses of the microbiota across hosts. For example, all tetrapods exhibited decreases in the abundances of Coprobacillus and Ruminococcus in response to fasting. We also discuss host-mediated physiological mechanisms that may underlie these community changes.

  6. A perspective on the evolution of germ-cell development and germinal mosaics of deleterious mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Ronny C; Balinski, Michael A; Bouzat, Juan L

    2015-10-01

    In many animals a small number of primordial germ cells (PGCs) are set aside early in development, mitosis and mitochondrial DNA syntheses are arrested, transcription is stopped or reduced, and the PGCs migrate later to the emerging gonads and become germ cells. What could be the evolutionary advantage of sequestering non-dividing PGCs early in development? A commonly cited advantage is a reduction in the number of new deleterious mutations that would occur if there were additional divisions in PGCs early in development. We would like to add to this advantage the fact that these additional mutations in PGCs give rise to germinal mosaics (i.e., premeiotic clusters of mutation) in multiple progeny of the same individual, thus having a larger detrimental effect on the evolutionary fitness of their carriers. Here, we reviewed published studies providing evidence that germinal mosaics of deleterious mutant alleles are not rare, occur for all types of genetic damage, and have been observed in all tested organisms and in nature. We propose the hypothesis that PGC sequestration during early animal development may have evolved in part in response to selection for preventing the occurrence of premeiotic clusters of deleterious mutant alleles, and describe a series of predictions that would allow the assessment of the potential role of germinal mosaics on the evolution of PGC sequestration.

  7. Role of an iron-dependent transcriptional regulator in the pathogenesis and host response to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Gupta

    Full Text Available Iron is a critical cofactor for many enzymes and is known to regulate gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae normally inhabits the upper respiratory mucosa but can also invade and replicate in lungs and blood. These anatomic sites vary considerably in both the quantity and form of available iron. The genome of serotype 4 pneumococcal strain TIGR4 encodes a putative iron-dependent transcriptional regulator (IDTR. A mutant deleted at idtr (Δidtr exhibited growth kinetics similar to parent strain TIGR4 in vitro and in mouse blood for up to 48 hours following infection. However, Δidtr was significantly attenuated in a murine model of sepsis. IDTR down-regulates the expression of ten characterized and putative virulence genes in nasopharyngeal colonization and pneumonia. The host cytokine response was significantly suppressed in sepsis with Δidtr. Since an exaggerated inflammatory response is associated with a poor prognosis in sepsis, the decreased inflammatory response could explain the increased survival with Δidtr. Our results suggest that IDTR, which is dispensable for pneumococcal growth in vitro, is associated with regulation of pneumococcal virulence in specific host environments. Additionally, IDTR ultimately modulates the host cytokine response and systemic inflammation that contributes to morbidity and mortality of invasive pneumococcal disease.

  8. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  9. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingru eLiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host’s immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory- immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine.

  10. Maternal androgens in avian brood parasites and their hosts: responses to parasitism and competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Caldwell; Wingfield, John C.; Fox, David M.; Walker, Brian G.; Thomley, Jill E

    2017-01-01

    In the coevolutionary dynamic of avian brood parasites and their hosts, maternal (or transgenerational) effects have rarely been investigated. We examined the potential role of elevated yolk testosterone in eggs of the principal brood parasite in North America, the brown-headed cowbird, and three of its frequent host species. Elevated maternal androgens in eggs are a common maternal effect observed in many avian species when breeding conditions are unfavorable. These steroids accelerate embryo development, shorten incubation period, increase nestling growth rate, and enhance begging vigor, all traits that can increase the survival of offspring. We hypothesized that elevated maternal androgens in host eggs are a defense against brood parasitism. Our second hypothesis was that elevated maternal androgens in cowbird eggs are a defense against intra-specific competition. For host species, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with parasitized nests of small species, those whose nest success is most reduced by cowbird parasitism. For cowbirds, we found that elevated yolk testosterone was correlated with eggs in multiply-parasitized nests, which indicate intra-specific competition for nests due to high cowbird density. We propose experimental work to further examine the use of maternal effects by cowbirds and their hosts.

  11. Cell host response to infection with novel human coronavirus EMC predicts potential antivirals and important differences with SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Laurence; Menachery, Vineet D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Sova, Pavel; Carter, Victoria S; Yount, Boyd L; Graham, Rachel L; Baric, Ralph S; Katze, Michael G

    2013-04-30

    A novel human coronavirus (HCoV-EMC) was recently identified in the Middle East as the causative agent of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resembling the illness caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Although derived from the CoV family, the two viruses are genetically distinct and do not use the same receptor. Here, we investigated whether HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV induce similar or distinct host responses after infection of a human lung epithelial cell line. HCoV-EMC was able to replicate as efficiently as SARS-CoV in Calu-3 cells and similarly induced minimal transcriptomic changes before 12 h postinfection. Later in infection, HCoV-EMC induced a massive dysregulation of the host transcriptome, to a much greater extent than SARS-CoV. Both viruses induced a similar activation of pattern recognition receptors and the interleukin 17 (IL-17) pathway, but HCoV-EMC specifically down-regulated the expression of several genes within the antigen presentation pathway, including both type I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. This could have an important impact on the ability of the host to mount an adaptive host response. A unique set of 207 genes was dysregulated early and permanently throughout infection with HCoV-EMC, and was used in a computational screen to predict potential antiviral compounds, including kinase inhibitors and glucocorticoids. Overall, HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV elicit distinct host gene expression responses, which might impact in vivo pathogenesis and could orient therapeutic strategies against that emergent virus. Identification of a novel coronavirus causing fatal respiratory infection in humans raises concerns about a possible widespread outbreak of severe respiratory infection similar to the one caused by SARS-CoV. Using a human lung epithelial cell line and global transcriptomic profiling, we identified differences in the host response between HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV. This enables rapid assessment of viral properties and the

  12. Dietary Fatty Acids and Immune Response to Food-Borne Bacterial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Functional innate and acquired immune responses are required to protect the host from pathogenic bacterial infections. Modulation of host immune functions may have beneficial or deleterious effects on disease outcome. Different types of dietary fatty acids have been shown to have variable effects on bacterial clearance and disease outcome through suppression or activation of immune responses. Therefore, we have chosen to review research across experimental models and food sources on the effec...

  13. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response: role of bacterial gene expression in temporal regulation of host defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie-Anne Walters

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4. Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways.

  14. The Impact of “Omic” and Imaging Technologies on Assessing the Host Immune Response to Biodefence Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Tree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interactions between host and pathogen is important for the development and assessment of medical countermeasures to infectious agents, including potential biodefence pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Ebola virus, and Francisella tularensis. This review focuses on technological advances which allow this interaction to be studied in much greater detail. Namely, the use of “omic” technologies (next generation sequencing, DNA, and protein microarrays for dissecting the underlying host response to infection at the molecular level; optical imaging techniques (flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy for assessing cellular responses to infection; and biophotonic imaging for visualising the infectious disease process. All of these technologies hold great promise for important breakthroughs in the rational development of vaccines and therapeutics for biodefence agents.

  15. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of the bark beetle Dendroctonus rhizophagus to volatiles from host pines and conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Ramírez, Claudia; Armendáriz-Toledano, Francisco; Macías-Sámano, Jorge E; Sullivan, Brian T; Zúñiga, Gerardo

    2012-05-01

    The bark beetle Dendroctonus rhizophagus is endemic to northwestern Mexico where it kills immature pines < 3 m tall. We report the first investigation of the chemical ecology of this pest of forest regeneration. We used GC-EAD to assess olfactory sensitivity of this species to volatile compounds from: resin of a major host, Pinus arizonica; mid/hindguts of single, gallery-initiating females; and mate-paired males within galleries of attacked host trees in the field. Antennae of both sexes responded to monoterpenes α-pinene, β-pinene and 3-carene as well as to the beetle-derived oxygenated monoterpenes fenchyl alcohol, myrtenal, cis-verbenol, trans-verbenol, verbenone, and myrtenol. These monoterpenes were quantified from pre-emerged D. rhizophagus adults forced to attack host tissue in the laboratory, and from individuals dissected from naturally-attacked hosts at different stages of colonization. In both bioassays, myrtenol and trans-verbenol were the most abundant volatiles, and trans-verbenol was the only one produced in significantly greater quantities by females than males in a naturally-colonized host. Two field experiments were performed to evaluate behavioral responses of D. rhizophagus to antennally-active monoterpenes. Results show that 3-carene was significantly attractive either alone or in a ternary (1:1:1) combination with α-pinene and β-pinene, whereas neither α-pinene nor β-pinene alone were attractive. None of the beetle-associated oxygenated monoterpenes enhanced the attractiveness of the ternary mixture of monoterpenes, while verbenone either alone or combined with the other five oxygenated terpenes reduced D. rhizophagus attraction to the ternary mixture. The results suggest that attraction of D. rhizophagus to the host tree P. arizonica is mediated especially by 3-carene. There was no conclusive evidence for an aggregation or sex attractant pheromone.

  16. Pathogenesis of amoebic encephalitis: Are the amoebae being credited to an 'inside job' done by the host immune response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul Mannan

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic free living amoeba like Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris are known to cause fatal "amoebic meningoencephalitis" by acquiring different route of entries to the brain. The host immune response to these protist pathogens differs from each another, as evidenced by the postmortem gross and microscopic findings from the brains of the affected patients. Cited with the expression of 'brain eating amoeba' when the infection is caused by N. fowleri, this expression is making its way into parasitology journals and books. The impression that it imparts is, as if the brain damage is substantially due to the enzymes and toxins produced by this amoeba. A detailed review of the literature, analysis of archived specimens and with our experimental assays, here we establish that with N. fowleri, Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., the infections result in an extensive brain damage that in fact is substantially caused by the host immune response rather than the amoeba. Due to the comparatively larger sizes of these pathogens and the prior exposure of the amoebal antigen to the human body, the host immune system launches an amplified response that not only breaches the blood brain barrier (BBB), but also becomes the major cause of brain damage in Amoebic meningoencephalitis. It is our understanding that for N. fowleri the host immune response is dominated by acute inflammatory cytokines and that, in cases of Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., it is the type IV hypersensitivity reaction that fundamentally not only contributes to disruption and leakiness of the blood brain barrier (BBB) but also causes the neuronal damage. The further intensification of brain damage is done by toxins and enzymes secreted by the amoeba, which causes the irreversible brain damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Silencing of host basal defense response-related gene expression increases susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Vasudevan; Sessa, Guido; Smart, Christine D

    2011-03-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is an actinomycete, causing bacterial wilt and canker disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to identify genes playing a role in host basal defense response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection using Nicotiana benthamiana as a model plant. A preliminary VIGS screen comprising 160 genes from tomato known to be involved in defense-related signaling identified a set of 14 genes whose suppression led to altered host-pathogen interactions. Expression of each of these genes and three additional targets was then suppressed in larger-scale VIGS experiments and the effect of silencing on development of wilt disease symptoms and bacterial growth during an N. benthamiana-C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis compatible interaction was determined. Disease susceptibility and in planta bacterial population size were enhanced by silencing genes encoding N. benthamiana homologs of ubiquitin activating enzyme, snakin-2, extensin-like protein, divinyl ether synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 2, and Pto-like kinase. The identification of genes having a role in the host basal defense-response to C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis advances our understanding of the plant responses activated by C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and raises possibilities for devising novel and effective molecular strategies to control bacterial canker and wilt in tomato.

  18. Data set of Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear proteome: Understanding the pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyalakshmi Kandhavelu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal keratitis is one of the leading causes of blindness in the tropical countries affecting individuals in their most productive age. The host immune response during this infection is poorly understood. We carried out comparative tear proteome analysis of Aspergillus flavus keratitis patients and uninfected controls. Proteome was separated into glycosylated and non-glycosylated fractions using lectin column chromatography before mass spectrometry. The data revealed the major processes activated in the human host in response to fungal infection and reflected in the tear. Extended analysis of this dataset presented here complements the research article entitled “Aspergillus flavus induced alterations in tear protein profile reveal pathogen-induced host response to fungal infection [1]” (Jeyalakhsmi Kandhavelu, Naveen Luke Demonte, Venkatesh Prajna Namperumalsamy, Lalitha Prajna, Chitra Thangavel, Jeya Maheshwari Jayapal, Dharmalingam Kuppamuthu, 2016. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE:PXD003825.

  19. Effects of Coralliophila violacea on tissue loss in the scleractinian corals Porites spp. depend on host response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo, L.; Work, Thierry M.; Miller, R.L.; Lozada-Misa, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated interactions between the corallivorous gastropod Coralliophila violacea and its preferred hosts Porites spp. Our objectives were to experimentally determine whether tissue loss could progress in Porites during or after Coralliophila predation on corals with and without tissue loss and to histologically document snail predation. In 64% of feeding scars, tissue regenerated within 3 wk, leaving no trace of predation. However, in roughly 28% of scars, lesions progressed to subacute tissue loss resembling white syndrome. In feeding experiments, scars from snails previously fed diseased tissue developed progressive tissue loss twice as frequently as scars from snails previously fed healthy tissue. Scars from previously healthy-fed snails were 3 times as likely to heal as those from previously diseased-fed snails. Histology revealed marked differences in host responses to snails; P. cylindrica manifested a robust inflammatory response with fewer secondary colonizing organisms such as algae, sponges, and helminths, whereas P. rus showed no evident inflammation and more secondary colonization. We conclude that lesion progression associated with Coralliophila may be associated with secondary colonization of coral tissues damaged by predator-induced trauma and necrosis. Importantly, variation at the cellular level should be considered when explaining interspecific differences in host responses in corals impacted by phenomena such as predation.

  20. Molecular Analysis of Host Immune Responses to the Resident Colonic Microflora

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    B Bahrami

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colonic mucosa. UC results from loss of tolerance towards the normal gut microbiota, leading to chronic mucosal inflammation. UC is incurable, and current therapies involve the use of immunosuppressant and anti-inflammatory drugs, steroids, and in extreme cases, surgery. UC treatments have a number of limitations, and can induce non-specific suppression of the host immune response, resulting in undesirable side effects, while having little effect on mucosal bacterial populations that are involved in disease aetiology. Manipulation of the composition of the microbiota to change mucosal cytokine profiles, by probiotics, may provide an alternative therapy. In vitro modeling was used to investigate the induction of immuno-modulatory cytokines in two human epithelial intestinal cell lines, Caco2 and HT-29. The cells were co-cultured for 3 and 8 hours with a range of mucosal bacteria: Clostridium clostridiiforme, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bif. longum, Bacteroides fragilis, Bact. thetaiotamicron and Bact. vulgatus. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4, -10, -18 and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFb-1, -2, -3 were developed, and used to assess cytokine gene expression. Results were normalised for cell number against b-actin and GAPDH. High basal levels of IL-18 mRNA were detected in both cell lines. Caco2 expressed higher levels of TGFb_isoforms than HT-29 cells. Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Bact. vulgatus and Bif. longum up-regulated IL18 in HT-29, whereas Bact. fragilis and Bact. thetaiotamicron down-regulated this cytokine. All bacterial isolates down-regulated IL-18 mRNA levels in Caco2, and all bacterial isolates except Bact. fragilis and Bact. thetaiotamicron significantly up-regulated TGFb-1. There was little change in

  1. The response of the host microcirculation to bacterial sepsis: Does the pathogen matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Legrand (Matthieu); E. Klijn (Elko); D. Payen (Didier); C. Ince (Can)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSepsis results from the interaction between a host and an invading pathogen. The microcirculatory dysfunction is now considered central in the development of the often deadly multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in septic shock patients. The microcirculatory flow shutdown and flow shuntin

  2. Mutualism effectiveness and vertical transmission of symbiotic fungal endophytes in response to host genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundel, Pedro E; Martínez-Ghersa, María A; Omacini, Marina; Cuyeu, Romina; Pagano, Elba; Ríos, Raúl; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2012-12-01

    Certain species of the Pooideae subfamily develop stress tolerance and herbivory resistance through symbiosis with vertically transmitted, asexual fungi. This symbiosis is specific, and genetic factors modulate the compatibility between partners. Although gene flow is clearly a fitness trait in allogamous grasses, because it injects hybrid vigor and raw material for evolution, it could reduce compatibility and thus mutualism effectiveness. To explore the importance of host genetic background in modulating the performance of symbiosis, Lolium multiflorum plants, infected and noninfected with Neotyphodium occultans, were crossed with genetically distant plants of isolines (susceptible and resistant to diclofop-methyl herbicide) bred from two cultivars and exposed to stress. The endophyte improved seedling survival in genotypes susceptible to herbicide, while it had a negative effect on one of the genetically resistant crosses. Mutualism provided resistance to herbivory independently of the host genotype, but this effect vanished under stress. While no endophyte effect was observed on host reproductive success, it was increased by interpopulation plant crosses. Neither gene flow nor herbicide had an important impact on endophyte transmission. Host fitness improvements attributable to gene flow do not appear to result in direct conflict with mutualism while this seems to be an important mechanism for the ecological and contemporary evolution of the symbiotum.

  3. Towards identifying host cell-type specific response patterns to bacterial endosymbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavrilovic, Srdjan

    The establishment of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation (SNF) is a complex process. It requires highly sophisticated signal exchanges between host plant and bacteria in order to fine-tune the molecular mechanisms necessary for optimal performance of the symbiosis, which ultimately determines...

  4. Impact of Lactobacillus plantarum Sortase on Target Protein Sorting, Gastrointestinal Persistence, and Host Immune Response Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remus, Daniela M.; Bongers, Roger S.; Meijerink, Marjolein; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Poolman, Bert; de Vos, Paul; Wells, Jerry M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A.

    Sortases are transpeptidases that couple surface proteins to the peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria, and several sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs) have been demonstrated to be crucial for the interactions of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria with their hosts. Here, we studied the role of

  5. Signalome-wide assessment of host cell response to hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Wu, Jianmin; Simpson, Kaylene J; Daly, Roger J; Netter, Hans J; Baumert, Thomas F; Doerig, Christian

    2017-05-08

    Host cell signalling during infection with intracellular pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we report on the use of antibody microarray technology to detect variations in the expression levels and phosphorylation status of host cell signalling proteins during hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Following transfection with HCV RNA, the JNK and NF-κB pathways are suppressed, while the JAK/STAT5 pathway is activated; furthermore, components of the apoptosis and cell cycle control machineries are affected in the expression and/or phosphorylation status. RNAi-based hit validation identifies components of the JAK/STAT, NF-κB, MAPK and calcium-induced pathways as modulators of HCV replication. Selective chemical inhibition of one of the identified targets, the JNK activator kinase MAP4K2, does impair HCV replication. Thus this study provides a comprehensive picture of host cell pathway mobilization by HCV and uncovers potential therapeutic targets. The strategy of identifying targets for anti-infective intervention within the host cell signalome can be applied to any intracellular pathogen.

  6. Viral persistence, liver disease and host response in Hepatitis C-like virus rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trivedi, Sheetal; Murthy, Satyapramod; Sharma, Himanshu

    2017-01-01

    The lack of a relevant, tractable, and immunocompetent animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has severely impeded investigations of viral persistence, immunity and pathogenesis. In the absence of immunocompetent models with robust HCV infection, homolog hepaciviruses in their natural host coul......, immunity and pathogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  7. Host responses to interspecific brood parasitism: a by-product of adaptations to conspecific parasitism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Why have birds evolved the ability to reject eggs? Typically, foreign egg discrimination is interpreted as evidence that interspecific brood parasitism (IP) has selected for the host’s ability to recognize and eliminate foreign eggs. Fewer studies explore the alternative hypothesis that rejection of interspecific eggs is a by-product of host defenses, evolved against conspecific parasitism (CP). We performed a large scale study with replication across taxa (two congeneric Turdus thrushes), space (populations), time (breeding seasons), and treatments (three types of experimental eggs), using a consistent design of egg rejection experiments (n = 1057 nests; including controls), in areas with potential IP either present (Europe; native populations) or absent (New Zealand; introduced populations). These comparisons benefited from the known length of allopatry (one and a half centuries), with no gene flow between native and introduced populations, which is rarely available in host-parasite systems. Results Hosts rejected CP at unusually high rates for passerines (up to 60%). CP rejection rates were higher in populations with higher conspecific breeding densities and no risks of IP, supporting the CP hypothesis. IP rejection rates did not covary geographically with IP risk, contradicting the IP hypothesis. High egg rejection rates were maintained in the relatively long-term isolation from IP despite non-trivial rejection costs and errors. Conclusions These egg rejection patterns, combined with recent findings that these thrushes are currently unsuitable hosts of the obligate parasitic common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), are in agreement with the hypothesis that the rejection of IP is a by-product of fine-tuned egg discrimination evolved due to CP. Our study highlights the importance of considering both IP and CP simultaneously as potential drivers in the evolution of egg discrimination, and illustrates how populations introduced to novel ecological contexts

  8. Quantitative Label-Free Phosphoproteomics Reveals Differentially Regulated Protein Phosphorylation Involved in West Nile Virus-Induced Host Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jun; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Chen, Zheng; Zhu, Bibo; He, Wen; Xu, Qiuping; Wei, Yanming; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Liu, Rong; Cao, Shengbo

    2015-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) can cause neuro-invasive and febrile illness that may be fatal to humans. The production of inflammatory cytokines is key to mediating WNV-induced immunopathology in the central nervous system. Elucidating the host factors utilized by WNV for productive infection would provide valuable insights into the evasion strategies used by this virus. Although attempts have been made to determine these host factors, proteomic data depicting WNV-host protein interactions are limited. We applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for label-free, quantitative phosphoproteomics to systematically investigate the global phosphorylation events induced by WNV infection. Quantifiable changes to 1,657 phosphoproteins were found; of these, 626 were significantly upregulated and 227 were downregulated at 12 h postinfection. The phosphoproteomic data were subjected to gene ontology enrichment analysis, which returned the inflammation-related spliceosome, ErbB, mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling pathways. We used short interfering RNAs to decrease the levels of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, bifunctional polynucleotide phosphatase/kinase, and retinoblastoma 1 and found that the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) is significantly decreased in WNV-infected U251 cells, which in turn led to markedly reduced inflammatory cytokine production. Our results provide a better understanding of the host response to WNV infection and highlight multiple targets for the development of antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapies.

  9. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  10. Microbial pathogens trigger host DNA double-strand breaks whose abundance is reduced by plant defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqi Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses and DNA damage repair are two fundamental processes that have been characterized extensively, but the links between them remain largely unknown. We report that multiple bacterial, fungal and oomycete plant pathogen species induce double-strand breaks (DSBs in host plant DNA. DNA damage detected by histone γ-H2AX abundance or DNA comet assays arose hours before the disease-associated necrosis caused by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Necrosis-inducing paraquat did not cause detectable DSBs at similar stages after application. Non-pathogenic E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria also did not induce DSBs. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is common during plant immune responses, ROS are known DNA damaging agents, and the infection-induced host ROS burst has been implicated as a cause of host DNA damage in animal studies. However, we found that DSB formation in Arabidopsis in response to P. syringae infection still occurs in the absence of the infection-associated oxidative burst mediated by AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Plant MAMP receptor stimulation or application of defense-activating salicylic acid or jasmonic acid failed to induce a detectable level of DSBs in the absence of introduced pathogens, further suggesting that pathogen activities beyond host defense activation cause infection-induced DNA damage. The abundance of infection-induced DSBs was reduced by salicylic acid and NPR1-mediated defenses, and by certain R gene-mediated defenses. Infection-induced formation of γ-H2AX still occurred in Arabidopsis atr/atm double mutants, suggesting the presence of an alternative mediator of pathogen-induced H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, pathogenic microorganisms can induce plant DNA damage. Plant defense mechanisms help to suppress rather than promote this damage, thereby contributing to the maintenance of genome integrity in somatic tissues.

  11. Improved Detection of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis Arising during Leukemia Treatment Using a Panel of Host Response Proteins and Fungal Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan R Brasier

    Full Text Available Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is an opportunistic fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy for hematological malignancy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or other forms of immunosuppression. In this group, Aspergillus infections account for the majority of deaths due to mold pathogens. Although early detection is associated with improved outcomes, current diagnostic regimens lack sensitivity and specificity. Patients undergoing chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation were enrolled in a multi-site prospective observational trial. Proven and probable IPA cases and matched controls were subjected to discovery proteomics analyses using a biofluid analysis platform, fractionating plasma into reproducible protein and peptide pools. From 556 spots identified by 2D gel electrophoresis, 66 differentially expressed post-translationally modified plasma proteins were identified in the leukemic subgroup only. This protein group was rich in complement components, acute-phase reactants and coagulation factors. Low molecular weight peptides corresponding to abundant plasma proteins were identified. A candidate marker panel of host response (9 plasma proteins, 4 peptides, fungal polysaccharides (galactomannan, and cell wall components (β-D glucan were selected by statistical filtering for patients with leukemia as a primary underlying diagnosis. Quantitative measurements were developed to qualify the differential expression of the candidate host response proteins using selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assays, and then applied to a separate cohort of 57 patients with leukemia. In this verification cohort, a machine learning ensemble-based algorithm, generalized pathseeker (GPS produced a greater case classification accuracy than galactomannan (GM or host proteins alone. In conclusion, Integration of host response proteins with GM improves the diagnostic detection of probable IPA in patients

  12. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-02-17

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora.

  13. The adaptive response of bacterial food-borne pathogens in the environment, host and food: Implications for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Broussolle, Véronique; Colin, Pierre; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Prieto, Miguel

    2015-11-20

    Bacteria are constantly faced to stress situations in their ecological niches, the food and the host gastrointestinal tract. The capacity to detect and respond to surrounding changes is crucial for bacterial pathogens to survive or grow in changing environments. To this purpose, cells have evolved various sophisticated networks designed to protect against stressors or repair damage caused by them. Challenges can occur during production of foods when subjected to processing, and after food ingestion when confronted with host defensive barriers. Some pathogenic bacteria have shown the capacity to develop stable resistance against extreme conditions within a defined genomic context and a limited number of generations. On the other hand, bacteria can also respond to adverse conditions in a transient manner, through the so-called stress tolerance responses. Bacterial stress tolerance responses include both structural and physiological modifications in the cell and are mediated by complex genetic regulatory machinery. Major aspects in the adaptive response are the sensing mechanisms, the characterization of cell defensive systems, such as the operation of regulatory proteins (e.g. RpoS), the induction of homeostatic and repair systems, the synthesis of shock response proteins, and the modifications of cell membranes, particularly in their fatty acid composition and physical properties. This article reviews certain strategies used by food-borne bacteria to respond to particular stresses (acid, cold stress, extreme pressure) in a permanent or transient manner and discusses the implications that such adaptive responses pose for food safety.

  14. Modelling cross-reactivity and memory in the cellular adaptive immune response to influenza infection in the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ada W C; Cao, Pengxing; Heffernan, Jane M; McVernon, Jodie; Quinn, Kylie M; La Gruta, Nicole L; Laurie, Karen L; McCaw, James M

    2017-01-21

    The cellular adaptive immune response plays a key role in resolving influenza infection. Experiments where individuals are successively infected with different strains within a short timeframe provide insight into the underlying viral dynamics and the role of a cross-reactive immune response in resolving an acute infection. We construct a mathematical model of within-host influenza viral dynamics including three possible factors which determine the strength of the cross-reactive cellular adaptive immune response: the initial naive T cell number, the avidity of the interaction between T cells and the epitopes presented by infected cells, and the epitope abundance per infected cell. Our model explains the experimentally observed shortening of a second infection when cross-reactivity is present, and shows that memory in the cellular adaptive immune response is necessary to protect against a second infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jolene; O’Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms. PMID:27782090

  16. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Carlson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever (ASF is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV. There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4 virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi. This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms.

  17. The Bacterial Second Messenger Cyclic di-GMP Regulates Brucella Pathogenesis and Leads to Altered Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mike; Harms, Jerome S; Marim, Fernanda M; Armon, Leah; Hall, Cherisse L; Liu, Yi-Ping; Banai, Menachem; Oliveira, Sergio C; Splitter, Gary A; Smith, Judith A

    2016-12-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, a chronic debilitating disease significantly impacting global health and prosperity. Much remains to be learned about how Brucella spp. succeed in sabotaging immune host cells and how Brucella spp. respond to environmental challenges. Multiple types of bacteria employ the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) to coordinate responses to shifting environments. To determine the role of c-di-GMP in Brucella physiology and in shaping host-Brucella interactions, we utilized c-di-GMP regulatory enzyme deletion mutants. Our results show that a ΔbpdA phosphodiesterase mutant producing excess c-di-GMP displays marked attenuation in vitro and in vivo during later infections. Although c-di-GMP is known to stimulate the innate sensor STING, surprisingly, the ΔbpdA mutant induced a weaker host immune response than did wild-type Brucella or the low-c-di-GMP guanylate cyclase ΔcgsB mutant. Proteomics analysis revealed that c-di-GMP regulates several processes critical for virulence, including cell wall and biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and the type IV secretion system. Finally, ΔbpdA mutants exhibited altered morphology and were hypersensitive to nutrient-limiting conditions. In summary, our results indicate a vital role for c-di-GMP in allowing Brucella to successfully navigate stressful and shifting environments to establish intracellular infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Feeding aggregation of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Ixodidae): benefits and costs in the contest with host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Hails, R S; Cui, W W; Nuttall, P A

    2001-11-01

    Gregariousness can be advantageous in interspecific competition while intraspecific competition may favour solitude. We examined feeding behaviour of the ixodid tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, in the context of interspecific (tick-host) and intraspecific (tick-tick) competition. Such competition is mediated through host rejection responses to tick infestation to which ticks respond by secreting immunodulatory saliva. We observed that group feeding adults increased their blood-feeding rate, reducing the time to mating and repletion, compared with individual feeding of paired adults. The benefits of feeding aggregation indicate direct reciprocity between ticks, most likely resulting from the shared activities of their bioactive saliva. However, fast-feeding ticks appeared to impair blood-feeding success of slow-feeding females during group feeding. This may be explained by the faster feeders exacerbating host responses on detachment that are then directed against the slower feeders. As female fecundity is generally proportional to the size of the bloodmeal, there will be a selection pressure to feed gregariously. Greater understanding of the benefits and costs of feeding aggregation may help to improve tick control strategies.

  19. Minimal change disease in graft versus host disease: a podocyte response to the graft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskey, Janna; Rivard, Chris; Myint, Han; Lucia, Scott; Smith, Maxwell; Shimada, Michiko; Ishimoto, Takuji; Araya, Carlos; Garin, Eduardo H; Johnson, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation. It has been suggested that nephrotic syndrome may represent a limited form of graft-versus-host disease although the pathological link between these two entities remains unclear. In this paper, we report a case of a 61-year-old female who underwent nonmyeloablative allogenic stem cell transplantation for T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and subsequently developed biopsy proven minimal change disease shortly after cessation of her immunosuppression therapy. Urinary CD80 was markedly elevated during active disease and disappeared following corticosteroid-induced remission. We hypothesize that alloreactive donor T cells target the kidney and induce podocyte expression of CD80 that results in proteinuria from limited 'graft versus host' disease.

  20. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations Near Sexually Antagonistic Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Connallon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation generates a steady supply of genetic variation that, while occasionally useful for adaptation, is more often deleterious for fitness. Recent research has emphasized that the fitness effects of mutations often differ between the sexes, leading to important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of genetic variation and long-term population viability. Some forms of sex-specific selection—i.e., stronger purifying selection in males than females—can help purge a population’s load of female-harming mutations and promote population growth. Other scenarios—e.g., sexually antagonistic selection, in which mutations that harm females are beneficial for males—inflate genetic loads and potentially dampen population viability. Evolutionary processes of sexual antagonism and purifying selection are likely to impact the evolutionary dynamics of different loci within a genome, yet theory has mostly ignored the potential for interactions between such loci to jointly shape the evolutionary genetic basis of female and male fitness variation. Here, we show that sexually antagonistic selection at a locus tends to elevate the frequencies of deleterious alleles at tightly linked loci that evolve under purifying selection. Moreover, haplotypes that segregate for different sexually antagonistic alleles accumulate different types of deleterious mutations. Haplotypes that carry female-benefit sexually antagonistic alleles preferentially accumulate mutations that are primarily male harming, whereas male-benefit haplotypes accumulate mutations that are primarily female harming. The theory predicts that sexually antagonistic selection should shape the genomic organization of genetic variation that differentially impacts female and male fitness, and contribute to sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fitness variation.

  1. Effects of juvenile host density and food availability on adult immune response, parasite resistance and virulence in a Daphnia-parasite system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine N Schoebel

    Full Text Available Host density can increase infection rates and reduce host fitness as increasing population density enhances the risk of becoming infected either through increased encounter rate or because host condition may decline. Conceivably, potential hosts could take high host density as a cue to up-regulate their defence systems. However, as host density usually covaries with food availability, it is difficult to examine the importance of host density in isolation. Thus, we performed two full-factorial experiments that varied juvenile densities of Daphnia magna (a freshwater crustacean and food availability independently. We also included a simulated high-density treatment, where juvenile experimental animals were kept in filtered media that previously maintained Daphnia at high-density. Upon reaching adulthood, we exposed the Daphnia to their sterilizing bacterial parasite, Pasteuria ramosa, and examined how the juvenile treatments influenced the likelihood and severity of infection (Experiment I and host immune investment (Experiment II. Neither juvenile density nor food treatments affected the likelihood of infection; however, well-fed hosts that were well-fed as juveniles produced more offspring prior to sterilization than their less well-fed counterparts. By contrast, parasite growth was independent of host juvenile resources or host density. Parasite-exposed hosts had a greater number of circulating haemocytes than controls (i.e., there was a cellular immune response, but the magnitude of immune response was not mediated by food availability or host density. These results suggest that density dependent effects on disease arise primarily through correlated changes in food availability: low food could limit parasitism and potentially curtail epidemics by reducing both the host's and parasite's reproduction as both depend on the same food.

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of the host response to an iridovirus infection in Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yuding; Chang, Ming Xian; Ma, Jie; LaPatra, Scott E.; Hu, Yi Wei; Huang, Lili; Nie, Pin; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-01-01

    International audience; AbstractThe emergence of an infectious viral disease caused by the Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV) has led to substantial economic losses. However, no more molecular information is available for the understanding of the mechanisms associated with virus–host interaction. In this study, de novo sequencing was used to obtain abundant high-quality ESTs and investigate differentially-expressed genes in the spleen of Chinese giant salamanders that were either infe...

  3. Tissue-specific patterning of host innate immune responses by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Russell E N; Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; DeDent, Andrea C; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory cytotoxins are prominent virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial sepsis, skin infection, and pneumonia. S. aureus α-toxin is a pore-forming toxin that utilizes a widely expressed receptor, ADAM10, to injure the host epithelium, endothelium, and immune cells. As each host tissue is characterized by a unique composition of resident cells and recruited immune cells, the outcome of α-toxin-mediated injury may depend on the infected tissue environment. Utilizing myeloid lineage-specific Adam10 knockout mice, we show that α-toxin exerts tissue-specific effects on innate immunity to staphylococcal infection. Loss of ADAM10 expression exacerbates skin infection, yet affords protection against lethal pneumonia. These diverse outcomes are not related to altered immune cell recruitment, but rather correlate with a defect in toxin-induced IL-1β production. Extension of these studies through analysis of ADAM10 double-knockout mice affecting both the myeloid lineage and either the skin or lung epithelium highlight the prominence of toxin-induced injury to the epithelium in governing the outcome of infection. Together, these studies provide evidence of tissue specificity of pore-forming cytotoxin action in the modulation of host immunity, and illustrate that the outcome of infection is a collective manifestation of all effects of the toxin within the tissue microenvironment.

  4. Response of xylem-feeding leafhopper to host plant species and plant quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A M; Brodbeck, B V; Strong, D R

    1996-04-01

    Carneocephala floridana, an oligophagous leafhopper that inhabits the salt marshes along the coasts of Florida, utilizesBorrichia frutescens andSalicornia virginica (both herbs) as primary summer hosts, but uses two grasses,Distichlis spicata andSpartina alterniflora, during the winter. We tested whether the seasonal patterns of abundance and apparent host-switching byCarneocephala are related to plant quality. In laboratory experiments, nymphs ofCarneocephala reared on nonfertilized control plants of the two herbs produced adults that were similar in size to field-collected insects. OnlyCarneocephala raised at the lowest densities onSpartina andDistichlis from the highest fertilizer treatments produced adults similar in body mass to those reared on nonfertilizedBorrichia andSalicornia. ForDistichlis, superior quality (high foliar nitrogen) plants were able to mitigate the negative effect of nymphal crowding on adult body mass. However, laboratory fertilization regimes produced an extremely high foliar nitrogen content in the two herbs and the organic acid concentration in the xylem fluid ofBorrichia, the only host species suitable for xylem fluid extraction, increased 2.5- to 3-fold. Total amino acid concentration in the xylem fluid of fertilizedBorrichia decreased compared to nonfertilized plants.Carneocephala demonstrated reduced feeding efficiencies on high nitrogenBorrichia. Our results suggest thatCarneocephala prefers, and performs better on, plants with high nitrogen content up to a threshold, beyond which high nitrogen levels result in reduced leafhopper feeding rates and assimilation efficiencies.

  5. MicroRNAs in the host response to viral infections of veterinary importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Samir Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of small regulatory non-coding RNAs has been an exciting advance in the field of genomics. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous RNA molecules, approximately 22 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression, mostly at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNA profiling technologies have made it possible to identify and quantify novel miRNAs and to study their regulation and potential roles in disease pathogenesis. Although miRNAs have been extensively investigated in viral infections of humans, their implications in viral diseases affecting animals of veterinary importance are much less understood. The number of annotated miRNAs in different animal species is growing continuously, and novel roles in regulating host-pathogen interactions are being discovered, for instance miRNA-mediated augmentation of viral transcription and replication. In this review, we present an overview of synthesis and function of miRNAs and an update on the current state of research on host-encoded miRNAs in the genesis of viral infectious diseases in their natural animal host as well as in selected in vivo and in vitro laboratory models.

  6. Dendroctonus armandi (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) cytochrome P450s display tissue specificity and responses to host terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lulu; Ma, Mingyuan; Gao, Guanqun; Chen, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Bark beetles oxidize the defensive allelochemicals of their host trees both to detoxify them and convert them into components of their pheromone systems which were catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and occur in different tissues of the insect. We study P450 genes in the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi), and some bio-information analysis was done for the full-length deduced amino acid sequences. The tissue specificity of these P450 genes was determined in three tissues (antenna, gut and reproductive organs). Differential expression of the P450 genes was observed between sexes, and within these significant differences exposed to stimuli (α-pinene (1:1 racemic mix), (S)-(-)-α-pinene, (S)-(-)-β-pinene, (+)-3-carene, (±)-limonene and turpentine oil) at 24h. Increased expression of P450 genes suggested that they play a role in the detoxification of monoterpenes released by the host trees. The different transcript accumulation patterns of these bark beetle P450 genes provided insight into ecological interactions of D. armandi with its host pine.

  7. Insight into bacterial virulence mechanisms against host immune response via the Yersinia pestis-human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-11-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP.

  8. Host Immune Responses in HIV-1 Infection: The Emerging Pathogenic Role of Siglecs and Their Clinical Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulak, Joanna; Di Vito, Clara; Zaghi, Elisa; Mavilio, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms employed by HIV-1 to escape immune responses still represents one of the major tasks required for the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting a disease still lacking a definitive cure. Host innate immune responses against HIV-1 are key in the early phases of the infection as they could prevent the development and the establishment of two hallmarks of the infection: chronic inflammation and viral reservoirs. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) belong to a family of transmembrane proteins able to dampen host immune responses and set appropriate immune activation thresholds upon ligation with their natural ligands, the sialylated carbohydrates. This immune-modulatory function is also targeted by many pathogens that have evolved to express sialic acids on their surface in order to escape host immune responses. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) is extensively covered by carbohydrates playing active roles in life cycle of the virus. Indeed, besides forming a protecting shield from antibody recognition, this coat of N-linked glycans interferes with the folding of viral glycoproteins and enhances virus infectivity. In particular, the sialic acid residues present on gp120 can bind Siglec-7 on natural killer and monocytes/macrophages and Siglec-1 on monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. The interactions between these two members of the Siglec family and the sialylated glycans present on HIV-1 envelope either induce or increase HIV-1 entry in conventional and unconventional target cells, thus contributing to viral dissemination and disease progression. In this review, we address the impact of Siglecs in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and discuss how they could be employed as clinic and therapeutic targets.

  9. Complexity of the Microglial Activation Pathways that Drive Innate Host Responses During Lethal Alphavirus Encephalitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufer Esen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microglia express multiple TLRs (Toll-like receptors and provide important host defence against viruses that invade the CNS (central nervous system. Although prior studies show these cells become activated during experimental alphavirus encephalitis in mice to generate cytokines and chemokines that influence virus replication, tissue inflammation and neuronal survival, the specific PRRs (pattern recognition receptors and signalling intermediates controlling microglial activation in this setting remain unknown. To investigate these questions directly in vivo, mice ablated of specific TLR signalling molecules were challenged with NSV (neuroadapted Sindbis virus and CNS viral titres, inflammatory responses and clinical outcomes followed over time. To approach this problem specifically in microglia, the effects of NSV on primary cells derived from the brains of wild-type and mutant animals were characterized in vitro. From the standpoint of the virus, microglial activation required viral uncoating and an intact viral genome; inactivated virus particles did not elicit measurable microglial responses. At the level of the target cell, NSV triggered multiple PRRs in microglia to produce a broad range of inflammatory mediators via non-overlapping signalling pathways. In vivo, disease survival was surprisingly independent of TLR-driven responses, but still required production of type-I IFN (interferon to control CNS virus replication. Interestingly, the ER (endoplasmic reticulum protein UNC93b1 facilitated host survival independent of its known effects on endosomal TLR signalling. Taken together, these data show that alphaviruses activate microglia via multiple PRRs, highlighting the complexity of the signalling networks by which CNS host responses are elicited by these infections.

  10. Oviposition response of the moth Lobesia botrana to sensory cues from a host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasin, Marco; Lucchi, Andrea; Ioriatti, Claudio; Mraihi, Mohamed; De Cristofaro, Antonio; Boger, Zvi; Anfora, Gianfranco

    2011-09-01

    The grapevine moth Lobesia botrana is a generalist insect herbivore and grapevine is one of its hosts. Previous studies have shown that insects use their olfactory abilities to locate hosts from a distance; whereas contact chemoreception mediates the stimulation of oviposition after landing. Little is known about the role of olfaction and its interactions with contact chemoreception and vision once the insect lands on the plant. Plant volatile compounds can be sensed by host-searching insects located some distance from the plant and insects sense both volatile and nonvolatile cues after landing on a plant. In the present study, we investigated the effects of these volatile and nonvolatile cues on the oviposition behavior of L. botrana. A behavioral bioassay with choice was developed in which insects were offered each sensory cue either alone or in combination with one or 2 other cues. Females were allowed to choose between a device with the stimulus and a blank device. Results were evaluated in terms of 2 parameters: quantity of eggs laid (egg counts) and preference for the stimulus (ODI: oviposition discrimination index). Our results suggest that olfaction significantly affects egg quantity and that there is significant synergism between olfaction and vision, in terms of their combined effect on egg quantity. In terms of preference (ODI), our results did not show a significant preference for any single cue; the highest ODI was measured for the full-cue stimulus (olfaction, vision, and contact). For ODI, a significant interaction was observed between olfaction and vision and a nearly significant interaction was observed between the olfactory and contact cues. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of plant sensory cues on the oviposition behavior of L. botrana.

  11. Towards identifying host cell-type specific response patterns to bacterial endosymbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavrilovic, Srdjan

    of view, available techniques have relied heavily on whole organ analyses that disregard specificities of individual cell types. To address this issue we aimed to develop a technology for comparative global analysis of mature mRNA and small RNA populations at the cell type specific level in the model...... plant Lotus japonicus. A powerful approach referred to here as Defined Expression and RNA Affinity co-Purification (DERAP) was developed to study gene expression and small RNA populations in the host roots during early phases of signal exchange at the cell-type level. As a basis for DERAP analysis...

  12. Characterization of the host response to the myxosporean parasite, Ceratomyxa shasta (Noble), by histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunological techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Smith, C.E.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The tissue response of Salmo gairdneri Richardson, against the myxosporean parasite. Ceratomyxa shasta (Noble), was investigated using histological techniques, scanning electron microscopy and immunological methods. The progress of infection in C. shasta-susceptible and resistant steelhead and rainbow trout was examined by standard histological techniques and by indirect fluorescent antibody methods using monoclonal antibodies directed against C. shasta antigens. Trophozoite stages were first observed in the posterior intestine and there was indication that resistance was due to the inability of the parasite to penetrate this tissue rather than to an inflammatory response. Examination of a severely infected intestine by scanning electron microscopy showed extensive destruction of the mucosal folds of the posterior intestine. Western blotting and indirect fluorescent antibody techniques were used to investigate the immunological component of the host response. No antibodies specific for C. shasta were detected by either method.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of the host response to early stage salmonid alphavirus (SAV-1) infection in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Tharangani K; Bron, James E; Thompson, Kim D; Taggart, John B; Adams, Alexandra; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Richards, Randolph H

    2012-05-01

    Salmon pancreas disease, caused by salmonid alphavirus (SAV) of the family Togaviridae, is an economically important disease affecting farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in Scotland, Norway, and Ireland. The virus causes characteristic lesions in the pancreas, heart, kidney and skeletal muscle of infected fish. The mechanisms responsible for the pathology and the immune responses elicited in infected Atlantic salmon are not fully understood. A microarray-based study was therefore performed to evaluate the host transcriptomic response during the early stages of an experimentally-induced SAV-1 infection. Atlantic salmon parr were injected intra-peritoneally with viral cell culture supernatant or cell culture supernatant without virus. RNA, extracted from head kidney sampled from infected and control fish at 1, 3 and 5 days post-injection (d.p.i.), was interrogated with the 17 k TRAITS/SGP cDNA microarray. The greatest number of significantly differentially expressed genes was recorded at 3 d.p.i., mainly associated with immune and defence mechanisms, including genes involved in interferon I pathways and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and II responses. Genes associated with apoptosis and cellular stress were also found to be differentially expressed between infected and uninfected individuals, as were genes involved in inhibiting viral attachment and replication. The microarray results were validated by follow-on analysis of eight genes by real-time PCR. The findings of the study reflect mechanisms used by the host to protect itself during the early stages of SAV-1 infection. In particular, there was evidence of rapid induction of interferon-mediated responses similar to those seen during mammalian alphavirus infections, and also early involvement of an adaptive immune response. This study provides essential knowledge to assist in the development of effective control and management strategies for SAV-1 infection.

  14. Evaluation of adhesion formation and host tissue response to intra-abdominal polytetrafluoroethylene mesh and composite prosthetic mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Brent D; Mostafa, Gamal; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Joels, Charles S; Kercher, Kent W; Austin, Catherine; Norton, H James; Heniford, B Todd

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the extent of adhesion formation to ePTFE mesh (DualMesh, W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, AZ) and two composite prosthetic materials, ePTFE and polypropylene (Bard Composix, C.R. Bard, Inc, Murray Hill, NJ) and hyaluronic acid/carboxymethylcellulose and polypropylene (Sepramesh, Genzyme Corp, Cambridge, MA) after their intra-abdominal placement on an intact peritoneum, simulating laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, and to evaluate host tissue response to the prosthetic biomaterials. Through a midline laparotomy, a 2 x 2 cm piece of mesh (n = 60) was sewn to an intact peritoneum on each side of a midline incision in 30 New Zealand white rabbits. Mesh adhesions were scored using a modified Diamond scale (0 = 0%, 1 = 1-25%, 2 = 26-50%, 3 >50%) at 1, 3, 9, and 16 weeks by serial microlaparoscopy (2 mm). All laparoscopic evaluations were videotaped for blinded scoring by three surgeons. Host tissue response was graded (1-4) for inflammation, tissue ingrowth, and mesothelialization. The predominant cell type (polymorphonuclear leukocytes versus foreign body giant cell) was recorded. Statistical differences (P value DualMesh) intra-abdominal against an intact peritoneum results in significantly fewer adhesions than the composite prosthetic meshes during a 4-month follow-up. The host tissue response is equivalent for the three prosthetic biomaterials. The long-term consequences of increased adhesion formation to the composite meshes and the ultimate biocompatibility of the nonabsorbable and absorbable barriers on the polypropylene mesh are to be determined.

  15. An evolutionary history of defensins: a role for copy number variation in maximizing host innate and adaptive immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee R Machado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defensins represent an evolutionary ancient family of antimicrobial peptides that play diverse roles in human health and disease. Defensins are cationic cysteine-containing multifunctional peptides predominantly expressed by epithelial cells or neutrophils. Defensins play a key role in host innate immune responses to infection and, in addition to their classically described role as antimicrobial peptides, have also been implicated in immune modulation, fertility, development and wound healing. Aberrant expression of defensins is important in a number of inflammatory diseases as well as modulating host immune responses to bacteria, unicellular pathogens and viruses. In parallel with their role in immunity, in other species, defensins have evolved alternative functions, including the control of coat color in dogs. Defensin genes reside in complex genomic regions that are prone to structural variations and some defensin family members exhibit copy number variation (CNV. Structural variations have mediated, and continue to influence, the diversification and expression of defensin family members. This review highlights the work currently being done to better understand the genomic architecture of the β-defensin locus. It evaluates current evidence linking defensin copy number variation to autoimmune disease (i.e. Crohn’s disease and psoriasis as well as the contribution CNV has in influencing immune responses to HIV infection.

  16. Wolbachia age-sex-specific density in Aedes albopictus: a host evolutionary response to cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Tortosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolbachia bacteria have invaded many arthropod species by inducing Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI. These symbionts represent fascinating objects of study for evolutionary biologists, but also powerful potential biocontrol agents. Here, we assess the density dynamics of Wolbachia infections in males and females of the mosquito Aedes albopitcus, an important vector of human pathogens, and interpret the results within an evolutionary framework. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wolbachia densities were measured in natural populations and in age controlled mosquitoes using quantitative PCR. We show that the density dynamics of the wAlbA Wolbachia strain infecting Aedes albopictus drastically differ between males and females, with a very rapid decay of infection in males only. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Theory predicts that Wolbachia and its hosts should cooperate to improve the transmission of infection to offspring, because only infected eggs are protected from the effects of CI. However, incompatible matings effectively lower the fertility of infected males, so that selection acting on the host genome should tend to reduce the expression of CI in males, for example, by reducing infection density in males before sexual maturation. The rapid decay of one Wolbachia infection in Aedes albopictus males, but not in females, is consistent with this prediction. We suggest that the commonly observed reduction in CI intensity with male age reflects a similar evolutionary process. Our results also highlight the importance of monitoring infection density dynamics in both males and females to assess the efficiency of Wolbachia-based control strategies.

  17. Mapping the AAV capsid host antibody response towards the development of second generation gene delivery vectors

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    Yu-Shan eTseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2. Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from monoclonal antibodies, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  18. Response of Hepatoma 9618a and Normal Liver to Host Carbogen and Carbon Monoxide Breathing

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    Simon P. Robinson

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hyperoxia (induced by host carbogen 95% oxygen/5% carbon dioxide breathing. and hypoxia (induced by host carbon monoxide CO at 660 ppm. breathing were compared by using noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR methods to gain simultaneous information on blood flow/oxygenation and the bioenergetic status of rat Morris H9618a hepatomas. Both carbogen and CO breathing induced a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in signal intensity in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD MR images. This was due to a decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb, which acts as an endogenous contrast agent, caused either by formation of oxyhemoglobin in the case of carbogen breathing, or carboxyhemoglobin with CO breathing. The results were confirmed by observation of similar changes in deoxyHb in arterial blood samples examined ex vivo after carbogen or CO breathing. There was no change in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP/PI in either tumor or liver after CO breathing, whereas NTP/Pl increased twofold in the hepatoma (but not in the liver after carbogen breathing. No changes in tumor intracellular pH were seen after either treatment, whereas extracellular pH became more alkaline after CO breathing and more acid after carbogen breathing, respectively. This tumor type and the liver are unaffected by CO breathing at 660 ppm, which implies an adequate oxygen supply.

  19. Resistance and host-response of selected plants to Meloidogyne megadora.

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    de Almeida, A M S F; de A Santos, M S N

    2002-06-01

    Fourteen plant species, including 30 genotypes, were assessed for host suitability to Meloidogyne megadora in a growth room at 20 to 28 degrees C. Host suitability was based on the gall index (GI) and the reproduction factor (Rf):final population density (Pf)/initial population density (Pi). The presence of distinct galling was observed on roots of six plant species, and reproduction occurred on five of the 14 species tested. Three cultivars of cantaloupe (cvs. Branco do Ribatejo, Concerto, and Galia), three of cucumber (cvs. LM 809, Half Long Palmetto, and Market More), six of banana (cvs. Maçá, Ouro Branco, Ouro Roxo, Prata, Páo, and Valery), and one of broad bean (cv. Algarve) were considered susceptible (Pf/Pi > 1). Resistant cultivars (Pf/Pi = 0) included beet (cv, Crosby), pepper (cv. LM 204), watermelon (cvs. Black Magic and Crimson Sweet), tomato (cvs. Moneymaker and Rossol), radish (cv. Cherry Belle), and corn (cv. Dunia); sunn hemp and black velvetbean genotypes were also resistant. All Brassica cultivars were galled, although no egg masses were observed (Pf/Pi = 0), and classified as resistant/hypersensitive.

  20. Response of Flour Beetles to Multiple Stressors of Parasitic (Hymenolepis diminuta), Environmental (Diatomaceous Earth), and Host (Reproduction) Origin.

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    Shostak, Allen W; Van Buuren, Kala G; Cook, Ranon

    2015-08-01

    Organisms face a multitude of potential stressors, and the way these stressors interact can provide insights into underlying biological processes. This study examined the flour beetle Tribolium confusum and its survival, net fecundity, and surface-seeking behavior in response to combinations of stressors from 3 categories. Infection by the cestode Hymenolepis diminuta provided a stress of parasitic origin. Exposure to diatomaceous earth (DE) provided a stress of environmental origin. Use of virgin and mated beetles evaluated reproduction as a stress of host origin. Single and multiple exposure of beetles to parasite eggs achieved a maximum mean abundance of 21 parasites/beetle and a maximum intensity of 90 parasites in an individual beetle. DE reduced initial parasite establishment, but did not directly affect survival of parasites after their establishment in the host. A rehydration technique was used to recover parasites from dead beetles, enabling this to be the first study to correlate H. diminuta intensity at time of death directly to mortality of T. confusum. A dichotomous intensity-mortality relationship was observed in 8% DE, whereby lightly infected (confusum in beetles, the difficulty of achieving high mean abundances, and an apparent need for the stressors to have strong effects individually if they are to have enhanced effects when in combination, suggests that exposure to multiple stressors would seriously impact only a small proportion of the host population.

  1. Early host responses of seasonal and pandemic influenza A viruses in primary well-differentiated human lung epithelial cells.

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    Rachael L Gerlach

    Full Text Available Replication, cell tropism and the magnitude of the host's antiviral immune response each contribute to the resulting pathogenicity of influenza A viruses (IAV in humans. In contrast to seasonal IAV in human cases, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic IAV (H1N1pdm shows a greater tropism for infection of the lung similar to H5N1. We hypothesized that host responses during infection of well-differentiated, primary human bronchial epithelial cells (wd-NHBE may differ between seasonal (H1N1 A/BN/59/07 and H1N1pdm isolates from a fatal (A/KY/180/10 and nonfatal (A/KY/136/09 case. For each virus, the level of infectious virus and host response to infection (gene expression and apical/basal cytokine/chemokine profiles were measured in wd-NHBE at 8, 24, 36, 48 and 72 hours post-infection (hpi. At 24 and 36 hpi, KY/180 showed a significant, ten-fold higher titer as compared to the other two isolates. Apical cytokine/chemokine levels of IL-6, IL-8 and GRO were similar in wd-NHBE cells infected by each of these viruses. At 24 and 36 hpi, NHBE cells had greater levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IFN-α, CCL2, TNF-α, and CCL5, when infected by pandemic viruses as compared with seasonal. Polarization of IL-6 in wd-NHBE cells was greatest at 36 hpi for all isolates. Differential polarized secretion was suggested for CCL5 across isolates. Despite differences in viral titer across isolates, no significant differences were observed in KY/180 and KY/136 gene expression intensity profiles. Microarray profiles of wd-NHBE cells diverged at 36 hpi with 1647 genes commonly shared by wd-NHBE cells infected by pandemic, but not seasonal isolates. Significant differences were observed in cytokine signaling, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal arrangement pathways. Our studies revealed differences in temporal dynamics and basal levels of cytokine/chemokine responses of wd-NHBE cells infected with each isolate; however, wd-NHBE cell gene intensity profiles were not significantly

  2. Role of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the rejection of renal and cardiac allografts in the rat. A passenger lymphocyte-mediated graft-versus-host reaction amplifies the host response

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    van Vrieshilfgaarde, R.; Hermans, P.; Terpstra, J.L.; van Breda Viresman, P.J.

    1980-03-01

    It is demonstrated that passenger lymphocytes migrate out of rat renal allografts into host spleens in a radioresistant fashion. These mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN kidney and heart transplants are immunocompetent, since they elicit a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction in the spleens of (LEW x BN)F2 hybrid hosts. The greater GVH reaction in (LEW x BN)F1 recipients of BN kidneys reflects the greater number of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the kidney when compared to the heart. The mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN renal allografts also cause a proliferative response in the spleens of the LEW hosts as well as an accelerated rejection of BN renal allografts when compared to BN cardiac allografts, for the differences between BN kidney and heart, both in terms of splenomegaly elicited in LEW as well as tempo of rejection, are abolished by total body x-irradiation of the donor with 900 rad. Results indicate that a mobile passenger lymphocyte mediated GVH reaction in the central lymphoid organs of the host augments the host response to allogenic kidneys and contributes materially to first-set renal allograft rejection; this GVH reaction on the other hand is not conspicuously present in LEW recipients of BN cardiac allografts and has therefore little effect on first-set cardiac allograft rejection.

  3. Responses of the Housefly, Musca domestica, to the Hytrosavirus Replication: Impacts on Host's Vitellogenesis and Immunity.

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    Kariithi, Henry M; Yao, Xu; Yu, Fahong; Teal, Peter E; Verhoeven, Chelsea P; Boucias, Drion G

    2017-01-01

    Hytrosaviridae family members replicate in the salivary glands (SGs) of their adult dipteran hosts and are transmitted to uninfected hosts via saliva during feeding. Despite inducing similar gross symptoms (SG hypertrophy; SGH), hytrosaviruses (SGHVs) have distinct pathobiologies, including sex-ratio distortions in tsetse flies and refusal of infected housefly females to copulate. Via unknown mechanism(s), SGHV replication in other tissues results in reduced fecundity in tsetse flies and total shutdown of vitellogenesis and sterility in housefly females. We hypothesized that vitellogenesis shutdown was caused by virus-induced modulation of hormonal titers. Here, we used RNA-Seq to investigate virus-induced modulation of host genes/pathways in healthy and virus-infected houseflies, and we validated expression of modulated genes (n = 23) by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the levels and activities of hemolymph AMPs, levels of endogenous sesquiterpenoids, and impacts of exogenous hormones on ovarian development in viremic females. Of the 973 housefly unigenes that were significantly modulated (padj ≤ 0.01, log2FC ≤ -2.0 or ≥ 2.0), 446 and 527 genes were downregulated and upregulated, respectively. While the most downregulated genes were related to reproduction (embryogenesis/oogenesis), the repertoire of upregulated genes was overrepresented by genes related to non-self recognition, ubiquitin-protease system, cytoskeletal traffic, cellular proliferation, development and movement, and snRNA processing. Overall, the virus, Musca domestica salivary gland hytrosavirus (MdSGHV), induced the upregulation of various components of the siRNA, innate antimicrobial immune, and autophagy pathways. We show that MdSGHV undergo limited morphogenesis in the corpora allata/corpora cardiaca (CA/CC) complex of M. domestica. MdSGHV replication in CA/CC potentially explains the significant reduction of hemolymph sesquiterpenoids levels, the refusal to mate, and the complete shutdown of

  4. High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet: deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular effects depend on age.

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    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vessieres, Emilie; Vibert, Francoise; Ayer, Audrey; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Henrion, Daniel; Paul, Jean-Louis; Noble, Florence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    High-protein-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diets have become widespread. Yet their deleterious consequences, especially on glucose metabolism and arteries, have already been underlined. Our previous study (2) has already shown glucose intolerance with major arterial dysfunction in very old mice subjected to an HP-LC diet. The hypothesis of this work was that this diet had an age-dependent deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular outcome. Two groups of mice, young and adult (3 and 6 mo old), were subjected for 12 wk to a standard or to an HP-LC diet. Glucose and lipid metabolism was studied. The cardiovascular system was explored from the functional stage with Doppler-echography to the molecular stage (arterial reactivity, mRNA, immunohistochemistry). Young mice did not exhibit any significant metabolic modification, whereas adult mice presented marked glucose intolerance associated with an increase in resistin and triglyceride levels. These metabolic disturbances were responsible for cardiovascular damages only in adult mice, with decreased aortic distensibility and left ventricle dysfunction. These seemed to be the consequence of arterial dysfunctions. Mesenteric arteries were the worst affected with a major oxidative stress, whereas aorta function seemed to be maintained with an appreciable role of cyclooxygenase-2 to preserve endothelial function. This study highlights for the first time the age-dependent deleterious effects of an HP-LC diet on metabolism, with glucose intolerance and lipid disorders and vascular (especially microvessels) and cardiac functions. This work shows that HP-LC lead to equivalent cardiovascular alterations, as observed in very old age, and underlines the danger of such diet.

  5. Evaluation of host inflammatory responses of β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramics caused by calcium pyrophosphate impurity using a subcutaneous model.

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    Lin, Kaili; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Lu; Lu, Jianxi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhen; Chang, Jiang

    2011-11-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. Since the effective use of biomaterials in vivo requires good biocompatibility and bio-functionality, it is vital that we assess the inflammatory reactions provoked by various implanted biomaterials. In chemical precipitation of β-tricalcium phosphate [β-Ca₃(PO₄)₂, β-TCP], the impurity of calcium pyrophosphate (Ca₂P₂O₇, CPP) will easily appear if the preparation conditions are not well controlled. To test the influences of CCP-impurity on the biocompatibility of the material, four groups of β-TCP ceramic samples doped with 0.5-10 wt % of CCP impurity, and pure β-TCP and CCP samples were fabricated and implanted in rat subcutaneous site for one, two, and four weeks. The host tissue responses to the ceramics were evaluated by histomorphometric analysis, and the results were compared with pure β-TCPbioceramics. The results show that the CPP impurity can elicit and stimulate the inflammatory responses at the tissue/implant interface. Moreover, with the increase of CPP doping amount, the inflammation increases apparently. However, the pure β-TCP bioceramics only present slight post-implantation inflammatory responses. The influence of the CPP doping on the inflammatory responses is mainly related to a microparticles release because of an insufficient sintering of β-TCP by CPP doping. The microparticle release could be at the origin of local inflammation and cell/tissue damages. Therefore, to obtain perfect biocompatibility and high quality β-TCP bioceramics, it is important to avoid and control the CPP impurity in the preparation of β-TCP powders and bioceramics.

  6. A primate model for age and host response to genital herpetic infection: determinants of latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, W C; Di Giacomo, R; Alexander, E R

    1981-04-01

    Thirty five female Cebus albifrons monkeys (16 adolescents and 19 adults) were infected vaginally with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2. Fifteen developed spontaneous recurrent genital HSV infections. All 35 were killed for study eight to 12 months after primary infection, and tissue from the vagina, cervix, uterus, ovary, paracervical autonomic plexus, and lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia of eight animals. Host age was the most important variable influencing viral latency; 69% of adolescents and 42% of adults had latent HSV type 2 infections. Animals that developed latent infections were significantly easier to infect, shed virus during the primary infection significantly longer, and had more severe primary disease than those who did not become latently infected.

  7. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Shona A.; Farnsworth, Rae H.; Solomon, Benjamin; Achen, Marc G.; Stacker, Steven A.; Fox, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however, the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response and can be targeted through the use of antiangiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells, controlling the microenvironment, and modulating the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with antiangiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review, we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion. PMID:28066431

  8. The roles of host and pathogen factors and the innate immune response in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection

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    Sun, Xingmin; Hirota, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the most common cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. The clinical manifestation of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is highly variable, from asymptomatic carriage, to mild self-limiting diarrhea, to the more severe pseudomembranous colitis. Furthermore, in extreme cases, colonic inflammation and tissue damage can lead to toxic megacolon, a condition requiring surgical intervention. C. difficile expresses two key virulence factors; the exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are glucosyltransferases that target host-cell monomeric GTPases. In addition, some hypervirulent strains produce a third toxin, binary toxin or C. difficile transferase (CDT), which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CDI. More recently, other factors such as surface layer proteins (SLPs) and flagellin have also been linked to the inflammatory responses observed in CDI. Although the adaptive immune response can influence the severity of CDI, the innate immune responses to C. difficile and its toxins play crucial roles in CDI onset, progression, and overall prognosis. Despite this, the innate immune responses in CDI have drawn relatively little attention from clinical researchers. Targeting these responses may prove useful clinically as adjuvant therapies, especially in refractory and/or recurrent CDI. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of how C. difficile and its toxins modulate innate immune responses that contribute to CDI pathogenesis. PMID:25242213

  9. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona A Hendry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response, and can be targeted through the use of anti-angiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells and controlling the microenvironment, and modulate the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with anti-angiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches, and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion.

  10. Enterococcus faecalis Glycolipids Modulate Lipoprotein-Content of the Bacterial Cell Membrane and Host Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andreas; Sava, Irina G.; Wobser, Dominique; Bao, Yinyin; Hese, Katrin; Broszat, Melanie; Henneke, Philipp; Becher, Dörte; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of the cell membrane composition of E. faecalis on its recognition by the host immune system. To this end, we employed an E. faecalis deletion mutant (ΔbgsA) that does not synthesize the major cell membrane glycolipid diglycosyl-diacylglycerol (DGlcDAG). Proteomic analysis revealed that 13 of a total of 21 upregulated surface-associated proteins of E. faecalis ΔbgsA were lipoproteins. This led to a total lipoprotein content in the cell membrane of 35.8% in ΔbgsA compared to only 9.4% in wild-type bacteria. Increased lipoprotein content strongly affected the recognition of ΔbgsA by mouse macrophages in vitro with an increased stimulation of TNF-α production by heat-fixed bacteria and secreted antigens. Inactivation of the prolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (lgt) in ΔbgsA abrogated TNF-α induction by a ΔbgsA_lgt double mutant indicating that lipoproteins mediate increased activation of mouse macrophages by ΔbgsA. Heat-fixed ΔbgsA bacteria, culture supernatant, or cell membrane lipid extract activated transfected HEK cells in a TLR2-dependent fashion; the same was not true of wild-type bacteria. In mice infected intraperitoneally with a sublethal dose of E. faecalis we observed a 70% greater mortality in mice infected with ΔbgsA compared with wild-type-infected mice. Increased mortality due to ΔbgsA infection was associated with elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-2. In summary, our results provide evidence that an E. faecalis mutant lacking its major bilayer forming glycolipid DGlcDAG upregulates lipoprotein expression leading to increased activation of the host innate immune system and virulence in vivo. PMID:26172831

  11. Relation between Angle Class II malocclusion and deleterious oral habits

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    José Tarcísio Lima Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral habits may interfere on the growth and development of the stomatognathic system and orofacial myofunctional conditions, producing changes in the position of teeth in their dental arches. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to verify the presence of deleterious oral habits in individuals with malocclusion and see if there is a predominance of Class II malocclusion in these individuals. METHODS: The records of 140 patients treated at the Clinic of Preventive Orthodontics FORP-USP who had already completed treatment were randomly selected and analyzed. Their ages ranged from 6 to 10 years and 11 months. Associations were made between the presence or absence of deleterious oral habits, type and number of habits found in each individual and the type of malocclusion according to Angle classification. The statistical analysis used was the Chi-square test with a significance level of 5%. History of deleterious oral habits was found in 67.1% of individuals. RESULTS: The Class I malocclusion was most frequent (82.9%, followed by Class II malocclusion (12.1% and Class III (5%. CONCLUSION: There was a predominance of Class II malocclusion in individuals with a history of deleterious oral habits.INTRODUÇÃO: hábitos bucais podem interferir no crescimento e desenvolvimento do sistema estomatognático e nas condições miofuncionais bucofaciais, acarretando alterações no posicionamento dos dentes nas respectivas arcadas dentárias. OBJETIVO: o objetivo dessa pesquisa foi verificar a presença de hábitos bucais deletérios em indivíduos portadores de má oclusão e observar se existe predominância de má oclusão Classe II de Angle nesses indivíduos. MÉTODOS: foram selecionadas, aleatoriamente, e analisadas 140 fichas de pacientes atendidos na Clínica de Ortodontia Preventiva da FORP-USP, que já haviam recebido alta no tratamento. A faixa etária variou dos 6 anos a 10 anos e 11 meses. Foram realizadas associações entre

  12. Mate choice among yeast gametes can purge deleterious mutations.

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    Tazzyman, S J; Seymour, R M; Pomiankowski, A; Greig, D

    2012-08-01

    Meiosis in Saccharomyces yeast produces four haploid gametes that usually fuse with each other, an extreme form of self-fertilization among the products of a single meiosis known as automixis. The gametes signal to each other with sex pheromone. Better-quality gametes produce stronger signals and are preferred as mates. We suggest that the function of this signalling system is to enable mate choice among the four gametes from a single meiosis and so to promote the clearance of deleterious mutations. To support this claim, we construct a mathematical model that shows that signalling during automixis (i) improves the long-term fitness of a yeast colony and (ii) lowers its mutational load. We also show that the benefit to signalling is greater with larger numbers of segregating mutations.

  13. Inferring Deleterious-Mutation Parameters in Natural Daphnia Populations

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    Deng Hong-Wen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Deng and Lynch (1, 2 proposed to characterize deleterious genomic mutations from changes in the mean and genetic variance of fitness traits upon selfing in outcrossing populations. Such observations can be readily acquired in cyclical parthenogens. Selfing and life-table experiments were performed for two such Daphnia populations. A significant inbreeding depression and an increase of genetic variance for all traits analyzed were observed. Deng and Lynch's (2 procedures were employed to estimate the genomic mutation rate (U, mean dominance coefficient ( , mean selection coefficient ( , and scaled genomic mutational variance ( . On average, , , and (^ indicates an estimate are 0.84, 0.30, 0.14 and 4.6E-4 respectively. For the true values, the and are lower bounds, and and upper bounds.

  14. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis.

  15. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis. PMID:26720149

  16. Differential activation of diverse glutathione transferases of Clonorchis sinensis in response to the host bile and oxidative stressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-An Bae

    intravascular trematodes. Interestingly, secretion of a 28 kDa σ-class GST (Cs28σGST3 was significantly affected by the host bile, involving reduced secretion of the 28 kDa species and augmented secretion of Cs28σGST3-related high-molecular-weight 85 kDa protein. Oxidative stressors induced upregulated secretion of 28 kDa Cs28σGST3, but not an 85 kDa species. A secretory 26 kDa μ-class GST (Cs26μGST2 was increased upon treatment with oxidative stressors and bile juice, while another 28 kDa σ-class GST (Cs28σGST1 showed negligible responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results represent the first analysis of the genuine nature of the C. sinensis ESP proteome in the presence of host bile mimicking the natural host environments. The behavioral patterns of migration and maturation of C. sinensis in the bile ducts might contribute to the secretion of copious amounts of diverse GSTs, but a smaller quantity and fewer kinds of cysteine proteases. The Cs28σGST1 and its paralog(s detoxify endogenous oxidative molecules, while Cs28σGST3 and Cs26μGST2 conjugate xenobiotics/hydrophobic substances in the extracellular environments, which imply that diverse C. sinensis GSTs might have evolved for each of the multiple specialized functions.

  17. High phosphate reduces host ability to develop arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis without affecting root calcium spiking responses to the fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coline eBalzergue

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis associates soil fungi with the roots of the majority of plants species and represents a major source of soil phosphorus acquisition. Mycorrhizal interactions begin with an exchange of molecular signals between the two partners. A root signaling pathway is recruited, for which the perception of fungal signals triggers oscillations of intracellular calcium concentration. High phosphate availability is known to inhibit the establishment and/or persistence of this symbiosis, thereby favoring the direct, non symbiotic uptake of phosphorus by the root system. In this study, Medicago truncatula plants were used to investigate the effects of phosphate supply on the early stages of the interaction. When plants were supplied with high phosphate fungal attachment to the roots was drastically reduced. An experimental system was designed to individually study the effects of phosphate supply on the fungus, on the roots and on root exudates. These experiments revealed that the most important effects of high phosphate supply were on the roots themselves, which became unable to host mycorrhizal fungi even when these had been appropriately stimulated. The ability of the roots to perceive their fungal partner was then investigated by monitoring nuclear calcium spiking in response to fungal signals. This response did not appear to be affected by high phosphate supply. In conclusion, high levels of phosphate predominantly impact the plant host, but apparently not in its ability to perceive the fungal partner.

  18. Comprehensive assessment of host responses to ionizing radiation by nuclear factor-κB bioluminescence imaging-guided transcriptomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the host responses to ionizing radiation by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB bioluminescence imaging-guided transcriptomic tool. Transgenic mice carrying the NF-κB-driven luciferase gene were exposed to a single dose of 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation. In vivo imaging showed that a maximal NF-κB-dependent bioluminescent intensity was observed at 3 h after irradiation and ex vivo imaging showed that liver, intestine, and brain displayed strong NF-κB activations. Microarray analysis of these organs showed that irradiation altered gene expression signatures in an organ-specific manner and several pathways associated with metabolism and immune system were significantly altered. Additionally, the upregulation of fatty acid binding protein 4, serum amyloid A2, and serum amyloid A3 genes, which participate in both inflammation and lipid metabolism, suggested that irradiation might affect the cross pathways of metabolism and inflammation. Moreover, the alteration of chemokine (CC-motif ligand 5, chemokine (CC-motif ligand 20, and Jagged 1 genes, which are involved in the inflammation and enterocyte proliferation, suggested that these genes might be involved in the radiation enteropathy. In conclusion, this report describes the comprehensive evaluation of host responses to ionizing radiation. Our findings provide the fundamental information about the in vivo NF-κB activity and transcriptomic pattern after irradiation. Moreover, novel targets involved in radiation injury are also suggested.

  19. Differences in Acinetobacter baumannii strains and host innate immune response determine morbidity and mortality in experimental pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna de Breij

    Full Text Available Despite many reports documenting its epidemicity, little is known on the interaction of Acinetobacter baumannii with its host. To deepen our insight into this relationship, we studied persistence of and host response to different A. baumannii strains including representatives of the European (EU clones I-III in a mouse pneumonia model. Neutropenic mice were inoculated intratracheally with five A. baumannii strains and an A. junii strain and at several days morbidity, mortality, bacterial counts, airway inflammation, and chemo- and cytokine production in lungs and blood were determined. A. baumannii RUH875 and RUH134 (EU clone I and II, respectively and sporadic strain LUH8326 resulted in high morbidity/mortality, whereas A. baumannii LUH5875 (EU clone III, which is less widespread than clone I and II caused less symptoms. A. baumannii type strain RUH3023(T and A. junii LUH5851 did not cause disease. All strains, except A. baumannii RUH3023(T and A. junii LUH5851, survived and multiplied in the lungs for several days. Morbidity and mortality were associated with the severity of lung pathology and a specific immune response characterized by low levels of anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and specific pro-inflammatory (IL-12p40 and IL-23 cytokines at the first day of infection. Altogether, a striking difference in behaviour among the A. baumannii strains was observed with the clone I and II strains being most virulent, whereas the A. baumannii type strain, which is frequently used in virulence studies appeared harmless.

  20. Recombinant Marburg viruses containing mutations in the IID region of VP35 prevent inhibition of Host immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albariño, César G; Wiggleton Guerrero, Lisa; Spengler, Jessica R; Uebelhoer, Luke S; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-02-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that Ebola and Marburg virus (EBOV and MARV) VP35 antagonize the host cell immune response. Moreover, specific mutations in the IFN inhibitory domain (IID) of EBOV and MARV VP35 that abrogate their interaction with virus-derived dsRNA, lack the ability to inhibit the host immune response. To investigate the role of MARV VP35 in the context of infectious virus, we used our reverse genetics system to generate two recombinant MARVs carrying specific mutations in the IID region of VP35. Our data show that wild-type and mutant viruses grow to similar titers in interferon deficient cells, but exhibit attenuated growth in interferon-competent cells. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type virus, both MARV mutants were unable to inhibit expression of various antiviral genes. The MARV VP35 mutants exhibit similar phenotypes to those previously described for EBOV, suggesting the existence of a shared immune-modulatory strategy between filoviruses.

  1. P58(IPK: a novel "CIHD" member of the host innate defense response against pathogenic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan G Goodman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available To support their replication, viruses take advantage of numerous cellular factors and processes. Recent large-scale screens have identified hundreds of such factors, yet little is known about how viruses exploit any of these. Influenza virus infection post-translationally activates P58(IPK, a cellular inhibitor of the interferon-induced, dsRNA-activated eIF2alpha kinase, PKR. Here, we report that infection of P58(IPK knockout mice with influenza virus resulted in increased lung pathology, immune cell apoptosis, PKR activation, and mortality. Analysis of lung transcriptional profiles, including those induced by the reconstructed 1918 pandemic virus, revealed increased expression of genes associated with the cell death, immune, and inflammatory responses. These experiments represent the first use of a mammalian infection model to demonstrate the role of P58(IPK in the antiviral response. Our results suggest that P58(IPK represents a new class of molecule, a cellular inhibitor of the host defense (CIHD, as P58(IPK is activated during virus infection to inhibit virus-induced apoptosis and inflammation to prolong host survival, even while prolonging viral replication.

  2. Host-response to foot-and-mouth disease in cattle; possible implications for the development of persistently infected "carriers"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina

    for effective disease control. The main purpose of this PhD-project has been to investigate the host response to FMD infection in cattle, with further objectives of elucidating any detectable differences in the measured immune response between animals that developed into FMDV carriers and those that did not...... course of infection with FMDV O UKG 34/2001 in sheep. An experimental study design involving endoscopical collection of small biopsies of pharyngeal mucosa from live cattle was developed. This technique enables collection of sequential tissue samples from infected animals, allowing investigation...... of the project are stated at the end of chapter 1. Chapter 2 contains overall descriptions of the animal experiments included in the project. The general concepts of the experimental procedures are described, as well as the clinical characteristics of infection caused by the two different FMDV O isolates...

  3. Real-time whole-body visualization of Chikungunya Virus infection and host interferon response in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Palha

    Full Text Available Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging arbovirus that may cause severe disease, constitutes an important public health problem. Herein we describe a novel CHIKV infection model in zebrafish, where viral spread was live-imaged in the whole body up to cellular resolution. Infected cells emerged in various organs in one principal wave with a median appearance time of ∼14 hours post infection. Timing of infected cell death was organ dependent, leading to a shift of CHIKV localization towards the brain. As in mammals, CHIKV infection triggered a strong type-I interferon (IFN response, critical for survival. IFN was mainly expressed by neutrophils and hepatocytes. Cell type specific ablation experiments further demonstrated that neutrophils play a crucial, unexpected role in CHIKV containment. Altogether, our results show that the zebrafish represents a novel valuable model to dynamically visualize replication, pathogenesis and host responses to a human virus.

  4. Role of host immune response in the occurrence of gastropathy in rats infected with larval Taenia taeniaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, J A; Oku, Y; Nonaka, N; Ito, M; Kamiya, M

    1997-11-01

    Decrease of spleen weight from peak to control levels together with a corresponding decline of serum IgG level at the onset of gastric hyperplasia in Taenia taeniaeformis-infected euthymic rats, may indicate that a form of down regulation of host immune response during the course of larval T. taeniaeformis infection could facilitate the occurrence of gastropathy in rats. Gastric hyperplasia developed in T. taeniaeformis-infected athymic nude rats, indicating that occurrence of gastropathy associated with larval T. taeniaeformis infection in the rat is T cell independent. Apparently, gastric hyperplasia appeared early in nude rats which suggests that absence of T cell-mediated response could have facilitated its early occurrence.

  5. Entomopathogenic Fungi: New Insights into Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, T M; Coates, C J; Dubovskiy, I M; Ratcliffe, N A

    2016-01-01

    Although many insects successfully live in dangerous environments exposed to diverse communities of microbes, they are often exploited and killed by specialist pathogens. Studies of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) provide valuable insights into the dynamics of the highly aggressive coevolutionary arms race between entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) and their arthropod hosts. The host defenses are designed to exclude the pathogen or mitigate the damage inflicted while the pathogen responds with immune evasion and utilization of host resources. EPF neutralize their immediate surroundings on the insect integument and benefit from the physiochemical properties of the cuticle and its compounds that exclude competing microbes. EPF also exhibit adaptations aimed at minimizing trauma that can be deleterious to both host and pathogen (eg, melanization of hemolymph), form narrow penetration pegs that alleviate host dehydration and produce blastospores that lack immunogenic sugars/enzymes but facilitate rapid assimilation of hemolymph nutrients. In response, insects deploy an extensive armory of hemocytes and macromolecules, such as lectins and phenoloxidase, that repel, immobilize, and kill EPF. New evidence suggests that immune bioactives work synergistically (eg, lysozyme with antimicrobial peptides) to combat infections. Some proteins, including transferrin and apolipophorin III, also demonstrate multifunctional properties, participating in metabolism, homeostasis, and pathogen recognition. This review discusses the molecular intricacies of these HPI, highlighting the interplay between immunity, stress management, and metabolism. Increased knowledge in this area could enhance the efficacy of EPF, ensuring their future in integrated pest management programs.

  6. Characterization of host response to Cryptococcus neoformans through quantitative proteomic analysis of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Kumar, Satwant; Yelamanchi, Soujanya D; Madugundu, Anil K; Anil, Abhijith K; Renuse, Santosh; Nair, Bipin G; Gowda, Harsha; Mathur, Premendu P; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Shankar, S K; Mahadevan, Anita; Keshava Prasad, T S

    2015-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection causing morbidity and mortality (>60%) in HIV-associated immunocompromised individuals caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal infection in brain have been studied using experimental animal models and cell lines. There are limited studies for the molecular understanding of cryptococcal meningitis in human brain. The proteins involved in the process of invasion and infection in human brain still remains obscure. To this end we carried out mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics of frontal lobe brain tissues from cryptococcal meningitis patients and controls to identify host proteins that are associated with the pathogenesis of cryptococcal meningitis. We identified 317 proteins to be differentially expressed (≥2-fold) from a total of 3423 human proteins. We found proteins involved in immune response and signal transduction to be differentially expressed in response to cryptococcal infection in human brain. Immune response proteins including complement factors, major histocompatibility proteins, proteins previously known to be involved in fungal invasion to brain such as caveolin 1 and actin were identified to be differentially expressed in cryptococcal meningitis brain tissues co-infected with HIV. We also validated the expression status of 5 proteins using immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of major histocompatibility complexes, class I, B (HLA-B), actin alpha 2 smooth muscle aorta (ACTA2) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) and downregulation of peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) and alpha crystallin B chain (CRYAB) in cryptococcal meningitis were confirmed by IHC-based validation experiments. This study provides the brain proteome profile of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV for a better understanding of the host response associated with the disease.

  7. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  8. How do tsetse recognise their hosts? The role of shape in the responses of tsetse (Glossina fuscipes and G. palpalis to artificial hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaki Tirados

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Palpalis-group tsetse, particularly the subspecies of Glossina palpalis and G. fuscipes, are the most important transmitters of human African trypanomiasis (HAT, transmitting >95% of cases. Traps and insecticide-treated targets are used to control tsetse but more cost-effective baits might be developed through a better understanding of the fly's host-seeking behaviour. Electrocuting grids were used to assess the numbers of G. palpalis palpalis and G. fuscipes quanzensis attracted to and landing on square or oblong targets of black cloth varying in size from 0.01 m(2 to 1.0 m(2. For both species, increasing the size of a square target from 0.01 m(2 (dimensions=0.1 × 0.1 m to 1.0 m(2 (1.0 × 1.0 m increased the catch ~4x however the numbers of tsetse killed per unit area of target declined with target size suggesting that the most cost efficient targets are not the largest. For G. f. quanzensis, horizontal oblongs, (1 m wide × 0.5 m high caught ~1.8x more tsetse than vertical ones (0.5 m wide × 1.0 m high but the opposite applied for G. p. palpalis. Shape preference was consistent over the range of target sizes. For G. p. palpalis square targets caught as many tsetse as the oblong; while the evidence is less strong the same appears to apply to G. f. quanzensis. The results suggest that targets used to control G. p. palpalis and G. f. quanzensis should be square, and that the most cost-effective designs, as judged by the numbers of tsetse caught per area of target, are likely to be in the region of 0.25 × 0.25 m(2. The preference of G. p. palpalis for vertical oblongs is unique amongst tsetse species, and it is suggested that this response might be related to its anthropophagic behaviour and hence importance as a vector of HAT.

  9. How do tsetse recognise their hosts? The role of shape in the responses of tsetse (Glossina fuscipes and G. palpalis) to artificial hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirados, Inaki; Esterhuizen, Johan; Rayaisse, Jean Baptiste; Diarrassouba, Abdoulaye; Kaba, Dramane; Mpiana, Serge; Vale, Glyn A; Solano, Philippe; Lehane, Michael J; Torr, Stephen J

    2011-08-01

    Palpalis-group tsetse, particularly the subspecies of Glossina palpalis and G. fuscipes, are the most important transmitters of human African trypanomiasis (HAT), transmitting >95% of cases. Traps and insecticide-treated targets are used to control tsetse but more cost-effective baits might be developed through a better understanding of the fly's host-seeking behaviour. Electrocuting grids were used to assess the numbers of G. palpalis palpalis and G. fuscipes quanzensis attracted to and landing on square or oblong targets of black cloth varying in size from 0.01 m(2) to 1.0 m(2). For both species, increasing the size of a square target from 0.01 m(2) (dimensions=0.1 × 0.1 m) to 1.0 m(2) (1.0 × 1.0 m) increased the catch ~4x however the numbers of tsetse killed per unit area of target declined with target size suggesting that the most cost efficient targets are not the largest. For G. f. quanzensis, horizontal oblongs, (1 m wide × 0.5 m high) caught ~1.8x more tsetse than vertical ones (0.5 m wide × 1.0 m high) but the opposite applied for G. p. palpalis. Shape preference was consistent over the range of target sizes. For G. p. palpalis square targets caught as many tsetse as the oblong; while the evidence is less strong the same appears to apply to G. f. quanzensis. The results suggest that targets used to control G. p. palpalis and G. f. quanzensis should be square, and that the most cost-effective designs, as judged by the numbers of tsetse caught per area of target, are likely to be in the region of 0.25 × 0.25 m(2). The preference of G. p. palpalis for vertical oblongs is unique amongst tsetse species, and it is suggested that this response might be related to its anthropophagic behaviour and hence importance as a vector of HAT.

  10. Transient expression of βC1 protein differentially regulates host genes related to stress response, chloroplast and mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briddon Rob W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses are emerging plant pathogens that infect a wide variety of crops including cotton, cassava, vegetables, ornamental plants and cereals. The geminivirus disease complex consists of monopartite begomoviruses that require betasatellites for the expression of disease symptoms. These complexes are widespread throughout the Old World and cause economically important diseases on several crops. A single protein encoded by betasatellites, termed βC1, is a suppressor of gene silencing, inducer of disease symptoms and is possibly involved in virus movement. Studies of the interaction of βC1 with hosts can provide useful insight into virus-host interactions and aid in the development of novel control strategies. We have used the differential display technique to isolate host genes which are differentially regulated upon transient expression of the βC1 protein of chili leaf curl betasatellite (ChLCB in Nicotiana tabacum. Results Through differential display analysis, eight genes were isolated from Nicotiana tabacum, at two and four days after infitration with βC1 of ChLCB, expressed under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Cloning and sequence analysis of differentially amplified products suggested that these genes were involved in ATP synthesis, and acted as electron carriers for respiration and photosynthesis processes. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs play an important role in plant growth and development, cell protection, defence processes, replication mechanisms and detoxification responses. Kegg orthology based annotation system analysis of these DEGs demonstrated that one of the genes, coding for polynucleotide nucleotidyl transferase, is involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolic pathways and is an RNA binding protein which is involved in RNA degradation. Conclusion βC1 differentially regulated genes are mostly involved in chloroplast and mitochondrial functions. βC1 also

  11. Interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells and Leptospira species; innate responses in the natural bovine reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Wilson-Welder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and L. interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2 was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of

  12. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-11-19

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome.

  13. The host type Ⅰ interferon response to viral and bacterial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea K. PERRY; Gang CHEN; Dahai ZHENG; Hong TANG; Genhong CHENG

    2005-01-01

    Type Ⅰ interferons (IFN) are well studied cytokines with anti-viral and immune-modulating functions. Type Ⅰ IFNs are produced following viral infections, but until recently, the mechanisms of viral recognition leading to IFN production were largely unknown. Toll like receptors (TLRs) have emerged as key transducers of type Ⅰ IFN during viral infections by recognizing various viral components. Furthermore, much progress has been made in defining the signaling pathways downstream of TLRs for type Ⅰ IFN production. TLR7 and TLR9 have become apparent as universally important in inducing type Ⅰ IFN during infection with most viruses, particularly by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. New intracellular viral pattern recognition receptors leading to type Ⅰ IFN production have been identified. Many bacteria can also induce the up-regulation of these cytokines. Interestingly, recent studies have found a detrimental effect on host cells if type Ⅰ IFN is produced during infection with the intracellular gram-positive bacterial pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. This review will discuss the recent advances made in defining the signaling pathways leading to type Ⅰ IFN production.

  14. The host-galaxy response to the afterglow of GRB 100901A

    CERN Document Server

    Hartoog, Olga E; Vreeswijk, Paul M; Kaper, Lex; Tanvir, Nial R; Savaglio, Sandra; Berger, Edo; Chornock, Ryan; Covino, Stefano; D'Elia, Valerio; Flores, Hector; Fynbo, Johan P U; Goldoni, Paolo; Gomboc, Andreja; Melandri, Andrea; Pozanenko, Alexei; Schaye, Joop; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Wijers, Ralph A M J

    2013-01-01

    For Gamma-Ray Burst 100901A, we have obtained Gemini-North and Very Large Telescope optical afterglow spectra at four epochs: one hour, one day, three days and one week after the burst, thanks to the afterglow remaining unusually bright at late times. Apart from a wealth of metal resonance lines, we also detect lines arising from fine-structure levels of the ground state of Fe II, and from metastable levels of Fe II and Ni II at the host redshift (z = 1.4084). These lines are found to vary significantly in time. The combination of the data and modelling results shows that we detect the fall of the Ni II 4 F9/2 metastable level population, which to date has not been observed. Assuming that the population of the excited states is due to the UV-radiation of the afterglow, we estimate an absorber distance of a few hundred pc. This appears to be a typical value when compared to similar studies. We detect two intervening absorbers (z = 1.3147, 1.3179). Despite the wide temporal range of the data, we do not see sign...

  15. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME. It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome.

  16. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome. PMID:27869779

  17. Human Adipose Cells In Vitro Are Either Refractory or Responsive to Insulin, Reflecting Host Metabolic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Aaron; Lee, Jo-Ping; Skarulis, Monica C.; Cushman, Samuel W.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    While intercellular communication processes are frequently characterized by switch-like transitions, the endocrine system, including the adipose tissue response to insulin, has been characterized by graded responses. Yet here individual cells from adipose tissue biopsies are best described by a switch-like transition between the basal and insulin-stimulated states for the trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Two statistically-defined populations best describe the observed cellular heterogeneity, representing the fractions of refractive and responsive adipose cells. Furthermore, subjects exhibiting high systemic insulin sensitivity indices (SI) have high fractions of responsive adipose cells in vitro, while subjects exhibiting decreasing SI have increasing fractions of refractory cells in vitro. Thus, a two-component model best describes the relationship between cellular refractory fraction and subject SI. Since isolated cells exhibit these different response characteristics in the presence of constant culture conditions and milieu, we suggest that a physiological switching mechanism at the adipose cellular level ultimately drives systemic SI. PMID:25768970

  18. Human adipose cells in vitro are either refractory or responsive to insulin, reflecting host metabolic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Lizunov

    Full Text Available While intercellular communication processes are frequently characterized by switch-like transitions, the endocrine system, including the adipose tissue response to insulin, has been characterized by graded responses. Yet here individual cells from adipose tissue biopsies are best described by a switch-like transition between the basal and insulin-stimulated states for the trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Two statistically-defined populations best describe the observed cellular heterogeneity, representing the fractions of refractive and responsive adipose cells. Furthermore, subjects exhibiting high systemic insulin sensitivity indices (SI have high fractions of responsive adipose cells in vitro, while subjects exhibiting decreasing SI have increasing fractions of refractory cells in vitro. Thus, a two-component model best describes the relationship between cellular refractory fraction and subject SI. Since isolated cells exhibit these different response characteristics in the presence of constant culture conditions and milieu, we suggest that a physiological switching mechanism at the adipose cellular level ultimately drives systemic SI.

  19. Methods for transcriptomic analyses of the porcine host immune response: application to Salmonella infection using microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technological developments in both the collection and analysis of molecular genetic data over the past few years have provided new opportunities for an improved understanding of the global response to pathogen exposure. Such developments are particularly dramatic for scientists studying the pig, whe...

  20. Self-assembled and responsive supramolecular nanoparticles mediated by cucurbit[8]uril host-guest interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffelen, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) have gained large interest in nanoscience because stable, but reversible three-dimensional assemblies can be used for a variety of applications, ranging from stimuli-responsive and self-healing materials to biomedical applications. In particular soft SNPs are prom

  1. Differential apple transcriptomic responses to penicillium expansum (pathogen) and penicillium digitatum (non-host pathogen) infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penicillium expansum is the causal agent of blue mould of pome fruits and is responsible for important economical losses during postharvest handling in all producing countries. Although control of this pathogen can be achieved by using chemical fungicides, the appearance of resistant strains and in...

  2. Self-assembled and responsive supramolecular nanoparticles mediated by cucurbit[8]uril host-guest interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffelen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) have gained large interest in nanoscience because stable, but reversible three-dimensional assemblies can be used for a variety of applications, ranging from stimuli-responsive and self-healing materials to biomedical applications. In particular soft SNPs are

  3. Sepsis in the intensive care unit: epidemiology, outcome and host response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vught, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening syndrome that arises when a dysbalanced patient response to an infection causes damage to the body’s own organs and tissues. Sepsis is, to date, still a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of sepsis is likely to

  4. Relative roles of the cellular and humoral responses in the Drosophila host defense against three gram-positive bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine T Nehme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two NF-kappaB signaling pathways, Toll and immune deficiency (imd, are required for survival to bacterial infections in Drosophila. In response to septic injury, these pathways mediate rapid transcriptional activation of distinct sets of effector molecules, including antimicrobial peptides, which are important components of a humoral defense response. However, it is less clear to what extent macrophage-like hemocytes contribute to host defense. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to dissect the relative importance of humoral and cellular defenses after septic injury with three different gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, we used latex bead pre-injection to ablate macrophage function in flies wildtype or mutant for various Toll and imd pathway components. We found that in all three infection models a compromised phagocytic system impaired fly survival--independently of concomitant Toll or imd pathway activation. Our data failed to confirm a role of the PGRP-SA and GNBP1 Pattern Recognition Receptors for phagocytosis of S. aureus. The Drosophila scavenger receptor Eater mediates the phagocytosis by hemocytes or S2 cells of E. faecalis and S. aureus, but not of M. luteus. In the case of M. luteus and E. faecalis, but not S. aureus, decreased survival due to defective phagocytosis could be compensated for by genetically enhancing the humoral immune response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results underscore the fundamental importance of both cellular and humoral mechanisms in Drosophila immunity and shed light on the balance between these two arms of host defense depending on the invading pathogen.

  5. CD36 Is Essential for Regulation of the Host Innate Response to Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin-Mediated Dermonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Moriah J; Febbraio, Maria; Hall, Pamela R

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the primary cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) in the United States. α-Hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming toxin secreted by S. aureus and a major contributor to tissue necrosis, prompts recruitment of neutrophils critical for host defense against S. aureus infections. However, the failure to clear apoptotic neutrophils can result in damage to host tissues, suggesting that mechanisms of neutrophil clearance are essential to limiting Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. We hypothesized that CD36, a scavenger receptor which facilitates recognition of apoptosing cells, would play a significant role in regulating Hla-mediated inflammation and tissue injury during S. aureus SSSI. In this study, we show that CD36 on macrophages negatively regulates dermonecrosis caused by Hla-producing S. aureus. This regulation is independent of bacterial burden, as CD36 also limits dermonecrosis caused by intoxication with sterile bacterial supernatant or purified Hla. Dermonecrotic lesions of supernatant intoxicated CD36(-/-) mice are significantly larger, with increased neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β expression, compared with CD36(+/+) (wild-type) mice. Neutrophil depletion of CD36(-/-) mice prevents this phenotype, demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to tissue injury in this model. Furthermore, administration of CD36(+/+) but not CD36(-/-) macrophages near the site of intoxication reduces dermonecrosis, IL-1β production and neutrophil accumulation to levels seen in wild-type mice. This therapeutic effect is reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization in the CD36(+/+) macrophages, supporting a mechanism of action whereby CD36-dependent macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils regulates Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD36 is essential for controlling the host innate response to S. aureus skin infection.

  6. Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Con; Jurcyzszak, Denise; Goody, Michelle F; Gabor, Kristin A; Longfellow, Jacob R; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2017-01-20

    Each year, seasonal influenza outbreaks profoundly affect societies worldwide. In spite of global efforts, influenza remains an intractable healthcare burden. The principle strategy to curtail infections is yearly vaccination. In individuals who have contracted influenza, antiviral drugs can mitigate symptoms. There is a clear and unmet need to develop alternative strategies to combat influenza. Several animal models have been created to model host-influenza interactions. Here, protocols for generating zebrafish models for systemic and localized human influenza A virus (IAV) infection are described. Using a systemic IAV infection model, small molecules with potential antiviral activity can be screened. As a proof-of-principle, a protocol that demonstrates the efficacy of the antiviral drug Zanamivir in IAV-infected zebrafish is described. It shows how disease phenotypes can be quantified to score the relative efficacy of potential antivirals in IAV-infected zebrafish. In recent years, there has been increased appreciation for the critical role neutrophils play in the human host response to influenza infection. The zebrafish has proven to be an indispensable model for the study of neutrophil biology, with direct impacts on human medicine. A protocol to generate a localized IAV infection in the Tg(mpx:mCherry) zebrafish line to study neutrophil biology in the context of a localized viral infection is described. Neutrophil recruitment to localized infection sites provides an additional quantifiable phenotype for assessing experimental manipulations that may have therapeutic applications. Both zebrafish protocols described faithfully recapitulate aspects of human IAV infection. The zebrafish model possesses numerous inherent advantages, including high fecundity, optical clarity, amenability to drug screening, and availability of transgenic lines, including those in which immune cells such as neutrophils are labeled with fluorescent proteins. The protocols detailed here

  7. AGN host galaxy mass function in COSMOS. Is AGN feedback responsible for the mass-quenching of galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, A.; Schulze, A.; Merloni, A.; Zamorani, G.; Ilbert, O.; La Franca, F.; Peng, Y.; Piconcelli, E.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the role of supermassive black holes in the global context of galaxy evolution by measuring the host galaxy stellar mass function (HGMF) and the specific accretion rate, that is, λSAR, the distribution function (SARDF), up to z ~ 2.5 with ~1000 X-ray selected AGN from XMM-COSMOS. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we jointly fit the stellar mass function and specific accretion rate distribution function, with the X-ray luminosity function as an additional constraint. Our best-fit model characterizes the SARDF as a double power-law with mass-dependent but redshift-independent break, whose low λSAR slope flattens with increasing redshift while the normalization increases. This implies that for a given stellar mass, higher λSAR objects have a peak in their space density at earlier epoch than the lower λSAR objects, following and mimicking the well-known AGN cosmic downsizing as observed in the AGN luminosity function. The mass function of active galaxies is described by a Schechter function with an almost constant M∗⋆ and a low-mass slope α that flattens with redshift. Compared to the stellar mass function, we find that the HGMF has a similar shape and that up to log (M⋆/M⊙) ~ 11.5, the ratio of AGN host galaxies to star-forming galaxies is basically constant (~10%). Finally, the comparison of the AGN HGMF for different luminosity and specific accretion rate subclasses with a previously published phenomenological model prediction for the "transient" population, which are galaxies in the process of being mass-quenched, reveals that low-luminosity AGN do not appear to be able to contribute significantly to the quenching and that at least at high masses, that is, M⋆ > 1010.7 M⊙, feedback from luminous AGN (log Lbol ≳ 46 [erg/s]) may be responsible for the quenching of star formation in the host galaxy.

  8. Host Th1/Th2 immune response to Taenia solium cyst antigens in relation to cyst burden of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, J; Prabhakar, A T; Gangadaran, P; Dorny, P; Vercruysse, J; Geldhof, P; Rajshekhar, V; Alexander, M; Oommen, A

    2016-10-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), Taenia solium larval infection of the brain, is an important cause of acquired seizures in endemic countries, which relate to number, location and degenerating cysts in the brain. Multicyst infections are common in endemic countries although single-cyst infection prevails in India. Single-cyst infections in an endemic country suggest a role for host immunity limiting the infection. This study examined ex vivo CD4(+) T cells and in vitro Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to T. solium cyst antigens of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy subjects from endemic and nonendemic regions and of single- and multicyst-infected patients for association with cyst burden of NCC. T. solium cyst antigens elicited a Th1 cytokine response in healthy subjects of T. solium-endemic and T. solium-non-endemic regions and those with single-cyst infections and a Th2 cytokine response from subjects with multicyst neurocysticercosis. Multicyst neurocysticercosis subjects also exhibited low levels of effector memory CD4(+) T cells. Th1 cytokine response of T. solium exposure and low infectious loads may aid in limiting cyst number. Th2 cytokines and low effector T cells may enable multiple-cyst infections to establish and persist.

  9. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 1beta modulates host innate immune response by antagonizing IRF3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beura, Lalit K; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Kwon, Byungjoon; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Jones, Clinton; Pattnaik, Asit K; Osorio, Fernando A

    2010-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection of swine leads to a serious disease characterized by a delayed and defective adaptive immune response. It is hypothesized that a suboptimal innate immune response is responsible for the disease pathogenesis. In the study presented here we tested this hypothesis and identified several nonstructural proteins (NSPs) with innate immune evasion properties encoded by the PRRS viral genome. Four of the total ten PRRSV NSPs tested were found to have strong to moderate inhibitory effects on beta interferon (IFN-beta) promoter activation. The strongest inhibitory effect was exhibited by NSP1 followed by, NSP2, NSP11, and NSP4. We focused on NSP1alpha and NSP1beta (self-cleavage products of NSP1 during virus infection) and NSP11, three NSPs with strong inhibitory activity. All of three proteins, when expressed stably in cell lines, strongly inhibited double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) signaling pathways. NSP1beta was found to inhibit both IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)- and NF-kappaB-dependent gene induction by dsRNA and Sendai virus. Mechanistically, the dsRNA-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were strongly inhibited by NSP1beta. Moreover, when tested in a porcine myelomonocytic cell line, NSP1beta inhibited Sendai virus-mediated activation of porcine IFN-beta promoter activity. We propose that this NSP1beta-mediated subversion of the host innate immune response plays an important role in PRRSV pathogenesis.

  10. Non-host disease resistance response in pea (Pisum sativum) pods: Biochemical function of DRR206 and phytoalexin pathway localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Herana Kamal; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Yang, Hong; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2015-05-01

    Continually exposed to potential pathogens, vascular plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to recognize encroaching threats and defend themselves. They do so by inducing a set of defense responses that can help defeat and/or limit effects of invading pathogens, of which the non-host disease resistance response is the most common. In this regard, pea (Pisum sativum) pod tissue, when exposed to Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli spores, undergoes an inducible transcriptional activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and also produces (+)-pisatin, its major phytoalexin. One of the inducible pathogenesis-related genes is Disease Resistance Response-206 (DRR206), whose role in vivo was unknown. DRR206 is, however, related to the dirigent protein (DP) family. In this study, its biochemical function was investigated in planta, with the metabolite associated with its gene induction being pinoresinol monoglucoside. Interestingly, both pinoresinol monoglucoside and (+)-pisatin were co-localized in pea pod endocarp epidermal cells, as demonstrated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging. In addition, endocarp epidermal cells are also the site for both chalcone synthase and DRR206 gene expression. Taken together, these data indicate that both (+)-pisatin and pinoresinol monoglucoside function in the overall phytoalexin responses.

  11. Subversion of Host Responses to Energy Insufficiency by Us3 Supports Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Replication during Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Elizabeth I; Smiley, James R; Mohr, Ian

    2017-07-15

    Cellular stress responses to energy insufficiency can impact virus reproduction. In particular, activation of the host AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by low energy could limit protein synthesis by inhibiting mTORC1. Although many herpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), stimulate mTORC1, how HSV-1-infected cells respond to energy availability, a physiological indicator regulating mTORC1, has not been investigated. In addition, the impact of low-energy stress on productive HSV-1 growth and viral genetic determinants potentially enabling replication under physiological stress remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 activity in HSV-1-infected cells is largely insensitive to stress induced by simulated energy insufficiency. Furthermore, resistance of mTORC1 activity to low-energy-induced stress, while not significantly influenced by the HSV-1 UL46-encoded phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt activator, was dependent upon the Ser/Thr kinase activity of Us3. A Us3-deficient virus was hypersensitive to low-energy-induced stress as infected cell protein synthesis and productive replication were reduced compared to levels in cells infected with a Us3-expressing virus. Although Us3 did not detectably prevent energy stress-induced AMPK activation, it enforced mTORC1 activation despite the presence of activated AMPK. In the absence of applied low-energy stress, AMPK activity in infected cells was restricted in a Us3-dependent manner. This establishes that the Us3 kinase not only activated mTORC1 but also enabled sustained mTORC1 signaling during simulated energy insufficiency that would otherwise restrict protein synthesis and virus replication. Moreover, it identifies the alphaherpesvirus-specific Us3 kinase as an mTORC1 activator that subverts the host cell energy-sensing program to support viral productive growth irrespective of physiological stress.IMPORTANCE Like all viruses, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reproduction relies upon

  12. ELISPOT Refinement Using Spot Morphology for Assessing Host Responses to Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A. Sharpe

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a global health problem. The Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG vaccine has variable efficacy (0–80% so there is a drive to develop novel vaccines. The cytokine, interferon gamma (IFNγ, is an essential component of the protective response to M. tuberculosis (M. tb infection and is also produced in response to BCG vaccination. Induction of an IFNγ response is used as a biomarker of successful vaccination in the assessment of new tuberculosis (TB vaccines. The IFNγ ELISPOT assay provides an important tool for TB research. It is used for both the diagnosis of infection (T.Spot assay, and for the evaluation of the immunogenicity of new TB vaccine candidates in human clinical trials, in the non-human primate (NHP model of TB infection studies. The ELISPOT assay captures IFNγ produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs following specific stimulation, onto a membrane so individual cells can be enumerated and the frequency of responding cells determined. Hence spot forming units (SFU per 106 cells provide the traditional measure for ELISPOT assays. The discriminatory power of SFU is limited. In some situations, the number of SFU in BCG vaccinated, and unvaccinated, subjects was found to be similar, although the spots were observed to be larger in vaccinated subjects. Spot size potentially provides a measure of the quantity of cytokine produced by individual cells. The AID ELISPOT plate reader software used to determine frequency of spots also has the capability to determine the size of each spot. Consideration of spot size in combination with spot forming units was investigated in our studies of BCG immunogenicity. This additional readout was found to enhance the discriminatory power of the ELISPOT assay, and provide more information on the immune response to BCG vaccination and infection with M.tb.

  13. Host responses to sepsis vary in different low-lethality murine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori F Gentile

    Full Text Available Animal models for the study of sepsis are being increasingly scrutinized, despite their essential role for early translational research. In particular, recent studies have suggested that at the level of the leukocyte transcriptome, murine models of burns, trauma and endotoxemia markedly differ from their human equivalents, and are only weakly similar amongst themselves. We compared the plasma cytokine and leukocyte transcriptome responses between two different low-lethality murine models of polymicrobial intra-abdominal sepsis.Six to ten week male C57BL/6j mice underwent either the 'gold standard' cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model of intra-abdominal sepsis or administration of a cecal slurry (CS, where cecal contents are injected intraperitoneally. Surviving mice were euthanized at two hours, one or three days after sepsis.The murine leukocyte transcriptomic response to the CLP and CS models of sepsis was surprisingly dissimilar at two hours, one, and three days after sepsis. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the maximum change in expression for the entire leukocyte transcriptome that changed significantly over time (n = 19,071 was R = 0.54 (R2 = 0.297. The CS model resulted in greater magnitude of early inflammatory gene expression changes in response to sepsis with associated increased production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Two hours after sepsis, CLP had more significant expression of genes associated with IL-10 signaling pathways, whereas CS had greater expression of genes related to CD28, apoptosis, IL-1 and T-cell receptor signaling. By three days, the changes in gene expression in both sepsis models were returning to baseline in surviving animals.These analyses reveal that the murine blood leukocyte response to sepsis is highly dependent on which model of intra-abdominal sepsis is employed, despite their similar lethality. It may be difficult to extrapolate findings from one murine model to another

  14. Host response to cuckoo song is predicted by the future risk of brood parasitism

    OpenAIRE

    Kleindorfer, Sonia; Evans, Christine; Colombelli-Négrel, Diane; Robertson, Jeremy; Griggio, Matteo; Hoi, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Risk assessment occurs over different temporal and spatial scales and is selected for when individuals show an adaptive response to a threat. Here, we test if birds respond to the threat of brood parasitism using the acoustical cues of brood parasites in the absence of visual stimuli. We broadcast the playback of song of three brood parasites (Chalcites cuckoo species) and a sympatric non-parasite (striated thornbill, Acanthiza lineata) in the territories of superb fairy-wrens (M...

  15. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Hodyra-Stefaniak; Paulina Miernikiewicz; Jarosław Drapała; Marek Drab; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Dorota Lecion; Zuzanna Kaźmierczak; Weronika Beta; Joanna Majewska; Marek Harhala; Barbara Bubak; Anna Kłopot; Andrzej Górski; Krystyna Dąbrowska

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluor...

  16. Volatiles from whitefly-infested plants elicit a host-locating response in the parasitoid, Encarsia formosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, M A; Chamberlain, K; Guerrieri, E; Pickett, J A; Wadhams, L J; Yasuda, T

    2003-07-01

    The blend of volatile compounds emitted by bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) infested with greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum) has been studied comparatively with undamaged plants and whiteflies themselves. Collection of the volatiles and analysis by gas chromatography revealed more than 20 compounds produced by plants infested with whitefly. Of these, 4 compounds, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, 4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, 3-octanone, and one unidentified compound were emitted at higher levels than from the undamaged control plants. Synthetic (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, 4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene, or 3-octanone all elicited a significant increase in oriented flight and landing on the source by the parasitoid, Encarsia formosa, in wind tunnel bioassays. Two-component mixtures of the compounds and the three-component mixture all elicited a similar or, in most cases, a better response by the parasitoid, the most effective being a mixture of (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol and 3-octanone. These results demonstrate that E. formosa uses volatiles from the plant-host complex as olfactory cues for host location.

  17. Interaction between Campylobacter and intestinal epithelial cells leads to a different proinflammatory response in human and porcine host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carmen; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Martins, Rodrigo Prado; Garrido, Juan J

    2014-11-15

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the leading causes of human diarrheal disease throughout the development world. Unlike human beings, gastrointestinal tract of pigs are frequently colonized by Campylobacter to a high level in a commensal manner. The aim of this study was to identify the differences underlying the divergent outcome following Campylobacter challenge in porcine versus human host. In order to address this, a comparative in vitro infection model was combined with microscopy, gentamicin protection assay, ELISA and quantitative PCR techniques. Invasion assays revealed that Campylobacter invaded human cells up to 10-fold more than porcine cells (pCampylobacter in human epithelial cell at early times of infection, whereas a very reduced cytokine gene expression was detected in porcine epithelial cells. These data indicate that Campylobacter fails to invade porcine cells compared to human cells, and this leads to a lack of proinflammatory response induction, probably due to its pathogenic or commensal behavior in human and porcine host, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent developments in the diagnosis of ectoparasite infections and disease through a better understanding of parasite biology and host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Beth; Burgess, Stewart T G; McNeilly, Tom N; Huntley, John F; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2012-02-01

    Some conventional methods of diagnosis of ectoparasite infections can have low sensitivity and/or specificity. In addition, early infestations, sub-clinical and carrier hosts often go un-diagnosed, allowing infestations to spread. This review focuses on the important ectoparasites of human, livestock and companion animals for which improved diagnostic tools are either already in use, or in development. These advances in diagnostic technologies have resulted in improved treatment, control and preventative strategies for many ectoparasitic diseases. Immunodiagnostic methods have had a large impact, with the emergence of highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for sarcoptic and psoroptic mange, with further improved tests in development. In the present review, the advantages and limitations of such tests are discussed and the potential for future development explored. The increasing use of molecular tools, for example, PCR and other molecular methods, has improved our understanding of the epidemiology of ectoparasitic diseases, with practical consequences for community-based control programmes. Recently, the identification of specific signalling pathways during the host response to ectoparasites has led to the identification of disease biomarkers which, along with new technologies, such as multiplexed assays and microfluidic platforms, could lead to more cost-effective, rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  19. A Helicobacter pylori Homolog of Eukaryotic Flotillin Is Involved in Cholesterol Accumulation, Epithelial Cell Responses and Host Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie L. Hutton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori acquires cholesterol from membrane raft domains in eukaryotic cells, commonly known as “lipid rafts.” Incorporation of this cholesterol into the H. pylori cell membrane allows the bacterium to avoid clearance by the host immune system and to resist the effects of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. The presence of cholesterol in H. pylori bacteria suggested that this pathogen may have cholesterol-enriched domains within its membrane. Consistent with this suggestion, we identified a hypothetical H. pylori protein (HP0248 with homology to the flotillin proteins normally found in the cholesterol-enriched domains of eukaryotic cells. As shown for eukaryotic flotillin proteins, HP0248 was detected in detergent-resistant membrane fractions of H. pylori. Importantly, H. pylori HP0248 mutants contained lower levels of cholesterol than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.01. HP0248 mutant bacteria also exhibited defects in type IV secretion functions, as indicated by reduced IL-8 responses and CagA translocation in epithelial cells (P < 0.05, and were less able to establish a chronic infection in mice than wild-type bacteria (P < 0.05. Thus, we have identified an H. pylori flotillin protein and shown its importance for bacterial virulence. Taken together, the data demonstrate important roles for H. pylori flotillin in host-pathogen interactions. We propose that H. pylori flotillin may be required for the organization of virulence proteins into membrane raft-like structures in this pathogen.

  20. Dose-response model of murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi: time post inoculation and host age dependency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamrakar Sushil B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rickettsia typhi (R. mooseri is the causative agent of murine typhus. It is one of the most widely distributed flea-borne diseases with a relatively mild febrile initial illness with six to 14 days of incubation period. The bacterium is gram negative and an obligate intracellular pathogen. The disease is transmitted to humans and vertebrate host through fleabites or via contact with infected feces. This paper develops dose-response models of different routes of exposure for typhus in rodents. Methods Data from published articles were analyzed using parametric dose-response relationship models. Dose-response relationships were fit to data using the method of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. Results Dose-response models quantifying the effects of different ages of rats and time post inoculation in BALB/c mice were analyzed in the study. Both the adult rats (inoculated intradermally and newborn rats (inoculated subcutaneously were best fit by exponential models and both distributions could be described by a single dose-response relationship. The BALB/C mice inoculated subcutaneously were best fit by Beta-Poisson models. The time post inoculation analysis showed that there was a definite time and response relationship existed in this case. Conclusions Intradermally or subcutaneously inoculated rats (adult and newborn models suggest that less than 1 plaque-forming unit (PFU (1.33 to 0.38 in 95% confidence limits of the pathogen is enough to seroconvert 50% of the exposed population on average. For the BALB/c mouse time post inoculation model, an average dose of 0.28 plaque-forming units (PFU (0.75 to 0.11 in 95% confidence limits will seroconvert 50% of the exposed mice.

  1. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity

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    Richa Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer.

  2. Coat protein gene sequence of tobacco mosaic virus encodes a host response determinant.

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, T.; Meshi, T; Takamatsu, N; Okada, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The common strain and tomato strain of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are known to be closely related to each other. However, plants with the N' gene, such as Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow, respond differently to infections by these viruses. In the N' plants, TMV-OM (common strain) spreads systemically with mosaic symptoms, whereas TMV-L (tomato strain) induces the necrotic response of plants, causing local lesions. To reveal the viral factor of TMV-L inducing th...

  3. Host response biomarkers in sepsis: overview on sTREM-1 detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarié, Jérémie; Barraud, Damien; Gibot, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of sepsis, and especially its differentiation from sterile inflammation, may be challenging. TREM-1, the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, is an amplifier of the innate immune response. Its soluble form acts as a decoy for the natural TREM-1 ligand and dampens its activation. In this chapter, we review the numerous studies that have evaluated the usefulness of sTREM-1 concentration determination for the diagnosis and the prognosis evaluation of sepsis or localized infection. Nowadays, sandwich ELISA kits are available and the assay is described.

  4. The Human Cytomegalovirus Major Immediate-Early Proteins as Antagonists of Intrinsic and Innate Antiviral Host Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nevels

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The major immediate-early (IE gene of human cytomegalovirus (CMV is believed to have a decisive role in acute infection and its activity is an important indicator of viral reactivation from latency. Although a variety of gene products are expressed from this region, the 72-kDa IE1 and the 86-kDa IE2 nuclear phosphoproteins are the most abundant and important. Both proteins have long been recognized as promiscuous transcriptional regulators. More recently, a critical role of the IE1 and IE2 proteins in counteracting nonadaptive host cell defense mechanisms has been revealed. In this review we will briefly summarize the available literature on IE1- and IE2-dependent mechanisms contributing to CMV evasion from intrinsic and innate immune responses.

  5. Human and Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Increase Flap Survival in Rats Independently of Host Immune Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline

    2017-01-01

    evaluated after 7 days. RESULTS: The mean survival rates for SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin were significantly increased as compared with the control group. Adipose stem/stromal cell and SVF lysate injection did not increase flap survival. Vessel density was increased for human...... and rat SVF and human ASC but not for SVF lysate. Human cells were not detected in the flaps after 7 days. CONCLUSIONS: Flap survival increased with SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin, suggesting that increased flap survival is independent of the host immune response. All cell...... injections lead to increased vessel density, but it did not necessarily lead to increased flap survival. Further research should elaborate which molecular events make SVF treatment more efficacious than ASC....

  6. Human and Autologous Adipose-derived Stromal Cells Increase Flap Survival in Rats Independently of Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Sheikh, Søren Paludan; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2017-07-22

    There is a rising interest in adipose-derived stromal cells for clinical use; however, it is unknown whether freshly isolated stromal cells (SVF) or culture-expanded cells (ASCs) are more efficacious. We therefore aimed to compare the 2 cellular therapies in an in vivo model of angiogenesis, the ischemic flap in rats, which induces acute ischemia. We also aimed to determine the importance of cell presence and the host immune response. A total of 96 rats (n = 12 in each group) were used, and in each rat, a caudally based random flap measuring 2 × 7 cm was made. The study was conducted in 3 phases. First, each rat was treated with human SVF cells, human ASCs, or vehicle. Second, each rat was treated with human SVF, human SVF lysate, or vehicle. Finally, each rat was treated with rat (autologous) SVF cells or vehicle. Flap survival, vessel density, and stromal cell retention were evaluated after 7 days. The mean survival rates for SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin were significantly increased as compared with the control group. Adipose stem/stromal cell and SVF lysate injection did not increase flap survival. Vessel density was increased for human and rat SVF and human ASC but not for SVF lysate. Human cells were not detected in the flaps after 7 days. Flap survival increased with SVF treatment regardless of human or autologous origin, suggesting that increased flap survival is independent of the host immune response. All cell injections lead to increased vessel density, but it did not necessarily lead to increased flap survival. Further research should elaborate which molecular events make SVF treatment more efficacious than ASC.

  7. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Rainey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus. Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3' open reading frame than the 5' non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed to

  8. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Stephanie M; Martinez, Julien; McFarlane, Melanie; Juneja, Punita; Sarkies, Peter; Lulla, Aleksei; Schnettler, Esther; Varjak, Margus; Merits, Andres; Miska, Eric A; Jiggins, Francis M; Kohl, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus). Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3' open reading frame than the 5' non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed to an induced

  9. Parasite development and host responses during the establishment of Trypanosoma brucei infection transmitted by tsetse fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, J D; Emergy, D L

    1984-02-01

    Following inoculation of Trypanosoma brucei into large mammals by the tsetse fly a local skin reaction, the 'chancre', develops due to trypanosome proliferation. We have cannulated the afferent and efferent lymphatics of the draining lymph node in goats and examined the onset of a cellular reaction, the emigration of the parasite from the chancre and the development of both antigenic variation and the specific immune response. The chancre first became detectable by day 3 post-infection, peaked by day 6 and then subsided. Lymphocyte output increased 6- to 8-fold by day 10 and the number of lymphoblasts increased 50-fold in this period. Both then declined. Trypanosomes were detected in lymph 1-2 days before the chancre, peaked by days 5-6, declined during development of the chancre and then peaked again. The bloodstream population appeared by days 4-5 and displayed different kinetics from that in lymph. Recirculation of parasites through the lymphatics ensued. Lymph-borne trypanosome populations were highly pleomorphic. Parasites in lymph expressed firstly a mixture of the Variable Antigen Types (VATs) which are found characteristically in the tsetse fly, this being followed by a mixture of other VATs. The two groups overlapped in appearance. In the bloodstream the same sequence of events occurred although 2 or 3 days later. The specific antibody response, as measured by radioimmunoassay and agglutination, arose within a few days of the first detection of each VAT. Activities appeared first in the lymph and then in plasma.

  10. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam F Tayabali

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa, P.fluorescens (Pf, P.putida (Pp, P.stutzeri (Ps were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications.

  11. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayabali, Azam F; Coleman, Gordon; Nguyen, Kathy C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa), P.fluorescens (Pf), P.putida (Pp), P.stutzeri (Ps)) were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications.

  12. Host transcriptomic responses to pneumonic plague reveal that Yersinia pestis inhibits both the initial adaptive and innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Wang, Tong; Tian, Guang; Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Xiaohong; Xin, Youqian; Yan, Yanfeng; Tan, Yafang; Cao, Shiyang; Liu, Wanbing; Cui, Yujun; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonic plague is the most deadly form of infection caused by Yersinia pestis and can progress extremely fast. However, our understanding on the host transcriptomic response to pneumonic plague is insufficient. Here, we used RNA-sequencing technology to analyze transcriptomic responses in mice infected with fully virulent strain 201 or EV76, a live attenuated vaccine strain lacking the pigmentation locus. Approximately 600 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in lungs from both 201- and EV76-infected mice at 12h post-infection (hpi). DEGs in lungs of 201-infected mice exceeded 2000 at 48hpi, accompanied by sustained large numbers of DEGs in the liver and spleen; however, limited numbers of DEGs were detected in those organs of EV-infected mice. Remarkably, DEGs in lungs were significantly enriched in critical immune responses pathways in EV76-infected but not 201-infected mice, including antigen processing and presentation, T cell receptor signaling among others. Pathological and bacterial load analyses confirmed the rapid systemic dissemination of 201-infection and the confined EV76-infection in lungs. Our results suggest that fully virulent Y. pestis inhibits both the innate and adaptive immune responses that are substantially stimulated in a self-limited infection, which update our holistic views on the transcriptomic response to pneumonic plague. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. A Bioinformatics Pipeline for the Analyses of Viral Escape Dynamics and Host Immune Responses during an Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Leung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly mutating viruses, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV and HIV, have adopted evolutionary strategies that allow escape from the host immune response via genomic mutations. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing are reshaping the field of immuno-virology of viral infections, as these allow fast and cheap generation of genomic data. However, due to the large volumes of data generated, a thorough understanding of the biological and immunological significance of such information is often difficult. This paper proposes a pipeline that allows visualization and statistical analysis of viral mutations that are associated with immune escape. Taking next generation sequencing data from longitudinal analysis of HCV viral genomes during a single HCV infection, along with antigen specific T-cell responses detected from the same subject, we demonstrate the applicability of these tools in the context of primary HCV infection. We provide a statistical and visual explanation of the relationship between cooccurring mutations on the viral genome and the parallel adaptive immune response against HCV.

  14. Computational approach for identification of Anopheles gambiae miRNA involved in modulation of host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanasambantham, Krishnaraj; Hairul-Islam, Villianur Ibrahim; Saravanan, Subramanian; Subasri, Subramaniyan; Subastri, Ariraman

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that play key roles in regulating gene expression in animals, plants, and viruses, which involves in biological processes including development, cancer, immunity, and host-microorganism interactions. In this present study, we have used the computational approach to identify potent miRNAs involved in Anopheles gambiae immune response. Analysis of 217,261 A. gambiae ESTs and further study of RNA folding revealed six new miRNAs. The minimum free energy of the predicted miRNAs ranged from -27.2 to -62.63 kcal/mol with an average of -49.38 kcal/mol. While its A + U % ranges from 50 to 65 % with an average value of 57.37 %. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted miRNAs revealed that aga-miR-277 was evolutionary highly conserved with more similarity with other mosquito species. Observing further the target identification of the predicted miRNA, it was noticed that the aga-miR-2304 and aga-miR-2390 are involved in modulation of immune response by targeting the gene encoding suppressin and protein prophenoloxidase. Further detailed studies of these miRNAs will help in revealing its function in modulation of A. gambiae immune response with respect to its parasite.

  15. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology.

  16. Secreted bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis are critical for induction of the innate immune response to virulent Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary F Fontana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila causes an inflammatory pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. For virulence, L. pneumophila requires a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system that translocates bacterial effectors to the host cytosol. L. pneumophila lacking the Dot/Icm system is recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs, leading to a canonical NF-κB-dependent transcriptional response. In addition, L. pneumophila expressing a functional Dot/Icm system potently induces unique transcriptional targets, including proinflammatory genes such as Il23a and Csf2. Here we demonstrate that this Dot/Icm-dependent response, which we term the effector-triggered response (ETR, requires five translocated bacterial effectors that inhibit host protein synthesis. Upon infection of macrophages with virulent L. pneumophila, these five effectors caused a global decrease in host translation, thereby preventing synthesis of IκB, an inhibitor of the NF-κB transcription factor. Thus, macrophages infected with wildtype L. pneumophila exhibited prolonged activation of NF-κB, which was associated with transcription of ETR target genes such as Il23a and Csf2. L. pneumophila mutants lacking the five effectors still activated TLRs and NF-κB, but because the mutants permitted normal IκB synthesis, NF-κB activation was more transient and was not sufficient to fully induce the ETR. L. pneumophila mutants expressing enzymatically inactive effectors were also unable to fully induce the ETR, whereas multiple compounds or bacterial toxins that inhibit host protein synthesis via distinct mechanisms recapitulated the ETR when administered with TLR ligands. Previous studies have demonstrated that the host response to bacterial infection is induced primarily by specific microbial molecules that activate TLRs or cytosolic pattern recognition receptors. Our results add to this model by providing a striking illustration of how the host immune response to a virulent

  17. Using Complementary and Alternative Medicines to Target the Host Response during Severe Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Alleva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now accepted that an overwhelming inflammatory response is the cause of human deaths from avian H5N1 influenza infection. With this in mind we sought to examine the literature for examples of complementary and alternative medicines that reduce inflammation, and to place the results of this search in the context of our own work in a mouse model of influenza disease, using a pharmaceutical agent with anti-inflammatory properties. Two Chinese herbs, Angelica sinensis (Dang Gui and Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen, have been recently shown to protect mice during lethal experimental sepsis via inhibition of the novel inflammatory cytokine High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1. Biochanin A, a ligand of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR alpha and gamma and the active isoflavone in Trifolium pratense (red clover, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus could be used as an influenza treatment. This is of great interest since we have recently shown that gemfibrozil, a drug used to treat hyperlipidemia in humans and a synthetic ligand of PPAR alpha, significantly reduces the mortality associated with influenza infections in mice. The inflammation-modulating abilities of these natural agents should be considered in light of what is now known about the mechanisms of fatal influenza, and tested as potential candidates for influenza treatments in their own right, or as adjunct treatments to antivirals.

  18. Kinetics of host immune responses and cytomegalovirus resistance in a liver transplant patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schaffer, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients, donor-seropositive\\/recipient-seronegative (D+\\/R-) cytomegalovirus (CMV) status is associated with the highest risk of ganciclovir-resistant CMV disease, which has been reported for patients receiving oral ganciclovir but not valganciclovir prophylaxis. We report a case of CMV breakthrough infection in a D+\\/R- liver transplant patient while he was receiving oral valganciclovir. Forty samples collected over 6 months were analyzed for the CMV viral load, lymphocyte counts, cytokine levels, and lymphocyte differentiation status. Genotypic resistance testing of the viral UL97 gene was performed when the patient failed to respond. CMV viremia occurred on day 50 post-transplant, and 5 samples taken between days 50 and 85 showed the wild-type UL97 genotype. The appearance of deletion 594-595 was observed from day 114 post-transplant. Viral loads declined when foscarnet was commenced and remained below 10,000 copies\\/mL when the lymphocyte count was greater than 1000\\/microL (P = 0.02). T cell responses revealed significant expansion of CD8+ terminal effector memory cells. CD4+ cells were largely populations of naive and central memory cells. Circulating interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels correlated with the viral load (P < 0.0001). Seroconversion occurred on day 230. The CMV viral load in combination with lymphocyte counts and IL-10 may be a predictive marker for the risk of development of resistant CMV disease in D+\\/R- SOT patients.

  19. Host stress and immune responses during aerosol challenge of Brown Norway rats with Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Gater

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation exposure models are becoming the preferred method for the comparative study of respiratory infectious diseases due to their resemblance to the natural route of infection. To enable precise delivery of pathogen to the lower respiratory tract in a manner that imposes minimal biosafety risk, nose-only exposure systems have been developed. Early inhalation exposure technology for infectious disease research grew out of technology used in asthma research where predominantly the Collison nebulizer is used to generate an aerosol by beating a liquid sample against glass. Although infectious aerosol droplets of 1-5µm in size can be generated, the Collison often causes loss of viability. In this work, we evaluate a gentler method for aerosolization of living cells and describe the use of the Sparging Liquid Aerosol Generator (SLAG in a rat pneumonic plague model. The SLAG creates aerosols by continuous dripping of liquid sample on a porous metal disc. We show the generation of 0.5 to 1µm Y. pestis aerosol particles using the SLAG with spray factors typically ranging from 10-7 to 10-8 with no detectable loss of bacterial viability. Delivery of these infectious particles via nose-only exposure led to the rapid development of lethal pneumonic plague. Further, we evaluated the effect of restraint-stress imposed by the nose-only exposure chamber on early inflammatory responses and bacterial deposition. Elevated serum corticosterone which peaked at 2 hrs post-procedure indicated the animals experienced stress as a result of restraint in the nose-only chamber. However, we observed no correlation between elevated corticosterone and the amount of bacterial deposition or inflammation in the lungs. Together these data demonstrate the utility of the SLAG and the nose-only chamber for aerosol challenge of rodents by Y. pestis.

  20. Cannabidiol reduces host immune response and prevents cognitive impairments in Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Ceretta, Renan A; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Simões, Lutiana R; Comim, Clarissa M; Quevedo, João; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José A; Teixeira, Antônio Lucio

    2012-12-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute infection affecting the pia matter, arachnoid and subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory response is associated with a significant mortality rate and neurologic sequelae, such as, seizures, sensory-motor deficits and impairment of learning and memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute and extended administration of cannabidiol on pro-inflammatory cytokines and behavioral parameters in adult Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis. Male Wistar rats underwent a cisterna magna tap and received either 10μl of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of S. pneumoniae suspension. Rats subjected to meningitis were treated by intraperitoneal injection with cannabidiol (2.5, 5, or 10mg/kg once or daily for 9 days after meningitis induction) or a placebo. Six hours after meningitis induction, the rats that received one dose were killed and the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained to assess cytokines/chemokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. On the 10th day, the rats were submitted to the inhibitory avoidance task. After the task, the animals were killed and samples from the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained. The extended administration of cannabidiol at different doses reduced the TNF-α level in frontal cortex. Prolonged treatment with canabidiol, 10mg/kg, prevented memory impairment in rats with pneumococcal meningitis. Although descriptive, our results demonstrate that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in pneumococcal meningitis and prevents cognitive sequel.

  1. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  2. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections--A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zhai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55% had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32, other viral infections (N = 4, or no viral agent identified (N = 24. The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment. Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates.

  3. Modular Transcriptional Networks of the Host Pulmonary Response during Early and Late Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicluna, Brendon P; van Lieshout, Miriam H; Blok, Dana C; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-05-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spneu) remains the most lethal bacterial pathogen and the dominant agent of community-acquired pneumonia. Treatment has perennially focused on the use of antibiotics, albeit scrutinized due to the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant Spneu strains. Immunomodulatory strategies have emerged as potential treatment options. Although promising, immunomodulation can lead to improper tissue functions either at steady state or upon infectious challenge. This argues for the availability of tools to enable a detailed assessment of whole pulmonary functions during the course of infection, not only those functions biased to the defense response. Thus, through the use of an unbiased tissue microarray and bioinformatics approach, we aimed to construct a comprehensive map of whole-lung transcriptional activity and cellular pathways during the course of pneumococcal pneumonia. We performed genome-wide transcriptional analysis of whole lungs before and 6 and 48 h after Spneu infection in mice. The 4,000 most variable transcripts across all samples were used to assemble a gene coexpression network comprising 13 intercorrelating modules (clusters of genes). Fifty-four percent of this whole-lung transcriptional network was altered 6 and 48 h after Spneu infection. Canonical signaling pathway analysis uncovered known pathways imparting protection, including IL17A/IL17F signaling and previously undetected mechanisms that included lipid metabolism. Through in silico prediction of cell types, pathways were observed to enrich for distinct cell types such as a novel stromal cell lipid metabolism pathway. These cellular mechanisms were furthermore anchored at functional hub genes of cellular fate, differentiation, growth and transcription. Collectively, we provide a benchmark unsupervised map of whole-lung transcriptional relationships and cellular activity during early and late pneumococcal pneumonia.

  4. Inhibition of the host translation shutoff response by herpes simplex virus 1 triggers nuclear envelope-derived autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Kerstin; English, Luc; Rondeau, Christiane; Leib, David; Lippé, Roger; Desjardins, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular pathway that degrades intracellular pathogens and contributes to antigen presentation. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection triggers both macroautophagy and an additional form of autophagy that uses the nuclear envelope as a source of membrane. The present study constitutes the first in-depth analysis of nuclear envelope-derived autophagy (NEDA). We established LC3a as a marker that allowed us to distinguish between NEDA and macroautophagy in both immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. NEDA was observed in many different cell types, indicating that it is a general response to HSV-1 infection. This autophagic pathway is known to depend on the viral protein γ34.5, which can inhibit macroautophagy via binding to beclin-1. Using mutant viruses, we were able to show that binding of beclin-1 by γ34.5 had no effect on NEDA, demonstrating that NEDA is regulated differently than macroautophagy. Instead, NEDA was triggered in response to γ34.5 binding to protein phosphatase 1α, an interaction used by the virus to prevent host cells from shutting off protein translation. NEDA was not triggered when late viral protein production was inhibited with acyclovir or hippuristanol, indicating that the accumulation of these proteins might stress infected cells. Interestingly, expression of the late viral protein gH was sufficient to rescue NEDA in the context of infection with a virus that otherwise does not support strong late viral protein expression. We argue that NEDA is a cellular stress response triggered late during HSV-1 infection and might compensate for the viral alteration of the macroautophagic response.

  5. A Novel Mechanism Underlying the Innate Immune Response Induction upon Viral-Dependent Replication of Host Cell mRNA: A Mistake of +sRNA Viruses' Replicases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgui, Laura R.; Colombo, María I.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are lifeless particles designed for setting virus-host interactome assuring a new generation of virions for dissemination. This interactome generates a pressure on host organisms evolving mechanisms to neutralize viral infection, which places the pressure back onto virus, a process known as virus-host cell co-evolution. Positive-single stranded RNA (+sRNA) viruses are an important group of viral agents illustrating this interesting phenomenon. During replication, their genomic +sRNA is employed as template for translation of viral proteins; among them the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is responsible of viral genome replication originating double-strand RNA molecules (dsRNA) as intermediates, which accumulate representing a potent threat for cellular dsRNA receptors to initiate an antiviral response. A common feature shared by these viruses is their ability to rearrange cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions, supporting replication efficiency increase by concentrating critical factors and protecting the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding cellular dsRNA receptors and describes prototype viruses developing replication niches inside rearranged membranes. However, for several viral agents it's been observed both, a complex rearrangement of cellular membranes and a strong innate immune antiviral response induction. So, we have included recent data explaining the mechanism by, even though viruses have evolved elegant hideouts, host cells are still able to develop dsRNA receptors-dependent antiviral response. PMID:28164038

  6. Impacts of different expressions of PA-X protein on 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus replication, pathogenicity and host immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinhwa; Yu, Hai; Li, Yonghai; Ma, Jingjiao; Lang, Yuekun; Duff, Michael; Henningson, Jamie; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Yuhao; Nagy, Abdou; Bawa, Bhupinder; Li, Zejun; Tong, Guangzhi; Richt, Juergen A; Ma, Wenjun

    2017-04-01

    Although several studies have investigated the functions of influenza PA-X, the impact of different expressions of PA-X protein including full-length, truncated or PA-X deficient forms on virus replication, pathogenicity and host response remains unclear. Herein, we generated two mutated viruses expressing a full-length or deficient PA-X protein based on the A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) virus that expresses a truncated PA-X to understand three different expressions of PA-X protein on virus replication, pathogenicity and host immune responses. The results showed that expression of either full-length or truncated PA-X protein enhanced viral replication and pathogenicity as well as reduced host innate immune response in mice by host shutoff activity when compared to the virus expressing the deficient PA-X form. Furthermore, the full-length PA-X expression exhibited a greater effect on virus pathogenicity than the truncated PA-X form. Our results provide novel insights of PA-X on viral replication, pathogenicity and host immune responses.

  7. Bim is required for T-cell allogeneic responses and graft-versus-host disease in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Yu, Jing; Iclozan, Cristina; Kaosaard, Kane; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Bim, a BH3-only Bcl-2-family protein, is essential for T-cell negative selection in the thymus as well as for the death of activated T cells in the periphery. The role of Bim has been extensively studied in T-cell responses to self-antigens and viral infections. Recent findings on Bim in autoimmunity triggered our interest in investigating whether Bim may play a role in another disease with inflammatory symptoms as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here we report that Bim is required for optimal T-cell responses to alloantigens in vivo and for the development of GVHD. Using murine models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we found that donor T cells deficient for Bim are impaired in the induction of GVHD primarily due to a significant defect in T cell activation and expansion in vivo. Upon TCR engagement, Bim(-/-) T cells exhibited selective defects in CD69 expression and phosphorylation of PLCγ1. Our studies uncover a novel aspect of Bim function in T-cell activation with important implications in understanding the mechanisms of T-cell activation and tolerance under allogeneic transplantation.

  8. Differences in host breed and diet influence colonization by Campylobacter jejuni and induction of local immune responses in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zifeng; Willer, Thomas; Pielsticker, Colin; Gerzova, Lenka; Rychlik, Ivan; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Chickens are regarded as the main reservoir for human campylobacteriosis. Little is known about the interaction between Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) and chickens. This interaction may be influenced by the stage of maturation of the immune system, developing gut microbiota composition and other factors including breed and diet. Our aim was to investigate the impact of breed, and diet on C. jejuni colonization and host immune responses in chickens. Birds were inoculated with 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of C. jejuni or diluent at one (Exp. 1) or 22 (Exp. 2) days post hatch. We compared local immune cell subpopulations, cytokine expression levels, and gut microbiota composition between broiler-type (BT) and layer-type (LT) birds fed with either commercial broiler feed (bf) or layer feed (lf). Lower colonization rates were observed in the older age group independent of breed and diet. Independent of breed, birds fed with bf showed higher CFU of C. jejuni compared to lf-fed groups. Campylobacter jejuni-inoculation had a significant effect on lymphocyte numbers and cytokine expression levels in BT birds independent of feeding strategy (p breeds. Diet and breed influenced C. jejuni colonization, immune responses and microbiota composition to a different extent comparing between LT and BT birds. The mechanisms behind these differences have to be elucidated further. Our results suggest that selection for more resistant breeds in combination with adapted feeding strategies may help to reduce Campylobacter colonization levels in commercial poultry in the future.

  9. Analysis of the roles of NrdR and DnaB from Streptococcus pyogenes in response to host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Okada, Ryo; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2015-03-01

    Toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) is a re-emerging infectious disease. Many virulence-associated proteins play important roles in its pathogenesis and the production of these proteins is controlled by many regulatory factors. CovS is one of the most important two-component sensor proteins in S. pyogenes, and it has been analyzed extensively. Our recent analyses revealed the existence of a transposon between covS and nrdR in several strains, and we speculated that this insertion has some importance. Hence, we examined the significances of the NrdR stand-alone regulator and DnaB, which is encoded by the gene located immediately downstream of nrdR in S. pyogenes infection. We established an nrdR-only knockout strain, and both nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain. These established knockout strains exhibited a deteriorated response to H2 O2 exposure. nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain was more easily killed by human polynuclear blood cells, but the nrdR-only knockout strain had no significant difference compared to wild type in contrast to the combined knockout strain. In addition, the mouse infection model experiment illustrated that nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain, but not the nrdR-only knockout strain, was less virulent compared with the parental strain. These results suggest that DnaB is involved in response to host defense.

  10. Exercise Improves Host Response to Influenza Viral Infection in Obese and Non-Obese Mice through Different Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kristi J.; Olson, Molly M.; Thompson, Nicholas J.; Cahill, Mackenzie L.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Yoon, Kyoungjin J.; Loiacono, Christina M.; Kohut, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with greater severity of influenza virus infection and impaired host defense. Exercise may confer health benefits even when weight loss is not achieved, but it has not been determined if regular exercise improves immune defense against influenza A virus (IAV) in the obese condition. In this study, diet-induced obese mice and lean control mice exercised for eight weeks followed by influenza viral infection. Exercise reduced disease severity in both obese and non-obese mice, but the mechanisms differed. Exercise reversed the obesity-associated delay in bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) cell infiltration, restored BAL cytokine and chemokine production, and increased ciliary beat frequency and IFNα-related gene expression. In non-obese mice, exercise treatment reduced lung viral load, increased Type-I-IFN-related gene expression early during infection, but reduced BAL inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In both obese and non-obese mice, exercise increased serum anti-influenza virus specific IgG2c antibody, increased CD8+ T cell percentage in BAL, and reduced TNFα by influenza viral NP-peptide-responding CD8+ T cells. Overall, the results suggest that exercise “restores” the immune response of obese mice to a phenotype similar to non-obese mice by improving the delay in immune activation. In contrast, in non-obese mice exercise treatment results in an early reduction in lung viral load and limited inflammatory response. PMID:26110868

  11. Non-oncogenic Acute Viral Infections Disrupt Anti-cancer Responses and Lead to Accelerated Cancer-Specific Host Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick J. Kohlhapp

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of increased cancer prevalence and cancer-specific deaths in patients with infections, we investigated whether infections alter anti-tumor immune responses. We report that acute influenza infection of the lung promotes distal melanoma growth in the dermis and leads to accelerated cancer-specific host death. Furthermore, we show that during influenza infection, anti-melanoma CD8+ T cells are shunted from the tumor to the infection site, where they express high levels of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1. Immunotherapy to block PD-1 reverses this loss of anti-tumor CD8+ T cells from the tumor and decreases infection-induced tumor growth. Our findings show that acute non-oncogenic infection can promote cancer growth, raising concerns regarding acute viral illness sequelae. They also suggest an unexpected role for PD-1 blockade in cancer immunotherapy and provide insight into the immune response when faced with concomitant challenges.

  12. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    the rIPD. Most common was immune deficiency due to transplantation. In 19% the episode of rIPD was the clinical manifestation that subsequently led to a diagnosis of an underlying disease. Finally, in 31% of the children no underlying disease was detected. Paper 2 covers data from a follow-up of the cohort of children described in Paper 1. Of this unselected cohort of rIPD, all children without an obvious underlying disease predisposing to pneumococcal disease (such as malignancy, HIV or cerebrospinal-fluid leakage) were invited to participate in the study by undergoing a thorough immunological evaluation. Basic immunological parameters including activity of complement-pathways and T-, B-, NK-cell count were examined in the children and their families. Furthermore, B-cell function including antibody response to polysaccharide-based pneumococcal vaccination and somatic hypermutation was evaluated. Toll like receptor (TLR) signalling function was evaluated in a functional assay. When children with classical risk factors for IPD were excluded, 15 individuals were eligible. Of whom, sex (40%) children with complement C2 deficiency were identified. Moreover, impaired vaccination response was found in six children: three with concurrent C2 deficiency and three with no other immune abnormality. One patient with a severe TLR signalling dysfunction was diagnosed. In Paper 3, we aimed to assess the impact of PCV7 in Denmark following the first three years of infant immunization. By comparing age-specific disease incidences of IPD in the pre-PCV7 (years 2000-2007) and the PCV7 periods (years 2008-2010) we sought to assess direct and indirect effects on incidence of IPD. In addition, changes in pneumococcal serotype distribution and IPD-related mortality were assessed. We documented a marked decline in the incidence of IPD in both vaccinated and non-vaccinated age groups. The overall incidence of IPD among children aged 0-5 years declined from 26.7 to 16.3 cases per 100,000 (IRR

  13. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Robinson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1 adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  14. Probing genetic control of swine responses to PRRSV infection: current progress of the PRRS host genetics consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunney Joan K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the role of host genetics in resistance to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection, and the effects of PRRS on pig health and related growth, are goals of the PRRS Host Genetics Consortium (PHGC. Methods The project uses a nursery pig model to assess pig resistance/susceptibility to primary PRRSV infection. To date, 6 groups of 200 crossbred pigs from high health farms were donated by commercial sources. After acclimation, the pigs were infected with PRRSV in a biosecure facility and followed for 42 days post infection (dpi. Blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 dpi for serum and whole blood RNA gene expression analyses; weekly weights were recorded for growth traits. All data have been entered into the PHGC relational database. Genomic DNAs from all PHGC1-6 pigs were prepared and genotyped with the Porcine SNP60 SNPchip. Results Results have affirmed that all challenged pigs become PRRSV infected with peak viremia being observed between 4-21 dpi. Multivariate statistical analyses of viral load and weight data have identified PHGC pigs in different virus/weight categories. Sera are now being compared for factors involved in recovery from infection, including speed of response and levels of immune cytokines. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are underway to identify genes and chromosomal locations that identify PRRS resistant/susceptible pigs and pigs able to maintain growth while infected with PRRSV. Conclusions Overall, the PHGC project will enable researchers to discover and verify important genotypes and phenotypes that predict resistance/susceptibility to PRRSV infection. The availability of PHGC samples provides a unique opportunity to continue to develop deeper phenotypes on every PRRSV infected pig.

  15. Infection of C57BL/6 mice by Trypanosoma musculi modulates host immune responses during Brucella abortus cocolonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Jake E; Leonhardt, Jack A; Yao, Chaoqun; Belden, E Lee; Andrews, Gerard P

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis, which results in fetal abortions in domestic and wildlife animal populations, is of major concern in the US and throughout much of the world. The disease, caused by Brucella abortus, poses an economic threat to agriculture-based communities. A moderately efficacious live attenuated vaccine (B. abortus strain RB51) exists. However, even with vaccine use, outbreaks occur. Evidence suggests that elk (Cervus canadensis), a wild host reservoir, are the source of recent outbreaks in domestic cattle herds in Wyoming, USA. Brucella abortus establishes a chronic, persistent infection in elk. The molecular mechanisms allowing the establishment of this persistent infective state are currently unknown. A potential mechanism could be that concurrent pathogen burdens contribute to persistence. In Wyoming, elk are chronically infected with Trypanosoma cervi, which may modulate host responses in a similar manner to that documented for other trypanosomes. To identify any synergistic relationship between the two pathogens, we simulated coinfection in the well-established murine brucellosis model using Trypanosoma musculi and B. abortus S19. Groups of C57BL/6 mice (Mus musculus) were infected with either B. abortus strain 19 (S19) or T. musculi or both. Sera were collected weekly; spleens from euthanized mice were tested to determine bacterial load near the end of normal brucellosis infection. Although changes in bacterial load were observed during the later stages of brucellosis in those mice coinfected with T. musculi, the most significant finding was the suppression of gamma interferon early during the infection along with an increase in interleukin-10 secretion compared with mice infected with either pathogen alone. These results suggest that immune modulatory events occur in the mouse during coinfection and that further experiments are warranted to determine if T. cervi impacts Brucella infection in elk.

  16. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark W; Donnelly, Sheila; Hutchinson, Andrew T; To, Joyce; Taylor, Nicole L; Norton, Raymond S; Perugini, Matthew A; Dalton, John P

    2011-05-01

    Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence) peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs) that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1) adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP) and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  17. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Immune Response Induction during Sequential Treatment with SB 9200 Followed by Entecavir in Woodchucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Manasa; Korolowicz, Kyle E; Balarezo, Maria; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Cleary, Dillon; Gimi, Rayomand; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Yon, Changsuek; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Tucker, Robin D; Afdhal, Nezam; Menne, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    SB 9200, an orally bioavailable dinucleotide, activates the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) causing the induction of the interferon (IFN) signaling cascade for antiviral defense. The present study evaluated the overall antiviral response in woodchucks upon induction of immune response, first with SB 9200 followed by Entecavir (ETV) versus reduction of viral burden with ETV followed by SB 9200 immunomodulation. Woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) were treated orally with SB 9200 (30 mg/kg/day) and ETV (0.5 mg/kg/day). Group 1 received ETV for 4 weeks followed by SB 9200 for 12 weeks. Group 2 received SB 9200 for 12 weeks followed by ETV for 4 weeks. At the end of treatment in Group 2, average reductions of 6.4 log10 in serum WHV DNA and 3.3 log10 in WHV surface antigen were observed whereas in Group 1, average reductions of 4.2 log10 and 1.1 log10 in viremia and antigenemia were noted. Both groups demonstrated marked reductions in hepatic WHV nucleic acid levels which were more pronounced in Group 2. Following treatment cessation and the 8-week follow-up, recrudescence of viral replication was observed in Group 1 while viral relapse in Group 2 was significantly delayed. The antiviral effects observed in both groups were associated with temporally different induction of IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver. These results suggest that the induction of host immune responses by pretreatment with SB 9200 followed by ETV resulted in antiviral efficacy that was superior to that obtained using the strategy of viral reduction with ETV followed by immunomodulation.

  18. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

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    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  19. Modulation of host immunity by beneficial microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamioudis, Christos; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2012-02-01

    In nature, plants abundantly form beneficial associations with soilborne microbes that are important for plant survival and, as such, affect plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Classical examples of symbiotic microbes are mycorrhizal fungi that aid in the uptake of water and minerals, and Rhizobium bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. Several other types of beneficial soilborne microbes, such as plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria and fungi with biological control activity, can stimulate plant growth by directly suppressing deleterious soilborne pathogens or by priming aboveground plant parts for enhanced defense against foliar pathogens or insect herbivores. The establishment of beneficial associations requires mutual recognition and substantial coordination of plant and microbial responses. A growing body of evidence suggests that beneficial microbes are initially recognized as potential invaders, after which an immune response is triggered, whereas, at later stages of the interaction, mutualists are able to short-circuit plant defense responses to enable successful colonization of host roots. Here, we review our current understanding of how symbiotic and nonsymbiotic beneficial soil microbes modulate the plant immune system and discuss the role of local and systemic defense responses in establishing the delicate balance between the two partners.

  20. Non structural protein of avian influenza A (H11N1 virus is a weaker suppressor of immune responses but capable of inducing apoptosis in host cells

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    Mukherjee Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Non-Structural (NS1 protein of Influenza A viruses is an extensively studied multifunctional protein which is commonly considered as key viral component to fight against host immune responses. Even though there has been a lot of studies on the involvement of NS1 protein in host immune responses there are still ambiguities regarding its role in apoptosis in infected cells. Interactions of NS1 protein with host factors, role of NS1 protein in regulating cellular responses and apoptosis are quite complicated and further studies are still needed to understand it completely. Results NS1 genes of influenza A/Chicken/India/WBNIV2653/2008 (H5N1 and A/Aquatic bird/India/NIV-17095/2007(H11N1 were cloned and expressed in human embryonic kidney (293T cells. Microarray based approach to study the host cellular responses to NS1 protein of the two influenza A viruses of different pathogenicity showed significant differences in the host gene expression profile. NS1 protein of H5N1 resulted in suppression of IFN-β mediated innate immune responses, leading to down-regulation of the components of JAK-STAT pathway like STAT1 which further suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines like CXCL10 and CCL5. The degree of suppression of host immune genes was found considerable with NS1 protein of H11N1 but was not as prominent as with H5N1-NS1. TUNEL assay analyses were found to be positive in both the NS1 transfected cells indicating both H5N1 as well as H11N1 NS1 proteins were able to induce apoptosis in transfected cells. Conclusions We propose that NS1 protein of both H5N1 and H11N1 subtypes of influenza viruses are capable of influencing host immune responses and possess necessary functionality to support apoptosis in host cells. H11N1, a low pathogenic virus without any proven evidence to infect mammals, contains a highly potential NS1 gene which might contribute to greater virus virulence in different gene combinations.

  1. Characterization of a variant of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri that triggers a host-specific defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, María A; Siciliano, María F; Ornella, Leonardo; Roeschlin, Roxana A; Favaro, María A; Delgado, Natalia Pino; Sendín, Lorena N; Orce, Ingrid G; Ploper, L Daniel; Vojnov, Adrian A; Vacas, José Gadea; Filippone, María P; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, María R

    2013-06-01

    Citrus is an economically important fruit crop that is severely afflicted by Asiatic citrus bacterial canker (CBC), a disease caused by the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (X. citri). To gain insight into the molecular epidemiology of CBC, 42 Xanthomonas isolates were collected from a range of Citrus spp. across 17 different orchards in Tucumán, Argentina and subjected to molecular, biochemical, and pathogenicity tests. Analysis of genome-specific X. citri markers and DNA polymorphisms based on repetitive elements-based polymerase chain reaction showed that all 42 isolates belonged to X. citri. Interestingly, pathogenicity tests showed that one isolate, which shares >90% genetic similarity to the reference strain X. citri T, has host range specificity. This new variant of X. citri subsp. citri, named X. citri A(T), which is deficient in xanthan production, induces an atypical, noncankerous chlorotic phenotype in Citrus limon and C. paradisi and weak cankerous lesions in C. aurantifolia and C. clementina leaves. In C. limon, suppression of canker development is concomitant with an oxidative burst; xanthan is not implicated in the phenotype induced by this interaction, suggesting that other bacterial factors would be involved in triggering the defense response.

  2. Adenovirus entry from the apical surface of polarized epithelia is facilitated by the host innate immune response.

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    Poornima L N Kotha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of viral-induced respiratory disease begins with an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease susceptibility to viral infection. The primary receptor for most adenoviruses is the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, a cell-cell adhesion protein normally localized at the basolateral surface of polarized epithelia and involved in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Recently, an alternate isoform of CAR, CAREx8, has been identified at the apical surface of polarized airway epithelia and is implicated in viral infection from the apical surface. We hypothesized that the endogenous role of CAREx8 may be to facilitate host innate immunity. We show that IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine and a neutrophil chemoattractant, stimulates the protein expression and apical localization of CAREx8 via activation of AKT/S6K and inhibition of GSK3β. Apical CAREx8 tethers infiltrating neutrophils at the apical surface of a polarized epithelium. Moreover, neutrophils present on the apical-epithelial surface enhance adenovirus entry into the epithelium. These findings suggest that adenovirus evolved to co-opt an innate immune response pathway that stimulates the expression of its primary receptor, apical CAREx8, to allow the initial infection the intact epithelium. In addition, CAREx8 is a new target for the development of novel therapeutics for both respiratory inflammatory disease and adenoviral infection.

  3. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  4. Adenovirus entry from the apical surface of polarized epithelia is facilitated by the host innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Poornima L N; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Yan, Ran; Alghamri, Mahmoud S; Brockman, Trisha L; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2015-03-01

    Prevention of viral-induced respiratory disease begins with an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease susceptibility to viral infection. The primary receptor for most adenoviruses is the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell-cell adhesion protein normally localized at the basolateral surface of polarized epithelia and involved in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Recently, an alternate isoform of CAR, CAREx8, has been identified at the apical surface of polarized airway epithelia and is implicated in viral infection from the apical surface. We hypothesized that the endogenous role of CAREx8 may be to facilitate host innate immunity. We show that IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine and a neutrophil chemoattractant, stimulates the protein expression and apical localization of CAREx8 via activation of AKT/S6K and inhibition of GSK3β. Apical CAREx8 tethers infiltrating neutrophils at the apical surface of a polarized epithelium. Moreover, neutrophils present on the apical-epithelial surface enhance adenovirus entry into the epithelium. These findings suggest that adenovirus evolved to co-opt an innate immune response pathway that stimulates the expression of its primary receptor, apical CAREx8, to allow the initial infection the intact epithelium. In addition, CAREx8 is a new target for the development of novel therapeutics for both respiratory inflammatory disease and adenoviral infection.

  5. Fine structure and cellular responses at the host-parasite interface in a range of fish-helminth systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, B S; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Shinn, A P; Giari, L

    2015-03-15

    A series of ultrastructural-based studies were conducted on the interface region in different fish-helminth systems: (a) an intestinal infection of the cestode Monobothrium wageneri in tench, Tinca tinca; (b) an extensive intestinal submucosa and mucosal infection in tench by metacercariae of an unidentified digenean trematode; (c) an intestinal infection in brown trout, Salmo trutta, by the acanthocephalan Dentitruncus truttae; (d) an extraintestinal infection by larvae of the acanthocephalan, Pomphorhynchus laevis in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus; and (e) an infection in the livers of Eurasian minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus, by larvae of the nematode Raphidascaris acus. Endoparasitic helminths frequently cause inflammation of the digestive tract and associated organs, inducing the recruitment of various immune cells to the site of infection. In each of the fish-helminth systems that were studied, a massive hyperplastic granulocyte response involving mast cells (MCs) and neutrophils in close proximity to the helminths was documented. The current study presents data on the interface region in each fish-helminth system and documents the penetration of mast cells granules within the tegument of P. laevis larvae. No extracellular vesicles containing tegumental secretions from any of the four different taxa of endoparasitic helminths species at the host-parasite interface region were seen.

  6. Silencing of the olfactory co-receptor gene in Dendroctonus armandi leads to EAG response declining to major host volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Gao, Guanqun; Chen, Hui

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on homology genes of Orco was utilized to identify DarmOrco, which is essential for olfaction in D. armandi. The results showed that DarmOrco shares significant sequence homology with Orco proteins had known in other insects. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis suggested that DarmOrco was abundantly expressed in adult D. armandi; by contrast, DarmOrco showed trace amounts of expression level in other stages. Of different tissues, DarmOrco expression level was the highest in the antennae. In order to understand the functional significance of Orco, we injected siRNA of DarmOrco into the conjunctivum between the second and third abdominal segments, and evaluated its expression after siRNA injected for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The results of qRT-PCR demonstrated that the reduction of mRNA expression level was significant (~80%) in DarmOrco siRNA-treated D. armandi than in water-injected and non-injected controls. The electroantennogram responses of females and males to 11 major volatiles of its host, were also reduced (30~68% for females; 16~70% for males) in siRNA-treated D. armandi compared with the controls. These results suggest that DarmOrco is crucial in mediating odorant perception.

  7. Interferon-mediated host response in experimentally induced salmonid alphavirus 1 infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Tharangani K; Thompson, Kim D; Adams, Alexandra; Richards, Randolph H

    2013-09-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) infection in cultured salmonids causes severe economic losses across Europe. Immune protection and antiviral mechanisms of the host against SAV are poorly characterised in vivo. Analysis of immune gene expression in head kidney of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) experimentally infected with SAV 1, using a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), revealed rapid induction of interferon I (INF-I), interferon II (INF-II) and INF-I associated Mx genes in SAV 1 infected fish compared to control fish injected with tissue culture supernatant. Mx protein was found to be highly expressed in the heart and mucosal membranes of infected fish by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Interestingly, the pathological changes that were observed in the target tissues of the virus became visible some time after peak expression of genes associated with the INF-I-pathway in head kidney tissue. These findings suggest that a non-specific antiviral immune response is rapidly induced during the early stages of SAV infection in salmon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tissue loss (white syndrome) in the coral Montipora capitata is a dynamic disease with multiple host responses and potential causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Russell, Robin; Aeby, Greta S.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue loss diseases or white syndromes (WS) are some of the most important coral diseases because they result in significant colony mortality and morbidity, threatening dominant Acroporidae in the Caribbean and Pacific. The causes of WS remain elusive in part because few have examined affected corals at the cellular level. We studied the cellular changes associated with WS over time in a dominant Hawaiian coral, Montipora capitata, and showed that: (i) WS has rapidly progressing (acute) phases mainly associated with ciliates or slowly progressing (chronic) phases mainly associated with helminths or chimeric parasites; (ii) these phases interchanged and waxed and waned; (iii) WS could be a systemic disease associated with chimeric parasitism or a localized disease associated with helminths or ciliates; (iv) corals responded to ciliates mainly with necrosis and to helminths or chimeric parasites with wound repair; (v) mixed infections were uncommon; and (vi) other than cyanobacteria, prokaryotes associated with cell death were not seen. Recognizing potential agents associated with disease at the cellular level and the host response to those agents offers a logical deductive rationale to further explore the role of such agents in the pathogenesis of WS in M. capitata and helps explain manifestation of gross lesions. This approach has broad applicability to the study of the pathogenesis of coral diseases in the field and under experimental settings.

  9. Comprehensive transcript profiling of Pto- and Prf-mediated host defense responses to infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysore, Kirankumar S; Crasta, Oswald R; Tuori, Robert P; Folkerts, Otto; Swirsky, Peter B; Martin, Gregory B

    2002-11-01

    The disease resistance gene Pto encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that confers resistance in tomato to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strains that express the effector protein AvrPto. Pto-mediated resistance to bacterial speck disease also requires Prf, a protein with leucine-rich repeats and a putative nucleotide-binding site, although the role of Prf in the defense pathway is not known. We used GeneCalling, an open-architecture, mRNA-profiling technology, to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in leaves 4 h after bacterial infection in the Pto- and Prf-mediated tomato-Pseudomonas(avrPto) interaction. Over 135 000 individual cDNA fragments representing an estimated 90% of the transcripts expressed in tomato leaves were examined and 432 differentially expressed genes were identified. The genes encode over 25 classes of proteins including 11 types of transcription factors and many signal transduction components. Differential expression of 91% of the genes required both Pto and Prf. Interestingly, differential expression of 32 genes did not require Pto but was dependent on Prf. Thus, our data support a role for Prf early in the Pto pathway and indicate that Prf can also function as an independent host recognition determinant of bacterial infection. Comprehensive expression profiling of the Pto-mediated defense response allows the development of many new hypotheses about the molecular basis of resistance to bacterial speck disease.

  10. Innate immune responses to systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice: neutrophils, but not interleukin-17, mediate host resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Jessica M; Meissler, Joseph J; Hartzell, Rebecca R; Spence, Phillip B; Truant, Allan; Gaughan, John; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2011-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with a high prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant strains, causing pneumonia and sepsis. The current studies further develop a systemic mouse model of this infection and characterize selected innate immune responses to the organism. Five clinical isolates, with various degrees of antibiotic resistance, were assessed for virulence in two mouse strains, and between male and female mice, using intraperitoneal infection. A nearly 1,000-fold difference in virulence was found between bacterial strains, but no significant differences between sexes or mouse strains were observed. It was found that microbes disseminated rapidly from the peritoneal cavity to the lung and spleen, where they replicated. A persistent septic state was observed. The infection progressed rapidly, with mortality between 36 and 48 h. Depletion of neutrophils with antibody to Ly-6G decreased mean time to death and increased mortality. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) promotes the response of neutrophils by inducing production of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (KC/CXCL1), the mouse homolog of human IL-8. Acinetobacter infection resulted in biphasic increases in both IL-17 and KC/CXCL1. Depletion of neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1, using specific antibodies, resulted in a difference in bacterial burdens in organs of infected mice at 10 h postinfection. Comparison of bacterial burdens between IL-17a(-/-) and wild-type mice confirmed that the absence of this cytokine did not sensitize mice to Acinetobacter infection. These studies definitely demonstrate the importance of neutrophils in resistance to systemic Acinetobacter infection. However, neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1 alone is required for effective host defense to systemic infection with this organism.

  11. Diversion of the host humoral response: a novel virulence mechanism of Haemophilus influenzae mediated via outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deknuydt, Florence; Nordström, Therése; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2014-06-01

    The respiratory tract pathogen Haemophilus influenzae frequently causes infections in humans. In parallel with all Gram-negative bacteria, H. influenzae has the capacity to release OMV. The production of these nanoparticles is an intriguing and partly unexplored phenomenon in pathogenesis. Here, we investigated how purified human peripheral blood B lymphocytes respond to OMV derived from unencapsulated, i.e., NTHi and the nonpathogenic Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We found that H. influenzae OMV directly interacted with the IgD BCR, as revealed by anti-IgD pAb and flow cytometry. Importantly, H. influenzae OMV-induced cel