WorldWideScience

Sample records for delaying hiv disease

  1. Cysteine 138 mutation in HIV-1 Nef from patients with delayed disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Martin; Laursen, Alex Lund; Gerstoft, J.

    2006-01-01

    on the delayed disease status. However, the results demonstrate a high incidence of a single amino acid polymorphism (cysteine 138) in HIV-1 Nef. The allelic frequency of cysteine 138 between the delayed disease progression group and the progressor group was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.......0139). The phylogeny of isolates was investigated and the variants harbouring the cysteine 138 mutation clustered independently. CONCLUSION: The present study describes a viral genetic polymorphism related to AIDS disease progression. The polymorphism (cysteine 138) has previously been reported to confer decreased...... viral replication (Premkumar DR, et al. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 1996; 12(4): 337-45). A sequence database search for comparative mutations revealed a high frequency of cysteine 138 in patients with reported SP AIDS...

  2. Cysteine 138 mutation in HIV-1 Nef from patients with delayed disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Martin; Laursen, Alex Lund; Gerstoft, J.

    2006-01-01

    .0139). The phylogeny of isolates was investigated and the variants harbouring the cysteine 138 mutation clustered independently. CONCLUSION: The present study describes a viral genetic polymorphism related to AIDS disease progression. The polymorphism (cysteine 138) has previously been reported to confer decreased......-1 isolates from patients in a long-term non-progressor (LTNP) cohort and a slow-progressor (SP) cohort (n = 11) was analysed and compared with isolates from a control patient group of progressors (n = 18). Most of the patients with delayed disease progression had extensive medical records, providing...... an insight into the LTNP disease profile and allowing for the stratification of patients based on their CD4 cell decline. RESULTS: In sequences from nine patients, most of the functional domains of HIV-1 Nef appeared intact, and no major deletions were observed to possibly account for an effect...

  3. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  4. Allowing Brief Delays in Responding Improves Event-Based Prospective Memory for Young Adults Living with HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Shayne; Doyle, Katie L.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Weber, Erica; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory (PM) tasks require individuals to remember to perform an action when they encounter a specific cue in the environment, and have clear relevance for daily functioning for individuals with HIV. In many everyday tasks, the individual must not only maintain the intent to perform the PM task, but the PM task response also competes with the alternative and more habitual task response. The current study examined whether event-based PM can be improved by slowing down the pace of the task environment. Fifty-seven young adults living with HIV performed an ongoing lexical decision task while simultaneously performing a PM task of monitoring for a specific word (which was focal to the ongoing task of making lexical decisions) or syllable contained in a word (which was nonfocal). Participants were instructed to refrain from making task responses until after a tone was presented, which occurred at varying onsets (0–1600ms) after each stimulus appeared. Improvements in focal and non-focal PM accuracy were observed with response delays of 600ms. Furthermore, the difference in PM accuracy between the low demand focal PM task and the resource demanding non-focal PM task was reduced by half across increasingly longer delays, falling from 31% at 0ms delay to only 14% at 1600ms delay. The degree of ongoing task response slowing for the PM conditions, relative to a control condition that did not have a PM task and made lexical decisions only, also decreased with increased delay. Overall, the evidence indicates that delaying the task responses of younger HIV-infected adults increased the probability that the PM relevant features of task stimuli were adequately assessed prior to the ongoing task response, and by implication that younger HIV infected adults can more adequately achieve PM goals when the pace of the task environment is slowed down. PMID:25116075

  5. Allowing Brief Delays in Responding Improves Event-Based Prospective Memory for Young Adults Living with HIV Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Loft, Shayne; Doyle, Katie L.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Weber, Erica; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory (PM) tasks require individuals to remember to perform an action when they encounter a specific cue in the environment, and have clear relevance for daily functioning for individuals with HIV. In many everyday tasks, the individual must not only maintain the intent to perform the PM task, but the PM task response also competes with the alternative and more habitual task response. The current study examined whether event-based PM can be improved by slowing down th...

  6. HIV and bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Benjamin; Dockrell, David; Bowman, Christine; McCloskey, Eugene

    2010-11-01

    Advances in management have resulted in a dramatic decline in mortality for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This decrease in mortality, initially the result of improved prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections but later mediated by the use of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to the need to consider long-term complications of the disease itself, or its treatment. Bone disease is increasingly recognised as a concern. The prevalence of reduced BMD and possibly also fracture incidence are increased in HIV-positive individuals compared with HIV-negative controls. There are many potential explanations for this - an increased prevalence of established osteoporosis risk factors in the HIV-positive population, a likely direct effect of HIV infection itself and a possible contributory role of ARV therapy. At present, the assessment of bone disease and fracture risk remains patchy, with little or no guidance on identifying those at increased risk of reduced BMD or fragility fracture. Preventative and therapeutic strategies with bone specific treatments need to be developed. Limited data suggest bisphosphonates may be beneficial in conjunction with vitamin D and calcium supplementation in the treatment of reduced BMD in HIV-infected patients but larger studies of longer duration are needed. The safety and cost-effectiveness of these and other treatments needs to be evaluated. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. HIV and chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Naicker, Saraladevi; Rahmania, Sadaf; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent complication of HIV infection, occurring in 3.5 – 48.5%, and occurs as a complication of HIV infection, other co-morbid disease and infections and as a consequence of therapy of HIV infection and its complications. The classic involvement of the kidney by HIV infection is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), occurring typically in young adults of African ancestry with advanced HIV disease in association with APOL1 high-risk variants. HIV-immune comple...

  8. Delayed habituation in Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulturk, Sefa; Akyol, Melih; Kececi, Hulusi; Ozcelik, Sedat; Cinar, Ziynet; Demirkazik, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system in Behcet's patients may be affected due to various reasons. This entity may be detected with the measurement of the electrodermal activities, heart rate variability and pupillometric methods. Habituation is one of the implicit forms of learning and memory and the loss of habituation can reveal pathological changes in the synaptic regions. To determine whether there is a functional decrease in the synaptic effectiveness (habituation) of the pathways to sympathetic neurons that had been repeatedly activated in Behcet's. Twelve patients with Behcet's disease and 12 healthy controls were included in the study. Sympathetic skin potential (SSP) records were taken at normal room temperature in a quiet place within a Faraday cage. Sixteen square wave single shock impulses (duration: 1200 ms, strength: 5 mA) were applied on each case. After the 1st stimulus, the SSP amplitudes were lower in the patients compared to the controls (P0.05). Whereas there was no significant differences among the SSP amplitudes after the 9th impulse in the controls (P>0.05). The habituation rate of the SSP after consecutive impulses was slowest in the patients compared to controls (P<0.001, t value=12.39). There is a delayed habituation in Behcet's disease and that may due to pathologic changes with vasculitis through their peripheral nerves.

  9. The effects of HIV disease and older age on laboratory-based, naturalistic, and self-perceived symptoms of prospective memory: does retrieval cue type and delay interval matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, G; Loft, S; Sheppard, D P; Woods, S P

    2016-11-01

    There is a rising prevalence of older HIV+ adults who are at risk of deficits in higher order neurocognitive functions and associated problems in everyday functioning. The current study applied multiprocess theory to examine the effects of HIV and aging on measures of laboratory-based, naturalistic, and self-perceived symptoms of prospective memory (PM). Participants included 125 Younger (48 with HIV, age = 32 ± 4.6 years) and 189 Older (112 with HIV, age = 56 ± 4.9 years) adults. Controlling for global neurocognitive functioning, mood, and other demographics, older age and HIV had independent effects on long-delay time-based PM in the laboratory, whereas on a naturalistic PM task older HIV- adults performed better than older HIV+ adults and younger persons. In line with the naturalistic findings, older age, but not HIV, was associated with a relative sparing of self-perceived PM failures in daily life across longer delay self-cued intervals. Findings suggest that, even in relatively younger aging cohorts, the effects of HIV and older age on PM can vary across PM delay intervals by the strategic demands of the retrieval cue type, are expressed differently in the laboratory and in daily life, and are independent of other higher order neurocognitive functions (e.g., retrospective memory).

  10. A Discrete Model for HIV Infection with Distributed Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim EL Boukari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a consistent discretization of a continuous model of HIV infection, with distributed time delays to express the lag between the times when the virus enters a cell and when the cell becomes infected. The global stability of the steady states of the model is determined and numerical simulations are presented to illustrate our theoretical results.

  11. Viruses & kidney disease: beyond HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Meryl; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-infected patients may acquire new viral co-infections; they may also experience the reactivation or worsening of existing viral infections, including active, smoldering, or latent infections. HIV-infected patients may be predisposed to these viral infections due to immunodeficiency or to risk factors common to HIV and other viruses. A number of these affect the kidney, either by direct infection or by deposition of immune complexes. In this review we discuss the renal manifestations and treatment of hepatitis C virus, BK virus, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and parvovirus B19 in patients with HIV disease. We also discuss an approach to the identification of new viral renal pathogens, using a viral gene chip to identify viral DNA or RNA. PMID:19013331

  12. Multicentric Castleman's disease & HIV infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2009-10-01

    We report the case of a 35 year patient from Nigeria who presented with fever and splenomegaly. The initial diagnosis was Salmonellosis. However, relapsing symptoms lead to a re-evaluation and ultimately a diagnosis of Multicentric Castleman\\'s Disease (MCD). There is no gold standard treatment but our patient responded to Rituximab and Highly active anti-retroviral therapy. MCD is a rare, aggressive disease that should be considered in a HIV positive patient presenting with fever and significant lymphadenopathy.

  13. Bilingualism delays clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Woumans, Evy; Santens, Patrick; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Stevens, Michaël; Duyck, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of bilingualism on the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a European sample of patients. We assessed all incoming AD patients in two university hospitals within a specified timeframe. Sixty-nine monolinguals and 65 bilinguals diagnosed with probable AD were compared for time of clinical AD manifestation and diagnosis. The influence of other potentially interacting variables was also examined. Results indicated a significant delay f...

  14. Early versus delayed initiation of antiretroviral therapy for Indian HIV-Infected individuals with tuberculosis on antituberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjeev; Shekhar, Rahul C; Singh, Gurjeet; Shah, Nipam; Ahmad, Hafiz; Kumar, Narendra; Sharma, Surendra K; Samantaray, J C; Ranjan, Sanjai; Ekka, Meera; Sreenivas, Vishnu; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T

    2012-07-31

    For antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults suffering from tuberculosis (TB), there is uncertainty about the optimal time to initiate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after starting antituberculosis treatment (ATT), in order to minimize mortality, HIV disease progression, and adverse events. In a randomized, open label trial at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, eligible HIV positive individuals with a diagnosis of TB were randomly assigned to receive HAART after 2-4 or 8-12 weeks of starting ATT, and were followed for 12 months after HAART initiation. Participants received directly observed therapy short course (DOTS) for TB, and an antiretroviral regimen comprising stavudine or zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. Primary end points were death from any cause, and progression of HIV disease marked by failure of ART. A total of 150 patients with HIV and TB were initiated on HAART: 88 received it after 2-4 weeks (early ART) and 62 after 8-12 weeks (delayed ART) of starting ATT. There was no significant difference in mortality between the groups after the introduction of HAART. However, incidence of ART failure was 31% in delayed versus 16% in early ART arm (p = 0.045). Kaplan Meier disease progression free survival at 12 months was 79% for early versus 64% for the delayed ART arm (p = 0.05). Rates of adverse events were similar. Early initiation of HAART for patients with HIV and TB significantly decreases incidence of HIV disease progression and has good tolerability. CTRI/2011/12/002260.

  15. Early versus delayed initiation of antiretroviral therapy for Indian HIV-Infected individuals with tuberculosis on antituberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Sanjeev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For antiretroviral therapy (ART naive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected adults suffering from tuberculosis (TB, there is uncertainty about the optimal time to initiate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART after starting antituberculosis treatment (ATT, in order to minimize mortality, HIV disease progression, and adverse events. Methods In a randomized, open label trial at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, eligible HIV positive individuals with a diagnosis of TB were randomly assigned to receive HAART after 2-4 or 8-12 weeks of starting ATT, and were followed for 12 months after HAART initiation. Participants received directly observed therapy short course (DOTS for TB, and an antiretroviral regimen comprising stavudine or zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. Primary end points were death from any cause, and progression of HIV disease marked by failure of ART. Findings A total of 150 patients with HIV and TB were initiated on HAART: 88 received it after 2-4 weeks (early ART and 62 after 8-12 weeks (delayed ART of starting ATT. There was no significant difference in mortality between the groups after the introduction of HAART. However, incidence of ART failure was 31% in delayed versus 16% in early ART arm (p = 0.045. Kaplan Meier disease progression free survival at 12 months was 79% for early versus 64% for the delayed ART arm (p = 0.05. Rates of adverse events were similar. Interpretation Early initiation of HAART for patients with HIV and TB significantly decreases incidence of HIV disease progression and has good tolerability. Trial registration CTRI/2011/12/002260

  16. HIV infection and Cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalić Tijana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with AIDS can have a dysfunction of the hypothalamic - pituitary-adrenal axis. With regard to HIV infection, most often mentioned is iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome or Pseudo-Cushing's Syndrome. So far there are described only two cases of Cushing disease in HIV -infected persons. Case report: A 48-year-old patient, after eleven years of HIV infection and a year since the introduction of HAART, was diagnosed with Cushing's disease based on cushingoid habitus, lack of suppression of cortisol in screening, elevated ACTH and pituitary tumor. She had transfenoidal surgery and histopathologic findings corresponded to basophilic adenoma. After the operation, short time on hydrocortisone substitution, she generally felt well with regular ART. Four years later, again easily bruising, facial redness, oily skin with acne, weight gain, uneven distribution of stomach adipose tissue, sweating, oligomenorrhea and high blood pressure. There was no rest/relapse of tumor on control pituitary MRI. Initially, elevated ACTH, valid cortisol in daily profiles, later the absence of the suppression of cortisol after 4 mg (LDST and 8 mg (HDST of dexamethasone along with maintenance of higher ACTH, indicate recurrence of clinical and laboratory relapse wherefore ketoconazole was introduced. Despite increasing doses of ketoconazole, she held slightly higher morning cortisol, ACTH and with persisting Cushing's syndrome. Conclusion: The coexistence of the two entities could lead to overlapping metabolic and phenotypic characteristics and the interaction between and/or synergism.

  17. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000–2006

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Sandra I.; Strauss, Ronald P.; MacDonald, Pia D. M.; Leone, Peter A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Miller, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Many adults in the United States enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social su...

  18. Coinfecting viruses as determinants of HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    The human body constitutes a balanced ecosystem of its own cells together with various microbes ("host-microbe ecosystem"). The transmission of HIV-1 and the progression of HIV disease in such an ecosystem are accompanied by de novo infection by other microbes or by activation of microbes that were present in the host in homeostatic equilibrium before HIV-1 infection. In recent years, data have accumulated on the interactions of these coinfecting microbes-viruses in particular-with HIV. Coinfecting viruses generate negative and positive signals that suppress or upregulate HIV-1. We suggest that the signals generated by these viruses may largely affect HIV transmission, pathogenesis, and evolution. The study of the mechanisms of HIV interaction with coinfecting viruses may indicate strategies to suppress positive signals, enhance negative signals, and lead to the development of new and original anti-HIV therapies.

  19. Factors Associated with Delayed Enrollment in HIV Medical Care among HIV-Positive Individuals in Odessa Region, Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neduzhko, Oleksandr; Postnov, Oleksandr; Perehinets, Ihor; DeHovitz, Jack; Joseph, Michael; Odegaard, David; Kaplan, Robert; Kiriazova, Tetiana

    In Ukraine, about one-third of identified HIV-positive individuals are not connected to care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey (n = 200) among patients registered at Odessa AIDS centers in October to December 2011. Factors associated with delayed enrollment in HIV care (>3 months since positive HIV test) were evaluated using logistic regression. Among study participants (mean age 35 ± 8.2 years, 47.5% female, 42.5% reported history of injecting drugs), 55% delayed HIV care enrollment. Odds of delayed enrollment were higher for those with lower educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.65, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-6.76), not feeling ill (aOR: 2.98, 95% CI: 1.50-5.93), or not having time to go to the AIDS center (aOR: 3.89, 95% CI: 1.39-10.89); injection drug use was not associated with delayed enrollment. Programs linking HIV-positive individuals to specialized care should address enrollment barriers and include education on HIV care benefits and case management for direct linkage to care. HIV testing and treatment should be coupled to ensure a continuum of care.

  20. HIV infection, aging and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W

    2011-01-01

    , including cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is suggested that CVD occurs earlier among HIV-positive patients compared with HIV-negative patients, and at a higher rate. Several factors have been proposed to contribute to this. First, the traditional CVD risk factors are highly prevalent in this population...

  1. Chronic kidney disease in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Rasyid, H.; Kasim, H.; Katu, S.

    2018-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population. Prediction of CKD in HIV patients needsto have done. This study aimis to identify the prevalence of CKD in HIV patients.Thisis a cross-sectional studyofmale and female, age 18-60 years old, diagnosedHIVat Wahidin Sudirohusodo & Hasanuddin University Hospital Makassar. Diagnosed as CKD if estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) HIV patients included in the analyses. Distribution of CKD, showed 3 (3.5%) subjects with eGFRHIV populations in Makassar is still quite low.

  2. Delay in seeking care for tuberculosis symptoms among adults newly diagnosed with HIV in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwira, L G; Dowdy, D W; Khundi, M; Barnes, G L; Nkhoma, A; Choko, A T; Murowa, M; Chaisson, R E; Corbett, E L; Fielding, K

    2018-03-01

    Ten primary health clinics in rural Thyolo District, Malawi. Tuberculosis (TB) is a common initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We investigated the time from TB symptom onset to HIV diagnosis to describe TB health-seeking behaviour in adults newly diagnosed with HIV. We asked adults (18 years) about the presence and duration of TB symptoms at the time of receiving a new HIV diagnosis. Associations with delayed health seeking (defined as >30 and >90 days from the onset of TB symptoms) were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. TB symptoms were reported by 416 of 1265 participants (33%), of whom 36% (150/416) had been symptomatic for >30 days before HIV testing. Most participants (260/416, 63%) were below the poverty line (US$0.41 per household member per day). Patients who first sought care from informal providers had an increased odds of delay of >30 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.6, 95%CI 0.9-2.8) or 90 days (aOR 2.0, 95%CI 1.1-3.8). Delayed health seeking for TB-related symptoms was common. Poverty was ubiquitous, but had no clear relationship to diagnostic delay. HIV-positive individuals who first sought care from informal providers were more likely to experience diagnostic delays for TB symptoms.

  3. Viruses & kidney disease: beyond HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Waldman, Meryl; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-infected patients may acquire new viral co-infections; they may also experience the reactivation or worsening of existing viral infections, including active, smoldering, or latent infections. HIV-infected patients may be predisposed to these viral infections due to immunodeficiency or to risk factors common to HIV and other viruses. A number of these affect the kidney, either by direct infection or by deposition of immune complexes. In this review we discuss the renal manifestations and t...

  4. Complications of HIV Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Havlir, Diane V.; Currier, Judith S.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest in the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of long-term complications of HIV disease and its therapies. Specifically, studies focused on cardiovascular, renal, bone, and fat abnormalities were prominent at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Although enthusiasm about the effectiveness of current antiretroviral therapy remains strong, collectively, the ongoing work in the area of HIV disease and treatment complications appears to refl...

  5. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  6. Factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Valma; Kurppa, Kalle; Huhtala, Heini; Collin, Pekka; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2014-11-01

    Here, we investigated the factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease and the impact of the national Current Care Guidelines in reducing the delay. This population-based study involved 825 adult celiac disease patients. The diagnosis was considered delayed when the interval between first symptoms and diagnosis was >10 years. The patients were asked about the duration and type of symptoms before diagnosis, time and site (tertiary, secondary, or primary care) of the diagnosis, family history of the disease, and presence of significant comorbidities. Analysis was performed by binary logistic regression. Altogether, 261 (32%) out of 825 participants reported a diagnostic delay of >10 years. Female gender, neurological or musculoskeletal disorders and presence of diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption were associated with prolonged delay. Male gender, diagnosis after the introduction of the first Current Care Guidelines in 1997, and being detected by serological screening, and family history of celiac disease were associated with a lower risk of delayed diagnosis. Factors not associated with the delay were site of diagnosis, age, and presence of dermatitis herpetiformis, type 1 diabetes, or thyroidal disease. The number of long diagnostic delays in celiac disease has decreased over the past decades. The shift of diagnostics from secondary and tertiary care to primary care has not been detrimental. National guidelines together with increased awareness and active screening in at-risk groups of celiac disease are important in these circumstances.

  7. Oral complications of HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. Leao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS.

  8. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sandra I; Strauss, Ronald P; MacDonald, Pia D M; Leone, Peter A; Eron, Joseph J; Miller, William C

    2009-09-01

    Many adults in the USA enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred and sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social support (emotional/informational, tangible, affectionate, and positive social interaction) were quantified with a modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale and included in proportional hazards models to determine their effect on delays seeking care. The median delay between diagnosis and entry to primary care was 5.9 months. Levels of social support were high but only positive social interaction was moderately associated with delayed presentation in adjusted models. The effect of low perceived positive social interaction on the time to initiation of primary care differed by history of alcoholism (no history of alcoholism, hazard ratio (HR): 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 2.34; history of alcoholism, HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.28). Ensuring timely access to HIV care remains a challenge in the southeastern USA. Affectionate, tangible, and emotional/informational social support were not associated with the time from diagnosis to care. The presence of positive social interaction may be an important factor influencing care-seeking behavior after diagnosis.

  9. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in humanized HIV-transgenic mice triggers HIV shedding and is associated with greater neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Briana; Fakioglu, Esra; Stefanidou, Martha; Wang, Yanhua; Dutta, Monica; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C

    2014-02-15

    Epidemiological studies consistently demonstrate synergy between herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Higher HIV-1 loads are observed in coinfected individuals, and conversely, HIV-1 is associated with more-severe herpetic disease. A small animal model of coinfection would facilitate identification of the biological mechanisms underlying this synergy and provide the opportunity to evaluate interventions. Mice transgenic for HIV-1 provirus and human cyclin T1 under the control of a CD4 promoter (JR-CSF/hu-cycT1) were intravaginally infected with HSV-2 and evaluated for disease progression, HIV shedding, and mucosal immune responses. HSV-2 infection resulted in higher vaginal HIV loads and genital tissue expression of HIV RNA, compared with HSV-uninfected JR-CSF/hu-cycT1 mice. There was an increase in genital tract inflammatory cells, cytokines, chemokines, and interferons in response to HSV-2, although the kinetics of the response were delayed in HIV-transgenic, compared with control mice. Moreover, the JR-CSF/hu-cycT1 mice exhibited earlier and more-severe neurological disease. The latter was associated with downregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor expression in neuronal tissue, a molecule with antiinflammatory, antiviral, and neuroprotective properties. JR-CSF/hu-cycT1 mice provide a valuable model to study HIV/HSV-2 coinfection and identify potential mechanisms by which HSV-2 facilitates HIV-1 transmission and HIV modulates HSV-2-mediated disease.

  10. Viruses and kidney disease: beyond HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Meryl; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2008-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients may acquire new viral co-infections; they also may experience the reactivation or worsening of existing viral infections, including active, smoldering, or latent infections. HIV-infected patients may be predisposed to these viral infections owing to immunodeficiency or risk factors common to HIV and other viruses. A number of these affect the kidney, either by direct infection or by deposition of immune complexes. In this review we discuss the renal manifestations and treatment of hepatitis C virus, BK virus, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and parvovirus B19 in patients with HIV disease. We also discuss an approach to the identification of new viral renal pathogens, using a viral gene chip to identify viral DNA or RNA.

  11. Delayed HIV diagnosis and initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodi, Sara; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Touloumi, Giota

    2014-01-01

    nine HIV cohorts within COHERE in Austria, France, Greece, Italy, Spain and Switzerland, collecting data on level of education in categories of the UNESCO/International Standard Classification of Education standard classification: non-completed basic, basic, secondary and tertiary education. We...

  12. Effects of early versus delayed initiation of antiretroviral treatment on clinical outcomes of HIV-1 infection: results from the phase 3 HPTN 052 randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Ribaudo, Heather J; Swindells, Susan; Eron, Joseph; Chen, Ying Q; Wang, Lei; Ou, San-San; Anderson, Maija; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeshwaran; Hakim, James G; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Pilotto, Jose H S; Godbole, Sheela V; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; de Melo, Marineide Gonçalves; Mayer, Kenneth H; Eshleman, Susan H; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A; Panchia, Ravindre; Sanne, Ian; Gallant, Joel; Hoffman, Irving; Taha, Taha E; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David; Essex, Max; Havlir, Diane; Cohen, Myron S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Use of antiretroviral treatment for HIV-1 infection has decreased AIDS-related morbidity and mortality and prevents sexual transmission of HIV-1. However, the best time to initiate antiretroviral treatment to reduce progression of HIV-1 infection or non-AIDS clinical events is unknown. We reported previously that early antiretroviral treatment reduced HIV-1 transmission by 96%. We aimed to compare the effects of early and delayed initiation of antiretroviral treatment on clinical outcomes. Methods The HPTN 052 trial is a randomised controlled trial done at 13 sites in nine countries. We enrolled HIV-1-serodiscordant couples to the study and randomly allocated them to either early or delayed antiretroviral treatment by use of permuted block randomisation, stratified by site. Random assignment was unblinded. The HIV-1-infected member of every couple initiated antiretroviral treatment either on entry into the study (early treatment group) or after a decline in CD4 count or with onset of an AIDS-related illness (delayed treatment group). Primary events were AIDS clinical events (WHO stage 4 HIV-1 disease, tuberculosis, and severe bacterial infections) and the following serious medical conditions unrelated to AIDS: serious cardiovascular or vascular disease, serious liver disease, end-stage renal disease, new-onset diabetes mellitus, and non-AIDS malignant disease. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00074581. Findings 1763 people with HIV-1 infection and a serodiscordant partner were enrolled in the study; 886 were assigned early antiretroviral treatment and 877 to the delayed treatment group (two individuals were excluded from this group after randomisation). Median CD4 counts at randomisation were 442 (IQR 373–522) cells per μL in patients assigned to the early treatment group and 428 (357–522) cells per μL in those allocated delayed antiretroviral treatment. In the delayed group

  13. Gastrointestinal diseases in HIV/AIDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    an estimated 65 million people believed to be infected and an estimated. 14 000 new infections ... HIV is a staggering 10 - 20% of the population.1 Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases ... Oral fluconazole is a very successful treatment for ... candidiasis should be started on voriconazole.7 .... habits point to further investigation. An.

  14. TREX1 Knockdown Induces an Interferon Response to HIV that Delays Viral Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Adam Wheeler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite their antiviral effect, the in vivo effect of interferons on HIV transmission is difficult to predict, because interferons also activate and recruit HIV-susceptible cells to sites of infection. HIV does not normally induce type I interferons in infected cells, but does if TREX1 is knocked down. Here, we investigated the effect of topical TREX1 knockdown and local interferon production on HIV transmission in human cervicovaginal explants and humanized mice. In explants in which TREX1 was knocked down, HIV induced interferons, which blocked infection. In humanized mice, even though TREX1 knockdown increased infiltrating immune cells, it delayed viral replication for 3–4 weeks. Similarly intravaginal application of type I interferons the day before HIV infection induced interferon responsive genes, reduced inflammation, and decreased viral replication. However, intravenous interferon enhanced inflammation and infection. Thus, in models of human sexual transmission, a localized interferon response inhibits HIV transmission but systemic interferons do not.

  15. Changing spectrum of renal disease in HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sunil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was done to evaluate the spectrum of various renal histopathological lesions in patients infected with HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus.32 HIV positive patients underwent Renal biopsy over a period of 3 years from October 2013 to September 2016 who had presented with renal dysfunction and urine sediment abnormalities. Out of 32 patients, 24 were males and 8 were females. The mode of transmission of disease was sexual in 25 patients.14 patients presented with Nephrotic range proteinuria and 11 patients underwent RRT (renal replacement therapy. Majority of patients had tubulointerstitial lesions (18 patients followed by glomerular lesions (14 patients.24 patients were receiving HAART (Highly active antiretroviral therapy and majority of them had tubulointerstitial lesions. Hence Renal biopsy is indicated in HIV patients presenting with renal failure to arrive at proper diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Predictors of disease progression in HIV infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananworanich Jintanat

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the extended clinically latent period associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection the virus itself is far from latent. This phase of infection generally comes to an end with the development of symptomatic illness. Understanding the factors affecting disease progression can aid treatment commencement and therapeutic monitoring decisions. An example of this is the clear utility of CD4+ T-cell count and HIV-RNA for disease stage and progression assessment. Elements of the immune response such as the diversity of HIV-specific cytotoxic lymphocyte responses and cell-surface CD38 expression correlate significantly with the control of viral replication. However, the relationship between soluble markers of immune activation and disease progression remains inconclusive. In patients on treatment, sustained virological rebound to >10 000 copies/mL is associated with poor clinical outcome. However, the same is not true of transient elevations of HIV RNA (blips. Another virological factor, drug resistance, is becoming a growing problem around the globe and monitoring must play a part in the surveillance and control of the epidemic worldwide. The links between chemokine receptor tropism and rate of disease progression remain uncertain and the clinical utility of monitoring viral strain is yet to be determined. The large number of confounding factors has made investigation of the roles of race and viral subtype difficult, and further research is needed to elucidate their significance. Host factors such as age, HLA and CYP polymorphisms and psychosocial factors remain important, though often unalterable, predictors of disease progression. Although gender and mode of transmission have a lesser role in disease progression, they may impact other markers such as viral load. Finally, readily measurable markers of disease such as total lymphocyte count, haemoglobin, body mass index and delayed type hypersensitivity may come into favour

  17. Management of HIV disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D L

    1991-01-01

    This brief report is concerned with the management of HIV infection since the 1980's in China. Mention was made of the 2-day Sino/American Symposium on Management of HIV Disease held in Beijing in 1990. Attendance included 600 participants from China and the US. 40 experts presented papers on topics covering diagnosis, treatment, research, prevention, psychology, sociology, ethics, education, and law. The Chinese Minister of Public Health and President of the Chinese Medical Association urged a unified and multiregional and multinational effort and a global network to combat HIV disease. Since the 1980's the Chinese government has instituted measures of prevention and control and recognized the harmful effects to health and life. Since 1985, 300,000 of the high risk population have received blood serum tests, of which 446 were found to be HIV positive. 5 were AIDS patients, of which 3 were foreigners and the other 2 from Beijing and Yunnan Province (southwest region) respectively. Included in the HIV positive group were 68 foreigners and 378 mainland Chinese. There have been no reported cases of mother/child infection. Drug users are identified as the high risk group for contracting and spreading the HIV infection. The number of drug users has increased rapidly, particularly along border regions of the southwest, and the method of use has been identified as intravenous injection. AIDS is now considered by the Chinese government as an infectious disease. There are monitoring stations in almost all provinces. The Ministry of Public Health has 3 laboratories for diagnosis of the HIV virus. A strain of HIV-1 virus has been isolated from a foreign tourist and used to prepare a diagnostic antigen. 5 units currently have P--grade laboratories for researching the etiology and molecular biology of AIDS. Research in medical institutes is also progressing on the use of traditional Chinese medicine to treat AIDS. Cooperation between China and the World Health Organization has

  18. Women and HIV Disease: An Emerging Social Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuntzner-Gibson, Denise

    1991-01-01

    Addresses major social issues faced by women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and explores gender differences in HIV transmission, disease progression, and diagnosis. Discusses how women's sexuality and reproductive rights are affected. Examines specific issues regarding HIV-infected women who use intravenous drugs, women of color,…

  19. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin test responses to PPD and other antigens among BCG-vaccinated HIV-1-infected and healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Natalia Moriya Xavierda; Albuquerque, Maly de; Lins, Janaína Bacelar Acioli; Alvares-Junior, João Teixeira; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2011-10-01

    Among HIV-1-infected patients, CD4+ T cell counts are well-established markers of cell-mediated immunity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests can be used to evaluate in vivo cell-mediated immunity to common antigens. DTH responses to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD), sporotrichin, trichophytin, candidin and streptokinase/streptodornase antigens were assessed. Thirty-six HIV-1-infected children/adolescents and 56 age- and sex-matched HIV-1/HIV-2-seronegative participants were tested. All participants had a BCG scar. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate significant differences between groups (pPPD positivity prevailed among healthy participants (40/56, 71.4%). PPD reactivity in the HIV-1-positive group was 8.3% (pPPD induration was 2.5mm (range: 2-5mm) in the HIV-1 group and 6.0 mm among healthy participants (range: 3-15 mm). There was no correlation between PPD positivity and age. No correlation between CD4+ T cell counts and DTH reactivity was observed among HIV-1-infected patients. DTH skin test responses, including PPD reactivity, were significantly lower among HIV-1-infected participants compared to healthy controls, which likely reflects advanced disease and T cell depletion.

  20. Cardiovascular Diseases in HIV-infected Subjects (HIV-HEART Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Detection of Frequency, Severity and Progression of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients With HIV-infection.; Effect on Cardiovascular Risk and Life Quality by Age, Gender, Classic Cardiovascular Risk Factors,; HIV-specific Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Medication, Antiretroviral Medication

  1. Factors associated with delayed entry into HIV medical care after HIV diagnosis in a resource-limited setting: Data from a cohort study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies from sub-Saharan Africa have shown that a substantial proportion of patients diagnosed with HIV enter into HIV medical care late. However, data from low or middle-income countries outside Africa are scarce. In this study, we investigated risk factors associated with delayed entry into care stratified by gender in a large cohort study in India. 7701 patients were diagnosed with HIV and 5410 entered into care within three months of HIV diagnosis. Nearly 80% entered into care within a year, but most patients who did not enter into care within a year remained lost to follow up or died. Patient with risk factors related to having a low socio-economic status (poverty, being homeless, belonging to a disadvantaged community and illiteracy were more likely to enter into care late. In addition, male gender and being asymptomatic at the moment of HIV infection were factors associated with delayed entry into care. Substantial gender differences were found. Younger age was found to be associated with delayed entry in men, but not in women. Widows and unmarried men were more likely to enter into care within three months. Women belonging to disadvantaged communities or living far from a town were more likely to enter into care late. The results of this study highlight the need to improve the linkage between HIV diagnosis and HIV treatment in India. HIV programmes should monitor patients diagnosed with HIV until they engage in HIV medical care, especially those at increased risk of attrition.

  2. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. Results: We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. Conclusions: The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination. PMID:21060095

  3. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  4. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, James H; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W A; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A; Majoie, Charles B L M; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J; Kalsbeek, A.

    OBJECTIVE: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. METHODS: A

  6. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, James H.; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W. A.; de Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A.; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Schrijver, J. H. N.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Henderiks, A.; Kootstra, N. A.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Maurer, I.; Ruiz, M. M. Mangas; Booiman, T.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Stege, J. A. ter; Twennaar, M. Klein; Su, T.; Siteur-van Rijnstra, E.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé , H. G.; Tembo, L.; Stott, M.; Prins, M. [= Maria

    2017-01-01

    To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. A large sample of

  7. Psychomotor delay, a possible rare presentation of moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafi, M. R.; Alizadeh, H.; Yazdani, Sh.; Mohseni, M.; Mohamadi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare, chronic cerebrovascular occlusive disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by progressive stenosis of the arteries of the circle of Willis leading to ischemic strokes in young people and cerebral hemorrhage, which is more frequent in adults. Secondarily, an abnormal network of fine collateral vessels arises at the base of the brain. The term moyamoya refers to the angiographic appearance of the cerebral vasculature. We present such a disease in an 18-month-old Iranian girl with global developmental delay, which is a very rare presentation of moyamoya disease. She was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography.

  8. Predictors of Delayed Entry into Medical Care of Children Diagnosed with HIV Infection: Data from an HIV Cohort Study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data about the attrition before entry into care of children diagnosed with HIV in low- or middle-income countries are scarce. The aim of this study is to describe the attrition before engagement in HIV medical care in 523 children who were diagnosed with HIV from 2007 to 2012 in a cohort study in India. The cumulative incidence of children who entered into care was 87.2% at one year, but most children who did not enter into care within one year were lost to followup. The mortality before entry into care was low (1.3% at one year and concentrated during the first three months after HIV diagnosis. Factors associated with delayed entry into care were being diagnosed after mother’s HIV diagnosis, belonging to scheduled castes, age 90 minutes from the HIV centre. Children whose parents were alive and were living in a rented house were at a higher risk of delayed entry into care than those who were living in an owned house. The results of this study can be used to improve the linkage between HIV testing and HIV care of children diagnosed with HIV in India.

  9. Stability and Hopf bifurcation in a delayed model for HIV infection of CD4{sup +}T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Liming [Department of Mathematics, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang, 464000 Henan (China); Beijing Institute of Information Control, Beijing 100037 (China)], E-mail: lmcai06@yahoo.com.cn; Li Xuezhi [Department of Mathematics, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang, 464000 Henan (China)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we consider a delayed mathematical model for the interactions of HIV infection and CD4{sup +}T cells. We first investigate the existence and stability of the Equilibria. We then study the effect of the time delay on the stability of the infected equilibrium. Criteria are given to ensure that the infected equilibrium is asymptotically stable for all delay. Moreover, by applying Nyquist criterion, the length of delay is estimated for which stability continues to hold. Finally by using a delay {tau} as a bifurcation parameter, the existence of Hopf bifurcation is also investigated. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  10. Shame, gay men, and HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabar, S

    1995-04-01

    Mental health professionals working with people with HIV disease are often confronted by the patients' feelings of shame and should be prepared to recognize and treat what can sabotage the openness crucial to the therapeutic process. Shame is unlike guilt in that instead of being a transgression against some moral code or value, it is the failure to live up to an internal ideal image of oneself; its sanction is rejection or abandonment as opposed to punishment. Shame can have many triggers, and when faced with these triggers, a strong sense of self can protect a person. However, most people with HIV find that shame does arise in some situations. In its wake, shame can cause withdrawal, substance abuse, depression, denial, rage, grandiosity, lack of entitlement, and perfectionism. Therapists can help gay men deal with shame and cope better with the indignities of HIV infection. Guidelines include building a strong patient/therapist relationship to build trust and improve self-esteem; and identifying the shame, and bringing it out for validation by the patient. Therapists must guide patients to an awareness of their true feelings, and help them trust their perceptions of these needs and feelings.

  11. The effects of HIV-1 regulatory TAT protein expression on brain reward function, response to psychostimulants and delay-dependent memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; Markou, Athina; Semenova, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    Depression and psychostimulant abuse are common comorbidities among humans with immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. The HIV regulatory protein TAT is one of multiple HIV-related proteins associated with HIV-induced neurotoxicity. TAT-induced dysfunction of dopamine and serotonin systems in corticolimbic brain areas may result in impaired reward function, thus, contributing to depressive symptoms and psychostimulant abuse. Transgenic mice with doxycycline-induced TAT protein expression in the brain (TAT+, TAT- control) show neuropathology resembling brain abnormalities in HIV+ humans. We evaluated brain reward function in response to TAT expression, nicotine and methamphetamine administration in TAT+ and TAT- mice using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure. We evaluated the brain dopamine and serotonin systems with high-performance liquid chromatography. The effects of TAT expression on delay-dependent working memory in TAT+ and TAT- mice using the operant delayed nonmatch-to-position task were also assessed. During doxycycline administration, reward thresholds were elevated by 20% in TAT+ mice compared with TAT- mice. After the termination of doxycycline treatment, thresholds of TAT+ mice remained significantly higher than those of TAT- mice and this was associated with changes in mesolimbic serotonin and dopamine levels. TAT+ mice showed a greater methamphetamine-induced threshold lowering compared with TAT- mice. TAT expression did not alter delay-dependent working memory. These results indicate that TAT expression in mice leads to reward deficits, a core symptom of depression, and a greater sensitivity to methamphetamine-induced reward enhancement. Our findings suggest that the TAT protein may contribute to increased depressive-like symptoms and continued methamphetamine use in HIV-positive individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HIV and Cancer Interaction Highlights Need to Address Disease Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The global landscape of disease highlights disparities that exist between nations. An estimated 36 million people worldwide live with HIV and AIDS, of which only 1 million are located within the United States. While the diagnosis of a life-threatening disease can be devastating, individuals with HIV and AIDS frequently bear an additional burden of stigma and discrimination.

  13. HIV related renal disease in Africans | Elangovan | IMTU Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal disease is becoming an increasingly prevalent entity in human immunodefi ciency virus (HIV)–infected patients, first diagnosed in AIDS patients in 1984. The HIV-related renal disease represents a spectrum of clinical and histological conditions presenting as acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, glomerulopathies, ...

  14. The spectrum of renal diseases in HIV infected adults presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The natural history of the renal diseases associated with HIV infection has been radically changed by antiretroviral therapy. There are other diseases, ... Patients had advanced HIV infection with mean CD4 count of197 cells/mm3. Majority of patients ( 64.5%) were not yet been initiated cART. 16% of the study patients were ...

  15. Heart disease among children with HIV/AIDS attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are very few published studies of heart disease in HIV infected children living in sub-Saharan Africa, a region with more than 50% of the world's population of HIV infected patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, and describe the type and clinical presentation of heart disease among children ...

  16. Predictors of Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation, Mortality, and Loss to Followup in HIV Infected Patients Eligible for HIV Treatment: Data from an HIV Cohort Study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies from Sub-Saharan Africa have shown that a substantial number of HIV patients eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART do not start treatment. However, data from other low- or middle-income countries are scarce. In this study, we describe the outcomes of 4105 HIV patients who became ART eligible from January 2007 to November 2011 in an HIV cohort study in India. After three years of ART eligibility, 78.4% started ART, 9.3% died before ART initiation, and 10.3% were lost to followup. Diagnosis of tuberculosis, being homeless, lower CD4 count, longer duration of pre-ART care, belonging to a disadvantaged community, being widowed, and not living near a town were associated with delayed ART initiation. Diagnosis of tuberculosis, being homeless, lower CD4 count, shorter duration of pre-ART care, belonging to a disadvantaged community, illiteracy, and age >45 years were associated with mortality. Being homeless, being single, not living near a town, having a CD4 count <150 cells/μL, and shorter duration of pre-ART care were associated with loss to followup. These results highlight the need to improve the timely initiation of ART in HIV programmes in India, especially in ART eligible patients with tuberculosis, low CD4 counts, living in rural areas, or having a low socioeconomic status.

  17. ANALYSIS OF HIV SUBTYPES AND CLINICAL STAGING OF HIV DISEASE/AIDS IN EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ismail

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 known to cause Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS disease are divided into several subtypes (A, B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K and Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF. Different characteristics of subtype of the virus and its interaction with the host can affect the severity of the disease. This study was to analyze HIV-1 subtypes circulating in HIV/AIDS patients from the East Java region descriptively and to analyze its relationship with clinical stadiums of HIV/AIDS. Information from this research was expected to complement the data of mocular epidemiology of HIV in Indonesia. This study utilited blood plasma from patients who had been tested to be HIV positive who sected treatment to or were reffered to the Intermediate Care Unit of Infectious Disease (UPIPI Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya from various area representing the East Java regions. Plasma was separated from blood samples by centrifugation for use in the the molecular biology examination including RNA extraction, nested PCR using specific primer for HIV gp120 env gene region, DNA purifying, DNA sequencing, and homology and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the HIV gp120 env gene, it was found that the most dominant subtypes in East Java were in one group of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF that is CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B which was also found in Southeast Asia. In the phylogenetic tree, most of HIV samples (30 samples are in the same branch with CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B and CRF34_01B, except for one sample (HIV40 which is in the same branch with subtype B. HIV subtypes are associated with clinical stadiums (disease severity since samples from different stages of HIV disease have the same subtype.

  18. Circumcision status and incident herpes simplex virus type 2 infection, genital ulcer disease, and HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Supriya D.; Moses, Stephen; Parker, Corette B.; Agot, Kawango; Maclean, Ian; Bailey, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We assessed the protective effect of medical male circumcision (MMC) against HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and genital ulcer disease (GUD) incidence. Design Two thousand, seven hundred and eighty-seven men aged 18–24 years living in Kisumu, Kenya were randomly assigned to circumcision (n=1391) or delayed circumcision (n =1393) and assessed by HIV and HSV-2 testing and medical examinations during follow-ups at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Methods Cox regression estimated the risk ratio of each outcome (incident HIV, GUD, HSV-2) for circumcision status and multivariable models estimated HIV risk associated with HSV-2, GUD, and circumcision status as time-varying covariates. Results HIV incidence was 1.42 per 100 person-years. Circumcision was 62% protective against HIV [risk ratio =0.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22–0.67] and did not change when controlling for HSV-2 and GUD (risk ratio =0.39; 95% CI 0.23–0.69). GUD incidence was halved among circumcised men (risk ratio =0.52; 95% CI 0.37–0.73). HSV-2 incidence did not differ by circumcision status (risk ratio =0.94; 95% CI 0.70–1.25). In the multivariable model, HIV seroconversions were tripled (risk ratio =3.44; 95% CI 1.52–7.80) among men with incident HSV-2 and seven times greater (risk ratio =6.98; 95% CI 3.50–13.9) for men with GUD. Conclusion Contrary to findings from the South African and Ugandan trials, the protective effect of MMC against HIV was independent of GUD and HSV-2, and MMC had no effect on HSV-2 incidence. Determining the causes of GUD is necessary to reduce associated HIV risk and to understand how circumcision confers protection against GUD and HIV PMID:22382150

  19. Delayed access to treatments for rare diseases: who's to blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltmate, Karen; Janiszewski, Peter M; Gingerich, Sheena; Cloutier, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The development and commercialization of drugs for rare diseases, termed 'orphan drugs', has historically been economically unattractive. However, because of the introduction of legislation that provides financial and regulatory incentives for the development of orphan drugs, new developments are making their way through the regulatory approval processes. Unfortunately, delays in availability of new drugs for treating rare disease continue to persist. This paper reviews the approach of several regulatory jurisdictions to orphan drugs in an effort to determine their relative effectiveness in providing patient access. Generally speaking, regulatory authorities across jurisdictions have recognized the need to enhance timely access to safe, effective treatment for patients with rare diseases and have been able to shift the approval timelines for access to new care. The greater impediment to orphan drug access appears to be funding, particularly in publicly sponsored health-care systems. Redundancies in federal and provincial reviews of orphan drugs can result in significant delays in access to new drugs. Clearly, more must be done to accelerate access to the treatments so desperately needed by patients. Public payers must be held accountable for their process and decisions--especially for rare disease therapies. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James H; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W A; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A; Majoie, Charles B L M; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J

    2017-04-04

    To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. A large sample of virologically suppressed HIV-positive adults (n = 162, age 45-82 years) and highly comparable HIV-negative controls (n = 105) were recruited as part of the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) collaboration. Using T1-weighted MRI scans, a machine-learning model of healthy brain aging was defined in an independent cohort (n = 2,001, aged 18-90 years). Neuroimaging data from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals were then used to estimate brain-predicted age; then brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD = brain-predicted brain age - chronological age) scores were calculated. Neuropsychological and clinical assessments were also carried out. HIV-positive individuals had greater brain-PAD score (mean ± SD 2.15 ± 7.79 years) compared to HIV-negative individuals (-0.87 ± 8.40 years; b = 3.48, p brain-PAD score was associated with decreased performance in multiple cognitive domains (information processing speed, executive function, memory) and general cognitive performance across all participants. Brain-PAD score was not associated with age, duration of HIV infection, or other HIV-related measures. Increased apparent brain aging, predicted using neuroimaging, was observed in HIV-positive adults, despite effective viral suppression. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased apparent brain aging related to cognitive deficits. However, predicted brain age difference did not correlate with chronological age or duration of HIV infection, suggesting that HIV disease may accentuate rather than accelerate brain aging. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Random Number Generation in HIV Disease: Associations with Neuropsychological Functions and Activities of Daily Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, David P; Woods, Steven Paul; Doyle, Katie L; Verduzco, Marizela

    2017-02-01

    HIV is associated with frontostriatal dysregulation and executive dysfunction. This study evaluated whether HIV-infected individuals evidence deficits in random number generation (RNG), which is a strategic task requiring paced, rule-guided production of digits. In total, 74 HIV+ adults and 54 seronegative comparison participants completed a comprehensive research neuropsychological battery. Participants produced a random digit sequence by avoiding any order and using numbers 1 through 10 for 100 s at a pace of 1 digit/s. Outcomes included intrusions, repetitions, seriation (1-2-3-4), and cycling (median length of gaps between repeating digits). HIV disease was associated with higher levels of seriation and cycling (ps  .10). Among HIV+ individuals, higher seriation was associated with neuropsychological performance including poorer auditory attention, verbal learning, and delayed memory, whereas higher cycling scores were associated with poorer delayed memory and verbal fluency (ps random sequences, which showed medium associations with higher order verbal abilities and may contribute to greater declines in everyday functioning outcomes. Future studies might examine RNG's role in health behaviors such as medical decision-making or medication adherence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A; Real, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most frequent chronic hepatic conditions worldwide. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease goes from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are metabolic, mainly obesity and the accompanying consequences. Treatment and prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease should target those metabolic abnormalities. The frequency of and the factors associated with hepatic steatosis in HIV infection seem to be similar to those reported in the general population, though direct comparisons are lacking. Hepatic steatosis in HIV infection may also be secondary to antiretroviral drugs or HCV-related factors in HCV-coinfected subjects. However, more recent data suggest that hepatic steatosis in HIV infection represents true non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As such, management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV infection should follow the same principles as in the general population.

  3. Slow progression of paediatric HIV disease: Selective adaptation or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the European Caucasian populations, the chemokine-cell receptor variant CCR5 \\"Delta 32\\" is a the genetic determinant of HIV disease progression that is believed to have been selected for in the general population by exposure to antigens closely interlinked to HIV like Yersinia pestis or small pox virus. Among African ...

  4. HIV-1 Nef in Macrophage-Mediated Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Fogel, Gary B.; Singer, Elyse J.; Salemi, Marco; Nolan, David J.; Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; McGrath, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has significantly reduced the number of AIDS-associated illnesses and changed the course of HIV-1 disease in developed countries. Despite the ability of cART to maintain high CD4+ T-cell counts, a number of macrophage-mediated diseases can still occur in HIV-infected subjects. These diseases include lymphoma, metabolic diseases, and HIV-associated neurological disorders. Within macrophages, the HIV-1 regulatory protein “Nef” can modulate surface receptors, interact with signaling pathways, and promote specific environments that contribute to each of these pathologies. Moreover, genetic variation in Nef may also guide the macrophage response. Herein, we review findings relating to the Nef–macrophage interaction and how this relationship contributes to disease pathogenesis. PMID:23215766

  5. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in an Aging HIV Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Iguacel, R; Llibre, J M; Friis-Moller, N

    2015-01-01

    With more effective and widespread antiretroviral treatment, the overall incidence of AIDS- or HIV-related death has decreased dramatically. Consequently, as patients are aging, cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV population....... The incidence of CVD overall in HIV is relatively low, but it is approximately 1.5-2-fold higher than that seen in age-matched HIV-uninfected individuals. Multiple factors are believed to explain this excess in risk such as overrepresentation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (particularly smoking...

  6. Sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. A female perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, M

    2012-02-03

    Sexually transmitted diseases have the greatest impact on the health of women. They are frequently asymptomatic, so screening for infection is important in preventing the long-term sequelae which include infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. HIV continues to increase in the female population and the gynecologic complications associated with it are unique to this population. Use of zidovudine in pregnant HIV-infected women has substantially decreased the rate of vertical transmission of HIV infection. The epidemiologic synergy between HIV and STDs is well recognized and prevention of one is dependent on prevention of the other.

  7. Consequences of missed opportunities for HIV testing during pregnancy and delayed diagnosis for Mexican women, children and male partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamil Kendall

    Full Text Available HIV testing during pregnancy permits prevention of vertical (mother-to-child transmission and provides an opportunity for women living with HIV to access treatment for their own health. In 2001, Mexico's National HIV Action Plan committed to universal offer of HIV testing to pregnant women, but in 2011, only 45.6% of women who attended antenatal care (ANC were tested for HIV. The study objective was to document the consequences of missed opportunities for HIV testing and counseling during pregnancy and late HIV diagnosis for Mexican women living with HIV and their families.Semi-structured-interviews with 55 women living with HIV who had had a pregnancy since 2001 were completed between 2009 and 2011. Interviews were analyzed thematically using a priori and inductive codes.Consistent with national statistics, less than half of the women living with HIV (42% were offered HIV testing and counseling during ANC. When not diagnosed during ANC, women had multiple contacts with the health-care system due to their own and other family members' AIDS-related complications before being diagnosed. Missed opportunities for HIV testing and counseling during antenatal care and health-care providers failure to recognize AIDS-related complications resulted in pediatric HIV infections, AIDS-related deaths of children and male partners, and HIV disease progression among women and other family members. In contrast, HIV diagnosis permitted timely access to interventions to prevent vertical HIV transmission and long-term care and treatment for women living with HIV.Omissions of the offer of HIV testing and counseling in ANC and health-care providers' failure to recognize AIDS-related complications had negative health, economic and emotional consequences. Scaling-up provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling within and beyond antenatal care and pre-service and in-service trainings on HIV and AIDS for health-care providers can hasten timely HIV diagnosis and

  8. Stability and Hopf bifurcation on a model for HIV infection of CD4{sup +} T cells with delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xia [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang, Henan 464000 (China)], E-mail: xywangxia@163.com; Tao Youde [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang, Henan 464000 (China); Beijing Institute of Information Control, Beijing 100037 (China); Song Xinyu [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang, Henan 464000 (China) and Research Institute of Forest Resource Information Techniques, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091 (China)], E-mail: xysong88@163.com

    2009-11-15

    In this paper, a delayed differential equation model that describes HIV infection of CD4{sup +} T cells is considered. The stability of the positive equilibrium and the existence of Hopf bifurcation are investigated. In succession, using the normal form theory and center manifold argument, we derive the explicit formulas which determine the stability, direction and other properties of bifurcating periodic solutions.

  9. HIV subtype influences HLA-B*07:02-associated HIV disease outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Adland, Emily; Koyanagi, Madoka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms within the MHC encoding region have the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any in the human genome and provide important clues to the mechanisms of HIV immune control. Few analyses have been undertaken of HLA alleles associated with rapid disease progression. HLA......% versus 43% in HLA-B*07:02-negative subjects). These data support earlier studies suggesting that increased breadth of the Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell response may contribute to improved HIV immune control irrespective of the particular HLA molecules expressed....

  10. 'Lost to follow up': rethinking delayed and interrupted HIV treatment among married Swazi women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlamini-Simelane, Thandeka T T; Moyer, Eileen

    2017-03-01

    Through various campaigns and strategies, more women are being tested for HIV in countries with a high prevalence of the virus. Despite the ready availability of treatment at government clinics in sub-Saharan African countries like Swaziland, women consistently report difficulty in maintaining access to treatment. Drawing on two individual case studies selected from a larger study of the so-called leaky cascade in Swaziland, we illustrate the protracted journeys married women undertake to initiate treatment. We demonstrate how women manoeuvre tactically after diagnosis, highlight factors that influence their decisions related to initiating treatment, and detail the actors involved in the decision-making process. Our research shows the persistence of structural factors that inhibit access, including economic constraints, gender inequality and patriarchal social norms. Patients referred as ‘lost to follow up’ are in many cases actively pursuing treatment within a context that includes the biomedical health system, but also extends well beyond it. We argue that the phrase ‘lost to follow up’ conceals the complex social navigation required by women to initiate and maintain access to treatment. Further, we suggest that many of the logistical challenges of monitoring and tracking people with HIV can be better addressed by taking into account the structural and social aspects of delayed treatment initiative.

  11. Therapeutic Approaches to Delay the Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The key cytopathologies in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients include mitochondrial dysfunction and energy hypometabolism, which are likely caused by the accumulation of small aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides. Thus, targeting these two abnormalities of the AD brain may hold promising therapeutic value for delaying the onset of AD. In his paper, we discuss two potential approaches to delay the onset of AD. The first is the use of low dose of diaminophenothiazins (redox active agents to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and to attenuate energy hypometabolism. Diaminophenothiazines enhance mitochondrial metabolic activity and heme synthesis, both key factors in intermediary metabolism of the AD brain.The second is to use the naturally occurring osmolytes to prevent the formation of toxic forms of Aβ and prevent oxidative stress. Scientific evidence suggests that both approaches may change course of the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration in AD. Osmolytes are brain metabolites which accumulate in tissues at relatively high concentrations following stress conditions. Osmolytes enhance thermodynamic stability of proteins by stabilizing natively-folded protein conformation, thus preventing aggregation without perturbing other cellular processes. Osmolytes may inhibit the formation of Aβ oligomers in vivo, thus preventing the formation of soluble oligomers. The potential significance of combining diaminophenothiazins and osmolytes to treat AD is discussed.

  12. Alcohol Increases Delay and Probability Discounting of Condom-Protected Sex: A Novel Vector for Alcohol-Related HIV Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patrick S; Sweeney, Mary M; Herrmann, Evan S; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol use, especially at binge levels, is associated with sexual HIV risk behavior, but the mechanisms through which alcohol increases sexual risk taking are not well-examined. Delay discounting, that is, devaluation of future consequences as a function of delay to their occurrence, has been implicated in a variety of problem behaviors, including risky sexual behavior. Probability discounting is studied with a similar framework as delay discounting, but is a distinct process in which a consequence is devalued because it is uncertain or probabilistic. Twenty-three, nondependent alcohol users (13 male, 10 female; mean age = 25.3 years old) orally consumed alcohol (1 g/kg) or placebo in 2 separate experimental sessions. During sessions, participants completed tasks examining delay and probability discounting of hypothetical condom-protected sex (Sexual Delay Discounting Task, Sexual Probability Discounting Task) and of hypothetical and real money. Alcohol decreased the likelihood that participants would wait to have condom-protected sex versus having immediate, unprotected sex. Alcohol also decreased the likelihood that participants would use an immediately available condom given a specified level of sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk. Alcohol did not affect delay discounting of money, but it did increase participants' preferences for larger, probabilistic monetary rewards over smaller, certain rewards. Acute, binge-level alcohol intoxication may increase sexual HIV risk by decreasing willingness to delay sex in order to acquire a condom in situations where one is not immediately available, and by decreasing sensitivity to perceived risk of STI contraction. These findings suggest that delay and probability discounting are critical, but heretofore unrecognized, processes that may mediate the relations between alcohol use and HIV risk. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  13. Delayed diagnosis of Addison's disease: an approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Janice V; Jude, Edward B

    2014-07-18

    Addison's disease accounts for the majority of cases of adrenal failure that are detected during hospital admissions. Unfortunately, prompt diagnosis of this condition is often delayed due to varied atypical manifestations and inadequate assessment at the time of presentation. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who was detected to have hypotension during routine colonoscopy for evaluation of anaemia and progressive weight loss. During admission for evaluation of hypotension, she was also detected to have hyponatremia. Hyponatremia and hypotension failed to improve despite fluid resuscitation. Our endocrinological opinion was sought for and on further evaluation she was diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy were eventually instituted, which was followed by restoration of blood pressure and normalisation of serum sodium levels. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Psoriasis Patients Are Enriched for Genetic Variants That Protect against HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyan; Hayashi, Genki; Lai, Olivia Y.; Dilthey, Alexander; Kuebler, Peter J.; Wong, Tami V.; Martin, Maureen P.; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A.; McVean, Gil; Wabl, Matthias; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis. PMID:22577363

  15. Identifying Symptom Patterns in People Living With HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalie L.; Azuero, Andres; Vance, David E.; Richman, Joshua S.; Moneyham, Linda D.; Raper, James L.; Heath, Sonya L.; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms guide disease management, and patients frequently report HIV-related symptoms, but HIV symptom patterns reported by patients have not been described in the era of improved antiretroviral treatment. The objectives of our study were to investigate the prevalence and burden of symptoms in people living with HIV and attending an outpatient clinic. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2011 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters and relationships between groups using appropriate statistic techniques. Two main clusters were identified. The most prevalent and bothersome symptoms were muscle aches/joint pain, fatigue, and poor sleep. A third of patients had seven or more symptoms, including the most burdensome symptoms. Even with improved antiretroviral drug side-effect profiles, symptom prevalence and burden, independent of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, are high. PMID:26790340

  16. Disruption of gut homeostasis by opioids accelerates HIV disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing eMeng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative studies during the past 30 years have established the correlation between opioid abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Further studies also demonstrate that opioid addiction is associated with faster progression to AIDS in patients. Recently, it was revealed that disruption of gut homeostasis and subsequent microbial translocation play important roles in pathological activation of the immune system during HIV infection and contributes to accelerated disease progression. Similarly, opioids have been shown to modulate gut immunity and induce gut bacterial translocation. This review will explore the mechanisms by which opioids accelerate HIV disease progression by disrupting gut homeostasis. Better understanding of these mechanisms will facilitate the search for new therapeutic interventions to treat HIV infection especially in opioid abusing population.

  17. HIV-associated multicentric Castleman’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzia de Fátima Naime

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. It is found with higher frequency in patients with HIV infection, with systemic symptoms and poor prognosis. We present the case of a 32-year old man with HIV disease, Kaposi’s sarcoma, lymphadenopathy, fever and hemolytic anemia. A diagnosis of Castleman’s disease is confirmed through biopsy and treatment is often based only on published case reports. Systemic treatments for MCD have included chemotherapy, anti-herpes virus, highly active antiretroviral therapy and, more recently, monoclonal antibodies against both IL6 and CD20.

  18. Delayed entry into HIV care after diagnosis in two specialized care and treatment centres in Cameroon: the influence of CD4 count and WHO staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah F. Takah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed entry into HIV care has complicated the challenges faced in sub-Saharan Africa due to the high HIV burden. A clear knowledge of the factors affecting delayed entry will be essential in directing interventions towards reducing delayed entry into HIV care. There exist very limited data on delayed entry in Cameroon despite its relevance; hence this study was conducted to determine the rate of delayed entry and its associated factors in HIV programmes in Cameroon. Methods Data used for this study was routine data obtained from the files of HIV patients who were diagnosed between January 1, 2015 and June 30, 2015 at Limbe and Buea regional hospital HIV centers in the South West region of Cameroon. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20. Results Of the 223 patients included in the study, nearly one-quarter of patients (22.4 % delayed to enter HIV care within 3 months. Those who delayed to enter care were less likely to present at first diagnosis (using HIV rapid test with symptoms such as fever > 1 month (5 % versus 30 %, p = 0.01 and weight loss > 10 % (13 % versus 48 %, p < 0.001. Alcohol consumption, WHO stage and CD4 count levels were also associated with delayed entry in bivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis only CD4 count greater than 500cells/μl and WHO stages I and II were independently associated with delayed entry into HIV care within 3 months. Conclusion In the South West region of Cameroon, approximately 1 out of 4 patients delay to enter HIV care. This high proportion of patients who delay to enter care correlates to the findings recorded by other studies in sub Saharan Africa. Interventions tackling delayed entry into HIV care might need to be favorably directed towards patients that have high CD4 counts and are at very early WHO clinical stages.

  19. Natural immunity and HIV disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, H; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Aladdin, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical implications of impaired levels of the natural immunity mediated by natural killer (NK) cells and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells during infection with HIV-1. DESIGN: Data used were from 172 individuals with an estimated measure of NK cell activity...... and 146 with an estimated measure of LAK cell activity. Patients had active HIV infection at the time of enrolment in the study and have been followed-up prospectively for a median of 3.0 years. METHODS: The lytic activity of NK cells and LAK cells, the CD4 T lymphocyte count, and the concentration of CD......16/CD56 NK cells were measured at enrolment. HIV RNA in plasma was measured retrospectively. Survival analysis was performed considering three main endpoints: CD4 cell counts below 100 x 10(6) cells/l, clinical AIDS, and death. RESULTS: In unadjusted analysis and after adjustment for age, CD4 T...

  20. Hiv infection in patients of sexually transmitted disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1027 male patients suffering from sexually transmitted diseases (STD during 1990 to 1996 were screened for HIV infection. All cases were in the age group 17 years to 48 years. One hundred and sixty-seven STD cases (16.3% were found to have HIV infection. A rising trend in incidence of HIV infection in STD patients from 1990 (2.8% to 1996 (27.8% was noticed countrary to declining trend of STDs from 213 cases in 1990 to 79 cases in 1996. The incidence of HIV infection was 30.3% in lymphogranuloma venereum, 19.5% in chancroid, 13.5% in syphilis, 17.6% in herpes genitatis, 6.7% in gonorrhoea and 11.2% in other STD cases.

  1. Impact of delay on disease outbreak in a spatial epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia-Xia; Wang, Jian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    One of the central issues in studying epidemic spreading is the mechanism on disease outbreak. In this paper, we investigate the effects of time delay on disease outbreak in spatial epidemics based on a reaction-diffusion model. By mathematical analysis and numerical simulations, we show that when time delay is more than a critical value, the disease outbreaks. The obtained results show that the time delay is an important factor in the spread of the disease, which may provide new insights on disease control.

  2. HIV Disease in the Psychology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Ann R.

    2000-01-01

    Provides ideas for relating HIV topics to psychology content. Suggests three methods of curriculum integration: (1) using traditional course content (research methods, abnormal psychology, health psychology, gender and ethnic studies, drugs and behavior); (2) exploring diversity issues; and (3) challenging students' critical thinking skills. (CMK)

  3. CASE STUDY – HIV AND LUNG DISEASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... pathology deep to the paraseptal bullae. An intercostal drain tip is seen in the left lateral pleural space. Fig. 2. Axial computed tomography scan on lung windows. Large bilateral paraseptal bullae are demonstrated with residual antero-medial pneumothorax. 37. CASE STUDY – HIV AND LUNG DISEASE ...

  4. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this chapter, we will review the molecular identities and biophysical properties of these channels. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the possibility and prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  5. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Compliance/adherence and care management in HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Fierro, M

    1997-01-01

    With the changing perspectives of the HIV epidemic and the introduction of protease inhibitors to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, the issue of compliance has gained considerable interest among health care providers. The idea that clients with HIV disease should succumb to a patriarchal system of medical care has been challenged by AIDS activists since the beginning of the epidemic. The concept that there is only one explanation for "noncompliance" is outdated. The reasons for noncompliance are multifaceted in nature and include psychosocial factors, complex medication and treatment regimens, ethnocultural concerns, and in many instances substance use. Therefore, the notion that there is one intervention to resolve noncompliance is at best archaic. Interventions to enhance compliance include supervised therapy, improving the nurse-client relationship, and patient education, all of which should be combined with ethnocultural interventions. Plans to enhance compliance must incorporate person-specific variables and should be tailored to individualized needs.

  7. Critical consciousness, racial and gender discrimination, and HIV disease markers in African American women with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Gwendolyn A; Cohen, Mardge H; Weber, Kathleen M; Dale, Sannisha K; Cruise, Ruth C; Brody, Leslie R

    2014-07-01

    Critical consciousness, the awareness of social oppression, is important to investigate as a buffer against HIV disease progression in HIV-infected African American women in the context of experiences with discrimination. Critical consciousness comprises several dimensions, including social group identification, discontent with distribution of social power, rejection of social system legitimacy, and a collective action orientation. The current study investigated self-reported critical consciousness as a moderator of perceived gender and racial discrimination on HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in 67 African American HIV-infected women. Higher critical consciousness was found to be related to higher likelihood of having CD4+ counts over 350 and lower likelihood of detectable viral load when perceived racial discrimination was high, as revealed by multiple logistic regressions that controlled for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence. Multiple linear regressions showed that at higher levels of perceived gender and racial discrimination, women endorsing high critical consciousness had a larger positive difference between nadir CD4+ (lowest pre-HAART) and current CD4+ count than women endorsing low critical consciousness. These findings suggest that raising awareness of social oppression to promote joining with others to enact social change may be an important intervention strategy to improve HIV outcomes in African American HIV-infected women who report experiencing high levels of gender and racial discrimination.

  8. HIV disease progression among women following seroconversion during a tenofovir-based HIV prevention trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon A Riddler

    Full Text Available Little is known regarding HIV disease outcomes among individuals who become infected with HIV while receiving antiretroviral medications for prevention. We compared HIV disease parameters among women who seroconverted while receiving tenofovir-containing oral or vaginal pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP to placebo.Participants with HIV seroconversion in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of oral tenofovir, oral tenofovir/emtricitabine, and vaginal tenofovir gel (MTN-003 were followed in a longitudinal cohort study (MTN-015. The effect of oral and vaginal tenofovir-containing PrEP on HIV disease progression was compared to placebo using linear mixed effects and Cox proportional hazard models, as appropriate. Additional analyses were performed to compare the outcomes among participants with detectable tenofovir or emtricitabine in plasma at the first quarterly visit in MTN-003.A total of 224 participants were included in the analysis; 93% from South Africa and 94% clade C virus. No differences in HIV RNA at steady state or the trajectory over 12 months were observed for each active arm compared to placebo; tenofovir gel recipients had higher CD4+ T cell counts (722 vs 596 cells/mm3; p = 0.02 at 90 days after estimated HIV seroconversion and higher average rates of change over 12 months compared to placebo (-181 vs -92 cells/mm3 per year; p = 0.08. With a median follow-up of 31 months, no significant differences were observed for time to CD4+ T cell count ≤350 cells/mm3, or the composite endpoint of CD4+ T cells ≤350 cells/mm3, initiation of antiretroviral therapy or death for each active arm compared to placebo. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the HIV RNA or CD4+ T cell counts at baseline, the change to month 12, or any disease progression outcomes among participants with oral drug detected and no oral drug detected compared to placebo.No clinically significant differences in HIV seroconversion outcomes were observed

  9. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, chronic kidney disease and antiretroviral drug use in HIV-positive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; de Wit, Stephane; Sedlacek, Dalibor; Beniowski, Marek; Gatell, Jose; Phillips, Andrew N.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Lundgren, Jens D.; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; Poll, B.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, Jelena; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in HIV-positive persons might be caused by both HIV and traditional or non-HIV-related factors. Our objective was to investigate long-term exposure to specific antiretroviral drugs and CKD. Design: A cohort study including 6843 HIV-positive persons with at

  10. Spirituality, psychological well-being, and HIV symptoms for African Americans living with HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C L; Holzemer, W L

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to explore the contribution of spiritual well-being and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) symptoms to psychological well-being measured by depression, hope, and state-trait anxiety in a sample of 117 African-American men and women with a mean age of 38 years living with HIV disease. Of the respondents, 26% had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 74% were HIV seropositive. Each participant completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Sign and Symptom Checklist for Persons with HIV Disease, the Spiritual Well-Being Scale, the Nowotny Hope Scale, State-Trait Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The findings suggest that existential well-being, a spiritual indicator of meaning and purpose, more than religious well-being, was significantly related to the participants' psychological well-being. In addition, HIV symptoms were found to be significant predictors of psychological well-being. These findings support the need for nurses to continue exploring ways to integrate and support spirituality within the domains of clinical practice.

  11. association between finger clubbing and chronic lung disease in hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-11

    Nov 11, 2013 ... Background: Finger clubbing in HIV infected children is associated with pulmonary diseases. ... is easy and quick to detect without sophisticated equipment and very ... interstitial pneumonia, bronchiectasis, interstitial pneumonitis and .... P value. Chest x-ray report. Abnormal. 90 (75.0). 54 (90.0). 36 (60.0).

  12. RESEARCH ARTICLES The spectrum of liver diseases in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harriet

    Conclusion:Drug history, liver enzyme studies, ultrasound, and hepatitis B and C investigations identified the probable etiology in 60. (78%) of 77 patients with HIV infection presenting with symptoms and/or signs of liver disease. African Health Sciences 2008; 8(1): 8-12. Corresponding author: Ponsiano Ocama. Infectious ...

  13. Non-infective pulmonary disease in HIV-positive children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; George, Reena; Plessis, Jaco du; Hayes, Murray; Mapukata, Ayanda; Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that over 90% of children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) live in the developing world and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Pulmonary disease is the most common clinical feature of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in infants and children causing the most morbidity and mortality, and is the primary cause of death in 50% of cases. Children with lung disease are surviving progressively longer because of earlier diagnosis and antiretroviral treatment and, therefore, thoracic manifestations have continued to change and unexpected complications are being encountered. It has been reported that 33% of HIV-positive children have chronic changes on chest radiographs by the age of 4 years. Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis is common in the paediatric HIV population and is responsible for 30-40% of pulmonary disease. HIV-positive children also have a higher incidence of pulmonary malignancies, including lymphoma and pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is seen after highly active antiretroviral treatment. Complications of pulmonary infections, aspiration and rarely interstitial pneumonitis are also seen. This review focuses on the imaging findings of non-infective chronic pulmonary disease. (orig.)

  14. 13 Research Article ABSTRACT Liver diseases in HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-10

    Nov 10, 2016 ... Liver diseases in HIV infected persons can occur due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus ... immunochromatographic test in Yaoundé central hospital, from ..... Hepatitis. B and C virus co-infection in The TREAT Asia.

  15. Headache among patients with HIV disease: prevalence, characteristics, and associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Kale E; Kirkland, Karl; Many, W J; Smitherman, Todd A

    2012-03-01

    Headache is one of the most common medical complaints reported by individuals suffering from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), but limited and conflicting data exist regarding their prevalence, prototypical characteristics, and relationship to HIV disease variables in the current era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The aims of the present cross-sectional study were to characterize headache symptoms among patients with HIV/AIDS and to assess relations between headache and HIV/AIDS disease variables. Two hundred HIV/AIDS patients (49% female; mean age = 43.22 ± 12.30 years; 74% African American) from an internal medicine clinic and an AIDS outreach clinic were administered a structured headache diagnostic interview to assess headache characteristics and features consistent with International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II diagnostic semiologies. They also completed 2 measures of headache-related disability. Prescribed medications, most recent cluster of differentiation (CD4) cell count, date of HIV diagnosis, possible causes of secondary headache, and other relevant medical history were obtained via review of patient medical records. One hundred seven patients (53.5%) reported headache symptoms, the large majority of which were consistent with characteristics of primary headache disorders after excluding 4 cases attributable to secondary causes. Among those who met criteria for a primary headache disorder, 88 (85.44%) met criteria for migraine, most of which fulfilled ICHD-II appendix diagnostic criteria for chronic migraine. Fifteen patients (14.56%) met criteria for episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Severity of HIV (as indicated by CD4 cell counts), but not duration of HIV or number of prescribed antiretroviral medications, was strongly associated with headache severity, frequency, and disability and also distinguished migraine from TTH. Problematic headache is highly prevalent

  16. Recommendations for evaluation and management of bone disease in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd T; Hoy, Jennifer; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Renjifo, Boris; Vescini, Fabio; Yin, Michael T; Powderly, William G

    2015-04-15

    Thirty-four human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) specialists from 16 countries contributed to this project, whose primary aim was to provide guidance on the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Four clinically important questions in bone disease management were identified, and recommendations, based on literature review and expert opinion, were agreed upon. Risk of fragility fracture should be assessed primarily using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), without dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in all HIV-infected men aged 40-49 years and HIV-infected premenopausal women aged ≥40 years. DXA should be performed in men aged ≥50 years, postmenopausal women, patients with a history of fragility fracture, patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid treatment, and patients at high risk of falls. In resource-limited settings, FRAX without bone mineral density can be substituted for DXA. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy should be followed; adjustment should avoid tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or boosted protease inhibitors in at-risk patients. Dietary and lifestyle management strategies for high-risk patients should be employed and antiosteoporosis treatment initiated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Smoking, internalized heterosexism, and HIV disease management among male couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, K E; Neilands, T B; Dilworth, S E; Taylor, J M; Johnson, M O

    2015-01-01

    High rates of cigarette smoking have been observed among HIV-positive individuals. Smoking has been linked to HIV-related medical complications and non-AIDS defining cancers and negatively impacts on immune function and virologic control. Although internalized heterosexism has been related to smoking behaviors, little is known about associations between partners' reports of smoking, internalized heterosexism, and HIV medication management in male couples with HIV. A sample of 266 male couples completed baseline assessments for a cohort study examining relationship factors and HIV treatment. A computer-based survey assessed self-reported smoking behaviors, alcohol use, internalized heterosexism, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. HIV-positive men also provided blood samples to assess viral load. Approximately 30% of the sample reported that they are currently smoking cigarettes. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, men in a primary relationship with a partner who reported currently smoking had more than five-fold greater odds of reporting smoking. Higher levels of internalized heterosexism and financial hardship were each independently associated with greater odds of reporting smoking. Among HIV-positive men on ART (n = 371), having a partner who reported smoking was associated with almost three-fold greater odds of having a detectable viral load. Our findings add new support to the evidence of romantic partners influencing each other's health behaviors, and demonstrate an association between smoking and disease management within male couples. Future research should explore the interpersonal and social contexts of smoking in order to develop interventions that meet the unique needs of male couples.

  18. Mathematical models for therapeutic approaches to control HIV disease transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The book discusses different therapeutic approaches based on different mathematical models to control the HIV/AIDS disease transmission. It uses clinical data, collected from different cited sources, to formulate the deterministic as well as stochastic mathematical models of HIV/AIDS. It provides complementary approaches, from deterministic and stochastic points of view, to optimal control strategy with perfect drug adherence and also tries to seek viewpoints of the same issue from different angles with various mathematical models to computer simulations. The book presents essential methods and techniques for students who are interested in designing epidemiological models on HIV/AIDS. It also guides research scientists, working in the periphery of mathematical modeling, and helps them to explore a hypothetical method by examining its consequences in the form of a mathematical modelling and making some scientific predictions. The model equations, mathematical analysis and several numerical simulations that are...

  19. Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandlal, Vikesh; Moodley, Dhayendre; Grobler, Anneke; Bagratee, Jayanthilall; Maharaj, Niren R; Richardson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia is a common clinical finding in HIV infected women and has been associated with advanced disease. The use of antiretroviral drugs such as Zidovudine (ZDV) either for prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV or used in combination with other antiretrovirals have been implicated in the development or increased severity of anaemia. We report the prevalence, type, severity and incidence of anaemia in a cohort of HIV infected women who initiated antiretroviral prophylaxis or treatment during pregnancy. This is a retrospective cohort data analysis of 408 HIV infected pregnant women who participated in a breastfeeding intervention study (HPTN 046 Study, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00074412) in South Africa. Women initiated zidovudine prophylaxis for PMTCT or triple antiretroviral treatment in pregnancy according to the standard of care. Laboratory and clinical data in pregnancy, anaemia (Hbpregnancy, 48/146 (32.9%) subsequently developed anaemia intrapartum or postpartum and 89/310 (28.7%) of all cases of anaemia remained unresolved by 2 weeks postdelivery. In a univariate analysis, CD4 count and gravidity were significant risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy, RR 1.41; 1.23-1.61 (panaemia in pregnancy and postdelivery. In conclusion, anaemia was most common among women in the advanced stage of HIV infection (CD4anaemia.

  20. DMPD: Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven disease? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18178131 Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven disease? Herbein G, Khan... KA. Trends Immunol. 2008 Feb;29(2):61-7. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven dise...ase? PubmedID 18178131 Title Is HIV infection a TNF receptor signalling-driven diseas

  1. Xerostomy, dental caries and periodontal disease in HIV+ patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Cavasin Filho

    Full Text Available We studied xerostomy and its correlation with periodontal and dental cavity diseases in HIV patients, through measurement of salivary flow and through variables such as saliva buffer capacity, salivary pH, periodontal index, MDF index, dental carie risk and risk of periodontal disease. One hundred patients were analyzed. They were distributed into two groups: Group I (test - 50 patients evidently HIV+, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases, levels of T-CD4 lymphocytes, viral load and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART; and Group II - (control 50 HIV- patients, from whom information was collected and analyzed regarding age, gender, skin color, habits, general and oral diseases. In both groups, measurement of salivary flow, pH and buffer capacity was made. Group I presented high MDF, bacteria plaque and bleeding, with a greater susceptibility to the risks of oral cavities and periodontal disease. The salivary flow and the buffering capacity of the saliva were low, indicating a high level of xerostomy. Two important modifying factors influence these pathologies in an incisive way: one is immunossuppression and the other is HAART therapy. The control exhibited results that are closer to normality; it had better oral-health conditions.

  2. Risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation at initial HIV diagnosis in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K Drain

    Full Text Available After observing persistently low CD4 counts at initial HIV diagnosis in South Africa, we sought to determine risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation among adults.We surveyed adults prior to HIV testing at four outpatient clinics in Durban from August 2010 to November 2011. All HIV-infected adults were offered CD4 testing, and late-stage HIV disease was defined as a CD4 count <100 cells/mm(3. We used multivariate regression models to determine the effects of sex, emotional health, social support, distance from clinic, employment, perceived barriers to receiving healthcare, and foregoing healthcare to use money for food, clothing, or housing ("competing needs to healthcare" on presentation with late-stage HIV disease.Among 3,669 adults screened, 830 were enrolled, newly-diagnosed with HIV and obtained a CD4 result. Among those, 279 (33.6% presented with late-stage HIV disease. In multivariate analyses, participants who lived ≥5 kilometers from the test site [adjusted odds ratio (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.7-4.7], reported competing needs to healthcare (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4, were male (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.3, worked outside the home (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, perceived health service delivery barriers (AOR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, and/or had poor emotional health (AOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-1.9 had higher odds of late-stage HIV disease presentation.Independent risk factors for late-stage HIV disease presentation were from diverse domains, including geographic, economic, demographic, social, and psychosocial. These findings can inform various interventions, such as mobile testing or financial assistance, to reduce the risk of presentation with late-stage HIV disease.

  3. 'Every disease has its cure': faith and HIV therapies in Islamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Every disease has its cure': faith and HIV therapies in Islamic northern Nigeria. ... African Journal of AIDS Research ... a divine cure for HIV exists, many Muslim patients on ART, and the predominantly Muslim biomedical staff who treat them, ...

  4. Genital ulcer disease treatment for reducing sexual acquisition of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutua, Florence M; M'imunya, James Machoki; Wiysonge, Charles Shey

    2012-08-15

    Genital ulcer disease by virtue of disruption of the mucosal surfaces may enhance HIV acquisition. Genital ulcer disease treatment with resolution of the ulcers may therefore contribute in reducing the sexual acquisition of HIV. To determine the effects of treatment of genital ulcer disease on sexual acquisition of HIV. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS, NLM Gateway, Web of Science, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists of relevant publications for eligible studies published between 1980 and August 2011. Randomized controlled trials of any treatment intervention aimed at curing genital ulcer disease compared with an alternative treatment, placebo, or no treatment. We included only trials whose unit of randomization was the individual with confirmed genital ulcer. We independently selected studies and extracted data in duplicate; resolving discrepancies by discussion, consensus, and arbitration by third review author. We expressed study results as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). There were three randomized controlled trials that met our inclusion criteria recruited HIV-negative participants with chancroid (two trials with 143 participants) and primary syphilis (one trial with 30 participants). The syphilis study, carried out in the US between 1995 and 1997, randomized participants to receive a single 2.0 g oral dose of azithromycin (11 participants); two 2.0 g oral doses of azithromycin administered six to eight days apart (eight participants); or benzathine penicillin G administered as either 2.4 million units intramuscular injection once or twice seven days apart (11 participants). No participant in the trial seroconverted during 12 months of follow-up. The chancroid trials, conducted in Kenya by 1990, found no significant differences in HIV seroconversion rates during four to 12 weeks of follow-up between 400 and 200 mg single

  5. Type a niemann-pick disease. Description of three cases with delayed myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, A; Sibilio, M; Caranci, F; Bartiromo, F; Taurisano, R; Balivo, F; Melis, D; Parenti, G; Cirillo, S; Elefante, R; Brunetti, A

    2008-06-03

    We describe three patients with type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD-A). NPD-A is an autosomal recessive neuronal storage disease classified among the sphingolipidoses, characterized by accumulation of sphingomyelin in various tissues and in the brain. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) of our three patients showed a marked delay of myelination with frontal atrophy. Few descriptions of this MRI pattern of delayed myelination have been published to date.

  6. Imaging features of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, J.C.; Shaw, P.; Miller, R.F.; Cartledge, J.D.; Nelson, M.; Bower, M.; Francis, N.; Padley, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated Castleman's disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine HIV-positive patients with biopsy-proven Castleman's disease were studied. Clinical and demographic data, CD4 count, histological diagnosis and human herpes type 8 (HHV8) serology or immunostaining results were recorded. CT images were reviewed independently by two radiologists. RESULTS: CT findings included splenomegaly (n=7) and peripheral lymph node enlargement (axillary n=8, inguinal n=4). All nodes displayed mild to avid enhancement after intravenous administration of contrast material. Hepatomegaly was evident in seven patients. Other features included abdominal (n=6) and mediastinal (n=5) lymph node enlargement and pulmonary abnormalities (n=4). Patterns of parenchymal abnormality included bronchovascular nodularity (n=2), consolidation (n=1) and pleural effusion (n=2). On histological examination eight patients (spleen n=3, lymph node n=9, lung n=1 bone marrow n=1) had the plasma cell variant and one had mixed hyaline-vascular/plasma cell variant. The majority had either positive immunostaining for HHV8 or positive serology (n=8). CONCLUSION: Common imaging features of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection are hepatosplenomegaly and peripheral lymph node enlargement. Although these imaging features may suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical context, they lack specificity and so biopsy is needed for diagnosis. In distinction from multicentric Castleman's disease in other populations the plasma cell variant is most commonly encountered, splenomegaly is a universal feature and there is a strong association with Kaposi's sarcoma

  7. The prevalence of secondary diseases of the HIV patients in the Omsk region: cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Pasechnik, Oksana; Pitsenko, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of secondary diseases of the HIV infected patients who were under observation in medical organizations of Omsk region in 2013 has been studied. 16, 8% of HIV-infected patients had a wide spectrum of secondary diseases, mainly infectious etiology. In the structure of secondary infections the leading position was occupied by tuberculosis (32, 3%), candidiasis (24,4%), bacterial diseases (23,7%). The average risk of tuberculosis diseases is 24 cases for 1000 HIV-infected patients.

  8. Clinical Factors and Disease Course Related to Diagnostic Delay in Korean Crohn's Disease Patients: Results from the CONNECT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Mo Moon

    Full Text Available Diagnostic delay frequently occurs in Crohn's disease (CD patients because of diagnostic limitations. However, diagnostic delay and its related factors remain poorly defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors associated with diagnostic delay and to evaluate the impact of diagnostic delay on clinical course in a Korean CD patient cohort. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 1,047 CD patients registered in the Crohn's Disease Clinical Network and Cohort study in Korea. The mean interval of diagnostic delay was 16.0 ± 33.1 months. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at diagnosis (≥40 years (p = 0.014, concomitant upper gastrointestinal (UGI disease (p = 0.012 and penetrating disease behavior at diagnosis (p = 0.001 were positively associated with long diagnostic delay (≥18 months. During the longitudinal follow-up, long diagnostic delay was independently predictive of further development of intestinal stenosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.93; p = 0.017, internal fistulas (HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.12-2.33; p = 0.011, and perianal fistulas (HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.80; p = 0.016. However, as for the risk of abscess formation, bowel perforation, and CD-related abdominal surgery, no significant association with diagnostic delay was observed. Older age at diagnosis, UGI involvement, and penetrating behavior are associated with long diagnostic delay in Korean CD patients. Moreover, diagnostic delay is associated with an increased risk of CD-related complications such as intestinal stenosis, internal fistulas, and perianal fistulas.

  9. Gender differences in HIV progression to AIDS and death in industrialized countries: slower disease progression following HIV seroconversion in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarrin, Inmaculada; Geskus, Ronald; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Prins, Maria; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Muga, Roberto; Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso; Meyer, Laurence; Porter, Kholoud; del Amo, Julia; Bucher, Heiner; Chêne, Geneviève; Pillay, Deenan; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Darbyshire, Janet; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Goujard, Cécile; Kaldor, John; Kelleher, Tony; Gelgor, Linda; Ramacciotti, Tim; Cooper, David; Smith, Don; Gill, John; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Nielsen, Claus; Pedersen, Court; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Vanhems, Philippe; Boufassa, Faroudy; Hamouda, Osamah; Kucherer, Claudia; Pantazis, Nikos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Karafoulidou, Anastasia; Rezza, Giovanni; Dorrucci, Maria; Longo, Benedetta; Balotta, Claudia; Coutinho, Roel

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate sex differences in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression before (pre-1997) and after (1997-2006) introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the authors used data from a collaboration of 23 HIV seroconverter cohort studies from Europe, Australia, and Canada

  10. Symptom Status Predicts Patient Outcomes in Persons with HIV and Comorbid Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Henderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are living longer; therefore, they are more likely to suffer significant morbidity due to potentially treatable liver diseases. Clinical evidence suggests that the growing number of individuals living with HIV and liver disease may have a poorer health-related quality of life (HRQOL than persons living with HIV who do not have comorbid liver disease. Thus, this study examined the multiple components of HRQOL by testing Wilson and Cleary’s model in a sample of 532 individuals (305 persons with HIV and 227 persons living with HIV and liver disease using structural equation modeling. The model components include biological/physiological factors (HIV viral load, CD4 counts, symptom status (Beck Depression Inventory II and the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey (MOS-HIV mental function, functional status (missed appointments and MOS-HIV physical function, general health perceptions (perceived burden visual analogue scale and MOS-HIV health transition, and overall quality of life (QOL (Satisfaction with Life Scale and MOS-HIV overall QOL. The Wilson and Cleary model was found to be useful in linking clinical indicators to patient-related outcomes. The findings provide the foundation for development and future testing of targeted biobehavioral nursing interventions to improve HRQOL in persons living with HIV and liver disease.

  11. Urinary NGAL marks cystic disease in HIV-associated nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragas, Neal; Nickolas, Thomas L; Wyatt, Christina; Forster, Catherine S; Sise, Meghan; Morgello, Susan; Jagla, Bernd; Buchen, Charles; Stella, Peter; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Mattei, Silvia; Bovino, Achiropita; Argentiero, Lucia; Magnano, Andrea; Devarajan, Prasad; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M; Allegri, Landino; Klotman, Paul; D'Agati, Vivette; Gharavi, Ali G; Barasch, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Nephrosis and a rapid decline in kidney function characterize HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Histologically, HIVAN is a collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with prominent tubular damage. We explored the expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a marker of tubular injury, to determine whether this protein has the potential to aid in the noninvasive diagnosis of HIVAN. We found that expression of urinary NGAL was much higher in patients with biopsy-proven HIVAN than in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with other forms of chronic kidney disease. In the HIV-transgenic mouse model of HIVAN, NGAL mRNA was abundant in dilated, microcystic segments of the nephron. In contrast, urinary NGAL did not correlate with proteinuria in human or in mouse models. These data show that marked upregulation of NGAL accompanies HIVAN and support further study of uNGAL levels in large cohorts to aid in the noninvasive diagnosis of HIVAN and screen for HIVAN-related tubular damage.

  12. Fox Den Disease: An Interesting Case Following Delayed Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehr, Ryan C; Kim, Nicholas; LoGiudice, John A; Ludwig, Kirk

    2015-06-01

    Pyoderma fistulans sinifica, also known as fox den disease, is a rare and poorly understood inflammatory disorder of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. This disorder is often mistaken for other inflammatory skin disorders and treated inappropriately. The authors describe the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the colorectal surgery service with a longstanding diagnosis of perirectal Crohn's disease. Despite aggressive immunosuppression and numerous surgical procedures, the patient continued to have unrelenting purulent drainage from the skin of his buttocks. Following wide excision of the affected skin and subcutaneous tissues by the colorectal surgeon, the plastic surgery team reconstructed the 30 cm x 55 cm wound using a combination of local flaps and skin grafts. The initial pathology report of the excised specimen confirmed the presence of nonspecific abscesses and inflammation. Upon special request by the plastic surgery team, the sample was resectioned with the specific intent of establishing a diagnosis of fox den disease. The additional slides met the criteria for an unequivocal diagnosis of fox den disease. Immunosuppression was discontinued and the patient healed his wounds without complication. Fox den disease is often overlooked because of the obscurity of the disease and the special histological sectioning needed to establish a diagnosis. In this case, the patient was unnecessarily treated with immunosuppressive drugs for more than 3 decades because of a misdiagnosis. With increased awareness of fox den disease, perhaps its pathophysiology can be better elucidated as more patients are appropriately diagnosed and treated.

  13. Delayed-Start Analyses in the Phase 3 Solanezumab EXPEDITION3 Study in Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Seifert, H; Case, M G; Andersen, S W; Holdridge, K C; Aisen, P S; Kollack-Walker, S; Siemers, E

    2018-01-01

    A delayed-start design has been proposed to assess a potential disease-modifying effect in investigational drugs for Alzheimer's disease that target the underlying disease process. We extended this methodology to recently obtained data from the EXPEDITION3. EXPEDITION3 was a Phase 3, double-blind study with participants randomized to solanezumab (400 mg) or placebo every 4 weeks for 80 weeks, with an optional extension of active treatment. The delayed-start analysis was designed to determine if a statistically significant treatment difference established during the placebo-controlled period is maintained (at predefined level) during the delayed-start period, which would suggest the active drug has a disease-modifying effect. The delayed-start analysis was assessed across multiple efficacy measures, and includes data from baseline in the placebo-controlled period and up to 9 months in the delayed-start period. No significant difference was observed between the placebo and solanezumab treatment groups at the end of the placebo-controlled period for the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive 14-item subscale. A significant treatment difference was observed at the end of the placebo-controlled period for the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living instrumental items, an effect also seen at 6 months in the delayed-start period, and the noninferiority criterion was met. No other efficacy measures met these criteria. Delayed-start statistical methodology was used to understand the longitudinal outcomes in EXPEDITION3 and its extension. The small treatment differences observed at the end of the placebo-controlled phase prevented adequate assessment of any putative disease modifying effect.

  14. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    Full Text Available One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been

  15. Anaemia in pregnancy is associated with advanced HIV disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikesh Nandlal

    Full Text Available Anaemia is a common clinical finding in HIV infected women and has been associated with advanced disease. The use of antiretroviral drugs such as Zidovudine (ZDV either for prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT of HIV or used in combination with other antiretrovirals have been implicated in the development or increased severity of anaemia. We report the prevalence, type, severity and incidence of anaemia in a cohort of HIV infected women who initiated antiretroviral prophylaxis or treatment during pregnancy.This is a retrospective cohort data analysis of 408 HIV infected pregnant women who participated in a breastfeeding intervention study (HPTN 046 Study, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00074412 in South Africa. Women initiated zidovudine prophylaxis for PMTCT or triple antiretroviral treatment in pregnancy according to the standard of care. Laboratory and clinical data in pregnancy, <72 hours and 2 weeks postdelivery were extracted from the main database and analysed.The mean Hb concentration was 10.6 g/dL at baseline and 262/408 (64.2% women were diagnosed with anaemia (Hb<11 g/dL in pregnancy, 48/146 (32.9% subsequently developed anaemia intrapartum or postpartum and 89/310 (28.7% of all cases of anaemia remained unresolved by 2 weeks postdelivery. In a univariate analysis, CD4 count and gravidity were significant risk factors for anaemia in pregnancy, RR 1.41; 1.23-1.61 (p<0.001 and 1.10; 1.01-1.18 (p = 0.02 respectively. After adjusting for antiretroviral regimen, age and gravidity in a multivariable analysis, only the CD4 count remains a significant risk factor for anaemia in pregnancy and postdelivery.In conclusion, anaemia was most common among women in the advanced stage of HIV infection (CD4<200 cells/mm3. There was no evidence of an association between ZDV or triple ARVs and anaemia.

  16. HIV-infected individuals who delay, decline, or discontinue antiretroviral therapy: Comparing clinic- and peer-recruited cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya eGwadz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA delay, decline, or discontinue antiretroviral therapy (ART when it is medically indicated (40-45%, largely African Americans and Latinos/Hispanics. This study explores the feasibility of locating PLHA who are not on ART (PLHA-NOA through clinics and peer referral; compares the two cohorts on multi-level barriers to ART; and examines readiness to initiate/reinitiate ART, a predictor of treatment outcomes. We recruited adult HIV-infected African American and Latino/Hispanic PLHA-NOA through HIV hospital clinics and peer referral in 2012-13. Participants engaged in structured one-hour assessments with reliable/valid measures on barriers to ART. We found recruitment through peers (63.2%, 60/95 was more feasible than in clinics (36.8%, 35/90. Participants were 48.0 years old and had lived with HIV for 14.7 years on average, and 56.8% had taken ART previously. Most (61.1% were male and African American (76.8%, and 23.2% were Latino/Hispanic. Peer-recruited participants were older, had lived with HIV longer, were less engaged in HIV care, and were more likely to have taken ART previously. The cohorts differed in reasons for discontinuing ART. Levels of ART knowledge were comparable between cohorts (68.5% correct, and there were no differences in attitudes toward ART (e.g., mistrust, which were in the neutral range. In bivariate linear regression, readiness for ART was negatively associated with physician mistrust (B=-10.4, and positively associated with self-efficacy (B=5.5, positive outcome expectancies (B=6.3, beliefs about personal necessity of ART (B=17.5, and positive internal norms (B=7.9. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of engaging this vulnerable population through peer referral. Peer-recruited PLHA evidence particularly high rates of risk factors compared those in clinics. Interventions to support ART initiation and continuation are sorely needed for both subgroups.

  17. Mechanisms Underlying HIV-Associated Noninfectious Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Rachel M; Flores, Sonia C; Palmer, Brent E; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Lesko, Catherine R; Lau, Bryan; Fontenot, Andrew P; Roman, Jesse; McDyer, John F; Twigg, Homer L

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary disease remains a primary source of morbidity and mortality in persons living with HIV (PLWH), although the advent of potent combination antiretroviral therapy has resulted in a shift from predominantly infectious to noninfectious pulmonary complications. PLWH are at high risk for COPD, pulmonary hypertension, and lung cancer even in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. The underlying mechanisms of this are incompletely understood, but recent research in both human and animal models suggests that oxidative stress, expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and genetic instability may result in lung damage, which predisposes PLWH to these conditions. Some of the factors that drive these processes include tobacco and other substance use, direct HIV infection and expression of specific HIV proteins, inflammation, and shifts in the microbiome toward pathogenic and opportunistic organisms. Further studies are needed to understand the relative importance of these factors to the development of lung disease in PLWH. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventing gatekeeping delays in the diagnosis of rare diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.; Fransen, L.; van den Aker, M.; Meijboom, B.R.

    2018-01-01

    GPs acting as gatekeepers render a healthcare system easily accessible as well as affordable. However, gatekeeping can have an important drawback: it may hamper timely diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from a rare disease (incidence <1:2000),1 especially if patients present with common

  19. Role of Natural Autoantibodies in Ugandans With Rheumatic Heart Disease and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Huck

    2016-03-01

    Interpretation: We found that HIV and RHD are associated with alterations in natural autoantibody responses previously linked to an increased risk for atherosclerosis and autoimmune inflammatory disease.

  20. Delays by people living with HIV/AIDS in accessing antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To understand, by qualitative enquiry, the underlying reasons and narratives ... denial, practical clinic constraints and appropriate types of health education. Keywords: qualitative research, delays, access, antiretroviral drugs, ARVs ...

  1. ‘Lost to follow up’ : Rethinking delayed and interrupted HIV treatment among married Swazi women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlamini-Simelane, T.T.T.; Moyer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Through various campaigns and strategies, more women are being tested for HIV in countries with a high prevalence of the virus. Despite the ready availability of treatment at government clinics in sub-Saharan African countries like Swaziland, women consistently report difficulty in maintaining

  2. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection during HIV disease. Persisting problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Manfredi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Still in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy, late recognition of HIV disease or lack of sufficient immune recovery pose HIV-infected patients at risk to develop opportunistic infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, which are environmental organisms commonly retrieved in soil and superficial waters.Among these microorganisms, the most frequent is represented by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC. Health care professionals who face HIV-infected patients should suspect disseminated mycobacterial disease when a deep immunodeficiency is present, (a CD4+ lymphocyte count below 50 cells/μL often associated with constitutional signs and symptoms, and non-specific laboratory abnormalities. Mycobacterial culture of peripheral blood is a reliable technique for diagnosing disseminated disease. Among drugs active against NTM, as well as some anti-tubercular compounds, the rifampin derivative rifabutin, and some novel fluoroquinolones, the availability of macrolides, has greatly contributed to improve both prophylaxis and treatment outcome of disseminated MAC infections. Although multiple questions remain about which regimens may be regarded as optimal, general recommendations can be expressed on the ground of existing evidences.Treatment should begin with associated clarithromycin (or azithromycin, plus ethambutol and rifabutin (with the rifabutin dose depending on other concomitant medications that might result in drug-drug interactions.A combined three-drug regimen is preferred for patients who cannot be prescribed an effective antiretroviral regimen immediately. Patients with a CD4+ lymphocyte count below 50 cells/μL, who do not have clinical evidence of active mycobacterial disease, should receive a primary prophylaxis with either clarithromycin or azithromycin, with or without rifabutin.

  3. Impact of viral hepatitis co-infection on response to antiretroviral therapy and HIV disease progression in the HIV-NAT cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, W. Phillip; Duncombe, Chris J.; Mahanontharit, Apicha; Boyd, Mark A.; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Lange, Joep M. A.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Cooper, David A.; Dore, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of viral hepatitis co-infection on HIV disease outcomes following commencement of combination antiretroviral therapy in a developing country setting. METHODS: HIV RNA suppression, CD4 cell count recovery, and HIV disease progression were examined within a cohort of

  4. The Burden of Oral Disease among Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I.; Russell, Jonathan S.; Dominy, Stephen S.; Patel, Kunjal; McKenna, Matt; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Seage, George R.; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare oral health parameters in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected youth (PHEU). Methods In a cross-sectional substudy within the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, participants were examined for number of decayed teeth (DT), Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT), oral mucosal disease, and periodontal disease (PD). Covariates for oral health parameters were examined using zero-inflated negative binomial regression and ordinal logistic regression models. Results Eleven sites enrolled 209 PHIV and 126 PHEU. Higher DT scores were observed in participants who were PHIV [Adjusted Mean Ratio (aMR) = 1.7 (95% CI 1.2–2.5)], female [aMR = 1.4 (1.0–1.9)], had no source of regular dental care [aMR = 2.3 (1.5–3.4)], and had a high frequency of meals/snacks [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.9 (1.1–3.1)] and juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.6 (1.1–2.4)]. Higher DMFT scores were observed in participants who were older [≥19, aMR = 1.9 (1.2–2.9)], had biological parent as caregiver [aMR = 1.2 (1.0–1.3)], had a high frequency of juice/soda [≥5 /day vs 0–3, aMR = 1.4 (1.1–1.7)] and a low saliva flow rate [mL/min, aMR = 0.8 per unit higher (0.6–1.0)]. Eighty percent had PD; no differences were seen by HIV status using the patient-based classifications of health, gingivitis or mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. No associations were observed of CD4 count and viral load with oral health outcomes after adjustment. Conclusions Oral health was poor in PHIV and PHEU youth. This was dismaying since most HIV infected children in the U.S. are carefully followed at medical health care clinics. This data underscore the need for regular dental care. As PHIV youth were at higher risk for cavities, it will be important to better understand this relationship in order to develop targeted interventions. PMID:27299992

  5. A CASE OF RENAL DISEASE IN HIV INFECTED PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Vina Septiani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Kidney diseases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients has been been fourth leading cause of death after sepsis, pneumonia, and liver disease. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN is the most common. We report a case, a male patient, 48 years, who experienced shortness of breath, cough and intermittent fever and has been reported as HIV positive, without previous antiretroviral treatment and last CD4+ count is 89 cells/mm3. There are elevated BUN and SC from day to day during treatment and proteinuria +2 as a sign of kidney disease with normal blood pressure and there was no edema. Patients given an antibiotic and ACE inhibitors as antiproteinuria. Patients with suspicion of HIVAN in this case can progress very rapidly and causes progressive decline in renal function. Prognosis of patients with HIVAN if not handled properly will develop end stage renal disease (ESRD in 1-4 months and had a mortality rate 4.7 times higher than HIV patients without renal impairment. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  6. Renal Impairment and Cardiovascular Disease in HIV-Positive Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Lundgren, Jens D; Ross, Mike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While the association between renal impairment and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established in the general population, the association remains poorly understood in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. METHODS: Individuals with ≥2 estimated glomerular...... filtration rate (eGFR) measurements after 1 February 2004 were followed until CVD, death, last visit plus 6 months, or 1 February 2015. CVD was defined as the occurrence of centrally validated myocardial infarction, stroke, invasive cardiovascular procedures, or sudden cardiac death. RESULTS: During a median...

  7. Lymphogranuloma venereum and HIV infection: misdiagnosed as Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sheel; Hay, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The report describes a young Caucasian homosexual man who presented with a 4-month history of bloody diarrhoea and weight loss. Over the next 4 months he was investigated for inflammatory bowel disease and subsequently started on mesalazine and prednisolone as an outpatient. Within a month of starting treatment his symptoms worsened, leading to his self-referral to the genitourinary medicine clinic. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with advanced HIV infection and lymphogranuloma venereum infection. The patient was treated with doxycycline for 3 weeks and started on antiretrovirals. One month later the patient is symptom free with a recovering immune system. PMID:22797476

  8. Rethinking the Poverty-disease Nexus: the Case of HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Kiran

    2017-09-01

    While it is well-established that poverty and disease are intimately connected, the nature of this connection and the role of poverty in disease causation remains contested in scientific and social studies of disease. Using the case of HIV/AIDS in South Africa and drawing on a theoretically grounded analysis, this paper reconceptualises disease and poverty as ontologically entangled. In the context of the South African HIV epidemic, this rethinking of the poverty-disease dynamic enables an account of how social forces such as poverty become embodied in the very substance of disease to produce ontologies of HIV/AIDS unique to South Africa.

  9. Management of Long-Term Complications of HIV Disease: Focus on Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Judith S

    2018-04-01

    HIV-infected individuals on effective antiretroviral therapy experience a number of non-AIDS noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, more frequently than uninfected individuals. Common pathways for such diseases are chronic immune activation and inflammation, including the prolonged inflammation associated with lower nadir CD4+ cell count. Prevention and treatment of non-AIDS conditions include treatment of traditional risk factors, lifestyle interventions, earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and potentially therapies specifically targeting inflammation and immune activation (eg, statins). This article summarizes a presentation by Judith S. Currier, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Improving the Management of HIV Disease, held in New York, New York, in February 2017.

  10. Non-communicable diseases and HIV care and treatment: models of integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Malia; Ojikutu, Bisola; Andrian, Soa; Sohng, Elaine; Minior, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing cause of morbidity in low-income countries including in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Integration of NCD and HIV services can build upon experience with chronic care models from HIV programmes. We describe models of NCD and HIV integration, challenges and lessons learned. A literature review of published articles on integrated NCD and HIV programs in low-income countries and key informant interviews were conducted with leaders of identified integrated NCD and HIV programs. Information was synthesised to identify models of NCD and HIV service delivery integration. Three models of integration were identified as follows: NCD services integrated into centres originally providing HIV care; HIV care integrated into primary health care (PHC) already offering NCD services; and simultaneous introduction of integrated HIV and NCD services. Major challenges identified included NCD supply chain, human resources, referral systems, patient education, stigma, patient records and monitoring and evaluation. The range of HIV and NCD services varied widely within and across models. Regardless of model of integration, leveraging experience from HIV care models and adapting existing systems and tools is a feasible method to provide efficient care and treatment for the growing numbers of patients with NCDs. Operational research should be conducted to further study how successful models of HIV and NCD integration can be expanded in scope and scaled-up by managers and policymakers seeking to address all the chronic care needs of their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Impact of HIV Type 1 DNA Levels on Spontaneous Disease Progression: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiara, Chrissa G; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported the prognostic strength of HIV-1 DNA with variable results however. The aims of the current study were to estimate more accurately the ability of HIV-1 DNA to predict progression of HIV-1 disease toward acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death...... of primary studies indicated that HIV-1 DNA was a significantly better predictor than HIV-1 RNA of either AIDS alone (ratio of RRs=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.07) or of combined (AIDS or death) progression outcomes (ratio of RRs=1.51, 95% CI: 1.11-2.05). HIV-1 DNA is a strong predictor of HIV-1 disease progression...

  12. Failure of delayed feedback deep brain stimulation for intermittent pathological synchronization in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Dovzhenok

    Full Text Available Suppression of excessively synchronous beta-band oscillatory activity in the brain is believed to suppress hypokinetic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Recently, a lot of interest has been devoted to desynchronizing delayed feedback deep brain stimulation (DBS. This type of synchrony control was shown to destabilize the synchronized state in networks of simple model oscillators as well as in networks of coupled model neurons. However, the dynamics of the neural activity in Parkinson's disease exhibits complex intermittent synchronous patterns, far from the idealized synchronous dynamics used to study the delayed feedback stimulation. This study explores the action of delayed feedback stimulation on partially synchronized oscillatory dynamics, similar to what one observes experimentally in parkinsonian patients. We employ a computational model of the basal ganglia networks which reproduces experimentally observed fine temporal structure of the synchronous dynamics. When the parameters of our model are such that the synchrony is unphysiologically strong, the feedback exerts a desynchronizing action. However, when the network is tuned to reproduce the highly variable temporal patterns observed experimentally, the same kind of delayed feedback may actually increase the synchrony. As network parameters are changed from the range which produces complete synchrony to those favoring less synchronous dynamics, desynchronizing delayed feedback may gradually turn into synchronizing stimulation. This suggests that delayed feedback DBS in Parkinson's disease may boost rather than suppress synchronization and is unlikely to be clinically successful. The study also indicates that delayed feedback stimulation may not necessarily exhibit a desynchronization effect when acting on a physiologically realistic partially synchronous dynamics, and provides an example of how to estimate the stimulation effect.

  13. Can Better Management of Periodontal Disease Delay the Onset and Progression of Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice; Robinson, Sarita; Crean, StJohn; Singhrao, Sim K

    2017-01-01

    A risk factor relationship exists between periodontal disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD) via tooth loss, and improved memory following dental intervention. This links the microbial contribution from indigenous oral periodontal pathogens to the manifestation of chronic conditions, such as AD. Here, we use Porphyromonas gingivalis infection to illustrate its effect on mental health. P. gingivalis infection, in its primary sub-gingival niche, can cause polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis. Dysbiosis describes the residency of select commensals from the oral cavity following co-aggregation around the dominant keystone pathogen, such as P. gingivalis, to gain greater virulence. The initial process involves P. gingivalis disturbing neutrophil mediated innate immune responses in the healthy gingivae and then downregulating adaptive immune cell differentiation and development to invade, and subsequently, establish new dysbiotic bacterial communities. Immune responses affect the host in general and functionally via dietary adjustments caused by tooth loss. Studies from animals orally infected with P. gingivalis confirm this bacterium can transmigrate to distant organ sites (the brain) and contribute toward peripheral and intracerebral inflammation, and compromise vascular and microvascular integrity. In another study, P. gingivalis infection caused sleep pattern disturbances by altering glial cell light/dark molecular clock activity, and this, in turn, can affect the clearance of danger associated molecular patterns, such as amyloid-β, via the glymphatic system. Since P. gingivalis can transmigrate to the brain and modulate organ-specific inflammatory innate and adaptive immune responses, this paper explores whether better management of indigenous periodontal bacteria could delay/prevent the onset and/or progression of dementia.

  14. European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines on the prevention and management of metabolic diseases in HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, J. D.; Battegay, M.; Behrens, G.; de Wit, S.; Guaraldi, G.; Katlama, C.; Martinez, E.; Nair, D.; Powderly, W. G.; Reiss, P.; Sutinen, J.; Vigano, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic diseases are frequently observed in HIV-infected persons and, as the risk of contracting these diseases is age-related, their prevalence will increase in the future as a consequence of the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). SUMMARY OF GUIDELINES: All HIV-infected persons

  15. Rates of cardiovascular disease following smoking cessation in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, K; Worm, S; Reiss, P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events after stopping smoking in patients with HIV infection.......The aim of the study was to estimate the rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events after stopping smoking in patients with HIV infection....

  16. Motor Asymmetry and Substantia Nigra Volume Are Related to Spatial Delayed Response Performance in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Erin R.; Black, Kevin J.; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Studies suggest motor deficit asymmetry may help predict the pattern of cognitive impairment in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). We tested this hypothesis using a highly validated and sensitive spatial memory task, spatial delayed response (SDR), and clinical and neuroimaging measures of PD asymmetry. We predicted SDR performance would be…

  17. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  18. 10-minute delayed recall from the modified mini-mental state test predicts Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, Scott A; Lee, Ae Young; Zarow, Chris; Teng, Evelyn L; Chui, Helena C

    2014-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity and specificity of two delayed recall scores from the Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) test with consensus clinical diagnosis to differentiate cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) versus non-AD pathologies. At a memory disorders clinic, 117 cognitively impaired patients were administered a baseline 3MS test and received a contemporaneous consensus clinical diagnosis. Their brains were examined after death about 5 years later. Using logistic regression with forward selection to predict pathologically defined AD versus non-AD, 10-min delayed recall entered first (p = 0.001), followed by clinical diagnosis (p = 0.02); 1-min delayed recall did not enter. 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 (score range = 0-9) were 87% sensitive and 47% specific in predicting AD pathology; consensus clinical diagnosis was 82% sensitive and 45% specific. For the 57 patients whose initial Mini-Mental State Examination scores were ≥19 (the median), 3MS 10-min delayed recall scores ≤4 showed some loss of sensitivity (80%) but a substantial gain in specificity (77%). In conclusion, 10-min delayed recall score on the brief 3MS test distinguished between AD versus non-AD pathology about 5 years before death at least as well as consensus clinical diagnosis that requires much more comprehensive information and complex deliberation.

  19. Two profitless delays for an SEIRS epidemic disease model with vertical transmission and pulse vaccination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xinzhu; Jiao Jianjun; Chen Lansun

    2009-01-01

    Since the investigation of impulsive delay differential equations is beginning, the literature on delay epidemic models with pulse vaccination is not extensive. In this paper, we propose a new SEIRS epidemic disease model with two profitless delays and vertical transmission, and analyze the dynamics behaviors of the model under pulse vaccination. Using the discrete dynamical system determined by the stroboscopic map, we obtain a 'infection-free' periodic solution, further, show that the 'infection-free' periodic solution is globally attractive when some parameters of the model are under appropriate conditions. Using a new modeling method, we obtain sufficient condition for the permanence of the epidemic model with pulse vaccination. We show that time delays, pulse vaccination and vertical transmission can bring different effects on the dynamics behaviors of the model by numerical analysis. Our results also show the delays are 'profitless'. In this paper, the main feature is to introduce two discrete time delays, vertical transmission and impulse into SEIRS epidemic model and to give pulse vaccination strategies.

  20. Aging with HIV-1 Infection: Motor Functions, Cognition, and Attention--A Comparison with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVaughn, S; Müller-Oehring, E M; Markey, B; Brontë-Stewart, H M; Schulte, T

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in their various combinations have dramatically increased the life expectancies of HIV-infected persons. People diagnosed with HIV are living beyond the age of 50 but are experiencing the cumulative effects of HIV infection and aging on brain function. In HIV-infected aging individuals, the potential synergy between immunosenescence and HIV viral loads increases susceptibility to HIV-related brain injury and functional brain network degradation similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the aging population. Although there are clear diagnostic differences in the primary pathology of both diseases, i.e., death of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra in PD and neuroinflammation in HIV, neurotoxicity to dopaminergic terminals in the basal ganglia (BG) has been implied in the pathogenesis of HIV and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of PD. Similar to PD, HIV infection affects structures of the BG, which are part of interconnected circuits including mesocorticolimbic pathways linking brainstem nuclei to BG and cortices subserving attention, cognitive control, and motor functions. The present review discusses the combined effects of aging and neuroinflammation in HIV individuals on cognition and motor function in comparison with age-related neurodegenerative processes in PD. Despite the many challenges, some HIV patients manage to age successfully, most likely by redistribution of neural network resources to enhance function, as occurs in healthy elderly; such compensation could be curtailed by emerging PD.

  1. A systematic review of prospective memory in HIV disease: from the laboratory to daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Gunes; Sheppard, David P; Tierney, Savanna M; Kordovski, Victoria M; Sullivan, Kelli L; Woods, Steven Paul

    2017-09-27

    Prospective memory (PM) is described as the capacity to form and maintain an intention that is executed in response to a specific cue. Neural injury and associated neurocognitive disorders are common among persons living with HIV disease, who might therefore be susceptible to impairment in PM. This literature review utilized a structured qualitative approach to summarize and evaluate our current understanding of PM functioning in people living with HIV disease. 33 studies of PM in HIV+ persons met criteria for inclusion. Findings showed that HIV is associated with moderate deficits in PM, which appear to be largely independent of commonly observed comorbid factors. The pattern of PM deficits reveals dysregulation of strategic processes that is consistent with the frontal systems pathology and associated executive dysfunction that characterizes HIV-associated neural injury. The literature also suggests that HIV-associated PM deficits present a strong risk of concurrent problems in a wide range of health behaviors (e.g. medication non-adherence) and activities of daily living (e.g. employment). Early attempts to improve PM in HIV disease have revealed that supporting strategic processes might be effective for some individuals. HIV-associated PM deficits are common and exert a significant adverse effect on the daily lives and health of infected persons. Much work remains to be done to understand the cognitive architecture of HIV-associated PM deficits and the most efficient means to enhance PM functioning and improve health outcomes in persons living with HIV.

  2. Delay in Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Patients Without Gastrointestinal Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Marco A; Gramelspacher, Anna Maria; Sinacore, James; Winterfield, Laura; Venu, Mukund

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the delay in diagnosis of patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease in those who present with gastrointestinal complaints vs nongastrointestinal complaints at our tertiary care center. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Celiac disease can have variable clinical presentations; it can be characterized by predominately gastrointestinal symptoms, or it may present without any gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 687 adult patients who carried the diagnosis of celiac disease. Patients included had biopsy-proven celiac disease and were categorized based on presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms prior to their diagnosis. There were 101 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease that met inclusion criteria. Fifty-two patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms and 49 had nongastrointestinal complaints. Results from Mann-Whitney statistical analysis showed a median delay in diagnosis of 2.3 months for the gastrointestinal symptoms group and 42 months for the nongastrointestinal group (P symptoms had abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone, as opposed to 15.5% in the gastrointestinal symptom group (P = .004). Of patients with nongastrointestinal symptoms, 69.4% had anemia, compared with 11.5% of the gastrointestinal symptom group (P symptom group, 68%, were noted to have abnormal bone density scans, compared with 41% in the gastrointestinal symptom group. No sex differences were noted on chi-squared analysis between the 2 groups (P = .997). Although there is growing awareness of celiac disease, the delay in diagnosis for patients without gastrointestinal symptoms remains prolonged, with an average delay of 3.5 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Systemic delays in the initiation of antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy do not improve outcomes of HIV-positive mothers: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myer Landon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation in eligible HIV-infected pregnant women is an important intervention to promote maternal and child health. Increasing the duration of ART received before delivery plays a major role in preventing vertical HIV transmission, but pregnant women across Africa experience significant delays in starting ART, partly due the perceived need to deliver ART counseling and patient education before ART initiation. We examined whether delaying ART to provide pre-ART counseling was associated with improved outcomes among HIV-infected women in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 490 HIV-infected pregnant women referred to initiate treatment at an urban ART clinic. At this clinic all patients including pregnant women are screened by a clinician and then undergo three sessions of counseling and patient education prior to starting treatment, commonly introducing delays of 2–4 weeks before ART initiation. Data on viral suppression and retention in care after ART initiation were taken from routine clinic records. Results A total of 382 women initiated ART before delivery (78%; ART initiation before delivery was associated with earlier gestational age at presentation to the ART service (p  Conclusions A substantial proportion of eligible pregnant women referred for ART do not begin treatment before delivery in this setting. Among women who do initiate ART, delaying initiation for patient preparation is not associated with improved maternal outcomes. Given the need to maximize the duration of ART before delivery for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, there is an urgent need for new strategies to help expedite ART initiation in eligible pregnant women.

  4. Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Marchewka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons.

  5. [Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Zofia; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Knysz, Brygida

    2015-12-16

    Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons.

  6. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; de Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; de Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.; Gras, A. Luuk; van Wout, Angelique B.; Arnedo-Valero, Mireia; Sierra, Mariana de Paz; Rodriguez, Ana Torrecilla; Garcia, Juan Gonzalez; Arribas, Jose R.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Prins, Yerly S. J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; Boer, K.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Bravenboer, B.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van de Ven-de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Haag, Den; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; de Boer, M. J. G.; Jolink, H.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Bronsveld, W.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polée, M. B.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; Weijer, S.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Stek, C. J.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Peters, E. J. G.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Plankey, Michael; Crain, Barbara; Dobs, Adrian; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Gallant, Joel; Johnson-Hill, Lisette; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola; Shepard, James; Thio, Chloe; Phair, John P.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Badri, Sheila; Conover, Craig; O'Gorman, Maurice; Ostrow, David; Palella, Frank; Ragin, Ann; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Aronow, Aaron; Bolan, Robert; Breen, Elizabeth; Butch, Anthony; Fahey, John; Jamieson, Beth; Miller, Eric N.; Oishi, John; Vinters, Harry; Visscher, Barbara R.; Wiley, Dorothy; Witt, Mallory; Yang, Otto; Young, Stephen; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Becker, James T.; Cranston, Ross D.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Mellors, John W.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Stall, Ronald D.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Abraham, Alison; Althoff, Keri; Cox, Christopher; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Gange, Stephen J.; Golub, Elizabeth; Schollenberger, Janet; Seaberg, Eric C.; Su, Sol; Huebner, Robin E.; Dominguez, Geraldina; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Carosi, G.; Cauda, R.; Monforte, A. d'Arminio; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; Sagnelli, E.; Viale, P. L.; Von Schlosser, F.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ammassari, A.; Andreoni, M.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; de Luca, A.; Gargiulo, M.; Gervasoni, C.; Girardi, E.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Murri, R.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Torti, C.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, Laura; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Montroni, M.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Riva, A.; Tirelli, U.; Martellotta, F.; Ladisa, N.; Lazzari, G.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Scalzini, A.; Minardi, C.; Bertelli, D.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Carnevale, G.; Lorenzotti, S.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Leoncini, F.; Mazzotta, F.; Pozzi, M.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Viscoli, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Chiodera, A.; Castelli, P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Foschi, A.; Salpietro, S.; Galli, A.; Bigoloni, A.; Spagnuolo, V.; Merli, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Bisio, L.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; de Marco, M.; Ferrari, C.; Borghi, R.; Baldelli, F.; Belfiori, B.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Narciso, P.; Tozzi, V.; Vullo, V.; d'Avino, A.; Zaccarelli, M.; Gallo, L.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Trotta, M. P.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A. M.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Raise, N. N.; Ebo, F.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Law, M.; Petoumenos, K.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.

    2013-01-01

    Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV

  7. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the onset of dementia, specifically Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A literature review was conducted in the world’s acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and MEDLINE. Altogether, 14 original studies focusing on the research topic were detected. These included six prospective cohort studies and eight retrospective studies. Both types of studies suggest different conclusions. The findings from the prospective cohort studies state that there is no association between bilingualism and the delay of the onset of AD, while the retrospective studies claim the opposite. Despite the negative results of the prospective cohort studies, more research should be conducted on bilingualism and its impact on the delay of the onset of AD, since the brain studies have brought positive findings as far as the enhancement of cognitive reserve is concerned. PMID:29089747

  8. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the onset of dementia, specifically Alzheimer's disease (AD). A literature review was conducted in the world's acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and MEDLINE. Altogether, 14 original studies focusing on the research topic were detected. These included six prospective cohort studies and eight retrospective studies. Both types of studies suggest different conclusions. The findings from the prospective cohort studies state that there is no association between bilingualism and the delay of the onset of AD, while the retrospective studies claim the opposite. Despite the negative results of the prospective cohort studies, more research should be conducted on bilingualism and its impact on the delay of the onset of AD, since the brain studies have brought positive findings as far as the enhancement of cognitive reserve is concerned.

  9. Connecting the dots: could microbial translocation explain commonly reported symptoms in HIV disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalie L; Vance, David E; Moneyham, Linda D; Raper, James L; Mugavero, Michael J; Heath, Sonya L; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2014-01-01

    Microbial translocation within the context of HIV disease has been described as one of the contributing causes of inflammation and disease progression in HIV infection. HIV-associated symptoms have been related to inflammatory markers and sCD14, a surrogate marker for microbial translocation, suggesting a plausible link between microbial translocation and symptom burden in HIV disease. Similar pathophysiological responses and symptoms have been reported in inflammatory bowel disease. We provide a comprehensive review of microbial translocation, HIV-associated symptoms, and symptoms connected with inflammation. We identify studies showing a relationship among inflammatory markers, sCD14, and symptoms reported in HIV disease. A conceptual framework and rationale to investigate the link between microbial translocation and symptoms is presented. The impact of inflammation on symptoms supports recommendations to reduce inflammation as part of HIV symptom management. Research in reducing microbial translocation-induced inflammation is limited, but needed, to further promote positive health outcomes among HIV-infected patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Knowledge of HIV Testing Guidelines Among US Internal Medicine Residents: A Decade After the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Routine HIV Testing Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandachi, Dima; Dang, Bich N; Wilson Dib, Rita; Friedman, Harvey; Giordano, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Ten years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended universal HIV screening, rates remain low. Internal medicine residents are the front-line medical providers for large groups of patients. We evaluated the knowledge of internal medicine residents about HIV testing guidelines and examined adherence to universal HIV testing in an outpatient setting. A cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents at four residency programs in Chicago was conducted from January to March 2016. Aggregate data on HIV screening were collected from 35 federally qualified community health centers in the Chicago area after inclusion of an HIV testing best practice alert in patients' electronic medical records. Of the 192 residents surveyed, 130 (68%) completed the survey. Only 58% were aware of universal HIV screening and 49% were aware that Illinois law allows for an opt-out HIV testing strategy. Most of the residents (64%) ordered no more than 10 HIV tests in 6 months. The most frequently reported barriers to HIV testing were deferral because of urgent care issues, lack of time, and the perception that patients were uncomfortable discussing HIV testing. From July 2015 to February 2016, the average HIV testing adherence rate in the 35 health centers was 18.2%. More effort is needed to change HIV testing practices among internal medicine residents so that they will adopt this approach in their future clinical practice. Improving knowledge about HIV testing and addressing other HIV testing barriers are essential for such a successful change.

  11. Autologous neural progenitor cell transplantation into newborn mice modeling for E200K genetic prion disease delays disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Kati; Binyamin, Orli; Fainstein, Nina; Keller, Guy; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2018-05-01

    TgMHu2ME199K mice, a transgenic line mimicking genetic prion disease, are born healthy and gradually deteriorate to a terminal neurological condition concomitant with the accumulation of disease-related PrP. To investigate whether transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to these mice can delay disease aggravation, we first tested the properties of mutant PrP in homogenates and enriched NPCs from TgMHu2ME199K embryos, as compared to PrP in sick TgMHu2ME199K brains. Next, we tested the clinical effect of NPCs transplantation into newborn TgMHu2ME199K mice. We show that mutant PrP does not convert into a disease-related isoform while in progenitor cells. Most important, transplantation of both wild type and transgenic NPCs significantly delayed the progression of spontaneous prion disease in TgMHu2ME199K mice. While the strong clinical effect was not accompanied by a reduced accumulation of disease-related PrP, treated mouse brains presented a significant reduction in amyloid glycosaminoglycans and preservation of neurogenesis levels, indicating a strong neuroprotective effect. These results may encourage the investigation of new pathways for treatment in these terrible diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Malaria, HIV and sickle cell disease in Ghana : Towards tailor-made interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owusu, E.D.A.

    2018-01-01

    Ghana has made many strides in the fight against malaria. This research looked at the contribution of malaria transmission heterogeneity to malaria, and the effect of geographical overlap between malaria, HIV and sickle cell disease. Our systematic review of the interactions between HIV and SCD

  13. Cardiometabolic disease risk and HIV status in rural South Africa : establishing a baseline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, Samuel J.; Gomez-Olive, F. Xavier; Houle, Brian; Thorogood, Margaret; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Angotti, Nicole; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa; Williams, Jill; Menken, Jane; Tollman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background: To inform health care and training, resource and research priorities, it is essential to establish how non-communicable disease risk factors vary by HIV-status in high HIV burden areas; and whether long-term anti-retroviral therapy (ART) plays a modifying role. Methods: As part of a

  14. Delaying Mobility Disability in People With Parkinson Disease Using a Sensorimotor Agility Exercise Program

    OpenAIRE

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a new framework for therapists to develop an exercise program to delay mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Mobility, or the ability to efficiently navigate and function in a variety of environments, requires balance, agility, and flexibility, all of which are affected by PD. This article summarizes recent research identifying how constraints on mobility specific to PD, such as rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing, poor sensory integration, inflexible...

  15. Role of delayed indium-111 labeled leukocyte scan in the management of Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaton, G.D.; Navab, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Diner, W.C.; Texter, E.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison of nine patients with Crohn's disease who had a positive delayed (24 hr) 111 indium leukocyte scan and 10 patients with negative scan showed no significant difference between the two groups for the Crohn's disease activity index, sedimentation rate, survival, complications, number of days in hospital, outpatient visits, or readmissions. Despite the apparent lack of statistical significance in Crohn's disease activity index, the scan was positive in nine of 16 patients with a Crohn's disease activity index more than 150, and none of three patients with Crohn's disease activity index less than 150. In the patients studied, there were no false-positive leukocyte scans. In nine of 10 patients with ileocolonic disease, scanning results correctly predicted the proper management. Six patients with positive scan and enteroclysis responded to medical treatment. Four patients had positive enteroclysis and negative scan; of these, three had radiographic features of chronic ileal stricture which was confirmed at operation. The results suggest that a negative delayed indium-111 leukocyte scan may be useful in diagnosis of chronic fibrotic ileal stricture

  16. CROI 2017: Complications and Comorbidities of HIV Disease and Its Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Currier, Judith S.; Havlir, Diane V.

    2017-01-01

    Complications of HIV disease remained a major focus at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI), and included studies focused on noncommunicable chronic diseases (eg, cardiovascular disease, obesity, bone disease, and malignancies) and opportunistic infections (Mycobacterium tuberculosis and cryptococcosis). Progress in identifying predictors of specific complications as well as interventions for the prevention and treatment of these comorbidities are summarized...

  17. Alcohol Types and HIV Disease Progression Among HIV-Infected Drinkers Not Yet on Antiretroviral Therapy in Russia and Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Stephen B; Fatch, Robin; Patts, Gregory; Winter, Michael; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine; Emenyonu, Nneka; Muyindike, Winnie; Kekibiina, Allen; Blokhina, Elena; Gnatienko, Natalia; Kruptisky, Evgeny; Cheng, Debbie M; Samet, Jeffrey H; Hahn, Judith A

    2017-11-01

    In HIV-infected drinkers, alcohol types more likely to cause inflammation could plausibly increase the risk of HIV disease progression. We therefore assessed the association between alcohol type and plasma HIV RNA level (HIV viral load) among HIV-infected drinkers not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Russia and Uganda. We analyzed the data of participants from cohorts in Russia and Uganda and assessed their HIV viral load at enrollment by the alcohol type predominantly consumed. We defined predominant alcohol type as the alcohol type contributing >50% of total alcohol consumption in the 1 month (Russia) or 3 months (Uganda) prior to enrollment. Using multiple linear regression, we compared log 10 HIV viral load by predominant alcohol type, controlling for age, gender, socioeconomic status, total number of standard drinks, frequency of drinking ≥6 drinks/occasion, and in Russia, history of injection drug use. Most participants (99.2% of 261 in Russia and 98.9% of 352 in Uganda) predominantly drank one alcohol type. In Russia, we did not find evidence for differences in viral load levels between drinkers of fortified wine (n = 5) or hard liquor (n = 49), compared to drinkers of beer/low-ethanol-content cocktails (n = 163); however, wine/high-ethanol-content cocktail drinkers (n = 42) had higher mean log 10 viral load than beer/low-ethanol-content cocktail drinkers (β = 0.38, 95% CI 0.07-0.69; p = 0.02). In Uganda, we did not find evidence for differences in viral load levels between drinkers of locally-brewed beer (n = 41), commercially-distilled spirits (n = 38), or locally-distilled spirits (n = 43), compared to drinkers of commercially-made beer (n = 218); however, wine drinkers (n = 8) had lower mean log 10 HIV viral load (β = -0.65, 95% CI -1.36 to 0.07, p = 0.08), although this did not reach statistical significance. Among HIV-infected drinkers not yet on ART in Russia and Uganda, we observed an association between the

  18. Pregnancy and HIV disease progression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Clara; Ronsmans, Carine

    2015-02-01

    To assess whether pregnancy accelerates HIV disease progression. Studies comparing progression to HIV-related illness, low CD4 count, AIDS-defining illness, HIV-related death, or any death in HIV-infected pregnant and non-pregnant women were included. Relative risks (RR) for each outcome were combined using random effects meta-analysis and were stratified by antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability. 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pregnancy was not associated with progression to HIV-related illness [summary RR: 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.66-2.61], AIDS-defining illness (summary RR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.74-1.25) or mortality (summary RR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.62-1.53), but there was an association with low CD4 counts (summary RR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.99-2.02) and HIV-related death (summary RR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.06-2.57). In settings where ART was available, there was no evidence that pregnancy accelerated progress to HIV/AIDS-defining illnesses, death and drop in CD4 count. In settings without ART availability, effect estimates were consistent with pregnancy increasing the risk of progression to HIV/AIDS-defining illnesses and HIV-related or all-cause mortality, but there were too few studies to draw meaningful conclusions. In the absence of ART, pregnancy is associated with small but appreciable increases in the risk of several negative HIV outcomes, but the evidence is too weak to draw firm conclusions. When ART is available, the effects of pregnancy on HIV disease progression are attenuated and there is little reason to discourage healthy HIV-infected women who desire to become pregnant from doing so. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Global stability for infectious disease models that include immigration of infected individuals and delay in the incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Uggenti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We begin with a detailed study of a delayed SI model of disease transmission with immigration into both classes. The incidence function allows for a nonlinear dependence on the infected population, including mass action and saturating incidence as special cases. Due to the immigration of infectives, there is no disease-free equilibrium and hence no basic reproduction number. We show there is a unique endemic equilibrium and that this equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable for all parameter values. The results include vector-style delay and latency-style delay. Next, we show that previous global stability results for an SEI model and an SVI model that include immigration of infectives and non-linear incidence but not delay can be extended to systems with vector-style delay and latency-style delay.

  20. The Rationale for Delaying Aging and the Prevention of Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Barzilai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [Excerpt] We offer a different approach to delaying or preventing age-related diseases. To understand the necessity for a new approach we have plotted the mortality rates in Israelis in relation to specific age groups and diseases. With the common phenomenon of aging of Western populations it is of utmost importance to follow time-dependent and age-dependent mortality patterns to predict future needs of Western health systems. Age-specific, gender-specific, and cause-of-death-specific mortality rates were extracted from the statistical abstract of Israel1 and include data for the period of 1975–2010; these are presented in Figure 1, separately for men (A and women (B. Detailed age-specific causes of death data were available for the year 2009. Data presented were restricted to 5-year age groups starting at age 50, and for cause-specific mortality to the following age groups: 45–54, 55–64, 65–74, 75–84, and 85+. Causes of mortality were separated into malignant diseases, acute myocardial infarction, other ischemic heart diseases, other forms of heart diseases, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, respiratory diseases, diseases of kidney, infectious diseases, all external causes, signs/symptoms and ill-defined conditions, and all other diseases. Figure 1 is similar to the one posted on the National Institute of Aging website and similar to data across the industrial world. The striking feature of this graph is that aging is a major log scale risk for most diseases, including the major killers: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. For example, while aging is a 100-fold risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD according to Figure 1, hypercholesterolemia is known to carry only a three-fold risk for CVD. For each of the mentioned diseases, aging is a log risk greater than the most important known risk factor for that disease.

  1. Gut Microbiota in HIV Infection: Implication for Disease Progression and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Chinweije Nwosu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Survival rates among HIV patients have significantly improved since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV management. However, persistent disease progression and clinical complications in virally suppressed individuals point to additional contributing factors other than HIV replication; microbial translocation is one such factor. The role of underlying commensal microbes and microbial products that traverse the intestinal lumen into systemic circulation in the absence of overt bacteraemia is under current investigation. This review focuses on current knowledge of the complex microbial communities and microbial markers involved in the disruption of mucosal immune T-cells in the promotion of inflammatory processes in HIV infections. Unanswered questions and aims for future studies are addressed. We provide perspective for discussing potential future therapeutic strategies focused on modulating the gut microbiota to abate HIV disease progression.

  2. Iron status and anaemia of chronic disease in HIV-infected African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-11

    Mar 11, 2009 ... A large percentage of women had anaemia of chronic disease, with HIV-infected ... subjects were recruited per week over a 25-week period (March 2000 ..... Washington DC: Academy for Educational Development; 1993.

  3. Distribution of HIV-1 resistance-conferring polymorphic alleles SDF ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    involved with delay in disease progression. ... proteins in 525 healthy individuals without any history of HIV-1 infection from 11 diverse populations of ... in three populations (Yamani, Pathan and Kamma), all in low frequencies (i.e. 1% to 3%).

  4. Stimulating high impact HIV-related cardiovascular research: recommendations from a multidisciplinary NHLBI Working Group on HIV-related heart, lung, and blood disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monica R; Cook, Nakela; Wong, Renee; Hsue, Priscilla; Ridker, Paul; Currier, Judith; Shurin, Susan

    2015-02-24

    The clinical challenges confronting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have shifted from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related illnesses to chronic diseases, such as coronary artery disease, chronic lung disease, and chronic anemia. With the growing burden of HIV-related heart, lung, and blood (HLB) disease, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recognizes it must stimulate and support HIV-related HLB research. Because HIV offers a natural, accelerated model of common pathological processes, such as inflammation, HIV-related HLB research may yield important breakthroughs for all patients with HLB disease. This paper summarizes the cardiovascular recommendations of an NHLBI Working Group, Advancing HIV/AIDS Research in Heart, Lung, and Blood Diseases, charged with identifying scientific priorities in HIV-related HLB disease and developing recommendations to promote multidisciplinary collaboration among HIV and HLB investigators. The working group included multidisciplinary sessions, as well as HLB breakout sessions for discussion of disease-specific issues, with common themes about scientific priorities and strategies to stimulate HLB research emerging in all 3 groups. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Delayed pneumothorax after laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy in a patient without underlying lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richie K Huynh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of a delayed pneumothorax occurring approximately 72 h post-operatively in a patient without any underlying lung disease who had undergone laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection. The patient was in her mid-40s with a body mass index of 28.0 and had no history of smoking. Her spontaneous pneumothorax manifested without any precipitating events or complications during recovery. There was no evidence of any infectious process. There were no central line attempts and all ports were placed intra-peritoneally, and there was no evidence of any subcutaneous emphysema. One possible mechanism of injury that we propose is barotrauma from an extended period of time in Trendelenburg position. Notably, the only abnormal finding throughout the entire post-operative period preceding the delayed pneumothorax was a PO 2 desaturation the day before. This case highlights the necessity to examine and investigate any desaturation post-operatively and deliberate its possible significance. Furthermore, it demonstrates that, even during a normal recovery period for a patient without any underlying lung disease or risk factors, spontaneous pneumothorax could still develop in a delayed fashion multiple days post-operatively from a laparoscopic procedure.

  6. Indicator disease-guided testing for HIV--the next step for Europe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazzard, B; Clumeck, N; d'Arminio Monforte, A

    2008-01-01

    with sexually transmitted diseases should be offered an HIV test, as should patients with certain types of cancers and laboratory abnormalities. Governments should consider adopting opt-out testing for pregnant women. These recommendations should be considered for implementation by all types of health......HIV should preferably be diagnosed in its earlier stages. To optimize the chances of doing so, HIV testing in patients presenting with one of several indicator diseases and conditions is recommended. Patients presenting with tuberculosis and other AIDS-defining conditions should be tested. Patients...

  7. Adaptive developmental delay in Chagas disease vectors: an evolutionary ecology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Menu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The developmental time of vector insects is important in population dynamics, evolutionary biology, epidemiology and in their responses to global climatic change. In the triatomines (Triatominae, Reduviidae, vectors of Chagas disease, evolutionary ecology concepts, which may allow for a better understanding of their biology, have not been applied. Despite delay in the molting in some individuals observed in triatomines, no effort was made to explain this variability.We applied four methods: (1 an e-mail survey sent to 30 researchers with experience in triatomines, (2 a statistical description of the developmental time of eleven triatomine species, (3 a relationship between development time pattern and climatic inter-annual variability, (4 a mathematical optimization model of evolution of developmental delay (diapause.85.6% of responses informed on prolonged developmental times in 5(th instar nymphs, with 20 species identified with remarkable developmental delays. The developmental time analysis showed some degree of bi-modal pattern of the development time of the 5(th instars in nine out of eleven species but no trend between development time pattern and climatic inter-annual variability was observed. Our optimization model predicts that the developmental delays could be due to an adaptive risk-spreading diapause strategy, only if survival throughout the diapause period and the probability of random occurrence of "bad" environmental conditions are sufficiently high.Developmental delay may not be a simple non-adaptive phenotypic plasticity in development time, and could be a form of adaptive diapause associated to a physiological mechanism related to the postponement of the initiation of reproduction, as an adaptation to environmental stochasticity through a spreading of risk (bet-hedging strategy. We identify a series of parameters that can be measured in the field and laboratory to test this hypothesis. The importance of these findings is

  8. Prevalence of Periodontal Diseases in a Multicenter Cohort of Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-exposed and Uninfected Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Mark I.; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Russell, Jonathan S.; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Shiboski, Caroline H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To compare the prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases between 180 perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) and 118 perinatally HIV-exposed and uninfected (PHEU) youth in a cross-sectional study conducted at 11 clinical sites in the United States and Puerto Rico from the Adolescent Master Protocol (AMP) study of the Pediatric HIV/AIDS cohort study (PHACS) network. Methods Several analyses were conducted, employing the current CDC/AAP classification for periodontitis and incorporating a definition of gingivitis based on a bleeding on probing threshold, and analyses based on more detailed whole mouth, intraoral regionally, site-based, and tooth-based criteria of bleeding on probing, plaque levels, pockets depths and clinical attachment levels. Results After adjusting for plaque control habits, and behavioral and sociodemographic factors, there were no significant differences in periodontal diseases between the PHIV and PHEU youth using any of these criteria. For PHIV youth, there was no significant association between parameters of periodontal disease and current HIV status. Conclusions While no significant differences in periodontal parameters were noted between the PHIV and PHEU youth, the influence of antiretroviral therapy on merits further exploration in this cohort in a longitudinal study. PMID:27801947

  9. Dyspeptic symptoms and delayed gastric emptying of solids in patients with inactive Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóbrega Ana Carolina Mello

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Crohn’s disease (CD have been shown to present dyspeptic symptoms more frequently than the general population. Some of these symptoms could be related to motility disorders to some degree. Then, we propose to investigate whether gastric emptying of solids in patients with inactive CD is delayed and to determine the relationships between gastric emptying and dyspeptic symptoms in inactive CD. Methods Twenty-six patients with inactive Crohn’s disease, as defined by a Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (CDAI 13C octanoic acid coupled to a solid meal and answered a validated questionnaire (The Porto Alegre Dyspeptic Symptoms Questionnaire to assess dyspeptic symptoms. Patients with scores ≥ 6 were considered to have dyspepsia. The control group was composed by 19 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Results Patients with CD had a significantly longer t 1/2 and t lag (p Conclusion Delayed gastric emptying in inactive Crohn’s disease patients seems to be associated with dyspeptic symptoms, particularly vomiting, even without any evidence of gastrointestinal obstruction.

  10. Erectile dysfunction drug receipt, risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert L; McGinnis, Kathleen A; Samet, Jeffrey H; Fiellin, David A; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Rodriquez-Barradas, Maria C; Kraemer, Kevin L; Gibert, Cynthia L; Braithwaite, R Scott; Goulet, Joseph L; Mattocks, Kristin; Crystal, Stephen; Gordon, Adam J; Oursler, Krisann K; Justice, Amy C

    2010-02-01

    Health care providers may be concerned that prescribing erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD) will contribute to risky sexual behavior. To identify characteristics of men who received EDD prescriptions, determine whether EDD receipt is associated with risky sexual behavior and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and determine whether these relationships vary for certain sub-groups. Cross-sectional study. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven sexually-active, HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men recruited from eight Veterans Health Affairs outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from participant surveys, electronic medical records, and administrative pharmacy data. EDD receipt was defined as two or more prescriptions for an EDD, risky sex as having unprotected sex with a partner of serodiscordant or unknown HIV status, and STDs, according to self-report. Overall, 28% of men received EDD in the previous year. Eleven percent of men reported unprotected sex with a serodiscordant/unknown partner in the past year (HIV-infected 15%, HIV-uninfected 6%, P sexual behavior (11% vs. 10%, p = 0.9) and STDs (7% vs 7%, p = 0.7). In multivariate analyses, EDD receipt was not significantly associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in the entire sample or in subgroups of substance users or men who had sex with men. EDD receipt was common but not associated with risky sexual behavior or STDs in this sample of HIV-infected and uninfected men. However, risky sexual behaviors persist in a minority of HIV-infected men, indicating ongoing need for prevention interventions.

  11. Screening for chronic comorbid diseases in people with HIV: the need for a strategic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, B; Post, F; Wierzbicki, A S; Phillips, A; Power, L; Das, S; Johnson, M; Moyle, G; Hughes, L; Wilkins, E; McCloskey, E; Compston, J; Di Angelantonio, E

    2013-01-01

    Among people living with HIV, the proportion of deaths attributed to chronic noninfectious comorbid diseases has increased over the past 15 years. This is partly a result of increased longevity in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and also because HIV infection is related, causally or otherwise, to several chronic conditions. These comorbidities include conditions that are strongly associated with modifiable risk factors, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and renal and bone diseases, and increasingly management guidelines for HIV recommend risk evaluation for these conditions. The uptake of these screening approaches is often limited by the resources required for their application, and hence the management of risk reduction in most HIV-infected populations falls below a reasonable standard. The situation is compounded by the fact that few risk calculators have been adjusted for specific use in HIV infection. There is substantial overlap of risk factors for the four common comorbid diseases listed above that are especially relevant in HIV infection, and this offers an opportunity to develop a simple screening approach that encompasses the key risk factors for lifestyle-related chronic disease in people with HIV infection. This would identify those patients who require more in-depth investigation, and facilitate a stepwise approach to targeted management. Such a tool could improve communication between patient and clinician. A significant proportion of people with HIV are sufficiently engaged with their care to participate in health promotion and take the lead in using patient-centric screening measures. Health-based social networking offers a mechanism for dissemination of such a tool and is able to embed educational messages and support within the process. © 2012 British HIV Association.

  12. Pregnancy and HIV Disease Progression in an Early Infection Cohort from Five African Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kristin M; Rida, Wasima; Haddad, Lisa B; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Yang, Annie H; Latka, Mary H; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Edward, Vinodh A; Price, Matt A

    2017-03-01

    Understanding associations between pregnancy and HIV disease progression is critical to provide appropriate counseling and care to HIV-positive women. From 2006 to 2011, women less than age 40 with incident HIV infection were enrolled in an early HIV infection cohort in Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Uganda, and Zambia. Time-dependent Cox models evaluated associations between pregnancy and HIV disease progression. Clinical progression was defined as a single CD4 measurement pregnancy. Among 222 women, 63 experienced clinical progression during 783.5 person-years at risk (8.0/100). Among 205 women, 87 experienced immunologic progression during 680.1 person-years at risk (12.8/100). The association between pregnancy and clinical progression was adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2, 1.8. The association between pregnancy and immunologic progression was aHR = 1.7; 95% CI: 0.9, 3.3. Models controlled for age; human leukocyte antigen alleles A*03:01, B*45, B*57; CD4 set point; and HIV-1 subtype. CD4 measurements before versus after pregnancies were not different. In this cohort, pregnancy was not associated with increased clinical or immunologic HIV progression. Similarly, we did not observe meaningful deleterious associations of pregnancy with CD4s. Our findings suggest that HIV-positive women may become pregnant without harmful health effects occurring during the pregnancy. Evaluation of longer-term impact of pregnancy on progression is warranted.

  13. The impact of HIV status, HIV disease progression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms on the health-related quality of life of Rwandan women genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Tracy L; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Cohen, Mardge H; Mutimura, Eugene; Adedimeji, Adebola A; Anastos, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV-infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry, 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV-) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall quality of life (QOL) than did HIV- women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long-term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL.

  14. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High rates of HPV infection have been observed in men from sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high. HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly associated with the development of anogenital warts and anal, penile and head and neck cancers in men. Despite increasing ...

  15. A Female Perspective on Living with HIV Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Kathy; Catley, Delwyn; Brisco, Susie T.; Engelson, Ellen S.; Rabkin, Judith G.; Kotler, Donald P.

    2001-01-01

    This article explores women's views on the positive and negative aspects of HIV. Many of the 55 women interviewed stated HIV was the motivation for positive changes. The physical symptoms, stigma, and limited life span were all shared negative experiences. Although the women demonstrated the ability to adapt, suggestions are given on how community…

  16. Ischemic heart disease in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, N; Thomsen, Henrik F.; Kronborg, G

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are concerns about highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) causing a progressive increase in the risk of ischemic heart disease. We examined this issue in a nationwide cohort study of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and a population-based control...... group. METHODS: We determined the rate of first hospitalization for ischemic heart disease in all Danish patients with HIV infection (3953 patients) from 1 January 1995 through 31 December 2004 and compared this rate with that for 373,856 subjects in a population-based control group. Data on first...... hospitalization for ischemic heart disease and comorbidity were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for all study participants. We used Cox's regression to compute the hospitalization rate ratio as an estimate of relative risk, adjusting for comorbidity. RESULTS: Although the difference...

  17. Ophthalmologic Disease in HIV Infection: Recent Changes in Pathophysiology and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael W

    2017-10-19

    Ophthalmologic conditions were among the earliest described findings in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this review is to highlight recent changes in the pathophysiology and management of ophthalmologic conditions in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996 changed ophthalmologic findings from predominantly acute infectious diseases to chronic, slowly progressive, debilitating conditions. HIV-associated neuroretinal disorder infrequently leads to blindness, but it causes visual disability in a large percentage of patients. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is now seen less commonly in the USA, but it remains an important cause of blindness in HIV-infected patients from developing countries. Immune recovery uveitis has emerged as a major cause of visual disability in the USA. As HIV has become a chronic disease, visual disability due to chronic noninfectious diseases have become increasingly important.

  18. Association of gene polymorphism of SDF1(CXCR12 with susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and AIDS disease progression: A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwei Ding

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphism of viral receptors is relevant to risks of HIV-1 infection, while it is still under debated whether the polymorphism of SDF1, a unique ligand for HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4, is associated with HIV susceptibility and AIDS disease progression. Therefore, we provided an updated quantitative assessment by meta-analysis from 16 case-control and 7 cohort studies.Articles reporting the relationship between SDF1 polymorphism and HIV susceptibility or AIDS progression were retrieved from PubMed, Embase and Ovid electronic databases up to Apr 2017. Data were pooled by odds ratios (ORs for HIV-1 infection with 95% confidence intervals (CIs and summary relative hazards (RHs for AIDS progression with 95% CIs using 1987 Center for Disease Control (CDC case definition of AIDS (CDC87 and 1993 Center for Disease Control (CDC case definition of AIDS (CDC93 and death as endpoints.As a result, 16 studies regarding susceptibility to HIV-1 infection with 2803 HIV-infected patients and 3697 healthy individuals and 7 studies regarding disease progression with 4239 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. For risks of infection, no evidences indicated SDF1 polymorphism was associated with the risk of HIV-1 infection in all genetic models (recessive model: OR = 0.94, 95% Cl: 0.75-1.17; homozygous model: OR = 0.89, 95% Cl: 0.70-1.15; heterozygous model: OR = 1.06, 95% Cl: 0.83-1.35; allele model: OR = 0.95, 95% Cl: 0.79-1.13, Furthermore, we failed to find an delayed AIDS progression except in some specific cohorts including MACS cohorts (RH = 0.38, 95% Cl: 0.17-0.59 for time to AIDS; RH = 0.27, 95% Cl: 0.07-0.46 for time to death at the study entry.Overall, no significant association was found between SDF1 polymorphism and HIV susceptibility. A protective effect of SDF1 on AIDS progression and death was seen especially in two studies based on the same cohorts. In conclusion, SDF1 polymorphism exerts a moderate protective effect against AIDS disease

  19. Disparities in Rates of Spine Surgery for Degenerative Spine Disease Between HIV Infected and Uninfected Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joseph T.; Gordon, Adam J.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Crystal, Stephen; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of nationwide Veterans Health Administration (VA) clinical and administrative data. Objective Examine the association between HIV infection and the rate of spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. Summary of Background Data Combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has prolonged survival in patients with HIV/AIDS, increasing the prevalence of chronic conditions such as degenerative spine disease that may require spine surgery. Methods We studied all HIV infected patients under care in the VA from 1996–2008 (n=40,038) and uninfected comparator patients (n=79,039) matched on age, gender, race, year, and geographic region. The primary outcome was spine surgery for degenerative spine disease defined by ICD-9 procedure and diagnosis codes. We used a multivariate Poisson regression to model spine surgery rates by HIV infection status, adjusting for factors that might affect suitability for surgery (demographics, year, comorbidities, body mass index, cART, and laboratory values). Results Two-hundred twenty eight HIV infected and 784 uninfected patients underwent spine surgery for degenerative spine disease during 700,731 patient-years of follow-up (1.44 surgeries per 1,000 patient-years). The most common procedures were spinal decompression (50%), and decompression and fusion (33%); the most common surgical sites were the lumbosacral (50%), and cervical (40%) spine. Adjusted rates of surgery were lower for HIV infected patients (0.86 per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up) than for uninfected patients (1.41 per 1,000 patient-years; IRR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.74, Pdegenerative spine disease. Possible explanations include disease prevalence, emphasis on treatment of non-spine HIV-related symptoms, surgical referral patterns, impact of HIV on surgery risk-benefit ratio, patient preferences, and surgeon bias. PMID:21697770

  20. Gene expression patterns associated with neurological disease in human HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Paolo Sanna

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and nosology of HIV-associated neurological disease (HAND remain incompletely understood. Here, to provide new insight into the molecular events leading to neurocognitive impairments (NCI in HIV infection, we analyzed pathway dysregulations in gene expression profiles of HIV-infected patients with or without NCI and HIV encephalitis (HIVE and control subjects. The Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA algorithm was used for pathway analyses in conjunction with the Molecular Signatures Database collection of canonical pathways (MSigDb. We analyzed pathway dysregulations in gene expression profiles of patients from the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium (NNTC, which consists of samples from 3 different brain regions, including white matter, basal ganglia and frontal cortex of HIV-infected and control patients. While HIVE is characterized by widespread, uncontrolled inflammation and tissue damage, substantial gene expression evidence of induction of interferon (IFN, cytokines and tissue injury is apparent in all brain regions studied, even in the absence of NCI. Various degrees of white matter changes were present in all HIV-infected subjects and were the primary manifestation in patients with NCI in the absence of HIVE. In particular, NCI in patients without HIVE in the NNTC sample is associated with white matter expression of chemokines, cytokines and β-defensins, without significant activation of IFN. Altogether, the results identified distinct pathways differentially regulated over the course of neurological disease in HIV infection and provide a new perspective on the dynamics of pathogenic processes in the course of HIV neurological disease in humans. These results also demonstrate the power of the systems biology analyses and indicate that the establishment of larger human gene expression profile datasets will have the potential to provide novel mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of neurological disease in HIV

  1. Pulmonary cystic disease in HIV positive individuals in the Democratic Republic of Congo: three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callens Steven FJ

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis in HIV seropositive patients has been described in the presence of injection drug use, malnutrition, repeated opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocytis jirovici pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and has been linked to the presence of HIV virus in lung tissue. Given the high burden of pulmonary infections and malnutrition among people living with HIV in resource poor settings, these individuals may be at increased risk of developing pulmonary emphysema, potentially reducing the long term benefit of antiretroviral therapy (ART if initiated late in the course of HIV infection. In this report, we describe three HIV-infected individuals (one woman and two children presenting with extensive pulmonary cystic disease.

  2. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimova B

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Blanka Klimova,1,2 Martin Valis,2 Kamil Kuca3,4 1Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, 2Department of Neurology, 3Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the onset of dementia, specifically Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A literature review was conducted in the world’s acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and MEDLINE. Altogether, 14 original studies focusing on the research topic were detected. These included six prospective cohort studies and eight retrospective studies. Both types of studies suggest different conclusions. The findings from the prospective cohort studies state that there is no association between bilingualism and the delay of the onset of AD, while the retrospective studies claim the opposite. Despite the negative results of the prospective cohort studies, more research should be conducted on bilingualism and its impact on the delay of the onset of AD, since the brain studies have brought positive findings as far as the enhancement of cognitive reserve is concerned. Keywords: older people, evidence, effectiveness, review, cognition

  3. Mannose-binding Lectin and the Risk of HIV Transmission and Disease Progression in Children A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Israëls, Joël; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Frakking, Florine N. J.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) can activate the complement system by binding to carbohydrates, such as those presented on the HIV virion surface. It is unclear whether genetically determined MBL deficiency is related to vertical HIV transmission and disease progression in HIV-infected

  4. Pre-AIDS mortality and its association with HIV disease progression in haemophilic men, injecting drug users and homosexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M. [= Maria; Sabin, C. A.; Lee, C. A.; Devereux, H.; Coutinho, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    To study pre-AIDS mortality and its association with HIV disease progression in different exposure groups with known intervals of HIV seroconversion. The type and rate of pre-AIDS deaths were assessed in 111 HIV-infected haemophilic men followed in London, and 118 injecting drug users and 158

  5. Voluntary wheel running delays disease onset and reduces pain hypersensitivity in early experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Curtis; Paylor, John W; Tenorio, Gustavo; Winship, Ian; Baker, Glen; Kerr, Bradley J

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is classically defined by motor deficits, but it is also associated with the secondary symptoms of pain, depression, and anxiety. Up to this point modifying these secondary symptoms has been difficult. There is evidence that both MS and the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), commonly used to study the pathophysiology of the disease, can be modulated by exercise. To examine whether limited voluntary wheel running could modulate EAE disease progression and the co-morbid symptoms of pain, mice with EAE were allowed access to running wheels for 1h every day. Allowing only 1h every day of voluntary running led to a significant delay in the onset of clinical signs of the disease. The development of mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey hairs and indicated that wheel running had a modest positive effect on the pain hypersensitivity associated with EAE. These behavioral changes were associated with reduced numbers of cFOS and phosphorylated NR1 positive cells in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to no-run EAE controls. In addition, within the dorsal horn, voluntary wheel running reduced the number of infiltrating CD3(+) T-cells and reduced the overall levels of Iba1 immunoreactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we observed that wheel-running lead to significant changes in the spinal cord levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Oxidative stress has separately been shown to contribute to EAE disease progression and neuropathic pain. Together these results indicate that in mice with EAE, voluntary motor activity can delay the onset of clinical signs and reduce pain symptoms associated with the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Gestalt perspective on working with people with HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabar, S

    1997-03-01

    Four aspects of Gestalt practice that are particularly relevant to HIV-related therapy are explored: the client-therapist relationship, the phenomenonological method, awareness as the goal of therapy, and experiments and role playing. Applying the Gestalt ideals of self-regulation, wholeness, and growth to a person with HIV is vital to counteract the patient's loss of immune function. The Gestalt experience cycle, defined as a model of how people identify their needs and then set out to meet those needs, is a useful paradigm in HIV-related therapy.

  7. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    OpenAIRE

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. METHODS: In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the ...

  8. Alexithymia, Assertiveness and Psychosocial Functioning in HIV: Implications for Medication Adherence and Disease Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Roger C; Ironson, Gail; Antoni, Michael; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Psychosocial function and adherence to antiretroviral regimen are key factors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease management. Alexithymia (AL) is a trait deficit in the ability to identify and describe feelings, emotions and bodily sensations. A structural equation model was used to test whether high levels of AL indirectly relate to greater non-adherent behavior and HIV disease severity via psychosocial dysfunction. Blood draws for HIV-1 viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte, along with psychosocial surveys were collected from 439 HIV positive adults aged 18-73 years. The structural model supports significant paths from: (1) AL to non-active patient involvement, psychological distress, and lower social support, (2) psychological distress and non-active involvement to non-adherent behavior, and (3) non-adherence to greater HIV disease severity (CFI = .97, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). A second model confirmed the intermediary effect of greater patient assertiveness on the path from AL to social support and non-active patient involvement (CFI = .94, RMSEA = .04, SRMR = .05). Altogether, AL is indirectly linked with HIV disease management through it's association with poor psychosocial function, however greater patient assertiveness buffers the negative impact of AL on relationship quality with healthcare providers and members of one's social support network.

  9. Dynamics of a stochastic delayed SIR epidemic model with vaccination and double diseases driven by Lévy jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of a stochastic delayed SIR epidemic model with vaccination and double diseases which make the research more complex. The environment variability in this paper is characterized by white noise and Lévy noise. We establish sufficient conditions for extinction and persistence in the mean of the two epidemic diseases. It is shown that: (i) time delay and Lévy noise have important effects on the persistence and extinction of epidemic diseases; (ii) two diseases can coexist under certain conditions.

  10. [Changes in clinic-epidemiological characteristics of new cases of HIV-1 infection in Castellón (Spain), and its impact on delayed presentation (1987-2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez-Gallego, Carlos; Vera-Remartinez, Enrique J; Albert-Coll, Monica; Roldán-Puchalt, M Concepción; Aguilar-Climent, Manuel; Rovira-Ferrando, Rosa E; Andrés-Soler, Jorge; Roig-Espert, Belén; Penadés-Vidal, María; Usó-Blasco, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    To describe the trend of the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of a cohort of HIV-1 infected patients in Castellón (Spain), and its impact on the delayed presentation. Data from HIV-1 infected outpatients presenting for care for the first time between 1987 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. There have been significant changes in the characteristics of the 1001 newly presented patients during the period studied. An increase in the mean age was observed (increasing from about 30 years before 1996, to approximately 35 after the 2000-2002 period), as well as an increase in the percentage of immigrants (de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of international migration in infectious diseases: the HIV epidemic and its trends in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ryuichi; Sawada, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Globalization and its associated international migrations facilitate the spread of infectious diseases. This article reports trends in and discusses the relation between international migration and HIV infection in Japan. The authors analyze relevant literature, drawing on government and other sources. Among foreigners in Japan, there were 27.0 reported HIV and 9.3 reported AIDS cases per million in 1990, and 52.9 HIV and 38.8 AIDS cases per million in 2000. These rates were initially 45 to 90 times the population prevalence of HIV and AIDS among Japanese, but are now only 10 to 20 times the prevalence among Japanese, as HIV becomes an increasing problem for the Japanese population. HIV-infected foreigners who are uninsured are at a disadvantage for diagnosis, counseling, and treatment compared with insured persons, and at a significantly higher risk for low CD4 counts. For all sections of Japan's population, counseling and testing are inadequate, and surveillance of behavioral risk, infection, and disease is limited. International migrants are at increased risk for HIV transmission and at a disadvantage for care and treatment. Japan needs both to develop policies that assist migrants and to respond to the growing threat among its nonmigrant population.

  12. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    benefit in preventing the development of these cancers in HIV-positive men, ... sexually transmitted infection (STI) affecting ..... age, smoking, receptive anal intercourse .... in HPV-infected circumcised men may help to explain the protective.

  13. The ineffable disease: exploring young people's discourses about HIV/AIDS in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Olson, Kärin

    2009-06-01

    The ongoing epidemic of HIV/AIDS in Western societies (in particular in North America), where most of the population knows about the disease and how it is transmitted, suggests that providing information is not enough to change unsafe conduct. More complex psychosocial processes, mainly still unexplored, seem to underlie the translation of health knowledge about the disease and the infection into safe practices. In this article we explore the discourse of young people in Alberta about HIV/AIDS and discuss ways in which this information might be used to shape preventive strategies. We conducted eight focus groups with young people 18 to 25 years of age living in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and analyzed the data using psychosocial discourse analysis. The results confirm the role of young people's interpersonal exchanges in determining HIV/AIDS preventive conduct and show the importance of social discourses about HIV/AIDS in mediating the impact of preventive campaigns on young people's attitudes and beliefs.

  14. Delayed Disease Progression in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Ebola Virus Makona Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Günther, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-10-01

    In late 2013, the largest documented outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever started in Guinea and has since spread to neighboring countries, resulting in almost 27,000 cases and >11,000 deaths in humans. In March 2014, Ebola virus (EBOV) was identified as the causative agent. This study compares the pathogenesis of a new EBOV strain, Makona, which was isolated in Guinea in 2014 with the prototype strain from the 1976 EBOV outbreak in the former Zaire. Both strains cause lethal disease in cynomolgus macaques with similar pathologic changes and hallmark features of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. However, disease progression was delayed in EBOV-Makona-infected animals, suggesting decreased rather than increased virulence of this most recent EBOV strain.

  15. Adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Kristiansen, T B; Katzenstein, T L

    2001-01-01

    /G transition that has been discovered recently, have also been shown to influence HIV progression. Since genetic linkages make these polymorphisms interdependent variables, the aim of the present study was to isolate and evaluate the effect on HIV disease progression for each of these mutations independently......HIV positive individuals heterozygous for a 32 basepair deletion in the CCR5 encoding gene (CCR5 Delta32) have a reduced number of CCR5 receptors on the cell surface and a slower progression towards AIDS and death. Other human polymorphisms, such as the CCR2 64I and the CCR5 promoter -2459 A...

  16. A controlled, randomized, delayed-start study of rasagiline in early Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Treatment with rasagiline mesylate, an irreversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor, improves symptoms of early Parkinson disease (PD). Preclinical studies suggest that this compound may also modify the progression of PD. To compare the effects of early and later initiation of rasagiline on progression of disability in patients with PD. Double-blind, parallel-group, randomized, delayed-start clinical trial. Four hundred four subjects with early PD, not requiring dopaminergic therapy, enrolled at 32 sites in the United States and Canada. Subjects were randomized to receive rasagiline, 1 or 2 mg/d, for 1 year or placebo for 6 months followed by rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 6 months. Change in total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score from baseline to 12 months. Three hundred seventy-one subjects were included in the 1-year efficacy analysis. Subjects treated with rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 1 year had a 2.29-unit smaller increase in mean adjusted total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score compared with subjects treated with placebo for 6 months followed by rasagiline, 2 mg/d, for 6 months (P =.01). The mean adjusted difference between the placebo/rasagiline, 2 mg/d, group and those receiving rasagiline, 1 mg/d, for 1 year was -1.82 unit on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (P =.05). Subjects treated with rasagiline, 2 and 1 mg/d, for 12 months showed less functional decline than subjects whose treatment was delayed for 6 months.

  17. The influence of CD 4+t cells, hiv disease stage and zidovudine on hiv isolation in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Brites

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-l isolation was attempted on 72 individuais, including persons with knoum HIV infection and five without proven HIV infection but with indeterminate Western blot patterns, as well as on low-risk HIV seronegative persons. The ahility to detect HIV- 1 frorn culture supernatant by p24 antigen capture assay was evaluated by segregating patients by absolute CD4+ cell counts, clinicai stage of disease, p24 antigenemia and zidovudine use. The likelihood of a p24 positive HIV culture was highest among patients with CD4+ T-cell counts below 200/ul and patients with advanced clinical disease. Use of zidovudine did not affect the rate ofHIV positwity in cultures.Tentativa de isolamento do vírus tipo 1 da imunodeficiência adquirida (VIH-1 foi realizada em 72 indivíduos sendo 51 pacientes com sorologia positiva para o VIH-1, confirmada por Western blot; 5 doadores de sangue com padrão indeterminado ao Western blot; 3 indivíduos com diagnóstico clínico de AIDS, porém com sorologia negativa, e 13 profissionais de saúde soronegativos. Os pacientes foram estratificados de acordo com a contagem de células CD4+, estágio clínico , antigenemia (p24 e uso de zidovudine. As culturas para o VIH-1 foram positivas em 45/50 (90% tentativas. Houve uma correlação inversa entre o número de células CD4+ e a freqüência de isolamento do VIH-1. As culturas foram positivas em 84% dos indivíduos com CD4+ <200, contra 48% d positividade naqueles com contagem de célula CD4+ acima deste valor. O uso de zidovudine não interferiu na positividade das culturas. Concluímo. que a sensibilidade dos métodos de culture qualitativo e quantitativo é similar para a detecção do VIH-1. A taxa de positividade das culturas não foi afetada pelo uso prévio de zidovudine, mas foi diretamente proporcional ao grau de imunodeficiência dos pacientes.

  18. Five-year risk of HIV diagnosis subsequent to 147 hospital-based indicator diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Legarth, Rebecca; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad

    2016-01-01

    . To estimate the risk of HIV diagnosis in the general population without any indicator diseases, we calculated the FYRHD starting at age 25, 35, 45, and 55 years. RESULTS: The risk in the male general population was substantially higher than the female general population, and the risk was lower in the older...... with relevant indicator diseases are nonexistent. METHODS: In a nationwide population-based cohort study encompassing all Danish residents aged 20-60 years during 1994-2013, we estimated the 5-year risk of an HIV diagnosis (FYRHD) after a first-time diagnosis of 147 prespecified potential indicator diseases...

  19. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the

  20. Genome-wide association scan in HIV-1-infected individuals identifying variants influencing disease course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle van Manen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AIDS develops typically after 7-11 years of untreated HIV-1 infection, with extremes of very rapid disease progression (15 years. To reveal additional host genetic factors that may impact on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection, we designed a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 404 participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS. METHODS: The association of SNP genotypes with the clinical course of HIV-1 infection was tested in Cox regression survival analyses using AIDS-diagnosis and AIDS-related death as endpoints. RESULTS: Multiple, not previously identified SNPs, were identified to be strongly associated with disease progression after HIV-1 infection, albeit not genome-wide significant. However, three independent SNPs in the top ten associations between SNP genotypes and time between seroconversion and AIDS-diagnosis, and one from the top ten associations between SNP genotypes and time between seroconversion and AIDS-related death, had P-values smaller than 0.05 in the French Genomics of Resistance to Immunodeficiency Virus cohort on disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: Our study emphasizes that the use of different phenotypes in GWAS may be useful to unravel the full spectrum of host genetic factors that may be associated with the clinical course of HIV-1 infection.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Scan in HIV-1-Infected Individuals Identifying Variants Influencing Disease Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Daniëlle; Delaneau, Olivier; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Boeser-Nunnink, Brigitte D.; Limou, Sophie; Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Burger, Judith A.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Moerland, Perry D.; van 't Slot, Ruben; Zagury, Jean-François; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2011-01-01

    Background AIDS develops typically after 7–11 years of untreated HIV-1 infection, with extremes of very rapid disease progression (15 years). To reveal additional host genetic factors that may impact on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection, we designed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 404 participants of the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Methods The association of SNP genotypes with the clinical course of HIV-1 infection was tested in Cox regression survival analyses using AIDS-diagnosis and AIDS-related death as endpoints. Results Multiple, not previously identified SNPs, were identified to be strongly associated with disease progression after HIV-1 infection, albeit not genome-wide significant. However, three independent SNPs in the top ten associations between SNP genotypes and time between seroconversion and AIDS-diagnosis, and one from the top ten associations between SNP genotypes and time between seroconversion and AIDS-related death, had P-values smaller than 0.05 in the French Genomics of Resistance to Immunodeficiency Virus cohort on disease progression. Conclusions Our study emphasizes that the use of different phenotypes in GWAS may be useful to unravel the full spectrum of host genetic factors that may be associated with the clinical course of HIV-1 infection. PMID:21811574

  2. Bone Disease in HIV: Recommendations for Screening and Management in the Older Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Availability of potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in markedly improved survival for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, as well as an aging HIV population. Increasing morbidity from age-related conditions has resulted in the need to understand the complex roles HIV and its treatment play in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Bone disease and fragility fractures are conditions that occur more frequently in HIV. It is therefore recommended that risk assessment for fragility fracture using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX(®)) algorithm, and low bone mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, be performed in all patients with HIV infection over the age of 50 years and in those with a history of fragility fracture, and should be repeated every 2-3 years. Because many HIV experts believe that HIV infection and its treatment is a secondary cause of osteoporosis, it should be included as such in the FRAX(®) assessment tool. Management of osteoporosis in HIV infection should follow the same guidelines as that in the general population. Attention to lifestyle factors, including vitamin D replacement, should be emphasized. Whether cessation of tenofovir- or protease inhibitor-based ART regimens should be considered prior to bisphosphonate treatment is currently unknown and should only occur in patients with active alternative ART regimens. The use of bisphosphonates has been shown to be safe and effective in HIV patients, and while there is limited data on second-line osteoporosis regimens, there is no reason to suggest they would not be effective in people with HIV.

  3. The Canadian HIV and aging cohort study - determinants of increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in HIV-infected individuals: rationale and study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Madeleine; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl; Baril, Jean-Guy; Trottier, Sylvie; Trottier, Benoit; Harris, Marianne; Walmsley, Sharon; Conway, Brian; Wong, Alexander; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Kovacs, Colin; MacPherson, Paul A; Monteith, Kenneth Marc; Mansour, Samer; Thanassoulis, George; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Zhu, Zhitong; Tsoukas, Christos; Ancuta, Petronela; Bernard, Nicole; Tremblay, Cécile L

    2017-09-11

    With potent antiretroviral drugs, HIV infection is becoming a chronic disease. Emergence of comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become a leading concern for patients living with the infection. We hypothesized that the chronic and persistent inflammation and immune activation associated with HIV disease leads to accelerated aging, characterized by CVD. This will translate into higher incidence rates of CVD in HIV infected participants, when compared to HIV negative participants, after adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors. When characterized further using cardiovascular imaging, biomarkers, immunological and genetic profiles, CVD associated with HIV will show different characteristics compared to CVD in HIV-negative individuals. The Canadian HIV and Aging cohort is a prospective, controlled cohort study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. It will recruit patients living with HIV who are aged 40 years or older or have lived with HIV for 15 years or more. A control population, frequency matched for age, sex, and smoking status, will be recruited from the general population. Patients will attend study visits at baseline, year 1, 2, 5 and 8. At each study visit, data on complete medical and pharmaceutical history will be captured, along with anthropometric measures, a complete physical examination, routine blood tests and electrocardiogram. Consenting participants will also contribute blood samples to a research biobank. The primary outcome is incidence of a composite of: myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, stroke, hospitalization for angina or congestive heart failure, revascularization or amputation for peripheral artery disease, or cardiovascular death. Preplanned secondary outcomes are all-cause mortality, incidence of the metabolic syndrome, incidence of type 2 diabetes, incidence of renal failure, incidence of abnormal bone mineral density and body fat distribution. Patients participating to the

  4. The Morbidity and Mortality Associated With Kidney Disease In An HIV Infected Cohort In Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Angel M.; Dworkin, Mark; Quesada, Luis; Rios-Olivares, Eddy; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nephropathy in HIV-infected patients has been associated with progression to AIDS and death. The virus, several co-morbid conditions and certain medications may contribute to the development and progression of kidney disease. Methods This study analyzed data collected from HIV-infected persons enrolled in a HIV registry in Puerto Rico during January 1998 through September 2006. Demographic factors, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings at enrollment, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescriptions were compared between patients with and without kidney disease. Death status and cause of death by December 2006 were also evaluated and compared. Results The study included 1,283 subjects, 69.0% male, 39.7% injecting drug users, 19.5% hepatitis C infected, 6.5% with diabetes mellitus (DM-II), 11.6% had hypertension (HTN) and 9.0% had kidney disease. Patients with kidney disease had significantly higher (pPuerto Ricans HIV-infected patients with nephropathy. Kidney disease preventive strategies that include aggressive control of HIV-infection and chronic medical conditions such as hypertension and diabetes are recommend as an approach to reduce this health disparity. PMID:20521408

  5. Digital clubbing in tuberculosis – relationship to HIV infection, extent of disease and hypoalbuminemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smieja Marek

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital clubbing is a sign of chest disease known since the time of Hippocrates. Its association with tuberculosis (TB has not been well studied, particularly in Africa where TB is common. The prevalence of clubbing in patients with pulmonary TB and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, severity of disease, and nutritional status was assessed. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with smear-positive TB recruited consecutively from the medical and TB wards and outpatient clinics at a public hospital in Uganda. The presence of clubbing was assessed by clinical signs and measurement of the ratio of the distal and inter-phalangeal diameters (DPD/IPD of both index fingers. Clubbing was defined as a ratio > 1.0. Chest radiograph, serum albumin and HIV testing were done. Results Two hundred patients (82% HIV-infected participated; 34% had clubbing by clinical criteria whilst 30% had clubbing based on DPD/IPD ratio. Smear grade, extensive or cavitary disease, early versus late HIV disease, and hypoalbuminemia were not associated with clubbing. Clubbing was more common among patients with a lower Karnofsky performance scale score or with prior TB. Conclusion Clubbing occurs in up to one-third of Ugandan patients with pulmonary TB. Clubbing was not associated with stage of HIV infection, extensive disease or hypoalbuminemia.

  6. Rapid Disease Progression With Delay in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Kestin, Larry Llyn; Grills, Inga Siiner; Battu, Madhu; Fitch, Dwight Lamar; Wong, Ching-yee Oliver; Margolis, Jeffrey Harold; Chmielewski, Gary William; Welsh, Robert James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess rate of disease progression from diagnosis to initiation of treatment for Stage I-IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with NSCLC underwent at least two sets of computed tomography (CT) and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans at various time intervals before treatment. Progression was defined as development of any new lymph node involvement, site of disease, or stage change. Results: Median time interval between first and second CT scans was 13.4 weeks, and between first and second PET scans was 9.0 weeks. Median initial primary maximum tumor dimension (MTD) was 3.5 cm (0.6-8.5 cm) with a median standardized uptake value (SUV) of 13.0 (1.7-38.5). The median MTD increased by a median of 1.0 cm (mean, 1.6 cm) between scans for a median relative MTD increase of 35% (mean, 59%). Nineteen patients (48%) progressed between scans. Rate of any progression was 13%, 31%, and 46% at 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. Upstaging occurred in 3%, 13%, and 21% at these intervals. Distant metastasis became evident in 3%, 13%, and 13% after 4, 8, and 16 weeks, respectively. T and N stage were associated with progression, whereas histology, grade, sex, age, and maximum SUV were not. At 3 years, overall survival for Stage III patients with vs. without progression was 18% vs. 67%, p = 0.05. Conclusions: With NSCLC, treatment delay can lead to disease progression. Diagnosis, staging, and treatment initiation should be expedited. After 4-8 weeks of delay, complete restaging should be strongly considered.

  7. Multilingualism (but not always bilingualism) delays the onset of Alzheimer disease: evidence from a bilingual community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkow, Howard; Whitehead, Victor; Phillips, Natalie; Wolfson, Christina; Atherton, Julie; Bergman, Howard

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper by Bialystok et al in Neuropsychologia (vol. 45, pgs. 459 to 464) suggested that early bilingualism produced a statistically significant 4.1-year delay in onset of memory loss symptoms in older individuals with Alzheimer disease, possibly reflecting an increase in the cognitive reserve of these individuals. That study focused on multilingual elderly patients of whom 90% were immigrants. Our memory clinic, in Montreal Canada, has the advantage of having a large set of individuals who are either multilingual immigrants to Canada, or who are nonimmigrants but raised in both official languages of Canada--French and English. We thus attempted to replicate the above findings using a larger cohort in a different setting. We examined age at diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and age at symptom onset for all unilingual versus multilingual participants, and then for those who were nonimmigrant English/French bilinguals. Overall, we found a small but significant protective effect of more than 2 languages spoken, but we found no significant benefit in bilinguals overall in relation to age at diagnosis or age at symptom onset. However, in the immigrant group, the results mirrored those of Bialystok et al with 2 or more languages delaying the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease by almost 5 years. A trend toward the same effect was also seen in nonimmigrants whose first language was French. In contrast, in nonimmigrants whose first language was English, no such effect was found. These results are discussed in relation to the earlier findings and the theory of cognitive reserve.

  8. Persistent proteinuria as an indicator of renal disease in HIV-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Hisbiiyah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Persistent proteinuria (microalbuminuria has been reported to be a precursor of HIV-related renal disease. Screening allows for early management in order to prevent the progression of renal disease and decrease morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease in HIV. Several studies have been done on renal manifestation in HIV-infected children from American and African regions, but similar studies from Asia are lacking. Objective To determine the prevalence of persistent proteinuria in HIV-positive children on antiretroviral therapy (ARV in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya. Methods A cross-sectional study on children with HIV and treated with  highly active antiretroviral therapy (HARRT was done from August 2014 to February 2015. Microalbuminuria was measured by the ratio of urine albumin to creatinine (ACR, while proteinuria was measured by dipstick. Measurements were performed 3 times in 4-8 weeks. All subjects underwent complete evaluation of blood tests, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, CD4 counts, and urinalysis. Data were analyzed using Chi-square and logistic regression tests. Results Of 38 children on HARRT enrolled in this study, 2 subjects developed acute kidney injury (AKI, 4 subjects were suspected to have urinary tract infection (UTI, and 1 subject was suspected to have urinary tract stones. The prevalence of persistent microalbuminuria was 2.6%. There was no correlation between immunological status, WHO clinical stage, or duration of ARV and the incidence of persistent proteinuria (P>0.05. Conclusion The prevalence of persistent proteinuria is  lower in younger HIV-infected children at a non-advanced stage and HIV-infected children with normal immunological status who are on HAART. We provide baseline data on the renal conditions of HIV-infected children in the era of HAART, before tenovofir is  increasingly used as an antiretroviral therapy regimen in Indonesia.

  9. 'Every disease has its cure': faith and HIV therapies in Islamic northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Jack Ume

    2010-12-01

    Northern Nigeria has one of the highest levels of HIV prevalence among societies that are predominantly Muslim. In the last decade the region has experienced marked expansion of religiously-oriented healing practices following the formal adoption of Islamic sharia law. Since 2005, international funding has also made antiretroviral therapy (ART) more widely available throughout Nigeria. This study uses ethnographic data collected in Kano, northern Nigeria's largest city, to examine Muslims' perspectives on HIV treatment in the context of popular health beliefs and expanding therapeutic options. The research found that passages from classical Islamic texts are regularly cited by both HIV/AIDS practitioners and patients, especially when talking about the supposition that Allah sends a cure to humankind for every disease. Some religious scholar-practitioners (malamai) working in the Islamic traditions of prophetic medicine insist that HIV can be completely cured given sufficient faith in the supernatural power of the Quran; others claim that the natural ingredients prescribed in Islamic texts can cure HIV. Such assertions contradict the mainstream biomedical position that, with the proper therapeutic regimen, infection with HIV can be managed as a chronic illness, although not cured. Thus, these assertions constitute a challenge to the increasing therapeutic hegemony of antiretroviralbased care in Nigeria. Without falsifying the proposition that a divine cure for HIV exists, many Muslim patients on ART, and the predominantly Muslim biomedical staff who treat them, express scepticism about whether the cure has yet to be revealed to humans. These findings suggest that despite recent efforts in Nigeria to assert a unified Islamic perspective on HIV and AIDS, substantive disagreements persist over the causes, treatments and curability of the disease. The healing systems in which practitioners and patients operate influence how they interpret Islamic texts concerning the

  10. Effectiveness of Closure of Public Places with Time Delay in Disease Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhenggang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical basis for the evaluation of the effciency of quarantine measure is developed in a SIR model with time delay. In this model, the effectiveness of the closure of public places such as schools in disease control, modeled as a high degree node in a social network, is evaluated by considering the effect of the time delay in the identification of the infected. In the context of the SIR model, the relation between the number of infectious individuals who are identified with time delay and then quarantined and those who are not identified and continue spreading the virus are investigated numerically. The social network for the simulation is modeled by a scale free network. Closure measures are applied to those infected nodes with high degrees. The effectiveness of the measure can be controlled by the present value of the critical degree KC: only those nodes with degree higher than KC will be quarantined. The cost CQ incurred for the closure measure is assumed to be proportional to the total links rendered inactive as a result of the measure, and generally decreases with KC, while the medical cost CQ incurred for virus spreading increases with KC. The total social cost (CM + CQ will have a minimum at a critical KC, which depends on the ratio of medical cost coeffcient αM and closure cost coeffcient αQ. Our simulation results demonstrate a mathematical procedure to evaluate the effciency of quarantine measure. Although the numerical work is based on a scale free network, the procedure can be readily generalized and applied to a more realistic social network to determine the proper closure measure in future epidemics.

  11. Effectiveness of closure of public places with time delay in disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenggang; Szeto, Kwok Yip; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2008-08-25

    A theoretical basis for the evaluation of the effciency of quarantine measure is developed in a SIR model with time delay. In this model, the effectiveness of the closure of public places such as schools in disease control, modeled as a high degree node in a social network, is evaluated by considering the effect of the time delay in the identification of the infected. In the context of the SIR model, the relation between the number of infectious individuals who are identified with time delay and then quarantined and those who are not identified and continue spreading the virus are investigated numerically. The social network for the simulation is modeled by a scale free network. Closure measures are applied to those infected nodes with high degrees. The effectiveness of the measure can be controlled by the present value of the critical degree K(C): only those nodes with degree higher than K(C) will be quarantined. The cost C(Q) incurred for the closure measure is assumed to be proportional to the total links rendered inactive as a result of the measure, and generally decreases with K(C), while the medical cost C(Q) incurred for virus spreading increases with K(C). The total social cost (C(M) + C(Q)) will have a minimum at a critical K(*), which depends on the ratio of medical cost coeffcient alpha(M) and closure cost coeffcient alpha(Q). Our simulation results demonstrate a mathematical procedure to evaluate the effciency of quarantine measure. Although the numerical work is based on a scale free network, the procedure can be readily generalized and applied to a more realistic social network to determine the proper closure measure in future epidemics.

  12. Vital Signs: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing and Diagnosis Delays - United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Andre F; Hoots, Brooke E; Hall, H Irene; Song, Ruiguang; Hayes, Demorah; Fulton, Paul; Prejean, Joseph; Hernandez, Angela L; Koenig, Linda J; Valleroy, Linda A

    2017-12-01

    Persons unaware of their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection account for approximately 40% of ongoing transmissions in the United States. Persons are unaware of their infection because of delayed HIV diagnoses that represent substantial missed opportunities to improve health outcomes and prevent HIV transmission. Data from CDC's National HIV Surveillance System were used to estimate, among persons with HIV infection diagnosed in 2015, the median interval (and range) from infection to diagnosis (diagnosis delay), based on the first CD4 test after HIV diagnosis and a CD4 depletion model indicating disease progression and, among persons living with HIV in 2015, the percentage with undiagnosed infection. Data from CDC's National HIV Behavioral Surveillance were analyzed to determine the percentage of persons at increased risk for HIV infection who had tested in the past 12 months and who had missed opportunities for testing. An estimated 15% of persons living with HIV in 2015 were unaware of their infection. Among the 39,720 persons with HIV infection diagnosed in 2015, the estimated median diagnosis delay was 3.0 years (interquartile range = 0.7-7.8 years); diagnosis delay varied by race/ethnicity (from 2.2 years among whites to 4.2 years among Asians) and transmission category (from 2.0 years among females who inject drugs to 4.9 years among heterosexual males). Among persons interviewed through National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 71% of men who have sex with men, 58% of persons who inject drugs, and 41% of heterosexual persons at increased risk for HIV infection reported testing in the past 12 months. In each risk group, at least two thirds of persons who did not have an HIV test had seen a health care provider in the past year. Delayed HIV diagnoses continue to be substantial for some population groups and prevent early entry to care to improve health outcomes and reduce HIV transmission to others. Health care providers and others providing HIV testing

  13. Oral Candida spp carriage and periodontal diseases in HIV-infected patients in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Alan Grupioni; Ribeiro, Ana Elisa Rodrigues Alves; Nakao, Cristiano; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Antonio, Luana Grupioni Lourenço; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Komesu, Marilena Chinali

    2017-06-01

    The majority of HIV-infected patients develop Candida spp-associated clinical oral lesions. Studies have shown that asymptomatic oral colonization of Candida spp may lead to oral lesions or become a source of disseminated infections. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of periodontal conditions on Candida spp prevalence and Candida spp carriage in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. Twenty-five patients not infected with HIV and 48 HIV-infected patients were classified according to periodontal conditions as being periodontal healthy or with periodontal disease. Candida spp carriage and classification were performed in oral rinse samples. Viral load and CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4+L) counts were performed in blood samples from HIV-infected patients. No differences in Candida spp prevalence related to HIV status or periodontal condition were detected. However, Candida spp carriage was increased in periodontally affected HIV-infected patients when compared to periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients (p= 0.04). Periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients presented Candida spp carriage in similar levels as healthy or periodontally affected non-HIV-infected patients. Candida spp carriage was correlated with CD4+L counting in HIV-infected patients. We concluded that periodontal disease is associated with increased Candida spp carriage in HIV-infected patients and may be a predisposing factor to clinical manifestations of candidiasis.

  14. Disclosure Decisions: HIV-Positive Persons Coping With Disease-Related Stressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, Lotte; Sodemann, Morten; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to investigate how Danish HIV-positive persons live with their disease, focusing on HIV-related stressors. Using the Glaserian method, we analyzed textual data from in-depth interviews with 16 HIV-positive persons. Decisions about disclosure appeared ...... and plans, and offers a theoretical basis for interventions designed to assist persons living with HIV to make the best possible individual decisions regarding disclosure, and thereby reduce HIV-related stress....... to be a major concern and a determining factor for HIV-related stress. Consequently, we developed a substantive theory about disclosure decisions in which three different strategies could be identified: (a) disclosing to everyone (being open); (b) restricting disclosure (being partly open); and (c) disclosing...... to no one (being closed). Disclosure was a continuum; none of the three strategies automatically relieved HIV-related stress. The theory describes the main determinants and consequences of each strategy. Our study demonstrates the importance of recurrent individual considerations about disclosure choices...

  15. HIV-1 DNA predicts disease progression and post-treatment virological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P; Hurst, Jacob; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Cooper, David; Schechter, Mauro; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Fidler, Sarah; Carrington, Mary; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN76742797 and EudraCT2004-000446-20 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03821.001 PMID:25217531

  16. Time trends for risk of severe age-related diseases in individuals with and without HIV infection in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line D; May, Margaret T; Kronborg, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether the reported high risk of age-related diseases in HIV-infected people is caused by biological ageing or HIV-associated risk factors such as chronic immune activation and low-grade inflammation is unknown. We assessed time trends in age-standardised and relative risks of nine...... serious age-related diseases in a nationwide cohort study of HIV-infected individuals and population controls. METHODS: We identified all HIV-infected individuals in the Danish HIV Cohort Study who had received HIV care in Denmark between Jan 1, 1995, and June 1, 2014. Population controls were identified...... from the Danish Civil Registration System and individually matched in a ratio of nine to one to the HIV-infected individuals for year of birth, sex, and date of study inclusion. Individuals were included in the study if they had a Danish personal identification number, were aged 16 years or older...

  17. Adopted Korean woman with symptoms of cystitis – Delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis leading to disseminated disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mose M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of miliary tuberculosis (TB in an adopted woman that developed following delayed diagnosis of presumed urogenital TB. The patient had a two year history of urological symptoms, diagnosed as interstitial cystitis and treated with cyclosporine. At admission, she presented with symptoms of pyelonephritis. Neck stiffness led to lumbar puncture that showed pleocytosis with lymphocytic predominance, high protein and low glucose levels, suggestive of TB meningitis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed nodular lung changes, lumbar spine destructive lesions, a unilateral kidney abscess and a parietal lobe tuberculoma. Urine and cerebrospinal fluids were positive for TB by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and culture. The patient developed complications in the form of hydrocephalus. She was treated with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and four drug anti-tuberculosis therapy. She was discharged to neurorehabilitation on continued anti-tuberculosis treatment, developing longer term sequelae in the form of severe cognitive disabilities. This case emphasizes the importance of continuing to include TB in the differential diagnosis of a variety of diseases, particularly in patients at possible increased risk of infection, and highlights the potentially serious consequences of delayed or missed TB diagnosis.

  18. HIV-related chronic lung disease in adolescents: are we prepared for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussard, Pierre; Gie, Robert P

    2017-12-01

    Chronic lung diseases (CLD) are the most chronic disease occurring in adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (ALHIV). In ALHIV who received antiretroviral therapy (ART) late in childhood, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis obliterans and interstitial pneumonitis are common. In adolescents who received ART early in life the spectrum of CLD has changed with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being common. Areas covered: The aim of this paper was to review CLD in ALHIV. We conducted a literature review of electronic databases focusing on CLD that were common prior to the introduction of ART (1996-2004), the present situation where ART is widely available (2005 to 2016), and articles which aided us speculating on the impact of HIV-related CLD in adolescents transitioning to adult HIV-clinics. Amongst the approximately 2.1 million adolescents living with HIV, CLD commonly occurs. Awareness of the CLD amongst ALHIV needs to be raised to ensure that disease appropriate treatment is available to these vulnerable adolescents. Expert commentary: As adolescents' transition from pediatric HIV-clinics to adult HIV-clinics the evidence shows that adolescents might not receive optimal care if adult pulmonologists are not aware of the CLD that commonly occur in ALHIV.

  19. The immigration delay disease: adermatoglyphia-inherited absence of epidermal ridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Bettina; Fuchs, Dana; Sprecher, Eli; Itin, Peter

    2011-05-01

    In the digital age, personal identification by fingerprints (epidermal ridges) has become more frequent and is often required for biometric passports. The more fingerprints are analyzed, the more variants in their formation are documented. Individuals completely missing fingerprints as an isolated finding are extremely rare. Only 4 kindreds have been described to date, with additional clinical features in most cases. We describe a female patient with missing epidermal ridges on the fingers, palms, toes, and soles as an isolated feature. Absent fingerprints, or adermatoglyphia, were inherited over 4 generations of her family in an autosomal dominant fashion. We present the clinical features of the index patient, and compare the case with previous reports in the literature. Because of problems in personal identification, this embryologic malformation caused the patient significant difficulties when traveling to other countries, which is why we name it the immigration delay disease. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Associations of hormonal contraceptive use with measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Maura K; Jeng, Gary; Samarina, Anna; Akatova, Natalia; Martirosyan, Margarita; Kissin, Dmitry M; Curtis, Kathryn M; Marchbanks, Polly A; Hillis, Susan D; Mandel, Michele G; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-01-01

    To examine the associations between hormonal contraceptive use and measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral treatment (ART) effectiveness. A prospective cohort study of women with prevalent HIV infection in St. Petersburg, Russia, was conducted. After contraceptive counseling, participants chose to use combined oral contraceptives (COCs), depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) or male condoms for pregnancy prevention. Among participants not using ART at enrollment, we used multivariate Cox regression to assess the association between current (time-varying) contraceptive use and disease progression, measured by the primary composite outcome of CD4 decline to contraceptive method. During a total of 5233 months follow-up among participants not using ART with enrollment CD4 ≥350 cells/mm(3) (n=315), 97 experienced disease progression. Neither current use of COCs [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-1.48] nor DMPA (aHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.71-2.31) was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for disease progression compared with use of nonhormonal methods (IUD or condoms). Among participants using ART at enrollment (n=77), we found no statistically significant differences in the predicted mean changes in CD4 cell count comparing current use of COCs (p=.1) or DMPA (p=.3) with nonhormonal methods. Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Small-for-Gestational-Age Births in Pregnant Women with HIV, due to Severity of HIV Disease, Not Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine rate and factors associated with small-for-gestational-age (SGA births to women with HIV. Methods. Prospective data were collected from 183 pregnant women with HIV in an urban HIV prenatal clinic, 2000–2011. An SGA birth was defined as less than the 10th or 3rd percentile of birth weight distribution based upon cut points developed using national vital record data. Bivariate analysis utilized chi-squared and t-tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Results. The prevalence of SGA was 31.2% at the 10th and 12.6% at the 3rd percentile. SGA at the 10th (OR 2.77; 95% CI, 1.28–5.97 and 3rd (OR 3.64; 95% CI, 1.12–11.76 percentiles was associated with cigarette smoking. Women with CD4 count >200 cells/mm3 at the first prenatal visit were less likely to have an SGA birth at the 3rd percentile (OR 0.29; 95% CI, 0.10–0.86. Women taking NNRTI were less likely to have an SGA infant at the 10th (OR 0.28; 95% CI, 0.10–0.75 and 3rd (OR 0.16; 95% CI, 0.03–0.91 percentiles compared to those women on PIs. Conclusions. In this cohort with high rates of SGA, severity of HIV disease, not ART, was associated with SGA births after adjusting for sociodemographic, medication, and disease severity.

  2. Finger tapping movements of Parkinson's disease patients automatically rated using nonlinear delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscsek, C; Rowat, P; Schettino, L; Lee, D; Song, D; Letellier, C; Poizner, H

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative condition whose severity is assessed by clinical observations of motor behaviors. These are performed by a neurological specialist through subjective ratings of a variety of movements including 10-s bouts of repetitive finger-tapping movements. We present here an algorithmic rating of these movements which may be beneficial for uniformly assessing the progression of the disease. Finger-tapping movements were digitally recorded from Parkinson's patients and controls, obtaining one time series for every 10 s bout. A nonlinear delay differential equation, whose structure was selected using a genetic algorithm, was fitted to each time series and its coefficients were used as a six-dimensional numerical descriptor. The algorithm was applied to time-series from two different groups of Parkinson's patients and controls. The algorithmic scores compared favorably with the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores, at least when the latter adequately matched with ratings from the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Moreover, when the two sets of mean scores for all patients are compared, there is a strong (r = 0.785) and significant (p<0.0015) correlation between them.

  3. The cost of implementing rapid HIV testing in sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggman, Ashley A; Feaster, Daniel J; Leff, Jared A; Golden, Matthew R; Castellon, Pedro C; Gooden, Lauren; Matheson, Tim; Colfax, Grant N; Metsch, Lisa R; Schackman, Bruce R

    2014-09-01

    Rapid HIV testing in high-risk populations can increase the number of persons who learn their HIV status and avoid spending clinic resources to locate persons identified as HIV infected. We determined the cost to sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics of point-of-care rapid HIV testing using data from 7 public clinics that participated in a randomized trial of rapid testing with and without brief patient-centered risk reduction counseling in 2010. Costs included counselor and trainer time, supplies, and clinic overhead. We applied national labor rates and test costs. We calculated median clinic start-up costs and mean cost per patient tested, and projected incremental annual costs of implementing universal rapid HIV testing compared with current testing practices. Criteria for offering rapid HIV testing and methods for delivering nonrapid test results varied among clinics before the trial. Rapid HIV testing cost an average of US $22/patient without brief risk reduction counseling and US $46/patient with counseling in these 7 clinics. Median start-up costs per clinic were US $1100 and US $16,100 without and with counseling, respectively. Estimated incremental annual costs per clinic of implementing universal rapid HIV testing varied by whether or not brief counseling is conducted and by current clinic testing practices, ranging from a savings of US $19,500 to a cost of US $40,700 without counseling and a cost of US $98,000 to US $153,900 with counseling. Universal rapid HIV testing in STD clinics with same-day results can be implemented at relatively low cost to STD clinics, if brief risk reduction counseling is not offered.

  4. HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases among female prostitutes in Kinshasa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzila, N; Laga, M; Thiam, M A; Mayimona, K; Edidi, B; Van Dyck, E; Behets, F; Hassig, S; Nelson, A; Mokwa, K

    1991-06-01

    In 1988, 1233 prostitutes from different geographic areas of Kinshasa participated in a cross-sectional survey on HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Despite relatively good knowledge about AIDS and STDs, the reported preventive behaviour was poor. Only 12% of the women reported regular use of condoms, while greater than 50% of the women reported regular use of antibiotics and 38% reported doing nothing specific to prevent STDs. Thirty-five per cent of the women were HIV-positive compared with 27% in a similar survey in Kinshasa in 1986. The prevalence of other STDs was very high, ranging from 5% for genital ulcer disease (GUD) to 23% for gonococcal infection. HIV-positive women were older than HIV-negative women (26.9 versus 25.4 years; P less than 0.001), had a significantly lower level of reported condom use (9 versus 14%, P = 0.009), and reported more frequent use of antibiotics to prevent STDs (55 versus 42%, P = less than 0.001). The prevalence of syphilis, gonorrhoea, chlamydial infection and trichomoniasis was not higher in HIV-positive women compared with HIV-negative women. However, HIV-positive women had a higher prevalence of GUD (9 versus 3%, P less than 0.001), antibodies against Haemophilus ducreyi (82 versus 57%, P less than 0.001), antibodies against herpes simplex virus type 2 (96 versus 76%, P less than 0.001), condylomata accuminata (5 versus 1%, P = 0.003) and cytologic evidence of human papilloma virus on Papaniclaou cervical smear (11 versus 5%, P = 0.006). This study confirms the high incidence of HIV and other STDs among prostitutes in Africa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in HIV patients--association with antiretroviral therapy. Results from the DAD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Weber, Rainer; Reiss, Peter

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected persons, and to investigate any association between such risk factors, stage of HIV disease, and use of antiretroviral therapies. DESIGN: Baseline data from 17,852 subjects enrolled in DAD, ...

  6. Prevalence and Knowledge Assessment of HIV and Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors among Formal Sector Employees in Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guariguata, Leonor; de Beer, Ingrid; Hough, Rina; Mulongeni, Pancho; Feeley, Frank G.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is growing in sub-Saharan Africa combined with an already high prevalence of infectious disease, like HIV. Engaging the formal employment sector may present a viable strategy for addressing both HIV and NCDs in people of working age. This study assesses

  7. Markers, Cofactors and Staging Systems in the Study of HIV Disease Progression: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Portela

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at providing a comprehensive review of markers, cofactors and staging systems used for HIV disease, focusing on some aspects that nowadays could even be considered historical, and advancing in current issues such as the prognostic value of viral load measurements, viral genotypic and phenotypic characterization, and new HIV disease treatment protocols. CD4+ cell values, combined with the new viral markers mentioned are promising as a parsimonious predictor set for defining both severity and progression. An adequate predictor of patient resource use for planning purposes still needs to be defined

  8. Risk factors and assessment for cardiovascular disease among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: this was a cross-sectional study of HIV-positive patients attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were performed; fasting lipid profile, plasma glucose, homocysteine and hsCRP were determined, as well as prevalences and risk assessments.

  9. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mark A; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) events in HIV...

  10. HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español HIV and AIDS KidsHealth / For Kids / HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  11. Transcriptomic meta-analysis identifies gene expression characteristics in various samples of HIV-infected patients with nonprogressive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le-Le; Zhang, Zi-Ning; Wu, Xian; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Fu, Ya-Jing; Shang, Hong

    2017-09-12

    A small proportion of HIV-infected patients remain clinically and/or immunologically stable for years, including elite controllers (ECs) who have undetectable viremia (10 years). However, the mechanism of nonprogression needs to be further resolved. In this study, a transcriptome meta-analysis was performed on nonprogressor and progressor microarray data to identify differential transcriptome pathways and potential biomarkers. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in nonprogressors and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DEGs identified in the meta-analysis. Five microarray datasets (81 cases and 98 controls in total), including whole blood, CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, were collected for meta-analysis. We determined that nonprogressors have reduced expression of important interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), CD38, lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) in whole blood, CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed a significant enrichment in DEGs that function in the type I interferon signaling pathway. Upregulated pathways, including the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in whole blood, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction in CD4 + T cells and the MAPK signaling pathway in CD8 + T cells, were identified in nonprogressors compared with progressors. In each metabolic functional category, the number of downregulated DEGs was more than the upregulated DEGs, and almost all genes were downregulated DEGs in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the three types of samples. Our transcriptomic meta-analysis provides a comprehensive evaluation of the gene expression profiles in major blood types of nonprogressors, providing new insights in the understanding of HIV pathogenesis and developing strategies to delay HIV disease progression.

  12. Absolute leukocyte telomere length in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: evidence of accelerated cell senescence in HIV-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Y Liu

    Full Text Available Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART has extended the longevity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals. However, this has resulted in greater awareness of age-associated diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Accelerated cellular senescence may be responsible, but its magnitude as measured by leukocyte telomere length is unknown and its relationship to HIV-associated COPD has not yet been established. We measured absolute telomere length (aTL in peripheral leukocytes from 231 HIV-infected adults. Comparisons were made to 691 HIV-uninfected individuals from a population-based sample. Subject quartiles of aTL were assessed for relationships with measures of HIV disease severity, airflow obstruction, and emphysema severity on computed tomographic (CT imaging. Multivariable regression models identified factors associated with shortened aTL. Compared to HIV-uninfected subjects, the mean aTL in HIV-infected patients was markedly shorter by 27 kbp/genome (p<0.001; however, the slopes of aTL vs. age were not different (p=0.469. Patients with longer known durations of HIV infection (p=0.019 and lower nadir CD4 cell counts (p=0.023 had shorter aTL. Shorter aTL were also associated with older age (p=0.026, smoking (p=0.005, reduced forced expiratory volume in one second (p=0.030, and worse CT emphysema severity score (p=0.049. HIV-infected subjects demonstrate advanced cellular aging, yet in a cART-treated cohort, the relationship between aTL and age appears no different from that of HIV-uninfected subjects.

  13. Rose Essential Oil Delayed Alzheimer's Disease-Like Symptoms by SKN-1 Pathway in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuqian; Li, Hongyu; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenqi; Liu, Ting; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Meizhu; Zhi, Dejuan

    2017-10-11

    There are no effective medications for delaying the progress of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disease in the world. In this study, our results with C. elegans showed that rose essential oil (REO) significantly inhibited AD-like symptoms of worm paralysis and hypersensivity to exogenous 5-HT in a dose-dependent manner. Its main components of β-citronellol and geraniol acted less effectively than the oil itself. REO significantly suppressed Aβ deposits and reduced the Aβ oligomers to alleviate the toxicity induced by Aβ overexpression. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of REO on worm paralysis phenotype were abrogated only after skn-1 RNAi but not daf-16 and hsf-1 RNAi. REO markedly activated the expression of gst-4 gene, which further supported SKN-1 signaling pathway was involved in the therapeutic effect of REO on AD C. elegans. Our results provided direct evidence on REO for treating AD on an organism level and relative theoretical foundation for reshaping medicinal products of REO in the future.

  14. Chronic hepatitis C infection and liver disease in HIV co-infected patients in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durier, Nicolas; Yunihastuti, Evy; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Boettiger, David; Widhani, Alvina; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Huy, Bui Vu; Omar, Sharifah Faridah binti Syed; Sanityoso, Andri; Chittmittrapap, Salyavit; Dung, Nguyen Thi Hoai; Pillai, Veena; Suwan-Ampai, Tuangporn; Law, Matthew; Sohn, Annette H.; Matthews, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Data on markers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease in HIV-HCV co-infected patients in resource-limited settings are scarce. We assessed HCV-RNA, HCV genotype (GT), IL28B GT, and liver fibrosis (FibroScan®) in 480 HIV-infected patients with positive HCV antibody in four HIV treatment centers in South East Asia. We enrolled 165 (34.4%) patients in Jakarta, 158 (32.9%) in Bangkok, 110 (22.9%) in Hanoi, and 47 (9.8%) in Kuala Lumpur. Overall, 426 (88.8%) were male, the median (IQR) age was 38.1 (34.7–42.5) years, 365 (76.0%) reported HCV exposure through injecting drug use, and 453 (94.4%) were on combination antiretroviral therapy. The median (IQR) CD4 count was 446 (325–614) cells/mm3 and 208 (94.1%) of 221 patients tested had HIV-1 RNA F4). One patient (0.3%) had FibroScan® failure. A high proportion of HIV-HCV co-infected patients had chronic HCV infection. HCV GT1 was predominant, and 62% of patients had liver disease warranting prompt treatment (>=F2). PMID:27917597

  15. Chronic hepatitis C infection and liver disease in HIV-coinfected patients in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durier, N; Yunihastuti, E; Ruxrungtham, K; Kinh, N V; Kamarulzaman, A; Boettiger, D; Widhani, A; Avihingsanon, A; Huy, B V; Syed Omar, S F B; Sanityoso, A; Chittmittrapap, S; Dung, N T H; Pillai, V; Suwan-Ampai, T; Law, M; Sohn, A H; Matthews, G

    2017-03-01

    Data on markers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease in HIV-HCV-coinfected patients in resource-limited settings are scarce. We assessed HCV RNA, HCV genotype (GT), IL28B GT and liver fibrosis (FibroScan ® ) in 480 HIV-infected patients with positive HCV antibody in four HIV treatment centres in South-East Asia. We enrolled 165 (34.4%) patients in Jakarta, 158 (32.9%) in Bangkok, 110 (22.9%) in Hanoi and 47 (9.8%) in Kuala Lumpur. Overall, 426 (88.8%) were male, the median (IQR) age was 38.1 (34.7-42.5) years, 365 (76.0%) reported HCV exposure through injecting drug use, and 453 (94.4%) were on combination antiretroviral therapy. The median (IQR) CD4 count was 446 (325-614) cells/mm 3 and 208 (94.1%) of 221 patients tested had HIV-1 RNA F4). One patient (0.3%) had FibroScan ® failure. In conclusion, a high proportion of HIV-HCV-coinfected patients had chronic HCV infection. HCV GT1 was predominant, and 62% of patients had liver disease warranting prompt treatment (≥F2). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Is the Newest Vital Sign a Useful Measure of Health Literacy in HIV Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordovski, Victoria M; Woods, Steven Paul; Avci, Gunes; Verduzco, Marizela; Morgan, Erin E

    Limited health literacy is common among persons infected with HIV and has been linked to poor mental and physical health outcomes, but there are no well-validated screening measures of health literacy in this vulnerable clinical population. The present study evaluates the usefulness of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) as a brief measure of health literacy in HIV disease. Seventy-eight HIV+ adults were administered the NVS, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and Single Item Literacy Screener (SILS). Main criterion variables included plasma HIV viral load, medication management capacity, self-efficacy for medication management, and perceived relationships with healthcare providers. The NVS showed good internal consistency and moderate correlations with the REALM and SILS. Rates of limited health literacy were highest on the NVS (30.3%) as compared to SILS (6.6%) and REALM (9.2%). A series of regressions controlling for education showed that the NVS was incrementally predictive of viral load, medication management capacity and self-efficacy, and relationships with healthcare providers, above and beyond the REALM and SILS. The NVS shows evidence of reliability, convergent validity, and incremental criterion-related validity and thus may serve as useful screening tool for assessing health literacy in HIV disease.

  17. Vitamin D and clinical disease progression in HIV infection: results from the EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viard, Jean-Paul; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Kirk, Ole

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: We examined the association between vitamin D [25(OH)D] level and disease progression in HIV infection. METHODS:: Within the EuroSIDA study, 2000 persons were randomly selected for 25(OH)D measurement in stored plasma samples closest to study entry. 25(OH)D results were stratified...

  18. HIV in Kenya: Sexual behaviour and quality of care of sexually transmitted diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes three important determinants of HIV spread in Kenya: 1. Sexual behaviour of female sex workers, their clients, and young adults 2. Health care seeking behaviour for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) 3. Quality of STD care in the public and private health

  19. Vinblastine, rituximab and HAART, treatment of an HIV -positive patient with multicentric Castleman's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalderen, M. C.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Terpstra, W. E.

    2010-01-01

    An HIV-positive man from Somalia presented with severe malaise, weight loss, relapsing fever, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. An FDG-PET-scan-guided lymph node biopsy revealed the characteristic histological features of the plasma cell variant of Castleman's disease. A high HHV-8 viral load was

  20. Herpes zoster, immunological deterioration and disease progression in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, J.; Krol, A.; van Praag, R. M.; Frissen, P. H.; Schellekens, P. T.; Lange, J. M.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Meer, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence of herpes zoster, the relationship between herpes zoster and immunological markers, and the prognostic value of herpes zoster for progression of HIV disease. DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 966 homosexual participants in The Amsterdam Cohort Study were studied.

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achhra, Amit C; Nugent, Melinda; Mocroft, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as an important health concern in HIV-positive individuals. Preventing long-term kidney toxicity from an antiretroviral therapy is therefore critical. Selected antiretroviral agents, especially tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and some ritonavir-boosted...

  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Funding for HIV Testing Associated With Higher State Percentage of Persons Tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Samah; Dietz, Patricia M; Van Handel, Michelle; Zhang, Jun; Shrestha, Ram K; Huang, Ya-Lin A; Wan, Choi; Mermin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between state per capita allocations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding for HIV testing and the percentage of persons tested for HIV. We examined data from 2 sources: 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 2010-2011 State HIV Budget Allocations Reports. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data were used to estimate the percentage of persons aged 18 to 64 years who had reported testing for HIV in the last 2 years in the United States by state. State HIV Budget Allocations Reports were used to calculate the state mean annual per capita allocations for CDC-funded HIV testing reported by state and local health departments in the United States. The association between the state fixed-effect per capita allocations for CDC-funded HIV testing and self-reported HIV testing in the last 2 years among persons aged 18 to 64 years was assessed with a hierarchical logistic regression model adjusting for individual-level characteristics. The percentage of persons tested for HIV in the last 2 years. In 2011, 18.7% (95% confidence interval = 18.4-19.0) of persons reported being tested for HIV in last 2 years (state range, 9.7%-28.2%). During 2010-2011, the state mean annual per capita allocation for CDC-funded HIV testing was $0.34 (state range, $0.04-$1.04). A $0.30 increase in per capita allocation for CDC-funded HIV testing was associated with an increase of 2.4 percentage points (14.0% vs 16.4%) in the percentage of persons tested for HIV per state. Providing HIV testing resources to health departments was associated with an increased percentage of state residents tested for HIV.

  3. Physician-patient communication in HIV disease: the importance of patient, physician, and visit characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, I B; Kaplan, S

    2000-12-15

    Although previous work that considered a variety of chronic conditions has shown that higher quality physician-patient communication care is related to better health outcomes, the quality of physician-patient communication itself for patients with HIV disease has not been well studied. To determine the relationship of patient, visit, physician, and physician practice characteristics to two measures of physician-patient communication for patients with HIV disease. Cross-sectional survey of physicians and patients. Cohort study enrolling patients from throughout eastern Massachusetts. 264 patients with HIV disease and their their primary HIV physicians (n = 69). Two measures of physician-patient communication were used, a five-item general communication measure (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93), and a four-item HIV-specific communication measure that included items about alcohol, drug use, and sexual behaviors (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92). The mean age of patients was 39. 5 years, 24% patients were women, 31.1% were nonwhite, and 52% indicated same-sex contact as their principal HIV risk factor. The mean age of physicians was 39.1 years, 33.3% were female, 39.7% were specialists, and 25.0% self-identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. In multivariable models relating patient and visit characteristics to general communication, longer reported visit length (pbetter communication. The interaction of patient gender and visit length was also significant (p =.02); longer visit length was more strongly associated with better general communication for male than female patients. In similar models relating patient and visit characteristics to HIV-specific communication, longer visit length (p better communication. In multivariable models relating physician and practice characteristics to general communication no variables were significant. However, both female physician gender (p =.002) and gay/lesbian/bisexual sexual preference (p =.003) were significantly associated with better HIV

  4. A multilevel understanding of HIV/AIDS disease burden among African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, Bridgette M

    2014-01-01

    Disproportionate HIV/AIDS rates among African American women have been examined extensively, primarily from an individual-centered focus. Beyond individual behaviors, factors such as the hyperincarceration of African American men and geographically concentrated disadvantage may better explain inequitable disease burden. In this article I propose a conceptual model of individual, social, and structural factors that influence HIV transmission among African American women. The model can be used to develop comprehensive assessments and guide prevention programs in African American communities. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  5. Anoxia Treatment for Delaying Skin Browning, Inhibiting Disease Development and Maintaining the Quality of Litchi Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueming Jiang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Litchi fruit has a very short shelf life after harvest, so marketers and consumers alike desire longer periods of storage, transportation and distribution. To extend shelf life, anoxia treatments were used for the fruit. Litchi fruit were exposed to pure N2 for 0, 3, 6, 12 or 24 h. They were then kept individually in closed but vented containers for 6 days in the dark at 20 °C and 95–100 % relative humidity. Exposure of litchi fruit to N2 for 3 or 6 h markedly delayed skin browning, reduced rot development and maintained higher concentrations of total soluble solids, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid after 6 days of storage. Anoxia treatment for 24 h reduced browning index, but it accelerated disease development, compared to the control. Thus, a pre-storage pure N2 treatment for 3 or 6 h can be an effective means of reducing rotting while maintaining the physical quality of the fruit.

  6. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  7. Delaying mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease using a sensorimotor agility exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2009-04-01

    This article introduces a new framework for therapists to develop an exercise program to delay mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Mobility, or the ability to efficiently navigate and function in a variety of environments, requires balance, agility, and flexibility, all of which are affected by PD. This article summarizes recent research identifying how constraints on mobility specific to PD, such as rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing, poor sensory integration, inflexible program selection, and impaired cognitive processing, limit mobility in people with PD. Based on these constraints, a conceptual framework for exercises to maintain and improve mobility is presented. An example of a constraint-focused agility exercise program, incorporating movement principles from tai chi, kayaking, boxing, lunges, agility training, and Pilates exercises, is presented. This new constraint-focused agility exercise program is based on a strong scientific framework and includes progressive levels of sensorimotor, resistance, and coordination challenges that can be customized for each patient while maintaining fidelity. Principles for improving mobility presented here can be incorporated into an ongoing or long-term exercise program for people with PD.

  8. Update to: Application of Bayesian decision-making to laboratory testing for Lyme disease and comparison with testing for HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook MJ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Cook,1 Basant K Puri21Independent researcher, Highcliffe, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UKIn our recent Bayesian analysis paper, false-negative results were compared between Lyme disease and HIV using a recommended test algorithm.1 When the two-tier test methodology for Lyme disease was compared with HIV two-stage testing, false negatives could be more than 500 times higher for Lyme disease testing.

  9. Effect of delayed diagnosis on disease course and management of Churg-Strauss syndrome: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Kuczia, Paweł; Wodkowski, Michał; Stodółkiewicz, Edyta; Macioł, Karolina; Musiał, Jacek

    2013-03-01

    Delayed diagnosis in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is largely attributed to the variable and nonspecific presentation of the disease's initial symptoms. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of delayed diagnosis on the course of CSS. We conducted a retrospective study of 30 CSS patients followed up in our department. In each patient, we assessed the delay in CSS diagnosis (the time when patients already fulfilled four out of six of the American College of Rheumatology criteria and the diagnosis was not yet established), the disease activity at the time of diagnosis, and organ involvement during CSS course. A median value of 2 weeks was chosen as the cutoff point after which the diagnosis was considered as delayed. Sixteen patients were diagnosed before (group 1) and 14 patients after this cutoff point (group 2). In group 2, we found a higher Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score at the moment of diagnosis (20.4 vs 25.1, p < 0.05) and a more severe disease course, resulting in more frequent hospitalization rates (0.64 vs 2.26/year, p < 0.00001), higher corticosteroids dose requirements (5.87 vs 11.57 mg/day converted to methylprednisolone, p < 0.0001), and additional immunosuppressive therapy administration (56.2 vs 92.8 %, p < 0.05) to maintain disease remission. All six perinuclear pattern of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibobodies (pANCA)-positive patients (20 %) were found in group 1. Concluding, the delay in diagnosis of CSS of more than 2 weeks was found to be associated with a disease course that was more severe. The presence of the pANCA antibodies may occasionally facilitate establishment of the diagnosis.

  10. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Coinfection and Concurrent Diseases Core: Canadian Guidelines for Management and Treatment of HIV/Hepatitis C Coinfection in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hull

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV coinfection occurs in 20% to 30% of Canadians living with HIV, and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. HIV-HCV management is more complex due to the accelerated progression of liver disease, the timing and nature of antiretroviral and HCV therapy, mental health and addictions management, socioeconomic obstacles and drug-drug interactions between new HCV direct-acting antiviral therapies and antiretroviral regimens.

  11. [Confidentiality in HIV-infection/AIDS--a comment on the Communicable Disease Control Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frich, J C

    1995-05-10

    The new Communicable Diseases Control Act has come into force in Norway. It makes it compulsory for a physician to warn a third party if it is obvious that a HIV-positive patient, with a high degree of certainty, puts the third party at risk of being infected with HIV. Some philosophers characterize medical confidentiality as an intransigent and absolute obligation, others as a prima facie duty. This article supports the latter view, but the author still argues that strict conditions have to be fulfilled before a physician should consider breaking medical confidentiality: The doctor must try repeatedly to gain the consent or co-operation of the patient involved. Possible negative long-term consequences for the preventive HIV-work support strict medical confidentiality.

  12. Rheumatic diseases in HIV-infected patients in the post-antiretroviral therapy era: a tertiary care center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Abdulqader, Yasir; Myers, Robert; Bhattarai, Bikash; Al-Ani, Muhsen

    2018-04-04

    The aim of the study was to calculate the proportion of rheumatic diseases in HIV patients who were receiving ART and to identify association of the HIV medications with the development of rheumatologic diseases. We conducted a retrospective chart review during the period of 2010 to 2016. We identified 2996 patients as having chronic HIV infection and on ART, and we collected data regarding patient's demographic characteristics, comorbidities, CD 4 count, HIV viral load, and ART. One hundred thirteen out of 2996 HIV patients (3.8%) were found to have a rheumatic condition (mean age of 48.6 years, 83% male). The most frequent musculoskeletal condition was avascular necrosis (AVN) in 39 (1.3%), and the most frequent autoimmune condition was psoriasis in 28 patients (1%). Compared with the 200 HIV patients without any diagnosis of rheumatic disease were the older patients with rheumatic conditions (mean age of 48.9 vs. 42.7 years; p rheumatic conditions were 1.7 times higher in males (relative to females). Those who received integrase inhibitors were more likely (63.3%) to develop rheumatologic manifestations relative to those who never received integrase inhibitors (21.6%; p rheumatic diseases in HIV patients appears to be comparable to the prevalence in the US population. Older age, longer duration of HIV infection, and the use of ART regimens containing integrase inhibitors, appear to increase the risk of developing a rheumatic condition.

  13. Severity of Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Among Patients With HIV Is Related to Markers of Inflammation and Coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordell, Anna D.; McKenna, Matthew; Borges, Álvaro H.; Duprez, Daniel; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Neaton, James D.; Gordin, F.; Finley, E.; Dietz, D.; Chesson, C.; Vjecha, M.; Standridge, B.; Schmetter, B.; Grue, L.; Willoughby, M.; Demers, A.; Lundgren, J. D.; Phillips, A.; Dragsted, U. B.; Jensen, K. B.; Fau, A.; Borup, L.; Pearson, M.; Jansson, P. O.; Jensen, B. G.; Benfield, T. L.; Darbyshire, J. H.; Babiker, A. G.; Palfreeman, A. J.; Fleck, S. L.; Collaco-Moraes, Y.; Cordwell, B.; Dodds, W.; van Hooff, F.; Wyzydrag, L.; Cooper, D. A.; Emery, S.; Drummond, F. M.; Connor, S. A.; Satchell, C. S.; Gunn, S.; Oka, S.; Delfino, M. A.; Merlin, K.; McGinley, C.; Neaton, J. D.; Bartsch, G.; DuChene, A.; George, M.; Grund, B.; Harrison, M.; Hogan, C.; Krum, E.; Larson, G.; Miller, C.; Nelson, R.; Neuhaus, J.; Roediger, M. P.; Schultz, T.; Thackeray, L.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Perez, G.; Lifson, A.; Duprez, D.; Hoy, J.; Lahart, C.; Perlman, D.; Price, R.; Rhame, F.; Sampson, J.; Worley, J.; der Simonian, R.; Brody, B. A.; Daar, E. S.; Dubler, N. N.; Fleming, T. R.; Freeman, D. J.; Kahn, J. P.; Kim, K. M.; Medoff, G.; Modlin, J. F.; Moellering, R.; Murray, B. E.; Pick, B.; Robb, M. L.; Scharfstein, D. O.; Sugarman, J.; Tsiatis, A.; Tuazon, C.; Zoloth, L.; Klingman, K.; Lehrman, S.; Lazovski, J.; Belloso, W. H.; Losso, M. H.; Benetucci, J. A.; Aquilia, S.; Bittar, V.; Bogdanowicz, E. P.; Cahn, P. E.; Casiró, A. D.; Cassetti, I.; Contarelli, J. M.; Corral, J. A.; Crinejo, A.; Daciuk, L.; David, D. O.; Guaragna, G.; Ishida, M. T.; Krolewiecki, A.; Laplume, H. E.; Lasala, M. B.; Lourtau, L.; Lupo, S. H.; Maranzana, A.; Masciottra, F.; Michaan, M.; Ruggieri, L.; Salazar, E.; Sánchez, M.; Somenzini, C.; Hoy, J. F.; Rogers, G. D.; Allworth, A. M.; Anderson, J. S. C.; Armishaw, J.; Barnes, K.; Carr, A.; Chiam, A.; Chuah, J. C. P.; Curry, M. C.; Dever, R. L.; Donohue, W. A.; Doong, N. C.; Dwyer, D. E.; Dyer, J.; Eu, B.; Ferguson, V. W.; French, M. A. H.; Garsia, R. J.; Gold, J.; Hudson, J. H.; Jeganathan, S.; Konecny, P.; Leung, J.; McCormack, C. L.; McMurchie, M.; Medland, N.; Moore, R. J.; Moussa, M. B.; Orth, D.; Piper, M.; Read, T.; Roney, J. J.; Roth, N.; Shaw, D. R.; Silvers, J.; Smith, D. J.; Street, A. C.; Vale, R. J.; Wendt, N. A.; Wood, H.; Youds, D. W.; Zillman, J.; Rieger, A.; Tozeau, V.; Aichelburg, A.; Vetter, N.; Clumeck, N.; DeWit, S.; de Roo, A.; Kabeya, K.; Leonard, P.; Lynen, L.; Moutschen, M.; O'Doherty, E.; Pereira, L. C.; Souza, T. N. L.; Schechter, M.; Zajdenverg, R.; Almeida, M. M. T. B.; Araujo, F.; Bahia, F.; Brites, C.; Caseiro, M. M.; Casseb, J.; Etzel, A.; Falco, G. G.; Filho, E. C. J.; Flint, S. R.; Gonzales, C. R.; Madruga, J. V. R.; Passos, L. N.; Reuter, T.; Sidi, L. C.; Toscano, A. L. C.; Zarowny, D.; Cherban, E.; Cohen, J.; Conway, B.; Dufour, C.; Ellis, M.; Foster, A.; Haase, D.; Haldane, H.; Houde, M.; Kato, C.; Klein, M.; Lessard, B.; Martel, A.; Martel, C.; McFarland, N.; Paradis, E.; Piche, A.; Sandre, R.; Schlech, W.; Schmidt, S.; Smaill, F.; Thompson, B.; Trottier, S.; Vezina, S.; Walmsley, S.; Wolff Reyes, M. J.; Northland, R.; Ostergaard, L.; Pedersen, C.; Nielsen, H.; Hergens, L.; Loftheim, I. R.; Raukas, M.; Zilmer, K.; Justinen, J.; Ristola, M.; Girard, P. M.; Landman, R.; Abel, S.; Abgrall, S.; Amat, K.; Auperin, L.; Barruet, R.; Benalycherif, A.; Benammar, N.; Bensalem, M.; Bentata, M.; Besnier, J. M.; Blanc, M.; Bouchaud, O.; Cabié, A.; Chavannet, P.; Chennebault, J. M.; Dargere, S.; de la Tribonniere, X.; Debord, T.; Decaux, N.; Delgado, J.; Dupon, M.; Durant, J.; Frixon-Marin, V.; Genet, C.; Gérard, L.; Gilquin, J.; Hoen, B.; Jeantils, V.; Kouadio, H.; Leclercq, P.; Lelièvre, J. -D.; Levy, Y.; Michon, C. P.; Nau, P.; Pacanowski, J.; Piketty, C.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Raymond, I.; Salmon, D.; Schmit, J. L.; Serini, M. A.; Simon, A.; Tassi, S.; Touam, F.; Verdon, R.; Weinbreck, P.; Weiss, L.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Yeni, P.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Staszewski, S.; Bergmann, F.; Bitsch, S.; Bogner, J. R.; Brockmeyer, N.; Esser, S.; Goebel, F. D.; Hartmann, M.; Klinker, H.; Lehmann, C.; Lennemann, T.; Plettenberg, A.; Potthof, A.; Rockstroh, J.; Ross, B.; Stoehr, A.; Wasmuth, J. C.; Wiedemeyer, K.; Winzer, R.; Hatzakis, A.; Touloumi, G.; Antoniadou, A.; Daikos, G. L.; Dimitrakaki, A.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Giannaris, M.; Karafoulidou, A.; Katsambas, A.; Katsarou, O.; Kontos, A. N.; Kordossis, T.; Lazanas, M. K.; Panagopoulos, P.; Panos, G.; Paparizos, V.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Petrikkos, G.; Sambatakou, H.; Skoutelis, A.; Tsogas, N.; Xylomenos, G.; Bergin, C. J.; Mooka, B.; Pollack, S.; Mamorksy, M. G.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Karplus, R.; Kedem, E.; Maayan, S.; Shahar, E.; Sthoeger, Z.; Turner, D.; Yust, I.; Tambussi, G.; Rusconi, V.; Abeli, C.; Bechi, M.; Biglino, A.; Bonora, S.; Butini, L.; Carosi, G.; Casari, S.; Corpolongo, A.; de Gioanni, M.; Di Perri, G.; Di Pietro, M.; D'Offizi, G.; Esposito, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Montroni, M.; Nardini, G.; Nozza, S.; Quirino, T.; Raise, E.; Honda, M.; Ishisaka, M.; Caplinskas, S.; Uzdaviniene, V.; Schmit, J. C.; Staub, T.; Himmich, H.; Marhoum El Filali, K.; Mills, G. D.; Blackmore, T.; Masters, J. A.; Morgan, J.; Pithie, A.; Brunn, J.; Ormasssen, V.; La Rosa, A.; Guerra, O.; Espichan, M.; Gutierrez, L.; Mendo, F.; Salazar, R.; Knytz, B.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Beniowski, M.; Gasiorowski, J.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Antunes, F.; Castro, R. S.; Doroana, M.; Horta, A.; Mansinho, K.; Miranda, A. C.; Pinto, I. V.; Valadas, E.; Vera, J.; Rakhmanova, A.; Vinogradova, E.; Yakovlev, A.; Zakharova, N.; Wood, R.; Orrel, C.; Gatell, J.; Arnaiz, J. A.; Carrillo, R.; Clotet, B.; Dalmau, D.; González, A.; Jordano, Q.; Jou, A.; Knobel, H.; Larrousse, M.; Mata, R.; Moreno, J. S.; Oretaga, E.; Pena, J. N.; Pulido, F.; Rubio, R.; Sanz, J.; Viciana, P.; Hirschel, B.; Spycher, R.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Bottone, S.; Cavassini, M.; Christen, A.; Franc, C.; Furrer, H. J.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Genné, D.; Hochstrasser, S.; Magenta, L.; Moens, C.; Müller, Nicolas J.; Nüesch, R.; Phanuphak, P.; Ruxrungtham, K.; Pumpradit, W.; Chetchotisakd, P.; Dangthongdee, S.; Kiertiburanakul, S.; Klinbuayaem, V.; Mootsikapun, P.; Nonenoy, S.; Piyavong, B.; Prasithsirikul, W.; Raksakulkarn, P.; Gazzard, B. G.; Ainsworth, J. G.; Anderson, J.; Angus, B. J.; Barber, T. J.; Brook, M. G.; Care, C. D.; Chadwick, D. R.; Chikohora, M.; Churchill, D. R.; Cornforth, D.; Dockrell, D. H.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Fox, P. A.; Fox, R.; Gomez, P. A.; Gompels, M. M.; Harris, G. M.; Herman, S.; Jackson, A. G. A.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Johnson, M. A.; Kinghorn, G. R.; Kuldanek, K. A.; Larbalestier, N.; Leen, C.; Lumsden, M.; Maher, T.; Mantell, J.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; McLean, L.; Morris, S.; Muromba, L.; Orkin, C. M.; Peters, B. S.; Peto, T. E. A.; Portsmouth, S. D.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Ronan, A.; Schwenk, A.; Slinn, M. A.; Stroud, C. J.; Thomas, R. C.; Wansbrough-Jones, M. H.; Whiles, H. J.; White, D. J.; Williams, E.; Williams, I. G.; Youle, M.; Abrams, D. I.; Acosta, E. A.; Adams, S.; Adamski, A.; Andrews, L.; Antoniskis, D.; Aragon, D. R.; Arduino, R.; Artz, R.; Bailowitz, J.; Barnett, B. J.; Baroni, C.; Barron, M.; Baxter, J. D.; Beers, D.; Beilke, M.; Bemenderfer, D.; Bernard, A.; Besch, C. L.; Bessesen, M. T.; Bethel, J. T.; Blue, S.; Blum, J. D.; Boarden, S.; Bolan, R. K.; Borgman, J. B.; Brar, I.; Braxton, B. K.; Bredeek, U. F.; Brennan, R.; Britt, D. E.; Brockelman, J.; Brown, S.; Bruzzese, V.; Bulgin-Coleman, D.; Bullock, D. E.; Cafaro, V.; Campbell, B.; Caras, S.; Carroll, J.; Casey, K. K.; Chiang, F.; Childress, G.; Cindrich, R. B.; Clark, C.; Climo, M.; Cohen, C.; Coley, J.; Condoluci, D. V.; Contreras, R.; Corser, J.; Cozzolino, J.; Crane, L. R.; Daley, L.; Dandridge, D.; D'Antuono, V.; Patron, J. G. Darcourt Rizo; DeHovitz, J. A.; Dejesus, E.; des-Jardin, J.; Diaz-Linares, M.; Dietrich, C.; Dodson, P.; Dolce, E.; Elliott, K.; Erickson, D.; Estes, M.; Faber, L. L.; Falbo, J.; Farrough, M. J.; Farthing, C. F.; Ferrell-Gonzalez, P.; Flynn, H.; Frank, C.; Freeman, K. F.; French, N.; Friedland, G.; Fujita, N.; Gahagan, L.; Genther, K.; Gilson, I.; Goetz, M. B.; Goodwin, E.; Graziano, F.; Guity, C. K.; Gulick, P.; Gunderson, E. R.; Hale, C. M.; Hannah, K.; Henderson, H.; Hennessey, K.; Henry, W. K.; Higgins, D. T.; Hodder, S. L.; Horowitz, H. W.; Howe-Pittman, M.; Hubbard, J.; Hudson, R.; Hunter, H.; Hutelmyer, C.; Insignares, M. T.; Jackson, L.; Jenny, L.; John, M.; Johnson, D. L.; Johnson, G.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Kaatz, J.; Kaczmarski, J.; Kagan, S.; Kantor, C.; Kempner, T.; Kieckhaus, K.; Kimmel, N.; Klaus, B. M.; Klimas, N.; Koeppe, J. R.; Koirala, J.; Kopka, J.; Kostman, J. R.; Kozal, M. J.; Kumar, A.; Labriola, A.; Lampiris, H.; Lamprecht, C.; Lattanzi, K. M.; Lee, J.; Leggett, J.; Long, C.; Loquere, A.; Loveless, K.; Lucasti, C. J.; Luskin-Hawk, R.; MacVeigh, M.; Makohon, L. H.; Mannheimer, S.; Markowitz, N. P.; Marks, C.; Martinez, N.; Martorell, C.; McFeaters, E.; McGee, B.; McIntyre, D. M.; McKee, J.; McManus, E.; Melecio, L. G.; Melton, D.; Mercado, S.; Merrifield, E.; Mieras, J. A.; Mogyoros, M.; Moran, F. M.; Murphy, K.; Mushatt, D.; Mutic, S.; Nadeem, I.; Nadler, J. P.; Nahass, R.; Nixon, D.; O'Brien, S.; Ognjan, A.; O'Hearn, M.; O'Keefe, K.; Okhuysen, P. C.; Oldfield, E.; Olson, D.; Orenstein, R.; Ortiz, R.; Osterberger, J.; Owen, W.; Parpart, F.; Pastore-Lange, V.; Paul, S.; Pavlatos, A.; Pearce, D. D.; Pelz, R.; Peterson, S.; Pierone, G.; Pitrak, D.; Powers, S. L.; Pujet, H. C.; Raaum, J. W.; Ravishankar, J.; Reeder, J.; Regevik, N.; Reilly, N. A.; Reyelt, C.; Riddell, J.; Rimland, D.; Robinson, M. L.; Rodriguez, A. E.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M. C.; Rodriguez Derouen, V.; Roland, R.; Rosmarin, C.; Rossen, W. L.; Rouff, J. R.; Sampson, J. H.; Sands, M.; Savini, C.; Schrader, S.; Schulte, M. M.; Scott, C.; Scott, R.; Seedhom, H.; Sension, M.; Sheble-Hall, A.; Sheridan, A.; Shuter, J.; Slater, L. N.; Slotten, R.; Slowinski, D.; Smith, M.; Snap, S.; States, D. M.; Stewart, M.; Stringer, G.; Sullivan, J.; Summers, K. K.; Swanson, K.; Sweeton, I. B.; Szabo, S.; Tedaldi, E. M.; Telzak, E. E.; Temesgen, Z.; Thomas, D.; Thompson, M. A.; Thompson, S.; Ting Hong Bong, C.; Tobin, C.; Uy, J.; Vaccaro, A.; Vasco, L. M.; Vecino, I.; Verlinghieri, G. K.; Visnegarwala, F.; Wade, B. H.; Watson, V.; Weise, J. A.; Weissman, S.; Wilkin, A. M.; Williams, L.; Witter, J. H.; Wojtusic, L.; Wright, T. J.; Yeh, V.; Young, B.; Zeana, C.; Zeh, J.; Savio, E.; Vacarezza, M.; Aagaard, B.; Aragon, E.; Arnaiz, J.; Dragsted, U.; Gey, D.; Grarup, J.; Hengge, U.; Herrero, P.; Jansson, P.; Jensen, B.; Jensen, K.; Juncher, H.; Lopez, P.; Lundgren, J.; Matthews, C.; Mollerup, D.; Reilev, S.; Tillmann, K.; Varea, S.; Angus, B.; Babiker, A.; Darbyshire, J.; Fleck, S.; Horton, J.; Hudson, F.; Moraes, Y.; Pacciarini, F.; Palfreeman, A.; Paton, N.; Smith, N.; Bebchuk, J.; Collins, G.; Denning, E.; Fosdick, L.; Herman-Lamin, K.; Neaton, J.; Quan, K.; Quan, S.; Thompson, G.; Wentworth, D.; Wyman, N.; Carey, C.; Chan, F.; Cooper, D.; Courtney-Rodgers, D.; Drummond, F.; Harrod, M.; Jacoby, S.; Kearney, L.; Law, M.; Lin, E.; Pett, S.; Robson, R.; Seneviratne, N.; Watts, E.; Sánchez, A.; Belloso, W.; Davey, R.; Pederson, C.; Modlin, J.; Beral, V.; Chaisson, R.; Fleming, T.; Hill, C.; Kim, K.; Murray, B.; Seligmann, M.; Weller, I.; Cahill, K.; Fox, L.; Luzar, M.; Martinez, A.; McNay, L.; Pierson, J.; Tierney, J.; Vogel, S.; Costas, V.; Eckstrand, J.; Abusamra, L.; Angel, E.; Benetucci, J.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Cahn, P.; Casiro, A.; Contarelli, J.; Corral, J.; David, D.; Dobrzanski, W.; Duran, A.; Ebenrstejin, J.; Ferrari, I.; Fridman, D.; Galache, V.; Ivalo, S.; Lanusse, I.; Laplume, H.; Lasala, M.; Lattes, R.; Lopardo, G.; Losso, M.; Lupo, S.; Marson, C.; Massera, L.; Moscatello, G.; Olivia, S.; Otegui, I.; Palacios, L.; Parlante, A.; Salomon, H.; Sanchez, M.; Suarez, C.; Tocci, M.; Toibaro, J.; Zala, C.; Agrawal, S.; Ambrose, P.; Anderson, C.; Baker, D.; Beileiter, K.; Blavius, K.; Bloch, M.; Boyle, M.; Bradford, D.; Britton, P.; Brown, P.; Busic, T.; Cain, A.; Carrall, L.; Carson, S.; Chenoweth, I.; Chuah, J.; Clark, F.; Clemons, J.; Clezy, K.; Cortissos, P.; Cunningham, N.; Curry, M.; Daly, L.; D'Arcy-Evans, C.; del Rosario, R.; Dinning, S.; Dobson, P.; Donohue, W.; Doong, N.; Downs, C.; Edwards, E.; Edwards, S.; Egan, C.; Ferguson, W.; Finlayson, R.; Forsdyke, C.; Foy, L.; Franic, T.; Frater, A.; French, M.; Gleeson, D.; Habel, P.; Haig, K.; Hardy, S.; Holland, R.; Hudson, J.; Hutchison, R.; Hyland, N.; James, R.; Johnston, C.; Kelly, M.; King, M.; Kunkel, K.; Lau, H.; Leamy, J.; Lester, D.; Lohmeyer, A.; Lowe, K.; MacRae, K.; Magness, C.; Martinez, O.; Maruszak, H.; Miller, S.; Murray, J.; Negus, P.; Newman, R.; Ngieng, M.; Nowlan, C.; Oddy, J.; Orford, N.; Patching, J.; Plummer, M.; Price, S.; Primrose, R.; Prone, I.; Ree, H.; Remington, C.; Richardson, R.; Robinson, S.; Rogers, G.; Roney, J.; Russell, D.; Ryan, S.; Sarangapany, J.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, K.; Shields, C.; Silberberg, C.; Shaw, D.; Skett, J.; Smith, D.; Soo, T. Meng; Sowden, D.; Street, A.; tee, B. Kiem; Thomson, Jl; Topaz, S.; Vale, R.; Villella, C.; Walker, A.; Watson, A.; Wendt, N.; Youds, D.; Cichon, P.; Gemeinhart, B.; Schmied, B.; Touzeau-Romer, V.; Colebunders, R.; DeRoo, A.; de Wit, S.; Angel, J.; Arsenault, M.; Bast, M.; Beckthold, B.; Bouchard, P.; Chabot, I.; Clarke, R.; Coté, P.; Gagne, C.; Gill, J.; Johnston, B.; Jubinville, N.; Lamoureux, N.; Latendre-Paquette, J.; Lindemulder, A.; McNeil, A.; Montaner, J.; Morrisseau, C.; O'Neill, R.; Page, G.; Pongracz, B.; Preziosi, H.; Puri, L.; Rachlis, A.; Ralph, E.; Rouleau, D.; Routy, J. P.; Seddon, T.; Shafran, S.; Sikora, C.; Stromberg, D.; Weiss, K.; Williams, K.; Baadegaard, B.; Andersen, Å Bengaard; Boedker, K.; Collins, P.; Gerstoft, J.; Jensen, L.; Moller, H.; Lehm Andersen, P.; Loftheim, I.; Mathiesen, L.; Obel, N.; Petersen, D.; Pors Jensen, L.; Trunk, F.; Aboulker, J. P.; Aouba, A.; Berthe, H.; Blanc, C.; Bornarel, D.; Boue, F.; Bouvet, E.; Brancon, C.; Breaud, S.; Brosseau, D.; Brunet, A.; Capitant, C.; Ceppi, C.; Chakvetadze, C.; Cheneau, C.; de Truchis, P.; Delavalle, A. M.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Dellamonica, P.; Dumont, C.; Edeb, N.; Fabre, G.; Ferrando, S.; Foltzer, A.; Foubert, V.; Gastaut, J. A.; Gerbe, J.; Goujard, C.; Honore, P.; Hue, H.; Hynh, T.; Jung, C.; Kahi, S.; Katlama, C.; Lang, J. M.; Le Baut, V.; Lefebvre, B.; Leturque, N.; Lévy, Y.; Loison, J.; Maddi, G.; Maignan, A.; Majerholc, C.; de Boever, C.; Meynard, J. L.; Michelet, C.; Michon, C.; Mole, M.; Netzer, E.; Pialoux, G.; Raffi, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Ravaux, I.; Reynes, J.; Salmon-Ceron, D.; Sebire, M.; Tegna, L.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Tramoni, C.; Viard, J. P.; Vidal, M.; Viet-Peaucelle, C.; Zeng, A.; Zucman, D.; Adam, A.; Arastéh, K.; Behrens, G.; Bickel, M.; Bittner, D.; Bogner, J.; Darrelmann, N.; Deja, M.; Doerler, M.; Faetkenheuer, G.; Fenske, S.; Gajetzki, S.; Goebel, F.; Gorriahn, D.; Harrer, E.; Harrer, T.; Hartl, H.; Heesch, S.; Jakob, W.; Jäger, H.; Kremer, G.; Ludwig, C.; Mantzsch, K.; Mauss, S.; Meurer, A.; Niedermeier, A.; Pittack, N.; Potthoff, A.; Probst, M.; Rittweger, M.; Rotty, J.; Rund, E.; Ruzicka, T.; Schmidt, Rt; Schmutz, G.; Schnaitmann, E.; Schuster, D.; Sehr, T.; Spaeth, B.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Stephan, C.; Stockey, T.; Trein, A.; Vaeth, T.; Vogel, M.; Wasmuth, J.; Wengenroth, C.; Wolf, E.; Mulcahy, F.; Reidy, D. l; Cohen, Y.; Drora, G.; Eliezer, I.; Godo, O.; Magen, E.; Mamorsky, M.; Vered, H.; Aiuti, F.; Bergamasco, A.; Bertelli, D.; Bruno, R.; Cagliuso, M.; Chrysoula, V.; Cologni, G.; Conti, V.; Costantini, A.; Gaiottino, F.; Filice, G.; Francesco, M.; Gianelli, E.; Graziella, C.; Martellotta, F.; Maserati, R.; Murdaca, G.; Puppo, F.; Pogliaghi, M.; Ripamonti, D.; Ronchetti, C.; Rusconi, S.; Sacchi, P.; Silvia, N.; Suter, F.; Uglietti, A.; Vechi, M.; Vergani, B.; Vichi, F.; Vitiello, P.; Iwamoto, A.; Kikuchi, Y.; Miyazaki, N.; Mori, M.; Nakamura, T.; Odawara, T.; Shirasaka, T.; Tabata, M.; Takano, M.; Ueta, C.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, Y.; Erradey, I.; Blok, W.; van Boxtel, R.; Brinkman H Doevelaar, K.; van Eeden, A.; Grijsen, M.; Groot, M.; Juttmann, J.; Kuipers, M.; Ligthart, S.; van der Meulen, P.; Lange, J.; Langebeek, N.; Reiss, P.; Richter, C.; Schoemaker, M.; Schrijnders-Gudde, L.; Septer-Bijleveld, E.; Sprenger, H.; Vermeulen, J.; ten Kate, R.; van de Ven, B.; Bruun, J.; Kvale, D.; Maeland, A.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Inglot, M.; Knysz, B.; Mularska, E.; Parczewski, M.; Pynka, M.; Rymer, W.; Szymczak, A.; de Salles Amorim, C.; Basso, C.; Flint, S.; Kallas, E.; Levi, G.; Lewi, D.; Pereira, L.; da Silva, M.; Souza, T.; Toscano, A.; Vaz Pinto, I.; Chia, E.; Foo, E.; Karim, F.; Lim, P. L.; Panchalingam, A.; Quek, A.; Alcázar-Caballero, R.; Arribas, J.; Arrizabalaga, J.; de Barron, X.; Blanco, F.; Bouza, E.; Bravo, I.; Calvo, S.; Carbonero, L.; Carpena, I.; Castro, M.; Cortes, L.; del Toro, M.; Domingo, P.; Elias, M.; Espinosa, J.; Estrada, V.; Fernandez-Cruz, E.; Fernández, P.; Freud, H.; Fuster, M.; Garcia, A.; Garcia, G.; Garrido, R.; Gijón, P.; Gonzalez-García, J.; Gil, I.; González-Lahoz, J.; López Grosso, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Guzmán, E.; Iribarren, J.; Jiménez, M.; Juega, J.; Lopez, J.; Lozano, F.; Martín-Carbonero, L.; Mateo, G.; Menasalvas, A.; Mirelles, C.; de Miguel Prieto, J.; Montes, M.; Moreno, A.; Moreno, J.; Moreno, V.; Muñoz, R.; Ocampo, A.; Ortega, E.; Ortiz, L.; Padilla, B.; Parras, A.; Paster, A.; Pedreira, J.; Peña, J.; Perea, R.; Portas, B.; Puig, J.; Rebollar, M.; de Rivera, J.; Roca, V.; Rodríguez- Arrondo, F.; Santos, J.; Sebastian, G.; Segovia, M.; Soriano, V.; Tamargo, L.; von Wichmann, M.; Bratt, G.; Hollander, A.; Olov Pehrson, P.; Petz, I.; Sandstrom, E.; Sönnerborg, A.; Gurtner, V.; Ampunpong, U.; Auchieng, C.; Bowonwatanuwong, C.; Chanchai, P.; Chuenyan, T.; Duncombe, C.; Horsakulthai, M.; Kantipong, P.; Laohajinda, K.; Pongsurachet, V.; Pradapmook, S.; Ruxruntham, K.; Seekaew, S.; Sonjai, A.; Suwanagool, S.; Techasathit, W.; Ubolyam, S.; Wankoon, J.; Alexander, I.; Dockrell, D.; Easterbrook, P.; Edwards, B.; Evans, E.; Fisher, M.; Gazzard, B.; Gilleran, G.; Hand, J.; Heald, L.; Higgs, C.; Jebakumar, S.; Jendrulek, I.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, S.; Kinghorn, G.; Kuldanek, K.; Murphy, M.; O'Farrell, S.; Ong, E.; Peters, B.; Stroud, C.; Wansbrough-Jones, M.; Weber, J.; White, D.; Williams, I.; Wiselka, M.; Yee, T.; Allegra, D.; Aneja, B.; Anstead, G.; Banks, S.; Baxter, J.; Baum, J.; Benator, D.; Black, D.; Boh, D.; Bonam, T.; Brito, M.; Burnside, A.; Casey, K.; Cason, L.; Clark, Cl; Clifford, D.; Couey, P.; Cuervo, H.; Deeks, S.; Dennis, M.; Dickerson, D.; Diez, M.; Di Puppo, J.; Dupre, D.; Elion, R.; El-Sadr, W.; Fabre, J.; Farrough, M.; Flamm, J.; Follansbee, S.; Foster, C.; Franz, J.; Frechette, G.; Freidland, G.; Frische, J.; Fuentes, L.; Funk, C.; Geisler, C.; Giles, M.; Goetz, M.; Gonzalez, M.; Graeber, C.; Grice, D.; Hahn, B.; Hamilton, C.; Hassler, S.; Henson, A.; Hopper, S.; Johnson, R.; Jones, R.; Kahn, J.; Kolber, M.; Koletar, S.; Larsen, R.; Lasseter, F.; Lederman, M.; Ling, T.; Lusch, T.; MacArthur, R.; Machado, C.; Makohon, L.; Mandelke, J.; Markowitz, N.; Martínez, M.; Mass, M.; Masur, H.; McGregor, D.; McIntyre, D.; McMullen, D.; Mettinger, M.; Middleton, S.; Mieras, J.; Mildvan, D.; Miller, P.; Miller, T.; Mitchell, V.; Mitsuyasu, R.; Moanna, A.; Mogridge, C.; Moran, F.; Murphy, R.; Ojeda, J.; Okhuysen, P.; Olson, M.; Pablovich, S.; Patel, S.; Poblete, R.; Potter, A.; Preston, E.; Rappoport, C.; Reyelt, M.; Riney, L.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rodriguez, J.; Rosmarin-DeStefano, C.; Rossen, W.; Rouff, J.; Saag, M.; Santiago, S.; Sarria, J.; Wirtz, S.; Schmidt, U.; Shin, A.; Shrader, S.; Simon, G.; Smith, K.; Spotkov, J.; Sprague, C.; States, D.; Suh, C.; Summers, K.; Sweeton, B.; Tan, V.; Tanner, T.; Tedaldi, E.; Thompson, M.; Toro, N.; Towner, W.; Upton, K.; Valenti, S.; Vita, J.; Voell, J.; Walker, J.; Walton, T.; Wason, K.; Wellons, A.; Weise, J.; Whitman, T.; Williams, B.; Williams, N.; Windham, J.; Witt, M.; Workowski, K.; Wortmann, G.; Wright, T.; Zelasky, C.; Zwickl, B.; Aldir, M.; Baptista, C.; da Conceicao Vera, J.; Raquel, C.; dos Santos, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background-In the general population, raised levels of inflammatory markers are stronger predictors of fatal than nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. People with HIV have elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and D-dimer; HIV-induced

  14. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-03-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with

  15. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance: updated case definitions of oral disease endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiboski, C H; Patton, L L; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Greenspan, D; Traboulsi, R S; Ghannoum, M; Jurevic, R; Phelan, J A; Reznik, D; Greenspan, J S

    2009-07-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) is part of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest HIV clinical trials organization in the world. Its main objective is to investigate oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS as the epidemic is evolving, in particular, the effects of antiretrovirals on oral mucosal lesion development and associated fungal and viral pathogens. The OHARA infrastructure comprises: the Epidemiologic Research Unit (at the University of California San Francisco), the Medical Mycology Unit (at Case Western Reserve University) and the Virology/Specimen Banking Unit (at the University of North Carolina). The team includes dentists, physicians, virologists, mycologists, immunologists, epidemiologists and statisticians. Observational studies and clinical trials are being implemented at ACTG-affiliated sites in the US and resource-poor countries. Many studies have shared end-points, which include oral diseases known to be associated with HIV/AIDS measured by trained and calibrated ACTG study nurses. In preparation for future protocols, we have updated existing diagnostic criteria of the oral manifestations of HIV published in 1992 and 1993. The proposed case definitions are designed to be used in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, in both US and resource-poor settings, where diagnoses may be made by non-dental healthcare providers. The objective of this article is to present updated case definitions for HIV-related oral diseases that will be used to measure standardized clinical end-points in OHARA studies, and that can be used by any investigator outside of OHARA/ACTG conducting clinical research that pertains to these end-points.

  16. Hiv/hbv, hiv/hcv and hiv/htlv-1 co infection among injecting drug user patients hospitalized at the infectious disease ward of a training hospital in iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Etemadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and risk factors for HBV, HCV and HTLV-I co-infection in the Iranian HIV positive Injecting Drug Users (IDU) patients admitted in hospital. Analyses were based on 154 male IDU patients admitted in Infectious disease ward of Razi Hospital, Ahwaz, Iran, from April 2001 to March 2003. All of them had been tested for HIV infection (Elisa-antibody and Western blot), HBV surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-1 antibody. One hundred and four patients (67.53%) were identified as HIV infected. Among HIV infected, HB surface antigen, HCV antibody and HTLV-I antibody were positive in 44.23% and 74.04% and 16.33% patients respectively. HCV/HBV/HIV and HCV/HBV/HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection were 20.20% and 8.65% respectively. Co-infection with HBV or HCV or HTLV-1 is common among hospitalized HIV-infected IDU patients in the region of study. HIV disease outcomes appear to be adversely affected by HBV/HCV/HTLV-I co-infection, so identification of these viral infections is recommended as routine tests for this population. (author)

  17. HIV incidence on the increase among homosexual men attending an Amsterdam sexually transmitted disease clinic: using a novel approach for detecting recent infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.; Spaargaren, Joke; Geskus, Ronald B.; Beijnen, Jos; Coutinho, Roel A.; Fennema, Han S. A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Dramatic increases have occurred in sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and in sexual risk behaviour among homosexual men in Amsterdam and internationally. We investigated whether these trends indicate a resurgence of the HIV epidemic. Methods: HIV incidence was determined among

  18. The association between HIV and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyle, Emily P; Mayosi, Bongani M; Middelkoop, Keren; Mosepele, Mosepele; Martey, Emily B; Walensky, Rochelle P; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Triant, Virginia A

    2017-12-15

    Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has confronted decades of the HIV epidemic with substantial improvements in access to life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Now, with improved survival, people living with HIV (PLWH) are at increased risk for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We assessed the existing literature regarding the association of CVD outcomes and HIV in SSA. We used the PRISMA guidelines to perform a systematic review of the published literature regarding the association of CVD and HIV in SSA with a focus on CVD surrogate and clinical outcomes in PLWH. From January 2000 until March 2017, 31 articles were published regarding CVD outcomes among PLWH in SSA. Data from surrogate CVD outcomes (n = 13) suggest an increased risk of CVD events among PLWH in SSA. Although acute coronary syndrome is reported infrequently in SSA among PLWH, limited data from five studies suggest extensive thrombus and hypercoagulability as contributing factors. Additional studies suggest an increased risk of stroke among PLWH (n = 13); however, most data are from immunosuppressed ART-naïve PLWH and thus are potentially confounded by the possibility of central nervous system infections. Given ongoing gaps in our current understanding of CVD and other NCDs in PLWH in SSA, it is imperative to ascertain the burden of CVD outcomes, and to examine strategies for intervention and best practices to enhance the health of this vulnerable population.

  19. [Problems and prospects of infectious diseases and HIV-infected military personnel register organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolekhan, V N; Zagorodnikov, G G; Gorichnyĭ, V A; Orlova, E S; Nikolaev, P G

    2014-08-01

    An analysis of regulatory documents of the Ministry of Healthcare and the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation related to HIV/AIDS prevention was carried out. The current system of HIV/AIDS detection and registration among military and civil personnel was assessed. Problems and prospects of scientific-and-research laboratory (the register of infectious disease pathology and HIV-infected military personnel) of Scientific-and-research centre at the Kirov Military medical academy were discussed. It is proposed that the main direction of the laboratory activity will be the restoration of up-to-date records of military personnel with HIV/AIDS. This activity will provide the necessary information to responsible specialists of the Main state sanitary and epidemiological surveillance centre and the Main military medical department of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation for the sanitary and epidemiological surveillance for purposeful and economically feasible management decisions in the field of military personnel infection diseases prevention.

  20. Real-Time PCR in HIV/Trypanosoma cruzi Coinfection with and without Chagas Disease Reactivation: Association with HIV Viral Load and CD4+ Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Vera Lúcia Teixeira; da Silva, Sheila Cristina Vicente; Sartori, Ana Marli; Bezerra, Rita Cristina; Westphalen, Elizabeth Visone Nunes; Molina, Tatiane Decaris; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Ibrahim, Karim Yaqub; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    Background Reactivation of chronic Chagas disease, which occurs in approximately 20% of patients coinfected with HIV/Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is commonly characterized by severe meningoencephalitis and myocarditis. The use of quantitative molecular tests to monitor Chagas disease reactivation was analyzed. Methodology Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of kDNA sequences, competitive (C-) PCR and real-time quantitative (q) PCR were compared with blood cultures and xenodiagnosis in samples from 91 patients (57 patients with chronic Chagas disease and 34 with HIV/T. cruzi coinfection), of whom 5 had reactivation of Chagas disease and 29 did not. Principal Findings qRT-PCR showed significant differences between groups; the highest parasitemia was observed in patients infected with HIV/T. cruzi with Chagas disease reactivation (median 1428.90 T. cruzi/mL), followed by patients with HIV/T. cruzi infection without reactivation (median 1.57 T. cruzi/mL) and patients with Chagas disease without HIV (median 0.00 T. cruzi/mL). Spearman's correlation coefficient showed that xenodiagnosis was correlated with blood culture, C-PCR and qRT-PCR. A stronger Spearman correlation index was found between C-PCR and qRT-PCR, the number of parasites and the HIV viral load, expressed as the number of CD4+ cells or the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Conclusions qRT-PCR distinguished the groups of HIV/T. cruzi coinfected patients with and without reactivation. Therefore, this new method of qRT-PCR is proposed as a tool for prospective studies to analyze the importance of parasitemia (persistent and/or increased) as a criterion for recommending pre-emptive therapy in patients with chronic Chagas disease with HIV infection or immunosuppression. As seen in this study, an increase in HIV viral load and decreases in the number of CD4+ cells/mm3 and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio were identified as cofactors for increased parasitemia that can be used to target the introduction of early, pre-emptive therapy. PMID

  1. Modeling screening, prevention, and delaying of Alzheimer's disease: an early-stage decision analytic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemers Eric R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD affects a growing proportion of the population each year. Novel therapies on the horizon may slow the progress of AD symptoms and avoid cases altogether. Initiating treatment for the underlying pathology of AD would ideally be based on biomarker screening tools identifying pre-symptomatic individuals. Early-stage modeling provides estimates of potential outcomes and informs policy development. Methods A time-to-event (TTE simulation provided estimates of screening asymptomatic patients in the general population age ≥55 and treatment impact on the number of patients reaching AD. Patients were followed from AD screen until all-cause death. Baseline sensitivity and specificity were 0.87 and 0.78, with treatment on positive screen. Treatment slowed progression by 50%. Events were scheduled using literature-based age-dependent incidences of AD and death. Results The base case results indicated increased AD free years (AD-FYs through delays in onset and a reduction of 20 AD cases per 1000 screened individuals. Patients completely avoiding AD accounted for 61% of the incremental AD-FYs gained. Total years of treatment per 1000 screened patients was 2,611. The number-needed-to-screen was 51 and the number-needed-to-treat was 12 to avoid one case of AD. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that duration of screening sensitivity and rescreen interval impact AD-FYs the most. A two-way sensitivity analysis found that for a test with an extended duration of sensitivity (15 years the number of AD cases avoided was 6,000-7,000 cases for a test with higher sensitivity and specificity (0.90,0.90. Conclusions This study yielded valuable parameter range estimates at an early stage in the study of screening for AD. Analysis identified duration of screening sensitivity as a key variable that may be unavailable from clinical trials.

  2. Modeling screening, prevention, and delaying of Alzheimer's disease: an early-stage decision analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furiak, Nicolas M; Klein, Robert W; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Siemers, Eric R; Sarpong, Eric; Klein, Timothy M

    2010-04-30

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) affects a growing proportion of the population each year. Novel therapies on the horizon may slow the progress of AD symptoms and avoid cases altogether. Initiating treatment for the underlying pathology of AD would ideally be based on biomarker screening tools identifying pre-symptomatic individuals. Early-stage modeling provides estimates of potential outcomes and informs policy development. A time-to-event (TTE) simulation provided estimates of screening asymptomatic patients in the general population age > or =55 and treatment impact on the number of patients reaching AD. Patients were followed from AD screen until all-cause death. Baseline sensitivity and specificity were 0.87 and 0.78, with treatment on positive screen. Treatment slowed progression by 50%. Events were scheduled using literature-based age-dependent incidences of AD and death. The base case results indicated increased AD free years (AD-FYs) through delays in onset and a reduction of 20 AD cases per 1000 screened individuals. Patients completely avoiding AD accounted for 61% of the incremental AD-FYs gained. Total years of treatment per 1000 screened patients was 2,611. The number-needed-to-screen was 51 and the number-needed-to-treat was 12 to avoid one case of AD. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that duration of screening sensitivity and rescreen interval impact AD-FYs the most. A two-way sensitivity analysis found that for a test with an extended duration of sensitivity (15 years) the number of AD cases avoided was 6,000-7,000 cases for a test with higher sensitivity and specificity (0.90,0.90). This study yielded valuable parameter range estimates at an early stage in the study of screening for AD. Analysis identified duration of screening sensitivity as a key variable that may be unavailable from clinical trials.

  3. Plasma Metabolomics Biosignature According to HIV Stage of Infection, Pace of Disease Progression, Viremia Level and Immunological Response to Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Scarpellini

    Full Text Available We evaluated plasma samples HIV-infected individuals with different phenotypic profile among five HIV-infected elite controllers and five rapid progressors after recent HIV infection and one year later and from 10 individuals subjected to antiretroviral therapy, five of whom were immunological non-responders (INR, before and after one year of antiretroviral treatment compared to 175 samples from HIV-negative patients. A targeted quantitative tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics approach was used in order to determine plasma metabolomics biosignature that may relate to HIV infection, pace of HIV disease progression, and immunological response to treatment.Twenty-five unique metabolites were identified, including five metabolites that could distinguish rapid progressors and INRs at baseline. Severe deregulation in acylcarnitine and sphingomyelin metabolism compatible with mitochondrial deficiencies was observed. β-oxidation and sphingosine-1-phosphate-phosphatase-1 activity were down-regulated, whereas acyl-alkyl-containing phosphatidylcholines and alkylglyceronephosphate synthase levels were elevated in INRs. Evidence that elite controllers harbor an inborn error of metabolism (late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency [MADD] was detected.Blood-based markers from metabolomics show a very high accuracy of discriminating HIV infection between varieties of controls and have the ability to predict rapid disease progression or poor antiretroviral immunological response. These metabolites can be used as biomarkers of HIV natural evolution or treatment response and provide insight into the mechanisms of the disease.

  4. Plasma Metabolomics Biosignature According to HIV Stage of Infection, Pace of Disease Progression, Viremia Level and Immunological Response to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpellini, Bruno; Zanoni, Michelle; Sucupira, Maria Cecilia Araripe; Truong, Hong-Ha M; Janini, Luiz Mario Ramos; Segurado, Ismael Dale Cotrin; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated plasma samples HIV-infected individuals with different phenotypic profile among five HIV-infected elite controllers and five rapid progressors after recent HIV infection and one year later and from 10 individuals subjected to antiretroviral therapy, five of whom were immunological non-responders (INR), before and after one year of antiretroviral treatment compared to 175 samples from HIV-negative patients. A targeted quantitative tandem mass spectrometry metabolomics approach was used in order to determine plasma metabolomics biosignature that may relate to HIV infection, pace of HIV disease progression, and immunological response to treatment. Twenty-five unique metabolites were identified, including five metabolites that could distinguish rapid progressors and INRs at baseline. Severe deregulation in acylcarnitine and sphingomyelin metabolism compatible with mitochondrial deficiencies was observed. β-oxidation and sphingosine-1-phosphate-phosphatase-1 activity were down-regulated, whereas acyl-alkyl-containing phosphatidylcholines and alkylglyceronephosphate synthase levels were elevated in INRs. Evidence that elite controllers harbor an inborn error of metabolism (late-onset multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency [MADD]) was detected. Blood-based markers from metabolomics show a very high accuracy of discriminating HIV infection between varieties of controls and have the ability to predict rapid disease progression or poor antiretroviral immunological response. These metabolites can be used as biomarkers of HIV natural evolution or treatment response and provide insight into the mechanisms of the disease.

  5. Mobile phone applications for the care and prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Pike, Emily C; Legrand, Sara; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2013-01-04

    Mobile phone applications (apps) provide a new platform for delivering tailored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention and care. To identify and evaluate currently available mobile phone apps related to the prevention and care of HIV and other STDs. We searched the Apple iTunes and Android Google Play stores for HIV/STD-related apps, excluding apps that exclusively targeted industry, providers, and researchers. Each eligible app was downloaded, tested, and assessed for user ratings and functionality as well as 6 broad content areas of HIV prevention and care: HIV/STD disease knowledge, risk reduction/safer sex, condom promotion, HIV/STD testing information, resources for HIV-positive persons, and focus on key populations. Search queries up to May 2012 identified 1937 apps. Of these, 55 unique apps met the inclusion criteria (12 for Android, 29 for iPhone, and 14 for both platforms). Among these apps, 71% provided disease information about HIV/STDs, 36% provided HIV/STD testing information or resources, 29% included information about condom use or assistance locating condoms, and 24% promoted safer sex. Only 6 apps (11%) covered all 4 of these prevention areas. Eight apps (15%) provided tools or resources specifically for HIV/STD positive persons. Ten apps included information for a range of sexual orientations, 9 apps appeared to be designed for racially/ethnically diverse audiences, and 15 apps featured interactive components. Apps were infrequently downloaded (median 100-500 downloads) and not highly rated (average customer rating 3.7 out of 5 stars). Most available HIV/STD apps have failed to attract user attention and positive reviews. Public health practitioners should work with app developers to incorporate elements of evidence-based interventions for risk reduction and improve app inclusiveness and interactivity.

  6. Increased Sensitivity to Binge Alcohol-Induced Gut Leakiness and Inflammatory Liver Disease in HIV Transgenic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atrayee Banerjee

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of alcohol-mediated advanced liver injury in HIV-infected individuals are poorly understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effect of binge alcohol on the inflammatory liver disease in HIV transgenic rats as a model for simulating human conditions. Female wild-type (WT or HIV transgenic rats were treated with three consecutive doses of binge ethanol (EtOH (3.5 g/kg/dose oral gavages at 12-h intervals or dextrose (Control. Blood and liver tissues were collected at 1 or 6-h following the last dose of ethanol or dextrose for the measurements of serum endotoxin and liver pathology, respectively. Compared to the WT, the HIV rats showed increased sensitivity to alcohol-mediated gut leakiness, hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evidenced with the significantly elevated levels of serum endotoxin, hepatic triglycerides, histological fat accumulation and F4/80 staining. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that hepatic levels of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4, leptin and the downstream target monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 were significantly up-regulated in the HIV-EtOH rats, compared to all other groups. Subsequent experiments with primary cultured cells showed that both hepatocytes and hepatic Kupffer cells were the sources of the elevated MCP-1 in HIV-EtOH rats. Further, TLR4 and MCP-1 were found to be upregulated by leptin. Collectively, these results show that HIV rats, similar to HIV-infected people being treated with the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART, are more susceptible to binge alcohol-induced gut leakiness and inflammatory liver disease than the corresponding WT, possibly due to additive or synergistic interaction between binge alcohol exposure and HIV infection. Based on these results, HIV transgenic rats can be used as a surrogate model to study the molecular mechanisms of many disease states caused by heavy alcohol intake in HIV-infected people on HAART.

  7. Low prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in a cross-sectional study of Danish HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Malmberg, Catarina Anna Evelina; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    . However, controversies exist on the prevalence of PAD among HIV-infected patients. In this study we aimed to measure the prevalence of PAD among HIV-infected patients and compare the ABI with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and other known CVD risk predictors. METHODS: We prospectively included HIV......BACKGROUND: Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a well-established screening tool for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and future cardiovascular events in the general population....... In contrast, a strong correlation was found between cIMT and traditional risk factors. Values of post-exercise ABI and cIMT were not correlated. The current ART did not influence ABI values. CONCLUSIONS: We found a low prevalence of PAD in HIV-infected patients. ABI did not correlate with CVD risk factors...

  8. Delayed follow-up in patients with diabetic retinopathy in South India: Social factors and impact on disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natrajan Vengadesan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify social factors associated with delayed follow-up in South Indian patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR and to study DR progression during the delayed follow-up period. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 500 consecutive patients with DR returning after greater than twice the advised follow-up period were identified from a tertiary referral center in South India. A previously validated 19-item questionnaire was administered to study patients to assess causes for the follow-up delay. Patient demographics, DR status, and treatment plan were recorded at the study visit and the visit immediately before the delay. The eye with the most severe disease was included in the analysis. Results: Complete data were available for 491 (98.2% patients. Among these, 248 (50.5% cited “my eyes were okay at the time,” 201 (41.0% cited “no attender to accompany me,” and 190 (38.6% cited “financial cost” as causes of the follow-up delay. Those with vision-threatening DR (VTDR, n = 233 predominantly reported “financial cost” (47% vs. 32%, P= 0.001, whereas those with non-VTDR more frequently reported “my eyes were okay at the time” (58% vs. 42%, P= 0.001. Evidence of disease progression from non-VTDR to VTDR was seen in 67 (26% patients. Almost 1/3rd (29% of patients who were previously advised regular examination required additional intervention. Conclusion: Many patient-level factors affect poor compliance with follow-up in DR, and these factors vary by disease severity. Targeting these barriers to care through patient education and clinic procedures may promote timely follow-up and better outcomes in these patients.

  9. Activation and coagulation biomarkers are independent predictors of the development of opportunistic disease in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodger, Alison J; Fox, Zoe; Lundgren, Jens

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Activation and coagulation biomarkers were measured within the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) trial. Their associations with opportunistic disease (OD) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients were examined. METHODS: Inflammatory (high-sensi...

  10. Activation delay-induced mechanical dyssynchrony in single-ventricle heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsha, Daniel; Risum, Niels; Barker, Piers

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of an infant with a single functional ventricle who developed ventricular dysfunction and heart failure due to an electrical activation delay and dyssynchrony. Earlier recognition of this potentially reversible aetiology may have changed her poor outcome.......We present the case of an infant with a single functional ventricle who developed ventricular dysfunction and heart failure due to an electrical activation delay and dyssynchrony. Earlier recognition of this potentially reversible aetiology may have changed her poor outcome....

  11. Dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk profiles of patients attending an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou DT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Danai Tavonga Zhou,1,2 Vitaris Kodogo,1 Kudzai Fortunate Vongai Chokuona,1 Exnevia Gomo,1 Olav Oektedalen,3 Babill Stray-Pedersen21Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Zimbabwe; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: The chronic inflammation induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD in HIV-infected individuals. HIV-infected patients generally benefit from being treated with antiretroviral drugs, but some antiretroviral agents have side effects, such as dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. There is general consensus that antiretroviral drugs induce a long-term risk of CHD, although the levels of that risk are somewhat controversial. The intention of this cross-sectional study was to describe the lipid profile and the long-term risk of CHD among HIV-positive outpatients at an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. Two hundred and fifteen patients were investigated (females n=165, mean age 39.8 years; males n=50; mean age 42.0 years. Thirty of the individuals were antiretroviral-naïve and 185 had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART for a mean 3.9±3.4 years. All participants had average lipid and glucose values within normal ranges, but there was a small difference between the ART and ART- for total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein (HDL.Those on a combination of D4T or ZDV/NVP/3TC and PI-based ART were on average oldest and had the highest TC levels. Framingham risk showed 1.4% prevalence of high CHD risk within the next ten years. After univariate analysis age, sex, TC/HDL ratio, HDL, economic earnings and systolic BP were associated with medium to high risk of CHD. After multivariate regression analysis and adjusting for age or sex only age, sex and economic earnings

  12. [Causes of lymphocytic meningitis in people with HIV admitted to the Infectious Disease department of Conakry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, F A; Cissoko, Y; Tounkara, T M; Sako, F B; Mouelle, A D; Kpami, D O; Traoré, M; Doumbouya, M

    2015-01-01

    The advent of HIV infection has significantly changed the distribution of the causes of lymphocytic meningitis. The objective of this study was to identify these causes among persons with HIV hospitalized in the infectious disease department of the CHU of Conakry. This retrospective study examined hospital records of patients with HIV infection admitted for lymphocytic meningitis over a 10-year period. Of the 8649 hospitalizations in the department during the study period, 3167 patients had HIV infection, and 85 of the latter were diagnosed with lymphocytic meningitis. Slightly more than half were male (sex ratio M/F = 1.1). Their mean age was 32 years. Of these 85 patients, 73 were positive for HIV-1 only and 12 for HIV1+2. A CD4 count was performed only in 13/85 patients and averaged 140 cells/mm3. The main causes associated with lymphocytic meningitis were cryptococcosis (58%), toxoplasmosis (5%), and tuberculosis (2%). Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Hæmophilus influenzae were also identified in 16% of cases. In 18% of cases no microbe was identified. The overall lethality rate was 68%; it reached 100% for tuberculous meningitis and for the cases without any identified cause and was 75%-76% for the patients with toxoplasmosis and cryptococcosis. The survival rate was 100% for all bacterial causes. A cause for lymphocytic meningitis was identified in more than 81% of the patients in our series, and the most common microbe was Cryptococcus neoformans. A better microbiological technical platform and improved accessibility to treatment would enable us to provide more relevant results and treatment.

  13. Access and management of HIV-related diseases in resource-constrained settings: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimba, Eao; Yengopal, V; Joshua, E; Thavarajah, R; Balasundaram, S

    2016-04-01

    With advancement of medical interventions, the lifespan of people living with HIV has increased globally. However, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) which bear the greatest burden of the HIV pandemic face a constant challenge in addressing the treatment needs of immune-suppressed patients. An analysis of the current management protocols and access to medication in resource-poor settings was conducted at this workshop, with emphasis on the situation in resource-poor settings. The participants developed a consensus document based on the need to respond to the constantly changing HIV pandemic. Provision of oral health care must be guided by interconnecting principles based on population based strategies that address upstream determinants of health. Basic oral health coverage in developing countries can only be realized with a strong foundation at the primary health level. Early diagnosis of HIV-related comorbidities including the adverse effects of ARVs is essential for the improvement of treatment outcomes. Standardization of oral health care delivery mechanisms will facilitate evaluation at national and regional levels. Oral health care workers have a moral obligation to participate in sustained campaigns to reduce the social stigma associated with HIV/AIDS in their work places at every stage of the referral chain. Future research also needs to realign itself towards prevention using the common risk factor approach, which has a broader impact on non-communicable diseases, which are increasingly affecting patients with HIV/AIDS as their life expectancies increase. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cortical Brain Atrophy and Intra-Individual Variability in Neuropsychological Test Performance in HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    HINES, Lindsay J.; MILLER, Eric N.; HINKIN, Charles H.; ALGER, Jeffery R.; BARKER, Peter; GOODKIN, Karl; MARTIN, Eileen M.; MARUCA, Victoria; RAGIN, Ann; SACKTOR, Ned; SANDERS, Joanne; SELNES, Ola; BECKER, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the relationship between dispersion-based intra-individual variability (IIVd) in neuropsychological test performance and brain volume among HIV seropositive and seronegative men and to determine the effects of cardiovascular risk and HIV infection on this relationship. Methods Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to acquire high-resolution neuroanatomic data from 147 men age 50 and over, including 80 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 67 seronegative controls (HIV−) in this cross-sectional cohort study. Voxel Based Morphometry was used to derive volumetric measurements at the level of the individual voxel. These brain structure maps were analyzed using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2). IIVd was measured by computing intra-individual standard deviations (ISD’s) from the standardized performance scores of five neuropsychological tests: Wechsler Memory Scale-III Visual Reproduction I and II, Logical Memory I and II, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III Letter Number Sequencing. Results Total gray matter (GM) volume was inversely associated with IIVd. Among all subjects, IIVd -related GM atrophy was observed primarily in: 1) the inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, the left inferior temporal gyrus extending to the supramarginal gyrus, spanning the lateral sulcus; 2) the right superior parietal lobule and intraparietal sulcus; and, 3) dorsal/ventral regions of the posterior section of the transverse temporal gyrus. HIV status, biological, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) variables were not linked to IIVd -related GM atrophy. Conclusions IIVd in neuropsychological test performance may be a sensitive marker of cortical integrity in older adults, regardless of HIV infection status or CVD risk factors, and degree of intra-individual variability links with volume loss in specific cortical regions; independent of mean-level performance on neuropsychological tests. PMID:26303224

  15. Speech and Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OTC Relief for Diarrhea Home Diseases and Conditions Speech and Language Delay Condition Speech and Language Delay Share Print Table of Contents1. ... Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is a speech and language delay? A speech and language delay ...

  16. Role of T. cruzi exposure in the pattern of T cell cytokines among chronically infected HIV and Chagas disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Regina Tozetto-Mendoza

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The impact of Chagas disease (CD in HIV-infected patients is relevant throughout the world. In fact, the characterization of the adaptive immune response in the context of co-infection is important for predicting the need for interventions in areas in which HIV and Chagas disease co-exist. METHODS: We described and compared the frequency of cytokine-producing T cells stimulated with soluble antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi using a cytometric assay for the following groups: individuals with chronic Chagas disease (CHR, n=10, those with Chagas disease and HIV infection (CO, n=11, those with only HIV (HIV, n=14 and healthy individuals (C, n=15. RESULTS: We found 1 a constitutively lower frequency of IL-2+ and IFN-γ+ T cells in the CHR group compared with the HIV, CO and healthy groups; 2 a suppressive activity of soluble T. cruzi antigen, which down-regulated IL-2+CD4+ and IFN-γ+CD4+ phenotypes, notably in the healthy group; 3 a down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines on CD8+ T cells in the indeterminate form of Chagas disease; and 4 a significant increase in IL-10+CD8+ cells distinguishing the indeterminate form from the cardiac/digestive form of Chagas disease, even in the presence of HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our data suggest the presence of an immunoregulatory response in chronic Chagas disease, which seems to be driven by T. cruzi antigens. Our findings provide new insights into immunotherapeutic strategies for people living with HIV/AIDS and Chagas disease.

  17. A mathematical model for the control of carrier-dependent infectious diseases with direct transmission and time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, A.K.; Mishra, S.N.; Pathak, A.L.; Srivastava, P.K.; Chandra, Peeyush

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a non-linear delay mathematical model for the control of carrier-dependent infectious diseases through insecticides is proposed and analyzed. In the modeling process, it is assumed that disease spreads due to direct contact between susceptibles and infectives as well as through carriers (indirect contact). Further, it is assumed that insecticides are used to kill carriers and the rate of introduction of insecticides is proportional to the density of carriers with some time lag. The model analysis suggests that as delay in using insecticides exceeds some critical value, the system loses its stability and Hopf-bifurcation occurs. The direction, stability and period of the bifurcating periodic solutions arising through Hopf-bifurcation are also analyzed using normal form concept and center manifold theory. Numerical simulation is carried out to confirm the obtained analytical results

  18. Biomedical Risk, Psychosocial Influences, and Developmental Outcomes: Lessons from the Pediatric HIV Population in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, Robert; Marfo, Kofi; Abubakar, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is home to millions of HIV-affected children. These children are likely to experience multiple developmental delays. In this chapter, I present data highlighting compromised neurobehavioral, mental health, and scholastic outcomes for children affected by HIV. Furthermore, I discuss biomedical factors (e.g., disease severity and…

  19. Research protocol for an epidemiological study on estimating disease burden of pediatric HIV in Belgaum district, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Sinha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric HIV is poised to become a major public health problem in India with the rising trend of HIV infection in pregnant women (Department of AIDS Control, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, http://www.naco.gov.in. There is lack of information on the epidemiology of pediatric HIV infection in India. Existing surveillance systems tend to underestimate the Pediatric burden. The overall aim of the present study is to estimate the disease burden of pediatric HIV among children in Belgaum district in the state of Karnataka in Southern India. An innovative multipronged epidemiological approach to comb the district is proposed. Methods The primary objectives of the study would be attained under three strategies. A prospective cohort design for objective (i to determine the incidence rate of HIV by early case detection in infants and toddlers (0–18 months born to HIV infected pregnant women; and cross sectional design for objectives (ii to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in children (0–14 years of HIV infected parents and (iii to determine the prevalence of HIV in sick children (0–14 years presenting with suspected signs and symptoms using age specific criteria for screening. Burden of pediatric HIV will be calculated as a product of cases detected in each strategy multiplied by a net inflation factor for each strategy. Study participants (i (ii (iii: HIV infected pregnant women and their live born children (ii Any HIV-infected man/woman, of age 18–49 years, having a biological child of age 0–14 years (iii Sick children of age 0–14 years presenting with suspected signs and symptoms and satisfying age-specific criteria for screening. Setting and conduct: Belgaum district which is a Category ‘A’ district (with more than 1 % antenatal prevalence in the district over the last 3 years before the study. Age-appropriate testing is used to detect HIV infection. Discussion There is a need to strengthen

  20. Research protocol for an epidemiological study on estimating disease burden of pediatric HIV in Belgaum district, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Anju; Nath, Anita; Sethumadhavan, Rajeev; Isac, Shajy; Washington, Reynold

    2016-05-26

    Pediatric HIV is poised to become a major public health problem in India with the rising trend of HIV infection in pregnant women (Department of AIDS Control, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, http://www.naco.gov.in). There is lack of information on the epidemiology of pediatric HIV infection in India. Existing surveillance systems tend to underestimate the Pediatric burden. The overall aim of the present study is to estimate the disease burden of pediatric HIV among children in Belgaum district in the state of Karnataka in Southern India. An innovative multipronged epidemiological approach to comb the district is proposed. The primary objectives of the study would be attained under three strategies. A prospective cohort design for objective (i) to determine the incidence rate of HIV by early case detection in infants and toddlers (0-18 months) born to HIV infected pregnant women; and cross sectional design for objectives (ii) to determine the prevalence of HIV infection in children (0-14 years) of HIV infected parents and (iii) to determine the prevalence of HIV in sick children (0-14 years) presenting with suspected signs and symptoms using age specific criteria for screening. Burden of pediatric HIV will be calculated as a product of cases detected in each strategy multiplied by a net inflation factor for each strategy. Study participants (i) (ii) (iii): HIV infected pregnant women and their live born children (ii) Any HIV-infected man/woman, of age 18-49 years, having a biological child of age 0-14 years (iii) Sick children of age 0-14 years presenting with suspected signs and symptoms and satisfying age-specific criteria for screening. Setting and conduct: Belgaum district which is a Category 'A' district (with more than 1 % antenatal prevalence in the district over the last 3 years before the study). Age-appropriate testing is used to detect HIV infection. There is a need to strengthen existing pediatric HIV estimation methods in India and other

  1. Severe rickets in a young girl caused by celiac disease: the tragedy of delayed diagnosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharafi, Butheinah A; Al-Imad, Shafiq A; Shamshair, Amani M; Al-Faqeeh, Derhim H

    2014-10-08

    Celiac disease is a systemic immune mediated disease which usually presents with gastrointestinal symptoms, but it may present with extra gastrointestinal manifestations such as metabolic bone disease and failure to thrive. This may lead to a delay in the diagnosis. We present a 13 year old female from the middle east with an 8 year history of severe rickets causing multiple bone deformities leaving the child crippled with bowing of both of her arms and legs. The patient was also found to have growth failure, anemia and on further workup she was found to have celiac disease. We are presenting this case because it shows a severe case of rickets after malabsorption for many years. Celiac disease should be kept in mind as a cause of rickets in patients not responding to usual forms of treatment or when associated with other manifestations of malabsorption.

  2. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Coinfection and Concurrent Diseases Core: Canadian guidelines for management and treatment of HIV/hepatitis C coinfection in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Mark; Klein, Marina; Shafran, Stephen; Tseng, Alice; Giguère, Pierre; Côté, Pierre; Poliquin, Marc; Cooper, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection occurs in 20% to 30% of Canadians living with HIV, and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. HIV-HCV management is more complex due to the accelerated progression of liver disease, the timing and nature of antiretroviral and HCV therapy, mental health and addictions management, socioeconomic obstacles and drug-drug interactions between new HCV direct-acting antiviral therapies and antiretroviral regimens. OBJECTIVE: To develop national standards for the management of HCV-HIV coinfected adults in the Canadian context. METHODS: A panel with specific clinical expertise in HIV-HCV co-infection was convened by The CIHR HIV Trials Network to review current literature, existing guidelines and protocols. Following broad solicitation for input, consensus recommendations were approved by the working group, and were characterized using a Class (benefit verses harm) and Level (strength of certainty) quality-of-evidence scale. RESULTS: All HIV-HCV coinfected individuals should be assessed for HCV therapy. Individuals unable to initiate HCV therapy should initiate antiretroviral therapy to slow liver disease progression. Standard of care for genotype 1 is pegylated interferon and weight-based ribavirin dosing plus an HCV protease inhibitor; traditional dual therapy for 24 weeks (for genotype 2/3 with virological clearance at week 4); or 48 weeks (for genotypes 2–6). Therapy deferral for individuals with mild liver disease may be considered. HIV should not be considered a barrier to liver transplantation in coinfected patients. DISCUSSION: Recommendations may not supersede individual clinical judgement. PMID:24489565

  3. (3)He pO2 mapping is limited by delayed-ventilation and diffusion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Parra-Robles, Juan; Deppe, Martin H; Lipson, David A; Lawson, Rod; Wild, Jim M

    2014-03-01

    Lung pO2 mapping with (3)He MRI assumes that the sources of signal decay with time during a breath-hold are radiofrequency depolarization and oxygen-dependent T1 relaxation, but the method is sensitive to other sources of spatio-temporal signal change such as diffusion. The purpose of this work was to assess the use of (3)He pO2 mapping in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ten patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were scanned with a 3D single breath-hold pO2 mapping sequence. Images showed signal increasing over time in some lung regions due to delayed ventilation during breath-hold. Regions of physically unrealistic negative pO2 values were seen in all patients, and regional mean pO2 values of -0.3 bar were measured in the two patients most affected by delayed ventilation (where mean time to signal onset was 3-4 s). Movement of gas within the lungs during breath-hold causes regional changes in signal over time that are not related to oxygen concentration, leading to erroneous pO2 measurements using the linear oxygen-dependent signal decay model. These spatio-temporal sources of signal change cannot be reliably separated at present, making pO2 mapping using this methodology unreliable in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with significant bullous emphysema or delayed ventilation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. HIV-1 Promoter Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Are Associated with Clinical Disease Severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Nonnemacher

    Full Text Available The large majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 markers of disease progression/severity previously identified have been associated with alterations in host genetic and immune responses, with few studies focused on viral genetic markers correlate with changes in disease severity. This study presents a cross-sectional/longitudinal study of HIV-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs contained within the viral promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR in patients within the Drexel Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES Cohort. HIV-1 LTR SNPs were found to associate with the classical clinical disease parameters CD4+ T-cell count and log viral load. They were found in both defined and undefined transcription factor binding sites of the LTR. A novel SNP identified at position 108 in a known COUP (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter/AP1 transcription factor binding site was significantly correlated with binding phenotypes that are potentially the underlying cause of the associated clinical outcome (increase in viral load and decrease in CD4+ T-cell count.

  5. Cross sectional analysis of respiratory symptoms in an injection drug user cohort: the impact of obstructive lung disease and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Shruti H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injection drug use is associated with an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and with obstructive lung diseases (OLD. Understanding how HIV and OLD may impact respiratory symptoms among injection drug users (IDUs is important to adequately care for this high-risk population. We characterized the independent and joint effects of HIV and OLD on respiratory symptoms of a cohort of inner-city IDUs. Methods Demographics, risk behavior and spirometric measurements were collected from a cross-sectional analysis of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Link to the IntraVenous Experience study, an observational cohort of IDUs followed in Baltimore, MD since 1988. Participants completed a modified American Thoracic Society respiratory questionnaire and the Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea score to assess respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, wheezing and dyspnea. Results Of 974 participants, 835 (86% were current smokers and 288 (29.6% were HIV-infected. The prevalence of OLD (FEV1/FVC ≤ 0.70 was 15.5%, and did not differ by HIV status. OLD, but not HIV, was associated with increased frequency of reported respiratory symptoms. There was a combined effect of OLD and HIV on worsening of MRC scores. OLD and HIV were independently associated with an increased odds of reporting an MRC ≥ 2 (OR 1.83 [95%CI 1.23-2.73] and 1.50 [95%CI 1.08-2.09], respectively. COPD, but not HIV, was independently associated with reporting an MRC ≥ 3 (OR 2.25 [95%CI 1.43-3.54] and 1.29 [95%CI 0.87-1.91], respectively. Conclusions While HIV does not worsen cough, phlegm or wheezing, HIV significantly increases moderate but not severe dyspnea in individuals of similar OLD status. Incorporating the MRC score into routine evaluation of IDUs at risk for OLD and HIV provides better assessment than cough, phlegm and wheezing alone.

  6. Delayed lung scintigraphy with N-isopropyl-I-123-p-iodoamphetamine in lung cancer and inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Takada, Yoshiki and others

    1989-01-01

    Lung studies with N-Isopropyl-I-123-p-Iodoamphetamine (IMP) were performed on patients with lung cancer or inflammatory disease. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of the delayed scintigraphy. The subjects consisted of 27 patients with lung cancer (34 lesions), 3 with radiation pneumonitis, 2 with interstitial pneumonitis, 2 with old tuberculous lesion (tuberculomas), 1 with diffuse panbronchiolitis, 1 with pneumonia and 1 with lung abscess. The delayed scintigraphy was performed 24 hr after intravenous injection of 3 mCi IMP, in sitting position. In 10 patients, SPECT images were obtained following the delayed scintigraphy. Delayed scintigraphic appearances of lung cancer were classified into 5 types, high IMP uptake in the area congruent with the lesion of atelectasis and/or obstructive pneumonia (Type I), high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type II), a defect in the area consistent with the tumor and no high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type III), high IMP uptake in the area almost congruent with the tumor (Type IV) and no significant change (Type V). Excluding 10 lesions with Type IV or V, no IMP uptake was seen in the areas congruent with the tumors. Type II was the most frequently observed pattern. Normal scintigrams (Type V) were observed in 8 lesions, whose sizes were fairly small. There was no definite trend caused by difference in histological types of cancers. In 8 patients with viable inflammatory disease of the lung, the delayed scintigrams showed high IMP uptake in the areas congruent with the abnormalities on chest roentgenograms. On the other hand, no uptake was seen in the old tuberculous lesions. (J.P.N.).

  7. Delayed lung scintigraphy with N-isopropyl-I-123-p-iodoamphetamine in lung cancer and inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Takada, Yoshiki

    1989-01-01

    Lung studies with N-Isopropyl-I-123-p-Iodoamphetamine (IMP) were performed on patients with lung cancer or inflammatory disease. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of the delayed scintigraphy. The subjects consisted of 27 patients with lung cancer (34 lesions), 3 with radiation pneumonitis, 2 with interstitial pneumonitis, 2 with old tuberculous lesion (tuberculomas), 1 with diffuse panbronchiolitis, 1 with pneumonia and 1 with lung abscess. The delayed scintigraphy was performed 24 hr after intravenous injection of 3 mCi IMP, in sitting position. In 10 patients, SPECT images were obtained following the delayed scintigraphy. Delayed scintigraphic appearances of lung cancer were classified into 5 types, high IMP uptake in the area congruent with the lesion of atelectasis and/or obstructive pneumonia (Type I), high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type II), a defect in the area consistent with the tumor and no high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type III), high IMP uptake in the area almost congruent with the tumor (Type IV) and no significant change (Type V). Excluding 10 lesions with Type IV or V, no IMP uptake was seen in the areas congruent with the tumors. Type II was the most frequently observed pattern. Normal scintigrams (Type V) were observed in 8 lesions, whose sizes were fairly small. There was no definite trend caused by difference in histological types of cancers. In 8 patients with viable inflammatory disease of the lung, the delayed scintigrams showed high IMP uptake in the areas congruent with the abnormalities on chest roentgenograms. On the other hand, no uptake was seen in the old tuberculous lesions. (J.P.N.)

  8. Global burden of disease of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: an updated analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasingham, Radha; Smith, Rachel M; Park, Benjamin J; Jarvis, Joseph N; Govender, Nelesh P; Chiller, Tom M; Denning, David W; Loyse, Angela; Boulware, David R

    2018-01-01

    Summary Background Cryptococcus is the most common cause of meningitis in adults living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Global burden estimates are crucial to guide prevention strategies and to determine treatment needs, and we aimed to provide an updated estimate of global incidence of HIV-associated cryptococcal disease. Methods We used 2014 Joint UN Programme on HIV and AIDS estimates of adults (aged >15 years) with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage. Estimates of CD4 less than 100 cells per µL, virological failure incidence, and loss to follow-up were from published multinational cohorts in low-income and middle-income countries. We calculated those at risk for cryptococcal infection, specifically those with CD4 less than 100 cells/µL not on ART, and those with CD4 less than 100 cells per µL on ART but lost to follow-up or with virological failure. Cryptococcal antigenaemia prevalence by country was derived from 46 studies globally. Based on cryptococcal antigenaemia prevalence in each country and region, we estimated the annual numbers of people who are developing and dying from cryptococcal meningitis. Findings We estimated an average global cryptococcal antigenaemia prevalence of 6·0% (95% CI 5·8–6·2) among people with a CD4 cell count of less than 100 cells per µL, with 278 000 (95% CI 195 500–340 600) people positive for cryptococcal antigen globally and 223 100 (95% CI 150 600–282 400) incident cases of cryptococcal meningitis globally in 2014. Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 73% of the estimated cryptococcal meningitis cases in 2014 (162 500 cases [95% CI 113 600–193 900]). Annual global deaths from cryptococcal meningitis were estimated at 181 100 (95% CI 119 400–234 300), with 135 900 (75%; [95% CI 93 900–163 900]) deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Globally, cryptococcal meningitis was responsible for 15% of AIDS-related deaths (95% CI 10–19). Interpretation Our analysis highlights the substantial ongoing burden of HIV

  9. Characterization of LEDGF/p75 genetic variants and association with HIV-1 disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Messiaen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 is an important co-factor involved in HIV-1 integration, the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction is a promising target for the new class of allosteric HIV integrase inhibitors (LEDGINs. Few data are available on the genetic variability of LEDGF/p75 and the influence on HIV disease in vivo. This study evaluated the relation between LEDGF/p75 genetic variation, mRNA expression and HIV-1 disease progression in order to guide future clinical use of LEDGINs. METHODS: Samples were derived from a therapy-naïve cohort at Ghent University Hospital and a Spanish long-term-non-progressor cohort. High-resolution melting curve analysis and Sanger sequencing were used to identify all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region, flanking intronic regions and full 3'UTR of LEDGF/p75. In addition, two intronic tagSNPs were screened based on previous indication of influencing HIV disease. LEDGF/p75 mRNA was quantified in patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using RT-qPCR. RESULTS: 325 samples were investigated from patients of Caucasian (n = 291 and African (n = 34 origin, including Elite (n = 49 and Viremic controllers (n = 62. 21 SNPs were identified, comprising five in the coding region and 16 in the non-coding regions and 3'UTR. The variants in the coding region were infrequent and had no major impact on protein structure according to SIFT and PolyPhen score. One intronic SNP (rs2737828 was significantly under-represented in Caucasian patients (P<0.0001 compared to healthy controls (HapMap. Two SNPs showed a non-significant trend towards association with slower disease progression but not with LEDGF/p75 expression. The observed variation in LEDGF/p75 expression was not correlated with disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: LEDGF/p75 is a highly conserved protein. Two non-coding polymorphisms were identified indicating a correlation with disease outcome, but further

  10. Improving adoption and acceptability of digital health interventions for HIV disease management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claborn, Kasey R; Meier, Ellen; Miller, Mary Beth; Leavens, Eleanor L; Brett, Emma I; Leffingwell, Thad

    2018-03-01

    Disease management remains a challenge for many people living with HIV (PLWH). Digital health interventions (DHIs) may assist with overcoming these challenges and reducing burdens on clinical staff; however, there is limited data regarding methods to improve uptake and acceptability of DHIs among PLWH. This qualitative study aimed to assess patient and provider perspectives on the use of DHIs and strategies to promote uptake among PLWH. Eight focus groups with patients (k = 5 groups; n = 24) and providers (k = 3 groups; n = 12) were conducted May through October of 2014. Focus groups (~90 min) followed a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis on three main themes: (a) perspectives towards the adoption and use of DHIs for HIV management; (b) perceptions of barriers and facilitators to patient usage; and (c) preferences regarding content, structure, and delivery. Analyses highlighted barriers and facilitators to DHI adoption. Patients and providers agreed that DHIs feel "impersonal" and "lack empathy," may be more effective for certain subpopulations, should be administered in the clinic setting, and should use multimodal delivery methods. Emergent themes among the providers included development of DHIs for providers as the target market and the need for culturally adapted DHIs for patient subpopulations. DHIs have potential to improve HIV management and health outcomes. DHIs should be developed in conjunction with anticipated consumers, including patients, providers, and other key stakeholders. DHIs tailored for specific HIV subpopulations are needed. Future studies should evaluate dissemination methods and marketing strategies to promote uptake.

  11. Disease severity, self-reported experience of workplace discrimination and employment loss during the course of chronic HIV disease: differences according to gender and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray-Spira, R; Gueguen, A; Lert, F

    2008-02-01

    Evidence for the existence of a harmful effect of chronic disease on employment status has been provided. Although this effect of chronic illness on employment has been reported to be higher among the groups with the lowest position on the labour market, the mechanisms of such inequalities are poorly understood. The present study aimed at investigating social inequalities in the chances of maintaining employment during the course of HIV infection and at examining the correlates of such inequalities. The authors used data from a national representative sample of people living with HIV in France (ANRS-EN12-VESPA survey). Retrospective information on social trajectory and disease characteristics from the time of HIV diagnosis was available. The risk of employment loss associated with indicators of disease severity and HIV-related workplace discrimination was computed over time since HIV diagnosis according to sociodemographic and occupational factors, using Cox proportional hazards models. Among the 478 working-age participants diagnosed as being HIV-infected in the era of multitherapies and employed at the time of HIV diagnosis, 149 experienced employment loss. After adjusting for sociodemographic and occupational factors, disease severity and self-reported HIV-related discrimination at work were significantly associated with the risk of employment loss in a socially-differentiated manner: advancement in HIV disease was associated with an increased risk of employment loss among women (HR 4.45, 95% CI 2.10 to 9.43) but not among men; self-reported experience of HIV-related discrimination at work was associated with an increased risk of employment loss among individuals with a primary/secondary educational level (HR 8.85, 95% CI 3.68 to 21.30) but not among those more educated. Chronic HIV disease affects the chances of maintaining employment in a socially-differentiated manner, resulting in increasing inequalities regarding workforce participation. Disease severity

  12. 'Limits and current knowledge of Pick's disease: its differential diagnosis'. A translation of the 1957 Delay, Brion, Escourolle article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Marie-Pierre; Miller, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    This article is a translation of a French article by Delay, Brion, and Escourolle. In a seminal article published in French in 1957 these authors summarized the work of previous researchers and reviewed a wide sample of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) cases formerly referred to as Pick's disease. The authors were among the first to define the critical clinical and anatomical differences between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and FTD and they even delineated distinctive FTD subtypes making possible the advances that now constitute the base of our studies. Reviewing their work allows us to appreciate the progress research has made.

  13. Incidence and risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals before and after the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Larsen, Mette; Ladelund, Steen

    2014-01-01

    with an increased risk of IPD. Detectable viral loads (RR, 1.88 [95% CI, 1.79-1.98]) and a relative fall in CD4 T-cell counts were also associated with an increased risk (≥500 to 350-500 CD4 T cells/µL: RR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.21-1.37] and risk of IPD declined over time......BACKGROUND: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is an important cause of morbidity among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We described incidence and risk factors for IPD in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. METHODS: Nationwide population-based cohort study of HIV......-infected adults treated at all Danish HIV treatment centers during 1995-2012. Nineteen population-matched controls per HIV-infected individual were retrieved. The risk of IPD was assessed using Poisson regression. RESULTS: The incidence of IPD was 304.7 cases per 100 000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) in HIV...

  14. Adding Recognition Discriminability Index to the Delayed Recall Is Useful to Predict Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Disease in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, María J; Campos, Jorge; Vázquez, Silvia; Sevlever, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ongoing research is focusing on the identification of those individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are most likely to convert to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated whether recognition memory tasks in combination with delayed recall measure of episodic memory and CSF biomarkers can predict MCI to AD conversion at 24-month follow-up. Methods: A total of 397 amnestic-MCI subjects from Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative were included. Logistic regression modeling was done to assess the predictive value of all RAVLT measures, risk factors such as age, sex, education, APOE genotype, and CSF biomarkers for progression to AD. Estimating adjusted odds ratios was used to determine which variables would produce an optimal predictive model, and whether adding tests of interaction between the RAVLT Delayed Recall and recognition measures (traditional score and d-prime) would improve prediction of the conversion from a-MCI to AD. Results: 112 (28.2%) subjects developed dementia and 285 (71.8%) subjects did not. Of the all included variables, CSF Aβ1-42 levels, RAVLT Delayed Recall, and the combination of RAVLT Delayed Recall and d-prime were predictive of progression to AD (χ 2 = 38.23, df = 14, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The combination of RAVLT Delayed Recall and d-prime measures may be predictor of conversion from MCI to AD in the ADNI cohort, especially in combination with amyloid biomarkers. A predictive model to help identify individuals at-risk for dementia should include not only traditional episodic memory measures (delayed recall or recognition), but also additional variables (d-prime) that allow the homogenization of the assessment procedures in the diagnosis of MCI.

  15. An Increase in Religiousness/Spirituality Occurs After HIV Diagnosis and Predicts Slower Disease Progression over 4 Years in People with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironson, Gail; Stuetzle, Rick; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most studies on religion/spirituality predicting health outcomes have been limited to church attendance as a predictor and have focused on healthy people. However, confronting a major medical crisis may be a time when people turn to the sacred. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which changes in spirituality/religiousness occur after HIV diagnosis and whether changes predict disease progression. DESIGN/PARTICIPANTS This longitudinal study examined the relationship between changes in spirituality/religiousness from before with after the diagnosis of HIV, and disease progression (CD4 and viral load [VL] every 6 months) over 4 years in 100 people with HIV. Measures included change in religiousness/spirituality after diagnosis of HIV, religiousness/spirituality at various times in one’s life, church attendance, depression, hopelessness, optimism, coping (avoidant, proactive), social support, CD4/VL, and health behaviors. RESULTS Forty-five percent of the sample showed an increase in religiousness/spirituality after the diagnosis of HIV, 42% remained the same, and 13% decreased. People reporting an increase in spirituality/religiousness after the diagnosis had significantly greater preservation of CD4 cells over the 4-year period, as well as significantly better control of VL. Results were independent of (i.e., held even after controlling for) church attendance and initial disease status (CD4/VL), medication at every time point, age, gender, race, education, health behaviors (adherence, risky sex, alcohol, cocaine), depression, hopelessness, optimism, coping (avoidant, proactive), and social support. CONCLUSIONS There is an increase in spirituality/religiousness after HIV diagnosis, and this increase predicts slower disease progression; medical personnel should be aware of its potential importance. PMID:17083503

  16. Delayed gastric emptying of both the liquid and solid components of a meal in chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, J S; Holdeman, K P; Dalrymple, G V; Harrison, K A; Quigley, E M

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in patients with chronic liver disease and portal hypertension. We measured gastric emptying of both the liquid and solid components of a meal in 10 consecutive patients with chronic liver disease and portal hypertension, but free of ascites, and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In the patients with liver disease, relationships between emptying and liver function were examined. To measure gastric emptying, subjects consumed a test meal that consisted of scrambled eggs labeled with 99mTc-sulfur colloid and 4 oz of water labeled with 111In-diethylene triamine pentacetic acid (DTPA). Patients with liver disease and portal hypertension demonstrated delayed emptying of both the liquid (t1/2, min, mean +/- SE, patients vs. 69.4 +/- 19.4 vs. 31.4 +/- 1.8, p < 0.01) and solid (post-lag phase solid emptying: 141 +/- 32.9 vs. 69.8 +/- 4.6, p < 0.006) components of the meal. We could not identify any correlation between gastric emptying and tests of liver function. Gastric emptying is delayed in patients with liver disease and portal hypertension; this abnormal gastric motor function may contribute to the pathophysiology of foregut complaints in this patient population.

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contracting or transmitting HIV/AIDS or other infectious diseases. Research Reports: HIV/AIDS : Explores the link between drug misuse and HIV/AIDS, populations most at risk, trends in HIV/AIDS, and ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) ... hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National ...

  19. Lipoprotein particle subclasses, cardiovascular disease and HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duprez, Daniel A; Kuller, Lewis H; Tracy, Russell

    2009-01-01

    using conditional logistic models. RESULTS: Total, large and small HDL-p, but not VLDL-p nor LDL-p, were significantly and inversely associated with CVD and its major component, non-fatal coronary heart disease. The HDL-p associations with CVD were reduced after adjustment for high sensitive C...

  20. HIV-occlusive vascular disease | Van Marle | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The usual risk factors for atherosclerosis were present, but the incidence was less than reported in the classic atherosclerosis population. More than 90% of the patients presented with advanced stage vascular disease (Fontaine III/IV), which explains the high rate (31.9%) of primary amputation. Eightyseven patients ...

  1. Prevalence of subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in healthy HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We tested for subclinical CVD using 3 tools: Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) to measure for the presence of peripheral artery disease, 12 lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) for electrical abnormalities and transthoracic Echocardiography (ECHO), to measure abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. At analysis, patients where ...

  2. Inflammation, coagulation and cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duprez, Daniel A; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Kuller, Lewis H

    2012-01-01

    The SMART study was a trial of intermittent use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (drug conservation [DC]) versus continuous use of ART (viral suppression [VS]) as a strategy to reduce toxicities, including cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We studied the predictive value of high sensitivity C-rea...

  3. Adverse psychosocial factors predict poorer prognosis in HIV disease: a meta-analytic review of prospective investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Yoichi; Vedhara, Kavita

    2009-05-01

    There is a growing epidemiological literature focusing on the association between psychosocial stress and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), but inconsistent findings have been published. We aimed to quantify the association between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV disease progression. We searched Medline; PsycINFO; Web of Science; PubMed up to 19 January 2009, and included population studies with a prospective design that investigated associations between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV disease progression or AIDS. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study characteristics, quality, and estimates of associations. The overall meta-analysis examined 36 articles including 100 psychosocial and disease related relationships. It exhibited a small, but robust positive association between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV progression (correlation coefficient as combined size effect 0.059, 95% confidence interval 0.043-0.074, p<0.001). Notably, sensitivity analyses showed that personality types or coping styles and psychological distress were more strongly associated with greater HIV disease progression than stress stimuli per se, and that all of the immunological and clinical outcome indicators (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome stage, CD4+ T-cell decline, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome mortality, and human immunodeficiency virus disease or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome symptoms) except for viral load exhibited detrimental effects by adverse psychosocial factors. In conclusion, the current review reveals a robust relationship between adverse psychosocial factors and HIV disease progression. Furthermore, there would appear to be some evidence for particular psychosocial factors to be most strongly associated with HIV disease progression.

  4. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Rose, Charles E.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Taussig, Jennifer; Gern, Robert; Hoyte, Tamika; Salazar, Laura; White, Jianglan; Todd, Jeff; Bautista, Greg; Flynn, Colin; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Isenberg, Debbie; Driscoll, Maura; Hurwitz, Elizabeth; Doherty, Rose; Wittke, Chris; Prachand, Nikhil; Benbow, Nanette; Melville, Sharon; Pannala, Praveen; Yeager, Richard; Sayegh, Aaron; Dyer, Jim; Sheu, Shane; Novoa, Alicia; Thrun, Mark; Al-Tayyib, Alia; Wilmoth, Ralph; Higgins, Emily; Griffin, Vivian; Mokotoff, Eve; MacMaster, Karen; Wolverton, Marcia; Risser, Jan; Rehman, Hafeez; Padgett, Paige; Bingham, Trista; Sey, Ekow Kwa; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa; Forrest, David; Beck, Dano; Cardenas, Gabriel; Nemeth, Chris; Anderson, Bridget J.; Watson, Carol-Ann; Smith, Lou; Robinson, William T.; Gruber, DeAnn; Barak, Narquis; Murrill, Chris; Neaigus, Alan; Jenness, Samuel; Hagan, Holly; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Wendel, Travis; Cross, Helene; Bolden, Barbara; D'Errico, Sally; Wogayehu, Afework; Godette, Henry; Brady, Kathleen A.; Kirkland, Althea; Sifferman, Andrea; Miguelino-Keasling, Vanessa; Velasco, Al; Tovar, Veronica; Raymond, H. Fisher; De León, Sandra Miranda; Rolón-Colón, Yadira; Marzan, Melissa; Courogen, Maria; Jaenicke, Tom; Thiede, Hanne; Burt, Richard; Jia, Yujiang; Opoku, Jenevieve; Sansone, Marie; West, Tiffany; Magnus, Manya; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects. PMID:25352589

  5. Structural Brain Abnormalities in Successfully Treated HIV Infection: Associations With Disease and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zoest, Rosan A; Underwood, Jonathan; De Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A; Cole, James H; Wit, Ferdinand W; Caan, Matthan W A; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Fuchs, Dietmar; Zetterberg, Henrik; Majoie, Charles B L M; Portegies, Peter; Winston, Alan; Sharp, David J; Gisslén, Magnus; Reiss, Peter

    2017-12-27

    Brain structural abnormalities have been reported in persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PLWH) who are receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but their pathophysiology remains unclear. We investigated factors associated with brain tissue volumes and white matter microstructure (fractional anisotropy) in 134 PLWH receiving suppressive cART and 79 comparable HIV-negative controls, aged ≥45 years, from the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS cohort, using multimodal neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Compared with controls, PLWH had lower gray matter volumes (-13.7 mL; 95% confidence interval, -25.1 to -2.2) and fractional anisotropy (-0.0073; 95% confidence interval, -.012 to -.0024), with the largest differences observed in those with prior clinical AIDS. Hypertension and the soluble CD14 concentration in cerebrospinal fluid were associated with lower fractional anisotropy. These associations were independent of HIV serostatus (Pinteraction = .32 and Pinteraction = .59, respectively) and did not explain the greater abnormalities in brain structure in relation to HIV infection. The presence of lower gray matter volumes and more white matter microstructural abnormalities in well-treated PLWH partly reflect a combination of historical effects of AIDS, as well as the more general influence of systemic factors, such as hypertension and ongoing neuroinflammation. Additional mechanisms explaining the accentuation of brain structure abnormalities in treated HIV infection remain to be identified. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Clinical Impacts of Delayed Diagnosis of Hirschsprung’s Disease in Newborn Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chung Lee

    2012-04-01

    Conclusion: In our study, we found that delayed diagnosis of HD beyond 1 week after birth significantly increases the risk of serious complications in neonatal patients. Patients with long-segment or total colonic aganglionosis have higher risk of postoperative HAEC and failure to thrive. Patients with preoperative HAEC are more likely to have adhesive bowel obstruction and failure to thrive.

  7. The Dynamics of an HIV/AIDS Model with Screened Disease Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Hove-Musekwa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of carriers usually complicates the dynamics and prevention of a disease. They are not recognized as disease cases themselves unless they are screened and they usually spread the infection without them being aware. We argue that this has been one of the major causes of the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We propose, in this paper, a model for the heterogeneous transmission of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the presence of disease carriers. The model allows us to assess the role of screening, as an intervention program that can slow the epidemic. A threshold value ψ*, for the screening rate is obtained. It is shown numerically that if 80% or more of the carrier population is screened, the epidemic can be contained. The qualitative analysis is done in terms of the model reproduction number R. The model has two equilibria, the disease free equilibrium and a unique endemic equilibrium. The disease free equilibrium is globally stable of R  1. A detailed discussion of the model reproduction number is given and numerical simulations are done to show the role of some of the important model parameters.

  8. Malaria, sickle cell disease, HIV, and co-trimoxazole prophylaxis: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewurama D.A. Owusu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This observational study recorded the malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD profile of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA and determined whether prophylactic co-trimoxazole (CTX and the haemoglobin S (Hb S allele influenced malaria episodes. Methods: Sickling status, malaria episodes, and HIV type, as well as other data, were extracted retrospectively from the clinical records of 1001 patients attending the antiretroviral therapy clinic at Ridge Regional Hospital in Accra, Ghana between 2010 and 2015. Finger-prick capillary blood of returning patients (n = 501 was tested for the haemoglobin (Hb level and malaria, after information on malaria prevention methods was obtained through the administration of a questionnaire. Results: The use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets was low (22.8%. CTX prophylaxis showed no significant influence on the overall number of malaria episodes from 2010 to 2015; however, it did show a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.026 with the time elapsed since the last malaria episode. Even though 19% of participants possessed Hb S, it had no influence on malaria episodes. Conclusions: Hb S did not influence malaria in PLHA. Further studies in Hb SS and Hb SC are needed, as there are suggestions of increased frequency and severity of malaria. The impact of CTX prophylaxis on this cohort will be insightful. Keywords: Malaria, HIV, Sickle cell disease, Co-trimoxazole, Ghana

  9. Tobacco, illicit drugs use and risk of cardiovascular disease in patients living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Iñiguez-Romo, Andrés

    2017-11-01

    There is a strong link between HIV, smoking and illicit drugs. This association could be clinically relevant as it may potentiate the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The purpose of this review is to bring readers up to date on issues concerning the cardiovascular risk associated with tobacco and illicit drugs in patients living with HIV (PLHIV), examining the studies related to this topic published in the last year. There is a strong association between smoking and atherosclerotic disease in PLHIV, reducing life expectancy secondary to CVD by up to 6 years. Illicit drugs were associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic problems but to a lesser extent than smoking. A significant association of drugs such as cocaine with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis been demonstrated. The relation of marijuana, heroin and amphetamines with atherosclerosis generates more controversy. However, those drugs are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, independently of smoking and other traditional risk factors. Tobacco and illicit drugs are linked to CVD in HIV patients. This leads to the need to create special programs to address the addiction to smoking and illicit drugs, in order to mitigate their consequences and reduce cardiovascular risk.

  10. A time-motion study of cardiovascular disease risk factor screening integrated into HIV clinic visits in Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Anton M; Rabkin, Miriam; Simelane, Samkelo; Gachuhi, Averie B; McNairy, Margaret L; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Bongomin, Pido; Okello, Velephi N; Bitchong, Raymond A; El-Sadr, Wafaa M

    2018-03-01

    Screening of modifiable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors is recommended but not routinely provided for HIV-infected patients, especially in low-resource settings. Potential concerns include limited staff time and low patient acceptability, but little empirical data exists. As part of a pilot study of screening in a large urban HIV clinic in Swaziland, we conducted a time-motion study to assess the impact of screening on patient flow and HIV service delivery and exit interviews to assess patient acceptability. A convenience sample of patients ≥40 years of age attending routine HIV clinic visits was screened for hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and tobacco smoking. We observed HIV visits with and without screening and measured time spent on HIV and CVD risk factor screening activities. We compared screened and unscreened patients on total visit time and time spent receiving HIV services using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. A separate convenience sample of screened patients participated in exit interviews to assess their satisfaction with screening. We observed 172 patient visits (122 with CVD risk factor screening and 50 without). Screening increased total visit time from a median (range) of 4 minutes (2 to 11) to 15 minutes (9 to 30) (p < 0.01). Time spent on HIV care was not affected: 4 (2 to 10) versus 4 (2 to 11) (p = 0.57). We recruited 126 patients for exit interviews, all of whom indicated that they would recommend screening to others. Provision of CVD risk factor screening more than tripled the length of routine HIV clinic visits but did not reduce the time spent on HIV services. Programme managers need to take longer visit duration into account in order to effectively integrate CVD risk factor screening and counselling into HIV programmes. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  11. Hormonal Contraception, Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Risk of HIV Disease Progression Among Zambian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kristin M; Kilembe, William; Haddad, Lisa; Vwalika, Bellington; Lakhi, Shabir; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Mulenga, Joseph; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Some studies suggest that hormonal contraception, pregnancy, and/or breastfeeding may influence rates of HIV disease progression. From 1994 to 2012, HIV discordant couples recruited at couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing centers in Lusaka were followed 3-monthly. Multivariate survival analyses explored associations between time-varying contraception, pregnancy, and breastfeeding and 2 outcomes among HIV-positive women: (1) time to death and (2) time to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation. Among 1656 female seropositive, male seronegative couples followed for 3359 person-years (PY), 224 women died [6.7/100 PY; 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.8 to 7.6]. After 2003, 290 women initiated ART (14.5/100 PY; 95% CI: 12.9 to 16.2). In a multivariate model of time to death, hormonal implant [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.98] and injectable (aHR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.97) were significantly protective relative to nonhormonal method use, whereas oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use was not (aHR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.57) controlling for baseline HIV disease stage, time-varying pregnancy, time-varying breastfeeding, and year of enrollment. In a multivariate model of time-to-ART initiation, implant was significantly protective (aHR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.31 to 0.95), whereas OCP (aHR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.44 to 1.10) and injectable (aHR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.55 to 1.32) were not relative to nonhormonal method use controlling for variables above, woman's age, and literacy. Pregnancy was not significantly associated with death (aHR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.66) or ART initiation (aHR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.86), whereas breastfeeding was protective for death (aHR = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.19 to 0.62) and ART initiation (aHR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.85). Hormonal implants and injectables significantly predicted lower mortality; implants were protective for ART initiation. OCPs and pregnancy were not associated with death or ART initiation, whereas

  12. Low prevalence of liver disease but regional differences in HBV treatment characteristics mark HIV/HBV co-infection in a South African HIV clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudence Ive

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is endemic in South Africa however, there is limited data on the degree of liver disease and geographic variation in HIV/HBV coinfected individuals. In this study, we analysed data from the CIPRA-SA 'Safeguard the household study' in order to assess baseline HBV characteristics in HIV/HBV co-infection participants prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation.812 participants from two South African townships Soweto and Masiphumelele were enrolled in a randomized trial of ART (CIPRA-SA. Participants were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg, and HBV DNA. FIB-4 scores were calculated at baseline.Forty-eight (5.9% were HBsAg positive, of whom 28 (58.3% were HBeAg positive. Of those with HBV, 29.8% had an HBV DNA<2000 IU/ml and ALT<40 IU/ml ; 83.0% had a FIB-4 score <1.45, consistent with absent or minimal liver disease. HBV prevalence was 8.5% in Masiphumelele compared to 3.8% in Soweto (relative risk 2.3; 95% CI: 1.3-4.0. More participants in Masiphumelele had HBeAg-negative disease (58% vs. 12%, p = 0.002 and HBV DNA levels ≤2000 IU/ml, (43% vs. 6% p<0.007.One third of HIV/HBV co-infected subjects had low HBV DNA levels and ALT while the majority had indicators of only mild liver disease. There were substantial regional differences in HBsAg and HbeAg prevalence in HIV/HBV co-infection between two regions in South Africa. This study highlights the absence of severe liver disease and the marked regional differences in HIV/HBV co-infection in South Africa and will inform treatment decisions in these populations.

  13. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction/hyperhemolysis syndrome in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talano, Julie-An M; Hillery, Cheryl A; Gottschall, Jerome L; Baylerian, Diane M; Scott, J Paul

    2003-06-01

    Alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has a reported incidence of 5% to 36%. One complication of alloimmunization is delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction/hyperhemolysis (DHTR/H) syndrome, which has a reported incidence of 11%. In patients with SCD, clinical findings in DHTR/H syndrome occur approximately 1 week after the red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and include the onset of increased hemolysis associated with pain and profound anemia. The hemoglobin (Hb) often drops below pretransfusion levels. In many reported adult cases, the direct antiglobulin test (DAT) remains negative and no new alloantibody is detected as the cause for these transfusion reactions. To date, few pediatric cases have been reported with this phenomenon. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical and laboratory findings of a case series in children who had SCD and experienced a DHTR/H syndrome at our institution. An 11-year retrospective chart review of patients with discharge diagnosis of SCD and transfusion reaction was performed. DHTR/H syndrome was defined as the abrupt onset of signs and symptoms of accelerated hemolysis evidenced by an unexplained fall in Hb, elevated lactic dehydrogenase, elevated bilirubin above baseline, and hemoglobinuria, all occurring between 4 and 10 days after an RBC transfusion. Patient characteristics, time from transfusion, symptoms, reported DAT, new autoantibody or alloantibody formation, laboratory abnormalities, and complications were recorded. Patients with acute transfusion reactions were excluded. We encountered 7 patients who developed 9 episodes of DHTR/H syndrome occurring 6 to 10 days after RBC transfusion. Each presented with fever and hemoglobinuria. All but 1 patient experienced pain initially ascribed to vaso-occlusive crisis. The DAT was positive in only 2 of the 9 episodes. The presenting Hb was lower than pretransfusion levels in 8 of the 9 events. Severe complications were observed after the onset of

  14. Prevalence of the subclinical sinus disease in HIV positive patients evaluated by the computed tomography versus a control population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, E.; Valette, M.; Ajana, F.; Gerard, Y.; Alfandari, S.; Chidiac, C.; Mouton, Y.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of subclinical sinus disease in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cerebral computed tomography scans (CCT) done at the Tourcoing hospital over an 18-month period in 139 HIV-positive patients and 140 control patients without evidence of active sinus disease were reviewed retrospectively. CCTs were evaluated independently by two physicians who were blinded to clinical data. Mucosal thickening and/or a full patients (20/139, 14.4%) than in the controls (8/140, 5.7%) (p=0.016). Mucosal thickening was the most common abnormality in both groups. CD4+cell counts were not correlated with the radiographic abnormalities studies. These radiographic data suggest that subclinical chronic sinusitis independent from the degree of immune deficiency may be more common in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative subjects. (author)

  15. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in HIV patients--association with antiretroviral therapy. Results from the DAD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Weber, Rainer; Reiss, Peter

    2003-01-01

    , a prospective multinational cohort study initiated in 1999. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses of CVD risk factors at baseline. The data collected includes data on demographic variables, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, body mass index, stage of HIV infection, antiretroviral...... to the prevalence among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive subjects. Subjects who have discontinued ART as well as subjects receiving nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors had similar cholesterol levels to treatment-naive subjects. Higher CD4 cell count, lower plasma HIV RNA levels, clinical signs......OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected persons, and to investigate any association between such risk factors, stage of HIV disease, and use of antiretroviral therapies. DESIGN: Baseline data from 17,852 subjects enrolled in DAD...

  16. Two regimes of HIV/AIDS: The MMWR and the socio-political construction of HIV/AIDS as a 'black disease'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseby, Kevin M

    2017-09-01

    Over the course of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, black Americans have become a central target of US public health prevention efforts. And today, HIV/AIDS is understood to disproportionately affect black Americans. This markedly contrasts with knowledge about the disease and efforts to prevent it in the first decade of the epidemic in the US, when expert and lay understandings and responses centred on white gay males. This article demonstrates that explaining these historical reversals as purely reflective of epidemiological data - or best knowledge available - is insufficient. Drawing on the concept disease regimes and utilising a discursive analysis of epidemiological results and editorial commentary published from 1981 to 1994 in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWR), this article argues for a socio-political explanation for the changing colour of HIV/AIDS. That is, it scrutinises institutional and discursive practices that within the HIV/AIDS prevention field and disease discourse constituted a 'regime of black American exclusion' (1981-1992) and a 'regime of black American inclusion (1993-present day). © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  17. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Blanka Klimova,1,2 Martin Valis,2 Kamil Kuca3,4 1Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, 2Department of Neurology, 3Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the ...

  18. View of God as benevolent and forgiving or punishing and judgmental predicts HIV disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironson, Gail; Stuetzle, Rick; Ironson, Dale; Balbin, Elizabeth; Kremer, Heidemarie; George, Annie; Schneiderman, Neil; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the predictive relationship between View of God beliefs and change in CD4-cell and Viral Load (VL) in HIV positive people over an extended period. A diverse sample of HIVseropositive participants (N = 101) undergoing comprehensive psychological assessment and blood draws over the course of 4 years completed the View of God Inventory with subscales measuring Positive View (benevolent/forgiving) and Negative View of God (harsh/judgmental/punishing). Adjusting for initial disease status, age, gender, ethnicity, education, and antiretroviral medication (at every 6-month visit), a Positive View of God predicted significantly slower disease-progression (better preservation of CD4-cells, better control of VL), whereas a Negative View of God predicted faster disease-progression over 4 years. Effect sizes were greater than those previously demonstrated for psychosocial variables known to predict HIV-disease-progression, such as depression and coping. Results remained significant even after adjusting for church attendance and psychosocial variables (health behaviors, mood, and coping). These results provide good initial evidence that spiritual beliefs may predict health outcomes.

  19. EGFR inhibitor erlotinib delays disease progression but does not extend survival in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Le Pichon

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive paralysis due to motor neuron death. Several lines of published evidence suggested that inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling might protect neurons from degeneration. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we treated the SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS with erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor clinically approved for oncology indications. Although erlotinib failed to extend ALS mouse survival it did provide a modest but significant delay in the onset of multiple behavioral measures of disease progression. However, given the lack of protection of motor neuron synapses and the lack of survival extension, the small benefits observed after erlotinib treatment appear purely symptomatic, with no modification of disease course.

  20. Differential effects of early weaning for HIV-free survival of children born to HIV-infected mothers by severity of maternal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Kuhn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported no benefit of early weaning for HIV-free survival of children born to HIV-infected mothers in intent-to-treat analyses. Since early weaning was poorly accepted, we conducted a secondary analysis to investigate whether beneficial effects may have been hidden.958 HIV-infected women in Lusaka, Zambia, were randomized to abrupt weaning at 4 months (intervention or to continued breastfeeding (control. Children were followed to 24 months with regular HIV PCR tests and examinations to determine HIV infection or death. Detailed behavioral data were collected on when all breastfeeding ended. Most participants were recruited before antiretroviral treatment (ART became available. We compared outcomes among mother-child pairs who weaned earlier or later than intended by study design adjusting for potential confounders.Of infants alive, uninfected and still breastfeeding at 4 months in the intervention group, 16.1% who weaned as instructed acquired HIV or died by 24 months compared to 16.0% who did not comply (p = 0.98. Children of women with less severe disease during pregnancy (not eligible for ART had worse outcomes if their mothers weaned as instructed (RH = 2.60 95% CI: 1.06-6.36 compared to those who continued breastfeeding. Conversely, children of mothers with more severe disease (eligible for ART but did not receive it who weaned early had better outcomes (p-value interaction = 0.002. In the control group, weaning before 15 months was associated with 3.94-fold (95% CI: 1.65-9.39 increase in HIV infection or death among infants of mothers with less severe disease.Incomplete adherence did not mask a benefit of early weaning. On the contrary, for women with less severe disease, early weaning was harmful and continued breastfeeding resulted in better outcomes. For women with more advanced disease, ART should be given during pregnancy for maternal health and to reduce transmission, including through breastfeeding

  1. Local Stability of AIDS Epidemic Model Through Treatment and Vertical Transmission with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novi W, Cascarilla; Lestari, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explain stability of the spread of AIDS through treatment and vertical transmission model. Human with HIV need a time to positively suffer AIDS. The existence of a time, human with HIV until positively suffer AIDS can be delayed for a time so that the model acquired is the model with time delay. The model form is a nonlinear differential equation with time delay, SIPTA (susceptible-infected-pre AIDS-treatment-AIDS). Based on SIPTA model analysis results the disease free equilibrium point and the endemic equilibrium point. The disease free equilibrium point with and without time delay are local asymptotically stable if the basic reproduction number is less than one. The endemic equilibrium point will be local asymptotically stable if the time delay is less than the critical value of delay, unstable if the time delay is more than the critical value of delay, and bifurcation occurs if the time delay is equal to the critical value of delay.

  2. The morbidity and mortality associated with kidney disease in an HIV-infected cohort in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Angel M; Dworkin, Mark; Quesada, Luis; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Nephropathy in HIV-infected patients has been associated with progression to AIDS and death. The virus, several comorbid conditions and certain medications may contribute to the development and progression of kidney disease. This study analyzed data collected from HIV-infected persons enrolled in a HIV registry in Puerto Rico during January 1998 through September 2006. Demographic factors, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings at enrollment, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescriptions were compared between patients with and without kidney disease. Death status and cause of death by December 2006 were also evaluated and compared. The study included 1,283 subjects, 69.0% male, 39.7% injecting drug users, 19.5% hepatitis C infected, 6.5% with diabetes mellitus (DM-2), 11.6% had hypertension (HTN) and 9.0% had kidney disease. Patients with kidney disease had significantly higher (P Puerto Rican HIV-infected patients with nephropathy. Kidney disease preventive strategies that include aggressive control of HIV-infection and chronic medical conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, are recommend as an approach to reduce this health disparity.

  3. Inflammation-modulating cytokine profile and lipid interaction in HIV-related risk factors for cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gori E

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Gori,1,2 Takafira Mduluza,3,4 Mudavanhu Nyagura,2 Babill Stray-Pedersen,5 Zvenyika Alfred Gomo1 1Chemical Pathology Department, College of Health Sciences, 2Preclinical Veterinary Studies Department, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, 3Biochemistry Department, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe; 4School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Abstract: HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART are associated with changes in plasma levels of lipoproteins, thus posing the risk of cardiovascular complications in infected individuals. The alteration in plasma lipoprotein levels results from dysregulation of inflammation-modulating cytokines that control lipid metabolism. Little is understood regarding the relationship between the cytokines and serum lipid levels, which have been reported to be altered in adults receiving ART. The objective of this study was to describe the profiles of inflammation-modulating cytokines and their relationship to lipids as cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in HIV infection. This observational cross-sectional study measured plasma levels of interleukin (IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, IL-4, total cholesterol (TC, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c in HIV-infected and uninfected adults. A total of 219 HIV-infected participants were enrolled from an HIV treatment center; of them, 187 were receiving ART and 32 were ART naïve, while 65 were HIV-uninfected blood donors. HIV-infected individuals had higher levels of IL-10 (HIV-infected ART-naïve [P=0.0024] and ART-receiving [P=0.033] than their uninfected counterparts. ART-naïve subjects had significantly higher plasma levels of IL-10 than ART-receiving subjects (P=0.0014. No significant difference was observed in plasma levels of IL-4 and TNF

  4. Distress in unaffected individuals who decline, delay or remain ineligible for genetic testing for hereditary diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiniger, Louise; Butow, Phyllis N; Price, Melanie A; Charles, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Reviews on the psychosocial aspects of genetic testing for hereditary diseases typically focus on outcomes for carriers and non-carriers of genetic mutations. However, the majority of unaffected individuals from high-risk families do not undergo predictive testing. The aim of this review was to examine studies on psychosocial distress in unaffected individuals who delay, decline or remain ineligible for predictive genetic testing. Systematic searches of Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, PubMed and handsearching of related articles published between 1990 and 2012 identified 23 articles reporting 17 different studies that were reviewed and subjected to quality assessment. Findings suggest that definitions of delaying and declining are not always straightforward, and few studies have investigated psychological distress among individuals who remain ineligible for testing. Findings related to distress in delayers and decliners have been mixed, but there is evidence to suggest that cancer-related distress is lower in those who decline genetic counselling and testing, compared with testers, and that those who remain ineligible for testing experience more anxiety than tested individuals. Psychological, personality and family history vulnerability factors were identified for decliners and individuals who are ineligible for testing. The small number of studies and methodological limitations preclude definitive conclusions. Nevertheless, subgroups of those who remain untested appear to be at increased risk for psychological morbidity. As the majority of unaffected individuals do not undergo genetic testing, further research is needed to better understand the psychological impact of being denied the option of testing, declining and delaying testing. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Soluble CD163 predicts incident chronic lung, kidney and liver disease in HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte M; Mejer, Niels; Knudsen, Troels B

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if monocyte and macrophage activity may be on the mechanistic pathway to non-AIDS comorbidity by investigating the associations between plasma-soluble CD163 (sCD163) and incident non-AIDS comorbidities in well treated HIV-infected individuals. DESIGN: Prospective single...... was examined using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for pertinent covariates. RESULTS: In HIV-1-infected individuals (n = 799), the highest quartile of plasma sCD163 was associated with incident chronic lung disease [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR), 3.2; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34; 7.......46] and incident chronic kidney disease (aHR, 10.94; 95% CI: 2.32; 51.35), when compared with lowest quartiles. Further, (every 1 mg) increase in plasma sCD163 was positively correlated with incident liver disease (aHR, 1.12; 95% CI: 1.05; 1.19). The sCD163 level was not associated with incident cancer...

  6. Innovation in sexually transmitted disease and HIV prevention: internet and mobile phone delivery vehicles for global diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2010-03-01

    Efficacious behavioral interventions and practices have not been universally accepted, adopted, or diffused by policy makers, administrators, providers, advocates, or consumers. Biomedical innovations for sexually transmitted disease (STD) and HIV prevention have been embraced but their effectiveness is hindered by behavioral factors. Behavioral interventions are required to support providers and consumers for adoption and diffusion of biomedical innovations, protocol adherence, and sustained prevention for other STDs. Information and communication technology such as the Internet and mobile phones can deliver behavioral components for STD/HIV prevention and care to more people at less cost. Recent innovations in STD/HIV prevention with information and communication technology-mediated behavioral supports include STD/HIV testing and partner interventions, behavioral interventions, self-management, and provider care. Computer-based and Internet-based behavioral STD/HIV interventions have demonstrated efficacy comparable to face-to-face interventions. Mobile phone STD/HIV interventions using text-messaging are being broadly utilized but more work is needed to demonstrate efficacy. Electronic health records and care management systems can improve care, but interventions are needed to support adoption. Information and communication technology is rapidly diffusing globally. Over the next 5-10 years smart-phones will be broadly disseminated, connecting billions of people to the Internet and enabling lower cost, highly engaging, and ubiquitous STD/HIV prevention and treatment support interventions.

  7. EBV+ HHV-8+ Multicentric Castleman Disease With Plasmablastic Aggregates in an HIV+ Man: An Evolving Clinicopathologic Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivane, Aditya; Pearce, Amy; Khatib, Nadia; Smith, Mark E F

    2018-06-01

    We report a case of EBV+ and HHV-8+ multicentric Castleman disease with plasmablastic aggregates in an HIV-positive individual. A 41-year-old man presented in early 2015 with fevers, sweats, weight loss, intractable itching, and on subsequent testing was found to be HIV positive. Investigations showed cervical lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. He was treated for HIV and his symptoms resolved. His symptoms recurred in January 2016, and a provisional diagnosis of multicentric Castleman disease was entertained. The HHV-8 (human herpesvirus-8) and EBV (Epstein-Barr virus) viral load was elevated. A left supraclavicular lymph node core biopsy was performed, which showed features of multicentric Castleman disease with plasmablastic aggregates that are EBV (EBER) and HHV-8 positive. He responded well to rituximab treatment and remains well with no symptoms at recent follow-up.

  8. Factors influencing cerebrospinal fluid and plasma HIV-1 RNA detection rate in patients with and without opportunistic neurological disease during the HAART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleixo Agdemir W

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system, HIV replication can occur relatively independent of systemic infection, and intrathecal replication of HIV-1 has been observed in patients with HIV-related and opportunistic neurological diseases. The clinical usefulness of HIV-1 RNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with opportunistic neurological diseases, or the effect of opportunistic diseases on CSF HIV levels in patients under HAART has not been well defined. We quantified CSF and plasma viral load in HIV-infected patients with and without different active opportunistic neurological diseases, determined the characteristics that led to a higher detection rate of HIV RNA in CSF, and compared these two compartments. Methods A prospective study was conducted on 90 HIV-infected patients submitted to lumbar puncture as part of a work-up for suspected neurological disease. Seventy-one patients had active neurological diseases while the remaining 19 did not. Results HIV-1 RNA was quantified in 90 CSF and 70 plasma samples. The HIV-1 RNA detection rate in CSF was higher in patients with neurological diseases, in those with a CD4 count lower than 200 cells/mm3, and in those not receiving antiretroviral therapy, as well as in patients with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. Median viral load was lower in CSF than in plasma in the total population, in patients without neurological diseases, and in patients with toxoplasmic encephalitis, while no significant difference between the two compartments was observed for patients with cryptococcal meningitis and HIV-associated dementia. CSF viral load was lower in patients with cryptococcal meningitis and neurotoxoplasmosis under HAART than in those not receiving HAART. Conclusion Detection of HIV-1 RNA in CSF was more frequent in patients with neurological disease, a CD4 count lower than 200 cells/mm3 and detectable plasma HIV-1. Median HIV-1 RNA levels were generally lower in CSF than in

  9. Men's serostatus disclosure to parents: associations among social support, ethnicity, and disease status in men living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Erin M; Antoni, Michael H; Lopez, Corina R; Durán, Ron E; Penedo, Frank J; Bandiera, Frank C; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy; Kumar, Mahendra; Schneiderman, Neil

    2009-07-01

    Directly disclosing a positive HIV serostatus to family members can affect psychological and disease status. Perceptions that one is in a supportive family environment may moderate these effects; however, ethnic differences may exist in the support processes of families coping with HIV. We examined the role of serostatus disclosure to parents, HIV-specific family support, and ethnicity (Latino versus non-Hispanic White) in explaining disease status (HIV Viral Load, CD4+ cell count) in a sample of men living with HIV (MLWH). Men (n=120) reported whether they had disclosed their serostatus to their mothers and fathers, rated their perceptions of HIV-specific social support received from family members, and provided morning peripheral venous blood samples to assess immune function. We also collected psychosocial and urinary neuroendocrine indicators of stress/distress as possible mediator variables. A three-way interaction emerged between serostatus disclosure to mothers, HIV-specific family support, and ethnicity in explaining both viral load and CD4+ cell count. Non-Hispanic White men who had disclosed to mothers and were receiving high family support had a lower viral load and higher CD4+ cell count, but Latino men who had disclosed to mothers and were receiving low family support had a higher viral load. These associations were not accounted for by men's medication adherence, psychological distress, or neuroendocrine hormones. Disclosure to fathers was not related to disease status. The effects of serostatus disclosure on disease status may depend, in part, on ethnic differences in the interpersonal processes of men's close family relationships.

  10. Contribution of Genetic Background, Traditional Risk Factors, and HIV-Related Factors to Coronary Artery Disease Events in HIV-Positive Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. Methods In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the Metabochip, we genotyped 1875 HIV-positive, white individuals enrolled in 24 HIV observational studies, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. Results A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9×10−4). In the final multivariable model, participants with an unfavorable genetic background (top genetic score quartile) had a CAD odds ratio (OR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–2.04). This effect was similar to hypertension (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), hypercholesterolemia (OR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16–1.96), diabetes (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49), ≥1 year lopinavir exposure (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), and current abacavir treatment (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.17–2.07). The effect of the genetic risk score was additive to the effect of nongenetic CAD risk factors, and did not change after adjustment for family history of CAD. Conclusions In the setting of HIV infection, the effect of an unfavorable genetic background was similar to traditional CAD risk factors and certain adverse antiretroviral exposures. Genetic testing may provide prognostic information complementary to family history of CAD. PMID:23532479

  11. Delayed endochondral ossification in early medial coronoid disease (MCD): a morphological and immunohistochemical evaluation in growing Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S F; Hazewinkel, H A W; Grinwis, G C M; Wolschrijn, C F; Siebelt, M; Vernooij, J C M; Voorhout, G; Tryfonidou, M A

    2013-09-01

    Medial coronoid disease (MCD) is a common joint disease of dogs. It has a multifactorial aetiology, but the relationship between known causal factors and the disease has yet to be elucidated. As most of the published literature is clinical and it reports changes associated with advanced disease, it is not known whether the changes reflect the cause or consequences of the condition. The aim of this study was to investigate early micromorphological changes occurring in articular cartilage and to describe the postnatal development of the medial coronoid process (MCP) before MCD develops. Three litters of MCD-prone young Labrador retrievers were purpose-bred from a dam and two sires with MCD. Comparisons of the micromorphological appearance of the MCP in MCD-negative and MCD-positive joints demonstrated that MCD was initially associated with a disturbance of endochondral ossification, namely a delay in the calcification of the calcifying zone, without concurrent abnormalities in the superficial layers of the joint cartilage. Cartilage canals containing patent blood vessels were only detected in dogs <12 weeks old, but the role of these channels in impaired ossification requires further investigation. Retained hyaline cartilage might ossify as the disease progresses, but weak areas can develop into cracks between the retained cartilage and the subchondral bone, leading to cleft formation and fragmentation of the MCP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Compassionate Love as a Predictor of Reduced HIV Disease Progression and Transmission Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidemarie Kremer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study examined if compassionate love (CL predicts HIV disease progression and transmission risk. Scientific study of CL emerged with Underwood’s working model of other-centered CL, defining five criteria: free choice, cognitive understanding, valuing/empowering, openness/receptivity for spirituality, and response of the heart. Method. This 10-year cohort study collected 6-monthly interviews/essays on coping with HIV and trauma of 177 people with HIV in South Florida. Secondary qualitative content analysis on other-centered CL inductively added the component of CL towards self. Deductively, we coded the presence of the five criteria of CL and rated the benefit of CL for the recipient on a 6-point Likert scale. Growth-curve modeling (reduced to 4 years due to cohort effects investigated if CL predicts CD4 slope (HIV disease progression and cumulative viral load detection (transmission risk. Results. Valuing/empowering and cognitive understanding were the essential criteria for CL to confer long-term benefits. CL had a higher benefit for recipients if given out of free choice. High scores of CL towards self were reciprocal with receiving (93% and giving (77% other-centered CL. Conversely, those rated low on CL towards self were least likely to score high on receiving (38% and giving (49% other-centered CL. Growth-curve modeling showed that CL towards self predicted 4-year cumulative undetectable viral load (independent from sociocultural differences, substance use disorder, baseline CD4 and viral load. Those high versus low on CL self were 2.25 times more likely to have undetectable viral load at baseline and 1.49 times more likely to maintain undetectable viral load over time. CL towards self predicted CD4 preservation after controlling for differences in CL giving. Conclusions. CL towards self is potentially the seed of being expressive and receptive of CL. Health care professionals prepared to walk the extra mile for those who

  13. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Patrícia M; Passos, Sonia R; Calvet, Guilherme A; Hökerberg, Yara H; Lessa, José L; Andrade, Carlos A de

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC), Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) by multiple logistic regression. Seventy-six (60.8%) patients with HIV, 40 (32%) patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2%) patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%), with up to 8 years of formal education (56%), and unemployed (81.6%). The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71) (56%), agoraphobia (n=65) (52%), major depressive episode (n=56) (44.8%), and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43) (34.4%) predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75) and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61). Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75), unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34), and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44). Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  14. Suicide risk and alcohol and drug abuse in outpatients with HIV infection and Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. Guimarães

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate psychiatric comorbidities in outpatients receiving care for HIV and Chagas disease at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas (IPEC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of 125 patients referred to an outpatient psychiatric clinic from February to December 2010. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used. Factors associated with more frequent mental disorders were estimated by odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI by multiple logistic regression. Results: Seventy-six (60.8% patients with HIV, 40 (32% patients with Chagas disease, and nine (7.2% patients with human T-lymphotropic virus were interviewed. The majority were women (64%, with up to 8 years of formal education (56%, and unemployed (81.6%. The median age was 49 years. Suicide risk (n=71 (56%, agoraphobia (n=65 (52%, major depressive episode (n=56 (44.8%, and alcohol/drug abuse (n=43 (34.4% predominated, the latter being directly associated with lower family income (OR = 2.64; 95%CI 1.03-6.75 and HIV infection (OR = 5.24; 95%CI 1.56-17.61. Suicide risk was associated with non-white skin color (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.03-4.75, unemployment (OR = 2.72; 95%CI 1.01-7.34, and diagnosis of major depression (OR = 3.34; 95%CI 1.54-7.44. Conclusion: Measures targeting adverse socioeconomic conditions and psychiatric and psychological monitoring and care should be encouraged in this population, considering the association with abuse of alcohol/other psychoactive drugs and suicide risk.

  15. Gender-Specific Effects of an Augmented Written Emotional Disclosure Intervention on Posttraumatic, Depressive, and HIV-Disease-Related Outcomes: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironson, Gail; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Leserman, Jane; Stuetzle, Rick; Fordiani, Joanne; Fletcher, MaryAnn; Schneiderman, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Trauma histories and symptoms of PTSD occur at very high rates in people with HIV and are associated with poor disease management and accelerated disease progression. The authors of this study examined the efficacy of a brief written trauma disclosure intervention on posttraumatic stress, depression, HIV-related physical symptoms, and…

  16. Group interventions for patients with cancer and HIV disease: part IV. Clinical and policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszcz, Molyn; Sherman, Allen; Mosier, Julie; Burlingame, Gary M; Cleary, Trish; Ulman, Kathleen Hubbs; Simonton, Stephanie; Latif, Umaira; Strauss, Bernhard; Hazelton, Lara

    2004-10-01

    Group interventions have assumed a growing role in primary prevention and supportive care for cancer and HIV disease. Earlier sections of this Special Report examined empirical findings for these interventions and provided recommendations for future research. The current section offers brief recommendations for service providers, policymakers, and stakeholders. Group services now occupy an increasingly prominent place in primary prevention programs and medical settings. In previous sections of this Special Report (Sherman, Leszcz et al., 2004; Sherman, Mosier et al., 2004a, 2004b) we examined the efficacy of different group interventions at different phases of cancer or HIV disease, considered characteristics of the intervention and the participants that might influence outcomes, and discussed mechanisms of action. Methodological challenges and priorities for future research were highlighted. In this, the final section, we offer brief recommendations for service providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders. We consider some of the barriers that constrain use of empirically-based group interventions and note how these programs might be implemented more widely and effectively.

  17. Two cases of cervical disc disease with intramedullary pathological changes, which are responsible for their neurological syndromes, on delayed CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Murai, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1987-01-01

    We report two cases of cervical disc disease with myelopathy classified as of motor system syndrome type showing small contrast accumulation within the spinal cord on delayed CT myelography. In our two cases, high density spots on delayed CT myelography were bilaterally localized within the spinal cord, and believed represent pathological changes of the spinal cord, such as collection of microcavities or cystic necrosis. In case 1, the high density areas seemed to be localized in the anterior horn and corticospinal tract, and in case 2, they seemed to be localized in the corticospinal tract. The patient in case 1 produced signs and symptoms resembling motor neurone disease and lesion could not be differentiated from the latter. Delayed CT myelography showed that the cause of the upper limb amyotrophy was attributed to an anterior horn disorder and that of pyramidal tract sign to a corticospinal tract disorder. Therefore, we could differentiate the lesion from motor neurone disease on delayed CT myelography in case 1. In conclusion, we emphasize that delayed CT myelography can demonstrate the intramedullary pathological changes in the cervical disc disease and is useful in distinguishing between cervical disc disease simulating motor neurone disease and the latter. (author)

  18. High prevalence of non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors amongst adults living with HIV in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pheak Chhoun

    Full Text Available With rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy for HIV, there are rising life expectancies among people living with HIV. As a result, co-morbidity from non-communicable diseases in those living and aging with HIV is increasingly being reported. Published data on this issue have been limited in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia and associated risk factors in adults living with HIV in Cambodia.This cross-sectional study was conducted in five provinces of Cambodia from May-June 2015. Information was obtained on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire, and anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed with fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl, hypertension with systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg and hypercholesterolemia with fasting blood cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to explore risk factors.The study sample included 510 adults living with HIV; 67% were female, with a mean age of 45 (standard deviation = 8 years. Of these, 8.8% had diabetes mellitus, 15.1% had hypertension and 34.7% had hypercholesterolemia. Of the total participants with non-communicable diseases (n = 244, 47.8% had one or more diseases, and 75% were not aware of their diseases prior to the study: new disease was diagnosed in 90% of diabetes mellitus, 44% of hypertension and 90% of hypercholesterolemia. Single disease occurred in 81%, dual disease in 17% and triple disease in 2%. In adjusted analyses, those consuming 1 serving of fruit compare to 2 servings as significantly with diabetes mellitus, those eating 1 serving of fruit compare to 2 servings and using lard for cooking were significantly associated with hypertension, and those being unemployed, having monthly income less than 100

  19. Knowledge and perceptions of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, and reproductive health among female students in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Zaman Mou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Young people are most vulnerable to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh. Lack of knowledge about reproductive health issues is also common in this group. Aims: This study aimed to assess the knowledge and perceptions of STDs, HIV/AIDS, and reproductive health of young female university students (19-27 years in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 402 female students from seven universities in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire on sociodemographic information, knowledge, and perceptions of STDs, HIV/AIDS, and reproductive health. Descriptive analysis was used, and data were presented as frequencies and percentages. Results: The majority of the participants were young, unmarried, undergraduate students. Most of the participants reported that they knew about STDs (79% and HIV/AIDS (66%. However, knowledge about the modes of transmission and prevention of the diseases was poor. HIV/AIDS was considered by 90% participants as a public health threat to Bangladesh, mostly due to illiteracy (76%, increased mortality (20%, existence of risky sexual behavior (18%, and aggression of Western culture (31%. About 65% of the participants mentioned that AIDS can be prevented by safe sexual practice, 55% mentioned prevention through upholding religious values and moral education, and 59% mentioned that education about AIDS would help prevent transmission. Conclusions: Although a majority of young Bangladeshi female students reported knowing about HIV/AIDS, their knowledge regarding transmission and prevention of the diseases was poor. Strategies for creating reproductive health education targeted at young female students are essential for the prevention of STDs and HIV/AIDS.

  20. HIV-1 subtype C envelope characteristics associated with divergent rates of chronic disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulder Philip JR

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 envelope diversity remains a significant challenge for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The evolutionary forces that shape the diversity of envelope are incompletely understood. HIV-1 subtype C envelope in particular shows significant differences and unique characteristics compared to its subtype B counterpart. Here we applied the single genome sequencing strategy of plasma derived virus from a cohort of therapy naïve chronically infected individuals in order to study diversity, divergence patterns and envelope characteristics across the entire HIV-1 subtype C gp160 in 4 slow progressors and 4 progressors over an average of 19.5 months. Results Sequence analysis indicated that intra-patient nucleotide diversity within the entire envelope was higher in slow progressors, but did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.07. However, intra-patient nucleotide diversity was significantly higher in slow progressors compared to progressors in the C2 (p = 0.0006, V3 (p = 0.01 and C3 (p = 0.005 regions. Increased amino acid length and fewer potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGs were observed in the V1-V4 in slow progressors compared to progressors (p = 0.009 and p = 0.02 respectively. Similarly, gp41 in the progressors was significantly longer and had fewer PNGs compared to slow progressors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.02 respectively. Positive selection hotspots mapped mainly to V1, C3, V4, C4 and gp41 in slow progressors, whereas hotspots mapped mainly to gp41 in progressors. Signature consensus sequence differences between the groups occurred mainly in gp41. Conclusions These data suggest that separate regions of envelope are under differential selective forces, and that envelope evolution differs based on disease course. Differences between slow progressors and progressors may reflect differences in immunological pressure and immune evasion mechanisms. These data also indicate that the pattern of envelope evolution

  1. Graves' Disease as a Manifestation of Immune Reconstitution in HIV-Infected Individuals after Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Rasul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in certain HIV-1-infected individuals has been described as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. This phenomenon should be suspected in individuals who present with clinical deterioration and a presentation suggestive of hyperthyroidism despite good virological and immunological response to HAART. Signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism may be discrete or overt and typically develop 8–33 months after initiating therapy. One to two percent of HIV-infected patients can present with overt thyroid disease. Relatively few cases of Graves' IRIS have been reported in the literature to date. We describe four cases of Graves' IRIS in HIV-infected patients who were started on HAART therapy.

  2. Impact of the Hayflick Limit on T cell responses to infection: lessons from aging and HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effros, Rita B

    2004-02-01

    Aging and HIV disease show certain immunological similarities. In both situations, control over viral infection is diminished, and there is an increase in certain types of cancer. The immune cell type responsible for controlling viral infections and cancer is the so-called CD8 or cytotoxic T cell. In elderly persons and individuals chronically infected with HIV, there are high proportions of CD8 T cells that resemble cells that reach the end stage of replicative senescence in cell culture after repeated rounds of antigen-driven proliferation. Senescent cultures are characterized by irreversible cell cycle arrest, shortened telomeres, inability to upregulate telomerase, loss of CD28 expression, and apoptosis resistance. Strategies that retard replicative senescence may, therefore, provide novel approaches to enhancing immune function during aging and HIV disease.

  3. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in HIV patients--association with antiretroviral therapy. Results from the DAD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Weber, Rainer; Reiss, Peter

    2003-01-01

    , a prospective multinational cohort study initiated in 1999. METHODS: Cross-sectional analyses of CVD risk factors at baseline. The data collected includes data on demographic variables, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, body mass index, stage of HIV infection, antiretroviral......OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected persons, and to investigate any association between such risk factors, stage of HIV disease, and use of antiretroviral therapies. DESIGN: Baseline data from 17,852 subjects enrolled in DAD...... therapy. RESULTS: Almost 25% of the study population were at an age where there is an appreciable risk of CVD, with those receiving a protease inhibitor (PI) and/or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) tending to be older. 1.4% had a previous history of CVD and 51.5% were cigarette...

  4. Ecological Study of HIV Infection and Hypertension in Sub-Saharan Africa: Is There a Double Burden of Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Angkurawaranon

    Full Text Available Data on prevalence of hypertension were derived from a systematic search of literature published between 1975 and 2014 with corresponding national estimates on HIV prevalence and antiretroviral therapy (ART coverage from the Demographic and Health Surveys and the joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS databases. National estimates on gross national income (GNI and under-five mortality were obtained from the World Bank database. Linear regression analyses using robust standard errors (allowing for clustering at country level were carried out for associations of age-standardised hypertension prevalence ratios (standardized to rural Uganda's hypertension prevalence data with HIV prevalence, adjusted for national indicators, year of study and sex of the study population.In total, 140 estimates of prevalence of hypertension representing 25 nations were sex-and area-matched with corresponding HIV prevalence. A two-fold increase in HIV prevalence was associated with a 9.29% increase in age, sex and study year-adjusted prevalence ratio for hypertension (95% CI 2.0 to 16.5, p = 0.01, which increased to 16.3% (95% CI 9.3 to 21.1 after adjusting for under-five mortality, GNI per capita and ART coverage.Countries with a pronounced burden of HIV may also have an increased burden of non-communicable diseases such as hypertension with potential economic and health systems implications.

  5. Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii by nested PCR in HIV-negative patients with pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina Rodrigues; de Assis, Ângela M; Luz, Edson A; Lyra, Luzia; Toro, Ivan F; Seabra, José Claudio C; Daldin, Dira H; Marcalto, Tathiane U; Galasso, Marcos T; Macedo, Ronaldo F; Schreiber, Angélica Z; Aoki, Francisco H

    Nested PCR can be used to determine the status of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection in other lung diseases. This study sought to detect a target DNA fragment (mitochondrial large subunit rRNA or mtL SUrRNA) of P. jirovecii in patients with lung disease who underwent bronchoscopy with collection of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The results from toluidine blue staining were compared with those obtained using molecular methods that included an "in house" DNA extraction procedure, PCR and nested PCR. Fifty-five BAL samples from patients with atypical chest X-rays were screened for P. jirovecii. None of the samples was positive for P. jirovecii using toluidine blue staining. In contrast, P. jirovecii DNA was detected by nested PCR in BAL samples from 36 of 55 patients (65.5%). The lung diseases in the patients included cancer, pneumonia, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Other chronic problems in the patients included hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and alcoholism. Nested PCR showed high sensitivity for detecting P. jirovecii, especially when compared with toluidine blue staining. Using this method, P. jirovecii infection was detected in HIV-negative patients with lung disease. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Delay in treatment of biliary disease during pregnancy increases morbidity and can be avoided with safe laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, J; Albrink, M; Serafini, F; Rosemurgy, A; Carey, L; Murr, M M

    2001-06-01

    Recent reports indicate that laparoscopic cholecystectomy in pregnancy is safe. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether delays in definitive treatment of symptomatic cholelithiasis increase morbidity. We reviewed the records of 16 women who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy during pregnancy between 1992 and 1999. Mean age was 24 +/- 5 years (mean +/- standard error). Symptom onset was during the first trimester in nine patients, second trimester in six patients, and third trimester in one patient. Patients had abdominal pain (93%), nausea (93%), emesis (80%), and fever (66%) for a median of 45 days (range 1-195 days) before cholecystectomy. Nine of 11 women who underwent cholecystectomy more than 5 weeks after onset of symptoms experienced recurrent attacks necessitating 15 hospital admissions and four emergency room visits. Moreover four women who developed symptoms in the first and second trimesters but whose operations were delayed to the third trimester had 11 hospital admissions and four emergency room visits; three of those four (75%) women developed premature contractions necessitating tocolytics. Cholecystectomy was completed laparoscopically in 14 women. There was no hospital infant or maternal mortality or morbidity. We recommend prompt laparoscopic cholecystectomy in pregnant women with symptomatic biliary disease because it is safe and it reduces hospital admissions and frequency of premature labor.

  7. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: a delayed complication of Hodgkin's disease therapy: analysis of 109 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadman, E.C.; Capizzi, R.L.; Bertino, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of combined modality therapy (irradiation and combinations of drugs) in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease has produced a significant improvement in survival, during which most patients lead an active and productive life. The estimated 1% incidence of leukemia in treated Hodgkin's disease patients, however, is greater than would be expected in the general population. There is a vast amount of literature which indicates that alkylating agents, procarbazine and irradiation are leukemogenic and immunosuppressive in animals and man. It is then conceivable that the current intensive treatment programs which use these agents are promoting the development of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). This leukemia has occurred most often in patients whose Hodgkin's disease is poorly controlled and who have received more aggressive therapy. The latent period from the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease to the diagnosis of leukemia is significantly shorter (p < 0.0005) in those patients who have received intensive and near maximal radiotherapy (total nodal irradiation), combination chemotherapy (MOPP or equivalent) or a sequential combination of the two modalities than similar patients who were threated with less than total nodal irradiation and or single agent chemotherapy. The following characteristic features have occurred with sufficient frequency to suggest that the subsequent leukemia is a distinct clinicopathological entity: pancytopenia, megaloblastoid marrow, nucleated red blood cells in the peripheral blood, random chromosomal aberrations of the bone marrow in most patients (94%), and refractoriness to antileukemia therapy (response rate 6.5%) with a very short survival

  8. An Intervention That Delays Institutionalization of Alzheimer's Disease Patients: Treatment of Spouse-Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, Mary S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Randomly assigned spouse-caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients to treatment group (individual and family counseling, support group participation, and ad hoc consultation) or control group (only routine support). Treatment group had less than half as many nursing home placements as control group. Placement also was affected by patient's need…

  9. Treatment with interferon-alpha delays disease in swine infected with a highly virulent CSFV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically significant, highly contagious swine disease. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is an enveloped virus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome, classified as a member of the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae (Becher et al.,...

  10. Is the virulence of HIV changing? A meta-analysis of trends in prognostic markers of HIV disease progression and transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeck, Joshua T.; Müller, Viktor; Maust, Brandon S.; Ledergerber, Bruno; Torti, Carlo; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Gras, Luuk; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Mullins, James I.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The potential for changing HIV-1 virulence has significant implications for the AIDS epidemic, including changing HIV transmission rates, rapidity of disease progression, and timing of ART. Published data to date have provided conflicting results. Design We conducted a meta-analysis of changes in baseline CD4+ T-cell counts and set point plasma viral RNA load over time in order to establish whether summary trends are consistent with changing HIV-1 virulence. Methods We searched PubMed for studies of trends in HIV-1 prognostic markers of disease progression and supplemented findings with publications referenced in epidemiological or virulence studies. We identified 12 studies of trends in baseline CD4+ T-cell counts (21 052 total individuals), and eight studies of trends in set point viral loads (10 785 total individuals), spanning the years 1984–2010. Using random-effects meta-analysis, we estimated summary effect sizes for trends in HIV-1 plasma viral loads and CD4+ T-cell counts. Results Baseline CD4+ T-cell counts showed a summary trend of decreasing cell counts [effect=−4.93 cells/µl per year, 95% confidence interval (CI) −6.53 to −3.3]. Set point viral loads showed a summary trend of increasing plasma viral RNA loads (effect=0.013 log10 copies/ml per year, 95% CI −0.001 to 0.03). The trend rates decelerated in recent years for both prognostic markers. Conclusion Our results are consistent with increased virulence of HIV-1 over the course of the epidemic. Extrapolating over the 30 years since the first description of AIDS, this represents a CD4+ T cells loss of approximately 148 cells/µl and a gain of 0.39 log10 copies/ml of viral RNA measured during early infection. These effect sizes would predict increasing rates of disease progression, and need for ART as well as increasing transmission risk. PMID:22089381

  11. The impact of HIV-related stigma on older and younger adults living with HIV disease: does age matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emlet, Charles A; Brennan, David J; Brennenstuhl, Sarah; Rueda, Sergio; Hart, Trevor A; Rourke, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the independent influence of age on levels of HIV-related stigma experienced by adults living with HIV/AIDS. To accomplish this, cross-sectional data from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study were used to determine whether older age is associated with overall stigma among HIV-positive adults living in Ontario, Canada (n = 960). The relationship was also tested for enacted, anticipated, and internalized stigma. Covariates included sociodemographic (e.g., gender, sexual orientation, race) and psychosocial variables (e.g., depression). Modifying effects of covariates were also investigated. Those 55 and older have significantly lower overall and internalized stigma than adults under age 40, even when accounting for gender, sexual orientation, income, time since diagnosis, depression, maladaptive coping, and social support. Age does not predict enacted or Anticipated Stigma when accounting for the demographic and psychosocial variables. A significant interaction between depression and age suggests that stigma declines with age among those who are depressed but increases to age 50 and then decreases in older age groups among those who are not depressed. Age matters when it comes to understanding stigma among adults living with HIV/AIDS; however, the relationship between age and stigma is complex, varying according to stigma type and depression level.

  12. FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of HIV-associated multicentric Castleman's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, Rob; Kazmi, Fahrad; Stebbing, Justin; Chinn, Roger; Ngan, Sarah; Bower, Mark; Nelson, Mark; O'Doherty, Michael

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the role of FDG-PET/CT scanning in the management of HIV-associated multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) a rare lymphoproliferative disorder associated with infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8). Nine patients with histologically confirmed MCD underwent fused FDG-PET/CT scans at initial MCD diagnosis (n = 3), at MCD relapse (n = 4), or during remission (n = 2). All seven patients with active MCD had markedly elevated plasma HHV8 viral loads, but the patients in remission had no HHV8 viraemia. The three patients with newly diagnosed MCD were not on antiretroviral therapy at the time of imaging, but the other six were all on fully suppressive antiretroviral regimens. In the seven patients with active MCD (newly diagnosed or relapse) 33/91 lymph node groups (36%) included radiologically enlarged nodes on the CT scan, whilst 57/91 lymph node groups (63%) showed enhanced FDG uptake on the PET scan. In scans from patients in remission, there were no enlarged lymph nodes on the CT scan but 3 lymph nodes (11%) demonstrated enhanced FDG uptake. The median SUV recorded for the seven patients with active MCD was 4.8 (range 2.6-9.3) which was significantly higher than the median value of 2.5 recorded for the patients in remission (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.011). Despite the small number of patients, in HIV-positive individuals with active MCD, FDG-PET scans more frequently detected abnormal uptake than CT scans detected enlarged lymph nodes. FDG-PET scanning has a useful role in the management of HIV-associated MCD in selecting appropriate sites for biopsy, and in staging and monitoring these lymphoproliferations. (orig.)

  13. Integration of outpatient infectious diseases clinic pharmacy services and specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elise M; Gerzenshtein, Lana

    2016-06-01

    The integration of specialty pharmacy services and existing outpatient clinical pharmacy services within an infectious diseases (ID) clinic to optimize the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is described. The management of HIV-infected patients is a highly specialized area of practice, often requiring use of complex medication regimens for reduction of HIV-associated morbidity and mortality prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections, and prevention of HIV transmission. To maximize the effectiveness and safety of treatment with antiretroviral agents and associated pharmacotherapies, an interdisciplinary team is often involved in patient care. At Chicago-based Northwestern Medicine (NM), the outpatient ID clinic has long worked with an interdisciplinary care team including physicians, clinical pharmacists, nurses, and social workers to care for patients with HIV infection. In April 2014, specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection were added to the NM ID clinic's care model to help maintain continuity of care and enhance patient follow-up. The care model includes well-defined roles for clinical pharmacists, pharmacy residents and students on rotation, and licensed pharmacy technicians. Specialty pharmacy services, including medication education, prescription fulfillment, assistance with medication access (e.g., navigation of financial assistance programs, completion of prior-authorization requests), and treatment monitoring, allow for closed-loop medication management of the HIV-infected patient population. Integration of specialty pharmacy services with the interdisciplinary care provided in the outpatient NM ID clinic has enhanced continuity of care for patients with HIV infection in terms of prescription filling, medication counseling, and adherence monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Possible Biomarkers for the Early Detection of HIV-associated Heart Diseases: A Proteomics and Bioinformatics Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraiya Rasheed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of cardiovascular disorders is increasing in HIV-infected individuals despite a significant reduction in the viral load by antiretroviral therapies (ART. Since the CD4+ T-cells are responsible for the viral load as well as immunological responses, we hypothesized that chronic HIV-infection of T-cells produces novel proteins/enzymes that cause cardiac dysfunctions. To identify specific factors that might cause cardiac disorders without the influence of numerous cofactors produced by other pathogenic microorganisms that co-inhabit most HIV-infected individuals, we analyzed genome-wide proteomes of a CD4+ T-cell line at different stages of HIV replication and cell growth over >6 months. Subtractive analyses of several hundred differentially regulated proteins from HIV-infected and uninfected counterpart cells and comparisons with proteins expressed from the same cells after treating with the antiviral drug Zidovudine/AZT and inhibiting virus replication, identified a well-coordinated network of 12 soluble/diffusible proteins in HIV-infected cells. Functional categorization, bioinformatics and statistical analyses of each protein predicted that the expression of cardiac-specific Ca2+ kinase together with multiple Ca2+ release channels causes a sustained overload of Ca2+ in the heart which induces fetal/cardiac myosin heavy chains (MYH6 and MYH7 and a myosin light-chain kinase. Each of these proteins has been shown to cause cardiac stress, arrhythmia, hypertrophic signaling, cardiomyopathy and heart failure (p = 8 × 10−11. Translational studies using the newly discovered proteins produced by HIV infection alone would provide additional biomarkers that could be added to the conventional markers for an early diagnosis and/or development of specific therapeutic interventions for heart diseases in HIV-infected individuals.

  15. Prognostic value of a CCR5 defective allele in pediatric HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiti, M L; Colognesi, C; Cancrini, C; Mas, A; Berrino, M; Salvatori, F; Orlandi, P; Jansson, M; Palomba, E; Plebani, A; Bertran, J M; Hernandez, M; de Martino, M; Amoroso, A; Tovo, P A; Rossi, P; Espanol, T; Scarlatti, G

    2000-01-01

    A deletion of 32 base pairs in the CCR5 gene (delta32 CCR5) has been linked to resistance to HIV-1 infection in exposed adults and to the delay of disease progression in infected adults. To determine the role of delta32 CCR5 in disease progression of HIV-1 infected children born to seropositive mothers, we studied a polymerase chain reaction in 301 HIV-1 infected, 262 HIV-1 exposed-uninfected and 47 HIV-1 unexposed-uninfected children of Spanish and Italian origin. Infected children were further divided into two groups according to their rate of HIV-1 disease progression: rapid progressors who developed severe clinical and/or immunological conditions within the second year of life, and delayed progressors with any other evolution of disease. Among the latter were the long-term, non-progressors (LTNP) who presented with mild or no symptoms of HIV-1 infection above 8 years of age. Viral phenotype was studied for 45 delayed progressors. No correlation was found between delta32 CCR5 and mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1. However, the frequency of the deletion was substantially higher in LTNP, compared with delayed (p = 0.019) and rapid progressors (p = 0.0003). In children carrying the delta32 CCRS mutation, the presence of MT-2 tropic virus isolate was associated with a severe immune suppression (p = 0.028); whereas, the presence of MT-2 negative viruses correlated with LTNP (p = 0.010). Given the rapidity and simplicity of the assay, the delta32 CCR5 mutation may be a useful predictive marker to identify children with delayed disease progression who, consequently, may not require immediate antiretroviral treatment.

  16. Perceived social support affects disease coping among people living with HIV: a study in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Faraji

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine potential correlations between perceived social support and disease coping styles among people living with HIV infection at a referral center in Tehran. Methods: In an observational study, 112 patients were recruited between April and July 2012. Along with demographic characteristics, availability of tangible, informational, and emotional support was measured using subscales extracted from the medical outcomes study: social support survey; disease coping styles were investigated in four groups (problem-focused, emotion-focused, engagement-based, and meaning-based. Data were analyzed to examine whether social support subscales predict coping styles. Results: Almost 70% of the patients were male, and 52% reported sexual contact as their perceived route of infection. Use of coping styles was positively correlated with social support scores (rs = 0.53, P < 0.001, and informational support had significant influence on implementation of three out of the four coping styles (emotion-focused, problem-focused, engagement-based. Being married and not reporting the route of infection were associated with higher social support scores; monthly income and level of education had significant associations with the use of various coping styles. Conclusions: Patients who implement strategies to cope with HIV/AIDS have received more informational and emotional support. This study recommends that the delivery of informational support in a comprehensive package can practically target the current demands of our patients; while thorough investigation of potential effects on disease coping, response to treatment, and compliance can aid us in the design of interventions to target stigma at societal level.

  17. Chronic genital ulcer disease with subsequent development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA urethritis and bacteraemia in an HIV-seropositive person – a case observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Katusiime

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-seropositive persons are at increased risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Genital ulcerative disease and sexually transmitted infection with subsequent MRSA infection in HIV-seropositive persons have been documented only once. We report a case of a 44-year-old man who presented to the Infectious Diseases Institute, Kampala, Uganda, with chronic genital ulcer disease and who subsequently developed MRSA urethritis and bacteraemia. This case also demonstrates that persistent genital ulcer disease in HIV-seropositive persons may be as a result of concurrent MRSA infection.

  18. Treatment with a non-toxic, self-replicating anti-prion delays or prevents prion disease in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Espinoza, R; Morales, R; Concha-Marambio, L; Moreno-Gonzalez, I; Moda, F; Soto, C

    2018-03-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurological disorders caused by prions, which are composed of a misfolded protein (PrP Sc ) that self-propagates in the brain of infected individuals by converting the normal prion protein (PrP C ) into the pathological isoform. Here, we report a novel experimental strategy for preventing prion disease based on producing a self-replicating, but innocuous PrP Sc -like form, termed anti-prion, which can compete with the replication of pathogenic prions. Our results show that a prophylactic inoculation of prion-infected animals with an anti-prion delays the onset of the disease and in some animals completely prevents the development of clinical symptoms and brain damage. The data indicate that a single injection of the anti-prion eliminated ~99% of the infectivity associated to pathogenic prions. Furthermore, this treatment caused significant changes in the profile of regional PrP Sc deposition in the brains of animals that were treated, but still succumbed to the disease. Our findings provide new insights for a mechanistic understanding of prion replication and support the concept that prion replication can be separated from toxicity, providing a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Uptake of community-based HIV testing during a multi-disease health campaign in rural Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Chamie

    Full Text Available The high burden of undiagnosed HIV in sub-Saharan Africa is a major obstacle for HIV prevention and treatment. Multi-disease, community health campaigns (CHCs offering HIV testing are a successful approach to rapidly increase HIV testing rates and identify undiagnosed HIV. However, a greater understanding of population-level uptake is needed to maximize effectiveness of this approach.After community sensitization and a census, a five-day campaign was performed in May 2012 in a rural Ugandan community. The census enumerated all residents, capturing demographics, household location, and fingerprint biometrics. The CHC included point-of-care screening for HIV, malaria, TB, hypertension and diabetes. Residents who attended vs. did not attend the CHC were compared to determine predictors of participation.Over 12 days, 18 census workers enumerated 6,343 residents. 501 additional residents were identified at the campaign, for a total community population of 6,844. 4,323 (63% residents and 556 non-residents attended the campaign. HIV tests were performed in 4,795/4,879 (98.3% participants; 1,836 (38% reported no prior HIV testing. Of 2674 adults tested, 257 (10% were HIV-infected; 125/257 (49% reported newly diagnosed HIV. In unadjusted analyses, adult resident campaign non-participation was associated with male sex (62% male vs. 67% female participation, p = 0.003, younger median age (27 years in non-participants vs. 32 in participants; p<0.001, and marital status (48% single vs. 71% married/widowed/divorced participation; p<0.001. In multivariate analysis, single adults were significantly less likely to attend the campaign than non-single adults (relative risk [RR]: 0.63 [95% CI: 0.53-0.74]; p<0.001, and adults at home vs. not home during census activities were significantly more likely to attend the campaign (RR: 1.20 [95% CI: 1.13-1.28]; p<0.001.CHCs provide a rapid approach to testing a majority of residents for HIV in rural African settings

  20. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  1. Previously Unidentified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in HIV/AIDS Cases Associate with Clinical Parameters and Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic background of an individual plays an important role in the progression of HIV infection to AIDS. Identifying previously unknown or uncharacterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that associate with disease progression may reveal important therapeutic targets and provide a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis. In the present study, we employed ultra-high multiplex PCR on an Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing platform to sequence 23 innate immune genes from 94 individuals with HIV/AIDS. This data was used to identify potential associations of SNPs with clinical parameters and disease progression. SNPs that associated with an increased viral load were identified in the genes for the interleukin 15 receptor (IL15RA, toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7, tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5, and two killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3. Additionally, SNPs that associated with progression from HIV infection to AIDS were identified in two 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase genes (OAS2 and OAS3. In contrast, other SNPs identified in OAS2 and OAS3 genes, as well as in the TRIM5 and KIR2DS4 genes, were associated with a slower progression of disease. Taken together, our data demonstrates the utility of ultra-high multiplex PCR in identifying polymorphisms of potential clinical significance and further,identifies SNPs that may play a role in HIV pathogenesis.

  2. Related or not? Development of spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a patient with chronic, well-controlled HIV: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babi, M-Alain; Kraft, Bryan D; Sengupta, Sweta; Peterson, Haley; Orgel, Ryan; Wegermann, Zachary; Lugogo, Njira L; Luedke, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel case of a rare disease: spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a patient with well-controlled HIV. We explore the relationship between spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and HIV. A 66-year-old man with long-standing, well-controlled HIV infection presented with 3 months of progressive, subacute neurocognitive decline. His symptoms included conceptual apraxia, apathy, memory impairment, and gait disturbance, and were initially attributed to depressive "pseudo-dementia." Unfortunately, the patient's symptoms rapidly progressed and he ultimately succumbed to his illness. Autopsy confirmed the clinical diagnosis of spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This case highlights spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease as a rare terminal illness in the setting of well-controlled chronic HIV. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with chronic and previously well-controlled HIV infection dying from a prion disease. Despite the very different epidemiology and pathophysiology of HIV and spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, this case does raise questions of whether certain host genetic factors could predispose to both conditions, albeit currently, there is no clear causal link between HIV and spontaneous Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  3. Functional bracing for delayed union of a femur fracture associated with Paget's disease of the bone in an Asian patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuta Masashi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Paget's disease of the bone is a common metabolic bone disease in most European countries, Australia, New Zealand, and North America. Conversely, this disease is rare in Scandinavia, Asia, and Africa. In Japan, it is extremely rare, with a prevalence of 0.15/100000. Paget's disease is a localized disorder of bone remodeling. Excessive bone resorption and abnormal bone formation result in biomechanically weakened bone and predispose patients to fracture. Delayed union and non-union of fractures have been reported in patients with Paget's disease. Therefore, open reduction and internal fixation of fractures has been recommended to prevent such complications. Here we report an unusual case of a 63-year-old Asian woman with delayed union of a femur fracture secondary to Paget's disease, which was treated successfully by functional bracing.

  4. Distribution of HIV-1 resistance-conferring polymorphic alleles SDF ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymorphic allelic variants of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5, as well as of stromal-derived factor-1 SDF-1, the ligand for the chemokine receptor CXCR4, are known to have protective effects against HIV-1 infection and to be involved with delay in disease progression. We have studied the DNA polymorphisms at ...

  5. Effects of Delay Duration on the WMS Logical Memory Performance of Older Adults with Probable Alzheimer's Disease, Probable Vascular Dementia, and Normal Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Valencia; Harris, Katie; Stabler, Anthony; Lu, Lisa H

    2017-05-01

    To examine how the duration of time delay between Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) Logical Memory I and Logical Memory II (LM) affected participants' recall performance. There are 46,146 total Logical Memory administrations to participants diagnosed with either Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), or normal cognition in the National Alzheimer's Disease Coordinating Center's Uniform Data Set. Only 50% of the sample was administered the standard 20-35 min of delay as specified by WMS-R and WMS-III. We found a significant effect of delay time duration on proportion of information retained for the VaD group compared to its control group, which remained after adding LMI raw score as a covariate. There was poorer retention of information with longer delay for this group. This association was not as strong for the AD and cognitively normal groups. A 24.5-min delay was most optimal for differentiating AD from VaD participants (47.7% classification accuracy), an 18.5-min delay was most optimal for differentiating AD versus normal participants (51.7% classification accuracy), and a 22.5-min delay was most optimal for differentiating VaD versus normal participants (52.9% classification accuracy). Considering diagnostic implications, our findings suggest that test administration should incorporate precise tracking of delay periods. We recommend a 20-min delay with 18-25-min range. Poor classification accuracy based on LM data alone is a reminder that story memory performance is only one piece of data that contributes to complex clinical decisions. However, strict adherence to the recommended range yields optimal data for diagnostic decisions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Treatment and disease progression in a birth cohort of vertically HIV-1 infected children in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilipenko Tatyana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ukraine has the highest HIV prevalence (1.6% and is facing the fastest growing epidemic in Europe. Our objective was to describe the clinical, immunological and virological characteristics, treatment and response in vertically HIV-infected children living in Ukraine and followed from birth. Methods The European Collaborative Study (ECS is an ongoing cohort study, in which HIV-1 infected pregnant women are enrolled and followed in pregnancy, and their children prospectively followed from birth. ECS enrolment in Ukraine started in 2000 initially with three sites, increasing to seven sites by 2009. Results A total of 245 infected children were included in the cohort by April 2009, with a median age of 23 months at most recent follow-up; 33% (n = 77 had injecting drug using mothers and 85% (n = 209 were infected despite some use of antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Fifty-five (22% children had developed AIDS, at a median age of 10 months (IQR = 6-19. The most prevalent AIDS indicator disease was Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP. Twenty-seven (11% children had died (median age, 6.2 months. Overall, 108 (44% children had started highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART, at a median 18 months of age; median HAART duration was 6.6 months to date. No child discontinued HAART and 92% (100/108 remained on their first-line HAART regimen to date. Among children with moderate/severe immunosuppression, 36% had not yet started HAART. Among children on HAART, 71% (69/97 had no evidence of immunosuppression at their most recent visit; the median reduction in HIV RNA was 4.69 log10 copies/mL over a median of 10 months treatment. From survival analysis, an estimated 94%, 84% and 81% of children will be alive and AIDS-free at 6, 12 and 18 months of age, respectively. However, survival increased significantly over time: estimated survival rates to 12 months of age were 87% for children born in 2000

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV types Western blot (WB band profiles as potential surrogate markers of HIV disease progression and predictors of vertical transmission in a cohort of infected but antiretroviral therapy naïve pregnant women in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirenje Mike Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expensive CD4 count and viral load tests have failed the intended objective of enabling access to HIV therapy in poor resource settings. It is imperative to develop simple, affordable and non-subjective disease monitoring tools to complement clinical staging efforts of inexperienced health personnel currently manning most healthcare centres because of brain drain. Besides accurately predicting HIV infection, sequential appearance of specific bands of WB test offers a window of opportunity to develop a less subjective tool for monitoring disease progression. Methods HIV type characterization was done in a cohort of infected pregnant women at 36 gestational weeks using WB test. Student-t test was used to determine maternal differences in mean full blood counts and viral load of mothers with and those without HIV gag antigen bands. Pearson Chi-square test was used to assess differences in lack of bands appearance with vertical transmission and lymphadenopathy. Results Among the 64 HIV infected pregnant women, 98.4% had pure HIV-1 infection and one woman (1.7% had dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infections. Absence of HIV pol antigen bands was associated with acute infection, p = 0.002. All women with chronic HIV-1 infection had antibody reactivity to both the HIV-1 envelope and polymerase antigens. However, antibody reactivity to gag antigens varied among the women, being 100%, 90%, 70% and 63% for p24, p17, p39 and p55, respectively. Lack of antibody reactivity to gag p39 antigen was associated with disease progression as confirmed by the presence of lymphadenopathy, anemia, higher viral load, p = 0.010, 0.025 and 0.016, respectively. Although not statistically significant, women with p39 band missing were 1.4 times more likely to transmit HIV-1 to their infants. Conclusion Absence of antibody reactivity to pol and gag p39 antigens was associated with acute infection and disease progression, respectively. Apart from its use in HIV disease

  8. Preparedness of HIV care and treatment clinics for the management of concomitant non–communicable diseases: a cross–sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Claudia; Aris, Eric; Mhalu, Aisa; Siril, Hellen; Christian, Beatrice; Koda, Happiness; Samatta, Talumba; Maghimbi, Martha Tsere; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Chalamilla, Guerino; Hawkins, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In Sub-Saharan Africa, epidemiological studies have reported an increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) among people living with HIV. NCD management can be feasibly integrated into HIV care; however, clinic readiness to provide NCD services in these settings should first be assessed and gaps in care identified. Methods A cross-sectional survey conducted in July 2013 assessed the resources available for NCD care at 14 HIV clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Sur...

  9. A new multiplex PCR strategy for the simultaneous determination of four genetic polymorphisms affecting HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ohlendorff, Stine Dahl

    2001-01-01

    The CCR5 Delta32, CCR2 64I, SDF1 3'A, and CCR5 promoter 59029 polymorphisms have been suggested to influence HIV-1 disease progression. Furthermore, the CCR5 Delta32 and the CCR2 64I polymorphisms have been associated with various other diseases. The purpose of the present study was to develop......, SDF1 3'A, and CCR5 promoter 59029 A/G polymorphisms....

  10. The imaging of HIV-related brain disease | Hoare | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 In addition, there is growing recognition that many HIV-infected individuals will develop neuropsychiatric disorders relatively early in the course of HIV ... the neurotoxic effects of HIV result in damage to white matter tracts in the brain.6 Once damage is established and related cognitive disorders ensue, the ability of HAART ...

  11. Chest radiographic pulmonary changes reflecting extrapulmonary involvement in paediatric HIV disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, Richard D.; Goddard, Elizabeth; Hendricks, Marc; Lawrenson, John

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory infections are the commonest cause of pulmonary change on chest radiographs of HIV-infected children. However, HIV-related neurological, oropharyngeal, oesophageal, cardiac and haematological abnormalities may also manifest with pulmonary changes and must be considered in the interpretation of the chest radiograph in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  12. The effects of untreated and treated HIV infection on bone disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, Aoife G

    2013-11-20

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is common in those with HIV, associated with higher bone turnover and a higher prevalence of fractures. This review explores low BMD in HIV, focusing on underlying mechanisms and relationships between low BMD and HIV infection, immune dysfunction, and antiretroviral therapy (ART).

  13. Severity of cardiovascular disease outcomes among patients with HIV is related to markers of inflammation and coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordell, Anna D; McKenna, Matthew; Borges, Álvaro H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the general population, raised levels of inflammatory markers are stronger predictors of fatal than nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. People with HIV have elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and D-dimer; HIV-induced acti...... with a greater risk of fatal CVD and a greater risk of death after a nonfatal CVD event. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov Unique identifier: SMART: NCT00027352, ESPRIT: NCT00004978, SILCAAT: NCT00013611....

  14. Antioxidant agents for delaying diabetic kidney disease progression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bolignano

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a key player in the genesis and worsening of diabetic kidney disease (DKD. We aimed at collecting all available information on possible benefits of chronic antioxidant supplementations on DKD progression.Systematic review and meta-analysis.Adults with DKD (either secondary to type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus.Cochrane CENTRAL, Ovid-MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs or quasi-RCTs without language or follow-up restriction.Any antioxidant supplementation (including but not limited to vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, zinc, methionine or ubiquinone alone or in combination.Primary outcome was progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD. Secondary outcomes were change in albuminuria, proteinuria, serum creatinine and renal function.From 13519 potentially relevant citations retrieved, 15 articles referring to 14 full studies (4345 participants met the inclusion criteria. Antioxidant treatment significantly decreased albuminuria as compared to control (8 studies, 327 participants; SMD: -0.47; 95% CI -0.78, -0.16 but had apparently no tangible effects on renal function (GFR (3 studies, 85 participants; MD -0.12 ml/min/1.73m2; 95% CI -0.06, 0.01. Evidence of benefits on the other outcomes of interest was inconclusive or lacking.Small sample size and limited number of studies. Scarce information available on hard endpoints (ESKD. High heterogeneity among studies with respect to DKD severity, type and duration of antioxidant therapy.In DKD patients, antioxidants may improve early renal damage. Future studies targeting hard endpoints and with longer follow-up and larger sample size are needed to confirm the usefulness of these agents for retarding DKD progression.

  15. Impacts of neglected tropical disease on incidence and progression of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria: scientific links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs are the most common infections of humans in Sub-Saharan Africa. Virtually all of the population living below the World Bank poverty figure is affected by one or more NTDs. New evidence indicates a high degree of geographic overlap between the highest-prevalence NTDs (soil-transmitted helminths, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, and trachoma and malaria and HIV, exhibiting a high degree of co-infection. Recent research suggests that NTDs can affect HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis (TB, and malaria disease progression. A combination of immunological, epidemiological, and clinical factors can contribute to these interactions and add to a worsening prognosis for people affected by HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria. Together these results point to the impacts of the highest-prevalence NTDs on the health outcomes of malaria, HIV/AIDS, and TB and present new opportunities to design innovative public health interventions and strategies for these ‘big three’ diseases. This analysis describes the current findings of research and what research is still needed to strengthen the knowledge base of the impacts NTDs have on the big three.

  16. Removal of Kidney Stones by Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Is Associated with Delayed Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dong Eun; Han, Seung Hyeok; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Seung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Lee, Mi Jung; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to elucidate whether stone removal by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is associated with delayed chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 131 nephrolithiasis patients with stage 3 and 4 CKD. We collected baseline clinical and laboratory data, kidney stone characteristics, and history of receiving ESWL. We classified study patients into two groups according to whether they underwent ESWL or not (Non-ESWL group vs. ESWL group). We initially compared annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) changes of Non-ESWL group with those of ESWL group before undergoing ESWL. In the next step, we sought to compare annual eGFR changes in the same patients before and after ESWL. Finally, we compared annual eGFR changes between success and failure groups among patients undergoing ESWL. Results The mean age of the patients was 62 years and 72.5% were male. The mean observation period was 3.2 years. Non-ESWL group and ESWL group before undergoing ESWL showed similar annual eGFR changes (-1.75±6.5 vs. -1.63±7.2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, p=0.425). However, eGFR declined slower after undergoing ESWL than before ESWL (annual eGFR changes, -0.29±6.1 vs. -1.63±7.2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, pESWL group, eGFR declined faster in the failure group than in the success group (annual eGFR change, -1.01±4.7 vs. -0.05±5.2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, pESWL is associated with delayed deterioration of renal function in CKD patients with nephrolithiasis. PMID:22665335

  17. Aberrant modulation of a delayed rectifier potassium channel by glutamate in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Markakis, Ioannis; Davaki, Panagiota; Tsaltas, Eleftheria; Rombos, Antonis; Hatzimanolis, Alexandros; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2010-02-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), potassium channel abnormalities have been reported in both neural and peripheral tissues. Herein, using whole-cell patch-clamp, we demonstrate an aberrant glutamate-dependent modulation of K(V)1.3 channels in T lymphocytes of AD patients. Although intrinsic K(V)1.3 properties in patients were similar to healthy individuals, glutamate (1-1000 microM) failed to yield the hyperpolarizing shift normally observed in K(V)1.3 steady-state inactivation (-4.4+/-2.7 mV in AD vs. -14.3+/-2.5 mV in controls, 10 microM glutamate), resulting in a 4-fold increase of resting channel activity. Specific agonist and antagonist data indicate that this abnormality is due to dysfunction of cognate group II mGluRs. Given that glutamate is present in plasma and that both mGluRs and K(V)1.3 channels regulate T-lymphocyte responsiveness, our finding may account for the presence of immune-associated alterations in AD. Furthermore, if this aberration reflects a corresponding one in neural tissue, it could provide a potential target in AD pathogenesis.

  18. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease: bilingualism as a form of cognitive reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-11-09

    There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology.

  19. The impact of disease stage on direct medical costs of HIV management: a review of the international literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Adrian; Johnston, Karissa; Annemans, Lieven; Tramarin, Andrea; Montaner, Julio

    2010-01-01

    The global prevalence of HIV infection continues to grow, as a result of increasing incidence in some countries and improved survival where highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is available. Growing healthcare expenditure and shifts in the types of medical resources used have created a greater need for accurate information on the costs of treatment. The objectives of this review were to compare published estimates of direct medical costs for treating HIV and to determine the impact of disease stage on such costs, based on CD4 cell count and plasma viral load. A literature review was conducted to identify studies meeting prespecified criteria for information content, including an original estimate of the direct medical costs of treating an HIV-infected individual, stratified based on markers of disease progression. Three unpublished cost-of-care studies were also included, which were applied in the economic analyses published in this supplement. A two-step procedure was used to convert costs into a common price year (2004) using country-specific health expenditure inflators and, to account for differences in currency, using health-specific purchasing power parities to express all cost estimates in US dollars. In all nine studies meeting the eligibility criteria, infected individuals were followed longitudinally and a 'bottom-up' approach was used to estimate costs. The same patterns were observed in all studies: the lowest CD4 categories had the highest cost; there was a sharp decrease in costs as CD4 cell counts rose towards 100 cells/mm³; and there was a more gradual decline in costs as CD4 cell counts rose above 100 cells/mm³. In the single study reporting cost according to viral load, it was shown that higher plasma viral load level (> 100,000 HIV-RNA copies/mL) was associated with higher costs of care. The results demonstrate that the cost of treating HIV disease increases with disease progression, particularly at CD4 cell counts below 100 cells

  20. Estimates of global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and mortality of HIV, 1980-2015 : the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Haidong; Wolock, Tim M.; Carter, Austin; Nguyen, Grant; Kyu, Hmwe Hmwe; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Hay, Simon I.; Mills, Edward J.; Trickey, Adam; Msemburi, William; Coates, Matthew M.; Mooney, Meghan D.; Fraser, Maya S.; Sligar, Amber; Salomon, Joshua; Larson, Heidi J.; Friedman, Joseph; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Abate, Kalkidan Hassen; Abbas, Kaja M.; Abd El Razek, Mohamed Magdy; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abdulle, Abdishakur M.; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M. E.; Abyu, Gebre Yitayih; Adebiyi, Akindele Olupelumi; Adedeji, Isaac Akinkunmi; Adelekan, Ademola Lukman; Adofo, Koranteng; Adou, Arsene Kouablan; Ajala, Oluremi N.; Akinyemiju, Tomi F.; Akseer, Nadia; Al Lami, Faris Hasan; Al-Aly, Ziyad; Alam, Khurshid; Alam, Noore K. M.; Alasfoor, Deena; Aldhahri, Saleh Fahed S.; Aldridge, Robert William; Alegretti, Miguel Angel; Aleman, Alicia V.; Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Ali, Raghib; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Hoek, Hans W.

    Background Timely assessment of the burden of HIV/AIDS is essential for policy setting and programme evaluation. In this report from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we provide national estimates of levels and trends of HIV/AIDS incidence, prevalence, coverage of antiretroviral

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National ... not just injection) can put a person at risk for getting HIV. Drug and alcohol intoxication affect ...

  2. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS ... but no cure, at the present time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are ...

  3. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, ... hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National ...

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease ... About HIV/AIDS. ( https://www.cdc.gov/actagainstaids/basics/whatishiv.html ). Atlanta, GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November ...

  5. Soap and water prophylaxis for limiting genital ulcer disease and HIV-1 infection in men in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, N

    1993-08-01

    In general, East, Central and Southern Africa appear to be worse affected by HIV-1 infection than West Africa. So far there is little evidence to suggest that differences in either sexual behaviour or numbers of sexual partners could account for this disparity. Two risk factors in men for acquiring HIV-1, that tend to vary along this geographical divide, are lack of circumcision and genital ulcer disease (GUD) which are much less common in West Africa. Although uncircumcised men with GUD are an important high frequency HIV-1 transmitter core group, few interventions have targeted such individuals. Given the recent expansion in AIDS-related technologies, is it possible that methods effective in limiting GUD in the preantibiotic era have been overlooked? During the first and second world wars, chancroid, the commonest cause of GUD in Africa today, was controlled successfully with various prophylactics including soap and water. Many parts of Africa are undergoing social upheaval against a background of violence, and in this environment soap and water prophylaxis would now seem to merit re-evaluation as an intervention for preventing both GUD and HIV-1 in uncircumcised men. By facilitating healing of traumatic, inflammatory and infected penile lesions, pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis with soap and water could be a cheap and effective method for decreasing the risks of acquiring GUD and HIV in this vulnerable group of uncircumcised men.

  6. Fluctuations in Blood Marginal Zone B-Cell Frequencies May Reflect Migratory Patterns Associated with HIV-1 Disease Progression Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, Julie; Chagnon-Choquet, Josiane; Poudrier, Johanne; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that overexpression of BLyS/BAFF was associated with increased relative frequencies of innate "precursor" marginal zone (MZ)-like B-cells in the blood of HIV-1-infected rapid and classic progressors. However, along with relatively normal BLyS/BAFF expression levels, these cells remain unaltered in elite-controllers (EC), rather, percentages of more mature MZ-like B-cells are decreased in the blood of these individuals. Fluctuations in frequencies of blood MZ-like B-cell populations may reflect migratory patterns associated with disease progression status, suggesting an important role for these cells in HIV-1 pathogenesis. We have therefore longitudinally measured plasma levels of B-tropic chemokines by ELISA-based technology as well as their ligands by flow-cytometry on blood B-cell populations of HIV-1-infected individuals with different rates of disease progression and uninfected controls. Migration potential of B-cell populations from these individuals were determined by chemotaxis assays. We found important modulations of CXCL13-CXCR5, CXCL12-CXCR4/CXCR7, CCL20-CCR6 and CCL25-CCR9 chemokine-axes and increased cell migration patterns in HIV progressors. Interestingly, frequencies of CCR6 expressing cells were significantly elevated within the precursor MZ-like population, consistent with increased migration in response to CCL20. Although we found little modulation of chemokine-axes in EC, cell migration was greater than that observed for uninfected controls, especially for MZ-like B-cells. Overall the immune response against HIV-1 may involve recruitment of MZ-like B-cells to peripheral sites. Moreover, our findings suggest that "regulated" attraction of these cells in a preserved BLyS/BAFF non-inflammatory environment, such as encountered in EC could be beneficial to the battle and even control of HIV.

  7. Critical appraisal of arguments for the delayed-start design proposed as alternative to the parallel-group randomized clinical trial design in the field of rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spineli, Loukia M; Jenz, Eva; Großhennig, Anika; Koch, Armin

    2017-08-17

    A number of papers have proposed or evaluated the delayed-start design as an alternative to the standard two-arm parallel group randomized clinical trial (RCT) design in the field of rare disease. However the discussion is felt to lack a sufficient degree of consideration devoted to the true virtues of the delayed start design and the implications either in terms of required sample-size, overall information, or interpretation of the estimate in the context of small populations. To evaluate whether there are real advantages of the delayed-start design particularly in terms of overall efficacy and sample size requirements as a proposed alternative to the standard parallel group RCT in the field of rare disease. We used a real-life example to compare the delayed-start design with the standard RCT in terms of sample size requirements. Then, based on three scenarios regarding the development of the treatment effect over time, the advantages, limitations and potential costs of the delayed-start design are discussed. We clarify that delayed-start design is not suitable for drugs that establish an immediate treatment effect, but for drugs with effects developing over time, instead. In addition, the sample size will always increase as an implication for a reduced time on placebo resulting in a decreased treatment effect. A number of papers have repeated well-known arguments to justify the delayed-start design as appropriate alternative to the standard parallel group RCT in the field of rare disease and do not discuss the specific needs of research methodology in this field. The main point is that a limited time on placebo will result in an underestimated treatment effect and, in consequence, in larger sample size requirements compared to those expected under a standard parallel-group design. This also impacts on benefit-risk assessment.

  8. Linking susceptibility to infectious diseases to immune system abnormalities among HIV Exposed Uninfected Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Ruck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV exposed, uninfected (HEU infants have been shown to have an increase in overall mortality from infectious causes when compared to HIV unexposed, uninfected (HU infants. This is the case in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings. We explore here the concept that specific types of infectious diseases that are more common among HEU infants could provide clues as to the potential underlying immunological abnormalities. The most commonly reported infections in HEU vs. HU are caused by encapsulated bacteria; this suggests the existence of a less effective humoral (antibody, complement immune response. Decreased transplacental transfer of protective maternal antibodies has been seen consistently among HEU newborns, suggesting that this may indeed be one of the key drivers of their susceptibility to infections with encapsulated bacteria. Reassuringly, HEU humoral response to vaccination appears to be well conserved. While there appears to be an increase in overall incidence of acute viral infections, no specific pattern of acute viral infections has emerged; and while there is evidence of increased chronic viral infection from perinatal transmission of hepatitis C and CMV, no data exist to suggest an increase in adverse outcomes. Thus, no firm conclusions about anti-viral effector mechanisms can be drawn. However, the most unusual of reported infections among the HEU have been opportunistic infections, suggesting the possibility of underlying defects in CD4 helper and overall immune regulatory function. This may relate to the observation that the immunological profile of HEUs indicate more activated T cell profile as well as a more inflammatory innate immune response. However, both of these observations appear temporary, marked in early infancy, but no longer evident later in life. The causes of these changes in early life immune profile are likely multifactorial and may be related to in utero exposure to HIV, but also to increased

  9. Molecular HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlet, Thomas; Memmi, Meriam; Saoudin, Henia; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear acid testing is more and more used for the diagnosis of infectious diseases. This paper focuses on the use of molecular tools for HIV screening. The term 'screening' will be used under the meaning of first-line HIV molecular techniques performed on a routine basis, which excludes HIV molecular tests designed to confirm or infirm a newly discovered HIV-seropositive patient or other molecular tests performed for the follow-up of HIV-infected patients. The following items are developed successively: i) presentation of the variety of molecular tools used for molecular HIV screening, ii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of blood products, iii) use of HIV molecular tools for the screening of organs and tissue from human origin, iv) use of HIV molecular tools in medically assisted procreation and v) use of HIV molecular tools in neonates from HIV-infected mothers.

  10. Impact of Perinatally Acquired HIV Disease Upon Longitudinal Changes in Memory and Executive Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malee, Kathleen M; Chernoff, Miriam C; Sirois, Patricia A; Williams, Paige L; Garvie, Patricia A; Kammerer, Betsy L; Harris, Lynnette L; Nozyce, Molly L; Yildirim, Cenk; Nichols, Sharon L

    2017-08-01

    Little is known regarding effects of perinatally acquired HIV infection (PHIV) on longitudinal change in memory and executive functioning (EF) during adolescence despite the importance of these skills for independence in adulthood. PHIV (n = 144) and perinatally HIV-exposed uninfected youth (PHEU, n = 79), ages 12-17, completed standardized tests of memory and EF at baseline and 2 years later. Changes from baseline for each memory and EF outcome were compared between PHEU and PHIV youth with (PHIV/C, n = 39) and without (PHIV/non-C, n = 105) history of CDC class C (AIDS-defining) diagnoses. Among PHIV youth, associations of baseline and past disease severity with memory and EF performance at follow-up were evaluated using adjusted linear regression models. Participants were primarily black (79%); 16% were Hispanic; 55% were female. Mean memory and EF scores at follow-up generally fell in the low-average to average range. Pairwise comparison of adjusted mean change from baseline to follow-up revealed significantly greater change for PHIV/non-C compared with PHEU youth in only one verbal recognition task, with a difference in mean changes for PHIV/non-C versus PHEU of -0.99 (95% CI: -1.80 to -0.19; P = 0.02). Among youth with PHIV, better immunologic status at baseline was positively associated with follow-up measures of verbal recall and recognition and cognitive inhibition/flexibility. Past AIDS-defining diagnoses and higher peak viral load were associated with lower performance across multiple EF tasks at follow-up. Youth with PHIV demonstrated stable memory and EF during a 2-year period of adolescence, allowing cautious optimism regarding long-term outcomes.

  11. HIV-associated salivary gland disease--clinical or imaging diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Rath, Inês Beatriz; Beltrame, Ana Paula C A; Carvalho, Aroldo P; Schaeffer, Marcela B; Almeida, Izabel C S

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed at studying the salivary gland disease (SGD) as it relates to associated factors, such as persistent generalised lymphadenopathy (PGL), lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP), clinical and immunological features of AIDS, and salivary flow rate and pH, as well as at exploring the relationship between the clinical diagnosis and the imaging diagnosis by ultrasound (US) examination of the parotid glands. Information regarding the observation of parotid gland enlargement, PGL, LIP, and clinical and immunological features of AIDS was gathered from medical records, and a saliva sample for unstimulated salivary flow rate and pH measurement was collected from 142 children aged 3 through 10 years treated at the Department of Infectious Diseases of Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. High-resolution ultrasonography was performed in 58 children. Pearson's chi-square test and t-test were used to evaluate the association between the variables. A significant association was found between SGD and LIP. Ultrasound revealed a 50% higher incidence of SGD that was not reported in the patients' records. US examination proved to be essential for the correct diagnosis and monitoring of the progression of HIV/SGD. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Gastrointestinal diseases in HIV-positive patients: ultrasonography and computed tomography in a study of 85 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.; Yague, D.; Garcia, C.; Villalon, M.; Pascual, A.; Artigas, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Gastrointestinal diseases constitute the second most common group conditions affecting HIV-positive patients after respiratory diseases. Gastrointestinal involvement may even be the first sign of the disease, a facto which demonstrates the importance of its proper assessment. To demonstrate the utility of computed tomography and ultrasound in the study of gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary diseases in the HIV-positive patient. We review a series of 85 HIV-positive patients presenting gastrointestinal symptomatology who underwent ultrasonography and/or computed tomography. the definitive diagnosis was achieved in all the patients by microbiological or histopathological means. In our series 36.4% the patients had presented systemic TB, 23.52% CMV infection, 17.64% Cryptosporidium infection and 17.64% MAI infection. Much lower incidences were found for Mycobacterium xenopi. M. kansai and Leishmania infection. The presence of lymphoma was confirmed in 7.05% of the patients and Koposi's sarcoma in 0.95%. In these patients, the most common finding on imaging studies in lymph node involvement, followed by diffuse hepatosplenomegaly. Imaging techniques, especially ultrasonography and computed tomography, are useful in these patients: although they do not provide the diagnosis, they do contribute data of prognostic and therapeutic importance. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazhila C. Chinsembu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond. Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach. Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L. Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd. Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants.

  14. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants.

  15. Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.L. Murray (Christopher); K.F. Ortblad (Katrina F); C. Guinovart (Caterina); S.S. Lim (Stephen); T.M. Wolock (Timothy M); D.A. Roberts (D Allen); E.A. Dansereau (Emily A); N. Graetz (Nicholas); R.M. Barber (Ryan); J.C. Brown (Jonathan C); H. Wang (Haidong); H.C. Duber (Herbert C); M. Naghavi (Morteza); D. Dicker (Daniel); L. Dandona (Lalit); J.A. Salomon (Joshua); K.R. Heuton (Kyle R); K. Foreman (Kyle); D.E. Phillips (David E); T.D. Fleming (Thomas D); A.D. Flaxman (Abraham D); B.K. Phillips (Bryan K); E.M. Johnson (Elizabeth); M.S. Coggeshall (Megan S); F. Abd-Allah (Foad); S.F. Abera (Semaw Ferede); J.P. Abraham (Jerry); I. Abubakar (Ibrahim); L.J. Abu-Raddad (Laith J); N.M. Abu-Rmeileh (Niveen Me); T. Achoki (Tom); A. Adeyemo (Adebowale); A.K. Adou (Arsène Kouablan); J.C. Adsuar (José C); E.E. Agardh (Emilie Elisabet); D. Akena (Dickens); M.J. Al Kahbouri (Mazin J); D. Alasfoor (Deena); M.I. Albittar (Mohammed I); G. Alcalá-Cerra (Gabriel); M.A. Alegretti (Miguel Angel); G. Alemu (Getnet ); R. Alfonso-Cristancho (Rafael); S. Alhabib (Samia); R. Ali (Raghib); F. Alla (Francois); P.J. Allen (Peter); U. Alsharif (Ubai); E. Alvarez (Elena); N. Alvis-Guzman (Nelson); A.A. Amankwaa (Adansi A); A.T. Amare (Azmeraw T); H. Amini (Hassan); K.A. Ammar; B.O. Anderson (Benjamin); C.A.T. Antonio (Carl Abelardo T); P. Anwari (Palwasha); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); V.S.A. Arsenijevic (Valentina S Arsic); A. Artaman (Ali); R.J. Asghar (Rana J); R. Assadi (Reza); L.S. Atkins (Lydia S); A.F. Badawi (Alaa); A. Banerjee (Amitava); S. Basu (Saonli); J. Beardsley (Justin); T. Bekele (Tolesa); M.L. Bell (Michelle Lee); E. Bernabe (Eduardo); T.J. Beyene (Tariku Jibat); N. Bhala (Neeraj); P.L. Bhalla (Pankaj); Z.A. Bhutta (Zulfiqar A); A.B. Abdulhak (Aref Bin); A. Binagwaho (Agnes); J.D. Blore (Jed D); D. Bose (Dipan); M. Brainin (Michael); N. Breitborde (Nicholas); C.A. Castañeda-Orjuela (Carlos A); F. Catalá-López (Ferrán); D. Chadha; J.-C. Chang (Jung-Chen); Y.T. Chiang; T.-W. Chuang (Ting-Wu); M. Colomar (Mercedes); L.T. Cooper Jr. (Leslie Trumbull); C. Cooper (Charles); K.J. Courville (Karen J); M.R. Cowie (Martin R.); M. Criqui (Michael); R. Dandona (Rakhi); A. Dayama (Anand); D. de Leo (Diego); F. Degenhardt; B. Del Pozo-Cruz (Borja); K. Deribe (Kebede); D.C. Des Jarlais (Don C); M. Dessalegn (Muluken); S.D. Dharmaratne (Samath D); U. Dilmen (Uǧur); E.L. Ding (Eric); J.M. Driscoll; Z. Durrani; R.G. Ellenbogen (Richard G); S. Ermakov (Sergey); A. Esteghamati (Alireza); E.J.A. Faraon (Emerito Jose A); F. Farzadfar (Farshad); S.-M. Fereshtehnejad (Seyed-Mohammad); D.O. Fijabi (Daniel Obadare); M.H. Forouzanfar (Mohammad H); U. Fra.Paleo (Urbano); L. Gaffikin (Lynne); A. Gamkrelidze (Amiran); F.G. Gankpé (Fortuné Gbètoho); J.M. Geleijnse (Marianne); B.D. Gessner (Bradford D); K.B. Gibney (Katherine B); I.A.M. Ginawi (Ibrahim Abdelmageem Mohamed); E.L. Glaser (Elizabeth L); P. Gona (Philimon); A. Goto (Akimoto); H.N. Gouda (Hebe N); H.C. Gugnani (Harish Chander); R. Gupta (Rajeev); R. Gupta (Rajeev); N. Hafezi-Nejad (Nima); R.R. Hamadeh (Randah Ribhi); M. Hammami (Mouhanad); G.J. Hankey (Graeme); H.L. Harb (Hilda L); J.M. Haro (Josep Maria); R. Havmoeller (Rasmus); S.I. Hay (Simon I); M.T. Hedayati (Mohammad T); I.B.H. Pi (Ileana B Heredia); H.W. Hoek (Hans); J.C. Hornberger (John C); H.D. Hosgood (H Dean); P.J. Hotez (Peter); D.G. Hoy (Damian G); J. Huang (Jian); K.M. Iburg (Kim M); B.T. Idrisov (Bulat T); K. Innos (Kaire); K.H. Jacobsen (Kathryn H); P. Jeemon (Panniyammakal); P.N. Jensen (Paul N); V. Jha (Vivekanand); G. Jiang (Guohong); J.B. Jonas; K. Juel (Knud); H. Kan (Haidong); I. Kankindi (Ida); V. Karam (Vincent); F. Karch (Francois); C.K. Karema (Corine Kakizi); A. Kaul (Anil); N. Kawakami (Norito); D.S. Kazi (Dhruv S); A.H. Kemp (Andrew H); A.P. Kengne (Andre Pascal); A. Keren (Andre); M. Kereselidze (Maia); Y.S. Khader (Yousef Saleh); S.E.A.H. Khalifa (Shams Eldin Ali Hassan); E.A. Khan (Ejaz Ahmed); Y.-H. Khang (Young-Ho); I. Khonelidze (Irma); Y. Kinfu (Yohannes); J.M. Kinge (Jonas M); L. Knibbs (Luke); Y. Kokubo (Yoshihiro); S. Kosen (Soewarta); B.K. Defo (Barthelemy Kuate); V.S. Kulkarni (Veena S); C. Kulkarni (Chanda); K. Kumar (Kuldeep); R.B. Kumar (Ravi B); G.A. Kumar (G Anil); G.F. Kwan (Gene F); T. Lai (Taavi); A.L. Balaji (Arjun Lakshmana); H. Lam (Hilton); Q. Lan (Qing); V.C. Lansingh (Van C); H.J. Larson (Heidi J); A. Larsson (Anders); J.-T. Lee (Jong-Tae); P.N. Leigh (Nigel); M. Leinsalu (Mall); R. Leung (Ricky); Y. Li (Yichong); Y. Li (Yongmei); G.M.F. de Lima (Graça Maria Ferreira); H.-H. Lin (Hsien-Ho); S.E. Lipshultz (Steven); S. Liu (Simin); Y. Liu (Yang); B.K. Lloyd (Belinda K); P.A. Lotufo (Paulo A); V.M.P. Machado (Vasco Manuel Pedro); J.H. Maclachlan (Jennifer H); C. Magis-Rodriguez (Carlos); M. Majdan (Marek); C.C. Mapoma (Christopher Chabila); W. Marcenes (Wagner); M.B. Marzan (Melvin Barrientos); J.R. Masci (Joseph R); R. Mashal; A.J. Mason-Jones (Amanda J); B.M. Mayosi (Bongani); T.T. Mazorodze (Tasara T); M.J. Mckay (Michael); M.J. Meaney; M.M. Mehndiratta (Man Mohan); F. Mejia-Rodriguez (Fabiola); Y.A. Melaku (Yohannes Adama); Z.A. Memish (Ziad); W. Mendoza (Walter); T.R. Miller (Ted R); E.J. Mills (Edward J); K.A. Mohammad (Karzan Abdulmuhsin); A.H. Mokdad (Ali H); G.L. Mola (Glen Liddell); L. Monasta (Lorenzo); M. Montico (Marcella); A.R. Moore (Ami R); R. Mori (Riccardo); W.N. Moturi (Wilkister Nyaora); M. Mukaigawara (Mitsuru); A.C. Murthy (Adeline C.); A. Naheed (Aliya); K.S. Naidoo (Kovin S); L. Naldi; M. Nangia (Monika); K.M.V. Narayan (Venkat); J.H.E. Nash (John); C. Nejjari (Chakib); R.D. Nelson (Robert); S.P. Neupane (Sudan Prasad); C. Newton (Cameron); M. Ng (Marie); M.I. Nisar (Muhammad Imran); S. Nolte (Sandra); O.F. Norheim (Ole F); V. Nowaseb (Vincent); L. Nyakarahuka (Luke); I.-H. Oh (In-Hwan); T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); B.O. Olusanya (Bolajoko O); S.B. Omer (Saad B); J.N. Opio (John Nelson); O.E. Orisakwe (Orish Ebere); N.G. Pandian (Natesa); C. Papachristou; M.S. Caicedo (Marco); J. Patten; V.K. Paul (Vinod K); B.I. Pavlin (Boris Igor); N. Pearce (Neil); D.M. Pereira (David M); Z. Pervaiz (Zahid); K. Pesudovs (Konrad); M. Petzold (Max); F. Pourmalek (Farshad); D. Qato (Dima); A.D. Quezada (Amado D); D.A. Quistberg (D Alex); A. Rafay (Anwar); K. Rahimi (Kazem); V. Rahimi-Movaghar (Vafa); S.U. Rahman (Sajjad Ur); M. Raju (Murugesan); S.M. Rana (Saleem M); H. Razavi (Homie); R.Q. Reilly (Robert Quentin); G. Remuzzi (Giuseppe); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); L. Ronfani (Luca); N. van Roy (Nadine); M.L. Sabin (Miriam Lewis); M.Y. Saeedi (Mohammad Yahya); M.A. Sahraian (Mohammad Ali); G.M.J. Samonte (Genesis May J); M.S. Sawhney (Monika); I.J.C. Schneider (Ione J C); D.C. Schwebel (David C); S. Seedat (Soraya); S.G. Sepanlou (Sadaf G); E.E. Servan-Mori (Edson E); S. Sheikhbahaei (Sara); K. Shibuya (Kenji); H.H. Shin (Hwashin Hyun); I. Shiue (Ivy); R. Shivakoti (Rupak); I.D. Sigfusdottir (Inga Dora); D.H. Silberberg (Donald H); A.P. Silva (Andrea P); J. Simard (Jacques); J.A. Singh (Jasvinder); V. Skirbekk (Vegard); K. Sliwa (Karen); S. Soneji (Samir); S.S. Soshnikov (Sergey S); C.T. Sreeramareddy (Chandrashekhar T); V.K. Stathopoulou (Vasiliki Kalliopi); K. Stroumpoulis (Konstantinos); S. Swaminathan; B.C. Sykes (Bryan); K.M. Tabb (Karen M); R.T. Talongwa (Roberto Tchio); E.Y. Tenkorang (Eric Yeboah); A.S. Terkawi (Abdullah Sulieman); A.J. Thomson (Alan J); A.L. Thorne-Lyman (Andrew L); J.A. Towbin (Jeffrey A); J. Traebert (Jefferson); B.X. Tran (Bach X); Z.T. Dimbuene (Zacharie Tsala); M. Tsilimbaris (Miltiadis); U.S. Uchendu (Uche S); K.N. Ukwaja (Kingsley N); S.R. Vallely (Stephen); T.J. Vasankari (Tommi J); N. Venketasubramanian (Narayanaswamy); F.S. Violante (Francesco S); V.V. Vlassov (Vasiliy Victorovich); P. Waller (Patrick); M.T. Wallin (Mitchell T); L. Wang (Linhong); S.X. Wang; Y. Wang (Yanping); S. Weichenthal (Scott); E. Weiderpass (Elisabete); R.G. Weintraub (Robert G); R. Westerman (Ronny); R.G. White (Richard); J.D. Wilkinson (James D); T.N. Williams (Thomas Neil); S.M. Woldeyohannes (Solomon Meseret); J.B. Wong (John); G. Xu (Gelin); Y.C. Yang (Yang C); K.-I. Yano; P. Yip (Paul); N. Yonemoto (Naohiro); S.-J. Yoon (Seok-Jun); M. Younis (Mustafa); C. Yu (Chuanhua); K.Y. Jin (Kim Yun); M. El Sayed Zaki (Maysaa); Y. Zhao (Yong); Y. Zheng (Yuhui); K. Balakrishnan (Kalpana); M. Zhou (Ming); J. Zhu (Jun); X.N. Zou (Xiao Nong); A.D. Lopez (Alan D); T. Vos (Theo)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach

  16. Anti-HI can cause a severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis in sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Clara; Habibi, Anoosha; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Chadebech, Philippe; Chami, Btissam; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Rieux, Claire; Nataf, Joëlle; Bartolucci, Pablo; Peyrard, Thierry; Pirenne, France

    2016-07-01

    Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is a life-threatening condition in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients that is frequently complicated by hyperhemolysis. Antibodies resulting from antigen disparity between donors of European ancestry and patients of African ancestry are common, but situations involving antibodies not classically of clinical significance are also encountered. Anti-HI is generally considered to be an innocuous naturally occurring antibody. We describe two cases of hyperhemolysis with anti-HI and provide details of the reported cases. Both SCD patients were polyimmunized and belonged to blood group B. They developed anti-HI that was reactive at 37°C, after the transfusion of group O red blood cell units matched for all known and produced antibodies classically considered to be clinically significant. Both patients developed DHTR with hyperhemolysis. In the first case, a pregnant woman, a second transfusion was unavoidable and the patient died from cardiac arrest. The state of the second patient improved without the need for further transfusion. Three other cases of DHTR with anti-HI have been described in the literature in SCD patients. The two additional cases reported here definitively demonstrate that anti-HI is dangerous in SCD patients. As a result, ABO-identical matching (including A1 status) must be considered in SCD patients with anti-HI. © 2016 AABB.

  17. Multifunctional liposomes delay phenotype progression and prevent memory impairment in a presymptomatic stage mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Simona; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Tolomeo, Daniele; Forloni, Gianluigi; Masserini, Massimo; Re, Francesca

    2017-07-28

    The failure of clinical trials largely focused on mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease has suggested to the scientific community that the effectiveness of Amyloid-β (Aβ)-centered treatments should be evaluated starting as early as possible, well before irreversible brain damage has occurred. Accordingly, also the preclinical development of new therapies should be carried out taking into account this suggestion. In the present investigation we evaluated the efficacy of a treatment with liposomes multifunctionalized for crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting Aβ, carried out on young APP/PS1 Tg mice, taken as a model of pre-symptomatic disease stage. Liposomes were administered once a week to Tg mice for 7months, starting at the age of 5months and up to the age of 12 when they display AD-like cognitive and brain biochemical/anatomical features. The treatment prevented the onset of the long-term memory impairment and slowed down the deposition of brain Aβ; at anatomical level, prevented both ventricle enlargement and entorhinal cortex thickness reduction, otherwise occurring in untreated mice. Strikingly, these effects were maintained 3months after treatment discontinuation. An increase of Aβ levels in the liver was detected at the end of the treatment, then followed also by reduction of brain Amyloid Precursor Protein and increase of Aβ-degrading enzymes. These results suggest that the treatment promotes brain Aβ clearance by a peripheral 'sink' effect and ultimately affects Aβ turnover in the brain. Worth of note, the treatment was apparently not toxic for all the organs analyzed, in particular for brain, as suggested by the lower brain TNF-α and MDA levels, and by higher level of SOD activity in treated mice. Together, these findings promote a very early treatment with multi-functional liposomes as a well-tolerated nanomedicine-based approach, potentially suitable for a disease-modifying therapy of AD, able to delay or prevent relevant

  18. Influence of model assumptions about HIV disease progression after initiating or stopping treatment on estimates of infections and deaths averted by scaling up antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucharitakul, Kanes; Boily, Marie-Claude; Dimitrov, Dobromir

    2018-01-01

    Background Many mathematical models have investigated the population-level impact of expanding antiretroviral therapy (ART), using different assumptions about HIV disease progression on ART and among ART dropouts. We evaluated the influence of these assumptions on model projections of the number of infections and deaths prevented by expanded ART. Methods A new dynamic model of HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) was developed, which incorporated each of four alternative assumptions about disease progression used in previous models: (A) ART slows disease progression; (B) ART halts disease progression; (C) ART reverses disease progression by increasing CD4 count; (D) ART reverses disease progression, but disease progresses rapidly once treatment is stopped. The model was independently calibrated to HIV prevalence and ART coverage data from the United States under each progression assumption in turn. New HIV infections and HIV-related deaths averted over 10 years were compared for fixed ART coverage increases. Results Little absolute difference (ART coverage (varied between 33% and 90%) if ART dropouts reinitiated ART at the same rate as ART-naïve MSM. Larger differences in the predicted fraction of HIV-related deaths averted were observed (up to 15pp). However, if ART dropouts could only reinitiate ART at CD4ART interruption did not affect the fraction of HIV infections averted with expanded ART, unless ART dropouts only re-initiated ART at low CD4 counts. Different disease progression assumptions had a larger influence on the fraction of HIV-related deaths averted with expanded ART. PMID:29554136

  19. Corpus callosum thickness on mid-sagittal MRI as a marker of brain volume: a pilot study in children with HIV-related brain disease and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Ackermann, Christelle; Laughton, Barbara; Cotton, Mark; Tomazos, Nicollette; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Mauff, Katya; Pettifor, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Corpus callosum thickness measurement on mid-sagittal MRI may be a surrogate marker of brain volume. This is important for evaluation of diseases causing brain volume gain or loss, such as HIV-related brain disease and HIV encephalopathy. To determine if thickness of the corpus callosum on mid-sagittal MRI is a surrogate marker of brain volume in children with HIV-related brain disease and in controls without HIV. A retrospective MRI analysis in children (<5 years old) with HIV-related brain disease and controls used a custom-developed semi-automated tool, which divided the midline corpus callosum and measured its thickness in multiple locations. Brain volume was determined using volumetric analysis. Overall corpus callosum thickness and thickness of segments of the corpus callosum were correlated with overall and segmented (grey and white matter) brain volume. Forty-four children (33 HIV-infected patients and 11 controls) were included. Significant correlations included overall corpus callosum (mean) and total brain volume (P = 0.05); prefrontal corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02); premotor corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.04) and white matter volume (P = 0.02), premotor corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02) and sensory corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.02). Corpus callosum thickness correlates with brain volume both in HIV-infected patients and controls. (orig.)

  20. Corpus callosum thickness on mid-sagittal MRI as a marker of brain volume: a pilot study in children with HIV-related brain disease and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Ackermann, Christelle [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Laughton, Barbara; Cotton, Mark [Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Children' s Hospital, Children' s Infectious Diseases Research Unit, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Tomazos, Nicollette [University of Cape Town, Faculty of Commerce, Department of Management Studies, Cape Town (South Africa); Spottiswoode, Bruce [University of Cape Town, MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, Department of Human Biology, Cape Town (South Africa); Mauff, Katya [University of Cape Town, Department of Statistical Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Pettifor, John M. [University of the Witwatersrand, MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2015-07-15

    Corpus callosum thickness measurement on mid-sagittal MRI may be a surrogate marker of brain volume. This is important for evaluation of diseases causing brain volume gain or loss, such as HIV-related brain disease and HIV encephalopathy. To determine if thickness of the corpus callosum on mid-sagittal MRI is a surrogate marker of brain volume in children with HIV-related brain disease and in controls without HIV. A retrospective MRI analysis in children (<5 years old) with HIV-related brain disease and controls used a custom-developed semi-automated tool, which divided the midline corpus callosum and measured its thickness in multiple locations. Brain volume was determined using volumetric analysis. Overall corpus callosum thickness and thickness of segments of the corpus callosum were correlated with overall and segmented (grey and white matter) brain volume. Forty-four children (33 HIV-infected patients and 11 controls) were included. Significant correlations included overall corpus callosum (mean) and total brain volume (P = 0.05); prefrontal corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02); premotor corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.04) and white matter volume (P = 0.02), premotor corpus callosum maximum with white matter volume (P = 0.02) and sensory corpus callosum mean with total brain volume (P = 0.02). Corpus callosum thickness correlates with brain volume both in HIV-infected patients and controls. (orig.)

  1. Patient reported delays in seeking treatment for Tuberculosis (TB among adult and pediatric TB patients and TB patients co-infected with HIV in Lima, Peru: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A Paz-Soldan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB remains a significant public health challenge worldwide, and particularly in Peru with one of the highest incidence rates in Latin America. TB patient behavior has a direct influence on whether a patient will receive timely diagnosis and successful treatment of their illness. Objectives: The objective was to understand the complex factors that can impact TB patient health seeking behavior. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with adult and parents of pediatric patients receiving TB treatment (n=43, within that group a sub-group was also co-infected with HIV (n=11. Results: Almost all of the study participants recognized delays in seeking either their child’s or their own diagnosis of their TB symptoms. The principal reasons for treatment-seeking delays were lack of knowledge and confusion of tuberculosis symptoms, fear and embarrassment of receiving a TB diagnosis, and a patient tendency to self-medicate prior to seeking formal medical attention.Conclusions: Health promotion activities that target patient delays have the potential to improve individual patient outcomes and mitigate the spread of TB at a community level.

  2. CIHR Canadian HIV Trials Network Co-Infection and Concurrent Diseases Core: Updated Canadian Guidelines for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Infection in HIV-hepatitis C Coinfected Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV coinfection occurs in 20% to 30% of Canadians living with HIV and is responsible for a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality. Management of HIV-HCV coinfection is more complex due to the accelerated progression of liver disease, the timing and nature of antiretroviral and HCV therapy, mental health and addictions management, socioeconomic obstacles and drug-drug interactions between new HCV direct-acting antiviral therapies and antiretroviral regimens.

  3. CD4 decline is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death in virally suppressed patients with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleberg, Marie; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S; Pedersen, Gitte; Pedersen, Court; Obel, Niels; Gerstoft, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The clinical implications of a considerable CD4 decline despite antiretroviral treatment and viral suppression are unknown. We aimed to test the hypothesis that a major CD4 decline could be a marker of cardiovascular disease or undiagnosed cancer. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were followed in the Danish nationwide, population-based cohort study in the period 1995-2010 with quarterly CD4 measurements. Associations between a CD4 decline of ≥30% and cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death were analyzed using Poisson regression with date of CD4 decline as a time-updated variable. We followed 2584 virally suppressed HIV patients for 13 369 person-years (PY; median observation time, 4.7 years). Fifty-six patients developed CD4 decline (incidence rate, 4.2/1000 PY [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.2-5.4]). CD4 counts dropped from a median of 492 cells/µL to 240 cells/µL. CD8, CD3, and total lymphocyte counts dropped concomitantly. No HIV-related factors, apart from treatment with didanosine, were associated with CD4 decline. The risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death increased markedly ≤6 months after CD4 decline (incidence rate ratio, 11.7 [95% CI, 3.6-37.4] and 13.7 [95% CI, 4.3-43.6], respectively, and mortality rate ratio 4.3 [95% CI, 1.1-17.6]). A major decline in CD4 count is associated with a marked increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death among virally suppressed HIV patients.

  4. Salk's HIV immunogen: an immune-based therapy in human trials since 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas Salk, the developer of the first polio vaccine, has created a therapeutic vaccine for HIV which helps the immune system fight disease progression. Salk uses inactivated HIV-1 virus combined with Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA) in the vaccine preparation. The resulting HIV-1 immunogen was first studied in 1987, and since then, 235 seropositive individuals have received inoculations without serious adverse effects. Data from the first 25 subjects indicate that immunization with the HIV-1 immunogen results in improvement of cell-mediated response against the virus, a slower increase in the amount of virus present, and a reduced rate of clinical progression. Subsequent studies also show that higher doses of immunogen may produce stronger cell-mediated responses and high HIV-DTH (delayed-type hypersensitivity responsiveness immunogen) is associated with better outcome. Additional trials of HIV-1 immunogen are awaiting Food and Drug Administration approval.

  5. Factors associated with presenting late or with advanced HIV disease in the Netherlands, 1996–2014: results from a national observational cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Coul, Eline L M; van Sighem, Ard; Brinkman, Kees; van Benthem, Birgit H; van der Ende, Marchina E; Geerlings, Suzanne; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Early testing for HIV and entry into care are crucial to optimise treatment outcomes of HIV-infected patients and to prevent spread of HIV. We examined risk factors for presentation with late or advanced disease in HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands. Methods HIV-infected patients registered in care between January 1996 and June 2014 were selected from the ATHENA national observational HIV cohort. Risk factors for late presentation and advanced disease were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Furthermore, geographical differences and time trends were examined. Results Of 20 965 patients, 53% presented with late-stage HIV infection, and 35% had advanced disease. Late presentation decreased from 62% (1996) to 42% (2013), while advanced disease decreased from 46% to 26%. Late presentation only declined significantly among men having sex with men (MSM; p Netherlands), and location of HIV diagnosis (hospital 3.27; 2.94 to 3.63, general practitioner 1.66; 1.50 to 1.83, antenatal screening 1.76; 1.38 to 2.34 vs sexually transmitted infection clinic). No association was found for socioeconomic status or level of urbanisation. Compared with Amsterdam, 2 regions had higher adjusted odds and 2 regions had lower odds of late presentation. Results were highly similar for advanced disease. Conclusions Although the overall rate of late presentation is declining in the Netherlands, targeted programmes to reduce late HIV diagnoses remain needed for all risk groups, but should be prioritised for heterosexual males, migrant populations, people aged ≥50 years and certain regions in the Netherlands. PMID:26729389

  6. Factors associated with presenting late or with advanced HIV disease in the Netherlands, 1996-2014: results from a national observational cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Coul, Eline L M; van Sighem, Ard; Brinkman, Kees; van Benthem, Birgit H; van der Ende, Marchina E; Geerlings, Suzanne; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-04

    Early testing for HIV and entry into care are crucial to optimise treatment outcomes of HIV-infected patients and to prevent spread of HIV. We examined risk factors for presentation with late or advanced disease in HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands. HIV-infected patients registered in care between January 1996 and June 2014 were selected from the ATHENA national observational HIV cohort. Risk factors for late presentation and advanced disease were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Furthermore, geographical differences and time trends were examined. Of 20,965 patients, 53% presented with late-stage HIV infection, and 35% had advanced disease. Late presentation decreased from 62% (1996) to 42% (2013), while advanced disease decreased from 46% to 26%. Late presentation only declined significantly among men having sex with men (MSM; p Netherlands), and location of HIV diagnosis (hospital 3.27; 2.94 to 3.63, general practitioner 1.66; 1.50 to 1.83, antenatal screening 1.76; 1.38 to 2.34 vs sexually transmitted infection clinic). No association was found for socioeconomic status or level of urbanisation. Compared with Amsterdam, 2 regions had higher adjusted odds and 2 regions had lower odds of late presentation. Results were highly similar for advanced disease. Although the overall rate of late presentation is declining in the Netherlands, targeted programmes to reduce late HIV diagnoses remain needed for all risk groups, but should be prioritised for heterosexual males, migrant populations, people aged ≥ 50 years and certain regions in the Netherlands. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Selection of sugarcane mutants with resistance to red-rot disease, water-logging and delayed/non-flowering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, M A.Q.; Shamsuzzaman, K M; Majid, M A; Howlider, M A.R.; Islam, M M [Institute of Nuclear Agriculture, Mymensingh (Bangladesh)

    1997-07-01

    Three batches of sugarcane cuttings were irradiated with gamma-rays in three different years for isolating mutants for delayed flowering, resistance to red-rot disease and water-logged conditions. In the first batch cuttings of cvs. `Isd-2/54`, `Latarijaba` and `Nagarbari` were irradiated with 20-40 Gy gamma-rays. In M{sub 1} V{sub 4} generation, 2,114 canes selected from inoculated M{sub 1}V{sub 3} generation, were re-inoculated with red-hot pathogen. Of these, four canes were resistant and 64 canes were moderately resistant to the disease. The M{sub 1}V{sub 5} generation of the selected clones was grown at two locations for selection. In the second batch, cuttings of cvs. `Isd-16`, `Isd-2/54`, `Nagarbari` and `Latarijaba` were irradiated with 20-60 Gy gamma-rays. The irradiated material was divided into three lots and each lot was put under different selection pressure. For isolating mutants with resistance to red-rot disease, 15,104 canes were artificially inoculated in the M{sub 1}V{sub 3}. Among these, one clone was resistant and 16 were moderately resistant. Of the 10,000 M{sub 1}V{sub 3} canes, grown under water-logged condition and selected for greenness of leaf at harvest, 38 canes were reasonably tolerant. For selecting late flowering mutants, about 8,500 canes were left in a field for a month after normal harvest; of these five showed late flowering. These mutants were grown for further selection in the M{sub 1}V{sub 4}. To screen out non-flowering canes, cvs. `I-291/87`, an early flowering types, and `I525/85`, a late flowering type were irradiated with 20-40 Gy gamma rays. M{sub 1}V{sub 3} generation has been grown in the field. (author). 13 refs, 6 tabs.

  8. Disease severity, self-reported experience of workplace discrimination and employment loss during the course of chronic HIV disease: differences according to gender and education.

    OpenAIRE

    Dray-Spira , Rosemary; Gueguen , Alice; Lert , France; Study Group , Vespa

    2008-01-01

    International audience; OBJECTIVES: Evidence for the existence of a harmful effect of chronic disease on employment status has been provided. Although this effect of chronic illness on employment has been reported to be higher among the groups with the lowest position on the labour market, the mechanisms of such inequalities are poorly understood. The present study aimed at investigating social inequalities in the chances of maintaining employment during the course of HIV infection and at exa...

  9. Diagnóstico tardío de la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana en la Cohorte VACH (1997-2002 Delayed diagnosis of HIV infection in the Spanish VACH cohort (1997-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Teira Cobo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudiar la prevalencia del diagnóstico tardío (DT de la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH y sus factores asociados. Métodos: Estudio transversal sobre los pacientes incluidos en la cohorte VACH cuya infección por el VIH hubiese sido diagnosticada entre 1997 y 2002. Consideramos DT los casos diagnosticados de sida concomitantemente o dentro del primer mes desde la primera serología positiva, o con recuento de CD4+ Objective: To study the prevalence of delayed diagnosis of HIV infection and associated factors. Methods: A cross sectional study of patients included in the Spanish VACH cohort who had been diagnosed with HIV infection between 1997 and 2002 was performed. Delayed diagnosis was defined as patients diagnosed with HIV infection and AIDS simultaneously or within the first month after the first positive serologic test, or those with a first CD4+ cell count below 200/ml. The epidemiological characteristics of these patients were compared with those of the remaining patients. Results: Of 2,820 new cases of HIV infection, delayed diagnosis was found in 506 (18%. These patients differed from the remaining patients in their lower mean age and higher HIV viral load, as well as in their distribution by sex (higher proportion of males, occupational status, history of incarceration in prison, and HIV-risk transmission group. The median survival during follow-up was significantly lower among AIDS patients with a delayed diagnosis. Conclusions: Delayed diagnosis remains a cause for concern in our environment, due to its magnitude and its association with mortality. Some epidemiological characteristics provide clues to guide future programs directed at increasing information and improving prevention.

  10. Changes in coronary heart disease risk profiles of HIV patients in Zimbabwe over 9 months: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou DT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Danai Tavonga Zhou,1,2 Olav Oektedalen,3 Sandra Shawarira-Bote,4 Babill Stray-Pedersen5 1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 4Newlands Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe; 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo and Womens Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Abstract: Dyslipidemia, hypertension, inflammation, and coronary heart disease (CHD are adverse events in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients even if they are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. Yet, data on CHD risk induced by HIV or ART in sub-Saharan Africa are limited. The aim of this longitudinal study was to describe changes in CHD risk profiles measured by lipids, inflammatory markers, and Framingham scores among HIV-positive patients previously reported from Harare, Zimbabwe. Patients were grouped into ART-experienced patients (n=147 and ART-naïve patients (n=23 and followed up for 9 months. Generalized least squares random-effects modeling was applied to explain changes in total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, low-density lipoprotein, TC/HDL ratio, myeloperoxidase, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, and Framingham scores over the 9-month period. Independent variables included age, sex, monthly earning, body mass index, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure, duration of HIV diagnosis, duration of ART, viral load, and CD4 count. In ART-experienced patients, there was a substantial decrease in TC over time, ART-negative patients showed a significant increase in TC and HDL over time, and the increase in TC was associated with high viral load and low duration of HIV diagnosis, while increase in HDL was associated with young age, low body mass index, and low SBP. Framingham risk scores increased with time in

  11. Prevalence and Knowledge Assessment of HIV and Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors among Formal Sector Employees in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guariguata, Leonor; de Beer, Ingrid; Hough, Rina; Mulongeni, Pancho; Feeley, Frank G; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F

    2015-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is growing in sub-Saharan Africa combined with an already high prevalence of infectious disease, like HIV. Engaging the formal employment sector may present a viable strategy for addressing both HIV and NCDs in people of working age. This study assesses the presence of three of the most significant threats to health in Namibia among employees in the formal sector: elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV and assesses the knowledge and self-perceived risk of employees for these conditions. A health and wellness screening survey of employees working in 13 industries in the formal sector of Namibia was conducted including 11,192 participants in the Bophelo! Project in Namibia, from January 2009 to October 2010. The survey combined a medical screening for HIV, blood glucose and blood pressure with an employee-completed survey on knowledge and risk behaviors for those conditions. We estimated the prevalence of the three conditions and compared to self-reported employee knowledge and risk behaviors and possible determinants. 25.8% of participants had elevated blood pressure, 8.3% of participants had an elevated random blood glucose measurement, and 8.9% of participants tested positive for HIV. Most participants were not smokers (80%), reported not drinking alcohol regularly (81.2%), and had regular condom use (66%). Most participants could not correctly identify risk factors for hypertension (57.2%), diabetes (57.3%), or high-risk behaviors for HIV infection (59.5%). In multivariate analysis, having insurance (OR:1.15, 95%CI: 1.03 - 1.28) and a managerial position (OR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.13 - 1.47) were associated with better odds of knowledge of diabetes. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV among employees of the Namibian formal sector is high, while risk awareness is low. Attention must be paid to improving the knowledge of health-related risk factors as well as providing

  12. Prevalence and Knowledge Assessment of HIV and Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors among Formal Sector Employees in Namibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Guariguata

    Full Text Available The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs is growing in sub-Saharan Africa combined with an already high prevalence of infectious disease, like HIV. Engaging the formal employment sector may present a viable strategy for addressing both HIV and NCDs in people of working age. This study assesses the presence of three of the most significant threats to health in Namibia among employees in the formal sector: elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV and assesses the knowledge and self-perceived risk of employees for these conditions.A health and wellness screening survey of employees working in 13 industries in the formal sector of Namibia was conducted including 11,192 participants in the Bophelo! Project in Namibia, from January 2009 to October 2010. The survey combined a medical screening for HIV, blood glucose and blood pressure with an employee-completed survey on knowledge and risk behaviors for those conditions. We estimated the prevalence of the three conditions and compared to self-reported employee knowledge and risk behaviors and possible determinants.25.8% of participants had elevated blood pressure, 8.3% of participants had an elevated random blood glucose measurement, and 8.9% of participants tested positive for HIV. Most participants were not smokers (80%, reported not drinking alcohol regularly (81.2%, and had regular condom use (66%. Most participants could not correctly identify risk factors for hypertension (57.2%, diabetes (57.3%, or high-risk behaviors for HIV infection (59.5%. In multivariate analysis, having insurance (OR:1.15, 95%CI: 1.03 - 1.28 and a managerial position (OR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.13 - 1.47 were associated with better odds of knowledge of diabetes.The prevalence of elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV among employees of the Namibian formal sector is high, while risk awareness is low. Attention must be paid to improving the knowledge of health-related risk factors as well as

  13. High prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis E virus in HIV-infected patients with unexplained liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchante, Nicolás; Parra-Sánchez, Manuel; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Cifuentes, Celia; Camacho, Ángela; Macías, Juan; Martínez-Dueñas, Loreto; Pérez-Navarro, Elisabet; Rivero, Antonio; Pineda, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    To look for evidence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) exposure in HIV-infected patients with unexplained elevations of liver stiffness (LS). Case-control study conducted in 31 HIV-infected patients with unexplained elevations of LS and in 31 HIV-controls with normal LS, matched by age, sex and CD4 cell-counts. Serum HEV antibodies were tested by two ELISA procedures and by Immunoblot. We defined exposure to HEV as the detection of serum HEV antibodies by at least one of the two ELISA assays, provided that it was confirmed by Immunoblot. A real-time PCR RNA assay was conducted in all plasma samples to identify subjects with active HEV infection. Exposure to HEV was demonstrated, according to the criteria used in this study, in 9 (29%) of the cases, whereas it was shown in 5 (16%) of the controls (p=.3). Serum HEV RNA was detected in none of the controls and in only in one case. This patient had a documented chronic hepatitis E with progression to cirrhosis. HEV antibodies are frequently found in HIV-infected patients with unexplained liver disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigating changes in brain network properties in HIV-associated neurocognitive disease (HAND) using mutual connectivity analysis (MCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Anas Zainul; D'Souza, Adora M.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    About 50% of subjects infected with HIV present deficits in cognitive domains, which are known collectively as HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). The underlying synaptodendritic damage can be captured using resting state functional MRI, as has been demonstrated by a few earlier studies. Such damage may induce topological changes of brain connectivity networks. We test this hypothesis by capturing the functional interdependence of 90 brain network nodes using a Mutual Connectivity Analysis (MCA) framework with non-linear time series modeling based on Generalized Radial Basis function (GRBF) neural networks. The network nodes are selected based on the regions defined in the Automated Anatomic Labeling (AAL) atlas. Each node is represented by the average time series of the voxels of that region. The resulting networks are then characterized using graph-theoretic measures that quantify various network topology properties at a global as well as at a local level. We tested for differences in these properties in network graphs obtained for 10 subjects (6 male and 4 female, 5 HIV+ and 5 HIV-). Global network properties captured some differences between these subject cohorts, though significant differences were seen only with the clustering coefficient measure. Local network properties, such as local efficiency and the degree of connections, captured significant differences in regions of the frontal lobe, precentral and cingulate cortex amongst a few others. These results suggest that our method can be used to effectively capture differences occurring in brain network connectivity properties revealed by resting-state functional MRI in neurological disease states, such as HAND.

  15. CD4 T cells remain the major source of HIV-1 during end stage disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); M. Schutten (Martin); B. Raschdorff; G. Grosschupff; P. Racz; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); K. Tenner-Racz

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the source of HIV-1 production in lymphoid tissue biopsies from HIV-infected patients, with no prior anti-retroviral protease inhibitor treatment, with a CD4 cell count > 150 x 10(6)/l (group I) or < 50 x 10(6)/l (group II), co-infected with Mycobacterium

  16. Current updates on HIV-related pulmonary disease in children: What ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-11

    Dec 11, 2015 ... ... findings and current management of pulmonary HIV infection in infants and children. .... spp. and Eschericia coli.5,6 Factors complicating treatment of bacterial infection ... Children with HIV also have an increased risk of malignancy most commonly ... such as lung abscess and empyema (Figure 3).5,15.

  17. Time 's picturing of HIV/Aids: International perceptions of disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    doxiconic process” as suggested by Dana Cloud and that the (visual) rhetoric of HIV/Aids has many similarities to what she sees as a culture clash in the rhetoric of the (American) war on terrorism. Key Words: Time, representation of HIV/Aids, race ...

  18. HIV-1 Disease Progression and Survival in an Adult Population in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B L; Chasela, Charles; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection remains a major global health burden since its discovery in 1983. Sub-Saharan Africa is the region hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS pandemic where 63% of the 33 million infected people live. While there is marked person-to-person variability in susceptibility, progression, and survival...

  19. Changes in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors With Immediate Versus Deferred Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Among HIV-Positive Participants in the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Sharma, Shweta; Achhra, Amit C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: HIV infection and certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) medications increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, mediated, in part, through traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied cardiovascular disease risk factor changes in the START...... (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) trial, a randomized study of immediate versus deferred ART initiation among HIV-positive persons with CD4+ cell counts >500 cells/mm3. Mean change from baseline in risk factors and the incidence of comorbid conditions were compared between groups....... The characteristics among 4685 HIV-positive START trial participants include a median age of 36 years, a CD4 cell count of 651 cells/mm3, an HIV viral load of 12 759 copies/mL, a current smoking status of 32%, a median systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 120/76 mm Hg, and median levels of total cholesterol of 168 mg...

  20. Pain Management for Persons Living With HIV Disease: Experience With Interprofessional Education in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Carla S; Pappas, Gregory; Henley, Yvonne; Kangalawe, Angela Kaiza; Oyebola, Folaju Olusegun; Obiefune, Michael; Nwene, Ejike; Stanis-Ezeobi, Winifred; Enejoh, Victor; Nwizu, Chidi; Nwandu, Anthea Nwandu; Memiah, Peter; Etienne-Mesubi, Martine; Oni, Babatunji; Amoroso, Anthony; Redfield, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    Pain management (PM) has not been routinely incorporated into HIV/AIDS care and treatment in resource-constrained settings. We describe training for multidisciplinary teams tasked with integrating care management into HIV clinics to address pain for persons living with HIV in Nigeria. Education on PM was provided to mixed-disciplinary teams including didactic and iterative sessions following home and hospital visits. Participants identified challenges and performed group problem solving. HIV trainers identified barriers to introducing PM reflecting views of the patient, providers, culture, and the health environment. Implementation strategies included (1) building upon existing relationships; (2) preliminary advocacy; (3) attention to staff needs; and (4) structured data review. Implementing PM in Nigerian HIV clinics requires recognition of cultural beliefs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Intracerebroventricular gene therapy that delays neurological disease progression is associated with selective preservation of retinal ganglion cells in a canine model of CLN2 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Jensen, Cheryl A; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Gillespie, Lauren E; Bristow, Daniel E; Katz, Martin L

    2016-05-01

    CLN2 disease is one of a group of lysosomal storage disorders called the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The disease results from mutations in the TPP1 gene that cause an insufficiency or complete lack of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). TPP1 is involved in lysosomal protein degradation, and lack of this enzyme results in the accumulation of protein-rich autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in numerous cell types including neurons throughout the central nervous system and the retina. CLN2 disease is characterized primarily by progressive loss of neurological functions and vision as well as generalized neurodegeneration and retinal degeneration. In children the progressive loss of neurological functions typically results in death by the early teenage years. A Dachshund model of CLN2 disease with a null mutation in TPP1 closely recapitulates the human disorder with a progression from disease onset at approximately 4 months of age to end-stage at 10-11 months. Delivery of functional TPP1 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), either by periodic infusion of the recombinant protein or by a single administration of a TPP1 gene therapy vector to the CSF, significantly delays the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongs life span but does not prevent the loss of vision or modest retinal degeneration that occurs by 11 months of age. In this study we found that in dogs that received the CSF gene therapy treatment, the degeneration of the retina and loss of retinal function continued to progress during the prolonged life spans of the treated dogs. Eventually the normal cell layers of the retina almost completely disappeared. An exception was the ganglion cell layer. In affected dogs that received TPP1 gene therapy to the CSF and survived an average of 80 weeks, ganglion cell axons were present in numbers comparable to those of normal Dachshunds of similar age. The selective preservation of the retinal ganglion cells suggests

  2. Assessment of myocardial infarction with delayed-enhancement MRI in coronary artery disease: a correlative study with cardiac events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinxiang; Yang Chao; Yang Dakuan; Yuan Shuguang; Yang Xinhuan; Wang Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between recent cardiac events and the score of myocardial infarction by delayed-enhancement MRI (DE-MRI). Methods: DE-MRI was performed in 40 subjects with coronary artery disease. The score of myocardial infarction by DE-MRI, the ejection fraction (EF) by echocardiography, recent cardiac events (the number of weekly nitroglycerin, the number of weekly angina episodes and the onset number of heart failure in the last year), 6-minute walking distance, as well as the Seattle angina questionnaire (SAQ) score were assessed. The Spearman correlation test and Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test were used for the statistics. Results: There were negative correlation between the myocardial infarction score by DE-MRI (median 12, inter-quartile range: 6.0-19.8) and the 6-minute walking distance (378.93±100.53), SAQ score (74.55±11.40) (r was 0.66 and 0.54, P< 0.05). The myocardial infarction score by DE-MRI was strongly correlated with the number of weekly nitroglycerin (median 1; inter-quartile range: 0-2.8), the number of weekly angina episodes (median 3, inter-quartile range: 1-6.5) and the onset number of heart failure in the last year (median 0, inter-quartile range: 0-2) (r was 0.87, 0.85 and 0.89, P<0.05). EF [(49.2±13.72)%] was negative correlation with the number of weekly nitroglycerin, the number of weekly angina episodes and the onset number of heart failure in the last year (r were 0.67, 0.73 and 0.73, P<0.05). Conclusion: DE-MRI can be used for evaluation and prediction of future cardiac events. (authors)

  3. Discordant Impact of HLA on Viral Replicative Capacity and Disease Progression in Pediatric and Adult HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Adland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available HLA class I polymorphism has a major influence on adult HIV disease progression. An important mechanism mediating this effect is the impact on viral replicative capacity (VRC of the escape mutations selected in response to HLA-restricted CD8+ T-cell responses. Factors that contribute to slow progression in pediatric HIV infection are less well understood. We here investigate the relationship between VRC and disease progression in pediatric infection, and the effect of HLA on VRC and on disease outcome in adult and pediatric infection. Studying a South African cohort of >350 ART-naïve, HIV-infected children and their mothers, we first observed that pediatric disease progression is significantly correlated with VRC. As expected, VRCs in mother-child pairs were strongly correlated (p = 0.004. The impact of the protective HLA alleles, HLA-B*57, HLA-B*58:01 and HLA-B*81:01, resulted in significantly lower VRCs in adults (p<0.0001, but not in children. Similarly, in adults, but not in children, VRCs were significantly higher in subjects expressing the disease-susceptible alleles HLA-B*18:01/45:01/58:02 (p = 0.007. Irrespective of the subject, VRCs were strongly correlated with the number of Gag CD8+ T-cell escape mutants driven by HLA-B*57/58:01/81:01 present in each virus (p = 0.0002. In contrast to the impact of VRC common to progression in adults and children, the HLA effects on disease outcome, that are substantial in adults, are small and statistically insignificant in infected children. These data further highlight the important role that VRC plays both in adult and pediatric progression, and demonstrate that HLA-independent factors, yet to be fully defined, are predominantly responsible for pediatric non-progression.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  5. Effects of Chinese herbal medicine on hyperlipidemia and the risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Li, Te-Mao; Cheng, Chi-Fung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Lai, Chih-Ho; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Jung-Chun; Lin, Chih-Chien; Liang, Wen-Miin; Lin, Ying-Ju

    2018-03-10

    Due to the development of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV/AIDS is now regarded as a treatable chronic disease. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is a type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) that has been widely applied in the healthcare system in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of use and patterns of prescription for the CHM-based treatment of HIV-infected patients and to assess the long-term effects of CHM on hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease events in these patients. We identified 21,846 HIV-infected patients (ICD-9-CM: 042-044, 079, and V08 codes). Of these, 1083 and 2166 patients who used CHM and were non-users, respectively, were matched for age, gender, and ART use before CHM. The chi-squared test, Cox proportional hazard model, Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank test were used for comparisons between these two groups. CHM users had a lower risk of hyperlipidemia compared with non-users after adjusting for comorbidities by using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model (P = 0.0011; HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.52-0.85). In addition, the CHM users had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared with non-users after adjusting for comorbidities (P = 0.0004; HR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.53-0.83). The 10-year cumulative incidences of hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease were lower in the CHM group (P herbs. A CHM network analysis showed that JG was the core CHM in one cluster, and BM, MXSGT, and HQin were important CHMs in that cluster. In the other cluster, YHS was the core CHM, and SYGCT and JWXYS were important CHMs. CHM as adjunctive therapy may reduce hyperlipidemia and the risk for cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. The list of the comprehensive herbal medicines that the patients used might be useful in further scientific investigations or therapeutic interventions for preventing atherosclerosis among HIV-infected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Survey of Texas HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis, and Viral Hepatitis Providers' Billing and Reimbursement Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Matthew B; Atwood, Robin; Greenberg, Jennifer B; Ray, Tara; Harris, Karol Kaye

    2015-11-01

    The Affordable Care Act presents financial challenges and opportunities for publicly funded service providers. We assessed billing practices and anticipated barriers to third-party billing among organizations in Texas that provide publicly funded HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis services. One third to one half of the organizations did not bill for medical services. The most common barrier to third-party billing was lack of staff knowledge about billing and coding. Future research must evaluate options for organizations and communities to maintain access to infectious disease services for vulnerable populations.

  7. A Survey of Texas HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis, and Viral Hepatitis Providers’ Billing and Reimbursement Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Robin; Greenberg, Jennifer B.; Ray, Tara; Harris, Karol Kaye

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act presents financial challenges and opportunities for publicly funded service providers. We assessed billing practices and anticipated barriers to third-party billing among organizations in Texas that provide publicly funded HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis services. One third to one half of the organizations did not bill for medical services. The most common barrier to third-party billing was lack of staff knowledge about billing and coding. Future research must evaluate options for organizations and communities to maintain access to infectious disease services for vulnerable populations. PMID:26447911

  8. Effects of CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, J P; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies relating certain chemokine and chemokine receptor gene alleles with the outcome of HIV-1 infection have yielded inconsistent results. OBJECTIVE: To examine postulated associations of genetic alleles with HIV-1 disease progression. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of individual-patient data....... SETTING: 19 prospective cohort studies and case-control studies from the United States, Europe, and Australia. PATIENTS: Patients with HIV-1 infection who were of European or African descent. MEASUREMENTS: Time to AIDS, death, and death after AIDS and HIV-1 RNA level at study entry or soon after...... (relative hazard among seroconverters, 0.64 and 0.74; P HIV-1 RNA levels after seroconversion (difference, -0.18 log(10) copies/mL and -0.14 log(10) copies/mL; P

  9. Thrombocytopenia is associated with an increased risk of cancer during treated HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Álvaro H; Lundgren, Jens D; Ridolfo, Annalisa; Katlama, Christine; Antunes, Francisco; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Blaxhult, Anders; Mitsura, Viktar M; Doroana, Manuela; Battegay, Manuel; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Mocroft, Amanda

    2014-11-13

    To assess the relationship between platelet counts and risk of AIDS and non-AIDS-defining events. Prospective cohort. EuroSIDA patients with at least one platelet count were followed from baseline (first platelet ≥ 1 January 2005) until last visit or death. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to assess the relationship between current platelet counts and the incidence of non-AIDS-defining (pancreatitis, end-stage liver/renal disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease) and AIDS-defining events. There were 62 898 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) among 12 279 patients, including 1168 non-AIDS-defining events [crude incidence 18.6/1000 PYFU, 95% confidence interval (CI) 17.5-19.6] and 735 AIDS-defining events (crude incidence 11.7/1000 PYFU, 95% CI 10.8-12.5). Patients with thrombocytopenia (platelet count ≤100 × 10/l) had a slightly increased incidence of AIDS-defining events [adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) 1.42, 95% CI 1.07-1.86], when compared to those with platelet counts 101-200 × 10/l, whereas the incidence of non-AIDS-defining events was more than two-fold higher (aIRR 2.66, 95% CI 2.17-3.26). Among non-AIDS-defining events, the adjusted incidence of cancer (aIRR 2.20, 95% CI 1.61-3.01), but not cardiovascular disease (aIRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.32-1.34), was significantly higher in patients with thrombocytopenia. The association between thrombocytopenia and cancer remained unaltered in sensitivity analyses requiring repeated platelet counts to confirm thrombocytopenia and lagging platelets by 1 year prior to clinical events. Patients with thrombocytopenia had increased incidence of AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining events, but the association with the latter, in particular cancer, was stronger. Future studies should investigate whether the pathophysiological processes underlying thrombocytopenia are associated with the development of cancer during treated HIV disease.

  10. Dermatoses em pacientes infectados pelo HIV com a contagem de linfócitos CD4 Dermatological disease among HIV-infected patients with CD4-lymphocyte count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandra Michelim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Correlacionar a prevalência das doenças dermatológicas entre pacientes infectados pelo HIV com a contagem de linfócitos CD4. MÉTODOS: Estudo de série de casos realizado na região de Caxias do Sul, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os dados foram coletados por meio da revisão de prontuários de pacientes com infecção pelo HIV internados em hospital público (198 pacientes, período de março de 1998 a junho de 2002 ou atendidos no ambulatório central universitário (40 pacientes, período de março a junho de 2002. As variáveis analisadas foram: idade, sexo, contagem de linfócitos CD4, carga viral e doenças dermatológicas apresentadas pelo paciente. Os testes estatísticos utilizados foram o Teste t de Student, o de Spearman e o do qui-quadrado. RESULTADOS: A freqüência de doença dermatológica foi de 67,2% entre os pacientes hospitalizados e de 75,0% entre os pacientes ambulatoriais. Candidíase oral foi a doença dermatológica mais prevalente. Na população hospitalar, a média de células CD4 foi menor entre os pacientes com doença dermatológica dos sem doença dermatológica (142,34 células/mm³ vs 512,35 células/mm³, respectivamente; p=0,018. O mesmo fenômeno foi observado na população ambulatorial (138,88 células/mm³ e 336,21 células/mm³, respectivamente; p=0,001. Verificou-se, em ambas as populações, uma correlação negativa entre a contagem de CD4 e o número total de doenças dermatológicas apresentadas pelo paciente (p=0,000, população hospitalar; p=0,000, população ambulatorial. CONCLUSÕES: As doenças dermatológicas são altamente prevalentes entre os pacientes infectados pelo HIV, sendo que a freqüência e o número dessas manifestações correlacionam-se bem com o status imunológico do paciente e com a progressão da doença.OBJECTIVE: To correlate the prevalence of dermatological diseases among HIV-infected patient with CD4-lymphocyte count. METHODS: A case series study was carried

  11. [Epidemiology of bacillary pulmonary tuberculosis according to HIV status of patients followed in the department of infectious diseases Conakry (Guinea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, F A; Sako, F B; Sylla, D; Bangoura, M; Kpamy, D O; Traoré, M; Doumbouya, M; Sangare, I

    2014-12-01

    Despite many efforts of prevention and the availability of free treatment, TB/HIV co-infection is still rampant in Guinea. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis according to HIV status among patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases department of Conakry University Hospital. This was a descriptive and analytical retrospective study of patient records admitted for pulmonary tuberculosis from January 2003 to December 2012. During this period, 1953 cases of tuberculosis were collected of which 346 (17.7%) were smear positive. There was a marked male predominance (59.7%). The average age was 38 ± 11 years. The majority of patients originated from the suburbs of Conakry and its surrounding prefectures (76.7%). People without profession were most represented (40.7%). A level of primary education was the most frequently reported (39.7%). Out of 325 patients tested for HIV, the serology was positive in 185 patients (56.9%). A contact with a TB patient was reported in 21.4% of HIV negative patients, and in 6.5% of the HIV-positive group (p = 0.0006). There was no difference between the two groups regarding clinical signs and symptoms. The mean CD4 count was comparable in both groups (p = 0.05). Lethality was higher among co-infected patients (30.4% against 15.56%; p = 0.00037). Strengthening the prevention of TB among PLWHA by the administration of isoniazide seems necessary and warrants further study on this subject in Guinea.

  12. Immunophenotypic analysis of the Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV; HHV-8)-infected B cells in HIV+ multicentric Castleman disease (MCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadburn, A; Hyjek, E M; Tam, W; Liu, Y; Rengifo, T; Cesarman, E; Knowles, D M

    2008-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is aetiologically related to Kaposi sarcoma, classical and extracavitary primary effusion lymphoma (PEL; EC-PEL) and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), entities preferentially occurring in HIV-infected individuals. Characterization of HIV-associated PELs/EC-PELs suggests that the KSHV-infected malignant cells originate from a pre-terminal stage of B-cell differentiation. However, only limited phenotypic studies have been performed on HIV+ MCD, including for PR domain containing 1 with zinc finger domain/B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (PRDM1/BLIMP1), a key regulator of terminal B-cell differentiation. The aim was to characterize KSHV-infected cells in 17 cases of HIV+ MCD. Double immunohistochemistry and immunohistochemistry-in situ hybridization were used to characterize the KSHV-infected cells in MCD; the results were compared with the phenotypic profiles of 39 PELs/EC-PELs and seven PEL cell lines. Whereas the immunophenotype of KSHV-infected cells in MCD and malignant KSHV+ PEL cells was similar (PAX5, Bcl-6-; PRDM1/BLIMP1, IRF4/MUM1+; Ki67+), the MCD KSHV-infected cells differed, as they expressed OCT2, cytoplasmic lambda immunoglobulin; variably expressed CD27; lacked CD138; and were Epstein-Barr virus negative. Although both PEL and MCD originate from KSHV-infected pre-terminally differentiated B cells, these findings, with previously reported genetic studies, indicate HIV+ MCD may arise from extrafollicular B cells, whereas PELs may originate from cells that have traversed the germinal centre.

  13. CD8+ T-Cells Count in Acute Myocardial Infarction in HIV Disease in a Predominantly Male Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatosin A. Badejo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus- (HIV- infected persons have a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI than HIV-uninfected persons. Earlier studies suggest that HIV viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and antiretroviral therapy are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Whether CD8+ T-cell count is associated with CVD risk is not clear. We investigated the association between CD8+ T-cell count and incident AMI in a cohort of 73,398 people (of which 97.3% were men enrolled in the U.S. Veterans Aging Cohort Study-Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC. Compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with high baseline CD8+ T-cell counts (>1065 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk (adjusted HR=1.82, P<0.001, 95% CI: 1.46 to 2.28. There was evidence that the effect of CD8+ T-cell tertiles on AMI risk differed by CD4+ T-cell level: compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with CD4+ T-cell counts ≥200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with high CD8+ T-cell count, while those with CD4+ T-cell counts <200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with low CD8+ T-cell count. CD8+ T-cell counts may add additional AMI risk stratification information beyond that provided by CD4+ T-cell counts alone.

  14. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic differences in tuberculosis disease in patients with and without HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanz, Javier; Lago-Gómez, María Rosa; Rodríguez-Zurita, María Elena; Martín-Echevarría, Esteban; Torralba, Miguel

    2018-04-23

    Our objective is to analyze the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in our population and to compare the characteristics of patients with and without HIV infection. Clinical-epidemiological retrospective cohort study that included patients diagnosed with TB with and without HIV infection between 2005-2016 in the province of Guadalajara (Spain). Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic variables were assessed, including microbiological resistances. TB was diagnosed in 261 patients. There were 25 patients (9.6%) who had HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection were predominantly males, had higher incidence of hepatitis C virus, a higher percentage of extrapulmonary TB, a higher prevalence of resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, a greater paradoxical response and a longer average hospital stay. On the other hand, they had a lower percentage of positive tuberculin skin test and positive sputum smear (microscopy). A significant percentage of TB patients had no serology for HIV. Patients with HIV infection show remarkable differences in epidemiological, clinical and resistance variables to antituberculosis drugs. A high percentage of patients with TB were not tested for HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing the vulnerability of women to sexually transmitted diseases STDS/ HIV: construction and validation of markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Cecilia De la Torre Ugarte Guanilo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct and validate markers of vulnerability of women to STDs/HIV, taking into consideration the importance of STDs/HIV. Method Methodological study carried out in three stages: 1 systematic review and identification of elements of vulnerability in the scientific production; 2 selection of elements of vulnerability, and development of markers; 3 establishment of the expert group and validation of the markers (content validity. Results Five markers were validated: no openness in the relationship to discuss aspects related to prevention of STDs/HIV; no perception of vulnerability to STDs/HIV; disregard of vulnerability to STDs/ HIV; not recognizing herself as the subject of sexual and reproductive rights; actions of health professionals that limit women’s access to prevention of STDs/HIV. Each marker contains three to eleven components. Conclusion The construction of such markers constituted an instrument, presented in another publication, which can contribute to support the identification of vulnerabilities of women in relation to STDs/HIV in the context of primary health care services. The markers constitute an important tool for the operationalization of the concept of vulnerability in primary health care and to promote inter/multidisciplinary and inter/multi-sectoral work processes.

  16. The influence of HIV disease events/stages on smoking attitudes and behaviors: project STATE (Study of Tobacco Attitudes and Teachable Events).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrine, Damon J; Fletcher, Faith E; Buchberg, Meredith K; Li, Yisheng; Arduino, Roberto C; Gritz, Ellen R

    2014-02-11

    Given the increase in life expectancy among HIV-positive individuals attributable to antiretroviral therapies, cigarette smoking now represents one of the most salient health risks confronting the HIV-positive population. Despite this risk, very few efforts to date have been made to target persons living with HIV for smoking cessation treatment, and no efforts have been made to explore the role of cognitions and HIV disease events/stages on smoking outcomes. The purpose of the study, Project STATE (Study of Tobacco Attitudes and Teachable Events), is to prospectively examine the relationship between HIV events/stages, perceived impact of HIV disease, attitudes about cigarette smoking, and smoking behaviors. This study employs a prospective design. Patients are recruited at the time of their first physician visit at a large inner city HIV-clinic--Thomas Street Health Center (TSHC). Consenting participants then complete a baseline assessment. All participants are offered standard care smoking cessation treatment. Follow-up assessments are completed on four subsequent occasions: 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-baseline. These follow-up assessments are scheduled to coincide with routine clinic appointments with their TSHC physicians. In addition, each participant is given a prepaid cell phone at the time of enrollment and asked to complete brief phone assessments weekly for the first three months of the study period. By evaluating events/stages of HIV disease as potential teaching moments for smoking cessation, findings from this study could be used to develop treatments tailored to an individual's stage of HIV disease. This study design will enable us to carefully track changes in smoking behavior over time, and to link these changes to both the course of HIV disease and/or to the participant's' perceived impact of HIV. By identifying optimal time points for intervention, the findings from this study will have the potential to maximize the efficiency and efficacy of

  17. The pathogenesis of liver disease in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, David M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2009-01-01

    There are many potential reasons for increased liver-related mortality in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection compared with either infection alone. HIV infects multiple cells in the liver and might potentially alter the life cycle of HBV, although evidence to date is limited. Unique mutations in HBV have been defined in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals and might directly alter pathogenesis. In addition, an impaired HBV-specific T-cell immune response is likely to be important. The roles of microbial translocation, immune activation and increased hepatic stellate cell activation will be important areas for future study.

  18. CD4 decline is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death in virally suppressed patients with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, Marie; Kronborg, Gitte; Larsen, Carsten S

    2013-01-01

    immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were followed in the Danish nationwide, population-based cohort study in the period 1995-2010 with quarterly CD4 measurements. Associations between a CD4 decline of ≥30% and cardiovascular disease, cancer, and death were analyzed using Poisson regression with date of CD4 decline...... as a time-updated variable. Results. We followed 2584 virally suppressed HIV patients for 13 369 person-years (PY; median observation time, 4.7 years). Fifty-six patients developed CD4 decline (incidence rate, 4.2/1000 PY [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.2-5.4]). CD4 counts dropped from a median of 492...

  19. Natural History and Factors Associated with Early and Delayed Mortality in HIV-Infected Patients Treated of Tuberculosis under Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course Strategy: A Prospective Cohort Study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive global results of DOTS in India, the effectiveness of DOTS for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients is not well known. This is an observational prospective cohort study performed in Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. The study included 1000 DOTS antituberculosis treatment (ATT episodes and 840 person-years. CD4 lymphocyte count was below 200 cells/mm3 in 77% of the cases, and 21% were retreatments. Two thirds were presented with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and the most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis was tuberculous meningitis followed by pleuritis, abdominal tuberculosis, and lymphadenitis. Cumulative incidence of mortality was 16%, 26%, 39%, and 46% at 1, 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Factors associated with three-month (early mortality were being homeless, having low CD4+ lymphocyte count, having tuberculous meningitis, belonging to a socially disadvantaged community, having more than 35 years, and being on an antiretroviral therapy at the moment of initiating the ATT. Factors associated with delayed mortality were having low CD4+ lymphocyte count, belonging to a socially disadvantaged community, receiving a category II ATT because of a previous episode of ATT and having acid fast bacilli in sputum before the ATT initiation. These findings indicate that there is an urgent need to improve the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in India.

  20. Global attractivity and permanence of a stage-structured pest management SI model with time delay and diseased pest impulsive transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Jianjun; Meng Xinzhu; Chen Lansun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a stage-structured pest management SI model with time delay and diseased pests impulsive transmission. We obtain the sufficient conditions of the global attractivity of pest-extinction boundary periodic solution and the permanence of the system. We also prove that all solutions of the system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Our results provide a reliable tactic basis for the practice of pest management

  1. "A case report of Pott’s disease with unusual involvement of two separate levels of spine and delayed progressive Kyphosis "

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi Movaghar V

    2001-01-01

    In Pott’s disease (tuberculous spondylitis), involvement of two separate levels of spine is rare. Attention to stability of spine prevents delayed progressive kyphosis. A 12-year-old girl presented with neck pain, tenderness and swelling Imaging showed Cl—C2 and T9-T10 and destruction. Mild spastic paraparesis was noticed. Preoperative diagnosis was metastasis. T9, T10 and T11 laminectomy and cervical operations were done in 2 sessions. Both pathologic examinations confirmed tuberculosis. Alt...

  2. HIV 1065_IN.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease. is case highlights the diagnostic value of lymph node excision biopsy in HIV-infected patients. S Afr J HIV .... illustrated that life expectancy in multicentric ... Schulte KM, Talat N. Castleman's disease: A two compartment model of HHV.

  3. Structural Brain Abnormalities in Successfully Treated HIV Infection: Associations With Disease and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoest, Rosan A.; Underwood, Jonathan; de Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Cole, James H.; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Zetterberg, Henrik; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Portegies, Peter; Winston, Alan; Sharp, David J.; Gisslén, Magnus; Reiss, Peter; Winston, A.; Prins, M.; Schim van der Loeff, M. F.; Schouten, J.; Schmand, B.; Geurtsen, G. J.; Sharp, D. J.; Villaudy, J.; Berkhout, B.; Gisslén, M.; Pasternak, A.; Sabin, C. A.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Libert, C.; Franceschi, C.; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, E.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; van der Valk, M.; Bisschop, P. H.; Zaheri, S.; Burger, D.; Cole, J. H.; Zikkenheiner, W.; Janssen, F. R.; Underwood, J.; Kooij, K. W.; Doyle, N.; Verbraak, F.; Demirkaya, N.; Weijer, K.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.

    2018-01-01

    Background. Brain structural abnormalities have been reported in persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; PLWH) who are receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but their pathophysiology remains unclear. Methods. We investigated factors associated with brain

  4. The impact of HIV infection and disease stage on the rate of weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The differential effect of the World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stages of. HIV on nutrition recovery has not been sufficiently, if at all, explored; .... syndromic classifications based on the Wellcome classification system,[14] having records ...

  5. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for infectious disease: HIV/AIDS drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael S; Patridge, Eric

    2014-10-01

    HIV/AIDS is one of the worst pandemics in history. According to the World Health Organization, 26 million people have died since 1981 - 1.6 million in 2012 alone. The dramatic rise in HIV/AIDS mobilized a swift and impressive coordination among governmental, academic and private sector organizations to identify the virus and develop new treatments. Herein, we assess the arsenal of 28 new molecular entities (NMEs) targeting HIV/AIDS. These data demonstrate that the first approval of zidovudine presaged an expansion of the antiviral repertoire over the following years. Whereas the rate of HIV/AIDS NMEs is rapidly declining, so is the number of organizations developing NMEs. We speculate that decisions to abandon further research reflect, in part, growing costs and time required for development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Constructing publics, preventing diseases and medicalizing bodies: HIV, AIDS, and its visual cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizzio Mc Manus

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this paper we analyze the visual cultures surrounding HIV and AIDS; we are especially interested in tracking the actors, discourses and visual cultures involved in AIDS prevention in Mexico for a period of twenty years: from 1985 to 2005. We use media studies to better comprehend how HIV and AIDS further medicalized human bodies by mobilizing specific discourses, metaphors and visual resources that, though promoting a better understanding of how HIV could be acquired and how it could be prevented, also generated new representations of sexuality, bodies and persons living with HIV or AIDS often biased in favor of different systems of value. Moreover, we try to offer a general characterization of the different publics that were targeted and preconceptions involving ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, geography and membership in different sociocultural groups.

  7. The effect of aging, nutrition, and exercise during HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Somarriba

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Somarriba, Daniela Neri, Natasha Schaefer, Tracie L MillerDivision of Pediatric Clinical Research, Department of Pediatrics, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USAAbstract: Medical advances continue to change the face of human immunodeficiency virus–acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS. As life expectancy increases, the number of people living with HIV rises, presenting new challenges for the management of a chronic condition. Aging, nutrition, and physical activity can influence outcomes in other chronic conditions, and emerging data show that each of these factors can impact viral replication and the immune system in HIV. HIV infection results in a decline of the immune system through the depletion of CD4+ T cells. From initial infection, viral replication is a continuous phenomenon. Immunosenescence, a hallmark of aging, results in an increased susceptibility to infections secondary to a delayed immune response, and this phenomenon may be increased in HIV-infected patients. Optimal nutrition is an important adjunct in the clinical care of patients with HIV. Nutritional interventions may improve the quality and span of life and symptom management, support the effectiveness of medications, and improve the patient’s resistance to infections and other disease complications by altering immunity. Moderate physical activity can improve many immune parameters, reduce the risk of acute infection, and combat metabolic abnormalities. As people with HIV age, alternative therapies such as nutrition and physical activity may complement medical management.Keywords: HIV replication, aging, diet, nutrition, exercise, immunity

  8. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Detection of Intestinal Protozoa in HIV-Infected Children in Malawi, Enterocytozoon Bieneusi is Common and Associated with Gastrointestinal Complaints and May Delay BMI (Nutritional Status) Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, Minke H W; Moons, Peter; Maseko, Nelson; Gushu, Monfort B; Iwajomo, Oluwadamilola H; Heyderman, Robert S; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Brienen, Eric A; van Lieshout, Lisette; Calis, Job C J

    2018-05-14

    Intestinal protozoa are common opportunistic infections in HIV patients. Longitudinal studies on either the clinical relevance, or the effect of immune reconstitution by anti-retroviral therapy on intestinal protozoan infections are children is lacking however. This study investigates prevalence and clinical relevance of intestinal protozoa in HIV-infected Malawian children prior to and during their first year of ART. Stool samples collected at enrolment and during follow-up were tested for non-opportunistic (Giardia lamblia, Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica) and opportunistic protozoa (Entroctytoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon spp., Cryptosporidium spp and Cystoisospora belli) using multiplex real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Associations between infections and clinical symptoms were evaluated using univariate methods. Non-opportunistic and opportunistic protozoa were detected in 40%(14/35) and 46%(16/35) of children at baseline respectively. E. bieneusi was the most prevalent protozoa (37%, 13/35) and associated with gastrointestinal complaints(43% in positive (10/13) versus 18% (4/22) in E. bieneusi-negative children, p=0.001). Body Mass Index (BMI) recovery during 12 months of ART was more commonly delayed in E. bieneusi-positive (+0.29+SD 0.83) than E. bieneusi-negative children (+1.03+SD 1.25; p=0.05). E. bieneusi was not detected after 12 months of ART. E. bieneusi was the most prevalent opportunistic intestinal protozoa, present in over a third of study participants prior to initiation of ART. Although all children cleared E.bieneusi after 12 months of ART, E. bieneusi was associated with gastro-intestinal complaints and may delay BMI recovery. Trials to assess effect of treatment of E. bieneusi on nutritional status should be considered in HIV-infected African children.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download

  9. Preclinical testing of radiopharmaceuticals for novel applications in HIV, bacterial and fungal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.; Garg, G.; Dadachova, E.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics, antifungal and antiviral medications have traditionally been used in the management of infections. Due to widespread emergence of resistance to antimicrobial medications, and their side effects, there is a growing need for alternative approaches for management of such conditions. Antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens are on the rise. A cure has not been achieved for viral infections like AIDS, while fungal and parasitic infections are constant threats to the health of general public. The incidence of opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals like HIV patients, patients receiving high dose steroids, chemotherapy patients, and organ transplant recipients is on the rise. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has the potential to be a suitable and viable therapeutic modality in the arena of infection management. Provided the target-associated antigen is expressed by the target cells and minimally or not expressed by other tissues, selective targeting of radiation to target sites can be theoretically accomplished with relative sparing normal tissues from radiation exposure. In our laboratory we successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of RIT for treating infectious diseases. We targeted murine cryptococcosis with a mAb to the Cryptococcus neoformans capsular glucuronoxylomannan labeled with Bismuth-213 (213Bi) or Rhenium-188 (188Re). We subsequently extended the applicability of RIT for treating bacterial and viral infections. One of the advantages of using RIT to treat infections as opposed to cancer is that, in contrast to tumor cells, cells expressing microbial antigens are antigenically very different from host tissues and thus provide the potential for exquisite specificity and low cross-reactivity. Ever increasing incidence of infectious pathologies, exhaustion of antimicrobial possibilities and rising drug resistance calls for use of alternative and novel therapeutic options and we believe RIT is the need of the hour to combat these

  10. Associations between use of crack cocaine and HIV-1 disease progression: research findings and implications for mother-to-infant transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent in vitro and in vivo research has suggested that cocaine has a direct effect on the pathogenesis of AIDS. These findings are confirmed by epidemiological studies linking the use of injected, inhaled, and smoked (crack) cocaine and indicators of HIV disease progression, even among adherent users of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Recent studies of vertical HIV transmission suggest that cocaine use may play a role in mother-to-child infection via alteration of maternal immune respo...

  11. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  12. Are Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for Preexposure Prophylaxis Specific Enough? Formulation of a Personalized HIV Risk Score for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beymer, Matthew R; Weiss, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Bourque, Linda B; Gee, Gilbert C; Morisky, Donald E; Shu, Suzanne B; Javanbakht, Marjan; Bolan, Robert K

    2017-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has emerged as a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention tool for populations at highest risk for HIV infection. Current US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for identifying PrEP candidates may not be specific enough to identify gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) at the highest risk for HIV infection. We created an HIV risk score for HIV-negative MSM based on Syndemics Theory to develop a more targeted criterion for assessing PrEP candidacy. Behavioral risk assessment and HIV testing data were analyzed for HIV-negative MSM attending the Los Angeles LGBT Center between January 2009 and June 2014 (n = 9481). Syndemics Theory informed the selection of variables for a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. Estimated coefficients were summed to create an HIV risk score, and model fit was compared between our model and CDC guidelines using the Akaike Information Criterion and Bayesian Information Criterion. Approximately 51% of MSM were above a cutpoint that we chose as an illustrative risk score to qualify for PrEP, identifying 75% of all seroconverting MSM. Our model demonstrated a better overall fit when compared with the CDC guidelines (Akaike Information Criterion Difference = 68) in addition to identifying a greater proportion of HIV infections. Current CDC PrEP guidelines should be expanded to incorporate substance use, partner-level, and other Syndemic variables that have been shown to contribute to HIV acquisition. Deployment of such personalized algorithms may better hone PrEP criteria and allow providers and their patients to make a more informed decision prior to PrEP use.

  13. Global, regional, and national incidence and mortality for HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria during 1990-2013 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murray, Christopher J. L.; Ortblad, Katrina F.; Guinovart, Caterina; Lim, Stephen S.; Wolock, Timothy M.; Roberts, D. Allen; Dansereau, Emily A.; Graetz, Nicholas; Barber, Ryan M.; Brown, Jonathan C.; Wang, Haidong; Duber, Herbert C.; Naghavi, Mohsen; Dicker, Daniel; Dandona, Lalit; Salomon, Joshua A.; Heuton, Kyle R.; Foreman, Kyle; Phillips, David E.; Fleming, Thomas D.; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Phillips, Bryan K.; Johnson, Elizabeth K.; Coggeshall, Megan S.; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Jerry P.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Achoki, Tom; Adeyemo, Austine Olufemi; Adou, Arsene Kouablan; Adsuar, Jose C.; Agardh, Emilie Elisabet; Akena, Dickens; Al Kahbouri, Mazin J.; Alasfoor, Deena; Albittar, Mohammed I.; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Angel Alegretti, Miguel; Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Alhabib, Samia; Ali, Raghib; Alla, Francois; Allen, Peter J.; Alsharif, Ubai; Alvarez, Elena; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amankwaa, Adansi A.; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Amini, Hassan; Ammar, Walid; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T.; Anwari, Palwasha; Arnlov, Johan; Arsenijevic, Valentina S. Arsic; Artaman, Ali; Asghar, Rana J.; Assadi, Reza; Atkins, Lydia S.; Badawi, Alaa; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Banerjee, Amitava; Basu, Sanjay; Beardsley, Justin; Bekele, Tolesa; Bell, Michelle L.; Bernabe, Eduardo; Beyene, Tariku Jibat; Bhala, Neeraj; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bin Abdulhak, Aref; Binagwaho, Agnes; Blore, Jed D.; Basara, Berrak Bora; Bose, Dipan; Brainin, Michael; Breitborde, Nicholas; Castaneda-Orjuela, Carlos A.; Catala-Lopez, Ferran; Chadha, Vineet K.; Chang, Jung-Chen; Chiang, Peggy Pei-Chia; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Colomar, Mercedes; Cooper, Leslie Trumbull; Cooper, Cyrus; Courville, Karen J.; Cowie, Benjamin C.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dandona, Rakhi; Dayama, Anand; De Leo, Diego; Degenhardt, Louisa; Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Deribe, Kebede; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Dessalegn, Muluken; Dharmaratne, Samath D.; Dilmen, Ugur; Ding, Eric L.; Driscoll, Tim R.; Durrani, Adnan M.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Ermakov, Sergey Petrovich; Esteghamati, Alireza; Faraon, Emerito Jose A.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Fijabi, Daniel Obadare; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Paleo, Urbano Fra; Gaffikin, Lynne; Gamkrelidze, Amiran; Gankpe, Fortune Gbetoho; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Gibney, Katherine B.; Ginawi, Ibrahim Abdelmageem Mohamed; Glaser, Elizabeth L.; Gona, Philimon; Goto, Atsushi; Gouda, Hebe N.; Gugnani, Harish Chander; Gupta, Rajeev; Gupta, Rahul; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hamadeh, Randah Ribhi; Hammami, Mouhanad; Hankey, Graeme J.; Harb, Hilda L.; Maria Haro, Josep; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hay, Simon I.; Hedayati, Mohammad T.; Heredia Pi, Ileana B.; Hoek, Hans W.; Hornberger, John C.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hotez, Peter J.; Hoy, Damian G.; Huang, John J.; Iburg, Kim M.; Idrisov, Bulat T.; Innos, Kaire; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Jensen, Paul N.; Jha, Vivekanand; Jiang, Guohong; Jonas, Jost B.; Juel, Knud; Kan, Haidong; Kankindi, Ida; Karam, Nadim E.; Karch, Andre; Karema, Corine Kakizi; Kaul, Anil; Kawakami, Norito; Kazi, Dhruv S.; Kemp, Andrew H.; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Keren, Andre; Kereselidze, Maia; Khader, Yousef Saleh; Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali Hassan; Khan, Ejaz Ahmed; Khang, Young-Ho; Khonelidze, Irma; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kinge, Jonas M.; Knibbs, Luke; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Kosen, S.; Defo, Barthelemy Kuate; Kulkarni, Veena S.; Kulkarni, Chanda; Kumar, Kaushalendra; Kumar, Ravi B.; Kumar, G. Anil; Kwan, Gene F.; Lai, Taavi; Balaji, Arjun Lakshmana; Lam, Hilton; Lan, Qing; Lansingh, Van C.; Larson, Heidi J.; Larsson, Anders; Lee, Jong-Tae; Leigh, James; Leinsalu, Mall; Leung, Ricky; Li, Yichong; Li, Yongmei; Ferreira De Lima, Graca Maria; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Liu, Shiwei; Liu, Yang; Lloyd, Belinda K.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Pedro Machado, Vasco Manuel; Maclachlan, Jennifer H.; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Majdan, Marek; Mapoma, Christopher Chabila; Marcenes, Wagner; Barrieotos Marzan, Melvin; Masci, Joseph R.; Mashal, Mohammad Taufiq; Mason-Jones, Amanda J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Mazorodze, Tasara T.; Mckay, Abigail Cecilia; Meaney, Peter A.; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Mejia-Rodriguez, Fabiola; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Memish, Ziad A.; Mendoza, Walter; Miller, Ted R.; Mills, Edward J.; Mohammad, Karzan Abdulmuhsin; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mola, Glen Liddell; Monasta, Lorenzo; Montico, Marcella; Moore, Ami R.; Mori, Rintaro; Moturi, Wilkister Nyaora; Mukaigawara, Mitsuru; Murthy, Kinnari S.; Naheed, Aliya; Naidoo, Kovin S.; Naldi, Luigi; Nangia, Vinay; Narayan, K. M. Venkat; Nash, Denis; Nejjari, Chakib; Nelson, Robert G.; Neupane, Sudan Prasad; Newton, Charles R.; Ng, Marie; Nisar, Muhammad Imran; Nolte, Sandra; Norheim, Ole F.; Nowaseb, Vincent; Nyakarahuka, Luke; Oh, In-Hwan; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Olusanya, Bolajoko O.; Omer, Saad B.; Opio, John Nelson; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.; Papachristou, Christina; Paternina Caicedo, Angel J.; Patten, Scott B.; Paul, Vinod K.; Pavlin, Boris Igor; Pearce, Neil; Pereira, David M.; Pervaiz, Aslam; Pesudovs, Konrad; Petzold, Max; Pourmalek, Farshad; Qato, Dima; Quezada, Amado D.; Quistberg, D. Alex; Rafay, Anwar; Rahimi, Kazem; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rahman, Sajjad Ur; Raju, Murugesan; Rana, Saleem M.; Razavi, Homie; Reilly, Robert Quentin; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Ronfani, Luca; Roy, Nobhojit; Sabin, Nsanzimana; Saeedi, Mohammad Yahya; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Samonte, Genesis May J.; Sawhney, Monika; Schneider, Ione J. C.; Schwebel, David C.; Seedat, Soraya; Sepanlou, Sadaf G.; Servan-Mori, Edson E.; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Shibuya, Kenji; Shin, Hwashin Hyun; Shiue, Ivy; Shivakoti, Rupak; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Silberberg, Donald H.; Silva, Andrea P.; Simard, Edgar P.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Skirbekk, Vegard; Sliwa, Karen; Soneji, Samir; Soshnikov, Sergey S.; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T.; Stathopoulou, Vasiliki Kalliopi; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Swaminathan, Soumya; Sykes, Bryan L.; Tabb, Karen M.; Talongwa, Roberto Tchio; Tenkorang, Eric Yeboah; Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Thomson, Alan J.; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Traebert, Jefferson; Tran, Bach X.; Dimbuene, Zacharie Tsala; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Uchendu, Uche S.; Ukwaja, Kingsley N.; Uzun, Selen Begum; Vallely, Andrew J.; Vasankari, Tommi J.; Venketasubramanian, N.; Violante, Francesco S.; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Vollset, Stein Emil; Waller, Stephen; Wallin, Mitchell T.; Wang, Linhong; Wang, XiaoRong; Wang, Yanping; Weichenthal, Scott; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weintraub, Robert G.; Westerman, Ronny; White, Richard A.; Wilkinson, James D.; Williams, Thomas Neil; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Wong, John Q.; Xu, Gelin; Yang, Yong C.; Yano, Yuichiro; Yentur, Gokalp Kadri; Yip, Paul; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Younis, Mustafa; Yu, Chuanhua; Jin, Kim Yun; Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Zhao, Yong; Zheng, Yingfeng; Zhou, Maigeng; Zhu, Jun; Zou, Xiao Nong; Lopez, Alan D.; Vos, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background The Millennium Declaration in 2000 brought special global attention to HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria through the formulation of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 6. The Global Burden of Disease 2013 study provides a consistent and comprehensive approach to disease estimation for between

  14. Immunity against HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis during Co-Infections with Neglected Infectious Diseases: Recommendations for the European Union Research Priorities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boraschi, D.; Alemayehu, M.A.; Aseffa, A.; Chiodi, F.; Chisi, J.; Prete, G. Del; Doherty, T.M.; Elhassan, I.; Engers, H.; Gyan, B; Harandi, A.M.; Kariuki, T.; Kironde, F.; Kouriba, B.; Langhorne, J.; Laskay, T.; Medaglini, D.; Olesen, O.; Onyebujoh, P.; Palma, C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Sibanda, E.; Steinhoff, U.; Tagliabue, A.; Thiel, A.; Vahedi, M.; Troye-Blomberg, M.

    2008-01-01

    Author SummaryInfectious diseases remain a major health and socioeconomic problem in many low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. For many years, the three most devastating diseases, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) have received most of the world's attention. However, in

  15. Biological and genetic evolution of HIV type 1 in two siblings with different patterns of disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Chiara; Leitner, Thomas; Laurén, Anna; Karlsson, Ingrid; Pastore, Angela; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Antonsson, Liselotte; Plebani, Anna; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the immunological and virological factors that may lead to different patterns of disease progression characteristic of HIV-1-infected children, two HIV-1-infected siblings, a slow and a fast progressor, were followed prospectively before the onset of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Viral coreceptor usage, including the use of CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors, macrophage tropism, and sensitivity to the CC-chemokine RANTES, has been studied. An autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibody response has been documented using peripheral blood mononuclear cells- and GHOST(3) cell line-based assays. Viral evolution was investigated by env C2-V3 region sequence analysis. Although both siblings were infected with HIV-1 of the R5 phenotype, their viruses showed important biological differences. In the fast progressor there was a higher RANTES sensitivity of the early virus, an increased trend to change the mode of CCR5 receptor use, and a larger genetic evolution. Both children developed an autologous neutralizing antibody response starting from the second year with evidence of the continuous emergence of resistant variants. A marked viral genetic and phenotypic evolution was documented in the fast progressor sibling, which is accompanied by a high viral RANTES sensitivity and persistent neutralizing antibodies.

  16. Motor function declines over time in human immunodeficiency virus and is associated with cerebrovascular disease, while HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder remains stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Elicer, Isabel; Byrd, Desiree; Clark, Uraina S; Morgello, Susan; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2018-04-25

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain prevalent in the combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) era, especially the milder forms. Despite these milder phenotypes, we have shown that motor abnormalities persist and have quantified them with the HIV Dementia Motor Scale (HDMS). Our objectives were to replicate, in an independent sample, our prior findings that the HDMS is associated with cognitive impairment in HIV, while adding consideration of age-associated comorbidities such as cerebrovascular disease, and to examine the longitudinal trajectories of cognitive and motor dysfunction. We included all participants enrolled in the Manhattan HIV Brain Bank (MHBB) from January 2007 to May 2017 who had complete baseline data (N = 164). MHBB participants undergo standardized longitudinal assessments including documentation of comorbidities and medications, blood work, the HDMS, and neurocognitive testing. We found that motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment, and cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with each other at baseline. Cerebrovascular disease independently predicted cognitive impairment in a multivariable model. Longitudinal analysis in a subset of 78 participants with ≥ 4 years of follow-up showed a stable cognition but declining motor function. We conclude that the HDMS is a valid measurement of motor dysfunction in HIV-infected patients and is associated with cognitive impairment and the presence of cerebrovascular disease. Cognitive impairment is mild and stable in CART-treated HIV; however, motor function declines over time, which may be related to the accrual of comorbidities such as cerebrovascular disease. Further research should examine the mechanisms underlying motor dysfunction in HIV and its clinical impact.

  17. HIV as a chronic disease considerations for service planning in resource-poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds Lucy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper reviews the healthcare issues facing nations which have a substantial caseload of chronic HIV cases. It considers the challenges of extending antiretroviral coverage to an expanding caseload as supplier price rises and international trade agreements come into force to reduce the availability of affordable antiretrovirals just as the economic downturn restricts donor funding. It goes on to review the importance in this context of supporting adherence to drug regimens in order to preserve access to affordable antiretrovirals for those already on treatment, and of removing key barriers such as patient fees and supply interruptions. The demands of those with chronic HIV for health services other than antiretroviral therapy are considered in the light of the fearful or discriminatory attitudes of non-specialist healthcare staff due to HIV-related stigma, which is linked with the weakness of infection control measures in many health facilities. The implications for prevention strategies including those involving criminalisation of HIV transmission or exposure are briefly summarised for the current context, in which the caseload of those whose chronic HIV infection must be controlled with antiretrovirals will continue to rise for the foreseeable future.

  18. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  19. Syndemics of psychosocial problems and HIV risk: A systematic review of empirical tests of the disease interaction concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Alexander C; Burns, Bridget F O

    2015-08-01

    In the theory of syndemics, diseases co-occur in particular temporal or geographical contexts due to harmful social conditions (disease concentration) and interact at the level of populations and individuals, with mutually enhancing deleterious consequences for health (disease interaction). This theory has widespread adherents in the field, but the extent to which there is empirical support for the concept of disease interaction remains unclear. In January 2015 we systematically searched 7 bibliographic databases and tracked citations to highly cited publications associated with the theory of syndemics. Of the 783 records, we ultimately included 34 published journal articles, 5 dissertations, and 1 conference abstract. Most studies were based on a cross-sectional design (32 [80%]), were conducted in the U.S. (32 [80%]), and focused on men who have sex with men (21 [53%]). The most frequently studied psychosocial problems were related to mental health (33 [83%]), substance abuse (36 [90%]), and violence (27 [68%]); while the most frequently studied outcome variables were HIV transmission risk behaviors (29 [73%]) or HIV infection (9 [23%]). To test the disease interaction concept, 11 (28%) studies used some variation of a product term, with less than half of these (5/11 [45%]) providing sufficient information to interpret interaction both on an additive and on a multiplicative scale. The most frequently used specification (31 [78%]) to test the disease interaction concept was the sum score corresponding to the total count of psychosocial problems. Although the count variable approach does not test hypotheses about interactions between psychosocial problems, these studies were much more likely than others (14/31 [45%] vs. 0/9 [0%]; χ2 = 6.25, P = 0.01) to incorporate language about "synergy" or "interaction" that was inconsistent with the statistical models used. Therefore, more evidence is needed to assess the extent to which diseases interact, either at the

  20. Cost of Care for HIV-Infected Patients with Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorder or Psychiatric Disease: Report from a Large, Integrated Health Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald N. DeLorenze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The costs of providing care to HIV-infected (HIV+ patients with co-occurring diagnoses of substance use (SU disorder or psychiatric disease (PD are not well documented. It is our objective to evaluate costs in these HIV+ patients receiving care in a large health plan. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study from 1995 to 2010 to compare costs of healthcare in HIV+ patients with and without co-occurring SU disorder and/or PD diagnoses. Estimates of proportional differences in costs (rate ratios were obtained from repeated measures generalized linear regression. Models were stratified by cost category (e.g., inpatient, outpatient. Results. Mean total healthcare costs per patient per year were higher in HIV+ patients diagnosed with SU disorder or PD compared to HIV+ patients without these comorbid conditions. After controlling for confounders, total mean costs remained significantly higher in patients diagnosed with SU disorder (RR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.18–1.31 or PD (RR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.15–1.24. Mean outpatient care costs were significantly greater in patients with both SU disorder and PD (RR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.41–1.64. Conclusions. Given these higher expenditures in the care of HIV+ patients with comorbid SU disorder and/or PD, greater efforts to facilitate SU disorder or PD treatment initiation and persistence could provide substantial savings.