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Sample records for delayed speech development

  1. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Delayed Speech or Language Development KidsHealth > For Parents > Delayed Speech or Language Development ... child is right on schedule. Normal Speech & Language Development It's important to discuss early speech and language ...

  2. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Parents Can Do en español Retraso en el desarrollo del habla o del lenguaje Your son ... for communication exchange and participation? What kind of feedback does the child get? When speech, language, hearing, ...

  3. Speech development delay in a child with foetal alcohol syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A female foetus in her mother’s womb was exposed to high concentrations of alcohol at each stage of pregnancy on a long-term basis, which resulted in a permanent disability. In addition to a number of deficiencies in the overall functioning of the body of the child, there are serious problems pertaining to verbal communication. This thesis aims to describe foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS disease and present the basic problems with communication functions in a child, caused by damage of brain structures responsible for speech development. The thesis includes a speech diagnosis and therapy program adapted to the presented case. In the Discussion Section we have presented characteristics of communication disorders in case of children with FAS and the description of developmental malformations, neurobehavioral disorders, and environmental factors affecting the development of the child’s speech.

  4. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Linden Ulrike; Groß Wibke; Ostermann Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 childr...

  5. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Wibke; Linden, Ulrike; Ostermann, Thomas

    2010-07-21

    Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic and supportive therapy for children with delayed speech development

  6. Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The speech-language pathologist should consistently assess your child’s speech and language development, as well as screen for hearing problems (with ... and caregivers play a vital role in a child’s speech and language development. It is important that you talk to your ...

  7. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Results Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. Conclusions This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic and supportive therapy for

  8. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linden Ulrike

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Results Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. Conclusions This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic

  9. Speech and Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... home affect my child’s language and speech?The brain has to work harder to interpret and use 2 languages, so it may take longer for children to start using either one or both of the languages they’re learning. It’s not unusual for a bilingual child to ...

  10. Group delay functions and its applications in speech technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hema A Murthy; B Yegnanarayana

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally, the information in speech signals is represented in terms of features derived from short-time Fourier analysis. In this analysis the features extracted from the magnitude of the Fourier transform (FT) are considered, ignoring the phase component. Although the significance of the FT phase was highlighted in several studies over the recent three decades, the features of the FT phase were not exploited fully due to difficulty in computing the phase and also in processing the phase function. The information in the short-time FT phase function can be extracted by processing the derivative of the FT phase, i.e., the group delay function. In this paper, the properties of the group delay functions are reviewed, highlighting the importance of the FT phase for representing information in the speech signal. Methods to process the group delay function are discussed to capture the characteristics of the vocal-tract system in the form of formants or through a modified group delay function. Applications of group delay functions for speech processing are discussed in some detail. They include segmentation of speech into syllable boundaries, exploiting the additive and high resolution properties of the group delay functions. The effectiveness of segmentation of speech, and the features derived from the modified group delay are demonstrated in applications such as language identification, speech recognition and speaker recognition. The paper thus demonstrates the need to exploit the potential of the group delay functions for development of speech systems.

  11. Language development, delay and intervention-the views of parents from communities that speech and language therapy managers in England consider to be under-served.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Harding, Sam; Roulstone, Sue

    2017-07-01

    Evidence-based practice includes research evidence, clinical expertise and stakeholder perspectives. Stakeholder perspectives are important and include parental ethno-theories, which embrace views about many aspects of speech, language and communication, language development, and interventions. The Developmental Niche Framework provides a useful theory to understand parental beliefs. Ethnotheories, including those about language development, delay and interventions, may vary cross culturally and are less well understood in relation to families who may be considered 'under-served' or 'hard-to-reach' by speech and language therapy services. Who is considered to be under-served and the reasons why some families are under-served are complex. To describe beliefs and reported practices, in relation to speech and language development, delay and intervention, of parents and carers from a small number of groups in England who were perceived to be under-served in relation to SLT services. As part of a wider National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded study (Child Talk), seven focus groups (with a total of 52 participants) were held with parents from three communities in England. Topics addressed included beliefs about language development, language delay and parents' reported responses to language delay. Data were transcribed and analysed using adapted framework analysis, which also drew on directed content analysis. Four themes resulted that broadly matched the topics addressed in the focus groups: language development and the environment; causes and signs of speech and language delay; responses to concerns about speech, language and communication; and improving SLT. These produced some previously unreported ideas, e.g., about how language develops and the causes of delay. The findings are discussed in relation to previous literature and the Developmental Niche Framework. Clinical implications include ideas about issues for SLTs to discuss with families and the

  12. Development and validation of a screening procedure to identify speech-language delay in toddlers with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Line Dahl; Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a clinically useful speech-language screening procedure for young children with cleft palate ± cleft lip (CP) to identify those in need of speech-language intervention. Twenty-two children with CP were assigned to a +/- need for intervention...... studies of children with CP. The external validity of this screening procedure was evaluated by comparing the +/- need for intervention assignment determined by the screening procedure to experienced speech-language pathologist (SLP)s' clinical judgement of whether or not a child needed early intervention....... The results of real-time listening assessment showed good-excellent inter-rater agreement on different consonant inventory measures. Furthermore, there was almost perfect agreement between the children selected for intervention with the screening procedure and the clinical judgement of experienced SLPs...

  13. Development and validation of a screening procedure to identify speech-language delay in toddlers with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Line Dahl; Willadsen, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a clinically useful speech-language screening procedure for young children with cleft palate +/- cleft lip (CP) to identify those in need of speech-language intervention. Twenty-two children with CP were assigned to a +/- need for intervention...... studies of children with CP. The external validity of this screening procedure was evaluated by comparing the +/- need for intervention assignment determined by the screening procedure to experienced speech-language pathologists’ (SLPs’) clinical judgment of whether or not a child needed early...... intervention. The results of real-time listening assessment showed good-excellent inter-rater agreement on different consonant inventory measures. Furthermore, there was almost perfect agreement between the children selected for intervention with the screening procedure and the clinical judgment of experienced...

  14. A preliminary study on the relationship between characteristics of TV content and delayed speech development in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Kanako; Tanimura, Masako

    2009-06-01

    Our previous population survey of 18-month-old children suggested an association between delayed language development and heavy TV viewing. We therefore collected all 85 videos described as children's favorites in that questionnaire to examine relationships between the characteristics of habitually viewed videos and language development. In the language delayed group, compared to the non-delayed group, the types of videos preferred more were "realistic animations" and "baby education" and the characteristics of videos were contained few close-ups of characters facing viewers, continued uninterruptedly between stories, had constant movement or transformation of characters, had a high frame rate of animation, and that adults readily kept on watching the videos even with the sound off. These characteristics were seen more in videos the above two types. These findings imply that habitual television/video viewing with characteristics that are not apt to elicit parent-child communication for long hours may affect delayed language development in young children.

  15. SPEECH DELAY IN THE PRACTICE OF A PAEDIATRICIAN AND CHILD’S NEUROLOGIST

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    N. N. Zavadenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main clinical forms and causes of speech delay in children. It presents modern data on the role of neurobiological factors in the speech delay pathogenesis, including early organic damage to the central nervous system due to the pregnancy and childbirth pathology, as well as genetic mechanisms. For early and accurate diagnosis of speech disorders in children, you need to consider normal patterns of speech development. The article presents indicators of pre-speech and speech development in children and describes the screening method for determining the speech delay. The main areas of complex correction are speech therapy, psycho-pedagogical and psychotherapeutic assistance, as well as pharmaceutical treatment. The capabilities of drug therapy for dysphasia (alalia are shown. 

  16. A Diagnostic Marker to Discriminate Childhood Apraxia of Speech From Speech Delay: III. Theoretical Coherence of the Pause Marker with Speech Processing Deficits in Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D; Strand, Edythe A; Fourakis, Marios; Jakielski, Kathy J; Hall, Sheryl D; Karlsson, Heather B; Mabie, Heather L; McSweeny, Jane L; Tilkens, Christie M; Wilson, David L

    2017-04-14

    Previous articles in this supplement described rationale for and development of the pause marker (PM), a diagnostic marker of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), and studies supporting its validity and reliability. The present article assesses the theoretical coherence of the PM with speech processing deficits in CAS. PM and other scores were obtained for 264 participants in 6 groups: CAS in idiopathic, neurogenetic, and complex neurodevelopmental disorders; adult-onset apraxia of speech (AAS) consequent to stroke and primary progressive apraxia of speech; and idiopathic speech delay. Participants with CAS and AAS had significantly lower scores than typically speaking reference participants and speech delay controls on measures posited to assess representational and transcoding processes. Representational deficits differed between CAS and AAS groups, with support for both underspecified linguistic representations and memory/access deficits in CAS, but for only the latter in AAS. CAS-AAS similarities in the age-sex standardized percentages of occurrence of the most frequent type of inappropriate pauses (abrupt) and significant differences in the standardized occurrence of appropriate pauses were consistent with speech processing findings. Results support the hypotheses of core representational and transcoding speech processing deficits in CAS and theoretical coherence of the PM's pause-speech elements with these deficits.

  17. A New Speech Codec Based on ANN with Low Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The author designs a new speech codec in this paper, which is based on ANN to carry out nonlinear prediction. This new codec synthesizes speeches with better quality than the conventional waveform or hybrid codecs does at the same bit rate. Moreover, the most important characteristic of this codec is the low coding delay, which will benefit the enhancement of the speech communication QoS when we transmit speech signals in IP or ATM networks.

  18. Comparing Motor Skills in Autism Spectrum Individuals With and Without Speech Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeau, Elise B; Meilleur, Andrée-Anne S; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Mottron, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Movement atypicalities in speed, coordination, posture, and gait have been observed across the autism spectrum (AS) and atypicalities in coordination are more commonly observed in AS individuals without delayed speech (DSM-IV Asperger) than in those with atypical or delayed speech onset. However, few studies have provided quantitative data to support these mostly clinical observations. Here, we compared perceptual and motor performance between 30 typically developing and AS individuals (21 with speech delay and 18 without speech delay) to examine the associations between limb movement control and atypical speech development. Groups were matched for age, intelligence, and sex. The experimental design included: an inspection time task, which measures visual processing speed; the Purdue Pegboard, which measures finger dexterity, bimanual performance, and hand-eye coordination; the Annett Peg Moving Task, which measures unimanual goal-directed arm movement; and a simple reaction time task. We used analysis of covariance to investigate group differences in task performance and linear regression models to explore potential associations between intelligence, language skills, simple reaction time, and visually guided movement performance. AS participants without speech delay performed slower than typical participants in the Purdue Pegboard subtests. AS participants without speech delay showed poorer bimanual coordination than those with speech delay. Visual processing speed was slightly faster in both AS groups than in the typical group. Altogether, these results suggest that AS individuals with and without speech delay differ in visually guided and visually triggered behavior and show that early language skills are associated with slower movement in simple and complex motor tasks.

  19. Sociodemographic profile of speech and language delay up to six years of age in Indian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Binu, Raj Sunil, Stephenson Baburaj, Mohandas MK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Speech and language is the most important skill for the child’s development and scholastic performance. Awareness of the delay is important in the programs for early identification. Purpose: to assess the prevalence of speech and language delay in children from age group 0 to six years of age. Methodology: The speech and language development of children coming in the well baby clinic and daily pediatric clinic of age group from birth to 6 years were evaluated using Language Evaluation Scale Trivandrum (LEST. The prevalence of speech and language delay in each age group was calculated and also analyzed in the sociodemograhic profile. Results: A total of 102 children were studied in which 13.7% had language delay. 18% had questionable language delay and 15.7% had suspect language delay. Though among language delay mixed type was more, children had more difficulty in doing expressive items. Language delay was also found to be more prevalent in males, single child, first born child and children of working mothers. Parental age, education or socioeconomic status was not found to be related to language delay. Conclusion: The 13.7% prevalence of language delay in the children indicates the need of early identification and for it a simple screening tool like LEST is a must during the routine evaluation of young children in pediatric clinics. Health care givers and parents should ensure that babies grow up in a language rich, nurturing and stimulating environment right from birth onwards.

  20. Feedback delays eliminate auditory-motor learning in speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Ludo; Maffett, Derek G

    2015-03-30

    Neurologically healthy individuals use sensory feedback to alter future movements by updating internal models of the effector system and environment. For example, when visual feedback about limb movements or auditory feedback about speech movements is experimentally perturbed, the planning of subsequent movements is adjusted - i.e., sensorimotor adaptation occurs. A separate line of studies has demonstrated that experimentally delaying the sensory consequences of limb movements causes the sensory input to be attributed to external sources rather than to one's own actions. Yet similar feedback delays have remarkably little effect on visuo-motor adaptation (although the rate of learning varies, the amount of adaptation is only moderately affected with delays of 100-200ms, and adaptation still occurs even with a delay as long as 5000ms). Thus, limb motor learning remains largely intact even in conditions where error assignment favors external factors. Here, we show a fundamentally different result for sensorimotor control of speech articulation: auditory-motor adaptation to formant-shifted feedback is completely eliminated with delays of 100ms or more. Thus, for speech motor learning, real-time auditory feedback is critical. This novel finding informs theoretical models of human motor control in general and speech motor control in particular, and it has direct implications for the application of motor learning principles in the habilitation and rehabilitation of individuals with various sensorimotor speech disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Imitation of contrastive lexical stress in children with speech delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Jennell C.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2005-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between acoustic correlates of stress in trochaic (strong-weak), spondaic (strong-strong), and iambic (weak-strong) nonword bisyllables produced by children (30-50) with normal speech acquisition and children with speech delay. Ratios comparing the acoustic measures (vowel duration, rms, and f0) of the first syllable to the second syllable were calculated to evaluate the extent to which each phonetic parameter was used to mark stress. In addition, a calculation of the variability of jaw movement in each bisyllable was made. Finally, perceptual judgments of accuracy of stress production were made. Analysis of perceptual judgments indicated a robust difference between groups: While both groups of children produced errors in imitating the contrastive lexical stress models (~40%), the children with normal speech acquisition tended to produce trochaic forms in substitution for other stress types, whereas children with speech delay showed no preference for trochees. The relationship between segmental acoustic parameters, kinematic variability, and the ratings of stress by trained listeners will be presented.

  2. Improving Narrative Skills in Young Children with Delayed Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Peter; Shanks, Becky; Davies, Karen

    2004-01-01

    A substantial number of 5-7 year old children experience delayed language development which threatens their progress in school, although they have not been placed on speech and language therapy caseloads. Children with delayed language development typically have a limited ability to understand and tell stories. Intervention to develop the oral…

  3. Epilepsy, speech delay, and mental retardation in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Salvatore; Mostardini, Rosa; Di Bartolo, Rosanna Maria; Balestri, Paolo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common muscular dystrophies which is related to the deletion of tandem repeats on chromosome 4q35. Extramuscular features such as hearing loss, retinopathy, mental retardation, and epilepsy, may be observed in patients carrying large 4q35 deletions resulting in fragment sizes less than 12 kilobases (kb) (normal >35 kb). We report on a family affected by FSHD carrying a small 4q35 deletion and residual fragments length of 17 kb, presenting with epilepsy (three patients), speech delay (two), and mental retardation (one). In all patients semeiology of seizures and interictal EEG anomalies were congruent with a localization-related epilepsy possibly involving the temporal lobe. In conclusion, we provide further evidences that extramuscular findings such as epilepsy, speech delay, and mental retardation may occur in those patients carrying smaller 4q35 deletions, suggesting that a close correlation between 4q35 fragment size and clinical severity in FSHD is therefore not constant. Moreover, a review of the literature and our observations seem to suggest that focal epilepsies, likely related to the temporal lobe in the present family, represent the main type of epilepsy occurring in children with FSHD. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THE ONTOGENESIS OF SPEECH DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Braudo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to acquaint the specialists, working with children having developmental disorders, with age-related norms for speech development. Many well-known linguists and psychologists studied speech ontogenesis (logogenesis. Speech is a higher mental function, which integrates many functional systems. Speech development in infants during the first months after birth is ensured by the innate hearing and emerging ability to fix the gaze on the face of an adult. Innate emotional reactions are also being developed during this period, turning into nonverbal forms of communication. At about 6 months a baby starts to pronounce some syllables; at 7–9 months – repeats various sounds combinations, pronounced by adults. At 10–11 months a baby begins to react on the words, referred to him/her. The first words usually appear at an age of 1 year; this is the start of the stage of active speech development. At this time it is acceptable, if a child confuses or rearranges sounds, distorts or misses them. By the age of 1.5 years a child begins to understand abstract explanations of adults. Significant vocabulary enlargement occurs between 2 and 3 years; grammatical structures of the language are being formed during this period (a child starts to use phrases and sentences. Preschool age (3–7 y. o. is characterized by incorrect, but steadily improving pronunciation of sounds and phonemic perception. The vocabulary increases; abstract speech and retelling are being formed. Children over 7 y. o. continue to improve grammar, writing and reading skills. The described stages may not have strict age boundaries, as soon as they are dependent not only on environment, but also on the child’s mental constitution, heredity and character.

  5. Auditory Brainstem Response Wave Amplitude Characteristics as a Diagnostic Tool in Children with Speech Delay with Unknown Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Abadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech delay with an unknown cause is a problem among children. This diagnosis is the last differential diagnosis after observing normal findings in routine hearing tests. The present study was undertaken to determine whether auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli are different between normally developing children and children suffering from delayed speech with unknown causes. In this cross-sectional study, we compared click auditory brainstem responses between 261 children who were clinically diagnosed with delayed speech with unknown causes based on normal routine auditory test findings and neurological examinations and had >12 months of speech delay (case group and 261 age- and sex-matched normally developing children (control group. Our results indicated that the case group exhibited significantly higher wave amplitude responses to click stimuli (waves I, III, and V than did the control group (P=0.001. These amplitudes were significantly reduced after 1 year (P=0.001; however, they were still significantly higher than those of the control group (P=0.001. The significant differences were seen regardless of the age and the sex of the participants. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups considering the latency of waves I, III, and V. In conclusion, the higher amplitudes of waves I, III, and V, which were observed in the auditory brainstem responses to click stimuli among the patients with speech delay with unknown causes, might be used as a diagnostic tool to track patients’ improvement after treatment.

  6. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback induces the temporal recalibration effect in both speech perception and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawabata, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    We ordinarily speak fluently, even though our perceptions of our own voices are disrupted by various environmental acoustic properties. The underlying mechanism of speech is supposed to monitor the temporal relationship between speech production and the perception of auditory feedback, as suggested by a reduction in speech fluency when the speaker is exposed to delayed auditory feedback (DAF). While many studies have reported that DAF influences speech motor processing, its relationship to the temporal tuning effect on multimodal integration, or temporal recalibration, remains unclear. We investigated whether the temporal aspects of both speech perception and production change due to adaptation to the delay between the motor sensation and the auditory feedback. This is a well-used method of inducing temporal recalibration. Participants continually read texts with specific DAF times in order to adapt to the delay. Then, they judged the simultaneity between the motor sensation and the vocal feedback. We measured the rates of speech with which participants read the texts in both the exposure and re-exposure phases. We found that exposure to DAF changed both the rate of speech and the simultaneity judgment, that is, participants' speech gained fluency. Although we also found that a delay of 200 ms appeared to be most effective in decreasing the rates of speech and shifting the distribution on the simultaneity judgment, there was no correlation between these measurements. These findings suggest that both speech motor production and multimodal perception are adaptive to temporal lag but are processed in distinct ways.

  7. Analytical Study of High Pitch Delay Resolution Technique for Tonal Speech Coding

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    Suphattharachai Chomphan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In tonal-language speech, since tone plays important role not only on the naturalness and also the intelligibility of the speech, it must be treated appropriately in a speech coder algorithm. Approach: This study proposes an analytical study of the technique of High Pitch Delay Resolutions (HPDR applied to the adaptive codebook of core coder of Multi-Pulse based Code Excited Linear Predictive (MP-CELP coder. Results: The experimental results show that the speech quality of the MP-CELP speech coder with HPDR technique is improved above the speech quality of the conventional coder. An optimum resolution of pitch delay is also presented. Conclusion: From the analytical study, it has been found that the proposed technique can improve the speech coding quality.

  8. DISODERS IN THE SPEECH DEVELOPMENT EARLY DETECTION AND TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilka RAZMOVSKA; Vasilka DOLEVSKA

    1998-01-01

    Introduction;· Causes for disorders in the speech development;· Disorders in the speech development, mental retardation and treatment;· Disorders in the speech development, hearing remainders and treatment;· Autism and disorders in the speech development;· Bilingual and disordered speech developmentSpeech of neglected children

  9. Self-Reported Parenting Behavior and Child Temperament in Families of Toddlers with and without Speech-Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry Carson, Cecyle K.; Carson, David K.; Klee, Thomas; Jackman-Brown, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This study examined self-reported parenting behaviors, and child temperament and behavior, based on parental perceptions of 47 toddlers ages 25 to 31 months. Data were obtained via parental reports and direct assessment. Children were identified as having a speech-language delay (SLD, n = 17) or as typically developing (n = 30) based on…

  10. Individual Variability in Delayed Auditory Feedback Effects on Speech Fluency and Rate in Normally Fluent Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, HeeCheong; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Zhang, Jingfei; Loucks, Torrey; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is known to induce stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs) and cause speech rate reductions in normally fluent adults, but the reason for speech disruptions is not fully known, and individual variation has not been well characterized. Studying individual variation in susceptibility to DAF may identify factors…

  11. Start/End Delays of Voiced and Unvoiced Speech Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrnstein, A

    1999-09-24

    Recent experiments using low power EM-radar like sensors (e.g, GEMs) have demonstrated a new method for measuring vocal fold activity and the onset times of voiced speech, as vocal fold contact begins to take place. Similarly the end time of a voiced speech segment can be measured. Secondly it appears that in most normal uses of American English speech, unvoiced-speech segments directly precede or directly follow voiced-speech segments. For many applications, it is useful to know typical duration times of these unvoiced speech segments. A corpus, assembled earlier of spoken ''Timit'' words, phrases, and sentences and recorded using simultaneously measured acoustic and EM-sensor glottal signals, from 16 male speakers, was used for this study. By inspecting the onset (or end) of unvoiced speech, using the acoustic signal, and the onset (or end) of voiced speech using the EM sensor signal, the average duration times for unvoiced segments preceding onset of vocalization were found to be 300ms, and for following segments, 500ms. An unvoiced speech period is then defined in time, first by using the onset of the EM-sensed glottal signal, as the onset-time marker for the voiced speech segment and end marker for the unvoiced segment. Then, by subtracting 300ms from the onset time mark of voicing, the unvoiced speech segment start time is found. Similarly, the times for a following unvoiced speech segment can be found. While data of this nature have proven to be useful for work in our laboratory, a great deal of additional work remains to validate such data for use with general populations of users. These procedures have been useful for applying optimal processing algorithms over time segments of unvoiced, voiced, and non-speech acoustic signals. For example, these data appear to be of use in speaker validation, in vocoding, and in denoising algorithms.

  12. Practise patterns of Malaysian speech-language pathologists in managing children with speech and language delay/disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joginder Singh, Susheel; Chan, Min Yen; Ahmad Rusli, Yazmin

    2016-12-01

    Children with speech and language delay/disorder (SLD) in the developing language stage (DLS) are one of the largest populations served by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in paediatric settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the practise patterns adopted by Malaysian SLPs when managing these children. A web-based questionnaire was developed to obtain information about SLPs' practises during assessment, planning and treatment. A total of 53 SLPs completed the questionnaire. When assessing the children, participants either always or usually involved parents, suggesting that they understood the importance of family involvement in services provided. When planning goals, the SLPs relied mostly on their clinical experience and less on research evidence. Participants reported that, most often, they employed a one-to-one approach when providing treatment. There was, however, great variation in the frequency of treatment provided, reflecting the different workplaces of participants. Generally, findings from this study indicated that some practises employed by Malaysian SLPs when managing children with SLD in the DLS are on par with the best practise guidelines, but there is still room for improvement in certain areas such as team collaboration and evidence-based practise. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  13. The Influence of Socio-Economic Status and Ethnicity on Speech and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Tehmina N.; Hughes, Amanda; Iqbal, Zafar; Cooper, Janet

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors influence the speech and language development of young children. Delays in the development of speech and language can have repercussions for school attainment and life chances. This paper is based on a survey of 3- to 4-year-old children in the city of Stoke-on-Trent in the UK. It analyses the data collected from 255 children…

  14. Design and development a children's speech database

    OpenAIRE

    Kraleva, Radoslava

    2016-01-01

    The report presents the process of planning, designing and the development of a database of spoken children's speech whose native language is Bulgarian. The proposed model is designed for children between the age of 4 and 6 without speech disorders, and reflects their specific capabilities. At this age most children cannot read, there is no sustained concentration, they are emotional, etc. The aim is to unite all the media information accompanying the recording and processing of spoken speech...

  15. Activities to Encourage Speech and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Swallowing / Development Activities to Encourage Speech and Language Development Birth to 2 Years Encourage your baby ... Play games with your child such as "house." Exchange roles in the family, with your pretending to ...

  16. Speech-perception-in-noise and bilateral spatial abilities in adults with delayed sequential cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Oosthuizen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine speech-perception-in-noise (with speech and noise spatially distinct and coincident and bilateral spatial benefits of head-shadow effect, summation, squelch and spatial release of masking in adults with delayed sequential cochlear implants. Study design: A cross-sectional one group post-test-only exploratory design was employed. Eleven adults (mean age 47 years; range 21 – 69 years of the Pretoria Cochlear Implant Programme (PCIP in South Africa with a bilateral severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Prerecorded Everyday Speech Sentences of The Central Institute for the Deaf (CID were used to evaluate participants’ speech-in-noise perception at sentence level. An adaptive procedure was used to determine the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, in dB at which the participant’s speech reception threshold (SRT was achieved. Specific calculations were used to estimate bilateral spatial benefit effects. Results: A minimal bilateral benefit for speech-in-noise perception was observed with noise directed to the first implant (CI 1 (1.69 dB and in the speech and noise spatial listening condition (0.78 dB, but was not statistically significant. The head-shadow effect at 180° was the most robust bilateral spatial benefit. An improvement in speech perception in spatially distinct speech and noise indicates the contribution of the second implant (CI 2 is greater than that of the first implant (CI 1 for bilateral spatial benefit. Conclusion: Bilateral benefit for delayed sequentially implanted adults is less than previously reported for simultaneous and sequentially implanted adults. Delayed sequential implantation benefit seems to relate to the availability of the ear with the most favourable SNR.

  17. Differentiating Speech Delay from Disorder: Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive-linguistic abilities of 2 subgroups of children with speech impairment were compared to better understand underlying deficits that might influence effective intervention. Methods: Two groups of 23 children, aged 3;3 to 5;6, performed executive function tasks assessing cognitive flexibility and nonverbal rule abstraction.…

  18. Differentiating Speech Delay from Disorder: Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive-linguistic abilities of 2 subgroups of children with speech impairment were compared to better understand underlying deficits that might influence effective intervention. Methods: Two groups of 23 children, aged 3;3 to 5;6, performed executive function tasks assessing cognitive flexibility and nonverbal rule abstraction.…

  19. Significance of Joint Features Derived from the Modified Group Delay Function in Speech Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Hema A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the significance of combining cepstral features derived from the modified group delay function and from the short-time spectral magnitude like the MFCC. The conventional group delay function fails to capture the resonant structure and the dynamic range of the speech spectrum primarily due to pitch periodicity effects. The group delay function is modified to suppress these spikes and to restore the dynamic range of the speech spectrum. Cepstral features are derived from the modified group delay function, which are called the modified group delay feature (MODGDF. The complementarity and robustness of the MODGDF when compared to the MFCC are also analyzed using spectral reconstruction techniques. Combination of several spectral magnitude-based features and the MODGDF using feature fusion and likelihood combination is described. These features are then used for three speech processing tasks, namely, syllable, speaker, and language recognition. Results indicate that combining MODGDF with MFCC at the feature level gives significant improvements for speech recognition tasks in noise. Combining the MODGDF and the spectral magnitude-based features gives a significant increase in recognition performance of 11% at best, while combining any two features derived from the spectral magnitude does not give any significant improvement.

  20. Significance of Joint Features Derived from the Modified Group Delay Function in Speech Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh M. Hegde

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the significance of combining cepstral features derived from the modified group delay function and from the short-time spectral magnitude like the MFCC. The conventional group delay function fails to capture the resonant structure and the dynamic range of the speech spectrum primarily due to pitch periodicity effects. The group delay function is modified to suppress these spikes and to restore the dynamic range of the speech spectrum. Cepstral features are derived from the modified group delay function, which are called the modified group delay feature (MODGDF. The complementarity and robustness of the MODGDF when compared to the MFCC are also analyzed using spectral reconstruction techniques. Combination of several spectral magnitude-based features and the MODGDF using feature fusion and likelihood combination is described. These features are then used for three speech processing tasks, namely, syllable, speaker, and language recognition. Results indicate that combining MODGDF with MFCC at the feature level gives significant improvements for speech recognition tasks in noise. Combining the MODGDF and the spectral magnitude-based features gives a significant increase in recognition performance of 11% at best, while combining any two features derived from the spectral magnitude does not give any significant improvement.

  1. Speech Delay and Its Affecting Factors (Case Study in a Child with Initial Aq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamsuardi

    2015-01-01

    Any parent wishes an appropriate development for their children. One of the parents' great concerns is the children's speech development; they are worried if their children are late to speak. The children's speech development is influenced by physical and environmental factors. The causes of physical factors are related to the problem but the role…

  2. Adaptation to Delayed Speech Feedback Induces Temporal Recalibration between Vocal Sensory and Auditory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. Participants read some sentences with specific delay times of DAF (0, 30, 75, 120 ms during three minutes to induce ‘Lag Adaptation’. After the adaptation, they then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback in producing simple voice but not speech. We found that speech production with lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  3. Measuring Word Complexity in Speech Screening: Single-Word Sampling to Identify Phonological Delay/Disorder in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carolyn; Cohen, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children's speech sound development is assessed by comparing speech production with the typical development of speech sounds based on a child's age and developmental profile. One widely used method of sampling is to elicit a single-word sample along with connected speech. Words produced spontaneously rather than imitated may give a…

  4. Measuring Word Complexity in Speech Screening: Single-Word Sampling to Identify Phonological Delay/Disorder in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carolyn; Cohen, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children's speech sound development is assessed by comparing speech production with the typical development of speech sounds based on a child's age and developmental profile. One widely used method of sampling is to elicit a single-word sample along with connected speech. Words produced spontaneously rather than imitated may give a…

  5. The WNT2 Gene Polymorphism Associated with Speech Delay Inherent to Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping-I; Chien, Yi-Ling; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Huang, Yu-Shu; Liu, Shih-Kai; Tsai, Wen-Che; Chiu, Yen-Nan

    2012-01-01

    Previous evidence suggests that language function is modulated by genetic variants on chromosome 7q31-36. However, it is unclear whether this region harbors loci that contribute to speech delay in autism. We previously reported that the WNT2 gene located on 7q31 was associated with the risk of autism. Additionally, two other genes on 7q31-36,…

  6. A Review on Speech Corpus Development for Automatic Speech Recognition in Indian Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cini kurian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Corpus development gained much attention due to recent statistics based natural language processing. It has new applications in Language Technology, linguistic research, language education and information exchange. Corpus based Language research has an innovative outlook which will discard the aged linguistic theories. Speech corpus is the essential resources for building a speech recognizer. One of the main challenges faced by speech scientist is the unavailability of these resources. Very fewer efforts have been made in Indian languages to make these resources available to public compared to English. In this paper we review the efforts made in Indian languages for developing speech corpus for automatic speech recognition.

  7. Auditory-motor interactions in pediatric motor speech disorders: neurocomputational modeling of disordered development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terband, H; Maassen, B; Guenther, F H; Brumberg, J

    2014-01-01

    Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between neurological deficits in auditory and motor processes using computational modeling with the DIVA model. In a series of computer simulations, we investigated the effect of a motor processing deficit alone (MPD), and the effect of a motor processing deficit in combination with an auditory processing deficit (MPD+APD) on the trajectory and endpoint of speech motor development in the DIVA model. Simulation results showed that a motor programming deficit predominantly leads to deterioration on the phonological level (phonemic mappings) when auditory self-monitoring is intact, and on the systemic level (systemic mapping) if auditory self-monitoring is impaired. These findings suggest a close relation between quality of auditory self-monitoring and the involvement of phonological vs. motor processes in children with pediatric motor speech disorders. It is suggested that MPD+APD might be involved in typically apraxic speech output disorders and MPD in pediatric motor speech disorders that also have a phonological component. Possibilities to verify these hypotheses using empirical data collected from human subjects are discussed. The reader will be able to: (1) identify the difficulties in studying disordered speech motor development; (2) describe the differences in speech motor characteristics between SSD and subtype CAS; (3) describe the different types of learning that occur in the sensory-motor system during babbling and early speech acquisition; (4) identify the neural control subsystems involved in speech production; (5) describe the potential role of auditory self-monitoring in developmental speech disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a Danish speech intelligibility test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    . The sentences were equalized with respect to intelligibility to ensure uniform SRTN assessments with all lists. In contrast to several previously developed tests such as the hearing in noise test (HINT) where the equalization is based on scored (objective) measures of word intelligibility, the present test used......Abstract A Danish speech intelligibility test for assessing the speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTN) has been developed. The test consists of 180 sentences distributed in 18 phonetically balanced lists. The sentences are based on an open word-set and represent everyday language...... an equalization method based on subjective assessments of the sentences. The new equalization method is shown to create lists with less variance between the SRTNs than the traditional method. The number of sentence levels included in the SRTN calculation was also evaluated and differs from previous tests...

  9. Robust time delay estimation for speech signals using information theory: A comparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Fei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Time delay estimation (TDE is a fundamental subsystem for a speaker localization and tracking system. Most of the traditional TDE methods are based on second-order statistics (SOS under Gaussian assumption for the source. This article resolves the TDE problem using two information-theoretic measures, joint entropy and mutual information (MI, which can be considered to indirectly include higher order statistics (HOS. The TDE solutions using the two measures are presented for both Gaussian and Laplacian models. We show that, for stationary signals, the two measures are equivalent for TDE. However, for non-stationary signals (e.g., noisy speech signals, maximizing MI gives more consistent estimate than minimizing joint entropy. Moreover, an existing idea of using modified MI to embed information about reverberation is generalized to the multiple microphones case. From the experimental results for speech signals, this scheme with Gaussian model shows the most robust performance in various noisy and reverberant environments.

  10. The development of speech production in children with cleft palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willadsen, Elisabeth; Chapman, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of speech development of children with cleft palate +/- cleft lip. The chapter will begin with a discussion of the impact of clefting on speech. Next, we will provide a brief description of those factors impacting speech development...... for this population of children. Finally, research examining various aspects of speech development of infants and young children with cleft palate (birth to age five) will be reviewed. This final section will be organized by typical stages of speech sound development (e.g., prespeech, the early word stage...

  11. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis Causing Chronic Stridor and Delayed Speech in an 18-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Alharbi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a relatively uncommon disease that presents clinically with symptoms ranging from hoarseness to severe dyspnea. Human papilloma virus types 6 and 11 are important in the etiology of papillomas and are most probably transmitted from mother to child during birth. Although spontaneous remission is frequent, pulmonary spread and/or malignant transformation resulting in death has been reported. CO2 laser evaporation of papillomas and adjuvant drug therapy using lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha are the most common treatments. However, several other treatments have been tried, with varying success. In the present report, a case of laryngeal papillomatosis presenting with chronic stridor and delayed speech is described.

  12. Otitis Media and Speech/Language Development in Late-Talkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rhea; And Others

    This study examines otitis media as a possible factor associated with increased risk for communicative handicap in a group of children with a possible vulnerability for language delay: "late-talkers." Speech and language outcomes at ages 3 and 4 were examined in 28 late talkers and 24 children with normal language development. Late…

  13. Hyperactivity, unexplained speech delay, and coarse facies--is it Sanfilippo syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Singhi, Pratibha; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Ganesan, Saptharishi L; Vyas, Sameer; Rao, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh

    2014-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis-IIIB or Sanfilippo-B syndrome is caused by deficiency of lysosomal α-N-acetylglucosaminidase that leads to accumulation of heparan-sulphate and degeneration of central nervous system with progressive dementia, hyperactivity, and aggressive behavior. Mucopolysaccharidosis-III remains underdiagnosed as a cause of developmental delay and hyperactivity both in adults and children because in contrast to other mucopolysaccharidoses, they have little somatic disease, coarse facial features, hepatosplenomegaly or skeletal changes, and a high incidence of false-negative results on the urinary screening tests. We describe here a girl with the classic phenotype of mucopolysaccharidosis-IIIB to alert pediatricians to the possibility of this disorder in children with unexplained speech delay and hyperactivity and prevent unnecessary investigations. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. A Review on Speech Corpus Development for Automatic Speech Recognition in Indian Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Cini kurian

    2015-01-01

    Corpus development gained much attention due to recent statistics based natural language processing. It has new applications in Language Technology, linguistic research, language education and information exchange. Corpus based Language research has an innovative outlook which will discard the aged linguistic theories. Speech corpus is the essential resources for building a speech recognizer. One of the main challenges faced by speech scientist is the unavailability of these resources. Very f...

  15. Infant directed speech and the development of speech perception: enhancing development or an unintended consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Bob; Kovack-Lesh, Kristine A; Goodwin, Dresden; McEchron, William

    2013-11-01

    Infant directed speech (IDS) is a speech register characterized by simpler sentences, a slower rate, and more variable prosody. Recent work has implicated it in more subtle aspects of language development. Kuhl et al. (1997) demonstrated that segmental cues for vowels are affected by IDS in a way that may enhance development: the average locations of the extreme "point" vowels (/a/, /i/ and /u/) are further apart in acoustic space. If infants learn speech categories, in part, from the statistical distributions of such cues, these changes may specifically enhance speech category learning. We revisited this by asking (1) if these findings extend to a new cue (Voice Onset Time, a cue for voicing); (2) whether they extend to the interior vowels which are much harder to learn and/or discriminate; and (3) whether these changes may be an unintended phonetic consequence of factors like speaking rate or prosodic changes associated with IDS. Eighteen caregivers were recorded reading a picture book including minimal pairs for voicing (e.g., beach/peach) and a variety of vowels to either an adult or their infant. Acoustic measurements suggested that VOT was different in IDS, but not in a way that necessarily supports better development, and that these changes are almost entirely due to slower rate of speech of IDS. Measurements of the vowel suggested that in addition to changes in the mean, there was also an increase in variance, and statistical modeling suggests that this may counteract the benefit of any expansion of the vowel space. As a whole this suggests that changes in segmental cues associated with IDS may be an unintended by-product of the slower rate of speech and different prosodic structure, and do not necessarily derive from a motivation to enhance development.

  16. Interconnection of the speech and socio-emotional development

    OpenAIRE

    Gamser, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The following thesis researches the relation between a child's speech and his socio-emotional development and their interconnection. Theoretical part of the paper serves to present some characteristics of development in the childhood stage and the influence of the child's entire life array on it. I continue by exposing important topics within speech and socio-emotional development. First, I present different phases of speech development, the process of acquiring communication skills and d...

  17. Development of binaural speech transmission index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van; Drullman, R.

    2006-01-01

    Although the speech transmission index (STI) is a well-accepted and standardized method for objective prediction of speech intelligibility in a wide range of-environments and applications, it is essentially a monaural model. Advantages of binaural hearing to the intelligibility of speech are disrega

  18. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. The article also explores whether the inconsistent findings can be attributed to differences in study designs or the definitions of bilingualism used between studies. Based on current evidence, it appears that lifelong bilingualism, where individuals frequently use both languages, may be protective against dementia. However, becoming bilingual in adulthood or using the second language infrequently is unlikely to substantially delay onset of the disease.

  19. Measuring speech sound development : An item response model approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priester, Gertrude H.; Goorhuis - Brouwer, Siena

    2013-01-01

    Research aim: The primary aim of our study is to investigate if there is an ordering in the speech sound development of children aged 3-6, similar to the ordering in general language development. Method: The speech sound development of 1035 children was tested with a revised version of Logo-Articula

  20. SPEEDY babies: A putative new behavioral syndrome of unbalanced motor-speech development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja-Leena Haapanen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marja-Leena Haapanen1, Tuomo Aro1, Elina Isotalo21Deparment of Otorhinolaryngology, Phoniatric Division, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; 2Department of Neurology, Peijas Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FinlandAbstract: Even though difficulties in motor development in children with speech and language disorders are widely known, hardly any attention is paid to the association between atypically rapidly occurring unassisted walking and delayed speech development. The four children described here presented with a developmental behavioral triad: 1 atypically speedy motor development, 2 impaired expressive speech, and 3 tongue carriage dysfunction resulting in related misarticulations. Those characteristics might be phenotypically or genetically clustered. These children didn’t have impaired cognition, neurological or mental disease, defective sense organs, craniofacial dysmorphology or susceptibility to upper respiratory infections, particularly recurrent otitis media. Attention should be paid on discordant and unbalanced achievement of developmental milestones. Present children are termed SPEEDY babies, where SPEEDY refers to rapid independent walking, SPEE and DY to dyspractic or dysfunctional speech development and lingual dysfunction resulting in linguoalveolar misarticulations. SPEEDY babies require health care that recognizes and respects their motor skills and supports their needs for motor activities and on the other hand include treatment for impaired speech. The parents may need advice and support with these children.Keywords: speedy walking, speech disorder, misarticulations

  1. The effects of mands and models on the speech of unresponsive language-delayed preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, S F; McQuarter, R J; Rogers-Warren, A K

    1984-02-01

    The effects of the systematic use of mands (non-yes/no questions and instructions to verbalize), models (imitative prompts), and specific consequent events on the productive verbal behavior of three unresponsive, socially isolate, language-delayed preschool children were investigated in a multiple-baseline design within a classroom free play period. Following a lengthy intervention condition, experimental procedures were systematically faded out to check for maintenance effects. The treatment resulted in increases in total verbalizations and nonobligatory speech (initiations) by the subjects. Subjects also became more responsive in obligatory speech situations. In a second free play (generalization) setting, increased rates of total child verbalizations and nonobligatory verbalizations were observed for all three subjects, and two of the three subjects were more responsive compared to their baselines in the first free play setting. Rate of total teacher verbalizations and questions were also higher in this setting. Maintenance of the treatment effects was shown during the fading condition in the intervention setting. The subjects' MLUs (mean length of utterance) increased during the intervention condition when the teacher began prompting a minimum of two-word utterances in response to a mand or model.

  2. Child obesity and motor development delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood obesity has been associated with delays in motor development using weight-for-length z-scores and subcutaneous fat. To study this further, percent body fat and motor development were assessed in children ages 3 to 24 months. Included were 455 children with a total of 1882 longitudinal obse...

  3. A Diagnostic Marker to Discriminate Childhood Apraxia of Speech from Speech Delay: IV. the Pause Marker Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Strand, Edythe A.; Fourakis, Marios; Jakielski, Kathy J.; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Mabie, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Three previous articles provided rationale, methods, and several forms of validity support for a diagnostic marker of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), termed the pause marker (PM). Goals of the present article were to assess the validity and stability of the PM Index (PMI) to scale CAS severity. Method: PM scores and speech, prosody,…

  4. Development of The Viking Speech Scale to classify the speech of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Virella, Daniel; Mjøen, Tone; da Graça Andrada, Maria; Murray, Janice; Colver, Allan; Himmelmann, Kate; Rackauskaite, Gija; Greitane, Andra; Prasauskiene, Audrone; Andersen, Guro; de la Cruz, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Surveillance registers monitor the prevalence of cerebral palsy and the severity of resulting impairments across time and place. The motor disorders of cerebral palsy can affect children's speech production and limit their intelligibility. We describe the development of a scale to classify children's speech performance for use in cerebral palsy surveillance registers, and its reliability across raters and across time. Speech and language therapists, other healthcare professionals and parents classified the speech of 139 children with cerebral palsy (85 boys, 54 girls; mean age 6.03 years, SD 1.09) from observation and previous knowledge of the children. Another group of health professionals rated children's speech from information in their medical notes. With the exception of parents, raters reclassified children's speech at least four weeks after their initial classification. Raters were asked to rate how easy the scale was to use and how well the scale described the child's speech production using Likert scales. Inter-rater reliability was moderate to substantial (k>.58 for all comparisons). Test-retest reliability was substantial to almost perfect for all groups (k>.68). Over 74% of raters found the scale easy or very easy to use; 66% of parents and over 70% of health care professionals judged the scale to describe children's speech well or very well. We conclude that the Viking Speech Scale is a reliable tool to describe the speech performance of children with cerebral palsy, which can be applied through direct observation of children or through case note review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of neural network models for developing speech systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Sreenivasa Rao

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses the application of neural networks for developing different speech systems. Prosodic parameters of speech at syllable level depend on positional, contextual and phonological features of the syllables. In this paper, neural networks are explored to model the prosodic parameters of the syllables from their positional, contextual and phonological features. The prosodic parameters considered in this work are duration and sequence of pitch $(F_0)$ values of the syllables. These prosody models are further examined for applications such as text to speech synthesis, speech recognition, speaker recognition and language identification. Neural network models in voice conversion system are explored for capturing the mapping functions between source and target speakers at source, system and prosodic levels. We have also used neural network models for characterizing the emotions present in speech. For identification of dialects in Hindi, neural network models are used to capture the dialect specific information from spectral and prosodic features of speech.

  6. Neural Development of Networks for Audiovisual Speech Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Everyday conversation is both an auditory and a visual phenomenon. While visual speech information enhances comprehension for the listener, evidence suggests that the ability to benefit from this information improves with development. A number of brain regions have been implicated in audiovisual speech comprehension, but the extent to which the…

  7. Developing a broadband automatic speech recognition system for Afrikaans

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Wet, Febe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Afrikaans is one of the eleven official languages of South Africa. It is classified as an under-resourced language. No annotated broadband speech corpora currently exist for Afrikaans. This article reports on the development of speech resources...

  8. Neural Development of Networks for Audiovisual Speech Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Everyday conversation is both an auditory and a visual phenomenon. While visual speech information enhances comprehension for the listener, evidence suggests that the ability to benefit from this information improves with development. A number of brain regions have been implicated in audiovisual speech comprehension, but the extent to which the…

  9. Auditory-motor interactions in pediatric motor speech disorders: Neurocomputational modeling of disordered development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.; Maassen, B.; Guenther, F. H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between

  10. Auditory-Motor Interactions in Pediatric Motor Speech Disorders: Neurocomputational Modeling of Disordered Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/296302066; Maassen, B.A.M.; Guenther, F.H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between

  11. Auditory-Motor Interactions in Pediatric Motor Speech Disorders: Neurocomputational Modeling of Disordered Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.R.; Maassen, B.A.M.; Guenther, F.H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between neurol

  12. Auditory-motor interactions in pediatric motor speech disorders: Neurocomputational modeling of disordered development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.R.; Maassen, B.A.M.; Guenther, F.H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between neurol

  13. Phonetic matching of auditory and visual speech develops during childhood: evidence from sine-wave speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, Martijn; Bortfeld, Heather; Vroomen, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The correspondence between auditory speech and lip-read information can be detected based on a combination of temporal and phonetic cross-modal cues. Here, we determined the point in developmental time at which children start to effectively use phonetic information to match a speech sound with one of two articulating faces. We presented 4- to 11-year-olds (N=77) with three-syllabic sine-wave speech replicas of two pseudo-words that were perceived as non-speech and asked them to match the sounds with the corresponding lip-read video. At first, children had no phonetic knowledge about the sounds, and matching was thus based on the temporal cues that are fully retained in sine-wave speech. Next, we trained all children to perceive the phonetic identity of the sine-wave speech and repeated the audiovisual (AV) matching task. Only at around 6.5 years of age did the benefit of having phonetic knowledge about the stimuli become apparent, thereby indicating that AV matching based on phonetic cues presumably develops more slowly than AV matching based on temporal cues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neural development of networks for audiovisual speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Everyday conversation is both an auditory and a visual phenomenon. While visual speech information enhances comprehension for the listener, evidence suggests that the ability to benefit from this information improves with development. A number of brain regions have been implicated in audiovisual speech comprehension, but the extent to which the neurobiological substrate in the child compares to the adult is unknown. In particular, developmental differences in the network for audiovisual speech comprehension could manifest through the incorporation of additional brain regions, or through different patterns of effective connectivity. In the present study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and structural equation modeling (SEM) to characterize the developmental changes in network interactions for audiovisual speech comprehension. The brain response was recorded while children 8- to 11-years-old and adults passively listened to stories under audiovisual (AV) and auditory-only (A) conditions. Results showed that in children and adults, AV comprehension activated the same fronto-temporo-parietal network of regions known for their contribution to speech production and perception. However, the SEM network analysis revealed age-related differences in the functional interactions among these regions. In particular, the influence of the posterior inferior frontal gyrus/ventral premotor cortex on supramarginal gyrus differed across age groups during AV, but not A speech. This functional pathway might be important for relating motor and sensory information used by the listener to identify speech sounds. Further, its development might reflect changes in the mechanisms that relate visual speech information to articulatory speech representations through experience producing and perceiving speech.

  15. Developing speech resources from parliamentary data for South African english

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Wet, Febe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Workshop on Spoken Language Technology for Under-resourced Languages, SLTU 2016, 9-12 May 2016, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Developing Speech Resources from Parliamentary Data for South African English Febe de Wet*, Jaco Badenhorst, Thipe Modipa Human...

  16. Modeling the development of pronunciation in infant speech acquisition.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, IS; Messum, P

    2011-01-01

    Pronunciation is an important part of speech acquisition, but little attention has been given to the mechanism or mechanisms by which it develops. Speech sound qualities, for example, have just been assumed to develop by simple imitation. In most accounts this is then assumed to be by acoustic matching, with the infant comparing his output to that of his caregiver. There are theoretical and empirical problems with both of these assumptions, and we present a computational model- Elija-that doe...

  17. Speech and Language Development in ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1999-01-01

    Speech discrimination and phonological working memory were examined in children with ADHD (N=9), ADHD plus developmental coordination disorder (ADHD+DCD) (N=13), and 19 age-matched controls, in a study at the Neuropediatric Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

  18. Modeling the development of pronunciation in infant speech acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ian S; Messum, Piers

    2011-01-01

    Pronunciation is an important part of speech acquisition, but little attention has been given to the mechanism or mechanisms by which it develops. Speech sound qualities, for example, have just been assumed to develop by simple imitation. In most accounts this is then assumed to be by acoustic matching, with the infant comparing his output to that of his caregiver. There are theoretical and empirical problems with both of these assumptions, and we present a computational model- Elija-that does not learn to pronounce speech sounds this way. Elija starts by exploring the sound making capabilities of his vocal apparatus. Then he uses the natural responses he gets from a caregiver to learn equivalence relations between his vocal actions and his caregiver's speech. We show that Elija progresses from a babbling stage to learning the names of objects. This demonstrates the viability of a non-imitative mechanism in learning to pronounce.

  19. EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF SPEECH AND INTERACTION BETWEEN MOTHER AND CHILD

    OpenAIRE

    Ana RADOJKOVIC; Slavica GOLUBOVIC; Dejan RADOJKOVIC

    1998-01-01

    Respecting the opinions of the modern researches which show that early interaction between mother and child has the crucial importance in child’s development, almost in all parts of child’s functions (speech, emotions, motor functions, intelligence). The authors did their own research that does not diffuse from the result got from former researches.Although this research is related to normal population of the children, also it is very important for speech in context of interaction between mot...

  20. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arrested Development of Audiovisual Speech Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Siemann, Justin K.; Woynaroski, Tiffany G.; Schneider, Brittany C.; Eberly, Haley E.; Camarata, Stephen M.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical communicative abilities are a core marker of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). A number of studies have shown that, in addition to auditory comprehension differences, individuals with autism frequently show atypical responses to audiovisual speech, suggesting a multisensory contribution to these communicative differences from their typically developing peers. To shed light on possible differences in the maturation of audiovisual speech integration, we tested younger (ages 6-12) and older (ages 13-18) children with and without ASD on a task indexing such multisensory integration. To do this, we used the McGurk effect, in which the pairing of incongruent auditory and visual speech tokens typically results in the perception of a fused percept distinct from the auditory and visual signals, indicative of active integration of the two channels conveying speech information. Whereas little difference was seen in audiovisual speech processing (i.e., reports of McGurk fusion) between the younger ASD and TD groups, there was a significant difference at the older ages. While TD controls exhibited an increased rate of fusion (i.e., integration) with age, children with ASD failed to show this increase. These data suggest arrested development of audiovisual speech integration in ASD. The results are discussed in light of the extant literature and necessary next steps in research. PMID:24218241

  2. The use of noncontingent escape to reduce disruptive behaviors in children with speech delays.

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, C. L.; Holmes, P A

    1998-01-01

    Noncontingent escape (NCE) was used to reduce disruptive behavior in 3 children during regularly scheduled speech therapy sessions. Results showed rapid decreases in disruptive behavior and accompanying increases in compliance across children. Findings suggest that speech therapists with little expertise in behavior analysis can effectively implement NCE.

  3. Runs of homozygosity associated with speech delay in autism in a taiwanese han population: evidence for the recessive model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-I Lin

    Full Text Available Runs of homozygosity (ROH may play a role in complex diseases. In the current study, we aimed to test if ROHs are linked to the risk of autism and related language impairment. We analyzed 546,080 SNPs in 315 Han Chinese affected with autism and 1,115 controls. ROH was defined as an extended homozygous haplotype spanning at least 500 kb. Relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH for the trait-associated ROH region was calculated to search for the signature of selection sweeps. Totally, we identified 676 ROH regions. An ROH region on 11q22.3 was significantly associated with speech delay (corrected p = 1.73×10(-8. This region contains the NPAT and ATM genes associated with ataxia telangiectasia characterized by language impairment; the CUL5 (culin 5 gene in the same region may modulate the neuronal migration process related to language functions. These three genes are highly expressed in the cerebellum. No evidence for recent positive selection was detected on the core haplotypes in this region. The same ROH region was also nominally significantly associated with speech delay in another independent sample (p = 0.037; combinatorial analysis Stouffer's z trend = 0.0005. Taken together, our findings suggest that extended recessive loci on 11q22.3 may play a role in language impairment in autism. More research is warranted to investigate if these genes influence speech pathology by perturbing cerebellar functions.

  4. Runs of homozygosity associated with speech delay in autism in a taiwanese han population: evidence for the recessive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping-I; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gau, Susan S-F; Wu, Yu-Yu; Liu, Shih-Kai

    2013-01-01

    Runs of homozygosity (ROH) may play a role in complex diseases. In the current study, we aimed to test if ROHs are linked to the risk of autism and related language impairment. We analyzed 546,080 SNPs in 315 Han Chinese affected with autism and 1,115 controls. ROH was defined as an extended homozygous haplotype spanning at least 500 kb. Relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH) for the trait-associated ROH region was calculated to search for the signature of selection sweeps. Totally, we identified 676 ROH regions. An ROH region on 11q22.3 was significantly associated with speech delay (corrected p = 1.73×10(-8)). This region contains the NPAT and ATM genes associated with ataxia telangiectasia characterized by language impairment; the CUL5 (culin 5) gene in the same region may modulate the neuronal migration process related to language functions. These three genes are highly expressed in the cerebellum. No evidence for recent positive selection was detected on the core haplotypes in this region. The same ROH region was also nominally significantly associated with speech delay in another independent sample (p = 0.037; combinatorial analysis Stouffer's z trend = 0.0005). Taken together, our findings suggest that extended recessive loci on 11q22.3 may play a role in language impairment in autism. More research is warranted to investigate if these genes influence speech pathology by perturbing cerebellar functions.

  5. High Pitch Delay Resolution Technique for Tonal Language Speech Coding Based on Multi-Pulse Based Code Excited Linear Prediction Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphattharachai Chomphan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In spontaneous speech communication, speech coding is an important process that should be taken into account, since the quality of coded speech depends on the efficiency of the speech coding algorithm. As for tonal language which tone plays important role not only on the naturalness and also the intelligibility of the speech, tone must be treated appropriately. Approach: This study proposes a modification of flexible Multi-Pulse based Code Excited Linear Predictive (MP-CELP coder with multiple bitrates and bitrate scalabilities for tonal language speech in the multimedia applications. The coder consists of a core coder and bitrate scalable tools. The High Pitch Delay Resolutions (HPDR are applied to the adaptive codebook of core coder for tonal language speech quality improvement. The bitrate scalable tool employs multi-stage excitation coding based on an embedded-coding approach. The multi-pulse excitation codebook at each stage is adaptively produced depending on the selected excitation signal at the previous stage. Results: The experimental results show that the speech quality of the proposed coder is improved above the speech quality of the conventional coder without pitch-resolution adaptation. Conclusion: From the study, it is a strong evidence to further apply the proposed technique in the speech coding systems or other speech processing technologies.

  6. Segregation of a 4p16.3 duplication with a characteristic appearance, macrocephaly, speech delay and mild intellectual disability in a 3-generation family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Ravn, Kirstine; Hamborg-Petersen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    delay/intellectual disability. In contrast small duplications of 4p are rare but with the advent of microarray techniques a few cases have been reported in recent years. Here we describe a 3 Mb duplication at 4p16.3 segregating with a characteristic phenotype, macrocephaly, speech delay and mild...

  7. The development of sensorimotor influences in the audiovisual speech domain: some critical questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guellaï, Bahia; Streri, Arlette; Yeung, H Henny

    2014-01-01

    Speech researchers have long been interested in how auditory and visual speech signals are integrated, and the recent work has revived interest in the role of speech production with respect to this process. Here, we discuss these issues from a developmental perspective. Because speech perception abilities typically outstrip speech production abilities in infancy and childhood, it is unclear how speech-like movements could influence audiovisual speech perception in development. While work on this question is still in its preliminary stages, there is nevertheless increasing evidence that sensorimotor processes (defined here as any motor or proprioceptive process related to orofacial movements) affect developmental audiovisual speech processing. We suggest three areas on which to focus in future research: (i) the relation between audiovisual speech perception and sensorimotor processes at birth, (ii) the pathways through which sensorimotor processes interact with audiovisual speech processing in infancy, and (iii) developmental change in sensorimotor pathways as speech production emerges in childhood.

  8. The development of sensorimotor influences in the audiovisual speech domain: Some critical questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahia eGuellaï

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Speech researchers have long been interested in how auditory and visual speech signals are integrated, and recent work has revived interest in the role of speech production with respect to this process. Here we discuss these issues from a developmental perspective. Because speech perception abilities typically outstrip speech production abilities in infancy and childhood, it is unclear how speech-like movements could influence audiovisual speech perception in development. While work on this question is still in its preliminary stages, there is nevertheless increasing evidence that sensorimotor processes (defined here as any motor or proprioceptive process related to orofacial movements affect developmental audiovisual speech processing. We suggest three areas on which to focus in future research: i the relation between audiovisual speech perception and sensorimotor processes at birth, ii the pathways through which sensorimotor processes interact with audiovisual speech processing in infancy, and iii developmental change in sensorimotor pathways as speech production emerges in childhood.

  9. Development of a speech recognition system for Spanish broadcast news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, Andreea; Jong, de Franciska

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development process of a speech recognition system for Spanish broadcast news within the MESH FP6 project. The system uses the SONIC recognizer developed at the Center for Spoken Language Research (CSLR), University of Colorado. Acoustic and language models were trained usi

  10. Development and validation of first-ever speech-specific perceptual speech evaluation tool for patients with head and neck cancer: the London speech evaluation (LSE) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Raghav C; Rose, Suzanne St; Chisholm, Edward J; Kerawala, Cyrus J; Clarke, Peter M; Nutting, Christopher M; Rhys-Evans, Peter H; Harrington, Kevin J; Kazi, Rehan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate the first ever speech-specific perceptual speech-evaluation tool for patients with head and neck cancer. Five speech parameters (intelligibility, articulation, speech rate, nasality, and asthenia) and overall grade were included and evaluated. Speech samples of 117 subjects were recorded on electroglottograph equipment using a standard protocol and were independently judged and rated by 3 experienced speech and language therapists and re-rated 12 weeks apart. Among patients the Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficients for internal consistency for connected speech were 0.89, whereas for single words the α coefficients ranged between 0.80 and 0.84. The Spearman's correlation coefficients for intra-rater reliability for connected speech and words varied between 0.30 and 0.90 and 0.49 and 0.76, respectively, whereas for inter-rater reliability the coefficients ranged between 0.53 and 0.99 and 0.56 and 0.99, respectively. For construct validity, the Spearman's correlation coefficient ranged between 0.41 and 0.55. The London Speech Evaluation (LSE) scale demonstrated a high reliability and validity in our cohort of patients with head and neck cancer. surgery. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Modeling the Development of Audiovisual Cue Integration in Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Laura M.; Nordeen, Elke R.; Vrabic, Sarah C.; Toscano, Joseph C.

    2017-01-01

    Adult speech perception is generally enhanced when information is provided from multiple modalities. In contrast, infants do not appear to benefit from combining auditory and visual speech information early in development. This is true despite the fact that both modalities are important to speech comprehension even at early stages of language acquisition. How then do listeners learn how to process auditory and visual information as part of a unified signal? In the auditory domain, statistical learning processes provide an excellent mechanism for acquiring phonological categories. Is this also true for the more complex problem of acquiring audiovisual correspondences, which require the learner to integrate information from multiple modalities? In this paper, we present simulations using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) that learn cue weights and combine cues on the basis of their distributional statistics. First, we simulate the developmental process of acquiring phonological categories from auditory and visual cues, asking whether simple statistical learning approaches are sufficient for learning multi-modal representations. Second, we use this time course information to explain audiovisual speech perception in adult perceivers, including cases where auditory and visual input are mismatched. Overall, we find that domain-general statistical learning techniques allow us to model the developmental trajectory of audiovisual cue integration in speech, and in turn, allow us to better understand the mechanisms that give rise to unified percepts based on multiple cues. PMID:28335558

  12. Early Speech Motor Development: Cognitive and Linguistic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nip, Ignatius S. B.; Green, Jordan R.; Marx, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal investigation examines developmental changes in orofacial movements occurring during the early stages of communication development. The goals were to identify developmental trends in early speech motor performance and to determine how these trends differ across orofacial behaviors thought to vary in cognitive and linguistic…

  13. Retracing Atypical Development: A Preserved Speech Variant of Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B.; Einspieler, Christa; Oberle, Andreas; Laccone, Franco; Prechtl, Heinz F. R.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the present study is the development of a girl with the preserved speech variant of Rett disorder. Our data are based on detailed retrospective and prospective video analyses. Despite achieving developmental milestones, movement quality was already abnormal during the girl's first half year of life. In addition, early hand…

  14. [Delayed development of hemispheric dominance accompanied by a rare form of retarded language development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, M; Wirth, G

    1986-04-01

    A severe and unusual form of retarded speech development in an eight-year old boy is analyzed as "right-hemispheric speech" against the background of neuropsychological theories on the specialisation of the cerebral hemispheres and considered in connection with the development of hemispheric dominance. A plan for therapy and teacher counselling is derived from this analysis. The influence of this retarded speech development on the acquisition of reading and writing is also touched upon.

  15. Music training for the development of speech segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Clément; Chobert, Julie; Besson, Mireille; Schön, Daniele

    2013-09-01

    The role of music training in fostering brain plasticity and developing high cognitive skills, notably linguistic abilities, is of great interest from both a scientific and a societal perspective. Here, we report results of a longitudinal study over 2 years using both behavioral and electrophysiological measures and a test-training-retest procedure to examine the influence of music training on speech segmentation in 8-year-old children. Children were pseudo-randomly assigned to either music or painting training and were tested on their ability to extract meaningless words from a continuous flow of nonsense syllables. While no between-group differences were found before training, both behavioral and electrophysiological measures showed improved speech segmentation skills across testing sessions for the music group only. These results show that music training directly causes facilitation in speech segmentation, thereby pointing to the importance of music for speech perception and more generally for children's language development. Finally these results have strong implications for promoting the development of music-based remediation strategies for children with language-based learning impairments.

  16. The Role of Speech-Gesture Congruency and Delay in Remembering Action Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Alexia; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2011-01-01

    When watching others describe events, does information from their speech and gestures affect our memory representations for the gist and surface form of the described events? Does our reliance on these memory representations change over time? Forty participants watched videos of stories narrated by an actor. Each story included three target events…

  17. International aspirations for speech-language pathologists' practice with multilingual children with speech sound disorders: development of a position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Verdon, Sarah; Bowen, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for the speech-language pathology profession in many cultures is to address the mismatch between the "linguistic homogeneity of the speech-language pathology profession and the linguistic diversity of its clientele" (Caesar & Kohler, 2007, p. 198). This paper outlines the development of the Multilingual Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Position Paper created to guide speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') facilitation of multilingual children's speech. An international expert panel was assembled comprising 57 researchers (SLPs, linguists, phoneticians, and speech scientists) with knowledge about multilingual children's speech, or children with speech sound disorders. Combined, they had worked in 33 countries and used 26 languages in professional practice. Fourteen panel members met for a one-day workshop to identify key points for inclusion in the position paper. Subsequently, 42 additional panel members participated online to contribute to drafts of the position paper. A thematic analysis was undertaken of the major areas of discussion using two data sources: (a) face-to-face workshop transcript (133 pages) and (b) online discussion artifacts (104 pages). Finally, a moderator with international expertise in working with children with speech sound disorders facilitated the incorporation of the panel's recommendations. The following themes were identified: definitions, scope, framework, evidence, challenges, practices, and consideration of a multilingual audience. The resulting position paper contains guidelines for providing services to multilingual children with speech sound disorders (http://www.csu.edu.au/research/multilingual-speech/position-paper). The paper is structured using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Children and Youth Version (World Health Organization, 2007) and incorporates recommendations for (a) children and families, (b) SLPs' assessment and intervention, (c) SLPs' professional

  18. Early Language Development of Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia: Speech Perception and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Ellen; de Bree, Elise

    2009-01-01

    Speech perception and speech production were examined in 3-year-old Dutch children at familial risk of developing dyslexia. Their performance in speech sound categorisation and their production of words was compared to that of age-matched children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing controls. We found that speech…

  19. Phonetic and phonemic acquisition : Normative data in English and Dutch speech sound development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priester, G. H.; Post, W. J.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S. M.

    Objective: Comparison of normative data in English and Dutch speech sound development in young children. Research questions were: Which normative data are present concerning speech sound development in children between two and six years of age? In which way are the speech sounds examined? What are

  20. Early Language Development of Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia: Speech Perception and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, Ellen; de Bree, Elise

    2009-01-01

    Speech perception and speech production were examined in 3-year-old Dutch children at familial risk of developing dyslexia. Their performance in speech sound categorisation and their production of words was compared to that of age-matched children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing controls. We found that speech…

  1. Phonetic and phonemic acquisition : Normative data in English and Dutch speech sound development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priester, G. H.; Post, W. J.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of normative data in English and Dutch speech sound development in young children. Research questions were: Which normative data are present concerning speech sound development in children between two and six years of age? In which way are the speech sounds examined? What are t

  2. The Sequential Development of Jaw and Lip Control for Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.; Reilly, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical displacements of the upper lip, lower lip, and jaw during speech were recorded for groups of 1-, 2-, and 6-year-olds and adults to examine if control over these articulators develops sequentially. All movement traces were amplitude- and time-normalized. The developmental course of upper lip, lower lip, and jaw control was examined by quantifying age-related changes in the similarity of each articulator's movement patterns to those produced by adult subjects and by same-age peers. In addition, differences in token-to-token stability of articulatory movement were assessed among the different age groups. The experimental findings revealed that 1- and 2-year-old children's jaw movements were significantly more adult-like than their upper and lower lip movements, which were more variable. In contrast, upper and lower lip movement patterns became more adult-like with maturation. These findings suggest that the earliest stages of speech motor development are constrained by the nonuniform development of articulatory control, with the jaw preceding the lips. The observed developmental patterns suggest that the properties of the oral motor control system significantly influence the pattern of speech sound acquisition. PMID:14748639

  3. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  4. The development of co-speech gesture and its semantic integration with speech in 6- to 12-year-old children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Wing-Chee; Wong, Miranda Kit-Yi; Lui, Ming; Yip, Virginia

    2015-11-01

    Previous work leaves open the question of whether children with autism spectrum disorders aged 6-12 years have delay in producing gestures compared to their typically developing peers. This study examined gestural production among school-aged children in a naturalistic context and how their gestures are semantically related to the accompanying speech. Delay in gestural production was found in children with autism spectrum disorders through their middle to late childhood. Compared to their typically developing counterparts, children with autism spectrum disorders gestured less often and used fewer types of gestures, in particular markers, which carry culture-specific meaning. Typically developing children's gestural production was related to language and cognitive skills, but among children with autism spectrum disorders, gestural production was more strongly related to the severity of socio-communicative impairment. Gesture impairment also included the failure to integrate speech with gesture: in particular, supplementary gestures are absent in children with autism spectrum disorders. The findings extend our understanding of gestural production in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders during spontaneous interaction. The results can help guide new therapies for gestural production for children with autism spectrum disorders in middle and late childhood. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Children's development of self-regulation in speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ewen N; Johnson, Elizabeth K; Forsythe, Jaime; Plante, Paul; Munhall, Kevin G

    2012-01-24

    Species-specific vocalizations fall into two broad categories: those that emerge during maturation, independent of experience, and those that depend on early life interactions with conspecifics. Human language and the communication systems of a small number of other species, including songbirds, fall into this latter class of vocal learning. Self-monitoring has been assumed to play an important role in the vocal learning of speech and studies demonstrate that perception of your own voice is crucial for both the development and lifelong maintenance of vocalizations in humans and songbirds. Experimental modifications of auditory feedback can also change vocalizations in both humans and songbirds. However, with the exception of large manipulations of timing, no study to date has ever directly examined the use of auditory feedback in speech production under the age of 4. Here we use a real-time formant perturbation task to compare the response of toddlers, children, and adults to altered feedback. Children and adults reacted to this manipulation by changing their vowels in a direction opposite to the perturbation. Surprisingly, toddlers' speech didn't change in response to altered feedback, suggesting that long-held assumptions regarding the role of self-perception in articulatory development need to be reconsidered.

  6. Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Peng, Shu-Chen; Spencer, Linda J.; Lu, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study characterized the development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children with a minimum of 8 years of cochlear implant (CI) experience. Method: Twenty-seven pediatric CI recipients' spontaneous speech samples from annual evaluation sessions were phonemically transcribed. Accuracy for these speech samples was…

  7. Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Peng, Shu-Chen; Spencer, Linda J.; Lu, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study characterized the development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children with a minimum of 8 years of cochlear implant (CI) experience. Method: Twenty-seven pediatric CI recipients' spontaneous speech samples from annual evaluation sessions were phonemically transcribed. Accuracy for these speech samples was…

  8. To Speak or Not to Speak: Developing Legal Standards for Anonymous Speech on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas A. Lipinski

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores recent developments in the regulation of Internet speech, in specific, injurious or defamatory speech and the impact such speech has on the rights of anonymous speakers to remain anonymous as opposed to having their identity revealed to plaintiffs or other third parties. The paper proceeds in four sections.  First, a brief history of the legal attempts to regulate defamatory Internet speech in the United States is presented. As discussed below this regulation has alte...

  9. Oral Articulatory Control in Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigos, Maria I.; Moss, Aviva; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to examine spatial and temporal aspects of articulatory control in children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), children with speech delay characterized by an articulation/phonological impairment (SD), and controls with typical development (TD) during speech tasks that increased in word length. Method:…

  10. Speech motor development in childhood apraxia of speech: generating testable hypotheses by neurocomputational modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.R.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a highly controversial clinical entity, with respect to both clinical signs and underlying neuromotor deficit. In the current paper, we advocate a modeling approach in which a computational neural model of speech acquisition and production is utilized in order to

  11. Neural bases of childhood speech disorders: lateralization and plasticity for speech functions during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique J; Morgan, Angela T

    2012-01-01

    Current models of speech production in adults emphasize the crucial role played by the left perisylvian cortex, primary and pre-motor cortices, the basal ganglia, and the cerebellum for normal speech production. Whether similar brain-behaviour relationships and leftward cortical dominance are found in childhood remains unclear. Here we reviewed recent evidence linking motor speech disorders (apraxia of speech and dysarthria) and brain abnormalities in children and adolescents with developmental, progressive, or childhood-acquired conditions. We found no evidence that unilateral damage can result in apraxia of speech, or that left hemisphere lesions are more likely to result in dysarthria than lesion to the right. The few studies reporting on childhood apraxia of speech converged towards morphological, structural, metabolic or epileptic anomalies affecting the basal ganglia, perisylvian and rolandic cortices bilaterally. Persistent dysarthria, similarly, was commonly reported in individuals with syndromes and conditions affecting these same structures bilaterally. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence that longterm and severe childhood speech disorders result predominantly from bilateral disruption of the neural networks involved in speech production.

  12. Speech Motor Development in Childhood Apraxia of Speech : Generating Testable Hypotheses by Neurocomputational Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.; Maassen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a highly controversial clinical entity, with respect to both clinical signs and underlying neuromotor deficit. In the current paper, we advocate a modeling approach in which a computational neural model of speech acquisition and production is utilized in order to

  13. Phonetic matching of auditory and visual speech develops during childhood : Evidence from sine-wave speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, M.; Bortfeld, H.; Vroomen, J.

    2015-01-01

    The correspondence between auditory speech and lip-read information can be detected based on a combination of temporal and phonetic cross-modal cues. Here, we determined the point in developmental time at which children start to effectively use phonetic information to match a speech sound with one

  14. Cued speech for enhancing speech perception and first language development of children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; LaSasso, Carol J

    2010-06-01

    Nearly 300 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss. Hearing impairment, if not adequately managed, has strong socioeconomic and affective impact on individuals. Cochlear implants have become the most effective vehicle for helping profoundly deaf children and adults to understand spoken language, to be sensitive to environmental sounds, and, to some extent, to listen to music. The auditory information delivered by the cochlear implant remains non-optimal for speech perception because it delivers a spectrally degraded signal and lacks some of the fine temporal acoustic structure. In this article, we discuss research revealing the multimodal nature of speech perception in normally-hearing individuals, with important inter-subject variability in the weighting of auditory or visual information. We also discuss how audio-visual training, via Cued Speech, can improve speech perception in cochlear implantees, particularly in noisy contexts. Cued Speech is a system that makes use of visual information from speechreading combined with hand shapes positioned in different places around the face in order to deliver completely unambiguous information about the syllables and the phonemes of spoken language. We support our view that exposure to Cued Speech before or after the implantation could be important in the aural rehabilitation process of cochlear implantees. We describe five lines of research that are converging to support the view that Cued Speech can enhance speech perception in individuals with cochlear implants.

  15. THE MEANING OF THE PREVENTION WITH SPEECH THERAPY AS A IMPORTANT FAC-TOR FOR THE PROPER DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILDREN SPEECH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. FILIPOVA

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presented some conscientious and results from the finished research which showing the meaning of the prevention with speech therapy in the development of the speech. The research was done at Negotino and with that are shown the most frequent speech deficiency of the children at preschool age.

  16. Typical and Delayed Lexical Development in Italian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescorla, Leslie; Frigerio, Alessandra; Sali, Maria Enrica; Spataro, Pietro; Longobardi, Emiddia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Language Development Survey (LDS; Rescorla, 1989) was used to compare Italian and English lexical development. The authors addressed the issue of universal versus language-specific aspects of lexical development by testing language, age, and gender effects on vocabulary scores and by comparing vocabulary composition across languages.…

  17. Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2013-02-01

    The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversarys task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

  18. [Influence of selected family environment factors on the child's speech development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemień, Grazyna; Wolanin, Grazyna; Stemplewska, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    All environment strata, natural, cultural and social environment affect the individual in typical way and create his specific reactions as well as mental experiences. A speech, as one of elements enabling adaptation to life in community is formed individually with particular children. The basis of such process is always the possibility of the intercourse with speech. The aim of undertaken subject was the analysis of influence of selected family environment factors on the child's speech development. The study was conducted with children of six and seven year old, where speech should be mastered with fixed pronunciation and proper speech technique. The following research problems have been assumed: 1) how does the speech competences' development with children of six and seven proceed, 2) in which level do the following factors of family environment (parents' age, parents' education, family's financial conditions) influence the child's speech development, 3) does the family's structure influence the proper child's speech development. The following research methods were applied: observation, interview and questionnaire. Applied research tools may be described as follows: inquiry sheet of questionnaire, child's speech card, pictorial test, test chi2. The presented work is a trial of analysis how the selected family environment factors influence the child's speech development.

  19. Look who's talking: speech style and social context in language input to infants are linked to concurrent and future speech development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Esparza, Nairán; García-Sierra, Adrián; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2014-11-01

    Language input is necessary for language learning, yet little is known about whether, in natural environments, the speech style and social context of language input to children impacts language development. In the present study we investigated the relationship between language input and language development, examining both the style of parental speech, comparing 'parentese' speech to standard speech, and the social context in which speech is directed to children, comparing one-on-one (1:1) to group social interactions. Importantly, the language input variables were assessed at home using digital first-person perspective recordings of the infants' auditory environment as they went about their daily lives (N =26, 11- and 14-months-old). We measured language development using (a) concurrent speech utterances, and (b) word production at 24 months. Parentese speech in 1:1 contexts is positively correlated with both concurrent speech and later word production. Mediation analyses further show that the effect of parentese speech-1:1 on infants' later language is mediated by concurrent speech. Our results suggest that both the social context and the style of speech in language addressed to children are strongly linked to a child's future language development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The development of co-speech gesture in the communication of children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Hannah; Clegg, Judy; Perkins, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Co-speech gestures have a close semantic relationship to speech in adult conversation. In typically developing children co-speech gestures which give additional information to speech facilitate the emergence of multi-word speech. A difficulty with integrating audio-visual information is known to exist for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which may affect development of the speech-gesture system. A longitudinal observational study was conducted with four children with ASD, aged 2;4 to 3;5 years. Participants were video-recorded for 20 min every 2 weeks during their attendance on an intervention programme. Recording continued for up to 8 months, thus affording a rich analysis of gestural practices from pre-verbal to multi-word speech across the group. All participants combined gesture with either speech or vocalisations. Co-speech gestures providing additional information to speech were observed to be either absent or rare. Findings suggest that children with ASD do not make use of the facilitating communicative effects of gesture in the same way as typically developing children.

  1. Development of speech motor control: lip movement variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schötz, Susanne; Frid, Johan; Löfqvist, Anders

    2013-06-01

    This study examined variability of lip movements across repetitions of the same utterance as a function of age in Swedish speakers. The specific purpose was to extend earlier findings by examining variability in both phase and amplitude. Subjects were 50 typically developed native Swedish children and adults (28 females, 22 males, aged 5 to 31 yr). Lip movements were recorded during 15 to 20 repetitions of a short Swedish phrase using three-dimensional articulography. After correction for head movements, the kinematic records were expressed in a maxilla-based coordinate system. Movement onset and offset of the utterance were identified using kinematic landmarks. The Euclidean distance between receivers on the upper and lower lips was calculated and subjected to functional data analysis to assess both phase and amplitude variability. Results show a decrease in both indices as a function of age, with a greater reduction of amplitude variability. There was no difference between males and females for either index. The two indices were moderately correlated with each other, suggesting that they capture different aspects of speech production. Utterance duration also decreased with age, but variability was unrelated to duration. The standard deviation of utterance duration also decreased with age. The present results thus suggest that age related changes in speech motor control continue up until 30 years of age.

  2. Maternal Functional Speech to Children: A Comparison of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, P.; de Falco, S.; Esposito, G.; Zaninelli, M.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2012-01-01

    Children with developmental disabilities benefit from their language environment as much as, or even more than, typically developing (TD) children, but maternal language directed to developmentally delayed children is an under investigated topic. The purposes of the present study were to compare maternal functional language directed to children with two developmental disabilities – Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Down Syndrome (DS) –with TD children and to investigate relations of maternal functional language with child language skills. Participants were 60 mothers and their children with TD (n =20), DS (n =20), or ASD (n =20). Children’s mean developmental age was 24.77 months (SD = 8.47) and did not differ across the groups. Mother and child speech were studied during naturalistic play. We found (a) similarities in maternal functional language directed to the two groups of children with developmental disabilities compared to that directed to TD children and (b) a positive association between subcategories of information-salient speech and child mean length of utterance in TD dyads only. The clinical and developmental implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22119699

  3. Infant overweight is associated with delayed motor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slining, Meghan; Adair, Linda S.; Goldman, Barbara Davis; Borja, Judith B.; Bentley, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine how infant overweight and high subcutaneous fat relate to infant motor development. Study design Participants are from the Infant Care, Feeding, and Risk of Obesity Project, a prospective, longitudinal study of low-income African American mother-infant dyads assessed from 3 -18 months of age (836 observations on 217 infants). Exposures were overweight (weight-for-length z-score ≥90th percentile of 2000 CDC/NCHS growth reference) and high subcutaneous fat (sum of three skinfold measurements >90th percentile of our sample). Motor development was assessed using Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II. Developmental delay was characterized as a standardized Psychomotor Development Index score <85. Longitudinal models estimated developmental outcomes as functions of time-varying overweight and subcutaneous fat, controlling for age and sex. Alternate models tested concurrent and lagged relationships (prior weight or subcutaneous fat predicting current motor development). Results Motor delay was 1.80 times as likely in overweight compared with non-overweight infants (95% CI:1.09, 2.97), and 2.32 times as likely in infants with high subcutaneous fat compared with lower subcutaneous fat (95% CI:1.26, 4.29). High subcutaneous fat was also associated with delay in subsequent motor development (OR=2.27, 95% CI:1.08, 4.76). Conclusions Pediatric overweight and high subcutaneous fat are associated with delayed infant motor development. PMID:20227724

  4. Development of speech services for people with cleft palate in Thailand: lack of professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathanee, Benjamas

    2012-11-01

    Cleft lip/palate is one of the most common birth defects and has a high incidence in Thailand. Most children with cleft still have social stigma from speech and language defects after surgical treatment. Speech and language therapies are required at an early age and require long-term care until teenager or adult. Unfortunately, there are insufficient speech services for cleft because of a lack of qualified speech and language pathologists in Thailand. Development consisted of two remedy modalities of bottom-up and top-down models, Community-Based Speech Therapy Model for people with Cleft Lip Cleft Palate including networking and standard assessments of both subjective and objective measurements. That might be the best and most suitable way to solve problems of lacking speech services in Thailand or developing countries which have similar contexts.

  5. Capitalising on North American speech resources for the development of a South African English large vocabulary speech recognition system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kamper, H

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available South African English is currently considered an under-resourced variety of English. Extensive speech resources are, however, available for North American (US) English. In this paper we consider the use of these US resources in the development of a...

  6. Look Who’s Talking NOW! Parentese Speech, Social Context, and Language Development Across Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Esparza, Nairán; García-Sierra, Adrián; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that the social interactions infants experience in their everyday lives at 11- and 14-months of age affect language ability at 24 months of age. These studies investigated relationships between the speech style (i.e., parentese speech vs. standard speech) and social context [i.e., one-on-one (1:1) vs. group] of language input in infancy and later speech development (i.e., at 24 months of age), controlling for socioeconomic status (SES). Results showed that the amount of exposure to parentese speech-1:1 in infancy was related to productive vocabulary at 24 months. The general goal of the present study was to investigate changes in (1) the pattern of social interactions between caregivers and their children from infancy to childhood and (2) relationships among speech style, social context, and language learning across time. Our study sample consisted of 30 participants from the previously published infant studies, evaluated at 33 months of age. Social interactions were assessed at home using digital first-person perspective recordings of the auditory environment. We found that caregivers use less parentese speech-1:1, and more standard speech-1:1, as their children get older. Furthermore, we found that the effects of parentese speech-1:1 in infancy on later language development at 24 months persist at 33 months of age. Finally, we found that exposure to standard speech-1:1 in childhood was the only social interaction that related to concurrent word production/use. Mediation analyses showed that standard speech-1:1 in childhood fully mediated the effects of parentese speech-1:1 in infancy on language development in childhood, controlling for SES. This study demonstrates that engaging in one-on-one interactions in infancy and later in life has important implications for language development. PMID:28676774

  7. Look Who’s Talking NOW! Parentese Speech, Social Context, and Language Development Across Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nairán Ramírez-Esparza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we found that the social interactions infants experience in their everyday lives at 11- and 14-months of age affect language ability at 24 months of age. These studies investigated relationships between the speech style (i.e., parentese speech vs. standard speech and social context [i.e., one-on-one (1:1 vs. group] of language input in infancy and later speech development (i.e., at 24 months of age, controlling for socioeconomic status (SES. Results showed that the amount of exposure to parentese speech-1:1 in infancy was related to productive vocabulary at 24 months. The general goal of the present study was to investigate changes in (1 the pattern of social interactions between caregivers and their children from infancy to childhood and (2 relationships among speech style, social context, and language learning across time. Our study sample consisted of 30 participants from the previously published infant studies, evaluated at 33 months of age. Social interactions were assessed at home using digital first-person perspective recordings of the auditory environment. We found that caregivers use less parentese speech-1:1, and more standard speech-1:1, as their children get older. Furthermore, we found that the effects of parentese speech-1:1 in infancy on later language development at 24 months persist at 33 months of age. Finally, we found that exposure to standard speech-1:1 in childhood was the only social interaction that related to concurrent word production/use. Mediation analyses showed that standard speech-1:1 in childhood fully mediated the effects of parentese speech-1:1 in infancy on language development in childhood, controlling for SES. This study demonstrates that engaging in one-on-one interactions in infancy and later in life has important implications for language development.

  8. Look Who's Talking NOW! Parentese Speech, Social Context, and Language Development Across Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Esparza, Nairán; García-Sierra, Adrián; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that the social interactions infants experience in their everyday lives at 11- and 14-months of age affect language ability at 24 months of age. These studies investigated relationships between the speech style (i.e., parentese speech vs. standard speech) and social context [i.e., one-on-one (1:1) vs. group] of language input in infancy and later speech development (i.e., at 24 months of age), controlling for socioeconomic status (SES). Results showed that the amount of exposure to parentese speech-1:1 in infancy was related to productive vocabulary at 24 months. The general goal of the present study was to investigate changes in (1) the pattern of social interactions between caregivers and their children from infancy to childhood and (2) relationships among speech style, social context, and language learning across time. Our study sample consisted of 30 participants from the previously published infant studies, evaluated at 33 months of age. Social interactions were assessed at home using digital first-person perspective recordings of the auditory environment. We found that caregivers use less parentese speech-1:1, and more standard speech-1:1, as their children get older. Furthermore, we found that the effects of parentese speech-1:1 in infancy on later language development at 24 months persist at 33 months of age. Finally, we found that exposure to standard speech-1:1 in childhood was the only social interaction that related to concurrent word production/use. Mediation analyses showed that standard speech-1:1 in childhood fully mediated the effects of parentese speech-1:1 in infancy on language development in childhood, controlling for SES. This study demonstrates that engaging in one-on-one interactions in infancy and later in life has important implications for language development.

  9. Social skills and developmental delay: importance in predicting the auditory and speech outcomes after cochlear implantation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Young-Soo; Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Eun Yeon; Ahn, Jungmin; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2015-02-01

    Preoperative evaluation of social interaction and global development levels using the Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS) and Bayley Scales of Infant Development-2nd edition (BSID-II) may be beneficial in predicting the postoperative outcome in pediatric cochlear implant recipients. In particular, cautious preoperative counseling regarding the poor postoperative prognosis may be necessary in children with low social skills and developmental status. To determine the clinical benefit of preoperative evaluation of social interaction and global development levels using VSMS and BSID-II in predicting the postoperative outcome in pediatric cochlear implant recipients. A total of 65 deaf children who underwent cochlear implantation (CI) were included in this study. Age at the time of implantation ranged from 12 to 76 months. All of the children underwent a comprehensive preimplant psychological assessment by a clinical psychologist. The VSMS and BSID-II were used for evaluating social skills and a child's development preoperatively. A social quotient (SQ) was calculated by using the VSMS for each subject using the following formula: (social age/chronological age) × 100. The auditory perception and speech production abilities were evaluated using the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scale and the Korean version of the Ling's stage (K-Ling), respectively, at 1 year after CI. The associations between the preoperative SQ/developmental levels and the postoperative auditory/speech outcomes were evaluated. The mean SQ was significantly decreased in the enrolled children (90.6 ± 26.1). The improvement in CAP score at 1 year after CI was correlated with preoperative SQ. The improvements in phonemic and phonologic levels of K-Ling were correlated with preoperative VSMS and BSID-II scores.

  10. Atypical speech and language development : a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  11. Atypical Speech and Language Development: A Consensus Study on Clinical Signs in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and red flags (i.e. most urgent clinical signs) for…

  12. English Speech Sound Development in Preschool-Aged Children from Bilingual English-Spanish Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildersleeve-Neumann, Christina E.; Kester, Ellen S.; Davis, Barbara L.; Pena, Elizabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: English speech acquisition by typically developing 3- to 4-year-old children with monolingual English was compared to English speech acquisition by typically developing 3- to 4-year-old children with bilingual English-Spanish backgrounds. We predicted that exposure to Spanish would not affect the English phonetic inventory but would…

  13. Atypical Speech and Language Development: A Consensus Study on Clinical Signs in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and red flags (i.e. most urgent clinical signs) for…

  14. Atypical speech and language development : a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Luinge, Margreet R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. AIM: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  15. Assessment of Danish-speaking children’s phonological development and speech disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Marit Carolin; Fox-Boyer, Annette

    2017-01-01

    The identification of speech sounds disorders is an important everyday task for speech and language therapists (SLTs) working with children. Therefore, assessment tools are needed that are able to correctly identify and diagnose a child with a suspected speech disorder and furthermore, that provide...... of the existing speech assessments in Denmark showed that none of the materials fulfilled current recommendations identified in research literature. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the evaluation of a newly constructed instrument for assessing the speech development and disorders of Danish...... with suspected speech disorder (Clausen and Fox-Boyer, in prep). The results indicated that the instrument showed strong inter-examiner reliability for both populations as well as a high content and diagnostic validity. Hence, the study showed that the LogoFoVa can be regarded as a reliable and valid tool...

  16. A novel nonsense mutation in KDM5C/JARID1C gene causing intellectual disability, short stature and speech delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Jensen, Lars R; Kuss, Andreas W; Ribeiro, Márcia G; Campos, Mário; Santos, Jussara M; Pimentel, Márcia M G

    2011-07-01

    Mutations in the Jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1C (JARID1C/SMCX/KDM5C) gene, located at Xp11.22, are emerging as frequent causes of X-linked intellectual disability (XLID). KDM5C encodes for a member of an ARID protein family that harbors conserved DNA-binding motifs and acts as a histone H3 lysine 4 demethylase, suggesting a potential role in epigenetic regulation during development, cell growth and differentiation. In this study, we describe clinical and genetic findings of a Brazilian family co-segregating a novel nonsense mutation (c.2172C>A) in exon 15 of KDM5C gene with the intellectual disability phenotype. The transition resulted in replacement of the normal cysteine by a premature termination codon at position 724 of the protein (p.Cys724X), leading to reduced levels of KDM5C transcript probably due to nonsense mediated mRNA decay. The clinical phenotype of the proband, who has two affected brothers and a mild cognitively impaired mother, consisted of short stature, speech delay, hyperactivity, violent behavior and high palate, besides severe mental retardation. Our findings extend the number of KDM5C mutations implicated in XLID and highlight its promise for understanding neural function and unexplained cases of XLID. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Teacher identification of speech and language impairment in kindergarten students using the Kindergarten Development Check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Belinda; Ward, Elizabeth; Cahill, Louise; Keating, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to profile the extent and accuracy of teacher identification of speech and language impairment within a kindergarten student population in Tasmania, Australia, using the Kindergarten Development Check (KDC). A total of 286 kindergarten students (aged 4-5 years and in their first year of formal schooling) were screened by teachers with the KDC on two separate occasions over their kindergarten year. In the following academic year, each of the same 286 students were assessed by a speech-language pathologist, and diagnosed with either typically developing or impaired speech and/or language skills. Review of KDC data determined the number of students identified by teachers with speech and language impairment at each occasion during their kindergarten year. Comparison of data from the later KDC administration and speech-language pathology assessment then determined the correspondence between identification of speech and language impairment by teachers and speech-language pathologists. Upon initial administration of the KDC, 51 (17.8%) students were identified by teachers with language impairment and 47 (16.4%) students with speech impairment. Following the second administration of the KDC 3 months later, 20 (7.0%) students continued to be identified with language impairment, and 39 (13.6%) with speech impairment. Comparison of speech-language pathology testing results and KDC data from the second administration found the overall validity of teacher identification was 86.4% and 71% for speech and language impairment respectively. Specificity rates were high, with 93% and 97% of students with typically developing speech and language skills respectively, correctly classified on the KDC. However, the sensitivity was only 50% for speech impairment and 15% for language impairment, indicating that 50% of students presenting with speech impairment and 85% of students with language impairment in their subsequent academic year were not recorded by

  18. DIFFICULTIES EMERGING IN THE PROCESS OF TEACHING RUSSIAN STUDENTS TO MAKE A SPEECH IN JAPANESE AT THE STAGE OF THE SPEECH TEXT PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Maksimenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a detailed description of difficulties that emerge in the process of teaching Russian students to make a speech in Japanese at the stage of the speech text preliminary development. The conducted research shows that in the process of acquiring speech making skills students have considerable difficulties and make a number of various mistakes at different stages (phases of oral speech production. We suppose that for developing an efficient model of teaching students to make a speech in Japanese it is necessary to introduce corrections into the speech production model which are directly connected with the peculiarities of making an oral presentation in Japanese at the initial stage of education.

  19. Dynamic Processes of Speech Development by Seven Adult Learners of Japanese in a Domestic Immersion Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    The present study revealed the dynamic process of speech development in a domestic immersion program by seven adult beginning learners of Japanese. The speech data were analyzed with fluency, accuracy, and complexity measurements at group, interindividual, and intraindividual levels. The results revealed the complex nature of language development…

  20. When "Simon Says" Doesn't Work: Alternatives to Imitation for Facilitating Early Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeThorne, Laura S.; Johnson, Cynthia J.; Walder, Louise; Mahurin-Smith, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide clinicians with evidence-based strategies to facilitate early speech development in young children who are not readily imitating sounds. Relevant populations may include, but are not limited to, children with autism spectrum disorders, childhood apraxia of speech, and late-talking toddlers. Method: Through multifaceted search…

  1. When "Simon Says" Doesn't Work: Alternatives to Imitation for Facilitating Early Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeThorne, Laura S.; Johnson, Cynthia J.; Walder, Louise; Mahurin-Smith, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide clinicians with evidence-based strategies to facilitate early speech development in young children who are not readily imitating sounds. Relevant populations may include, but are not limited to, children with autism spectrum disorders, childhood apraxia of speech, and late-talking toddlers. Method: Through multifaceted search…

  2. Developing and Evaluating an Oral Skills Training Website Supported by Automatic Speech Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Howard Hao-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Oral communication ability has become increasingly important to many EFL students. Several commercial software programs based on automatic speech recognition (ASR) technologies are available but their prices are not affordable for many students. This paper will demonstrate how the Microsoft Speech Application Software Development Kit (SASDK), a…

  3. Dynamic Processes of Speech Development by Seven Adult Learners of Japanese in a Domestic Immersion Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    The present study revealed the dynamic process of speech development in a domestic immersion program by seven adult beginning learners of Japanese. The speech data were analyzed with fluency, accuracy, and complexity measurements at group, interindividual, and intraindividual levels. The results revealed the complex nature of language development…

  4. The Development of the Mealings, Demuth, Dillon, and Buchholz Classroom Speech Perception Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealings, Kiri T.; Demuth, Katherine; Buchholz, Jörg; Dillon, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Open-plan classroom styles are increasingly being adopted in Australia despite evidence that their high intrusive noise levels adversely affect learning. The aim of this study was to develop a new Australian speech perception task (the Mealings, Demuth, Dillon, and Buchholz Classroom Speech Perception Test) and use it in an open-plan…

  5. Developing and Evaluating an Oral Skills Training Website Supported by Automatic Speech Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Howard Hao-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Oral communication ability has become increasingly important to many EFL students. Several commercial software programs based on automatic speech recognition (ASR) technologies are available but their prices are not affordable for many students. This paper will demonstrate how the Microsoft Speech Application Software Development Kit (SASDK), a…

  6. Adaptive Long-Term Coding of LSF Parameters Trajectories for Large-Delay/Very- to Ultra-Low Bit-Rate Speech Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Girin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model-based method for coding the LSF parameters of LPC speech coders on a “long-term” basis, that is, beyond the usual 20–30 ms frame duration. The objective is to provide efficient LSF quantization for a speech coder with large delay but very- to ultra-low bit-rate (i.e., below 1 kb/s. To do this, speech is first segmented into voiced/unvoiced segments. A Discrete Cosine model of the time trajectory of the LSF vectors is then applied to each segment to capture the LSF interframe correlation over the whole segment. Bi-directional transformation from the model coefficients to a reduced set of LSF vectors enables both efficient “sparse” coding (using here multistage vector quantizers and the generation of interpolated LSF vectors at the decoder. The proposed method provides up to 50% gain in bit-rate over frame-by-frame quantization while preserving signal quality and competes favorably with 2D-transform coding for the lower range of tested bit rates. Moreover, the implicit time-interpolation nature of the long-term coding process provides this technique a high potential for use in speech synthesis systems.

  7. Delays in clinical development of neurological drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-06-28

    The delays in the approval and development of neurological drugs between Japan and other countries have been a major issue for patients with neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to analyze factors contributing to the delay in the launching of neurological drugs in Japan. We analyzed data from Japan and the US for the approval of 42 neurological drugs, all of which were approved earlier in the US than in Japan, and examined the potential factors that may cause the delay of their launch. Introductions of the 42 drugs in Japan occurred at a median of 87 months after introductions in the US. The mean review time of new drug applications for the 20 drugs introduced in Japan in January 2011 or later (15 months) was significantly shorter than that for the other 22 drugs introduced in Japan in December 2010 or earlier (24 months). The lag in the Japan's review time behind the US could not explain the approval delays. In the 31 of the 42 drugs, the application data package included overseas data. The mean review time of these 31 drugs (17 months) was significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs without overseas data (26 months). The mean approval lag behind the US of the 31 drugs (78 months) was also significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs (134 months). These results show that several important reforms in the Japanese drug development and approval system (e.g., inclusion of global clinical trial data) have reduced the delays in the clinical development of neurological drugs.

  8. Multilingual Phoneme Models for Rapid Speech Processing System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    clusters. It was found that multilingual bootstrapping methods out- perform monolingual English bootstrapping methods on the Arabic evaluation data initially...International Phonetic Alphabet . . . . . . . . . 7 2.3.2 Multilingual vs. Monolingual Speech Recognition 7 2.3.3 Data-Driven Approaches...one set of models and monolingual speech recognition systems that draw from a multilingual training space. The second approach is the focus of this

  9. Development of millisecond and internal delayed electric detonators in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedek, D.

    1986-01-01

    The stages of developing millisecond and internal delayed detonators are discussed. The problems of their practical introduction in Hungary as well as the economic background of their production are outlined. The present situation, i.e. production possibilities, application of different detonator types as well as the expected progress in the field of detonator production and use in mines endangered by fire-damp are dealt with.

  10. The Speech Anxiety Thoughts Inventory: scale development and preliminary psychometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yongrae; Smits, Jasper A J; Telch, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Cognitions have been known to play a central role in the development, maintenance, and treatment of speech anxiety. However, few instruments are currently available to assess cognitive contents associated with speech anxiety. This report describes three studies examining the psychometric characteristics of a revised English version of the Speech Anxiety Thoughts Inventory (SATI)-an instrument measuring maladaptive cognitions associated with speech anxiety. In Study 1, factor analyses of the SATI revealed a two-factor solution-"prediction of poor performance" and "fear of negative evaluation by audience", respectively. In Study 2, the two-factor structure was replicated. In addition, results revealed stability over a four-week period, high internal consistency, and good convergent and discriminant validity. In Study 3, the scale demonstrated sensitivity to change following brief exposure-based treatments. These findings suggest that the SATI is a highly reliable, valid measure to assess cognitive features of speech anxiety.

  11. Speech Coding Development for Audio fixing Using Spectrum Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. S. Nageswara Rao 1, Dr. C.D. Naidu 2, Dr. K. Jaya Sankar 3

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the enhancement of speech signals contaminated by speech-correlated noise, such as that in the output of a speech coder, is presented. This module is based on numerical speech processing algorithms which modelise the infected ear and generates the stimulus signals for the cilia cells (brain. The method is also based on constrained optimization of a criterion. This interface uses a gamma chirp filter bank constituted of 16 band pass filters based on IIR filters. The implemented method is on a block by- block basis and uses two constraints. A first constraint ensures that the signal power is preserved. A modification constraint ensures that the power of the difference of the enhanced and unenhanced signal is less than a fraction of the power of the unenhanced signal. The applied method is to increase the periodicity of the speech signal. Sounds that are not nearly periodic are perceptually unaffected by the optimization because of the modification constraint. The results demonstrated a degree of discrimination and interferences between different sounds especially in multi speaker environment.

  12. Sex differences in multisensory speech processing in both typically developing children and those on the autism spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars A. Ross

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous work has revealed sizeable deficits in the abilities of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD to integrate auditory and visual speech signals, with clear implications for social communication in this population. There is a strong male preponderance in ASD, with approximately four affected males for every female. The presence of sex differences in ASD symptoms suggests a sexual dimorphism in the ASD phenotype, and raises the question of whether this dimorphism extends to ASD traits in the neurotypical population. Here, we investigated possible sexual dimorphism in multisensory speech integration in both ASD and neurotypical individuals. Methods: We assessed whether males and females differed in their ability to benefit from visual speech when target words were presented under varying levels of signal-to-noise, in samples of neurotypical children and adults, and in children diagnosed with an ASD. Results: In typically developing (TD children and children with ASD, females (n= 47 and n=15 respectively were significantly superior in their ability to recognize words under audiovisual listening conditions compared to males (n= 55 and n=58 respectively. This sex difference was absent in our sample of neurotypical adults (n= 28 females; n= 28 males. Conclusions: We propose that the development of audiovisual integration is delayed in male relative to female children, a delay that is also observed in ASD. In neurotypicals, these sex differences disappear in early adulthood when females approach their performance maximum and males catch up. Our findings underline the importance of considering sex differences in the search for autism endophenotypes and strongly encourage increased efforts to study the underrepresented population of females within ASD.

  13. Process of speech acquisition and development of autistic children with or without autistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanaha, Ana Carina; Machado, Gislaine Mara Guerra; Loebmann, Carla; Perissinoto, Jacy

    2014-01-01

    To compare the trajectory of acquisition speech and development of autistic children with or without autistic regression. The sample consisted of 64 children, aged 3-10 years, of both genders, diagnosed by a multidisciplinary team with autism. In the analysis were investigated during the interview: mention whether or not the episode regression speech reported by parents; number of words produced in a minimum period of three months prior to detection of regression; mention whether or not the episode regression social behaviors concomitant arrest in speech, verbal and production at three years of age. We adopted a significance level of 5% for statistical analysis. Thirty one percent of children had speech regression. These, 100% showed regression of social behaviors. Mean words produced before the detection regression were five. The groups did not show difference on the period of acquisition and development of speech. It was possible to compare the trajectory speech development of children with or without regression. And we did not find that the children affected by autistic regression period show more positive clinical outcome in relation to the production of speech.

  14. SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY DEVELOPMENT IN SEVERE TO PROFOUND HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN ESTABLISHMENT OF A DATA COLLECTION FOR EARLY INTERVENTION IN HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Daneshman P. Borghei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of early detection of hearing impairment in children is early intervention. There is growing interest in early detection of hearing impairment in developing countries. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the spoken language development in severe to profound hearing impaired children and compared their speech intelligibility with normal hearing children at the same age. Nine severe to profound hearing impaired children below 2 years old out of the primer 42 cases were selected for this survey. They receive aural habilitation and also speech therapy after beginning the speech production. Speech intelligibility test of these children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read five questions which can be answered with one word only, at the age of 4, 5 and 6 in comparison with 27 normal hearing children at the same age. At the age of 4 the mean speech intelligibility score of the studied group was 31.77% (SD 12.17 and the control was %96 (SD 2.23. At the age of 5, this score was %51.22 (SD 14.42, the control one 97.85% (SD 1.93. Finally at age 6 it was 72% (SD 18.97 for hearing–impaired group and 99.22% (SD 1.18 in control one. Severe to profound hearing impaired children acquired spoken language but not at the same level. In general, their speech development showed about 2 to 3 years delay. Their speech intelligibility was acceptable for severe group around the age 6 but almost semi–intelligible for profound group at the same age.

  15. Children's Development of Self-Regulation in Speech Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDonald, Ewen; Johnson, Elizabeth K.; Forsythe, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    [4–8]. Experimental modifications of auditory feedback can also change vocalizations in both humans and songbirds [9–13]. However, with the exception of large manipulations of timing [14, 15], no study to date has ever directly examined the use of auditory feedback in speech production under the age...... of 4. Here we use a real-time formant perturbation task [16] to compare the response of toddlers, children, and adults to altered feedback. Children and adults reacted to this manipulation by changing their vowels in a direction opposite to the perturbation. Surprisingly, toddlers' speech didn't change...

  16. The Effects of Imitative Vs. Cognitive Methods on The Speech Development of Children With Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh JALILI*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Jalili M, Jahangiri N, Yazdi Aa, Ashrafzadeh F. The Effects of Imitative Vs. Cognitive Methods on The Speech Development of Children With Autism. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:37-46.ObjectiveThe present study was performed to examine the effects of two speech therapy methods on six verbal behaviors of autistic children, including oral speech, listening, organizing, speaking, semantics, and syntax.Materials & MethodsIn this study, thirty 6-8 years old children with autism were assigned to one of two groups: imitative and cognitive groups. Before starting the main procedures of the study, the children of both groups were homogenized concerning their autism level. In the first phase of the study, the speech development level of the two groups was measured in a pre-test, in which both groups showed similar results. Then, both groups of children received 6 months of speech therapy instruction, during which one group was taught using an imitative method, while the other group was being worked with cognitive method.ResultsAfter 6-month treatment period, a post-test was done, and the t-tests based on the data of the two groups revealed a significant difference between the results.ConclusionThe statistics showed that after the teaching period, autistic that worked with cognitive method gained a better development in their speech abilities, comparing to those worked with the imitative method.Reference:Samadi SA, Mahmoodizadeh A, McConkey R. A national study of the prevalence of Autism among five year old children in Iran. Autism 2012;16(1:5-14.Fombonne E, Simmons H, Ford T, Meltzer H, Goodman R. Prevalence of pervasive developmental disorders in the British nationwide survey of child mental health. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2001;40(7:820-7.Fombonne, E. The changing epidemiology of Autism. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil 2005,18(4:281-94.Filipek PA, Accardo PJ, Ashwal S, Baranek GT, Cook EH Jr, Dawson G

  17. Hemispheric speech lateralisation in the developing brain is related to motor praxis ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C. Hodgson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Commonly displayed functional asymmetries such as hand dominance and hemispheric speech lateralisation are well researched in adults. However there is debate about when such functions become lateralised in the typically developing brain. This study examined whether patterns of speech laterality and hand dominance were related and whether they varied with age in typically developing children. 148 children aged 3–10 years performed an electronic pegboard task to determine hand dominance; a subset of 38 of these children also underwent functional Transcranial Doppler (fTCD imaging to derive a lateralisation index (LI for hemispheric activation during speech production using an animation description paradigm. There was no main effect of age in the speech laterality scores, however, younger children showed a greater difference in performance between their hands on the motor task. Furthermore, this between-hand performance difference significantly interacted with direction of speech laterality, with a smaller between-hand difference relating to increased left hemisphere activation. This data shows that both handedness and speech lateralisation appear relatively determined by age 3, but that atypical cerebral lateralisation is linked to greater performance differences in hand skill, irrespective of age. Results are discussed in terms of the common neural systems underpinning handedness and speech lateralisation.

  18. Data recycling: using existing databases to increase research capacity in speech-language development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M; Breit-Smith, Allison; Rogers, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This clinical forum was organized to provide a means for informing the research and clinical communities of one mechanism through which research capacity might be enhanced within the field of speech-language pathology. Specifically, forum authors describe the process of conducting secondary analyses of extant databases to answer questions of relevance to speech and language development and disorders. This prologue defines the concept of secondary analysis of databases and provides an overview of each of the articles that make up the forum. Researchers invested in addressing basic and applied problems of relevance to speech and language services in schools can make use of a variety of extant databases to increase research capacity.

  19. Year Round. Method of speech development and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova U.B.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This methodological manual is created based on analysis of many years of experience of teachers working with children with developmental disorders. The manual is aimed at getting pre-school children or first graders with speech and communication difficulties leading to academic failure ready for school. Сontinued. Beginning in № 1 (46, 2015

  20. Year Round. Method of speech development and correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova U.B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This methodological manual is created based on the analysis of many years of experience of teachers working with children with developmental disorders. The manual is aimed at pre-school children or first graders with speech and communication difficulties leading to academic failure.

  1. Developing a Child Friendly Text-to-Speech System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the implementation details of a child friendly, good quality, English text-to-speech (TTS system that is phoneme-based, concatenative, easy to set up and use with little memory. Direct waveform concatenation and linear prediction coding (LPC are used. Most existing TTS systems are unit-selection based, which use standard speech databases available in neutral adult voices. Here reduced memory is achieved by the concatenation of phonemes and by replacing phonetic wave files with their LPC coefficients. Linguistic analysis was used to reduce the algorithmic complexity instead of signal processing techniques. Sufficient degree of customization and generalization catering to the needs of the child user had been included through the provision for vocabulary and voice selection to suit the requisites of the child. Prosody had also been incorporated. This inexpensive TTS system was implemented in MATLAB, with the synthesis presented by means of a graphical user interface (GUI, thus making it child friendly. This can be used not only as an interesting language learning aid for the normal child but it also serves as a speech aid to the vocally disabled child. The quality of the synthesized speech was evaluated using the mean opinion score (MOS.

  2. Year Round. Method of speech development and correction

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlova U.B.; Khotyleva T.U.

    2017-01-01

    This methodological manual is created based on the analysis of many years of experience of teachers working with children with developmental disorders. The manual is aimed at pre-school children or first graders with speech and communication difficulties leading to academic failure.

  3. Year Round. Method of speech development and correction

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlova U.B.; Khotyleva T.U.

    2016-01-01

    This methodological manual is created based on analysis of many years of experience of teachers working with children with developmental disorders. The manual is aimed at getting pre-school children or first graders with speech and communication difficulties leading to academic failure ready for school. Сontinued. Beginning in № 1 (46), 2015

  4. Amharic Speech Recognition for Speech Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Melese, Michael; Besacier, Laurent; Meshesha, Million

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The state-of-the-art speech translation can be seen as a cascade of Automatic Speech Recognition, Statistical Machine Translation and Text-To-Speech synthesis. In this study an attempt is made to experiment on Amharic speech recognition for Amharic-English speech translation in tourism domain. Since there is no Amharic speech corpus, we developed a read-speech corpus of 7.43hr in tourism domain. The Amharic speech corpus has been recorded after translating standard Bas...

  5. Development and evaluation of a computerized Mandarin speech test system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wufang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jianyong; Lin, Changyan

    2011-03-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a Computerized Mandarin Speech Test System (CMSTS). Taking into account the rules for developing speech materials and the unique linguistic characteristics of Mandarin, we designed and digitally recorded a set of materials comprised of seven lists of monosyllabic words, nine lists of disyllabic words, and fifteen lists of sentences with a high degree of subject familiarity. The CMSTS was developed with Visual Studio 2008, Access 2003 and DirectX 9. The system included five functions: listener management, a speech test, list management, data management, and system settings. We used the system to measure the speech recognition threshold (SRT) of 76 participants with normal hearing (age range: 20-28 years), and measured performance-intensity functions (PI) for all stimuli. The SRT results were in accord with pure-tone results obtained by pure-tone audiometry. In a speech recognition score (SRS) test, changing the presentation level had the strongest effect on sentence recognition, followed by the presence of disyllabic words. Monosyllabic words were least affected by changes in presentation level. The slopes of the linear portion of the PI using the system were in accord with the findings of previous studies using audiometers and CDs with similar materials. The CMSTS has sufficient sensitivity, and can facilitate the wider use of speech audiometry in Chinese audiology clinics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of speech in neurological disorders: Development of a Swahili screening test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Miller

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessments for acquired motor-speech disorders that look at movements of the articulators would appear at first glance to be universal. This may be true for the most basic non-speech aspects of movement. We argue that assessments for speech motor control must be attuned to language-specific variables to be fully valid. We describe the rationale for, and development of a motor-speech-disorder screening test for Swahili speakers which includes impairment measures as well as measures of intelligibility and speech-voice naturalness. We further describe its initial validation in terms of content validity, feasibility of administration and scoring without requirements for lengthy training and technical expertise and application to groups of people with and without Parkinson’s disease in Tanzania. Results indicate that the protocol is ready to use in so far as it is acceptable to users (clinicians, patients, is feasible to use, shows good interrater reliability, and is capable of differentiating performance in healthy speakers and those whose speech is disordered. We highlight needs for further development, including issues around training, development of local norms for healthy speakers and for speakers with a variety of neurological disturbances, and extension of the tool to cover culturally valid assessment of impact of communication disorders.

  7. Cost-Efficient Development of Acoustic Models for Speech Recognition of Related Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nouza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available When adapting an existing speech recognition system to a new language, major development costs are associated with the creation of an appropriate acoustic model (AM. For its training, a certain amount of recorded and annotated speech is required. In this paper, we show that not only the annotation process, but also the process of speech acquisition can be automated to minimize the need of human and expert work. We demonstrate the proposed methodology on Croatian language, for which the target AM has been built via cross-lingual adaptation of a Czech AM in 2 ways: a using commercially available GlobalPhone database, and b by automatic speech data mining from HRT radio archive. The latter approach is cost-free, yet it yields comparable or better results in LVCSR experiments conducted on 3 Croatian test sets.

  8. Children's perception of their synthetically corrected speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömbergsson, Sofia; Wengelin, Asa; House, David

    2014-06-01

    We explore children's perception of their own speech - in its online form, in its recorded form, and in synthetically modified forms. Children with phonological disorder (PD) and children with typical speech and language development (TD) performed tasks of evaluating accuracy of the different types of speech stimuli, either immediately after having produced the utterance or after a delay. In addition, they performed a task designed to assess their ability to detect synthetic modification. Both groups showed high performance in tasks involving evaluation of other children's speech, whereas in tasks of evaluating one's own speech, the children with PD were less accurate than their TD peers. The children with PD were less sensitive to misproductions in immediate conjunction with their production of an utterance, and more accurate after a delay. Within-category modification often passed undetected, indicating a satisfactory quality of the generated speech. Potential clinical benefits of using corrective re-synthesis are discussed.

  9. Development of the speech test signal in Brazilian Portuguese for real-ear measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Luciana P; Scollie, Susan D; Martinelli Iório, Maria Cecília

    2013-08-01

    Recommended practice is to verify the gain and/or output of hearing aids with speech or speech-shaped signals. This study has the purpose of developing a speech test signal in Brazilian Portuguese that is electroacoustically similar to the international long-term average speech spectrum (ILTASS) for use in real ear verification systems. A Brazilian Portuguese speech passage was recorded using standardized equipment and procedures for one female talker and compared to ISTS. The passage consisted of simple, declarative sentences making a total of 148 words. The recordings of a Brazilian Portuguese passage were filtered to the ILTASS and compared to the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS). Aided recordings were made at three test levels, for three audiograms for the Brazilian Portuguese passage and the ISTS. The unaided test signals were spectrally matched to within 0.5 dB. Aided evaluation revealed that the Brazilian Portuguese passage produced aided spectra that were within 1 dB on average, within about 2 dB per audiogram, and within about 3 dB per frequency for 95% of fittings. Results indicate that the Brazilian Portuguese passage developed in this study provides similar electroacoustic hearing-aid evaluations to those expected from the standard ISTS passage.

  10. The influence of hearing aids on the speech and language development of children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J Bruce; Oleson, Jacob J; Ambrose, Sophie E; Walker, Elizabeth; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing loss (HL) in children can be deleterious to their speech and language development. The standard of practice has been early provision of hearing aids (HAs) to moderate these effects; however, there have been few empirical studies evaluating the effectiveness of this practice on speech and language development among children with mild-to-severe HL. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of aided hearing and duration of HA use to speech and language outcomes in children with mild-to-severe HL. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational cross-sectional design was used to examine the association of aided hearing levels and length of HA use with levels of speech and language outcomes. One hundred eighty 3- and 5-year-old children with HL were recruited through records of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and referrals from clinical service providers in the general community in 6 US states. INTERVENTIONS All but 4 children had been fitted with HAs, and measures of aided hearing and the duration of HA use were obtained. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized measures of speech and language ability were obtained. RESULTS Measures of the gain in hearing ability for speech provided by the HA were significantly correlated with levels of speech (ρ179 = 0.20; P = .008) and language: ρ155 = 0.21; P = .01) ability. These correlations were indicative of modest levels of association between aided hearing and speech and language outcomes. These benefits were found for children with mild and moderate-to-severe HL. In addition, the amount of benefit from aided hearing interacted with the duration of HA experience (Speech: F4,161 = 4.98; P hearing. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The degree of improved hearing provided by HAs was associated with better speech and language development in children. In addition, the duration of HA experience interacted with the aided hearing to influence outcomes. These results provide support for the

  11. Tracking development from early speech-language acquisition to reading skills at age 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Marschik, Peter B; Sachse, Steffi; Green, Vanessa A; Zhang, Dajie; Van Der Meer, Larah; Wolin, Thomas; Einspieler, Christa

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated a link between speech-language and literacy development. To add to this body of knowledge, we investigated whether lexical and grammatical skills from toddler to early school age are related to reading competence in adolescence. Twenty-three typically developing children were followed from age 1;6 to 13;6 (years;months). Parental checklists and standardized tests were used to assess the development of mental lexicon, grammatical and reading capacities of the children. Direct assessment of early speech-language functions positively correlated with later reading competence, whereas lexical skills reported by parents were not associated with this capacity. At (pre-) school age, larger vocabulary and better grammatical abilities predicted advanced reading abilities in adolescence. Our study contributes to the understanding of typical speech-language development and its relation to later reading outcome, extending the body of knowledge on these developmental domains for future early identification of children at risk for reading difficulties.

  12. Maternal and paternal pragmatic speech directed to young children with Down syndrome and typical development

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Falco, Simona; Venuti, Paola; Esposito, Gianluca; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare functional features of maternal and paternal speech directed to children with Down syndrome and developmental age-matched typically developing children. Altogether 88 parents (44 mothers and 44 fathers) and their 44 young children (22 children with Down syndrome and 22 typically developing children) participated. Parents’ speech directed to children was obtained through observation of naturalistic parent–child dyadic interactions. Verbatim transcripts of maternal and paternal language were categorized in terms of the primary function of each speech unit. Parents (both mothers and fathers) of children with Down syndrome used more affect-salient speech compared to parents of typically developing children. Although parents used the same amounts of information-salient speech, parents of children with Down syndrome used more direct statements and asked fewer questions than did parents of typically developing children. Concerning parent gender, in both groups mothers used more language than fathers and specifically more descriptions. These findings held controlling for child age and MLU and family SES. This study highlights strengths and weaknesses of parental communication to children with Down syndrome and helps to identify areas of potential improvement through intervention. PMID:21215458

  13. VOCAL DEVELOPMENT AS A MAIN CONDITION IN EARLY SPEECH AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne HOLM

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is the evident positive vocal development in pre-lingual deaf children, who underwent a Cochlea Implantation in early age. The presented research compares the vocal speech expressions of three hearing impaired children and two children with normal hearing from 10 months to 5 years. Comparisons of the spontaneous vocal expressions were conducted by sonagraphic analyses. The awareness of the own voice as well as the voices of others is essential for the child’s continuous vocal development from crying to speech. Supra-segmental factors, such as rhythm, dynamics and melody play a very important role in this development.

  14. Smart command recognizer (SCR) - For development, test, and implementation of speech commands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Carol A.; Bunnell, John W.; Krones, Robert R.

    1988-01-01

    The SCR, a rapid prototyping system for the development, testing, and implementation of speech commands in a flight simulator or test aircraft, is described. A single unit performs all functions needed during these three phases of system development, while the use of common software and speech command data structure files greatly reduces the preparation time for successive development phases. As a smart peripheral to a simulation or flight host computer, the SCR interprets the pilot's spoken input and passes command codes to the simulation or flight computer.

  15. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eHerrera-Marschitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified.In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by over expression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, competing for NAD+ during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat foetuses into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that it constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles.

  16. Assessing recall in mothers' retrospective reports: concerns over children's speech and language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ginny; Miller, Laura L; Ford, Tamsin; Golding, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Retrospective recall about children's symptoms is used to establish early developmental patterns in clinical practice and is also utilised in child psychopathology research. Some studies have indicated that the accuracy of retrospective recall is influenced by life events. Our hypothesis was that an intervention: speech and language therapy, would adversely affect the accuracy of parent recall of early concerns about their child's speech and language development. Mothers (n = 5,390) reported on their child's speech development (child male to female ratio = 50:50) when their children were aged 18 or 30 months, and also reported on these early concerns retrospectively, 10 years later, when their children were 13 years old. Overall reliability of retrospective recall was good, 86 % of respondents accurately recalling their earlier concerns. As hypothesised, however, the speech and language intervention was strongly associated with inaccurate retrospective recall about concerns in the early years (Relative Risk Ratio = 19.03; 95 % CI:14.78-24.48). Attendance at speech therapy was associated with increased recall of concerns that were not reported at the time. The study suggests caution is required when interpreting retrospective reports of abnormal child development as recall may be influenced by intervening events.

  17. The development of a cryogenic optical delay line for DARWIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dool, T.C. van den; Kamphues, F.G.

    2005-01-01

    TNO, in cooperation with Micromega-Dynamics, SRON, Dutch Space and CSL, has designed a compact breadboard cryogenic delay line for use in future space interferometry missions. The work is performed under ESA contract in preparation for the DARWIN mission. The breadboard (BB) delay line is

  18. Do long delay conditioned stimuli develop inhibitory properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha eEscobar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In long-delay conditioning, a long conditioned stimulus (CS is paired in its final segments with an unconditioned stimulus. With sufficient training, this procedure usually results in conditioned responding being delayed until the final segment of the CS, a pattern of responding known as inhibition of delay. However, there have been no systematic investigations of the associative structure of long delay conditioning, and whether the initial segment of a long delay CS actually becomes inhibitory is debatable. In an appetitive preparation with rat subjects, the initial segment of long delay CS A passed a retardation (Experiment 1a but not a summation (Experiment 1b test for conditioned inhibition. Furthermore, retardation was observed only if long delay conditioning and retardation training occurred in the same context (Experiment 2. Thus, the initial segment of a long delay CS appears to share more characteristics with a latent inhibitor than a conditioned inhibitor. Componential theories of conditioning appear best suited to account for these results.

  19. Speech Enhancement Algorithm with Leading-in Delay%一种引入延迟的语音增强算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翔; 高勇

    2011-01-01

    针对传统语音增强算法中,只采用当前帧和当前帧以前的信息对当前帧语音谱进行估计而造成变电平噪声和音乐噪声的问题,采用一种改进的引入延迟的语音增强算法.通过引入延迟,可以在对当前帧语音谱进行估计时使用当前帧以后帧的信息,在噪声估计冲采用类似路径搜索的双向搜索方法消除变电平噪声的影响,在先验信噪比估计中采用改进的非因果先验信噪比估计算法,消徐低信噪比平滑不足带来的音乐噪声,在此基础上构建了一个完整的语音增强算法.实验结果表明,该算法基本不受变电平噪声的影响,而且音乐噪声和残留背景噪声都得到了很好的抑制.%Since traditional speech enhancement algorithms usually only use the information of the current frame and the previous frame for estimation of the speech spectrum, which may cause variable level noises and music noise, a improved speech enhancement algorithm with leading-in delay is proposed to solve this problem.By using the information of the frame after the current frame, a two-way search method which is similar to the method of path search can be adopted to eliminate the influence of variable level noises and music noise.An improved non-causal priori SNR estimation method is employed in the priori SNR estimation to eliminate the music noise caused by the inadequate of smooth in low SNR.Based on this, a complete speech enhancement algorithm is constructed.The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is noy affected by the variable level noise, but can suppress the music noise and residual background noise effectively.

  20. Atypical speech and language development: a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margot I. Visser-Bochane; Sijmen A. Reijneveld; Cees P. van der Schans; Ellen Gerrits; Margreet R. Luinge

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech–language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  1. Impact of Placement Type on the Development of Clinical Competency in Speech-Language Pathology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheepway, Lyndal; Lincoln, Michelle; McAllister, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speech-language pathology students gain experience and clinical competency through clinical education placements. However, currently little empirical information exists regarding how competency develops. Existing research about the effectiveness of placement types and models in developing competency is generally descriptive and based…

  2. Atypical speech and language development: a consensus study on clinical signs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; Schans, Cees P. van der; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech–language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and

  3. Developing a bilingual "persian cued speech" website for parents and professionals of children with hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Movallali

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of the internet as a source of information gathering, self-help and support is becoming increasingly recognized. Parents and professionals of children with hearing impairment have been shown to seek information about different communication approaches online. Cued Speech is a very new approach to Persian speaking pupils. Our aim was to develop a useful website to give related information about Persian Cued Speech to parents and professionals of children with hearing impairment.All Cued Speech websites from different countries that fell within the first ten pages of Google and Yahoo search-engines were assessed. Main subjects and links were studied. All related information was gathered from the websites, textbooks, articles etc.Using a framework that combined several criteria for health-information websites, we developed the Persian Cued Speech website for three distinct audiences (parents, professionals and children.An accurate, complete, accessible and readable resource about Persian Cued Speech for parents and professionals is available now.

  4. Masithethe: speech and language development and difficulties in isiXhosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Michelle; Smouse, Mantoa

    2012-03-02

    IsiXhosa is the second most spoken language in South Africa and one of its official languages. Spoken mainly in the Eastern and Western Cape regions it is fitting that much of the research focusing on children's isiXhosa speech and language acquisition has been carried out at the University of Cape Town (UCT). We describe what is known about children's acquisition of isiXhosa, and highlight studies which inform our knowledge of the typical development of the language in relation to the acquisition of consonants including clicks and the isiXhosa noun class system. Little is known about the specific nature of speech and language difficulties in isiXhosa, and the development of isiXhosa resources for speech and language assessment and therapy is in its infancy. Suggestions are made for advancing knowledge and practice which is needed to provide a relevant and quality service to isiXhosa speakers.

  5. A case of acutely developed delayed radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Amari, Masakuni [Geriatrics Research Inst., Maebashi (Japan). Hospital; Fukuda, Toshio; Okamoto, Koichi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-08-01

    A 66-year-old man with a history of hypertension received radiation therapy on his neck at age 61 because of laryngeal cancer (T1bN0M0). Five years after the radiation, he acutely developed dysuria, tetraparesis and dissociated sensory disturbances below bilateral Th4 level. T2 weighted MRI showed a high signal lesion affecting the central area of the spinal cord extending from C1 to C7. On the second clinical day, he developed respiratory arrest and was ventilated. The cerebrospinal fluid contained 20/mm{sup 3} (monocyte 15, neutorophil 5) white cells; protein was 52.5 mg/dl; IgG index 0.54; Q albumin was 9.6; tests for oligoclonal band and myelin basic protein were negative; a culture yielded no microorganism. He was treated with steroids and supportive measures without improvement, and died of a sudden cardiac arrest on the 8th clinical day. postmortem examination confirmed conspicuous focal spongy changes with many axonal swellings, especially in the posterior and lateral columns at cervical and Th1 levels. The pathological findings were considered to be compatible with those of delayed radiation myelopathy (DRM). In the anterior horn of the cervical cord there were lesions of diffuse racification and the proliferation of small vessels. There were no findings of hyaline vascular changes, infarction or metastasis of laryngeal cancer at the spinal cord. It is considered that hyperintensity of signals on T2-weighted may originate from racification and proliferation of small vessels in the gray matter, and these pathological changes would be intimately associated with the severe neurologic morbidity of this patient. Acute development of neurological findings and the pathological changes in the gray matter of the spinal cord are rare manifestations of DRM. (author)

  6. Development of Audition and Speech: Implications for Early Intervention with Infants Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1999-01-01

    This article presents information about the auditory and speech development of infants with normal hearing and those who are deaf or hard of hearing. Methods of assessing hearing, evidence of auditory learning prior to birth, behavior assessment procedures, hearing aid use, and early identification and speech development are discussed. (Contains…

  7. Predictors of token-to-token inconsistency in preschool children with typical speech-language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Toby; Sosa, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine potential concurrent predictors and replicate rates of token-to-token inconsistency (inconsistency in repeated productions of the same word) in 43 children with typical speech-language development, ages 2;6 to 4;2. A standard linear regression was used to determine which variables, if any, among age, expressive and receptive vocabulary, and speech sound production abilities predicted token-to-token inconsistency. Inconsistency rates in children from one research site, reported elsewhere, were compared to rates in children from a second research site. The results revealed that expressive vocabulary was the only significant predictor of token-to-token inconsistency in these children. Furthermore, inconsistency rates were similarly high across the two research sites. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for our theoretical understanding of token-to-token inconsistency and its role in the differential diagnosis of speech sound disorders in children.

  8. Development of an audiovisual speech perception app for children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Julia; Preston, Jonathan; Brancazio, Lawrence; D'angelo, Michael; Turcios, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Perception of spoken language requires attention to acoustic as well as visible phonetic information. This article reviews the known differences in audiovisual speech perception in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and specifies the need for interventions that address this construct. Elements of an audiovisual training program are described. This researcher-developed program delivered via an iPad app presents natural speech in the context of increasing noise, but supported with a speaking face. Children are cued to attend to visible articulatory information to assist in perception of the spoken words. Data from four children with ASD ages 8-10 are presented showing that the children improved their performance on an untrained auditory speech-in-noise task.

  9. "It's the Way You Talk to Them." The Child's Environment: Early Years Practitioners' Perceptions of Its Influence on Speech and Language Development, Its Assessment and Environment Targeted Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Lewis, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Speech and language delay occurs in approximately 6% of the child population, and interventions to support this group of children focus on the child and/or the communicative environment. Evidence about the effectiveness of interventions that focus on the environment as well as the (reported) practices of speech and language therapists (SLTs) and…

  10. Oral breathing and speech disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitos, Silvia F; Arakaki, Renata; Solé, Dirceu; Weckx, Luc L M

    2013-01-01

    To assess speech alterations in mouth-breathing children, and to correlate them with the respiratory type, etiology, gender, and age. A total of 439 mouth-breathers were evaluated, aged between 4 and 12 years. The presence of speech alterations in children older than 5 years was considered delayed speech development. The observed alterations were tongue interposition (TI), frontal lisp (FL), articulatory disorders (AD), sound omissions (SO), and lateral lisp (LL). The etiology of mouth breathing, gender, age, respiratory type, and speech disorders were correlated. Speech alterations were diagnosed in 31.2% of patients, unrelated to the respiratory type: oral or mixed. Increased frequency of articulatory disorders and more than one speech disorder were observed in males. TI was observed in 53.3% patients, followed by AD in 26.3%, and by FL in 21.9%. The co-occurrence of two or more speech alterations was observed in 24.8% of the children. Mouth breathing can affect speech development, socialization, and school performance. Early detection of mouth breathing is essential to prevent and minimize its negative effects on the overall development of individuals. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Reading Skills of Students with Speech Sound Disorders at Three Stages of Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skebo, Crysten M.; Lewis, Barbara A.; Freebairn, Lisa A.; Tag, Jessica; Ciesla, Allison Avrich; Stein, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between phonological awareness, overall language, vocabulary, and nonlinguistic cognitive skills to decoding and reading comprehension was examined for students at 3 stages of literacy development (i.e., early elementary school, middle school, and high school). Students with histories of speech sound disorders (SSD) with…

  12. Learning for Development: Selected Speeches of Sir John Daniel and Colleagues, September 2006-February 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commonwealth of Learning, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The third in a series published by the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), this booklet reproduces five addresses and one article from late 2006 and early 2007. This collection of speeches is entitled "Learning for Development" because that is the focus of the work of the COL's work. The addresses presented here were given at the opening and closing…

  13. Comment stimuler l'enfant au langage (How to Stimulate a Child's Speech Development).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Paulette; Buteau, Magdelhayne

    This collection of exercises, intended principally for parents and teachers engaged in early childhood education, contains 30 pages of exercises designed to foster speech and vocabulary development of young children. Although the book is primarily intended for use with native speakers of French, the exercises would be useful for elementary school…

  14. Changes in Speech and Language Development of a Young Child after Decannulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, R.; Plante, E.; Green, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews the speech and language development of a child who, as result of complete subglottic stenosis, was aphonic from birth until 2 years and 11 months of age at which time laryngotracheal reconstruction provided normal respiration. The boy had congenital subglottic stenosis requiring neonatal tracheostomy. The congenital subglottic…

  15. Changes in Speech and Language Development of a Young Child after Decannulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, R.; Plante, E.; Green, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    This report reviews the speech and language development of a child who, as result of complete subglottic stenosis, was aphonic from birth until 2 years and 11 months of age at which time laryngotracheal reconstruction provided normal respiration. The boy had congenital subglottic stenosis requiring neonatal tracheostomy. The congenital subglottic…

  16. Speech and language development in toddlers with and without cleft palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priester, G. H.; Goorhuis-Brouwer, S. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The effect of early palate closure on speech and language development in children with cleft palate. Design: Comparative study. Setting: University Medical Center Groningen, Cleft Palate Team (The Netherlands). Materials and methods: Forty-three toddlers with cleft palate and thirty-two t

  17. Developing Educationally Relevant IEPs: A Technical Assistance Document for Speech-Language Pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannen, Susan J.; Cooper, Eugene B.; Dellegrotto, John T.; Disney, Sarah T.; Eger, Diane L.; Ehren, Barbara J.; Ganley, Kimberly A.; Isakson, Carolyn W.; Montgomery, Judith K.; Ralabate, Patricia K.; Secord, Wayne A.; Whitmire, Kathleen A.

    This document provides information, based on the final Part B regulations implementing statutory changes made by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1997, which will assist speech-language pathologists in their role in developing Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) as IEP team members and in implementing those portions…

  18. Delays in GABAergic interneuron development and behavioral inhibition after prenatal stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lussier, Stephanie J; Stevens, Hanna E

    2016-01-01

    .... Prenatal stress delays GABAergic progenitor migration, but the significance of these early developmental disruptions for the continued development of GABAergic cells in the juvenile brain is unclear...

  19. Analysis of Delays in Hard Rock Mine Lateral Development: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. Eshun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify and isolate the major causes of delays in underground lateral development at AngloGold Ashanti (AGA, Obuasi Mine, Ghana. It uses fishbone analysis to identify and present 20 possible causes of delays in lateral development at the mine. By employing Pareto analysis, 7 major causes of delays have been isolated. They are: scoop problems, low compressed air, labour shortages, bad ground, flood, power outages and waste pass getting full. The study concludes that, should management concentrate in minimising the 7 major causes of delays, it will be solving about 80% of the problems associated with delays in underground lateral development at AGA, Obuasi mine. The study further gives specific recommendations to reduce delays in lateral development at the mine.

  20. Analysis of Delays in Hard Rock Mine Lateral Development: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    P.A. Eshun; V.A. Temeng

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and isolate the major causes of delays in underground lateral development at AngloGold Ashanti (AGA), Obuasi Mine, Ghana. It uses fishbone analysis to identify and present 20 possible causes of delays in lateral development at the mine. By employing Pareto analysis, 7 major causes of delays have been isolated. They are: scoop problems, low compressed air, labour shortages, bad ground, flood, power outages and waste pass getting full. The study concludes th...

  1. Speech Production Accuracy and Variability in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients: Comparisons with Typically Developing Age-Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J.; Goffman, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The speech production accuracy and variability scores of 6 young cochlear implant (CI) recipients with 2 years of device experience were compared with those of typically developing (TD) age-peers. Method: Words from the First Words Speech Test (FWST; Ertmer, 1999) were imitated 3 times to assess the accuracy and variability of initial…

  2. Cultural-historical and cognitive approaches to understanding the origins of development of written speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Obukhova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of the emergence and development of written speech, its relationship to the oral speech, connections to the symbolic and modeling activities of preschool children – playing and drawing. While a child's drawing is traditionally interpreted in psychology either as a measure of intellectual development, or as a projective technique, or as a criterion for creative giftedness of the child, in this article, the artistic activity is analyzed as a prerequisite for development of written speech. The article substantiates the hypothesis that the mastery of “picture writing” – the ability to display the verbal content in a schematic picturesque plan – is connected to the success of writing speech at school age. Along with the classical works of L.S. Vygotsky, D.B. Elkonin, A.R. Luria, dedicated to finding the origins of writing, the article presents the current Russian and foreign frameworks of forming the preconditions of writing, based on the concepts of cultural-historical theory (“higher mental functions”, “zone of proximal development”, etc.. In Western psychology, a number of pilot studies used the developmental function of drawing for teaching the written skills to children of 5-7 years old. However, in cognitive psychology, relationship between drawing and writing is most often reduced mainly to the analysis of general motor circuits. Despite the recovery in research on writing and its origins in the last decade, either in domestic or in foreign psychology, the written speech is not a sufficiently studied problem.

  3. Multiple Transcoding Impact on Speech Quality in Ideal Network Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mikulec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the impact of transcoding on the speech quality. We have focused mainly on the transcoding between codecs without the negative influence of the network parameters such as packet loss and delay. It has ensured objective and repeatable results from our measurement. The measurement was performed on the Transcoding Measuring System developed especially for this purpose. The system is based on the open source projects and is useful as a design tool for VoIP system administrators. The paper compares the most used codecs from the transcoding perspective. The multiple transcoding between G711, GSM and G729 codecs were performed and the speech quality of these calls was evaluated. The speech quality was measured by Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality method, which provides results in Mean Opinion Score used to describe the speech quality on a scale from 1 to 5. The obtained results indicate periodical speech quality degradation on every transcoding between two codecs.

  4. Development of coffee maker service robot using speech and face recognition systems using POMDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiharto, Widodo; Meiliana; Santoso Gunawan, Alexander Agung

    2016-07-01

    There are many development of intelligent service robot in order to interact with user naturally. This purpose can be done by embedding speech and face recognition ability on specific tasks to the robot. In this research, we would like to propose Intelligent Coffee Maker Robot which the speech recognition is based on Indonesian language and powered by statistical dialogue systems. This kind of robot can be used in the office, supermarket or restaurant. In our scenario, robot will recognize user's face and then accept commands from the user to do an action, specifically in making a coffee. Based on our previous work, the accuracy for speech recognition is about 86% and face recognition is about 93% in laboratory experiments. The main problem in here is to know the intention of user about how sweetness of the coffee. The intelligent coffee maker robot should conclude the user intention through conversation under unreliable automatic speech in noisy environment. In this paper, this spoken dialog problem is treated as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP). We describe how this formulation establish a promising framework by empirical results. The dialog simulations are presented which demonstrate significant quantitative outcome.

  5. To Speak or Not to Speak: Developing Legal Standards for Anonymous Speech on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas A. Lipinski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores recent developments in the regulation of Internet speech, in specific, injurious or defamatory speech and the impact such speech has on the rights of anonymous speakers to remain anonymous as opposed to having their identity revealed to plaintiffs or other third parties. The paper proceeds in four sections.  First, a brief history of the legal attempts to regulate defamatory Internet speech in the United States is presented. As discussed below this regulation has altered the traditional legal paradigm of responsibility and as a result creates potential problems for the future of anonymous speech on the Internet.  As a result plaintiffs are no longer pursuing litigation against service providers but taking their dispute directly to the anonymous speaker. Second, several cases have arisen in the United States where plaintiffs have requested that the identity of an anonymous Internet speaker be revealed.  These cases are surveyed.  Third, the cases are analyzed in order to determine the factors that courts require to be present before the identity of an anonymous speaker will be revealed.  The release is typically accomplished by the enforcement of a discovery subpoena instigated by the party seeking the identity of the anonymous speaker. The factors courts have used are as follows: jurisdiction, good faith (both internal and external, necessity (basic and sometimes absolute, and at times proprietary interest. Finally, these factors are applied in three scenarios--e-commerce, education, and employment--to guide institutions when adopting policies that regulate when the identity of an anonymous speaker--a customer, a student or an employee--would be released as part of an internal initiative, but would nonetheless be consistent with developing legal standards.

  6. 3p14.1 de novo microdeletion involving the FOXP1 gene in an adult patient with autism, severe speech delay and deficit of motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Orazio; D'Agruma, Leonardo; Minenna, Adelaide Franca; Palumbo, Pietro; Stallone, Raffaella; Palladino, Teresa; Zelante, Leopoldo; Carella, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome region 3p14.1, including FOXP1 gene, is relatively rare and, until recently, there were no strong evidences to support the hypothesis that this microdeletion could play a role in the etiology of genomic disorders. Here, we report on an adult patient with a recognizable phenotype of autism, severe speech delay, deficit of motor coordination and typical dysmorphic features. Analysis of a dense whole genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array showed a 1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome region 3p14.1 including the entire coding region of FOXP1 (MIM 605515) gene. In order to study the parental origin of the deletion, we analyzed selected SNPs in the deleted area in the proband and his parents showing Mendelian incompatibilities suggesting a de novo deletion on the chromosome of paternal origin. Despite the frequency of this genomic alteration has not been estimated, our patient confirm the hypothesis that microdeletion of 3p14.1 seems to be a rare cause of cognitive disorders and that haploinsufficiency of FOXP1 may play a role in neurological and language deficits in patients carrying a 3p14.1 deletion. Finally, our patient is also important because useful to further delineate the clinical spectrum secondary to the 3p14.1 microdeletions.

  7. Fragile X syndrome and an isodicentric X chromosome in a woman with multiple anomalies, developmental delay, and normal pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, D L; Gane, L W; Richards, C S; Lampe, M; Hills, J; O'Connor, R; Manchester, D; Taylor, A; Tassone, F; Hulseberg, D; Hagerman, R J; Patil, S R

    1999-07-30

    We report on an individual with developmental delays, short stature, skeletal abnormalities, normal pubertal development, expansion of the fragile X triplet repeat, as well as an isodicentric X chromosome. S is a 19-year-old woman who presented for evaluation of developmental delay. Pregnancy was complicated by a threatened miscarriage. She was a healthy child with intellectual impairment noted in infancy. Although she had global delays, speech was noted to be disproportionately delayed with few words until age 3.5 years. Facial appearance was consistent with fragile X syndrome. Age of onset of menses was 11 years with normal breast development. A maternal male second cousin had been identified with fragile X syndrome based on DNA studies. The mother of this child (S's maternal first cousin) and the grandfather (S's maternal uncle) were both intellectually normal but were identified as carrying triplet expansions in the premutation range. S's mother had some school difficulties but was not identified as having global delays. Molecular analysis of S's fragile X alleles noted an expansion of more than 400 CGG repeats in one allele. Routine cytogenetic studies of peripheral blood noted the presence of an isodicentric X in 81of 86 cells scored. Five of 86 cells were noted to be 45,X. Cytogenetic fra(X) studies from peripheral blood showed that the structurally normal chromosome had the fragile site in approximately 16% of the cells. Analysis of maternal fragile X alleles identified an allele with an expansion to approximately 110 repeats. FMRP studies detected the expression of the protein in 24% of cells studied. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with an isodicentric X and fragile X syndrome. Whereas her clinical phenotype is suggestive of fragile X syndrome, her skeletal abnormalities may represent the presence of the isodicentric X. Treatment of S with 20 mg/day of Prozac improved her behavior. In the climate of cost con trol, this individual

  8. Speech and Language Deficits in Early-Treated Children with Galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisbren, Susan E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Intelligence and speech-language development of eight children (3.6 to 11.6 years old) with classic galactosemia were assessed by standardized tests. Each of the children had delays of early speech difficulties, and all but one had language disorders in at least one area. Available from: Journal of Pediatrics, C.V. Mosby Co., 11830 Westline…

  9. Effects of Background Noise on Cortical Encoding of Speech in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nicole; Zecker, Steven; Trommer, Barbara; Chen, Julia; Kraus, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This study provides new evidence of deficient auditory cortical processing of speech in noise in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Speech-evoked responses (approximately 100-300 ms) in quiet and background noise were evaluated in typically-developing (TD) children and children with ASD. ASD responses showed delayed timing (both conditions) and…

  10. A systematic scoping review of speech and language therapists' public health practice for early language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clare; Williams, Emma; Bryan, Karen

    2017-07-01

    There have been calls for speech and language therapists (SLTs) to work within a public-health framework to support language development. Innovative practice is reported, but the range of services remains unknown. Furthermore, the potential impact of public health practice in speech and language therapy on early child development is also currently unknown. A new method in SLT research, systematic scoping reviews enable greater breadth of focus than traditional systematic reviews when identifying innovative practice. To report scope and critically appraise evidence of family-focused health-promotion practice for early language development in this area. Using the Cochrane Public Health Group scoping review framework, data from reports of health-promotion practice with families of children aged 0-3 years were extracted and critically appraised on service delivery, information, reach and evaluation. Group-based service delivery was the most popular form of service delivery. There were limited reports on the information given in services and on their reach. Questionnaires were the most popular reported evaluation method. Quality of evaluations was poor due to lack of replicability and experimental control in the studies reported. This method of systematic review has highlighted the scope of health-promotion practice in speech and language therapy and also demonstrated the lack of evidence for its effectiveness on child language development. It is argued that systematic scoping reviews are valuable for scoping innovative practice in areas where either there is a lack of robust evidence or there is a high level of heterogeneity in practice or evaluation. To support clinician appraisal of available evidence, recommendations are given for development of questionnaire appraisal and for categorization of evidence levels on summary databases. © 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  11. Development of a High Power Programmable Precise Time-Delay Trigger/Ignition System for MFCG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bi; HE Yuan-hang; ZHANG Qing-ming; MA Yue-fen

    2008-01-01

    High-power precise delay trigger/ignition system is a programmable pulse generator developed for experiment controlling in explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators.Precise delay pulses are generated by the digital circuit,after being magnified and sharpened through multistage isolated amplifiers and rising edge sharpening device,high-voltage steep delay pulses with precision less than us level are obtained.This system has been used in our compact magnetic flux compression generator experiments in place of the traditional primaeord delay device.

  12. Tobacco, Market Economy and Market of Ideas Newest Developments Concerning Freedom of Commercial Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Krzeminska-Vamvaka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The paper highlights the link between market and freedom of expression with reference to the newest developments in the area of tobacco advertising in several legal systems (EU, Ireland, US, Canada. It analyses how courts in those systems assess the scope of the right to freedom of commercial speech and change the dynamics of the market. Tobacco restrictions influence demand and consumption levels, but also force development of new advertising techniques. The paper demonstrates the indirect impact of freedom of speech on the market as signpost on which advertising restrictions are judged with regard to the commercial speaker’s right to speak and the consumer’s right to receive information.

  13. [The acoustic aspect of the speech development in children during the third year of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakso, E E; Gromova, A D; Frolova, O V; Romanova, O D

    2004-01-01

    The current part of a Russian language acquisition longitudinal study based on auditory, phonetic and instrumental analysis is devoted to the third year of child's life. We examined the development of supplementary acoustic and phonetic features of the child's speech providing for the possibility for the speech to be recognized. The instrumental analysis and statistical processing of vowel formant dynamics as well as stress, palatalization and VOT development, has been performed for the first time in Russian children. We showed that the high probability of children words recognition by auditors was due to establishment of a system of acoustically stable features which, in combination with each other, provide for the informative sufficiency of a message.

  14. The development of conjunction use in advanced L2 speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Jaroszek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the results of a longitudinal study of how the use of conjunctions, as an aspect of spoken discourse competence of 13 selected advanced students of English, developed throughout their 3-year English as a foreign language (EFL tertiary education. The analysis was carried out in relation to a number of variables, including 2 reference levels, one representing English native discourse and the other observed in teacher talk in actual EFL classes, language type exposure, as registered by the participants of the study on a weekly basis, and teaching procedures. The study investigated possible factors determining the development of 3 aspects of conjunction use: (a formal conjunctions, (b specific conjunctions, that is, those conjunctions that are both characteristic of natural English discourse and are underrepresented in L2 discourse, and (c conjunction diversity. The results point to a restricting effect of teacher talk on the development of specific conjunction use and conjunction diversity. These 2 aspects of conjunction use enjoyed only a slight rise, approaching the teacher reference level. On the other hand, formal conjunctions use did increase radically throughout the study, exceeding the native reference level. In this case teacher talk played a reinforcing role at most. As indicated in a correlational analysis, although there was a clear tendency of the participants’ development of conjunction use towards the native reference level, exposure to authentic English may not have been facilitative of the development of this discourse aspect. An interesting observation was made with reference to the effect of formal instruction on the development of conjunction use: Although the subjects did receive intensive training in conjunction use in the 1st semester of their EFL course, it was not until the 2nd year that their levels of formal conjunction use in spoken output increased. This suggests that formal instruction may have

  15. An Improved Greedy Search Algorithm for the Development of a Phonetically Rich Speech Corpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Song; Nakamura, Satoshi

    An efficient way to develop large scale speech corpora is to collect phonetically rich ones that have high coverage of phonetic contextual units. The sentence set, usually called as the minimum set, should have small text size in order to reduce the collection cost. It can be selected by a greedy search algorithm from a large mother text corpus. With the inclusion of more and more phonetic contextual effects, the number of different phonetic contextual units increased dramatically, making the search not a trivial issue. In order to improve the search efficiency, we previously proposed a so-called least-to-most-ordered greedy search based on the conventional algorithms. This paper evaluated these algorithms in order to show their different characteristics. The experimental results showed that the least-to-most-ordered methods successfully achieved smaller objective sets at significantly less computation time, when compared with the conventional ones. This algorithm has already been applied to the development a number of speech corpora, including a large scale phonetically rich Chinese speech corpus ATRPTH which played an important role in developing our multi-language translation system.

  16. Development of a Mandarin-English Bilingual Speech Recognition System for Real World Music Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Pan, Jielin; Lin, Yang; Shao, Jian; Yan, Yonghong

    In recent decades, there has been a great deal of research into the problem of bilingual speech recognition-to develop a recognizer that can handle inter- and intra-sentential language switching between two languages. This paper presents our recent work on the development of a grammar-constrained, Mandarin-English bilingual Speech Recognition System (MESRS) for real world music retrieval. Two of the main difficult issues in handling the bilingual speech recognition systems for real world applications are tackled in this paper. One is to balance the performance and the complexity of the bilingual speech recognition system; the other is to effectively deal with the matrix language accents in embedded language**. In order to process the intra-sentential language switching and reduce the amount of data required to robustly estimate statistical models, a compact single set of bilingual acoustic models derived by phone set merging and clustering is developed instead of using two separate monolingual models for each language. In our study, a novel Two-pass phone clustering method based on Confusion Matrix (TCM) is presented and compared with the log-likelihood measure method. Experiments testify that TCM can achieve better performance. Since potential system users' native language is Mandarin which is regarded as a matrix language in our application, their pronunciations of English as the embedded language usually contain Mandarin accents. In order to deal with the matrix language accents in embedded language, different non-native adaptation approaches are investigated. Experiments show that model retraining method outperforms the other common adaptation methods such as Maximum A Posteriori (MAP). With the effective incorporation of approaches on phone clustering and non-native adaptation, the Phrase Error Rate (PER) of MESRS for English utterances was reduced by 24.47% relatively compared to the baseline monolingual English system while the PER on Mandarin utterances was

  17. Development of Speech Input/Output Interfaces for Tactical Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    Strieb was a consultant to the project. Ms . S. Joy Mountford of Honeywell SRC provided significant input to the development of the initial question...Uchange heading on Page 71 from references to - t bibliography. No change in distribution It ,,, r 1..... statement per Ms . Martha Kline, AFWAL/TST...1990-2000). The Near Term aircraft study focused on the F-16A cockpit as the baseline de- sign, but was projected through the F-16C ( MSIP ) configuration

  18. Development of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) test for hearing aid comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, R M; McDaniel, D M

    1989-06-01

    The Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test has been developed for use in clinical comparisons of hearing aid conditions. After listening to a short passage of connected speech, subjects generate a rating proportional to its intelligibility using an equal-appearing interval scale from 0 to 10. Before test passages are presented, the signal-to-babble ratio (SBR) is adjusted to a level that elicits intelligibility ratings of 7-8 for a "setup" passage. Then, with SBR held constant, three or more test passages are rated and the results averaged for each aided condition. This paper describes the generation of recorded test materials and their investigation using normally hearing listeners. Based on these data, a critical difference of about 2 scale intervals is recommended. A future paper will deal with results for hearing-impaired subjects.

  19. Follow-up of premature children with high risk for growth and development delay: a multiprofessional assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Freitas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the activities of a multiprofessional outpatient clinic performed by neonatologist, physiatrist, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist, audiologist and psychologist, who evaluated the development of premature newborns. Methods: Twenty children born at a tertiary-care hospital (São Paulo, Brazil, between April 2006 and April 2007, with birth weight below 1250 g or less than 32 weeks of gestation, were evaluated. The multiprofessional evaluation included assessment of development using the Bayley III scale, at the corrected age of 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Results: The mean gestation age at birth was 28.8 weeks; mean birth weight was 1055 g. The mean maternal age was 35 years and the mean length of stay of neonates was 46.3 days. Fifteen percent of children presented impaired sensory motor skills, 20% had hearing abnormalities and 10% motor alterations. Bayley III showed alterations in the communication area in 10% of subjects and in the motor area in 10% of individuals. The parents were oriented to stimulate the child or a specific intervention was suggested. The major development delay was observed between 6 and 18 months of age and the development was improved at 24 months of age. Conclusions: Most children evaluated had improved growth and development at 24 corrected-age months. Further studies with a larger sample are recommended, as well as the possibility to follow this population group up till the primary school.

  20. Towards the Development of a Mexican Speech-to-Sign-Language Translator for the Deaf Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Omar Caballero-Morales

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Una parte significativa de la población mexicana es sorda. Esta discapacidad restringe sus habilidades de interacción social con personas que no tienen dicha discapacidad y viceversa. En este artículo presentamos nuestros avances hacia el desarrollo de un traductor Voz-a-Lenguaje-de-Señas del español mexicano para asistir a personas sin discapacidad a interactuarcon personas sordas. La metodología de diseño propuesta considera limitados recursos para(1 el desarrollo del Reconocedor Automático del Habla (RAH mexicano, el cual es el módulo principal del traductor, y (2 el vocabulario del Lenguaje de Señas Mexicano (LSM disponible para representar las oraciones reconocidas. La traducción Voz-a-Lenguaje-de-Señas fue lograda con un nivel de precisión mayor al 97% para usuarios de prueba diferentes de aquellos seleccionados para el entrenamiento del RAH.A significant population of Mexican people are deaf. This disorder restricts their social interac-tion skills with people who don't have such disorder and viceversa. In this paper we presentour advances towards the development of a Mexican Speech-to-Sign-Language translator toassist normal people to interact with deaf people. The proposed design methodology considerslimited resources for (1 the development of the Mexican Automatic Speech Recogniser (ASRsystem, which is the main module in the translator, and (2 the Mexican Sign Language(MSL vocabulary available to represent the decoded speech. Speech-to-MSL translation wasaccomplished with an accuracy level over 97% for test speakers different from those selectedfor ASR training.

  1. Effect of Early Cognitive and Speech Intervention on Developmental Delay%早期认知语言康复训练对发育迟缓患儿各发育能区的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡继红; 周平秋; 郭春光; 刘丽君; 陈建树; 张惠佳

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨早期认知语言康复训练对发育迟缓患儿各项发育能区的影响。方法2014年6月~2015年6月住院和门诊治疗的发育迟缓患儿58例,根据诊疗情况分为观察组(n=32)和对照组(n=26)。观察组接受早期认知语言康复训练和常规康复,对照组仅接受常规康复。两组患儿在治疗前和治疗3个月后,分别采用Gesell发育量表进行评定。结果两组治疗后,大运动、精细动作、语言、个人-社交能区发育商均有显著改善(t>2.90, P2.84, P36.52, P2.90, P2.84, P36.52, P<0.01). Conclusion Early cognitive and speech intervention may improve development of many dimensions in children with developmental delay. The earlier the intervention, the better the outcome.

  2. Children with autism spectrum disorders who do not develop phrase speech in the preschool years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrelgen, Fritjof; Fernell, Elisabeth; Eriksson, Mats; Hedvall, Åsa; Persson, Clara; Sjölin, Maria; Gillberg, Christopher; Kjellmer, Liselotte

    2015-11-01

    There is uncertainty about the proportion of children with autism spectrum disorders who do not develop phrase speech during the preschool years. The main purpose of this study was to examine this ratio in a population-based community sample of children. The cohort consisted of 165 children (141 boys, 24 girls) with autism spectrum disorders aged 4-6 years followed longitudinally over 2 years during which time they had received intervention at a specialized autism center. In this study, data collected at the 2-year follow-up were used. Three categories of expressive language were defined: nonverbal, minimally verbal, and phrase speech. Data from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II were used to classify expressive language. A secondary objective of the study was to analyze factors that might be linked to verbal ability, namely, child age, cognitive level, autism subtype and severity of core autism symptoms, developmental regression, epilepsy or other medical conditions, and intensity of intervention. The proportion of children who met the criteria for nonverbal, minimally verbal, and phrase speech were 15%, 10%, and 75%, respectively. The single most important factor linked to expressive language was the child's cognitive level, and all children classified as being nonverbal or minimally verbal had intellectual disability. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Leaf development and photosynthetic properties of three tropical tree species with delayed greening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Z.Q.; Slot, M.; Fan, Z.X.

    2005-01-01

    Leaf developmental patterns were characterized for three tropical tree species with delayed greening. Changes in the pigment contents, photosynthetic capacity, stomata development, photosystem 2 efficiency, rate of energy dissipation, and the activity of partial protective enzymes were followed in d

  4. Learning to converse through dialogic speech acts. An approach to the development of interactional skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gesuato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to the development of oral interactional skills, field-tested with intermediate-level University students of English as a foreign language based on the provision of specific input and training. Its aim was to build a repertoire of communicative strategies and automatize conversa­tional behaviour in the production and reaction to speech acts (apologies, thanks, complaints, compliments, offers and requests. The approach shows how conversational skills can be developed by exposing learners to model interactions, guiding them in the analysis of dialogues’ formal-functional properties, and engaging them in activities motivating their autonomy.

  5. Attention and Word Learning in Autistic, Language Delayed and Typically Developing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eTenenbaum

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has demonstrated that patterns of social attention hold predictive value for language development in typically developing infants. The goal of this research was to explore how patterns of attention in autistic, language delayed, and typically developing children relate to early word learning and language abilities. We tracked patterns of eye movements to faces and objects while children watched videos of a woman teaching them a series of new words. Subsequent test trials measured participants’ recognition of these novel word-object pairings. Results indicated that greater attention to the speaker’s mouth was related to higher scores on standardized measures of language development for autistic and typically developing children (but not for language delayed children. This effect was mediated by age for typically developing, but not autistic children. When effects of age were controlled for, attention to the mouth among language delayed participants was negatively correlated with standardized measures of language learning. Attention to the speaker’s mouth and eyes while she was teaching the new words was also predictive of faster recognition of the newly learned words among autistic children. These results suggest that language delays among children with autism may be driven in part by aberrant social attention, and that the mechanisms underlying these delays may differ from those in language delayed participants without autism.

  6. Attention and word learning in autistic, language delayed and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Elena J; Amso, Dima; Abar, Beau; Sheinkopf, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that patterns of social attention hold predictive value for language development in typically developing infants. The goal of this research was to explore how patterns of attention in autistic, language delayed, and typically developing children relate to early word learning and language abilities. We tracked patterns of eye movements to faces and objects while children watched videos of a woman teaching them a series of new words. Subsequent test trials measured participants' recognition of these novel word-object pairings. Results indicated that greater attention to the speaker's mouth was related to higher scores on standardized measures of language development for autistic and typically developing children (but not for language delayed children). This effect was mediated by age for typically developing, but not autistic children. When effects of age were controlled for, attention to the mouth among language delayed participants was negatively correlated with standardized measures of language learning. Attention to the speaker's mouth and eyes while she was teaching the new words was also predictive of faster recognition of those words among autistic children. These results suggest that language delays among children with autism may be driven in part by aberrant social attention, and that the mechanisms underlying these delays may differ from those in language delayed participants without autism.

  7. Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role may also be filled by the team nurse.) What can parents do to help? Parents and ... provider to obtain the necessary information. Your school district is also obligated to evaluate and treat your ...

  8. Swahili Speech Development: Preliminary Normative Data from Typically Developing Pre-School Children in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangji, Nazneen; Pascoe, Michelle; Smouse, Mantoa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Swahili is widely spoken in East Africa, but to date there are no culturally and linguistically appropriate materials available for speech-language therapists working in the region. The challenges are further exacerbated by the limited research available on the typical acquisition of Swahili phonology. Aim: To describe the speech…

  9. Swahili Speech Development: Preliminary Normative Data from Typically Developing Pre-School Children in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangji, Nazneen; Pascoe, Michelle; Smouse, Mantoa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Swahili is widely spoken in East Africa, but to date there are no culturally and linguistically appropriate materials available for speech-language therapists working in the region. The challenges are further exacerbated by the limited research available on the typical acquisition of Swahili phonology. Aim: To describe the speech…

  10. Auditory Perception, Suprasegmental Speech Processing, and Vocabulary Development in Chinese Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan S; Chen, I-Chen; Chiang, Chun-Han; Lai, Ying-Hui; Tsao, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The current study examined the associations between basic auditory perception, speech prosodic processing, and vocabulary development in Chinese kindergartners, specifically, whether early basic auditory perception may be related to linguistic prosodic processing in Chinese Mandarin vocabulary acquisition. A series of language, auditory, and linguistic prosodic tests were given to 100 preschool children who had not yet learned how to read Chinese characters. The results suggested that lexical tone sensitivity and intonation production were significantly correlated with children's general vocabulary abilities. In particular, tone awareness was associated with comprehensive language development, whereas intonation production was associated with both comprehensive and expressive language development. Regression analyses revealed that tone sensitivity accounted for 36% of the unique variance in vocabulary development, whereas intonation production accounted for 6% of the variance in vocabulary development. Moreover, auditory frequency discrimination was significantly correlated with lexical tone sensitivity, syllable duration discrimination, and intonation production in Mandarin Chinese. Also it provided significant contributions to tone sensitivity and intonation production. Auditory frequency discrimination may indirectly affect early vocabulary development through Chinese speech prosody.

  11. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three sub-types of motor speech disorders.…

  12. Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Fourakis, Marios; Hall, Sheryl D.; Karlsson, Heather B.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; McSweeny, Jane L.; Potter, Nancy L.; Scheer-Cohen, Alison R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Tilkens, Christie M.; Wilson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three extensions to a classification system for paediatric speech sound disorders termed the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS). Part I describes a classification extension to the SDCS to differentiate motor speech disorders from speech delay and to differentiate among three sub-types of motor speech disorders.…

  13. COMMUNICATIVE ACTIVITY OF ADOLESCENTS WITH DIFFICULTIES OF THE SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENTS FROM MIGRANT FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Isaakyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of communicative activity of teenagers from migrant families are conditioned to increasing migration processes on the territory of Russia. The development of migration processes exacerbated the problem of children’s and adolescents’ adaptation in the environment of the other cultures. The conducting a series of socio-psychological research of characteristics of adolescents from migrant families has shown that the problem of social adaptation and integration in society of adolescents from migrant families with difficulties of speech and communicative development is considered to be the most difficult. Adolescence age is acutely flowing transition from childhood to adulthood, which are interwoven contradictory trends. For this difficult stage it is indicative as positive (self-growth, improving   the   social   relationships,   expanding   the scope  of activities and negative (disharmony in  the structure of personality, folding before-established system of interests, protester behavior manifestation. At this time, the appearance of those patterns of behavior that will affect the physical and mental health, all further public and private life is ending. For the formation of adolescent's personality an evaluation of the reference  group which  is a  school  team  is  very important. If a teenager has some difficulties in speech development, it will have problems in communication activities. This will entail not only the problems in the educational activity, but also in determining the status of the adolescent peer group. It is necessity to determine  the  success  level  of  the  communicative  and speech development of adolescents from migrant families for the making a training group and the subsequent remedial work. This may increase adapt and the socializing of adolescents from immigrant families.

  14. An investigation of the factors affecting flatfoot in children with delayed motor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun-Chung; Tung, Li-Chen; Tung, Chien-Hung; Yeh, Chih-Jung; Yang, Jeng-Feng; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of flatfoot in children with delayed motor development and the relevant factors affecting it. In total, 121 preschool-aged children aged 3-6 with delayed motor development (male: 81; female: 40) were enrolled in the motor-developmentally delayed children group, and 4 times that number, a total of 484 children (male: 324; female: 160), of gender- and age-matched normal developmental children were used as a control group for further analyses. The age was from 3.0 to 6.9 years old for the participants. The judgment criterion of flatfoot was the Chippaux-Smirak index >62.70%, in footprint measurement. The results showed that the prevalence of flatfoot in children with motor developmental delay was higher than that in normal developmental children, approximately 58.7%, and that it decreased with age from 62.8% of 3-year-olds to 50.0% of 6-year-olds. The results also showed that motor-developmentally delayed children with flatfoot are at about 1.5 times the risk of normal developmental children (odds ratio=1.511, p=0.005). In addition, the prevalence of flatfoot is relatively higher in overweight children with delayed motor development, and that in obese children is even as high as 95.8% (23/24). Children with both excessive joint laxity and delayed development are more likely to suffer from flatfoot. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for clinical workers to deal with foot issues in children with delayed motor development.

  15. Speech Perception and Short-Term Memory Deficits in Persistent Developmental Speech Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Mary Kay; Barac-Cikoja, Dragana; Finnegan, Kimberly; Jeffries, Neal; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2006-01-01

    Children with developmental speech disorders may have additional deficits in speech perception and/or short-term memory. To determine whether these are only transient developmental delays that can accompany the disorder in childhood or persist as part of the speech disorder, adults with a persistent familial speech disorder were tested on speech…

  16. [Development of early auditory and speech perception skills within one year after cochlear implantion in prelingual deaf children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ying; Chen, Yuan; Xi, Xin; Hong, Mengdi; Chen, Aiting; Wang, Qian; Wong, Lena

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the development of early auditory capability and speech perception in the prelingual deaf children after cochlear implantation, and to study the feasibility of currently available Chinese assessment instruments for the evaluation of early auditory skill and speech perception in hearing-impaired children. A total of 83 children with severe-to-profound prelingual hearing impairment participated in this study. Participants were divided into four groups according to the age for surgery: A (1-2 years), B (2-3 years), C (3-4 years) and D (4-5 years). The auditory skill and speech perception ability of CI children were evaluated by trained audiologists using the infant-toddler/meaningful auditory integration scale (IT-MAIS/MAIS) questionnaire, the Mandarin Early Speech Perception (MESP) test and the Mandarin Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (MPSI) test. The questionnaires were used in face to face interviews with the parents or guardians. Each child was assessed before the operation and 3 months, 6 months, 12 months after switch-on. After cochlear implantation, early postoperative auditory development and speech perception gradually improved. All MAIS/IT-MAIS scores showed a similar increasing trend with the rehabilitation duration (F=5.743, P=0.007). Preoperative and post operative MAIS/IT-MAIS scores of children in age group C (3-4 years) was higher than that of other groups. Children who had longer hearing aid experience before operation demonstrated higher MAIS/IT-MAIS scores than those with little or no hearing aid experience (F=4.947, P=0.000). The MESP test showed that, children were not able to perceive speech as well as detecting speech signals. However as the duration of CI use increased, speech perception ability also improved substantially. However, only about 40% of the subjects could be evaluated using the most difficult subtest on the MPSI in quiet at 12 months after switch-on. As MCR decreased, the proportion of children who could be tested

  17. Maximizing health literacy and client recall in a developing context: speech-language therapist and client perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wühlisch, Friderike Schmidt; Pascoe, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In the field of speech-language therapy, limited research has been conducted with regards to health literacy and client recall. However, speech-language therapists frequently provide a considerable amount of information for clients to understand, apply and review in order to manage their (or their child's) health. This study aimed to investigate (1) issues around clients' health literacy and recall of information; and (2) how these issues can be overcome in speech-language therapy in a developing context. An exploratory study was undertaken with specific focus on speech-language therapists and their clients who had previously received treatment for dysphagia, voice disorders (including laryngectomies), and cleft lip and/or palate management. They were recruited at public tertiary hospitals and primary healthcare clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Data were gathered through focus group discussions and qualitatively analysed using a content-driven immersion/crystallization style. Five themes and 13 subthemes were identified. Speech-language therapists currently use mostly low-technology strategies to manage issues of health literacy and client recall, and frequently view poor outcomes as being related to clients themselves and a lack of compliance. An understanding of context, intercultural health literacy and client-provider concordance are important factors that should inform the clinical practice of speech-language therapy. There is a need to develop effective strategies for information provision and review post-consultation. Speech-language therapists have an important mediating role in cross-cultural communication. © 2011 Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.

  18. Development of delayed hydride cracking resistant-pressure tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, S. S.; Yim, K. S

    2000-10-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate that the pattern of nucleation and growth of a DHC crack is governed by the precipitation of hydrides so that the DHC velocity and K{sub IH} are determined by an angle of the cracking plane and the hydride habit plane 10.7. Since texture controls the distribution of the 10.7 habit plane in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube, we draw a conclusion that a textural change in Zr-2.5Nb tube from a strong tangential texture to the radial texture shall increase the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub IH}, and decrease the delayed hydride cracking velocity. This conclusion is also verified by a complimentary experiment showing a linear dependence of DHCV and K{sub IH} with an increase in the basal component in the cracking plane. On the basis of the study on the DHC mechanism and the effect of manufacturing processes on the properties of Zr-2.5Nb tube, we have established a manufacturing procedure to make pressure tubes with improved DHC resistance. The main features of the established manufacturing process consist in the two step-cold pilgering process and the intermediate heat treatment in the {alpha} + {beta} phase for Zr-2.5Nb alloy and in the {alpha} phase for Zr-1Nb-1.2Sn-0.4Fe alloy. The manufacturing of DHC resistant-pressure tubes of Zr-2.5Nb and Zr-1N-1.2Sn-0.4Fe was made in the ChMP zirconium plant in Russia under a joint research with Drs. Nikulina and Markelov in VNIINM (Russia). Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube made with the established manufacturing process has met all the specification requirements put by KAERI. Chracterization tests have been jointly conducted by VNIINM and KAERI. As expected, the Zr-2.5Nb tube made with the established procedure has improved DHC resistance compared to that of CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube used currently. The measured DHC velocity of the Zr-2.5Nb tube meets the target value (DHCV <5x10{sup -8} m/s) and its other properties also were equivalent to those of the CANDU Zr-2.5Nb tube used currently. The Zr-1Nb-1

  19. Low testosterone correlates with delayed development in male orangutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Emery Thompson

    Full Text Available Male orangutans (Pongo spp. display an unusual characteristic for mammals in that some adult males advance quickly to full secondary sexual development while others can remain in an adolescent-like form for a decade or more past the age of sexual maturity. Remarkably little is understood about how and why differences in developmental timing occur. While fully-developed males are known to produce higher androgen levels than arrested males, the longer-term role of steroid hormones in male life history variation has not been examined. We examined variation in testosterone and cortisol production among 18 fully-developed ("flanged" male orangutans in U.S. captive facilities. Our study revealed that while testosterone levels did not vary significantly according to current age, housing condition, and species origin, males that had undergone precocious development had higher testosterone levels than males that had experienced developmental arrest. While androgen variation had previously been viewed as a state-dependent characteristic of male developmental status, our study reveals that differences in the physiology of early and late developing males are detectable long past the developmental transition and may instead be trait-level characteristics associated with a male's life history strategy. Further studies are needed to determine how early in life differences in testosterone levels emerge and what consequences this variation may have for male behavioral strategies.

  20. Individual development of preschool children-prevalences and determinants of delays in Germany: a cross-sectional study in Southern Bavaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stich Heribert L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even minor abnormalities of early child development may have dramatic long term consequences. Accurate prevalence rates for a range of developmental impairments have been difficult to establish. Since related studies have used different methodological approaches, direct comparisons of the prevalence of developmental delays are difficult. The understanding of the key factors affecting child development, especially in preschool aged children remains limited. We used data from school entry examinations in Bavaria to measure the prevalence of developmental impairments in pre-school children beginning primary school in 1997–2009. Methods The developmental impairments of all school beginners in the district of Dingolfing- Landau, Bavaria were assessed using modified “Bavarian School Entry Model” examination from 1997 to 2009 (N=13,182. The children were assessed for motor, cognitive, language and psychosocial impairments using a standardised medical protocol. Prevalence rates of impairments in twelve domains of development were estimated. Using uni- and multivariable logistic regression models, association between selected factors and development delays were assessed. Results The highest prevalence existed for impairments of pronunciation (13.8% followed by fine motor impairments (12.2%, and impairments of memory and concentration (11.3% and the lowest for impairments of rhythm of speech (3.1%. Younger children displayed more developmental delays. Male gender was strongly associated with all developmental impairments (highest risk for fine motor impairments = OR 3.22, 95% confidence interval 2.86-3.63. Preschool children with siblings (vs. children without any siblings were at higher risk of having impairments in pronunciation (OR 1.31, 1.14-1.50. The influence of the non-German nationality was strong, with a maximum risk increase for the subareas of grammar and psychosocial development. Although children with non

  1. Individual development of preschool children-prevalences and determinants of delays in Germany: a cross-sectional study in Southern Bavaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Heribert L; Baune, Bernhard Th; Caniato, Riccardo N; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Krämer, Alexander

    2012-12-05

    Even minor abnormalities of early child development may have dramatic long term consequences. Accurate prevalence rates for a range of developmental impairments have been difficult to establish. Since related studies have used different methodological approaches, direct comparisons of the prevalence of developmental delays are difficult. The understanding of the key factors affecting child development, especially in preschool aged children remains limited. We used data from school entry examinations in Bavaria to measure the prevalence of developmental impairments in pre-school children beginning primary school in 1997-2009. The developmental impairments of all school beginners in the district of Dingolfing-Landau, Bavaria were assessed using modified "Bavarian School Entry Model" examination from 1997 to 2009 (N=13,182). The children were assessed for motor, cognitive, language and psychosocial impairments using a standardised medical protocol. Prevalence rates of impairments in twelve domains of development were estimated. Using uni- and multivariable logistic regression models, association between selected factors and development delays were assessed. The highest prevalence existed for impairments of pronunciation (13.8%) followed by fine motor impairments (12.2%), and impairments of memory and concentration (11.3%) and the lowest for impairments of rhythm of speech (3.1%). Younger children displayed more developmental delays. Male gender was strongly associated with all developmental impairments (highest risk for fine motor impairments = OR 3.22, 95% confidence interval 2.86-3.63). Preschool children with siblings (vs. children without any siblings) were at higher risk of having impairments in pronunciation (OR 1.31, 1.14-1.50). The influence of the non-German nationality was strong, with a maximum risk increase for the subareas of grammar and psychosocial development. Although children with non-German nationality had a reduced risk of disorders for the rhythm

  2. Maternal Functional Speech to Children: A Comparison of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, P.; de Falco, S.; Esposito, G.; Zaninelli, M.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2012-01-01

    Children with developmental disabilities benefit from their language environment as much as, or even more than, typically developing (TD) children, but maternal language directed to developmentally delayed children is an underinvestigated topic. The purposes of the present study were to compare maternal functional language directed to children…

  3. Development and validation of the Speech Reception in Noise (SPRINT) Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungart, Douglas S; Walden, Brian; Cord, Mary; Phatak, Sandeep; Theodoroff, Sarah M; Griest, Susan; Grant, Ken W

    2017-01-20

    Since 1992, the Speech Recognition in Noise Test, or SPRINT, has been the standard speech-in-noise test for assessing auditory fitness-for-duty of US Army Soldiers with hearing loss. The original SPRINT test consisted of 200 monosyllabic words presented at a Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of +9 dB in the presence of a six-talker babble noise. Normative data for the test was collected on 319 hearing impaired Soldiers, and a procedure for making recommendations about the disposition of military personnel on the basis of their SPRINT score and their years of experience was developed and implemented as part of US Army policy. In 2013, a new 100-word version of the test was developed that eliminated words that were either too easy or too hard to make meaningful distinctions among hearing impaired listeners. This paper describes the development of the original 200-word SPRINT test, along with a description of the procedure used to reduce the 200-word test to 100 words and the results of a validation study conducted to evaluate how well the shortened 100-word test is able to capture the results from the full 200-word version of the SPRINT.

  4. Study of accent-based music speech protocol development for improving voice problems in stroke patients with mixed dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ji; Jo, Uiri

    2013-01-01

    Based on the anatomical and functional commonality between singing and speech, various types of musical elements have been employed in music therapy research for speech rehabilitation. This study was to develop an accent-based music speech protocol to address voice problems of stroke patients with mixed dysarthria. Subjects were 6 stroke patients with mixed dysarthria and they received individual music therapy sessions. Each session was conducted for 30 minutes and 12 sessions including pre- and post-test were administered for each patient. For examining the protocol efficacy, the measures of maximum phonation time (MPT), fundamental frequency (F0), average intensity (dB), jitter, shimmer, noise to harmonics ratio (NHR), and diadochokinesis (DDK) were compared between pre and post-test and analyzed with a paired sample t-test. The results showed that the measures of MPT, F0, dB, and sequential motion rates (SMR) were significantly increased after administering the protocol. Also, there were statistically significant differences in the measures of shimmer, and alternating motion rates (AMR) of the syllable /K$\\inve$/ between pre- and post-test. The results indicated that the accent-based music speech protocol may improve speech motor coordination including respiration, phonation, articulation, resonance, and prosody of patients with dysarthria. This suggests the possibility of utilizing the music speech protocol to maximize immediate treatment effects in the course of a long-term treatment for patients with dysarthria.

  5. Formulation, Development and Evaluation of delayed release capsules of Duloxetine Hydrochloride made of different Enteric Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Yerramsetty

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Delayed release systems have acquired a centre stage in the arena of pharmaceutical research and development. The present study involves formulation and evaluation of Duloxetine Hydrochloride delayed release capsules. Duloxetine Hydrochloride is an acid labile drug. It degrades in the acidic environment of the stomach thus leading to therapeutic inefficacy. Therefore it is necessary to bypass the acidic pH of the stomach which can be achieved by formulating delayed release dosage form by using different enteric polymers. Protection of drug from acidic environment is done by coating the drug with enteric polymers by using suspension layering technique in Fluidized bed processor (FBP with different enteric polymers like HPMCAS (Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose Acetate Succinate, Acryl EZE and HPMCP (Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose phthalate.The formulation (E12 of delayed release capsules of Duloxetine Hydrochloride containing HPMCP (HP-55: HP- 50 as enteric polymer can be taken as optimized

  6. Development of cross-linguistic variation in speech and gesture: motion events in English and Turkish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyürek, Asli; Kita, Sotaro; Allen, Shanley; Brown, Amanda; Furman, Reyhan; Ishizuka, Tomoka

    2008-07-01

    The way adults express manner and path components of a motion event varies across typologically different languages both in speech and cospeech gestures, showing that language specificity in event encoding influences gesture. The authors tracked when and how this multimodal cross-linguistic variation develops in children learning Turkish and English, 2 typologically distinct languages. They found that children learn to speak in language-specific ways from age 3 onward (i.e., English speakers used 1 clause and Turkish speakers used 2 clauses to express manner and path). In contrast, English- and Turkish-speaking children's gestures looked similar at ages 3 and 5 (i.e., separate gestures for manner and path), differing from each other only at age 9 and in adulthood (i.e., English speakers used 1 gesture, but Turkish speakers used separate gestures for manner and path). The authors argue that this pattern of the development of cospeech gestures reflects a gradual shift to language-specific representations during speaking and shows that looking at speech alone may not be sufficient to understand the full process of language acquisition.

  7. Storytelling as an approach to evaluate the child's level of speech development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Both in developmental psychology and in linguistics, the child's storytelling is an interesting topic of research from the point of view of evaluating the child's level of speech development, especially of its pragmatic component, and from the point of view of teaching and learning in the preschool period. In the present study, children's storytelling in different situational contexts was analyzed and evaluated: with a picture book without any text, after listening to a text from a picture book, and after a suggested story beginning (ie., with the introductory sentence given to them. The sample included children of three age groups, approximately 4, 6 and 8 years; each age group had approximately the same numbers of boys and girls. A total of over 300 stories were collected, which were subsequently analyzed and evaluated using a set of story developmental level criteria. Two key criteria were used: story coherence and cohesion. Comparisons by age and gender, as well as by context of storytelling, show significant developmental differences in story content and structure for different age groups, and the important role of storytelling context. Differences in storytelling between boys and girls did not prove statistically significant. The findings also suggest new options and approaches for further stimulations of speech development within preschool and primary school curricula might be considered.

  8. Sperry Univac speech communications technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medress, Mark F.

    1977-01-01

    Technology and systems for effective verbal communication with computers were developed. A continuous speech recognition system for verbal input, a word spotting system to locate key words in conversational speech, prosodic tools to aid speech analysis, and a prerecorded voice response system for speech output are described.

  9. ASSESSMENT OF IMPROVEMENT IN SPEECH PERCEPTION AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN COCHLEAR IMPLANT SURGERY : AN INTERESTING STUDY FROM A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe to profound prelingual deafness that is either congenital or acquired is estimated to occur in 0.5 to 3 per 1000 live births. This is often associated with early delays in language development, speech perception, socialization and results in lower academic achievement. These de velopmental and behavioral problems are severe as 90 % of children are born to normal patients whereas with deaf parents it is less as they have a mutual communication. After much research in this field the first 22 channel cochlear implant surgery was don e in 1982. The number of prelingually deafened adults seeking cochlear implant is increasing as these individuals can derive substantial benefit, although their performance is poorer than adults with post - lingual deafness. MATERIAL AND METHODS : The present prospective study was conducted in the Department of ENT, Pt. J.N.M. Medical College and Dr. B. R.A.M. Hospital, Raipur (C.G. The subject selected were prelingually deafened individuals who were undergoing post cochlear implant speech therapy in the Depar tment. This study included individuals, who underwent cochlear implant surgery in this Department during the period of July, 2008 to September, 2010 and the age was within 10 years at the time of surgery. The study was designed as a prospective longitudina l analysis to asses functioning of patients, who underwent cochlear implantation. A total 37 cochlear implant surgeries were carried out in Department. Of these 3 cases were outside the age criteria of the present study and another 2 cases were lost in fol low up. Pre - operatively, detailed information of subject including the age, sex and address as well as contact number was collected. Then a General Examination was followed with reference to Built, Nutrition, Pulse, and Blood pressure, Oedema, Cyanosis, Cl ubbing and Citrus. A systemic examination was also performed. A Local Examination with special emphasis to tympanic membrane and any middle ear

  10. Speech and language development after cochlear implantation in children with bony labyrinth malformations: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catli, Tolgahan; Uckan, Burcu; Olgun, Levent

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate speech and language development after long-term cochlear implantation in children with bony labyrinth malformations (BLMs) and to present the surgical findings in this group of patients. The auditory and linguistic skills of 21 children who had BLM were assessed in this study. They were implanted between 1998 and 2009. Twenty-two sex-matched and age-matched implantees without BLM were evaluated as the control group. To compare speech perception and speech intelligibility between the groups, the categories of auditory performance (CAP) test and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) test, respectively, were administered. The Turkish version of the Test of Early Language Development (TELD-3-T) was administered to evaluate and compare the linguistic skills of the groups. Surgical findings and complications were also analyzed. Implanted anomalies were common cavity in five patients, incomplete partition type 1 in 5 patients, and incomplete partition type 2 in 11 patients. The CAP and SIR scores were significantly higher in the control group (p 0.05). Based on the specific type of malformation, the CAP and SIR scores were comparable between the subgroups (p > 0.05). No perioperative complications occurred in the control group. However, various perioperative complications (gusher, etc.) and surgical difficulty occurred in the anomaly group. The malformation group had unsatisfactory results with regard to speech perception skills; however, this group and the non-anomalous group exhibited comparable long-term results on linguistic development.

  11. Preschool educators’ attitudes of the preventive speech therapy programme in nursery schools as a model of stimulating environment for developing language competence capacities

    OpenAIRE

    Vidmar, Alenka

    2016-01-01

    The Masters Thesis presents an innovative concept of a preventive speech therapy programme (PSP). A model of creating an encouraging environment that supports language development of kindergarten children, the PSP provides a range of possibilities for the speech therapist to carry out his/her mission. Unique in the Republic of Slovenia, the model opens new possibilities to further develop interdisciplinary teamwork between the speech therapist and teachers in a kindergarten setting. The th...

  12. A Mobile Phone based Speech Therapist

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Vinod K.; Pande, Arun; Kopparapu, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with articulatory disorders often have difficulty in speaking. These patients need several speech therapy sessions to enable them speak normally. These therapy sessions are conducted by a specialized speech therapist. The goal of speech therapy is to develop good speech habits as well as to teach how to articulate sounds the right way. Speech therapy is critical for continuous improvement to regain normal speech. Speech therapy sessions require a patient to travel to a hospital or a ...

  13. The Co-Emergence of Cognition, Language, and Speech Motor Control in Early Development: A Longitudinal Correlation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nip, Ignatius S. B.; Green, Jordan R.; Marx, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although the development of spoken language is dependent on the emergence of cognitive, language, and speech motor skills, knowledge about how these domains interact during the early stages of communication development is currently limited. This exploratory investigation examines the strength of associations between longitudinal changes in…

  14. The Co-Emergence of Cognition, Language, and Speech Motor Control in Early Development: A Longitudinal Correlation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nip, Ignatius S. B.; Green, Jordan R.; Marx, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Although the development of spoken language is dependent on the emergence of cognitive, language, and speech motor skills, knowledge about how these domains interact during the early stages of communication development is currently limited. This exploratory investigation examines the strength of associations between longitudinal changes in…

  15. Talk in Blended-Space Speech Communities: An Exploration of Discursive Practices of a Professional Development Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Tabitha Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study is an exploration of alternative teacher professional development. While using symbolic interactionism for a research lens, it characterizes the discursive practices commonly found in formal, informal, and blended-space speech communities based on the talk within a leadership-development program comprised of five female, church-based…

  16. Public Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of public speech in society, noting the power of public speech to create a world and a public. The paper offers a theory of public speech, identifies types of public speech, and types of public speech fallacies. Two ways of speaking of the public and of public life are distinguished. (SM)

  17. Monitoring Progress in Vocal Development in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients: Relationships between Speech Samples and Scores from the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J.; Jung, Jongmin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the concurrent validity of the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP; Ertmer & Stoel-Gammon, 2008) and data obtained from speech samples recorded at the same intervals. Method: Nineteen children who are deaf who received cochlear implants before their 3rd birthdays participated in the study. Speech samples and…

  18. Incorporating Speech Synthesis in the Development of a Mobile Platform for E-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roux, Justus; Scholtz, Pieter; Klop, Daleen

    2010-01-01

    infrastructures. Aspects of the mobile platform development are described paying attention to basic functionalities of the user interface, as well as to the underlying web technologies involved. Some of the main features of the literacy training module are described, such as grapheme-sound, correspondence......This presentation and accompanying demonstration focuses on the development of a mobile platform for e-learning purposes with enhanced text-to-speech capabilities. It reports on an international consortium project entitled Mobile E-learning for Africa (MELFA), which includes a reading and literacy...... training component, particularly focusing on an African language, isiXhosa. The high penetration rate of mobile phones within the African continent has created new opportunities for delivering various kinds of information, including e-learning material to communities that have not had appropriate...

  19. Speech processing in mobile environments

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on speech processing in the presence of low-bit rate coding and varying background environments. The methods presented in the book exploit the speech events which are robust in noisy environments. Accurate estimation of these crucial events will be useful for carrying out various speech tasks such as speech recognition, speaker recognition and speech rate modification in mobile environments. The authors provide insights into designing and developing robust methods to process the speech in mobile environments. Covering temporal and spectral enhancement methods to minimize the effect of noise and examining methods and models on speech and speaker recognition applications in mobile environments.

  20. The Development of Co-Speech Gesture and Its Semantic Integration with Speech in 6- to 12-Year-Old Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Wing-Chee; Wong, Miranda Kit-Yi; Lui, Ming; Yip, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Previous work leaves open the question of whether children with autism spectrum disorders aged 6-12?years have delay in producing gestures compared to their typically developing peers. This study examined gestural production among school-aged children in a naturalistic context and how their gestures are semantically related to the accompanying…

  1. Radiographic study of delayed tooth development in patients with dental agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mealin, Erika V; Parekh, Susan; Jones, Steven P; Moles, David R; Gill, Daljit S

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the radiographic development of permanent teeth in a group of children affected by dental agenesis with an unaffected control group and to determine the effects of confounding factors including the severity of the dental agenesis, age, sex, ethnicity, and the number of stages used to estimate dental age. A single-center retrospective cross-sectional study of dental panoramic tomographs was undertaken between July 2007 and April 2008 in a postgraduate teaching school. A total of 139 patients (aged 9-18 years) were recruited from the orthodontic clinic on the basis of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria to either a dental agenesis group or a control group. Dental panoramic tomograms were assessed, and the stages of development of the permanent teeth in the left maxillary and left mandibular regions were scored by using the 12 stages of Haavikko and the 8 stages of Demirjian and Goldstein. For each tooth scored, the mean dental age and standard error were determined by using the dental age assessment method, and an estimated dental age for each subject was derived by using the weighted average method. A statistically significant delay in dental age was found in the patients with dental agenesis compared with the control group. The dental age assessment method of Haavikko showed a delay of 1.20 years (SD, 1.74), and the method of Demirjian and Goldstein showed a delay of 1.64 years (SD, 1.75). It was also observed that older patients with dental agenesis had greater delays in tooth formation (P tooth, the dental age was delayed by 0.13 year (lower confidence interval, -0.22; upper confidence interval, 0.35). There was no evidence that sex or ethnicity has an effect on the delay in dental age in patients with dental agenesis. The development of permanent teeth in children with dental agenesis is delayed when compared with a matched control group. The severity of dental agenesis affected the magnitude of the delay (P <0

  2. Speech in spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalling, Ellika; Hartelius, Lena

    2013-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias clinically characterized by progressive ataxia, dysarthria and a range of other concomitant neurological symptoms. Only a few studies include detailed characterization of speech symptoms in SCA. Speech symptoms in SCA resemble ataxic dysarthria but symptoms related to phonation may be more prominent. One study to date has shown an association between differences in speech and voice symptoms related to genotype. More studies of speech and voice phenotypes are motivated, to possibly aid in clinical diagnosis. In addition, instrumental speech analysis has been demonstrated to be a reliable measure that may be used to monitor disease progression or therapy outcomes in possible future pharmacological treatments. Intervention by speech and language pathologists should go beyond assessment. Clinical guidelines for management of speech, communication and swallowing need to be developed for individuals with progressive cerebellar ataxia.

  3. Understanding, identifying and supporting speech, language and communication needs in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Shona

    2013-12-01

    Communication is a fundamental life skill and acts as the foundation on which many other areas of development are based. Any child who is not developing their speech, language and communication skills in the expected way is considered to have speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). These range from children with delayed speech and language development, whose difficulties will resolve with the correct intervention, to children with long term, persistent difficulties in one or more areas of their speech, language and communication development. Speech, language and communication is a skill central to other areas of development, meaning the impacts of SLCN can be significant. These impacts can be minimised by ensuring early identification and support for those children and young people who are presenting with SLCN.

  4. Speech Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your treatment plan may include seeing a speech therapist , a person who is trained to treat speech disorders. How often you have to see the speech therapist will vary — you'll probably start out seeing ...

  5. Development of a serial order in speech constrained by articulatory coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hama; Taga, Gentaro

    2013-01-01

    Universal linguistic constraints seem to govern the organization of sound sequences in words. However, our understanding of the origin and development of these constraints is incomplete. One possibility is that the development of neuromuscular control of articulators acts as a constraint for the emergence of sequences in words. Repetitions of the same consonant observed in early infancy and an increase in variation of consonantal sequences over months of age have been interpreted as a consequence of the development of neuromuscular control. Yet, it is not clear how sequential coordination of articulators such as lips, tongue apex and tongue dorsum constrains sequences of labial, coronal and dorsal consonants in words over the course of development. We examined longitudinal development of consonant-vowel-consonant(-vowel) sequences produced by Japanese children between 7 and 60 months of age. The sequences were classified according to places of articulation for corresponding consonants. The analyses of individual and group data show that infants prefer repetitive and fronting articulations, as shown in previous studies. Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops. In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends. These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

  6. Development of a serial order in speech constrained by articulatory coordination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Oohashi

    Full Text Available Universal linguistic constraints seem to govern the organization of sound sequences in words. However, our understanding of the origin and development of these constraints is incomplete. One possibility is that the development of neuromuscular control of articulators acts as a constraint for the emergence of sequences in words. Repetitions of the same consonant observed in early infancy and an increase in variation of consonantal sequences over months of age have been interpreted as a consequence of the development of neuromuscular control. Yet, it is not clear how sequential coordination of articulators such as lips, tongue apex and tongue dorsum constrains sequences of labial, coronal and dorsal consonants in words over the course of development. We examined longitudinal development of consonant-vowel-consonant(-vowel sequences produced by Japanese children between 7 and 60 months of age. The sequences were classified according to places of articulation for corresponding consonants. The analyses of individual and group data show that infants prefer repetitive and fronting articulations, as shown in previous studies. Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops. In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends. These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

  7. Efficacy of speech therapy in children with language disorders : specific language impairment compared with language impairment in comorbidity with cognitive delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorhuis-Brouwer, SM; Knijff, WA

    2002-01-01

    Objective: this article discusses the effect of speech therapy on language comprehension, language production and non-verbal functioning in two groups of children with developmental language disorders. Design: retrospective study-a follow-up after a mean of 2 years, Materials and methods: verbal and

  8. Efficacy of speech therapy in children with language disorders : specific language impairment compared with language impairment in comorbidity with cognitive delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goorhuis-Brouwer, SM; Knijff, WA

    2002-01-01

    Objective: this article discusses the effect of speech therapy on language comprehension, language production and non-verbal functioning in two groups of children with developmental language disorders. Design: retrospective study-a follow-up after a mean of 2 years, Materials and methods: verbal and

  9. Attention and word learning in autistic, language delayed and typically developing children

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbaum, Elena J.; Amso, Dima; Abar, Beau; Sheinkopf, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that patterns of social attention hold predictive value for language development in typically developing infants. The goal of this research was to explore how patterns of attention in autistic, language delayed, and typically developing children relate to early word learning and language abilities. We tracked patterns of eye movements to faces and objects while children watched videos of a woman teaching them a series of new words. Subsequent test trials measure...

  10. Early Lexical Expression in Typically Developing Maltese Children: Implications for the Identification of Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Daniela; Grech, Helen; Dodd, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Limited word production may be the first indicator of impaired language development. The unavailability of normative data and standardized assessments for young Maltese children hinders the identification of early language delays. This study aimed to document Maltese children's expressive vocabulary growth and accompanying range of variation, to…

  11. Daytime Sleep Patterns in Preschool Children with Autism, Developmental Delay, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, A. J.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Tang, Karen; Anders, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined daytime sleep patterns in 3 groups of preschool-aged children: children with autism, children with developmental delay, and children who were developing typically. Sleep was assessed in 194 children via actigraphy and parent-report sleep diaries for 7 consecutive days on 3 separate occasions over 6 months. Children with…

  12. Sleep Patterns in Preschool-Age Children with Autism, Developmental Delay, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodlin-Jones, Beth L.; Tang, Karen; Liu, Jingyi; Anders, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates sleep disorders by assessing the quantity and quality of sleep in preschool children with autism and comparing them with developmental delay without autism, and typical development. The results prove that sleep patterns are different in preschool children across all three categories.

  13. Delayed umbilical cord clamping for reducing anaemia in low birthweight infants : implications for developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Gruschke, Sebastian; Brabin, Bernard J.

    BACKGROUND: Cheap and effective interventions are needed to reduce the risk of infant anaemia in developing countries. Delayed cord clamping (DCC) has been shown to be a simple, safe and cost-free delivery procedure that augments red cell mass in appropriate-for-gestational-age term and preterm

  14. Frontostriatal white matter integrity predicts development of delay of gratification : A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, Michelle; Peper, Jiska S.; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Mandl, René C W; Crone, Eveline A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification increases considerably across development. Here, we test the hypothesis that this impulse control capacity is driven by increased maturation of frontostriatal circuitry using a fiber-tracking approach combined with longitudinal imaging. In total, 192 healthy volunt

  15. Early Lexical Expression in Typically Developing Maltese Children: Implications for the Identification of Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Daniela; Grech, Helen; Dodd, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Limited word production may be the first indicator of impaired language development. The unavailability of normative data and standardized assessments for young Maltese children hinders the identification of early language delays. This study aimed to document Maltese children's expressive vocabulary growth and accompanying range of variation, to…

  16. Home-based Early Intervention on Auditory and Speech Development in Mandarin-speaking Deaf Infants and Toddlers with Chronological Aged 7–24 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The data suggested the early hearing intervention and home-based habilitation benefit auditory and speech development. Chronological age and recovery time may be major factors for aural verbal outcomes in hearing impaired children. The development of auditory and speech in hearing impaired children may be relatively crucial in thefirst year's habilitation after fitted with the auxiliary device.

  17. The use of simulated clients to develop the clinical skills of speech and language therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syder, D

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports the pilot of a new technique for the development of students' clinical skills. A bank of simulated clients was used in the teaching of generic clinical skills to two groups of speech and language therapy students. The method for the training of actors and running of sessions is described in detail by use of both group and individual formats. The intervention was used with three groups of students at different points in a 2-year Masters degree course. Questionnaires to students evaluate the technique and the timing of its use in the course. It is concluded that this new type of clinical teaching is a valid and much-needed supplement to traditional individual National Health Service (NHS) placements.

  18. Sociocultural Influences on the Development of Verbal Mediation: Private Speech and Phonological Recoding in Saudi Arabian and British Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Namlah, Abdulrahman S.; Fernyhough, Charles; Meins, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Cross-national stability in private speech (PS) and short-term memory was investigated in Saudi Arabian (n=63) and British (n=58) 4- to 8-year-olds. Assumed differences in child-adult interaction between the 2 nationality groups led to predictions of Gender ? Nationality interactions in the development of verbal mediation. British boys used more…

  19. The effects of infant orthopaedics on speech and language development in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, Emmy Maria

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation into the effects of infant orthopaedics (IO) on speech and language development in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). The study was performed within the framework of the three-centre prospective randomised clinical trial 'Dutchcleft'. Two gro

  20. Computer-Mediated Input, Output and Feedback in the Development of L2 Word Recognition from Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Joshua; Cheng, Junyu; O'Toole, John Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the impact of computer-mediated input, output and feedback on the development of second language (L2) word recognition from speech (WRS). A quasi-experimental pre-test/treatment/post-test research design was used involving three intact tertiary level English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Classes were either assigned to…

  1. Computer-Mediated Input, Output and Feedback in the Development of L2 Word Recognition from Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Joshua; Cheng, Junyu; O'Toole, John Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the impact of computer-mediated input, output and feedback on the development of second language (L2) word recognition from speech (WRS). A quasi-experimental pre-test/treatment/post-test research design was used involving three intact tertiary level English as a Second Language (ESL) classes. Classes were either assigned to…

  2. Computer-Based Rehabilitation for Developing Speech and Language in Hearing-Impaired Children: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrea; El-Refaie, Amr; Stephenson, Caitlin; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe; Deng, Dennis; Erickson, Shane; Tay, David; Morris, Meg E.; Doube, Wendy; Caelli, Terry

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to examine whether online or computer-based technologies were effective in assisting the development of speech and language skills in children with hearing loss. Relevant studies of children with hearing loss were analysed with reference to (1) therapy outcomes, (2) factors affecting outcomes, and (3)…

  3. Co-Working: Parents' Conception of Roles in Supporting Their Children's Speech and Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Karen E.; Marshall, Julie; Brown, Laura J. E.; Goldbart, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    Speech and language therapists' (SLTs) roles include enabling parents to provide intervention. We know little about how parents understand their role during speech and language intervention or whether these change during involvement with SLTs. The theory of conceptual change, applied to parents as adult learners, is used as a framework for…

  4. Dual silent communication system development based on subvocal speech and Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Daniel Ramírez-Corzo

    2016-09-01

    Additionally, in this article we show the speech subvocal signals’ recording system realization. The average accuracy percentage was 72.5 %, and includes a total of 50 words by class, this is 200 signals. Finally, it demonstrated that using the Raspberry Pi it is possible to set a silent communication system, using subvocal. speech signals.

  5. The Long Road to Automation: Neurocognitive Development of Letter-Speech Sound Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Dries J. W.; Bonte, Milene L.; van Atteveldt, Nienke; Blomert, Leo

    2009-01-01

    In transparent alphabetic languages, the expected standard for complete acquisition of letter-speech sound associations is within one year of reading instruction. The neural mechanisms underlying the acquisition of letter-speech sound associations have, however, hardly been investigated. The present article describes an ERP study with beginner and…

  6. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  7. Huntington's Disease: Speech, Language and Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Society of America Huntington's Disease Youth Organization Movement Disorder Society National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Typical Speech and Language Development Learning More Than One Language Adult Speech and Language Child Speech and Language Swallowing ...

  8. Beginning to talk like an adult: increases in speech-like utterances in young cochlear implant recipients and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J; Jung, Jongmin; Kloiber, Diana True

    2013-11-01

    Speech-like utterances containing rapidly combined consonants and vowels eventually dominate the prelinguistic and early word productions of typically developing (TD) toddlers. It seems reasonable to expect a similar phenomenon in young recipients of cochlear implants (CIs). The authors of this study sought to determine the number of months of robust hearing experience needed to achieve a majority of speech-like utterances in both of these groups. Speech samples were recorded from CI recipients at 3-month intervals during the first 2 years of CI experience, and from TD children at time points between 6 and 24 months of age. Speech-like utterances were operationally defined as those belonging to the basic canonical syllables (BCS) or advanced forms (AF) levels of the Consolidated Stark Assessment of Early Vocal Development-Revised ( Ertmer, Young, & Nathani, 2007). On average, the CI group achieved a majority of speech-like utterances after 12 months of robust hearing experience and the TD group after 18 months. The CI group produced greater percentages of speech-like utterances at each interval until 24 months, when both groups approximated 80%. Auditory deprivation did not limit progress in vocal development as young CI recipients showed more-rapid-than-typical speech development during the first 2 years of device use. Implications for the infraphonological model of speech development are considered.

  9. Indirect Speech Acts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李威

    2001-01-01

    Indirect speech acts are frequently used in verbal communication, the interpretation of them is of great importance in order to meet the demands of the development of students' communicative competence. This paper, therefore, intends to present Searle' s indirect speech acts and explore the way how indirect speech acts are interpreted in accordance with two influential theories. It consists of four parts. Part one gives a general introduction to the notion of speech acts theory. Part two makes an elaboration upon the conception of indirect speech act theory proposed by Searle and his supplement and development of illocutionary acts. Part three deals with the interpretation of indirect speech acts. Part four draws implication from the previous study and also serves as the conclusion of the dissertation.

  10. A Networking of Community-Based Speech Therapy: Borabue District, Maha Sarakham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumnum, Tawitree; Kum-ud, Weawta; Prathanee, Benjamas

    2015-08-01

    Most children with cleft lip and palate have articulation problems because of compensatory articulation disorders from velopharyngeal insufficiency. Theoretically, children should receive speech therapy from a speech and language pathologist (SLP) 1-2 sessions per week. For developing countries, particularly Thailand, most of them cannot reach standard speech services because of limitation of speech services and SLP Networking of a Community-Based Speech Model might be an appropriate way to solve this problem. To study the effectiveness of a networking of Khon Kaen University (KKU) Community-Based Speech Model, Non Thong Tambon Health Promotion Hospital, Borabue, Maha Sarakham, in decreasing the number of articulation errors for children with CLP. Six children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) who lived in Borabue and the surrounding district, Maha Sarakham, and had medical records in Srinagarind Hospital. They were assessed for pre- and post-articulation errors and provided speech therapy by SLP via teaching on service for speech assistant (SA). Then, children with CLP received speech correction (SC) by SA based on assignment and caregivers practiced home program for a year. Networking of Non Thong Tambon Health Promotion Hospital, Borabue, Maha Sarakham significantly reduce the number of post-articulation errors for 3 children with CLP. There were factors affecting the results in treatment of other children as follows: delayed speech and language development, hypernaslaity, and consistency of SC at local hospital and home. A networking of KKU Community-Based Speech Model, Non Thong Tambon Health Promotion Hospital, Borabue, and Maha Sarakham was a good way to enhance speech therapy in Thailand or other developing countries, where have limitation of speech services or lack of professionals.

  11. Student diversity and implications for clinical competency development amongst domestic and international speech-language pathology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Stacie; Lincoln, Michelle; McAllister, Sue

    2012-06-01

    International students graduating from speech-language pathology university courses must achieve the same minimum competency standards as domestic students. This study aimed to collect descriptive information about the number, origin, and placement performance of international students as well as perceptions of the performance of international students on placement. University Clinical Education Coordinators (CECs), who manage clinical placements in eight undergraduate and six graduate entry programs across the 10 participating universities in Australia and New Zealand completed a survey about 3455 international and domestic speech-language pathology students. Survey responses were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively with non-parametric statistics and thematic analysis. Results indicated that international students came from a variety of countries, but with a regional focus on the countries of Central and Southern Asia. Although domestic students were noted to experience significantly less placement failure, fewer supplementary placements, and reduced additional placement support than international students, the effect size of these relationships was consistently small and therefore weak. CECs rated international students as more frequently experiencing difficulties with communication competencies on placement. However, CECs qualitative comments revealed that culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students may experience more difficulties with speech-language pathology competency development than international students. Students' CALD status should be included in future investigations of factors influencing speech-language pathology competency development.

  12. Development of a Marx-coupled trigger generator with high voltages and low time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yixiang; Zeng, Jiangtao; Sun, Fengju; Cong, Peitian; Su, Zhaofeng; Yang, Shi; Zhang, Xinjun; Qiu, Ai'ci

    2016-10-01

    Coupled by the Marx of the "JianGuang-I" facility, a high voltage, low time-delay trigger generator was developed. Working principles of this trigger generator and its key issues were described in detail. Structures of this generator were also carefully designed and optimized. Based on the "JianGuang-I" Marx generator, a test stand was established. And a series of experiment tests were carried out to the study performance of this trigger generator. Experiment results show that the output voltage of this trigger generator can be continuously adjusted from 58 kV to 384 kV. The time delay (from the beginning of the Marx-discharging pulse to the time that the output pulse of the trigger generator arises) of this trigger pulse is about 200 ns and its peak time (0%˜100%) is less than 50 ns. Experiment results also indicate that the time-delay jitter of trigger voltages decreases rapidly with the increase in the peak voltage of trigger pulses. When the trigger voltage is higher than 250 kV, the time-delay jitters (the standard deviation) are less than 7.7 ns.

  13. The attitudes of family physicians toward a child with delayed growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aker, Servet; Şahin, Mustafa Kürşat; Kınalı, Ömer; Şimşek Karadağ, Elif; Korkmaz, Tuğba

    2017-09-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the attitude of family physicians toward a child with delayed growth and development. Primary healthcare professionals play a key role in monitoring growth and development, the best indicator of the child's health status. If delayed growth and development can be detected early, then it is usually possible to restore functioning. This descriptive study was performed in Samsun, Turkey, in May and June 2015. In total, 325 family physicians were included. The study consisted of two parts. In the first session of the research, the story of an 18-month-old child with delayed growth and development was presented using visual materials. An interview between the child's mother and a member of primary healthcare staff was then enacted by two of the authors using role-playing. Subsequently, participants were given the opportunity to ask the mother and member of primary healthcare staff questions about the case. During the sessions, two observers observed the participants, took notes and compared these after the presentation. In the second part of the study, the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of three open-ended questions. Findings When asking questions of the mother, family physicians generally used accusatory and judgmental language. One of the questions most commonly put to the mother was 'Do you think you are a good mother?' Family physicians were keen to provide instruction for the patient and relatives. Family physicians to a large extent thought that the problem of a child with delayed growth and development can be resolved through education. Family physicians' manner of establishing relations with the patient and relatives is inappropriate. We therefore think that they should receive on-going in-service training on the subject.

  14. Assessing and developing the written reflective practice skills of speech-language pathology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kate; Tillard, Gina; Wyles, Christine; Gerhard, Daniel; Ormond, Tika; McAuliffe, Megan

    2017-09-19

    Written reflective practice aims to support critical thinking and problem solving skills in speech-language pathology (SLP) clinical education programmes. Yet, there has been limited investigation of students' development of written reflective practice skills over time and during a real-time clinical experience. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' development of breadth and depth of written reflective practice across a six-week clinical experience. Participants were 59 undergraduate and 14 postgraduate SLP students. Participants wrote critical reflections describing an interaction with a client/s at the conclusion of weeks two, four and six of their clinical experience. Formative feedback was provided after each submission. Breadth and depth of reflection were coded using a modification of Plack et al.'s coding schema. There was a statistically significant association between time and likelihood of development of breadth of reflection for the elements process and content. Depth of reflection improved significantly across time. The majority of participants were classified as "reflectors" or critical reflector at the conclusion of the study. SLP students can make significant improvements in both breadth and depth of written reflective practice over a six-week period. Implications for clinical teaching are discussed.

  15. A 797 kb de novo deletion of 18q21.31 in a patient with speech delay, mental retardation, sleeping problems, facial dysmorphism, and feet anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Mireille M L; Gijsbers, Antoinet C J; Bosch, Cathy A J; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Bijlsma, Emilia K

    2011-01-01

    We report a 797 kb de novo interstitial deletion of 18q21.31 in a 6-year-old boy with speech delay, mental retardation, sleeping problems, facial dysmorphism, and feet anomalies. Examination of the region showed two genes, TXNL1 and WDR7, to be involved in the deletion. Haploinsufficiency of these genes could potentially contribute to the phenotype. Our patient has some clinical features that overlap with earlier described patients with a larger deletion of the distal part of chromosome 18q. The small deletion in region 18q21.31 may be responsible for some of the common features found in patients with larger 18q deletions.

  16. [Delayed identity development, family relationships and psychopathology: Links between healthy and clinically disturbed youth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge; Escher, Fabian J

    2017-05-19

    This study compared three groups of various age and health status (total N = 732) with respect to their identity status, stress level, and parental behavior. As expected, patients were characterized by delayed identity development, particularly ruminative exploration. Further, patients experienced high identity stress and described high levels of anxious paternal rearing and intrusive maternal psychological control. The patients‘ levels of both internalizing and externalizing symptomatology were high, and the impact of externalizing symptoms on identity arrest was strong. Identity status was delayed, albeit age adequate in both groups of healthy youths, with comparably high levels of anxious parental monitoring. Compared to adolescents, young adults were particularly active in their identity development, showing a high level of identity stress but no increase in psychopathology.

  17. Lexical and Phonological Development in Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech--A Commentary on Stoel-Gammon's "Relationships between Lexical and Phonological Development in Young Children"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velleman, Shelley L.

    2011-01-01

    Although not the focus of her article, phonological development in young children with speech sound disorders of various types is highly germane to Stoel-Gammon's discussion (this issue) for at least two primary reasons. Most obvious is that typical processes and milestones of phonological development are the standards and benchmarks against which…

  18. 基于麦克风阵列的相容时延矢量声源定位方法%A consistent delay vector estimation algorithm for speech source localization based on microphone array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怡典

    2012-01-01

    Time difference of arrive (TDOA) estimation is one of speech source localization algorithm. A traditional two-step procedure is adopted. TDOA estimates of the speech signal relative to pairs of spatially separated microphones are obtained and then applied to generate a source location estimate. However, in low SNR environment, TDOA estimates of a pair of microphones may have a large error. So source location estimation be significantly biased away from its true location. A consistent delay vector estimation algorithm is presented in this paper. Without estimating independently TDOA for every pair of microphones, it generates an objective function based on the all array. The maximum objective function value occurs at the true time delay vector. So the source location can be estimated by perform a search. The simulation results show that the algorithm can improves localization precision in case of low SNR and short signal time.%时廷估计是常用的声源定位方法,传统的算法将定位分为两个步骤,即先估计麦克风阵列中每一对基元的接收信号时延,然后根据这些时延用几何的方法确定声源的位置.在低信噪比下,一对麦克风的时延估计误差较大,导致定位误差较大.相容时延矢量估计算法将两步合为一步,没有逐对估计时延,而是构造一个目标函数,通过搜索得到声源的位置.仿真结果表明,在低信噪比下,只需要较短的数据,该算法仍可得到较高的定位精度.

  19. Late snowmelt delays plant development and results in lower reproductive success in the High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Elisabeth J; Dullinger, Stefan; Semenchuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    In tundra areas where the growing season is short, any delay in the start of summer may have a considerable effect on plant development, growth and reproductive success. Climate models suggest long-term changes in winter precipitation in the Arctic, which may lead to deeper snow cover and a resultant delay in date of snow melt. In this paper, we investigated the role of snow depth and melt out date on the phenological development and reproductive success of vascular plants in Adventdalen, Svalbard (78° 10'N, 16° 06'E). Effects of natural variations in snow accumulation were demonstrated using two vegetation types (snow depth: meadow 21 cm, heath 32 cm), and fences were used to experimentally increase snow depth by over 1m. Phenological delay was greatest directly after snowmelt in the earlier phenological phases, and had the largest effect on the early development of those species which normally green-up early (i.e. Dryas, Papaver, Salix, Saxifraga). Compressed growing seasons and length of the reproductive period led to a reduced reproductive success in some of the study species. There were fewer flowers, fewer plots with dispersing seeds, and lower germination rates. This can have consequences for plant establishment and community composition in the long-term.

  20. SUMMARY OF MONITORING SYSTEMS PROFESSIONAL READINESS OF STUDENTS TO COMMUNICATIVELY-SPEECH DEVELOPMENT IN PRESCHOOLERS BILINGUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neonila Vyacheslavovna Ivanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article describes the main provisions of the monitoring system of professional readiness of the future teachers of pre-school education.Methodology. Presented in the paper position monitoring system of professional readiness of students to develop communicative speech bilingual children in the profil «Preschool education» are analized based on the principles: compliance with the general content of the training and disciplinary purposes of vocational training; Unity of its substantive and procedural right; structural integrity of the contents; orientation of its content for the implementation of the system, the personal, the activity, polysubject (Dialogic, cultural approaches.Results. We studid and summarized some of the theoretical and practical aspects, given the scientific substantiation of organizational methods of monitoring of professional readiness of the future teachers to the communicative and language development of preschool children bilingual.Practical implications. Еducational system of higher education.

  1. On language acquisition in speech and sign: development of combinatorial structure in both modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Languages are composed of a conventionalized system of parts which allow speakers and signers to generate an infinite number of form-meaning mappings through phonological and morphological combinations. This level of linguistic organization distinguishes language from other communicative acts such as gestures. In contrast to signs, gestures are made up of meaning units that are mostly holistic. Children exposed to signed and spoken languages from early in life develop grammatical structure following similar rates and patterns. This is interesting, because signed languages are perceived and articulated in very different ways to their spoken counterparts with many signs displaying surface resemblances to gestures. The acquisition of forms and meanings in child signers and talkers might thus have been a different process. Yet in one sense both groups are faced with a similar problem: "how do I make a language with combinatorial structure"? In this paper I argue first language development itself enables this to happen and by broadly similar mechanisms across modalities. Combinatorial structure is the outcome of phonological simplifications and productivity in using verb morphology by children in sign and speech.

  2. On language acquisition in speech and sign:development drives combinatorial structure in both modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMorgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Languages are composed of a conventionalized system of parts which allow speakers and signers to compose an infinite number of form-meaning mappings through phonological and morphological combinations. This level of linguistic organization distinguishes language from other communicative acts such as gestures. In contrast to signs, gestures are made up of meaning units that are mostly holistic. Children exposed to signed and spoken languages from early in life develop grammatical structure following similar rates and patterns. This is interesting, because signed languages are perceived and articulated in very different ways to their spoken counterparts with many signs displaying surface resemblances to gestures. The acquisition of forms and meanings in child signers and talkers might thus have been a different process. Yet in one sense both groups are faced with a similar problem: 'how do I make a language with combinatorial structure’? In this paper I argue first language development itself enables this to happen and by broadly similar mechanisms across modalities. Combinatorial structure is the outcome of phonological simplifications and productivity in using verb morphology by children in sign and speech.

  3. Development of a two wheeled self balancing robot with speech recognition and navigation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Muhaimin; Ashik-E-Rasul, Haq, Nowab. Md. Aminul; Hassan, Mehedi; Hasib, Irfan Mohammad Al; Hassan, K. M. Rafidh

    2016-07-01

    This paper is aimed to discuss modeling, construction and development of navigation algorithm of a two wheeled self balancing mobile robot in an enclosure. In this paper, we have discussed the design of two of the main controller algorithms, namely PID algorithms, on the robot model. Simulation is performed in the SIMULINK environment. The controller is developed primarily for self-balancing of the robot and also it's positioning. As for the navigation in an enclosure, template matching algorithm is proposed for precise measurement of the robot position. The navigation system needs to be calibrated before navigation process starts. Almost all of the earlier template matching algorithms that can be found in the open literature can only trace the robot. But the proposed algorithm here can also locate the position of other objects in an enclosure, like furniture, tables etc. This will enable the robot to know the exact location of every stationary object in the enclosure. Moreover, some additional features, such as Speech Recognition and Object Detection, are added. For Object Detection, the single board Computer Raspberry Pi is used. The system is programmed to analyze images captured via the camera, which are then processed through background subtraction, followed by active noise reduction.

  4. Speech therapy teleconsultations of a public telehealth service in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira Lucena, Aline; Alkmim, Maria Beatriz; Soares Garcia, Vinícius; de Araújo Brandão Couto, Erica; Marcolino, Milena Soriano

    2015-01-01

    Our aim is to assess speech therapy teleconsultations performed by the Telehealth Network of Minas Gerais, a public telehealth service that attends 722 cities in Brazil, to demonstrate the importance of the telehealth to support these professionals. In this observational retrospective study, consecutive speech therapy teleconsultations performed by the Telehealth Network of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from February 2011 to May 2014, were analyzed. Socio-demographic characteristics of the cities which requested teleconsultations were assessed, and teleconsultations were analyzed based on the type of query. Throughout the study, 259 valid speech therapy teleconsultations were performed. There were no significant differences in socio-demographic characteristics of municipalities that requested and did not request speech therapy teleconsultations. Speech therapists (65%), nurses (27%) and physicians (5%) requested the highest number of teleconsultations, mostly related to the area of language (47%), oral motor skills (29%), voice (20%), audiology (18%) and dysphagia (10%). In conclusion, teleconsultations demonstrated to be a potential tool for speech therapists working in remote areas.

  5. Development an Automatic Speech to Facial Animation Conversion for Improve Deaf Lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hamidreza Kasaei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose design and initial implementation of a robust system which can automatically translates voice into text and text to sign language animations. Sign Language
    Translation Systems could significantly improve deaf lives especially in communications, exchange of information and employment of machine for translation conversations from one language to another has. Therefore, considering these points, it seems necessary to study the speech recognition. Usually, the voice recognition algorithms address three major challenges. The first is extracting feature form speech and the second is when limited sound gallery are available for recognition, and the final challenge is to improve speaker dependent to speaker independent voice recognition. Extracting feature form speech is an important stage in our method. Different procedures are available for extracting feature form speech. One of the commonest of which used in speech
    recognition systems is Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCCs. The algorithm starts with preprocessing and signal conditioning. Next extracting feature form speech using Cepstral coefficients will be done. Then the result of this process sends to segmentation part. Finally recognition part recognizes the words and then converting word recognized to facial animation. The project is still in progress and some new interesting methods are described in the current report.

  6. Phonological awareness intervention for children with childhood apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Brigid C; Gillon, Gail T

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of an integrated phonological awareness intervention to improve the speech production, phonological awareness and printed word decoding skills for three children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) aged 7;3, 6;3 and 6;10. The three children presented with severely delayed phonological awareness skills before intervention. In consideration for the heterogeneity in the population with CAS, the study employed a multiple single-subject design with repeated measures. Baseline and post-intervention measures for speech, phonological awareness and decoding were compared. Each child received intervention for three 45-min sessions per week for 3 weeks (approximately 7 h of individual treatment). Sessions focused on developing phoneme awareness, linking graphemes to phonemes and providing opportunities for targeted speech production practice. Phonological awareness activities were linked with each child's speech production goals. Two participants significantly improved target speech and phonological awareness skills during intervention. These participants also generalized the phonological awareness skills from trained to untrained items and were able to transfer newly acquired knowledge to improved performance on a non-word reading task. The results suggest that integrated phonological awareness intervention may be an effective method simultaneously to treat speech production, phonological awareness and decoding skills in some children with CAS. The findings are discussed within the context of the phonological representational theory of CAS.

  7. Social and linguistic factors influencing adaptation in children's speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, R L; Cappella, J N

    1989-09-01

    The ability to appropriately reciprocate or compensate a partner's communicative response represents an essential element of communicative competence. Previous research indicates that as children grow older, their speech levels reflect greater adaptation relative to their partner's speech. In this study, we argue that patterns of adaptation are related to specific linguistic and pragmatic abilities, such as verbal responsiveness, involvement in the interaction, and the production of relatively complex syntactic structures. Thirty-seven children (3-6 years of age) individually interacted with an adult for 20 to 30 minutes. Adaptation between child and adult was examined among conversational floortime, response latency, and speech rate. Three conclusions were drawn from the results of this investigation. First, by applying time-series analysis to the interactants' speech behaviors within each dyad, individual measures of the child's adaptations to the adult's speech can be generated. Second, consistent with findings in the adult domain, these children generally reciprocated changes in the adult's speech rate and response latency. Third, there were differences in degree and type of adaptation within specific dyads. Chronological age was not useful in accounting for this individual variation, but specific linguistic and social abilities were. Implications of these findings for the development of communicative competence and for the study of normal versus language-delayed speech were discussed.

  8. Early developmental delay in children with autism: A study from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabameri, Elahe; Sotoodeh, Mohammad Saber

    2015-05-01

    Early diagnosis is appropriate and important for developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder. In many less developed countries, unfortunately, diagnosis of this disorder is delayed. The aim of the present study is to determine whether this disorder can be screened using simple strategies such as comparison of the age of acquisition of motor skills. For this purpose, 124 children with autism were chosen to enter the study, and their parents were asked to retrospectively specify the age of achieving milestones of sitting without support, standing alone and walking alone. Information obtained from the parents was compared with World Health Organization standards. Results indicate that participants (male and female) have significantly delayed age of acquisition of all three skills. Based on this result, it can be suggested that existing standards, as a simple means with low cost and easy availability, can be used for early screening of the disease at a younger age so that treatment can be provided more quickly.

  9. Cognitive development in children with language impairment, and correlation between language and intelligence development in kindergarten children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Su-Fen; Liu, Jui-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Ling; Chang, Ming-Yuh; Chang, Tung-Ming; Cheng, Helen

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of 65 children with developmental delay. The male-to-female ratio was 2.25 : 1, and the mean age was 5.8 years; performance IQ was 94.8, verbal IQ was 83, and full-scale IQ was 87.4. Twenty-three (35%) children had normal language development, 13 (20%) had below average language development, and 29 (45%) had developmental language disorder. Performance IQ was significantly better than verbal IQ in all children (P children with developmental language disorder and specific language impairment was significantly lower than that of children with normal language development. Performance IQ was found to be correlated with language score (r = .309, P = .012). The children with language impairment were associated with lower IQ scores. The discrepancy between performance IQ and verbal IQ persisted in children with developmental delay, not only in children with language disorder. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. International students in speech-language pathology clinical education placements: Perceptions of experience and competency development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Stacie; Lincoln, Michelle; McAllister, Sue

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to describe perceptions of clinical placement experiences and competency development for international speech-language pathology students and to determine if these perceptions were different for domestic students. Domestic and international students at two Australian universities participated in nine focus group interviews. Thematic analysis led to the identification of two themes shared by international and domestic students and several separate themes. Shared themes identified the important influence of students' relationships with clinical educators, unique opportunities and learning that occurs on placement. International student themes included concerns about their communication skills and the impact of these skills on client progress. They also explored their adjustment to unfamiliar placement settings and relationships, preferring structured placements to assist this adjustment. Domestic student themes explored the critical nature of competency attainment and assessment on placement, valuing placements that enabled them to achieve their goals. The findings of this study suggest that international students experience additional communication, cultural and contextual demands on clinical placement, which may increase their learning requirements. Clinical education practices must be responsive to the learning needs of diverse student populations. Strategies are suggested to assist all students to adjust to the professional and learning expectations of clinical education placements.

  11. The Key Regulator for Language and Speech Development, FOXP2, is a Novel Substrate for SUMOylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Leslie J; Wang, Chiung-Min; Nascimento, Leticia; Liu, Runhua; Wang, Lizhong; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2016-02-01

    Transcription factor forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) plays an essential role in the development of language and speech. However, the transcriptional activity of FOXP2 regulated by the post-translational modifications remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that FOXP2 is clearly defined as a SUMO target protein at the cellular levels as FOXP2 is covalently modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO3. Furthermore, SUMOylation of FOXP2 was significantly decreased by SENP2 (a specific SUMOylation protease). We further showed that FOXP2 is selectively SUMOylated in vivo on a phylogenetically conserved lysine 674 but the SUMOylation does not alter subcellular localization and stability of FOXP2. Interestingly, we observed that human etiological FOXP2 R553H mutation robustly reduces its SUMOylation potential as compared to wild-type FOXP2. In addition, the acidic residues downstream the core SUMO motif on FOXP2 are required for its full SUMOylation capacity. Finally, our functional analysis using reporter gene assays showed that SUMOylation may modulate transcriptional activity of FOXP2 in regulating downstream target genes (DISC1, SRPX2, and MiR200c). Altogether, we provide the first evidence that FOXP2 is a substrate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation of FOXP2 plays a functional role in regulating its transcriptional activity.

  12. Reading skills of students with speech sound disorders at three stages of literacy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skebo, Crysten M; Lewis, Barbara A; Freebairn, Lisa A; Tag, Jessica; Avrich Ciesla, Allison; Stein, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between phonological awareness, overall language, vocabulary, and nonlinguistic cognitive skills to decoding and reading comprehension was examined for students at 3 stages of literacy development (i.e., early elementary school, middle school, and high school). Students with histories of speech sound disorders (SSD) with and without language impairment (LI) were compared to students without histories of SSD or LI (typical language; TL). In a cross-sectional design, students ages 7;0 (years;months) to 17;9 completed tests that measured reading, language, and nonlinguistic cognitive skills. For the TL group, phonological awareness predicted decoding at early elementary school, and overall language predicted reading comprehension at early elementary school and both decoding and reading comprehension at middle school and high school. For the SSD-only group, vocabulary predicted both decoding and reading comprehension at early elementary school, and overall language predicted both decoding and reading comprehension at middle school and decoding at high school. For the SSD and LI group, overall language predicted decoding at all 3 literacy stages and reading comprehension at early elementary school and middle school, and vocabulary predicted reading comprehension at high school. Although similar skills contribute to reading across the age span, the relative importance of these skills changes with children's literacy stages.

  13. Cochlear implant: Speech and language development in deaf and hard of hearing children following implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Almost 200 cochlear implantations were done in the four centers (two in Belgrade, per one in Novi Sad and Niš in Serbia from 2002 to 2009. Less than 10% of implantees were postlingually deaf adults. The vast majority, i.e. 90% were pre- and perilingually profoundly deaf children. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of improved auditory perception due to cochlear implantation on comprehension of abstract words in children as compared with hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids and normal hearing children. Methods. Thirty children were enrolled in this study: 20 hearing impaired and 10 normal hearing. The vocabulary test was used. Results. The overall results for the whole test (100 words showed a significant difference in favor of the normal hearing as compared with hearing impaired children. The normal hearing children successfully described or defined 77.93% of a total of 100 words. Success rate for the cochlear implanted children was 26.87% and for the hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids 20.32%. Conclusion. Testing for abstract words showed a statistically significant difference between the cochlear implanted and the hearing impaired children with hearing aids (Mann- Whitney U-test, p = 0.019 implying considerable advantage of cochlear implants over hearing aids regarding successful speech development in prelingually deaf children.

  14. A diagnostic marker for childhood apraxia of speech: the coefficient of variation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D; Green, Jordan R; Campbell, Thomas F; McSweeny, Jane L; Scheer, Alison R

    2003-01-01

    Terms such as isochrony, syllable segregation, scanning speech and staccato-like rhythmic quality have been used to characterize the temporal regularity that may be a core feature of apraxia of speech. The present report describes a procedure to quantify temporal regularity in children with suspected apraxia of speech (sAOS). Conversational speech samples from 15 such children, together with samples from 30 3-6-year-old children with normal speech acquisition and 30 3-6-year-old children with moderate to severe speech delay of unknown origin, were selected from an audio archive. Signal processing routines were developed to identify and measure the duration of speech and pause events in 24 utterances from the speech samples of each of the 75 speakers. A value termed the coefficient of variation expressed the normalized variability in the durations of each participant's speech events and pause events within each utterance. A metric termed the coefficient of variation ratio, derived by dividing the coefficient of variation for pause events by the coefficient of variation for speech events, expressed a speaker's relative temporal variation in the two domains. The 15 children with sAOS had higher coefficient of variation ratios than the 30 children in each of the two comparison groups, indicating that the children with sAOS had proportionally more variation in the duration of pause events and/or less variation in the duration of speech events. Findings are interpreted as supporting the view that a constraint in speech timing is a core feature of the praxis disorder that defines a developmental form of apraxia of speech.

  15. Preschool Connected Speech Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJohnson, Albert; And Others

    This speech inventory developed for a study of aurally handicapped preschool children (see TM 001 129) provides information on intonation patterns in connected speech. The inventory consists of a list of phrases and simple sentences accompanied by pictorial clues. The test is individually administered by a teacher-examiner who presents the spoken…

  16. Private Speech in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Authoritarian teaching practices in ballet inhibit the use of private speech. This paper highlights the critical importance of private speech in the cognitive development of young ballet students, within what is largely a non-verbal art form. It draws upon research by Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky and contemporary socioculturalists, to…

  17. Private Speech in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Authoritarian teaching practices in ballet inhibit the use of private speech. This paper highlights the critical importance of private speech in the cognitive development of young ballet students, within what is largely a non-verbal art form. It draws upon research by Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky and contemporary socioculturalists, to…

  18. Preschool Connected Speech Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJohnson, Albert; And Others

    This speech inventory developed for a study of aurally handicapped preschool children (see TM 001 129) provides information on intonation patterns in connected speech. The inventory consists of a list of phrases and simple sentences accompanied by pictorial clues. The test is individually administered by a teacher-examiner who presents the spoken…

  19. Ramathibodi Language Development Questionnaire: A Newly Developed Screening Tool for Detection of Delayed Language Development in Children Aged 18-30 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuthapisith, Jariya; Wantanakorn, Pornchanok; Roongpraiwan, Rawiwan

    2015-08-01

    To develop a parental questionnaire for screening children with delayed language development in primary care settings. Ramathibodi Language Development (RLD) questionnaire was developed and completed by groups of 40 typically developing children age 18 to 30 months old and 30 children with delayed language development. The mean score was significantly lower in the delay language group (6.7 ± 1.9), comparing with the typically developing group (9.6 ± 0.7). The optimal ROC curve cut-off score was 8 with corresponding sensitivity and specificity were 98% and 72%, respectively. The corresponding area under the curve was 0.96 (95% CI = 0.92-0.99). The RLD questionnaire was the promising language developmental screening instrument that easily utilized in well-child examination settings.

  20. A Report on the Development of Teaching Audience-Appropriate English Speeches in a Collaborative Task-Based Framework

    OpenAIRE

    HENSLEY, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This is a report on the development of a collaborative task-based syllabus in a third-year (English) Language Communication class at a public university in Japan over the course of four consecutive semesters. The aim of this paper is to provide an examination into the methods implemented and adapted in a syllabus concerning audience-appropriate speeches in English. The author/instructor, over the course of four semesters, made incremental changes to the syllabus and class format while maintai...

  1. Computer-based speech therapy for childhood speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Lisa; Erickson, Shane; Morris, Meg E

    2017-07-01

    With the current worldwide workforce shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists, new and innovative ways of delivering therapy to children with speech sound disorders are needed. Computer-based speech therapy may be an effective and viable means of addressing service access issues for children with speech sound disorders. To evaluate the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs for children with speech sound disorders. Studies reporting the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs were identified via a systematic, computerised database search. Key study characteristics, results, main findings and details of computer-based speech therapy programs were extracted. The methodological quality was evaluated using a structured critical appraisal tool. 14 studies were identified and a total of 11 computer-based speech therapy programs were evaluated. The results showed that computer-based speech therapy is associated with positive clinical changes for some children with speech sound disorders. There is a need for collaborative research between computer engineers and clinicians, particularly during the design and development of computer-based speech therapy programs. Evaluation using rigorous experimental designs is required to understand the benefits of computer-based speech therapy. The reader will be able to 1) discuss how computerbased speech therapy has the potential to improve service access for children with speech sound disorders, 2) explain the ways in which computer-based speech therapy programs may enhance traditional tabletop therapy and 3) compare the features of computer-based speech therapy programs designed for different client populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDE IN SPEECH CORRECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEALEY, WILLIAM C.

    WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS, PRINCIPALS, SPEECH CLINICIANS, AND SUPERVISORS, THIS GUIDE OUTLINES THE MECHANICS OF ORGANIZING AND CONDUCTING SPEECH CORRECTION ACTIVITIES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. IT INCLUDES THE REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION OF A SPEECH CLINICIAN IN MISSOURI AND DESCRIBES ESSENTIAL STEPS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A…

  3. Speech Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina

    2011-01-01

    About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011.......About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011....

  4. Auditory and speech processing and reading development in Chinese school children: behavioural and ERP evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Sai, Xiaoguang; Wang, Cixin; Wang, Jue; Sha, Shuying; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2005-11-01

    By measuring behavioural performance and event-related potentials (ERPs) this study investigated the extent to which Chinese school children's reading development is influenced by their skills in auditory, speech, and temporal processing. In Experiment 1, 102 normal school children's performance in pure tone temporal order judgment, tone frequency discrimination, temporal interval discrimination and composite tone pattern discrimination was measured. Results showed that children's auditory processing skills correlated significantly with their reading fluency, phonological awareness, word naming latency, and the number of Chinese characters learned. Regression analyses found that tone temporal order judgment, temporal interval discrimination and composite tone pattern discrimination could account for 32% of variance in phonological awareness. Controlling for the effect of phonological awareness, auditory processing measures still contributed significantly to variance in reading fluency and character naming. In Experiment 2, mismatch negativities (MMN) in event-related brain potentials were recorded from dyslexic children and the matched normal children, while these children listened passively to Chinese syllables and auditory stimuli composed of pure tones. The two groups of children did not differ in MMN to stimuli deviated in pure tone frequency and Chinese lexical tones. But dyslexic children showed smaller MMN to stimuli deviated in initial consonants or vowels of Chinese syllables and to stimuli deviated in temporal information of composite tone patterns. These results suggested that Chinese dyslexic children have deficits in auditory temporal processing as well as in linguistic processing and that auditory and temporal processing is possibly as important to reading development of children in a logographic writing system as in an alphabetic system.

  5. Space discriminative function for microphone array robust speech recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xianyu; Ou Zhijian; Wang Zuoying

    2005-01-01

    Based on W-disjoint orthogonality of speech mixtures, a space discriminative function was proposed to enumerate and localize competing speakers in the surrounding environments. Then, a Wiener-like post-filterer was developed to adaptively suppress interferences. Experimental results with a hands-free speech recognizer under various SNR and competing speakers settings show that nearly 69% error reduction can be obtained with a two-channel small aperture microphone array against the conventional single microphone baseline system. Comparisons were made against traditional delay-and-sum and Griffiths-Jim adaptive beamforming techniques to further assess the effectiveness of this method.

  6. Addressing education of speech-language pathologists in the World Report on Disability: development of a speech-language pathology program in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Kartini; Ibrahim, Hasherah; Othman, Basyariatul Fathi; Vong, Etain

    2013-02-01

    The current paper is a response to the Wiley, McAllister, Davidson, and Marshall lead article regarding the application of the World Report on Disability (WRD) to people with communication disorders. The current paper directly addresses recommendation 5 (improvement of human resource capacity) and indirectly addresses recommendations 7, 8, and 9 (related to improving local knowledge and data on communicative disabilities) indirectly. The paper describes Malaysia's initiatives in the early 1990s, in developing its local professional capacity to provide services for people with communication disorders (PWCD). It charts the history of development of a local undergraduate entry-level degree program for speech-language pathology (SLP) from the point of conceptualization to full execution. The article provides glimpses to the processes and challenges faced by Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia as the pioneer university in the South East Asia region to undertake the training and education of the SLP profession and highlights relevant issues faced by newly introduced professions in a country where resources and practice traditions were previously unavailable. It underscores the important role played by government institutions and an international professional network in driving forward-looking policies to implement and sustain the program.

  7. Mouse zygotes respond to severe sperm DNA damage by delaying paternal DNA replication and embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Gawecka

    Full Text Available Mouse zygotes do not activate apoptosis in response to DNA damage. We previously reported a unique form of inducible sperm DNA damage termed sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF. SCF mirrors some aspects of somatic cell apoptosis in that the DNA degradation is mediated by reversible double strand breaks caused by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B followed by irreversible DNA degradation by a nuclease(s. Here, we created zygotes using spermatozoa induced to undergo SCF (SCF zygotes and tested how they responded to moderate and severe paternal DNA damage during the first cell cycle. We found that the TUNEL assay was not sensitive enough to identify the breaks caused by SCF in zygotes in either case. However, paternal pronuclei in both groups stained positively for γH2AX, a marker for DNA damage, at 5 hrs after fertilization, just before DNA synthesis, while the maternal pronuclei were negative. We also found that both pronuclei in SCF zygotes with moderate DNA damage replicated normally, but paternal pronuclei in the SCF zygotes with severe DNA damage delayed the initiation of DNA replication by up to 12 hrs even though the maternal pronuclei had no discernable delay. Chromosomal analysis of both groups confirmed that the paternal DNA was degraded after S-phase while the maternal pronuclei formed normal chromosomes. The DNA replication delay caused a marked retardation in progression to the 2-cell stage, and a large portion of the embryos arrested at the G2/M border, suggesting that this is an important checkpoint in zygotic development. Those embryos that progressed through the G2/M border died at later stages and none developed to the blastocyst stage. Our data demonstrate that the zygote responds to sperm DNA damage through a non-apoptotic mechanism that acts by slowing paternal DNA replication and ultimately leads to arrest in embryonic development.

  8. Tackling the complexity in speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    section includes four carefully selected chapters. They deal with facets of speech production, speech acoustics, and/or speech perception or recognition, place them in an integrated phonetic-phonological perspective, and relate them in more or less explicit ways to aspects of speech technology. Therefore......, we hope that this volume can help speech scientists with traditional training in phonetics and phonology to keep up with the latest developments in speech technology. In the opposite direction, speech researchers starting from a technological perspective will hopefully get inspired by reading about...... the questions, phenomena, and communicative functions that are currently addressed in phonetics and phonology. Either way, the future of speech research lies in international, interdisciplinary collaborations, and our volume is meant to reflect and facilitate such collaborations...

  9. Tackling the complexity in speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    section includes four carefully selected chapters. They deal with facets of speech production, speech acoustics, and/or speech perception or recognition, place them in an integrated phonetic-phonological perspective, and relate them in more or less explicit ways to aspects of speech technology. Therefore......, we hope that this volume can help speech scientists with traditional training in phonetics and phonology to keep up with the latest developments in speech technology. In the opposite direction, speech researchers starting from a technological perspective will hopefully get inspired by reading about...... the questions, phenomena, and communicative functions that are currently addressed in phonetics and phonology. Either way, the future of speech research lies in international, interdisciplinary collaborations, and our volume is meant to reflect and facilitate such collaborations...

  10. Speech Impairment in Down Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray D.; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This review summarizes research on disorders of speech production in Down Syndrome (DS) for the purposes of informing clinical services and guiding future research. Method Review of the literature was based on searches using Medline, Google Scholar, Psychinfo, and HighWire Press, as well as consideration of reference lists in retrieved documents (including online sources). Search terms emphasized functions related to voice, articulation, phonology, prosody, fluency and intelligibility. Conclusions The following conclusions pertain to four major areas of review: (a) Voice. Although a number of studies have been reported on vocal abnormalities in DS, major questions remain about the nature and frequency of the phonatory disorder. Results of perceptual and acoustic studies have been mixed, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions or even to identify sensitive measures for future study. (b) Speech sounds. Articulatory and phonological studies show that speech patterns in DS are a combination of delayed development and errors not seen in typical development. Delayed (i.e., developmental) and disordered (i.e., nondevelopmental) patterns are evident by the age of about 3 years, although DS-related abnormalities possibly appear earlier, even in infant babbling. (c) Fluency and prosody. Stuttering and/or cluttering occur in DS at rates of 10 to 45%, compared to about 1% in the general population. Research also points to significant disturbances in prosody. (d) Intelligibility. Studies consistently show marked limitations in this area but it is only recently that research goes beyond simple rating scales. PMID:23275397

  11. [Spectral characteristics of vowel-like sounds in children of the first year of life and speech development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, N G; Samokishchuk, A P; Kulikov, G A

    2003-11-01

    To study the continuity in speech development, an investigation of vowel-like sounds recorded in the course of longitudinal research of speech formation was carried out in 12 infants beginning with the first month up to 12 months of their life. It was revealed that features ensuring separation of vowel-like sounds are specific by their amplitude relation and frequency location of the most expressed spectral maxima, including the maxima corresponding to the fundamental frequency. As fundamental frequency increased, the vowel-like sounds [a], [u], [i] began to exhibit specific changes of the amplitude ratios of the spectral maxima. It was established that peculiarities of frequency positions of spectral maxima and relations of their amplitudes may be the very features on the bases of which children compare their own vowel-like sounds to the vowels of the adults in sound imitation. These findings and literature data corroborated the opinion of continuity in speech development, beginning with the early preverbal vocalizations.

  12. A note on the population genetic consequences of delayed larval development in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Mattoso de Salles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations by Dobzhansky's group in the 1940s suggesting that the presence of recessive genotypes could account for lower larval developmental rates in Drosophila melanogaster were not confirmed at the time and all subsequent investigations on this subject focused on the analysis of ecological models based on competition among pre-adult individuals. However, a paper published in this journal in 1991 eventually confirmed the finding made by Dobzhansky and his co-workers. In this report, we provide a theoretical analysis of the population genetic effects of a delay in the rate of larval development produced by such a genetic mechanism.

  13. A Development of a System Enables Character Input and PC Operation via Voice for a Physically Disabled Person with a Speech Impediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Toshimasa; Egashira, Hiroyuki; Takata, Mayumi; Okazaki, Yasuhisa; Watanabe, Kenzi; Kondo, Hiroki

    We have designed and implemented a PC operation support system for a physically disabled person with a speech impediment via voice. Voice operation is an effective method for a physically disabled person with involuntary movement of the limbs and the head. We have applied a commercial speech recognition engine to develop our system for practical purposes. Adoption of a commercial engine reduces development cost and will contribute to make our system useful to another speech impediment people. We have customized commercial speech recognition engine so that it can recognize the utterance of a person with a speech impediment. We have restricted the words that the recognition engine recognizes and separated a target words from similar words in pronunciation to avoid misrecognition. Huge number of words registered in commercial speech recognition engines cause frequent misrecognition for speech impediments' utterance, because their utterance is not clear and unstable. We have solved this problem by narrowing the choice of input down in a small number and also by registering their ambiguous pronunciations in addition to the original ones. To realize all character inputs and all PC operation with a small number of words, we have designed multiple input modes with categorized dictionaries and have introduced two-step input in each mode except numeral input to enable correct operation with small number of words. The system we have developed is in practical level. The first author of this paper is physically disabled with a speech impediment. He has been able not only character input into PC but also to operate Windows system smoothly by using this system. He uses this system in his daily life. This paper is written by him with this system. At present, the speech recognition is customized to him. It is, however, possible to customize for other users by changing words and registering new pronunciation according to each user's utterance.

  14. A Case Study Assessing the Auditory and Speech Development of Four Children Implanted with Cochlear Implants by the Chronological Age of 12 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit May-Mederake

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with severe hearing loss most likely receive the greatest benefit from a cochlear implant (CI when implanted at less than 2 years of age. Children with a hearing loss may also benefit greater from binaural sensory stimulation. Four children who received their first CI under 12 months of age were included in this study. Effects on auditory development were determined using the German LittlEARS Auditory Questionnaire, closed- and open-set monosyllabic word tests, aided free-field, the Mainzer and Göttinger speech discrimination tests, Monosyllabic-Trochee-Polysyllabic (MTP, and Listening Progress Profile (LiP. Speech production and grammar development were evaluated using a German language speech development test (SETK, reception of grammar test (TROG-D and active vocabulary test (AWST-R. The data showed that children implanted under 12 months of age reached open-set monosyllabic word discrimination at an age of 24 months. LiP results improved over time, and children recognized 100% of words in the MTP test after 12 months. All children performed as well as or better than their hearing peers in speech production and grammar development. SETK showed that the speech development of these children was in general age appropriate. The data suggests that early hearing loss intervention benefits speech and language development and supports the trend towards early cochlear implantation. Furthermore, the data emphasizes the potential benefits associated with bilateral implantation.

  15. Investigating the of Explicit Instruction of Apology Speech Act on Pragmatic Development of Iranian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Rajabi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning a foreign language requires students to acquire both grammatical knowledge and socio-pragmatic rules of a language. Pragmatic competence as one of the most difficult aspects of language provides several challenges to L2 learners in the process of learning a foreign language. To overcome this problem, EFL teachers should find the most effective way of teaching pragmatic knowledge to their students. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effect of explicit teaching of apology speech act, as an aspect of pragmatic competence, on the Iranian EFL learners’ appropriate use of the mentioned speech act. In so doing, a total of 73 EFL students at intermediate and advanced levels participated in a pre-posttest design research with experimental and control group. Data were collected using a Discourse Completion Test (DCT. The selection of apologetic situations in DCT was based on two variables of social status and social distance. The results revealed that explicit instruction was a facilitative tool that helped students use the proper apology strategies in different situations. Moreover, it was found that L2 proficiency had a significant influence on overall appropriateness of speech act production.Keywords: Explicit instruction; Apology speech act;   Pragmatic competence; Iranian EFL learners  

  16. The relationships between processing facial identity, emotional expression, facial speech, and gaze direction during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Sibylle M; Schwarzer, Gudrun; Korell, Monika; Maier-Karius, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with 5- to 11-year-olds and adults to investigate whether facial identity, facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction are processed independently of or in interaction with one another. In a computer-based, speeded sorting task, participants sorted faces according to facial identity while disregarding facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction or, alternatively, according to facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction while disregarding facial identity. Reaction times showed that children and adults were able to direct their attention selectively to facial identity despite variations of other kinds of face information, but when sorting according to facial speech and emotional expression, they were unable to ignore facial identity. In contrast, gaze direction could be processed independently of facial identity in all age groups. Apart from shorter reaction times and fewer classification errors, no substantial change in processing facial information was found to be correlated with age. We conclude that adult-like face processing routes are employed from 5 years of age onward.

  17. The Relationships between Processing Facial Identity, Emotional Expression, Facial Speech, and Gaze Direction during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Sibylle M.; Schwarzer, Gudrun; Korell, Monika; Maier-Karius, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with 5- to 11-year-olds and adults to investigate whether facial identity, facial speech, emotional expression, and gaze direction are processed independently of or in interaction with one another. In a computer-based, speeded sorting task, participants sorted faces according to facial identity while disregarding…

  18. Impact of Language on Development of Auditory-Visual Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Kaoru; Burnham, Denis

    2008-01-01

    The McGurk effect paradigm was used to examine the developmental onset of inter-language differences between Japanese and English in auditory-visual speech perception. Participants were asked to identify syllables in audiovisual (with congruent or discrepant auditory and visual components), audio-only, and video-only presentations at various…

  19. The development of vowel spaces in English- and Korean-learning infants' speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung

    2005-04-01

    A previous study (Yang, 1996) revealed that the vowel spaces of adult speech differ between English and Korean. This study longitudinally investigated whether vowel spaces of English- and Korean-learning infants' speech demonstrated similar patterns to their ambient languages. Speech samples of English- and Korean-learning infants were collected at 12 and 24 months and transcribed by either native English- or Korean-speakers, respectively. First and second formants of each vowel were measured using LPC, spectral peak value, and spectrographic formant mid points. The vowel spaces between the two groups displayed similar patterns at 12 months although the frequency of occurrence of each vowel differed (e.g., [i] occurs more frequently in English than in Korean). However, the vowel spaces showed different patterns at 24 months. F2 values for front vowels [i, e] were higher in English-learning infants' speech than those in Korean. [a] in Korean was located at a central position of vowel space while it was located at a back position in English. These patterns were similar to the adult vowel space of Korean and English. This study suggests that infants form vowel space similar to their own languages at around 24 months.

  20. The Development of a Skill Mastery Assessment for a Basic Speech Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Shelley D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the creation of an interpersonal skill assessment instrument for the basic course by faculty at the speech communication faculty at Collin County Community College. Explains why this approach has been successful for the faculty. Demonstrates how other institutions can benefit from this department's approach. (RS)

  1. Profiles of Verbal Working Memory Growth Predict Speech and Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Harris, Michael S.; Hoen, Helena M.; Xu, Huiping; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Verbal short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) skills predict speech and language outcomes in children with cochlear implants (CIs) even after conventional demographic, device, and medical factors are taken into account. However, prior research has focused on single end point outcomes as opposed to the longitudinal process of…

  2. Speech and Literacy Development in a Child with a Cochlear Implant: Application of a Psycholinguistic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Michelle; Randall-Pieterse, Candice; Geiger, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This single case study describes the speech, phonological awareness and literacy of a 6;0-year-old girl with a cochlear implant. NG, a child with a congenital bilateral severe/profound hearing loss, received a monaural cochlear implant at the age of 3;0, three years prior to the study. Using a psycholinguistic framework to investigate her single…

  3. Brief Report: Arrested Development of Audiovisual Speech Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Siemann, Justin K.; Woynaroski, Tiffany G.; Schneider, Brittany C.; Eberly, Haley E.; Camarata, Stephen M.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical communicative abilities are a core marker of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). A number of studies have shown that, in addition to auditory comprehension differences, individuals with autism frequently show atypical responses to audiovisual speech, suggesting a multisensory contribution to these communicative differences from their…

  4. Drought stress delays endosperm development and misregulates genes associated with cytoskeleton organization and grain quality proteins in developing wheat seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begcy, Kevin; Walia, Harkamal

    2015-11-01

    Drought stress is a major yield-limiting factor for wheat. Wheat yields are particularly sensitive to drought stress during reproductive development. Early seed development stage is an important determinant of seed size, one of the yield components. We specifically examined the impact of drought stress imposed during postzygotic early seed development in wheat. We imposed a short-term drought stress on plants with day-old seeds and observed that even a short-duration drought stress significantly reduced the size of developing seeds as well as mature seeds. Drought stress delayed the developmental transition from syncytial to cellularized stage of endosperm. Coincident with reduced seed size and delayed endosperm development, a subset of genes associated with cytoskeleton organization was misregulated in developing seeds under drought-stressed. Several genes linked to hormone pathways were also differentially regulated in response to drought stress in early seeds. Notably, drought stress strongly repressed the expression of wheat storage protein genes such as gliadins, glutenins and avenins as early as 3 days after pollination. Our results provide new insights on how some of the early seed developmental events are impacted by water stress, and the underlying molecular pathways that can possibly impact both grain size and quality in wheat.

  5. Interaction Between Syndromic and Non-Syndromic Factors Affecting Speech and Language Development in Treacher-Collins Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Poorjavad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treacher-Collins syndrome is a congenital craniofacial disorder with multiple anomalies. This syndrome affects the maxilla, mandible, eyes, middle and outer ears, and soft palate. Conductive hearing loss due to the deformities of the middle and external ears is prevalent. The characteristics of this syndrome include multiple and serious threats to normal communication development in children. In this study, speech and language features of a Persian speaking child with this syndrome are presented.Case: The case was an 8-year old girl with Treacher-Collins syndrome and bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss due to atretic canal. In language and speech assessments, moderate hypernasality, numerous compensatory errors and morphosyntactic deficits were observed. There were 13 phonemes that were incorrectly produced at least in one position. Besides, she used 22 types of phonological processes that were abnormal and disappear before the age of three in normal Persian speaking children.Conclusion: Moderate hearing loss, velopharyngeal incompetency, malocclusion and dental anomalies, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and environmental factors resulted in severe speech and language disorders in this case. These disorders affected her academic performance as well. Moderate hypernasality, numerous compensatory errors, and excessive and abnormal use of phonological processes were not presented as prevalent characteristics of Treacher-Collins syndrome in other resources.

  6. Prenatal MDMA exposure delays postnatal development in the rat: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuland, Emilie; Germaux, Marie-Aure; Galineau, Laurent; Chalon, Sylvie; Belzung, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA (ecstasy) is a synthetic illicit drug which is widely consumed throughout the world. Drug abuse during pregnancy may have an impairing effect on the progeny of drug-abusing mothers. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of prenatal MDMA exposure on the progeny development, using a rat model. Pregnant animals were injected daily with MDMA (10 mg/kg) between the 13th and 20th days of gestation. Male and female pups were then tested throughout the lactation period on the appearance and improvement of physical and sensory motor parameters. Appearance of some physical features (eyes opening and incisor eruption) and neurological reflexes as well as improving performances in negative geotaxis, gait and inclined board tests were delayed in pups prenatally exposed to MDMA compared to saline-treated pups. In contrast, functions that are necessary for survival such as forelimb reflex (that enables suckling) were present in both groups. At four weeks of age, MDMA animals recovered to normal level in all studied parameters. The delay in physical and neurological reflex development could be interpreted as alterations in maturation of some neuronal circuitries induced by prenatal MDMA exposure.

  7. Seasonal life history trade-offs in two leafwing butterflies: Delaying reproductive development increases life expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElderry, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Surviving inhospitable periods or seasons may greatly affect fitness. Evidence of this exists in the prevalence of dormant stages in the life cycles of most insects. Here I focused on butterflies with distinct seasonal morphological types (not a genetic polymorphism) in which one morphological type, or form, delays reproduction until favorable conditions return, while the other form develops in an environment that favors direct reproduction. For two butterflies, Anaea aidea and A. andria, I tested the hypothesis that the development of each seasonal form involves a differential allocation of resources to survival at eclosion. I assayed differences in adult longevity among summer and winter forms in either a warm, active environment or a cool, calm environment. Winter form adults lived 40 times longer than summer form but only in calm, cool conditions. The magnitude of this difference provided compelling evidence that the winter form body plan and metabolic strategy (i.e. resource conservatism) favor long term survival. This research suggests that winter form adults maintain lowered metabolic rate, a common feature of diapause, to conserve resources and delay senescence while overwintering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preventive measures in speech and language therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Slokar, Polona

    2014-01-01

    Preventive care plays an important role in speech and language therapy. Through training, a speech and language therapist informs the expert and the general public about his efforts in the field of feeding, speech and language development, as well as about the missing elements that may appear in relation to communication and feeding. A speech and language therapist is also responsible for early detection of irregularities and of those factors which affect speech and language development. To a...

  9. Vocabulary development in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants and its relationship with speech perception abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Wong, Lena L N; Zhu, Shufeng; Xi, Xin

    2017-01-01

    China has the largest population of children with hearing impairments and cochlear implantation is gaining popularity there. However, the vocabulary development in this population is largely unexplored. This study examined early vocabulary outcomes, factors influencing early vocabulary development and the relationship between speech perception and vocabulary development in Mandarin-speaking children during the first year of cochlear implant use. A battery of vocabulary tests was administered to 80 children before implantation and 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. Demographic information was obtained to evaluate their relationships with vocabulary outcomes. The Mandarin-speaking children, who received their cochlear implants before 3 years of age, developed vocabulary at a rate faster than that of their same-aged peers with normal hearing. Better pre-implant hearing levels, younger age at implantation, and higher maternal education level contributed to the early vocabulary development. The trajectories of speech perception development highly correlated with those of vocabulary development during 3 to 12 months of CI use. and Implications: These findings imply that the vocabulary development of children implanted before 3 years of age may catch up with that of their hearing peers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and evaluation of a set of group delay standards. [deep space tracking station calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Beatty, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A set of cable assemblies serving as group delay standards having nominal delays of 15, 30, and 60 nsec are described. Various types of measurements were performed on the cable standards, including impedance, microwave phase shift, RF pulse burst delay, modulation pulsed delay, and envelope phase shift measurements. The results of these tests are given, and various sources of error are discussed, in particular, dispersion and internal reflections.

  11. Achievement report on research and development of medical and welfare equipment technology. Esophageal speech aid system; Iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Shokudo hassei hojo sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    Research and development of an esophageal speech aid system is carried out to assist patients with the vocal chords lost in pharyngectomy. The goal is to develop a device to enable people, who have had their pharynges removed but can communicate under noiseless circumstances, to communicate easily even in the noisy street. The study involves the development of a voice pickup means, speech signal processing technology, integrated circuit dedicated to the present purpose, esophageal speech signal analyzer, and improvement on the user's comfort. The effort results in a highly directional microphone and a small, high-output loudspeaker. Several real-time signal processing algorithms are developed, including one related to the bandwidth division type analysis and synthesis technique that ensures stable voice conversion. An esophageal speech database is built. A portable esophageal speech aid system is manufactured by way of experiment, which is equipped with the functions of analog simple voice magnification and digital voice conversion. This device serves concurrently as a telephone speech aid system. (NEDO)

  12. Development of an automated speech recognition interface for personal emergency response systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailidis Alex

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demands on long-term-care facilities are predicted to increase at an unprecedented rate as the baby boomer generation reaches retirement age. Aging-in-place (i.e. aging at home is the desire of most seniors and is also a good option to reduce the burden on an over-stretched long-term-care system. Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERSs help enable older adults to age-in-place by providing them with immediate access to emergency assistance. Traditionally they operate with push-button activators that connect the occupant via speaker-phone to a live emergency call-centre operator. If occupants do not wear the push button or cannot access the button, then the system is useless in the event of a fall or emergency. Additionally, a false alarm or failure to check-in at a regular interval will trigger a connection to a live operator, which can be unwanted and intrusive to the occupant. This paper describes the development and testing of an automated, hands-free, dialogue-based PERS prototype. Methods The prototype system was built using a ceiling mounted microphone array, an open-source automatic speech recognition engine, and a 'yes' and 'no' response dialog modelled after an existing call-centre protocol. Testing compared a single microphone versus a microphone array with nine adults in both noisy and quiet conditions. Dialogue testing was completed with four adults. Results and discussion The microphone array demonstrated improvement over the single microphone. In all cases, dialog testing resulted in the system reaching the correct decision about the kind of assistance the user was requesting. Further testing is required with elderly voices and under different noise conditions to ensure the appropriateness of the technology. Future developments include integration of the system with an emergency detection method as well as communication enhancement using features such as barge-in capability. Conclusion The use of an automated

  13. Metaheuristic applications to speech enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kunche, Prajna

    2016-01-01

    This book serves as a basic reference for those interested in the application of metaheuristics to speech enhancement. The major goal of the book is to explain the basic concepts of optimization methods and their use in heuristic optimization in speech enhancement to scientists, practicing engineers, and academic researchers in speech processing. The authors discuss why it has been a challenging problem for researchers to develop new enhancement algorithms that aid in the quality and intelligibility of degraded speech. They present powerful optimization methods to speech enhancement that can help to solve the noise reduction problems. Readers will be able to understand the fundamentals of speech processing as well as the optimization techniques, how the speech enhancement algorithms are implemented by utilizing optimization methods, and will be given the tools to develop new algorithms. The authors also provide a comprehensive literature survey regarding the topic.

  14. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  15. Comparative efficacy of the picture exchange communication system (PECS) versus a speech-generating device: effects on social-communicative skills and speech development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Miriam C; Wendt, Oliver; Subramanian, Anu; Hsu, Ning

    2013-09-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) and a speech-generating device (SGD) were compared in a study with a multiple baseline, alternating treatment design. The effectiveness of these methods in increasing social-communicative behavior and natural speech production were assessed with three elementary school-aged children with severe autism who demonstrated extremely limited functional communication skills. Results for social-communicative behavior were mixed for all participants in both treatment conditions. Relatively little difference was observed between PECS and SGD conditions. Although findings were inconclusive, data patterns suggest that Phase II of the PECS training protocol is conducive to encouraging social-communicative behavior. Data for speech outcomes did not reveal any increases across participants, and no differences between treatment conditions were observed.

  16. Optimized energy-delay sub-network routing protocol development and implementation for wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, James W.; Zawodniok, Maciej; Jagannathan, S.; Watkins, Steve E.

    2008-08-01

    The development and the implementation issues of a reactive optimized energy-delay sub-network routing (OEDSR) protocol for wireless sensor networks (WSN) are introduced and its performance is contrasted with the popular ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) routing protocol. Analytical results illustrate the performance of the proposed OEDSR protocol, while experimental results utilizing a hardware testbed under various scenarios demonstrate improvements in energy efficiency of the OEDSR protocol. A hardware platform constructed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), now the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MST), based on the Generation 4 Smart Sensor Node (G4-SSN) prototyping platform is also described. Performance improvements are shown in terms of end-to-end (E2E) delay, throughput, route-set-up time and drop rates and energy usage is given for three topologies, including a mobile topology. Additionally, results from the hardware testbed provide valuable lessons for network deployments. Under testing OEDSR provides a factor of ten improvement in the energy used in the routing session and extends network lifetime compared to AODV. Depletion experiments show that the time until the first node failure is extended by a factor of three with the network depleting and network lifetime is extended by 6.7%.

  17. Developing an Inspection Optimization Model Based on the Delay-Time Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Nazemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrastructures are considered as important facilities required for every country and society to be able to work properly. Aging and deterioration of such structures during their lifetime are a major concern both for maintenance researchers in the academic world and for the practitioners. This concern is mainly because the deterioration increases the maintenance costs dramatically and lowers the reliability, availability, and safety of the structural system. Preventive maintenance and inspection activities are the most usual means for keeping the structure in a good condition. This paper utilizes the concept of delay-time for developing the optimal inspection policy for deteriorating structures. In the proposed stochastic model, discrete times of inspection activities are taken as the decision variables of an optimization problem, in a way that the obtained aperiodic (nonuniform inspection schedule minimizes the total downtime ratio of the structure. To illustrate the model capabilities, various numerical examples are solved and results are compared with the traditional periodic (uniform inspection policies. The results indicate the substantial reduction in system downtime due to the wisely planned inspection schedule and the appropriate utilization of delay-time concept, which is indeed a powerful framework for inspection optimization problems.

  18. Identifying second language speech tasks and ability levels for successful nurse oral interaction with patients in a linguistic minority setting: an instrument development project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Talia; Laurier, Michel D; Turner, Carolyn E; Segalowitz, Norman

    2011-09-01

    One of the most demanding situations for members of linguistic minorities is a conversation between a health professional and a patient, a situation that frequently arises for linguistic minority groups in North America, Europe, and elsewhere. The present study reports on the construction of an oral interaction scale for nurses serving linguistic minorities in their second language (L2). A mixed methods approach was used to identify and validate a set of speech activities relating to nurse interactions with patients and to derive the L2 ability required to carry out those tasks. The research included an extensive literature review, the development of an initial list of speech tasks, and validation of this list with a nurse focus group. The retained speech tasks were then developed into a questionnaire and administered to 133 Quebec nurses who assessed each speech task for difficulty in an L2 context. Results were submitted to Rasch analysis and calibrated with reference to the Canadian Language Benchmarks, and the constructs underlying the speech tasks were identified through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results showed that speech tasks dealing with emotional aspects of caregiving and conveying health-specific information were reported as being the most demanding in terms of L2 ability, and the most strongly associated with L2 ability required for nurse-patient interactions. Implications are discussed with respect to the development and use of assessment instruments to facilitate L2 workplace training for health care professionals.

  19. The relationship of bottle feeding and other sucking behaviors with speech disorder in Patagonian preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanez N David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that children's nonnutritive sucking habits may lead to delayed development of their oral anatomy and functioning. However, these findings were inconsistent. We investigated associations between use of bottles, pacifiers, and other sucking behaviors with speech disorders in children attending three preschools in Punta Arenas (Patagonia, Chile. Methods Information on infant feeding and sucking behaviors, age starting and stopping breast- and bottle-feeding, pacifier use, and other sucking behaviors, was collected from self-administered questionnaires completed by parents. Evaluation of speech problems was conducted at preschools with subsequent scoring by a licensed speech pathologist using age-normative standards. Results A total of 128 three- to five-year olds were assessed, 46% girls and 54% boys. Children were breastfed for an average of 25.2 (SD 9.6 months and used a bottle 24.4 (SD 15.2 months. Fifty-three children (41.7% had or currently used a pacifier for an average of 11.4 (SD 17.3 months; 23 children (18.3% were reported to have sucked their fingers. Delayed use of a bottle until after 9 months appeared to be protective for subsequent speech disorders. There was less than a one-third lower relative odds of subsequent speech disorders for children with a delayed use of a bottle compared to children without a delayed use of a bottle (OR: 0.32, 95% CI: 0.10-0.98. A three-fold increase in relative odds of speech disorder was found for finger-sucking behavior (OR: 2.99, 95% CI: 1.10-8.00 and for use of a pacifier for 3 or more years (OR: 3.42, 95% CI: 1.08-10.81. Conclusion The results suggest extended use of sucking outside of breastfeeding may have detrimental effects on speech development in young children.

  20. Phonemic clicks and the mapping asymmetry: How language emerged and speech developed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybregts, Riny

    2017-02-01

    Language must have existed before human populations became separated (all descendant populations have language) but language did not emerge until long after these population divergences occurred (behavioral modernity only showed then). Distinguishing capacity for language from externalized language resolves the apparent paradox. Speech emerged only after the capacity for language became fixated. This accords well with a fundamental property of human language. Rules mapping to meaning rely on structural properties only, while rules mapping to sound are (also) sensitive to linear order, reflecting properties of sensorimotor modalities. The asymmetry suggests (i) language as a system of thought takes primacy over language as communication, and (ii) evolution of the language capacity preceded emergence of speech. Click phonemes with their unique geneological, genetic and geographical distribution may be relevant here. Separation followed possession of internal language but preceded externalized language. Clicks were recruited for externalization in San populations only after deepest separation.

  1. Development and validation of an instrument to measure occupational stress in speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimian, M J; Lieberman, R J; Fastenau, P S

    1991-04-01

    The Speech-Language Pathologist Stress Inventory (SLPSI) is a 48-item questionnaire adapted from the Teacher Stress Inventory (Fimian, 1988). Factor analyses of the responses of 626 speech-language pathologists revealed four stress source factors (Bureaucratic Restrictions, Time and Workload Management, Lack of Professional Supports, and Instructional Limitations) and two stress manifestation factors (Emotional-Fatigue Manifestations and Biobehavioral Manifestations). The internal consistency reliability of scales based on these factors ranged from .71 to .87, with .93 for the entire scale. Evidence for construct validity was found in moderate positive correlations between the scales of the SLPSI and the scales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) (Maslach & Jackson, 1986). Stress and burnout subscale intercorrelations ranged from .10 to .82 (p less than .01), and the correlation between stress strength and burnout frequency was .66 (p less than .001).

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS OF STUTTERING CHILDREN AND CHILDREN WITH FLUENT SPEECH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila BEGIC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of phonological awareness of stuttering children and children with fluent speech. The sample consisted of 64 children, between 56 and 83 months old (4 years and 8 months to 6 years and 11 months. Examinees were divided in two groups. The first group consisted of 32 stuttering children, 19 males, and 13 females. The control group consisted of 32 children with fluent speech, whose age and sex were equal to the age and sex of the children in the experimental group. The research was conducted in preschools and primary schools in Tuzla and Una-Sana Canton in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The subjects were examined with 7 subtests (syllable and phoneme blending abilities, ability to rhyme, phoneme segmentation, phoneme deletion, phoneme transposition and spoonerisms. Each of the subtest scores, which index a variety of phonological awareness abilities, was examined separately. Phonological awareness score is the total score which relates to a common result that the subjects achieved on these 7 individual subtests. The results showed that there were no statistically significant differences between stuttering children and their peers with fluent speech in relation to Phonological awareness score. The examination of differences between stuttering and non-stuttering children in individual variables, which describe phonological awareness, showed that there was statistically significant difference in the ability to rhyme between these two subjects groups. T-test was used for examination of the differences between the male stuttering children and their fluent peers, and also female stuttering children and their fluent peers for the phonological awareness variables. The results exhibited statistically significant differences in the variable Rhyme between the male stuttering children and their fluent peers. In addition, we examined the ability of phonemic analysis of children who stutter and children with fluent

  3. Decoding social media speak: developing a speech act theory research agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, S.; de Ruyter, K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose\\ud – Drawing on the theoretical domain of speech act theory (SAT) and a discussion of its suitability for setting the agenda for social media research, this study aims to explore a range of research directions that are both relevant and conceptually robust, to stimulate the advancement of knowledge and understanding of online verbatim data.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach\\ud – Examining previously published cross-disciplinary research, the study identifies how recent conceptual and...

  4. Speech transmission index from running speech: A neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F. F.; Cox, T. J.

    2003-04-01

    Speech transmission index (STI) is an important objective parameter concerning speech intelligibility for sound transmission channels. It is normally measured with specific test signals to ensure high accuracy and good repeatability. Measurement with running speech was previously proposed, but accuracy is compromised and hence applications limited. A new approach that uses artificial neural networks to accurately extract the STI from received running speech is developed in this paper. Neural networks are trained on a large set of transmitted speech examples with prior knowledge of the transmission channels' STIs. The networks perform complicated nonlinear function mappings and spectral feature memorization to enable accurate objective parameter extraction from transmitted speech. Validations via simulations demonstrate the feasibility of this new method on a one-net-one-speech extract basis. In this case, accuracy is comparable with normal measurement methods. This provides an alternative to standard measurement techniques, and it is intended that the neural network method can facilitate occupied room acoustic measurements.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATED SPEECH RECOGNITION SYSTEM FOR EGYPTIAN ARABIC PHONE CONVERSATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Romanenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with description of several speech recognition systems for the Egyptian Colloquial Arabic. The research is based on the CALLHOME Egyptian corpus. The description of both systems, classic: based on Hidden Markov and Gaussian Mixture Models, and state-of-the-art: deep neural network acoustic models is given. We have demonstrated the contribution from the usage of speaker-dependent bottleneck features; for their extraction three extractors based on neural networks were trained. For their training three datasets in several languageswere used:Russian, English and differentArabic dialects.We have studied the possibility of application of a small Modern Standard Arabic (MSA corpus to derive phonetic transcriptions. The experiments have shown that application of the extractor obtained on the basis of the Russian dataset enables to increase significantly the quality of the Arabic speech recognition. We have also stated that the usage of phonetic transcriptions based on modern standard Arabic decreases recognition quality. Nevertheless, system operation results remain applicable in practice. In addition, we have carried out the study of obtained models application for the keywords searching problem solution. The systems obtained demonstrate good results as compared to those published before. Some ways to improve speech recognition are offered.

  6. Private speech and strategy-use patterns: bidirectional comparisons of children with and without mathematical difficulties in a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostad, Snorre A; Sorensen, Peer M

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines private speech and strategy-use patterns for solving simple number fact problems in addition. The progressive differentiation by grade between children's levels of private speech internalization--including silence--was investigated and related to children's developmental patterns for subcategories of strategy-use internalization. Comparisons were made between 67 children with math difficulties (MD) and 67 children without MD from Grade 2 to Grade 7 in primary schools. Two separate laboratory investigations were performed for each child to examine private speech and strategy-use internalization. Analysis was based on private speech category differences, strategy-use differences, and differences in the occurrence of private speech-strategy-use combinations. Children without MD showed a grade-determined shift from less to more internalized private speech and from the use of backup strategies to retrieval strategies. In contrast, the private speech and the strategy-use internalization of children with MD, reflected in inaudible private speech and backup strategy use, seemed to converge at earlier developmental levels. The development of children with MD seemed almost to stop at the inaudible private speech-backup strategy combination level. The silence-retrieval strategy combination level was the primary alternative for typical math achievers. In all, the characteristics of the development curves of the children with MD were consistent with a developmental difference and not with a developmental delay model. Implications for intervention and future research methodology are discussed.

  7. Complex segmental duplications mediate a recurrent dup(X)(p11.22-p11.23) associated with mental retardation, speech delay, and EEG anomalies in males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorda, Roberto; Bonaglia, M Clara; Beri, Silvana; Fichera, Marco; Novara, Francesca; Magini, Pamela; Urquhart, Jill; Sharkey, Freddie H; Zucca, Claudio; Grasso, Rita; Marelli, Susan; Castiglia, Lucia; Di Benedetto, Daniela; Musumeci, Sebastiano A; Vitello, Girolamo A; Failla, Pinella; Reitano, Santina; Avola, Emanuela; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Mastrangelo, Massimo; Fiocchi, Isabella; Spaccini, Luigina; Torniero, Claudia; Fontana, Elena; Lynch, Sally Ann; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Black, Graeme; Jonveaux, Philippe; Leheup, Bruno; Seri, Marco; Romano, Corrado; dalla Bernardina, Bernardo; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2009-09-01

    Submicroscopic copy-number variations make a considerable contribution to the genetic etiology of human disease. We have analyzed subjects with idiopathic mental retardation (MR) by using whole-genome oligonucleotide-based array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and identified familial and de novo recurrent Xp11.22-p11.23 duplications in males and females with MR, speech delay, and a peculiar electroencephalographic (EEG) pattern in childhood. The size of the duplications ranges from 0.8-9.2 Mb. Most affected females show preferential activation of the duplicated X chromosome. Carriers of the smallest duplication show X-linked recessive inheritance. All other affected individuals present dominant expression and comparable clinical phenotypes irrespective of sex, duplication size, and X-inactivation pattern. The majority of the rearrangements are mediated by recombination between flanking complex segmental duplications. The identification of common clinical features, including the typical EEG pattern, predisposing genomic structure, and peculiar X-inactivation pattern, suggests that duplication of Xp11.22-p11.23 constitutes a previously undescribed syndrome.

  8. Developing a cognitive behavioral therapy manual for delayed sleep-wake phase disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Danielsson, Katarina; Markström, Agneta; Broman, Jan-Erik

    2016-11-01

    This article reports the development of a treatment protocol, based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) principles, for delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD). The protocol consists of psycho-education, presenting a CBT model for DSWPD, case formulation, motivational interviewing, registering sleep in a diary, strategies to improve the rhythm of sleep and wakefulness, relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, strategies to cope with daytime symptoms, constructing an individualized CBT program, and learning how to deal with relapses. Qualitative data, focusing on how the patients perceived the protocol, were collected within the realm of a trial exploring the efficacy of the protocol. These findings highlighted several advantages but also disadvantages of the therapy. It is our hope that this paper might act as a platform for further clinical work and future research efforts in patients with DSWPD.

  9. Reduced Mid1 expression and delayed neuromotor development in daDREAM transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara eDierssen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Previous work has shown a role for DREAM in cerebellar function regulating the expression of the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3 in cerebellar granular neurons to control Ca2+ homeostasis and survival of these neurons. To achieve a global view of the genes regulated by DREAM in the cerebellum, we performed a genome-wide analysis in transgenic cerebellum expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM. Here we show that DREAM regulates the expression of the midline 1 (Mid1 gene early after birth. As a consequence, daDREAM mice exhibit a significant shortening of the rostro-caudal axis of the cerebellum and a severe delay in neuromotor development early after birth. Our results indicate a role for DREAM in cerebellar function.

  10. Development of a Zulu speech reception threshold test for Zulu first language speakers in Kwa Zulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panday, Seema; Kathard, Harsha; Pillay, Mershen; Govender, Cyril

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of speech reception threshold (SRT) is best evaluated in an individual's first language. The present study focused on the development of a Zulu SRT word list, according to adapted criteria for SRT in Zulu. The aim of this paper is to present the process involved in the development of the Zulu word list. In acquiring the data to realize this aim, 131 common bisyllabic Zulu words were identified by two Zulu speaking language interpreters and two tertiary level educators. Eighty two percent of these words were described as bisyllabic verbs. Thereafter using a three point Likert scale, 58 bisyllabic verbs were rated by 5 linguistic experts as being familiar, phonetically dissimilar and being low tone verbs. According to the Kendall's co-efficient of concordance at 95% level of confidence the agreement among the raters was good for each criterion. The results highlighted the importance of adapting the criteria for SRT to suit the structure of the language. An important research implication emerging from the study is the theoretical guidelines proposed for the development of SRT material in other African Languages. Furthermore, the importance of using speech material appropriate to the language has also being highlighted. The developed SRT word list in Zulu is applicable to the adult Zulu First Language Speaker in KZN.

  11. Post onset, oral rapamycin treatment delays development of mitochondrial encephalopathy only at supramaximal doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Buonvicino, Daniela; Muzzi, Mirko; Cavone, Leonardo; Guasti, Daniele; Lapucci, Andrea; Pratesi, Sara; De Cesaris, Francesco; Luceri, Francesca; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathies are fatal, infantile neurodegenerative disorders caused by a deficit of mitochondrial functioning, for which there is urgent need to identify efficacious pharmacological treatments. Recent evidence shows that rapamycin administered both intraperitoneally or in the diet delays disease onset and enhances survival in the Ndufs4 null mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy. To delineate the clinical translatability of rapamycin in treatment of mitochondrial encephalopathy, we evaluated the drug's effects on disease evolution and mitochondrial parameters adopting treatment paradigms with fixed daily, oral doses starting at symptom onset in Ndufs4 knockout mice. Molecular mechanisms responsible for the pharmacodynamic effects of rapamycin were also evaluated. We found that rapamycin did not affect disease development at clinically-relevant doses (0.5 mg kg(-1)). Conversely, an oral dose previously adopted for intraperitoneal administration (8 mg kg(-1)) delayed development of neurological symptoms and increased median survival by 25%. Neurological improvement and lifespan were not further increased when the dose raised to 20 mg kg(-1). Notably, rapamycin at 8 mg kg(-1) did not affect the reduced expression of respiratory complex subunits, as well as mitochondrial number and mtDNA content. This treatment regimen however significantly ameliorated architecture of mitochondria cristae in motor cortex and cerebellum. However, reduction of mTOR activity by rapamycin was not consistently found within the brain of knockout mice. Overall, data show the ability of rapamycin to improve ultrastructure of dysfunctional mitochondria and corroborate its therapeutic potential in mitochondrial disorders. The non-clinical standard doses required, however, raise concerns about its rapid and safe clinical transferability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ambulatory EEG NeuroMonitor platform for engagement studies of children with development delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ruhi; Consul-Pacareu, Sergi; Abusaud, Mohammed; Sahadat, Md N.; Morshed, Bashir I.

    2013-05-01

    Engagement monitoring is crucial in many clinical and therapy applications such as early learning preschool classes for children with developmental delays including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or cerebral palsy; as it is challenging for the instructors to evaluate the individual responses of these children to determine the effectiveness of the teaching strategies due to the diverse and unique need of each child who might have difficulty in verbal or behavioral communication. This paper presents an ambulatory scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) NeuroMonitor platform to study brain engagement activities in natural settings. The developed platform is miniature (size: 2.2" x 0.8" x 0.36", weight: 41.8 gm with 800 mAh Li-ion battery and 3 snap leads) and low-power (active mode: 32 mA low power mode: under 5mA) with 2 channels (Fp1, Fp2) to record prefrontal cortex activities of the subject in natural settings while concealed within a headband. The signals from the electrodes are amplified with a low-power instrumentation amplifier; notch filtered (fc = 60Hz), then band-passed by a 2nd-order Chebyshev-I low-pass filter cascaded with a 2nd-order low-pass (fc = 125Hz). A PSoC ADC (16-bit, 256 sps) samples this filtered signal, and can either transmit it through a Class-2 Bluetooth transceiver to a remote station for real-time analysis or store it in a microSD card for offline processing. This platform is currently being evaluated to capture data in the classroom settings for engagement monitoring of children, aimed to study the effectiveness of various teaching strategies that will allow the development of personalized classroom curriculum for children with developmental delays.

  13. Using Automatic Speech Recognition to Dictate Mathematical Expressions: The Development of the "TalkMaths" Application at Kingston University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, Angela; Hunter, Gordon; Pflugel, Eckhard; Denholm-Price, James; Binelli, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Speech technology--especially automatic speech recognition--has now advanced to a level where it can be of great benefit both to able-bodied people and those with various disabilities. In this paper we describe an application "TalkMaths" which, using the output from a commonly-used conventional automatic speech recognition system,…

  14. A Survey on Speech Enhancement Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar. K

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Speech enhancement is a technique which processes the noisy speech signal. The aim of speech enhancement is to improve the perceived quality of speech and/or to improve its intelligibility. Due to its vast applications in mobile telephony, VOIP, hearing aids, Skype and speaker recognition, the challenges in speech enhancement have grown over the years. It is more challenging to suppress back ground noise that effects human communication in noisy environments like airports, road works, traffic, and cars. The objective of this survey paper is to outline the single channel speech enhancement methodologies used for enhancing the speech signal which is corrupted with additive background noise and also discuss the challenges and opportunities of single channel speech enhancement. This paper mainly focuses on transform domain techniques and supervised (NMF, HMM speech enhancement techniques. This paper gives frame work for developments in speech enhancement methodologies

  15. Neutrophil apoptosis is delayed in an equine model of colitis: Implications for the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S L; Singh, B

    2017-05-01

    Horses that develop colitis invariably exhibit signs of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). A significant contributor to the development of SIRS in human subjects is delayed neutrophil apoptosis, but this has not been specifically studied in horses. To determine the occurrence of ex vivo neutrophil apoptosis and its contribution to the development of SIRS in an equine colitis model. Experiment using a colitis model. Neutrophils were isolated before and after the induction of colitis using an oligofructose overdose model, placed into culture for 12 h or 24 h with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at various concentrations, and assessed for the occurrence of apoptosis using Annexin V and propidium iodide staining with flow cytometric quantification. Levels of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activity were measured after 12 h of incubation in neutrophil lysates. Ex vivo neutrophil apoptosis was significantly delayed in neutrophils isolated after the induction of colitis (12-h incubation: P = 0.004; 24-h incubation: P = 0.003) with concomitant reductions in caspase-3, -8 and -9 activity (caspase-3: P = 0.004; caspase-8: P = 0.02; caspase-9: P = 0.02). Neutrophils isolated after the induction of colitis were refractory to LPS-delayed apoptosis. Neutrophil apoptosis was delayed with increasing cell concentration in vitro. The main limitation of the study is the that the exact mechanism for delayed neutrophil apoptosis following the induction of colitis was not fully elucidated. The data show that neutrophil apoptosis is delayed in horses following the induction of colitis as a result of interference with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, which may contribute to the development of equine SIRS. Concurrent development of neutrophilia may contribute to a prolonged neutrophil lifespan through a concentration-dependent delay in apoptosis. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Clonidine treatment delays postnatal motor development and blocks short-term memory in young mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino-Núñez, Cristina; Domínguez-del-Toro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    During the development of the nervous system, the perinatal period is particularly sensitive as neuronal connections are still forming in the brain of the neonate. Alpha2-adrenergic receptors are overexpressed temporarily in proliferative zones in the developing brain, reaching a peak during the first postnatal week of life. Both stimulation and blocking of these receptors during this period alter the development of neural circuits, affecting synaptic connectivity and neuronal responses. They even affect motor and cognitive skills later on in the adult. It's especially important to look for the early neurological consequences resulting from such modifications, because they may go unnoticed. The main objective of the present study has been to reaffirm the importance of the maturation of alpha-adrenergic system in mice, by carrying out a comprehensive examination of motor, behavioral and cognitive effects in neonates, during early postnatal development, following chronic administration of the drug Clonidine, an alpha2 adrenergic system agonist. Our study shows that mice treated postnatally with clonidine present a temporal delay in the appearance of developmental markers, a slow execution of vestibular reflexes during first postnatal week of life and a blockade of the short term memory in the novel object recognition task. Shortly after the treatment the startle response is hyperreactive.

  17. Auditory Masking Effects on Speech Fluency in Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia: Comparison to Altered Auditory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Adam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of masked auditory feedback (MAF) on speech fluency in adults with aphasia and/or apraxia of speech (APH/AOS). We hypothesized that adults with AOS would increase speech fluency when speaking with noise. Altered auditory feedback (AAF; i.e., delayed/frequency-shifted feedback) was included as a control condition not…

  18. Speech Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benesty, Jacob; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll;

    of methods and have been introduced in somewhat different contexts. Linear filtering methods originate in stochastic processes, while subspace methods have largely been based on developments in numerical linear algebra and matrix approximation theory. This book bridges the gap between these two classes......Speech enhancement is a classical problem in signal processing, yet still largely unsolved. Two of the conventional approaches for solving this problem are linear filtering, like the classical Wiener filter, and subspace methods. These approaches have traditionally been treated as different classes...... of methods by showing how the ideas behind subspace methods can be incorporated into traditional linear filtering. In the context of subspace methods, the enhancement problem can then be seen as a classical linear filter design problem. This means that various solutions can more easily be compared...

  19. NICT/ATR Chinese-Japanese-English Speech-to-Speech Translation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tohru Shimizu; Yutaka Ashikari; Eiichiro Sumita; ZHANG Jinsong; Satoshi Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the latest version of the Chinese-Japanese-English handheld speech-to-speech translation system developed by NICT/ATR,which is now ready to be deployed for travelers.With the entire speech-to-speech translation function being implemented into one terminal,it realizes real-time,location-free speech-to-speech translation.A new noise-suppression technique notably improves the speech recognition performance.Corpus-based approaches of speech recognition,machine translation,and speech synthesis enable coverage of a wide variety of topics and portability to other languages.Test results show that the character accuracy of speech recognition is 82%-94% for Chinese speech,with a bilingual evaluation understudy score of machine translation is 0.55-0.74 for Chinese-Japanese and Chinese-English.

  20. Development of communication and speech skills after cochlear implant in a sign language child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassandro, E; Nicastri, M; Chiarella, G; Genovese, E; Gallo, L V; Catalano, M

    2003-04-01

    In selecting patients to undergo cochlear implant, a pre-existing use of sign language gives rise to two problems that have been widely debated in the literature. First, the caution shown toward the candidacy of patients using this mode of communication, since it is considered a possible element of interference in the acquisition of speech. Secondly, refusal of the cochlear implant procedure, on the part of the deaf community, on the grounds both of cultural identity and of it being more "natural" for a deaf person to use an unimpaired visual channel rather than an impaired hearing channel. In order to establish whether knowledge of sign language does, indeed, affect speech production negatively and evaluate which mode of communication, oral or gestual, is preferred, the present investigation was carried out on a preverbal deaf child who had undergone cochlear implant at about 7 years of age and has always used both languages. His verbal skills were evaluated in the precochlear implant stage, then at 6 and 12 months after, together with the changes in his use of sign language and in the relationship between the two modes. Results, besides observing the presence of linguistic evolution at each level examined and already evident at 6 months, also documented a progressive reduction in the spontaneous use of sign language. In conclusion, the present experience revealed no temporal or qualitative differences in post-cochlear implant evolution of speech skills, in comparison with that observed in patients with an exclusively aural-oral approach. Furthermore, the increased use of the hearing pathway, made possible by cochlear implant, determined a spontaneous choice of verbal language as the most natural and economic mode of communication.

  1. Tonal Language Speech Compression Based on a Bitrate Scalable Multi-Pulse Based Code Excited Linear Prediction Coder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphattharachai Chomphan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Speech compression is an important issue in the modern digital speech communication. The functionality of bitrates scalability also plays significant role, since the capacity of communication system varies all the time. When considering tonal speech, such as Thai, tone plays important role on the naturalness and the intelligibility of the speech, it must be treated appropriately. Therefore these issues are taken into account in this study. Approach: This study proposes a modification of flexible Multi-Pulse based Code Excited Linear Predictive (MP-CELP coder with bitrates scalabilities for tonal language speech in the multimedia applications. The coder consists of a core coder and bitrates scalable tools. The high pitch delay resolutions are applied to the adaptive codebook of core coder for tonal language speech quality improvement. The bitrates scalable tool employs multi-stage excitation coding based on an embedded-coding approach. The multi-pulse excitation codebook at each stage is adaptively produced depending on the selected excitation signal at the previous stage. Results: The experimental results show that the speech quality of the proposed coder is improved above the speech quality of the conventional coder without pitch-resolution adaptation. Conclusion: From the study, the proposed approach is able to improve the speech compression quality for tonal language and the functionality of bitrates scalability is also developed.

  2. The treatment of apraxia of speech : Speech and music therapy, an innovative joint effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Josephus Johannes Stephanus

    2016-01-01

    Apraxia of Speech (AoS) is a neurogenic speech disorder. A wide variety of behavioural methods have been developed to treat AoS. Various therapy programmes use musical elements to improve speech production. A unique therapy programme combining elements of speech therapy and music therapy is called S

  3. The treatment of apraxia of speech : Speech and music therapy, an innovative joint effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Josephus Johannes Stephanus

    2016-01-01

    Apraxia of Speech (AoS) is a neurogenic speech disorder. A wide variety of behavioural methods have been developed to treat AoS. Various therapy programmes use musical elements to improve speech production. A unique therapy programme combining elements of speech therapy and music therapy is called

  4. The treatment of apraxia of speech : Speech and music therapy, an innovative joint effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Josephus Johannes Stephanus

    2016-01-01

    Apraxia of Speech (AoS) is a neurogenic speech disorder. A wide variety of behavioural methods have been developed to treat AoS. Various therapy programmes use musical elements to improve speech production. A unique therapy programme combining elements of speech therapy and music therapy is called S

  5. [Speech impairment and the Smith-Magenis syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, C; Morlot, S; Ptok, M

    2007-08-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a distinct multiple congenital anomaly caused by an interstitial deletion of the chromosome 17 p11.2. The phenotype includes dysmorphic features, mental retardation, speech delay, signs of peripheral neuropathy, and neurobehavioral problems. Also sensorineural and conduction hearing loss are described. In children with speech delay the physician should consider a genetic or syndromal disease.

  6. Development of language and speech perception in congenitally, profoundly deaf children as a function of age at cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, Mario A; Teoh, Su-Wooi; Neuburger, Heidi

    2004-01-01

    Like any other surgery requiring anesthesia, cochlear implantation in the first few years of life carries potential risks, which makes it important to assess the potential benefits. This study introduces a new method to assess the effect of age at implantation on cochlear implant outcomes: developmental trajectory analysis (DTA). DTA compares curves representing change in an outcome measure over time (i.e. developmental trajectories) for two groups of children that differ along a potentially important independent variable (e.g. age at intervention). This method was used to compare language development and speech perception outcomes in children who received cochlear implants in the second, third or fourth year of life. Within this range of age at implantation, it was found that implantation before the age of 2 resulted in speech perception and language advantages that were significant both from a statistical and a practical point of view. Additionally, the present results are consistent with the existence of a 'sensitive period' for language development, a gradual decline in language acquisition skills as a function of age. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Speech Indexing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordelman, R.J.F.; Jong, de F.M.G.; Leeuwen, van D.A.; Blanken, H.M.; de Vries, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter will focus on the automatic extraction of information from the speech in multimedia documents. This approach is often referred to as speech indexing and it can be regarded as a subfield of audio indexing that also incorporates for example the analysis of music and sounds. If the objecti

  8. Plowing Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Zla ba sgrol ma

    2009-01-01

    This file contains a plowing speech and a discussion about the speech This collection presents forty-nine audio files including: several folk song genres; folktales and; local history from the Sman shad Valley of Sde dge county World Oral Literature Project

  9. Speech coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  10. Sensorimotor Interactions in Speech Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Shiller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Auditory input is essential for normal speech development and plays a key role in speech production throughout the life span. In traditional models, auditory input plays two critical roles: 1 establishing the acoustic correlates of speech sounds that serve, in part, as the targets of speech production, and 2 as a source of feedback about a talker's own speech outcomes. This talk will focus on both of these roles, describing a series of studies that examine the capacity of children and adults to adapt to real-time manipulations of auditory feedback during speech production. In one study, we examined sensory and motor adaptation to a manipulation of auditory feedback during production of the fricative “s”. In contrast to prior accounts, adaptive changes were observed not only in speech motor output but also in subjects' perception of the sound. In a second study, speech adaptation was examined following a period of auditory–perceptual training targeting the perception of vowels. The perceptual training was found to systematically improve subjects' motor adaptation response to altered auditory feedback during speech production. The results of both studies support the idea that perceptual and motor processes are tightly coupled in speech production learning, and that the degree and nature of this coupling may change with development.

  11. Development and testing of an audio forensic software for enhancing speech signals masked by loud music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Robert A.; Negrescu, Cristian; Stanomir, Dumitru

    2016-12-01

    In many situations audio recordings can decide the fate of a trial when accepted as evidence. But until they can be taken into account they must be authenticated at first, but also the quality of the targeted content (speech in most cases) must be good enough to remove any doubt. In this scope two main directions of multimedia forensics come into play: content authentication and noise reduction. This paper presents an application that is included in the latter. If someone would like to conceal their conversation, the easiest way to do it would be to turn loud the nearest audio system. In this situation, if a microphone was placed close by, the recorded signal would be apparently useless because the speech signal would be masked by the loud music signal. The paper proposes an adaptive filters based solution to remove the musical content from a previously described signal mixture in order to recover the masked vocal signal. Two adaptive filtering algorithms were tested in the proposed solution: the Normalised Least Mean Squares (NLMS) and Recursive Least Squares (RLS). Their performances in the described situation were evaluated using Simulink, compared and included in the paper.

  12. Development and validation of dissolution testings in acidic media for rabeprazole sodium delayed-release capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yinhe; Si, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Lulu; Feng, Xin; Yang, Xinmin; Huang, Min; Wu, Chuanbin

    2016-10-01

    Rabeprazole sodium (RAB) dissolved in acidic media is accompanied by its degradation in the course of dissolution testing. To develop and establish the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle (RAB) delayed-release capsules (ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle) in acidic media using USP apparatus 2 (paddle apparatus) as a dissolution tester, the issues of determination of accumulative release amount of RAB in these acidic media and interference of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose phthalate were solved by adding appropriate hydrochloric acid (HCl) into dissolution samples coupled with centrifugation so as to remove the interference and form a solution of degradation products of RAB, which is of a considerably stable ultraviolet (UV) absorbance at the wavelength of 298 nm within 2.0 h. Therefore, the accumulative release amount of RAB in dissolution samples at each sample time points could be determined by UV-spectrophotometry, and the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle in the media of pH 1.0, pH 6.0, and pH 6.8 could be established. The method was validated per as the ICH Q2 (R1) guidelines and demonstrated to be adequate for quality control of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle and the accumulative release profiles can be used as a tool to guide the formulation development and quality control of a generic drug for ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle.

  13. Effects of dust, formaldehyde and delayed feeding on early postnatal development of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, Pieter; van de Ven, Lotte J F; Lourens, Sander; Kemp, Bas; van den Brand, Henry

    2017-06-01

    We investigated effects of perinatal exposure to dust or formaldehyde and the moment of first feed intake after hatching on broiler chicken development during the first week of life. Four environmental treatments were used from 468 until 512h of incubation: control (CONT), heat treated dust (HTD), untreated dust (UTD) or formaldehyde disinfection (FORM). After hatching, all chickens were assigned to 1 of 2 feeding treatments: early feeding (EF; feed and water available in the hatcher) or delayed feeding (DF). After 512h of incubation (day 0), chickens were reared until day 7 of age. In DF chickens, body weight (BW), yolk free body mass (YFBM) and relative liver weight did not differ among environmental treatments at day 0. However, in EF chickens BW at day 0 was greater in HTD chickens than in UTD and FORM chickens. YFBM in EF chickens at day 0 was greater when chickens were exposed to HTD compared to the other environmental treatments. In EF chickens, relative liver weight was greater in HTD chickens than in FORM. In DF chickens, BW at day 0 was positively related with hatching time (HT). In EF chickens, YFBM was positively related to HT. Residual yolk weight at day 0 was positively related with HT, whereas relative liver weight and microbicidal capacity were negatively related with HT. This study demonstrated that formaldehyde and dust during the hatching phase affect broiler chicken development at pulling from the incubator, but not at day 7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Are cognitive "insomnia" processes involved in the development and maintenance of delayed sleep wake phase disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Cele E; Gradisar, Michael; Barbero, Sebastian C

    2016-04-01

    Although individuals with delayed sleep wake phase disorder (DSWPD) and chronic insomnia disorder (CID) share many of the same phenomenological experiences, theories relating to the development and maintenance of these disorders are distinct in focus. Unlike CID, theory relating to DSWPD is primarily physiologically based and assumes almost no cognitive pathway. However, recent research findings suggest that individuals with DSWPD also display many of the sleep-disordered cognitive processes that were previously assumed to be unique to the insomnia experience. As such, this review aims to summarise current research findings to address the question "Could cognitive processes be involved in the development and maintenance of DSWPD?" In particular, the presence of cognitive and physiological pre-sleep arousal, sleep-related attentional bias, distorted perception of sleep and daytime functioning, dysfunctional beliefs and safety behaviours will be investigated. As this emerging area of research requires a stronger evidence base, we highlight suggestions for future investigation and provide preliminary practice points for clinicians assessing and treating "insomnia" in patients with DSWPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Critical Thinking Process in English Speech

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-li

    2016-01-01

    With the development of mass media, English speech has become an important way for international cultural exchange in the context of globalization. Whether it is a political speech, a motivational speech, or an ordinary public speech, the wisdom and charm of critical thinking are always given into full play. This study analyzes the cultivation of critical thinking in English speech with the aid of representative examples, which is significant for cultivating college students’critical thinking as well as developing their critical thinking skills in English speech.

  16. [Changes in cardiorhythm and its stochastic parameters in first-graders with normal neuropsychological development and in children with speech disorders during performance of intellectual activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenskaia, V G; Svereva, S V; Muzalevskaia, M O; Tomanov, L V

    2002-01-01

    Influence of positive and negative motivation on the performance efficiency and some stochastic characteristics of RR-interval fluctuations in speech association experiment was studied in two groups of pupils of the first class: normally developing children and children with speech deviations. It was shown that children with normal development achieve their maximal productivity mostly under the influence of their inner motivation without external stimulation, while for achieving the maximal productivity by children with speech deviations the positive external motivation is required. Baseline ECG recordings in two groups of children significantly differed only in the standard error of the RR-intervals that was decreased in the deviant children. Under conditions of positive motivation, the maximal intellectual productivity in both groups of children was achieved at significantly different values of the fractal index beta. The findings are discussed in terms of the influence of motivation on the verbal performance and concomitant adaptation.

  17. Chloroquine neither eliminates liver stage parasites nor delays their development in a murine Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejram eSahu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination (CVac confers long lasting sterile protection against homologous parasite strains in humans, and involves inoculation of infectious sporozoites under drug cover. CVac using the drug chloroquine (CQ induces pre-erythrocytic immunity in humans that includes antibody to sporozoites and T-cell responses to liver stage parasites. The mechanism by which CVac with CQ induces strong protective immunity is not understood as untreated infections do not confer protection. CQ kills blood stage parasites, but its effect on liver stage parasites is poorly studied. Here we hypothesized that CQ may prolong or perturb liver stage development of Plasmodium, as a potential explanation for enhanced pre-erythrocytic immune responses. Balb/c mice with or without CQ prophylaxis were infected with sporozoite forms of a luciferase-expressing rodent parasite, Plasmodium yoelii-Luc (Py-Luc. Mice that received primaquine (PQ, a drug that kills liver stage parasites, served as a positive control of drug effect. Parasite burden in liver was measured both by bioluminescence and by qRT-PCR quantification of parasite transcript. Time to appearance of parasites in the blood was monitored by microscopic analysis of Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood smears. The parasite load in livers of CQ-treated and untreated mice did not significantly differ at any of the time points studied. Parasites appeared in the blood smears of both CQ-treated and untreated mice 3 days after infection. Taken together, our findings confirm that CQ neither eliminates liver stage parasites nor delays their development. Further investigations into the mechanism of CQ-induced protection after CVac are required, and may give insights relevant to drug and vaccine development.

  18. Enhanced insulin sensitivity in prepubertal children with constitutional delay of growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dyanne A; Hofman, Paul L; Miles, Harriet L; Sato, Tim A; Billett, Nathalie E; Robinson, Elizabeth M; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2010-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that prepubertal children with presumed constitutional delay of growth and development (CDGD) have enhanced insulin sensitivity and, therefore, insulin sensitivity is associated with later onset of puberty. Twenty-one prepubertal children with presumed CDGD and 23 prepubertal control children, underwent a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test to evaluate insulin sensitivity and other markers of insulin, glucose, and growth regulation. Children in the CDGD group were shorter and leaner than control subjects. Children with presumed CDGD were 40% more insulin sensitive (17.0 x 10(-4) min(-1)/[mU/L] versus 12.1 x 10(-4) min(-1)/[mU/L]; P = .0006) and had reduced acute insulin response, thus maintaining euglycemia (216 mU/L versus 330 mU/L; P = .02) compared with control subjects. In addition, the CDGD group had lower serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 levels (3333 ng/mL versus 3775 ng/mL; P = .0004) and a trend toward lower serum insulin-like growth factor-II levels (794 ng/mL versus 911 ng/mL; P = .06). Prepubertal children with presumed CDGD have enhanced insulin sensitivity, supporting the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity is associated with timing of puberty. It may signify long-term biological advantages with lower risk of metabolic syndrome and malignancy. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Home-based Early Intervention on Auditory and Speech Development in Mandarin-speaking Deaf Infants and Toddlers with Chronological Aged 7-24 Months

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Yang; Yue-Hui Liu; Ming-Fu Fu; Chun-Lin Li; Li-Yan Wang; Qi Wang; Xi-Bin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background:Early auditory and speech development in home-based early intervention of infants and toddlers with hearing loss younger than 2 years are still spare in China.This study aimed to observe the development of auditory and speech in deaf infants and toddlers who were fitted with hearing aids and/or received cochlear implantation between the chronological ages of 7-24 months,and analyze the effect of chronological age and recovery time on auditory and speech development in the course of home-based early intervention.Methods:This longitudinal study included 55 hearing impaired children with severe and profound binaural deafness,who were divided into Group A (7-12 months),Group B (13-18 months) and Group C (19-24 months) based on the chronological age.Categories auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating scale (SIR) were used to evaluate auditory and speech development at baseline and 3,6,9,12,18,and 24 months of habilitation.Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic features and were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance.Results:With 24 months of hearing intervention,78% of the patients were able to understand common phrases and conversation without lip-reading,96% of the patients were intelligible to a listener.In three groups,children showed the rapid growth of trend features in each period of habilitation.CAP and SIR scores have developed rapidly within 24 months after fitted auxiliary device in Group A,which performed much better auditory and speech abilities than Group B (P < 0.05) and Group C (P < 0.05).Group B achieved better results than Group C,whereas no significant differences were observed between Group B and Group C (P > 0.05).Conclusions:The data suggested the early hearing intervention and home-based habilitation benefit auditory and speech development.Chronological age and recovery time may be major factors for aural verbal outcomes in hearing impaired children.The development of auditory

  20. Development of a new Delayed Memory Index for the WMS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Chelune, Gordon J; Price, Larry R

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents the Delayed Memory Index (DMI) as an alternative to the General Memory Index (GMI) of the Weschler Memory Scale-Third Edition (WMS-III). The WMS-III Immediate Memory Index (IMI) and the GMI are not parallel in structure, making a direct comparison between these index scores (i.e., immediate vs. delayed memory variables) difficult. The IMI is composed of the sum of scaled scores of four subtests (Logical Memory I, Verbal Paired Associates I, Faces I, and Family Pictures I) while the GMI is composed of the sum of scaled scores of five subtests (Logical Memory II, Verbal Paired Associates II, Faces II, Family Pictures II and Auditory Recognition Delayed). Inclusion of Auditory Recognition Delayed in the GMI is also problematic as it is highly skewed and limited by extreme ceiling effects (see Tulsky, Chiaravalloti, Palmer, & Chelune, 2003). To remedy these problems, we present a new index score that does not include auditory recognition, the Delayed Memory Index. Normative tables for the new Delayed Memory Index based on the inclusion of the Faces subtest, or alternatively the Visual Reproduction subtest, are presented, and initial estimates of their psychometric properties are described.

  1. Private speech use in arithmetical calculation: relationship with phonological memory skills in children with and without mathematical difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostad, Snorre A

    2015-07-01

    The majority of recent studies conclude that children's private speech development (private speech internalisation) is important for mathematical development and subject to disabling. The main concern of the present study was whether or not the two phonological memory factors evaluated in the study (i.e. the results of children's digit span assessments, both forward and backward) relates to private speech internalisation and whether this relationship changes with children's age, or mathematical achievement levels, or both. We made comparisons between children with acknowledged mathematical difficulties (MD) and children without mathematical difficulties (MN), basing on private speech differences, phonological memory differences and differences in the relationship between private speech internalisation and phonological memory skills. The results not only confirm the impact of private speech internalisation but also emphasise a possible parallel role of phonological memory for subsequent mathematical achievement. In contrast to the MD children, children without MD showed an age-determined shift from a lesser to greater relationship between a high level of private speech internalisation and a high level phonological memory skills. As a whole, the results are consistent with a developmental difference and not with a developmental delay model and suggest that relationships between private speech internalisation and phonological memory may reflect individual differences in children's mathematical achievement. The results are discussed in terms of directions for future research.

  2. The phonological development of Danish-speaking children: a normative cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Marit Carolin; Fox-Boyer, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of children’s speech development is of great importance for speech and language therapists since it provides a baseline for the evaluation of whether a child shows typical, delayed or deviant speech development. As previous studies have shown that differences are seen...... in the speech development across languages, language-specific data are of great importance in order to understand how the phonological system of the ambient language affects the children’s speech acquisition. To date, little is known about the typical speech development in Danish-speaking children....... It was suggested, however, that the acquisition process might be slower for Danish-speaking children than for children acquiring other languages due to the “blurry” sound structure of Danish. The aim of the current study was, therefore, to investigate typical speech development in Danish-speaking children...

  3. Effects of Sampling Context on the Finite Verb Production of Children with and without Delayed Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Linda R.; Gilmore, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Informal language sampling is ubiquitous in the study of developing grammatical abilities in children with and without delayed language, including study of grammatical abilities in the area of finite verb production. Finite verbs are particularly important to assess as they appear to be the grammatical morphemes most vulnerable to error in the…

  4. OJKO-project : Longitudinal study on the development of young children with a serious cognitive and motor developmental delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; Visser, Linda; van der Putten, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a longitudinal project on the development of children with a serious cognitive and motor developmental delay has started in Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of this study are to evaluate the cognitive, motor, communicative and social-emotional abilities of young children with a severe

  5. Delayed early primary visual pathway development in premature infants: high density electrophysiological evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Tremblay

    Full Text Available In the past decades, multiple studies have been interested in developmental patterns of the visual system in healthy infants. During the first year of life, differential maturational changes have been observed between the Magnocellular (P and the Parvocellular (P visual pathways. However, few studies investigated P and M system development in infants born prematurely. The aim of the present study was to characterize P and M system maturational differences between healthy preterm and fullterm infants through a critical period of visual maturation: the first year of life. Using a cross-sectional design, high-density electroencephalogram (EEG was recorded in 31 healthy preterms and 41 fullterm infants of 3, 6, or 12 months (corrected age for premature babies. Three visual stimulations varying in contrast and spatial frequency were presented to stimulate preferentially the M pathway, the P pathway, or both systems simultaneously during EEG recordings. Results from early visual evoked potentials in response to the stimulation that activates simultaneously both systems revealed longer N1 latencies and smaller P1 amplitudes in preterm infants compared to fullterms. Moreover, preterms showed longer N1 and P1 latencies in response to stimuli assessing the M pathway at 3 months. No differences between preterms and fullterms were found when using the preferential P system stimulation. In order to identify the cerebral generator of each visual response, distributed source analyses were computed in 12-month-old infants using LORETA. Source analysis demonstrated an activation of the parietal dorsal region in fullterm infants, in response to the preferential M pathway, which was not seen in the preterms. Overall, these findings suggest that the Magnocellular pathway development is affected in premature infants. Although our VEP results suggest that premature children overcome, at least partially, the visual developmental delay with time, source analyses reveal

  6. Three different profiles: early socio-communicative capacities in typical Rett syndrome, the preserved speech variant and normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Kaufmann, Walter E; Pokorny, Florian; Grossmann, Tobias; Windpassinger, Christian; Petek, Erwin; Einspieler, Christa

    2014-02-01

    This is the first study aiming to compare pre-diagnostic socio-communicative development of a female with typical Rett syndrome (RTT), a female with the preserved speech variant of RTT (PSV) and a control toddler. We analysed 1275 min of family videos at the participants' age between 9 and 24 months and used the Inventory of Potential Communicative Acts (IPCA) to delineate their repertoires of communicative forms and functions. The results revealed different profiles for the three different conditions. The repertoire of communicative gestures and (pre)linguistic vocalizations was most comprehensive in the control toddler, followed by the female with PSV and the female with RTT. These findings contribute to the growing knowledge about early developmental abnormalities in RTT. In order to define distinctive profiles for typical and atypical RTT and evaluate their specificity, a larger body of evidence is needed.

  7. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK ON LANGUAGE AND SPEECH DEVELOPMENT IN THE SYSTEM OF E-LINGUOMETHODOLOGY MEANS FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna A. Khyzhnyak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the problems of primary school teachers professional activity under the conditions of education informatization, gives the general characteristic of e-linguomethodology’s researches directions as an innovative area of methodology science, argues the necessity of general classification of e-linguomethodology’s genres for primary school, presents an analysis of existing research on the topic, summarizes their results on the electronic books as a genre of educational software. The author substantiates her own classification of e-linguomethodology’s means for primary school, accents attention on importance of their system use in an educational process, pays special attention to psychological and pedagogical, methodical and technical requirements to electronic textbooks on language and speech development.

  8. Development of a regional tropospheric delay model for GPS-based navigation with emphasis to the Indian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, K.; Saha, Korak; Suresh Raju, C.

    2008-08-01

    The accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), aimed to support precise positioning for aircraft navigation globally by coordinating different regional augmentation systems, is limited by the extent to which the atmospheric propagation delay of microwave signals can be modeled. An algorithm is developed for modeling the tropospheric delay based on mean meteorological parameters. A Region-specific Tropospheric Delay (RTD) model is developed exclusively for the Indian region using meteorological data from the Indian subcontinent, as a part of GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) program. The applicability of this model is examined in the context of the global model used in Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), developed employing meteorological data mostly from North American continent, by comparing the estimated zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) with those obtained from regional models employing measured atmospheric parameters at the surface. The rms deviation of ZTD estimated using RTD model from that of the surface model is found to be ˜5 cm. A further validation by comparing with GPS measurements from two IGS stations at Bangalore and Hyderabad showed that predictions made using the RTD model are within an rms deviation of ±5 cm while those using WAAS model is ±7 cm. Maximum value of the residual error for RTD model is ˜15 cm, which corresponds to a ˜0.5 m error in the vertical coordinates for the lowest satellite elevation angles usually encountered.

  9. Perception of Speech Sounds in School-Aged Children with Speech Sound Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L; Irwin, Julia R; Turcios, Jacqueline

    2015-11-01

    Children with speech sound disorders may perceive speech differently than children with typical speech development. The nature of these speech differences is reviewed with an emphasis on assessing phoneme-specific perception for speech sounds that are produced in error. Category goodness judgment, or the ability to judge accurate and inaccurate tokens of speech sounds, plays an important role in phonological development. The software Speech Assessment and Interactive Learning System, which has been effectively used to assess preschoolers' ability to perform goodness judgments, is explored for school-aged children with residual speech errors (RSEs). However, data suggest that this particular task may not be sensitive to perceptual differences in school-aged children. The need for the development of clinical tools for assessment of speech perception in school-aged children with RSE is highlighted, and clinical suggestions are provided. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Neural entrainment to rhythmically presented auditory, visual, and audio-visual speech in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Alan James; Mead, Natasha; Barnes, Lisa; Goswami, Usha

    2012-01-01

    Auditory cortical oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in speech perception. It is suggested that the brain may take temporal "samples" of information from the speech stream at different rates, phase resetting ongoing oscillations so that they are aligned with similar frequency bands in the input ("phase locking"). Information from these frequency bands is then bound together for speech perception. To date, there are no explorations of neural phase locking and entrainment to speech input in children. However, it is clear from studies of language acquisition that infants use both visual speech information and auditory speech information in learning. In order to study neural entrainment to speech in typically developing children, we use a rhythmic entrainment paradigm (underlying 2 Hz or delta rate) based on repetition of the syllable "ba," presented in either the auditory modality alone, the visual modality alone, or as auditory-visual speech (via a "talking head"). To ensure attention to the task, children aged 13 years were asked to press a button as fast as possible when the "ba" stimulus violated the rhythm for each stream type. Rhythmic violation depended on delaying the occurrence of a "ba" in the isochronous stream. Neural entrainment was demonstrated for all stream types, and individual differences in standardized measures of language processing were related to auditory entrainment at the theta rate. Further, there was significant modulation of the preferred phase of auditory entrainment in the theta band when visual speech cues were present, indicating cross-modal phase resetting. The rhythmic entrainment paradigm developed here offers a method for exploring individual differences in oscillatory phase locking during development. In particular, a method for assessing neural entrainment and cross-modal phase resetting would be useful for exploring developmental learning difficulties thought to involve temporal sampling, such as

  11. Neural entrainment to rhythmically-presented auditory, visual and audio-visual speech in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan James Power

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory cortical oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in speech perception. It is suggested that the brain may take temporal ‘samples’ of information from the speech stream at different rates, phase-resetting ongoing oscillations so that they are aligned with similar frequency bands in the input (‘phase locking’. Information from these frequency bands is then bound together for speech perception. To date, there are no explorations of neural phase-locking and entrainment to speech input in children. However, it is clear from studies of language acquisition that infants use both visual speech information and auditory speech information in learning. In order to study neural entrainment to speech in typically-developing children, we use a rhythmic entrainment paradigm (underlying 2 Hz or delta rate based on repetition of the syllable ba, presented in either the auditory modality alone, the visual modality alone, or as auditory-visual speech (via a talking head. To ensure attention to the task, children aged 13 years were asked to press a button as fast as possible when the ba stimulus violated the rhythm for each stream type. Rhythmic violation depended on delaying the occurrence of a ba in the isochronous stream. Neural entrainment was demonstrated for all stream types, and individual differences in standardized measures of language processing were related to auditory entrainment at the theta rate. Further, there was significant modulation of the preferred phase of auditory entrainment in the theta band when visual speech cues were present, indicating cross-modal phase resetting. The rhythmic entrainment paradigm developed here offers a method for exploring individual differences in oscillatory phase locking during development. In particular, a method for assessing neural entrainment and cross-modal phase resetting would be useful for exploring developmental learning difficulties thought to involve temporal sampling

  12. Loss of LORELEI function in the pistil delays initiation but does not affect embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Double fertilization, uniquely observed in plants, requires successful sperm cell delivery by the pollen tube to the female gametophyte, followed by migration, recognition and fusion of the two sperm cells with two female gametic cells. The female gametophyte not only regulates these steps but also controls the subsequent initiation of seed development. Previously, we reported that loss of LORELEI, which encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, in the female reproductive tissues causes a delay in initiation of seed development. From these studies, however, it was unclear if embryos derived from fertilization of lre-5 gametophytes continued to lag behind wild-type during seed development. Additionally, it was not determined if the delay in initiation of seed development had any lingering effects during seed germination. Finally, it was not known if loss of LORELEI function affects seedling development given that LORELEI is expressed in eight-day-old seedlings. Here, we showed that despite a delay in initiation, lre-5/lre-5 embryos recover, becoming equivalent to the developing wild-type embryos beginning at 72 hours after pollination. Additionally, lre-5/lre-5 seed germination, and seedling and root development are indistinguishable from wild-type indicating that loss of LORELEI is tolerated, at least under standard growth conditions, in vegetative tissues. PMID:21051955

  13. Loss of LORELEI function in the pistil delays initiation but does not affect embryo development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Palanivelu, Ravishankar

    2010-11-01

    Double fertilization, uniquely observed in plants, requires successful sperm cell delivery by the pollen tube to the female gametophyte, followed by migration, recognition and fusion of the two sperm cells with two female gametic cells. The female gametophyte not only regulates these steps but also controls the subsequent initiation of seed development. Previously, we reported that loss of LORELEI, which encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, in the female reproductive tissues causes a delay in initiation of seed development. From these studies, however, it was unclear if embryos derived from fertilization of lre-5 gametophytes continued to lag behind wild type during seed development. Additionally, it was not determined if the delay in initiation of seed development had any lingering effects during seed germination. Finally, it was not known if loss of LORELEI function affects seedling development given that LORELEI is expressed in eight-day-old seedlings. Here, we showed that despite a delay in initiation, lre-5/lre-5 embryos recover, becoming equivalent to the developing wild-type embryos beginning at 72 hours after pollination. Additionally, lre-5/lre-5 seed germination, and seedling and root development are indistinguishable from wild type indicating that loss of LORELEI is tolerated, at least under standard growth conditions, in vegetative tissues.

  14. Advances to the development of a basic Mexican sign-to-speech and text language translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bautista, G.; Trujillo-Romero, F.; Diaz-Gonzalez, G.

    2016-09-01

    Sign Language (SL) is the basic alternative communication method between deaf people. However, most of the hearing people have trouble understanding the SL, making communication with deaf people almost impossible and taking them apart from daily activities. In this work we present an automatic basic real-time sign language translator capable of recognize a basic list of Mexican Sign Language (MSL) signs of 10 meaningful words, letters (A-Z) and numbers (1-10) and translate them into speech and text. The signs were collected from a group of 35 MSL signers executed in front of a Microsoft Kinect™ Sensor. The hand gesture recognition system use the RGB-D camera to build and storage data point clouds, color and skeleton tracking information. In this work we propose a method to obtain the representative hand trajectory pattern information. We use Euclidean Segmentation method to obtain the hand shape and Hierarchical Centroid as feature extraction method for images of numbers and letters. A pattern recognition method based on a Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used to interpret the hand gestures. Finally, we use K-Fold Cross Validation method for training and testing stages. Our results achieve an accuracy of 95.71% on words, 98.57% on numbers and 79.71% on letters. In addition, an interactive user interface was designed to present the results in voice and text format.

  15. Auditory processing and phonological awareness in children with normal and deviant speech development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintas, Victor Gandra; Attoni, Tiago Mendonça; Keske-Soares, Márcia; Mezzomo, Carolina Lisbôa

    2010-01-01

    Auditory processing (AP) and phonological awareness (PA) in children with and without phonological disorders. To compare the performance of children with and without phonological disorders in a PA test; to verify the possible relationship between performances in distinct tasks of this test with the performance in the AP evaluation. Participants were 44 children with and without the diagnosis of phonological disorder, aged between 5:0 and 7:0 years, of both genders. After speech samples were gathered, subjects were divided into two groups: a study group (SG), composed by children with phonological disorders, and a control group (CG) with children without phonological disorders. PA was assessed through the Protocol Task Awareness Test (PTAT), and through the simplified AP evaluation (screening)--Disyllabic change--Staggered Spondaic Word (SSW), dichotic listening test and the binaural fusion test. In both PA and AP assessments, children of the CG obtained better results. When correlating the results of AP and PA, a greater number of correlations were observed for the SG. A significant relationship between the performance in the AP evaluation and success in PA tasks exists for children with phonological disorders.

  16. Can Speech Development at 36 Months in Children with Hearing Loss Be Predicted from Information Available in the Second Year of Life?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenchain, Patrick; Menn, Lise; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1999-01-01

    A study involving 19 children with hearing impairments found that those who developed intelligible speech by 36 months had at 16-23 months a high frequency of vocal utterances, a high proportion of vocal utterances that included intelligible true words, a large consonant inventory, and a high percentage of intonational utterances. (Contains…

  17. Early Speech Development in Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Interrelationships with Language and Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Sedey, Allison

    1999-01-01

    A study investigated the relationship between speech production and several demographic and developmental factors in 147 children (ages 14-60 months) with hearing impairments. Significant predictors of speech intelligibility and phonetic inventory included the child's age, expressive language ability, degree of hearing loss, mode of communication,…

  18. The Impact of Early Intervention on Speech and Lexical Development for Toddlers with Cleft Palate: A Retrospective Look at Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin-Jones, Mary; Chapman, Kathy L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the impact of early intervention on speech and lexical measures for toddlers with cleft palate. Method: Speech measures of ten 27-month-old toddlers with cleft palate who had been referred for therapy at 17 months of age were compared to those of 10 toddlers with cleft palate who had…

  19. Profiling Early Socio-Communicative Development in Five Young Girls with the Preserved Speech Variant of Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Einspieler, Christa; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D.; Wolin, Thomas; Pini, Giorgio; Budimirovic, Dejan B.; Zappella, Michele; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a developmental disorder characterized by regression of purposeful hand skills and spoken language, although some affected children retain some ability to speech. We assessed the communicative abilities of five young girls, who were later diagnosed with the preserved speech variant of RTT, during the pre-regression period…

  20. Speech Therapy Prevention in Kindergarten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vašíková Jana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This contribution presents the results of a research focused on speech therapy in kindergartens. This research was realized in Zlín Region. It explains how speech therapy prevention is realized in kindergartens, determines the educational qualifications of teachers for this activity and verifies the quality of the applied methodologies in the daily program of kindergartens. Methods: The empirical part of the study was conducted through a qualitative research. For data collection, we used participant observation. We analyzed the research data and presented them verbally, using frequency tables and graphs, which were subsequently interpreted. Results: In this research, 71% of the teachers completed a course of speech therapy prevention, 28% of the teachers received pedagogical training and just 1% of the teachers are clinical speech pathologists. In spite of this, the research data show that, in most of kindergartens, the aim of speech therapy prevention is performed in order to correct deficiencies in speech and voice. The content of speech therapy prevention is implemented in this direction. Discussion: Awareness of the teachers’/parents’ regarding speech therapy prevention in kindergartens. Limitations: This research was implemented in autumn of 2016 in Zlín Region. Research data cannot be generalized to the entire population. We have the ambition to expand this research to other regions next year. Conclusions: Results show that both forms of speech therapy prevention - individual and group - are used. It is also often a combination of both. The aim of the individual forms is, in most cases, to prepare a child for cooperation during voice correction. The research also confirmed that most teachers do not have sufficient education in speech therapy. Most of them completed a course of speech therapy as primary prevention educators. The results also show that teachers spend a lot of time by speech therapy prevention in

  1. Can adolescents learn self-control? Delay of gratification in the development of control over risk taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Daniel; Duckworth, Angela L; Sznitman, Sharon; Park, Sunhee

    2010-09-01

    Recent findings from developmental neuroscience suggest that the adolescent brain is too immature to exert control over impulsive drives, such as sensation seeking, that increase during adolescence. Using a discounting of delayed reward paradigm, this research examines the ability to delay gratification as a potential source of control over risk-taking tendencies that increase during adolescence. In addition, it explores the role of experience resulting from risk taking as well as future time perspective as contributors to the development of this ability. In a nationally representative sample (n = 900) of young people aged 14-22, a structural equation analysis shows that risk taking as assessed by use of three popular drugs (tobacco, marijuana, and alcohol) is inversely related to the ability to delay gratification. The relation is robust across gender, age, and different levels of sensation seeking. In addition, high sensation seekers exhibit dramatic age-related increase in delay of gratification, lending support to the hypothesis that engaging in risky behavior provides experience that leads to greater patience for long-term rewards. The findings support the conclusion that a complete understanding of the development of self-control must consider individual differences not easily explained by universal trends in brain maturation.

  2. The timing and effort of lexical access in natural and degraded speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Eva Wagner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding speech is effortless in ideal situations, and although adverse conditions, such as caused by hearing impairment, often render it an effortful task, they do not necessarily suspend speech comprehension. A prime example of this is speech perception by cochlear implant users, whose hearing prostheses transmit speech as a significantly degraded signal. It is yet unknown how mechanisms of speech processing deal with such degraded signals, and whether they are affected by effortful processing of speech.This paper compares the automatic process of lexical competition between natural and degraded speech, and combines gaze fixations, which capture the course of lexical disambiguation, with pupillometry, which quantifies the mental effort involved in processing speech. Listeners’ ocular responses were recorded during disambiguation of lexical embeddings with matching and mismatching durational cues. Durational cues were selected due to their substantial role in listeners' quick limitation of the number of lexical candidates for lexical access in natural speech. Results showed that lexical competition increased effort in processing natural stimuli in particular in presence of mismatching cues. Signal degradation reduced listeners’ ability to quickly integrate durational cues in lexical selection, and delayed and prolonged lexical competition. The effort of processing degraded speech was increased overall, and because it had its sources at the pre-lexical level this effect can be attributed to listening to degraded speech rather than to lexical disambiguation. In sum, the course of lexical competition was largely comparable for natural and degraded speech, but showed crucial shifts in timing, and different sources of increased mental effort. We argue that well-timed progress of information from sensory to pre-lexical and lexical stages of processing, which is the result of perceptual adaptation during speech development, is the reason why

  3. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  4. Speech and Hearing Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Reiko; Sakata, Robert

    1978-01-01

    In the public school, the speech and hearing therapist attempts to foster child growth and development through the provision of services basic to awareness of self and others, management of personal and social interactions, and development of strategies for coping with the handicap. (MM)

  5. Differences in Speech Recognition Between Children with Attention Deficits and Typically Developed Children Disappear When Exposed to 65 dB of Auditory Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Göran B W; Jobs, Elisabeth Nilsson

    2016-01-01

    The most common neuropsychiatric condition in the in children is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), affecting ∼6-9% of the population. ADHD is distinguished by inattention and hyperactive, impulsive behaviors as well as poor performance in various cognitive tasks often leading to failures at school. Sensory and perceptual dysfunctions have also been noticed. Prior research has mainly focused on limitations in executive functioning where differences are often explained by deficits in pre-frontal cortex activation. Less notice has been given to sensory perception and subcortical functioning in ADHD. Recent research has shown that children with ADHD diagnosis have a deviant auditory brain stem response compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the speech recognition threshold differs between attentive and children with ADHD symptoms in two environmental sound conditions, with and without external noise. Previous research has namely shown that children with attention deficits can benefit from white noise exposure during cognitive tasks and here we investigate if noise benefit is present during an auditory perceptual task. For this purpose we used a modified Hagerman's speech recognition test where children with and without attention deficits performed a binaural speech recognition task to assess the speech recognition threshold in no noise and noise conditions (65 dB). Results showed that the inattentive group displayed a higher speech recognition threshold than typically developed children and that the difference in speech recognition threshold disappeared when exposed to noise at supra threshold level. From this we conclude that inattention can partly be explained by sensory perceptual limitations that can possibly be ameliorated through noise exposure.

  6. Differences in Speech Recognition Between Children with Attention Deficits and Typically Developed Children Disappear when Exposed to 65 dB of Auditory Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran B W Söderlund

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common neuropsychiatric condition in the in children is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, affecting approximately 6-9 % of the population. ADHD is distinguished by inattention and hyperactive, impulsive behaviors as well as poor performance in various cognitive tasks often leading to failures at school. Sensory and perceptual dysfunctions have also been noticed. Prior research has mainly focused on limitations in executive functioning where differences are often explained by deficits in pre-frontal cortex activation. Less notice has been given to sensory perception and subcortical functioning in ADHD. Recent research has shown that children with ADHD diagnosis have a deviant auditory brain stem response compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the speech recognition threshold differs between attentive and children with ADHD symptoms in two environmental sound conditions, with and without external noise. Previous research has namely shown that children with attention deficits can benefit from white noise exposure during cognitive tasks and here we investigate if noise benefit is present during an auditory perceptual task. For this purpose we used a modified Hagerman’s speech recognition test where children with and without attention deficits performed a binaural speech recognition task to assess the speech recognition threshold in no noise and noise conditions (65 dB. Results showed that the inattentive group displayed a higher speech recognition threshold than typically developed children (TDC and that the difference in speech recognition threshold disappeared when exposed to noise at supra threshold level. From this we conclude that inattention can partly be explained by sensory perceptual limitations that can possibly be ameliorated through noise exposure.

  7. Application of wavelets in speech processing

    CERN Document Server

    Farouk, Mohamed Hesham

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a survey on wide-spread of employing wavelets analysis  in different applications of speech processing. The author examines development and research in different application of speech processing. The book also summarizes the state of the art research on wavelet in speech processing.

  8. Audiovisual Speech Integration and Lipreading in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth G.; Bennetto, Loisa

    2007-01-01

    Background: During speech perception, the ability to integrate auditory and visual information causes speech to sound louder and be more intelligible, and leads to quicker processing. This integration is important in early language development, and also continues to affect speech comprehension throughout the lifespan. Previous research shows that…

  9. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-15

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  10. Differences in assertive speech acts produced by children with autism, Asperger syndrome, specific language impairment, and normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziatas, Kathryn; Durkin, Kevin; Pratt, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The assertive speech acts of children with autism (n = 12) and Asperger syndrome (n = 12), individually matched to children with specific language impairment (SLI; n = 24) and children with normal development (n = 24) were studied in the context of gently structured conversation. These children also completed the false belief test of theory of mind. The children with autism used significantly lower proportions of assertions involving explanations and descriptions than the children with SLI or normal development and significantly lower proportions of assertions involving internal state and explanations than the children with Asperger syndrome. The children with autism used a higher proportion of assertions involving identifications than any other group. The assertions of the children with Asperger syndrome were generally not different than those of the children with SLI or normal development except for a higher proportion of assertions involving own internal state. Further analysis of the mental assertions revealed that the children with autism and Asperger syndrome predominantly referred to desire and made few references to thought and belief, whereas the children with SLI and those with normal development used a higher proportion of references to thought and belief.

  11. Production and perception of clear speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlow, Ann R.

    2003-04-01

    When a talker believes that the listener is likely to have speech perception difficulties due to a hearing loss, background noise, or a different native language, she or he will typically adopt a clear speaking style. Previous research has established that, with a simple set of instructions to the talker, ``clear speech'' can be produced by most talkers under laboratory recording conditions. Furthermore, there is reliable evidence that adult listeners with either impaired or normal hearing typically find clear speech more intelligible than conversational speech. Since clear speech production involves listener-oriented articulatory adjustments, a careful examination of the acoustic-phonetic and perceptual consequences of the conversational-to-clear speech transformation can serve as an effective window into talker- and listener-related forces in speech communication. Furthermore, clear speech research has considerable potential for the development of speech enhancement techniques. After reviewing previous and current work on the acoustic properties of clear versus conversational speech, this talk will present recent data from a cross-linguistic study of vowel production in clear speech and a cross-population study of clear speech perception. Findings from these studies contribute to an evolving view of clear speech production and perception as reflecting both universal, auditory and language-specific, phonological contrast enhancement features.

  12. Hate speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Birgitta Nilsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The manifesto of the Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik is based on the “Eurabia” conspiracy theory. This theory is a key starting point for hate speech amongst many right-wing extremists in Europe, but also has ramifications beyond these environments. In brief, proponents of the Eurabia theory claim that Muslims are occupying Europe and destroying Western culture, with the assistance of the EU and European governments. By contrast, members of Al-Qaeda and other extreme Islamists promote the conspiracy theory “the Crusade” in their hate speech directed against the West. Proponents of the latter theory argue that the West is leading a crusade to eradicate Islam and Muslims, a crusade that is similarly facilitated by their governments. This article presents analyses of texts written by right-wing extremists and Muslim extremists in an effort to shed light on how hate speech promulgates conspiracy theories in order to spread hatred and intolerance.The aim of the article is to contribute to a more thorough understanding of hate speech’s nature by applying rhetorical analysis. Rhetorical analysis is chosen because it offers a means of understanding the persuasive power of speech. It is thus a suitable tool to describe how hate speech works to convince and persuade. The concepts from rhetorical theory used in this article are ethos, logos and pathos. The concept of ethos is used to pinpoint factors that contributed to Osama bin Laden's impact, namely factors that lent credibility to his promotion of the conspiracy theory of the Crusade. In particular, Bin Laden projected common sense, good morals and good will towards his audience. He seemed to have coherent and relevant arguments; he appeared to possess moral credibility; and his use of language demonstrated that he wanted the best for his audience.The concept of pathos is used to define hate speech, since hate speech targets its audience's emotions. In hate speech it is the

  13. Speech enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Chen, Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    We live in a noisy world! In all applications (telecommunications, hands-free communications, recording, human-machine interfaces, etc.) that require at least one microphone, the signal of interest is usually contaminated by noise and reverberation. As a result, the microphone signal has to be ""cleaned"" with digital signal processing tools before it is played out, transmitted, or stored.This book is about speech enhancement. Different well-known and state-of-the-art methods for noise reduction, with one or multiple microphones, are discussed. By speech enhancement, we mean not only noise red

  14. FOXP2 expression during brain development coincides with adult sites of pathology in a severe speech and language disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cecilia S L; Gerrelli, Dianne; Monaco, Anthony P; Fisher, Simon E; Copp, Andrew J

    2003-11-01

    Disruption of FOXP2, a gene encoding a forkhead-domain transcription factor, causes a severe developmental disorder of verbal communication, involving profound articulation deficits, accompanied by linguistic and grammatical impairments. Investigation of the neural basis of this disorder has been limited previously to neuroimaging of affected children and adults. The discovery of the gene responsible, FOXP2, offers a unique opportunity to explore the relevant neural mechanisms from a molecular perspective. In the present study, we have determined the detailed spatial and temporal expression pattern of FOXP2 mRNA in the developing brain of mouse and human. We find expression in several structures including the cortical plate, basal ganglia, thalamus, inferior olives and cerebellum. These data support a role for FOXP2 in the development of corticostriatal and olivocerebellar circuits involved in motor control. We find intriguing concordance between regions of early expression and later sites of pathology suggested by neuroimaging. Moreover, the homologous pattern of FOXP2/Foxp2 expression in human and mouse argues for a role for this gene in development of motor-related circuits throughout mammalian species. Overall, this study provides support for the hypothesis that impairments in sequencing of movement and procedural learning might be central to the FOXP2-related speech and language disorder.

  15. Acoustic correlates of inflectional morphology in the speech of children with specific language impairment and their typically developing peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Amanda J; Goffman, Lisa

    2007-07-01

    The development of the use of the third-person singular -s in open syllable verbs in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their typically developing peers was examined. Verbs that included overt productions of the third-person singular -s morpheme (e.g. Bobby plays ball everyday; Bear laughs when mommy buys popcorn) were contrasted with clearly bare stem contexts (e.g. Mommy, buy popcorn; I saw Bobby play ball) on both global and local measures of acoustic duration. A durational signature for verbs inflected with -s was identified separately from factors related to sentence length. These duration measures were also used to identify acoustic changes related to the omission of the -s morpheme. The omitted productions from the children with SLI were significantly longer than their correct third-person singular and bare stem productions. This result was unexpected given that the omitted productions have fewer phonemes than correctly inflected productions. Typically developing children did not show the same pattern, instead producing omitted productions that patterned most closely with bare stem forms. These results are discussed in relation to current theoretical approaches to SLI, with an emphasis on performance and speech-motor accounts.

  16. A Case of Expansion of Traumatic Choroidal Rupture with Delayed-Developed Outer Retinal Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Moon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to report the expansion of a choroidal rupture site caused by blunt ocular trauma using scanning laser ophthalmoscope-optical coherence tomography. Case Report: The clinical course of a 15-year-old girl with a traumatic ocular injury after being hit in the eye by an elbow was evaluated. Upon the first examination, the best-corrected visual acuity was 16/20. The findings were subretinal pigment epithelial hemorrhage and vertical choroidal rupture. Three weeks after the trauma, the patient's visual acuity was reduced to counting fingers at 30 cm. On fundus examination and fluorescein angiography subretinal pigment epithelial hemorrhage decreased, while the choroidal rupture expanded; on optical coherence tomography outer retinal changes in the adjacent area were detected. Discussion: This study reveals that the delayed expansion of a choroidal rupture site and the delayed change of the adjacent outer retina improved.

  17. Design and development of ankle-foot prosthesis with delayed release of plantarflexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mitchell, MSc

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A computer-controlled mechanism that fits a standard ankle-foot prosthesis was designed to capture the absorbed energy in the ankle and delay its release until specific times in the gait cycle. This mechanism used a direct current motor to take up and hold the compression of a carbon-fiber ankle joint. Based on the timing of the contact forces between the foot and the ground, a microprocessor released the spring at preset times later in the gait cycle. This mechanism was added to a Talux prosthetic foot and was employed by a user of a conventional energy-storage ankle-foot prosthesis. His gait was recorded using a motion analysis system. Five settings: 0, 55, 65, 75, and 85 ms delay were tested on separate days, and the standard kinematic and kinetic gait data were recorded. The user reported some settings were more comfortable than others. When these preferences were tested with a randomized double-blind trial, the preferences were not consistent. A second user showed a preference for the 55 ms delay. The modifications to the device resulted in changes to the gait of the subjects, including increased cadence and kinematics of the unaffected joints and a longer, slower push from the ankle, which was noticed by both of the subjects.

  18. Design and development of ankle-foot prosthesis with delayed release of plantarflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael; Craig, Katelynn; Kyberd, Peter; Biden, Edmund; Bush, Greg

    2013-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanism that fits a standard ankle-foot prosthesis was designed to capture the absorbed energy in the ankle and delay its release until specific times in the gait cycle. This mechanism used a direct current motor to take up and hold the compression of a carbon-fiber ankle joint. Based on the timing of the contact forces between the foot and the ground, a microprocessor released the spring at preset times later in the gait cycle. This mechanism was added to a Talux prosthetic foot and was employed by a user of a conventional energy-storage ankle-foot prosthesis. His gait was recorded using a motion analysis system. Five settings: 0, 55, 65, 75, and 85 ms delay were tested on separate days, and the standard kinematic and kinetic gait data were recorded. The user reported some settings were more comfortable than others. When these preferences were tested with a randomized double-blind trial, the preferences were not consistent. A second user showed a preference for the 55 ms delay. The modifications to the device resulted in changes to the gait of the subjects, including increased cadence and kinematics of the unaffected joints and a longer, slower push from the ankle, which was noticed by both of the subjects.

  19. Coordination of head movements and speech in first encounter dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paggio, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    slightly after, but also that there are delays in both directions in the range of -/+ 1s. Various factors that may influence delay duration are investigated. Correlations are found between delay length and the duration of the speech sequences associated with the head movements. Effects due to the different......This paper presents an analysis of the temporal alignment be- tween head movements and associated speech segments in the NOMCO corpus of first encounter dialogues [1]. Our results show that head movements tend to start slightly before the onset of the corresponding speech sequence and to end...

  20. Coordination of head movements and speech in first encounter dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paggio, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    slightly after, but also that there are delays in both directions in the range of -/+ 1s. Various factors that may influence delay duration are investigated. Correlations are found between delay length and the duration of the speech sequences associated with the head movements. Effects due to the different......This paper presents an analysis of the temporal alignment be- tween head movements and associated speech segments in the NOMCO corpus of first encounter dialogues [1]. Our results show that head movements tend to start slightly before the onset of the corresponding speech sequence and to end...

  1. Subcutaneous fat accumulation in early infancy is more strongly associated with motor development and delay than muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, H; Kawai, M; Niwa, F; Hasegawa, T; Iwanaga, K; Ohata, K; Tamaki, A; Heike, T

    2014-06-01

    Physical growth in neurologically healthy preterm infants affects motor development. This study investigated the separate relationships between muscle and fat in infancy and later motor development and physical growth. Muscle thickness and subcutaneous fat thickness of the anterior thigh were measured using ultrasound images obtained from neurologically healthy preterm infants at birth, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months' corrected age. We also obtained the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory and Alberta Infant Motor Scale scores at 18 months' corrected age to assess motor ability and motor delay. Thirty preterm infants completed the study protocol. There was a significant positive correlation between motor ability and increments in subcutaneous fat thickness during the first 3 and 6 months' corrected age (r = 0.48 and 0.40, p muscle thickness growth in any of the periods. A secondary, logistic regression analysis showed that increments in subcutaneous fat thickness during the first 3 months were a protective factor for motor delay. Subcutaneous fat accumulation in early infancy is more strongly associated with motor development and delay than muscle growth. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Speech Intelligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas

    Speech intelligibility (SI) is important for different fields of research, engineering and diagnostics in order to quantify very different phenomena like the quality of recordings, communication and playback devices, the reverberation of auditoria, characteristics of hearing impairment, benefit using hearing aids or combinations of these things.

  3. Speech dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, L.C.W.

    2011-01-01

    In order for speech to be informative and communicative, segmental and suprasegmental variation is mandatory. Only this leads to meaningful words and sentences. The building blocks are no stable entities put next to each other (like beads on a string or like printed text), but there are gradual tran

  4. Advanced Persuasive Speaking, English, Speech: 5114.112.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Developed as a high school quinmester unit on persuasive speaking, this guide provides the teacher with teaching strategies for a course which analyzes speeches from "Vital Speeches of the Day," political speeches, TV commercials, and other types of speeches. Practical use of persuasive methods for school, community, county, state, and…

  5. Implementation of a Speech Improvement Program at the Kindergarten Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert A.

    Evaluated was a speech improvement program for kindergarten students in which speech improvement lessons were summarized for teachers, and the services of itinerant speech therapists were shared by classroom teachers. Teacher and therapist agreed upon specific speech lessons which were conducted on a weekly basis. Program development involved…

  6. A longitudinal group study of speech development in Danish children born with and without cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutters, B; Bau, A; Brøndsted, K

    2001-01-01

    The present study focuses on contoid vocalization by Danish 1-year-old unrepaired toddlers born with cleft lip and palate, and how they differ from their non-cleft peers. Furthermore, we focus on how the same children master Danish consonants at 3 years of age compared with their non-cleft peers in terms of their ability to produce consonants in accordance with adult target. Also, with the 3 year olds, we look at cleft speech characteristics as well as developmental speech characteristics found in both groups of children. Based on phonetic transcription, it was found that Danish unoperated cleft palate children at 1 year of age produced few types of contoids and preferably contoids that did not require closure of the velopharyngeal port in their prespeech. In addition, the data suggest that consonants produced by cleft children who are treated with one-stage surgery after speech onset, at 3 years of age differ from speech produced by non-cleft children, not only as regards cleft speech characteristics, but also as regards developmental speech characteristics.

  7. The Effectiveness of Self-regulatory Speech Training for Planning and Problem Solving in Children with Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Safiyyah; Fletcher, Janet; Bayliss, Donna M

    2016-08-01

    Self-regulatory speech has been shown to be important for the planning and problem solving of children. Our intervention study, including comparisons to both wait-list and typically developing controls, examined the effectiveness of a training programme designed to improve self-regulatory speech, and consequently, the planning and problem solving performance of 87 (60 males, 27 females) children aged 4-7 years with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) who were delayed in their self-regulatory speech development. The self-regulatory speech and Tower of London (TOL) performance of children with SLI who received the intervention initially or after a waiting period was compared with that of 80 (48 male, 32 female) typically developing children who did not receive any intervention. Children were tested at three time points: Time 1- prior to intervention; Time 2 - after the first SLI group had received training and the second SLI group provided a wait-list control; and Time 3 - when the second SLI group had received training. At Time 1 children with SLI produced less self-regulatory speech and were impaired on the TOL relative to the typically developing children. At Time 2, the TOL performance of children with SLI in the first training group improved significantly, whereas there was no improvement for the second training group (the wait-list group). At Time 3, the second training group improved their TOL performance and the first group maintained their performance. No significant differences in TOL performance were evident between typically developing children and those with SLI at Time 3. Moreover, decreases in social speech and increases in inaudible muttering following self-regulatory speech training were associated with improvements in TOL performance. Together, the results show that self-regulatory speech training was effective in increasing self-regulatory speech and in improving planning and problem solving performance in children with SLI.

  8. Development of a novel mouse model of amodiaquine-induced liver injury with a delayed onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metushi, Imir G; Cai, Ping; Dervovic, Dzana; Liu, Feng; Lobach, Alexandra; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Uetrecht, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Amodiaquine (AQ) treatment is associated with a high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. Evidence suggests that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated. A significant impediment to mechanistic studies of IDILI is the lack of valid animal models. This study reports the first animal model of IDILI with characteristics similar to mild IDILI in humans. Treatment of female C57BL/6 mice with AQ led to liver injury with delayed onset, which resolved despite continued treatment. Covalent binding of AQ was detected in the liver, which was greater in female than in male mice, and higher in the liver than in other organs. Covalent binding in the liver was maximal by Day 3, which did not explain the delayed onset of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation. However, coincident with the elevated serum ALT, infiltration of liver and splenic mononuclear cells and activation of CD8 T-cells within the liver were identified. By Week 7, when ALT levels had returned close to normal, down-regulation of several inflammatory cytokines and up-regulation of PD-1 on T-cells suggested induction of immune tolerance. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) mice with AQ resulted in higher ALT activities than C57BL/6 mice, which suggested that the adaptive immune response was responsible for immune tolerance. In contrast, depletion of NK cells significantly attenuated the increase in ALT, which implied a role for NK cells in mild AQ-induced IDILI. This is the first example of a delayed-onset animal model of IDILI that appears to be immune-mediated.

  9. Delay-Tolerant Networking for Space Flight Operations: Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale future space exploration will offer complex communication challenges that may be best addressed by establishing a network infrastructure. The Internet protocols are not well suited for operation of a network over interplanetary distances; a Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) architecture has been proposed instead. DTN is now a rapidly growing research field, but most implementations are mainly aimed at supporting applications of DTN technology to terrestrial networking problems. Those implementations are not necessarily suitable for deployment in an interplanetary network. Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) is an implementation of the DTN architecture that is specifically designed for use in resource-constrained embedded systems, such as interplanetary robotic spacecraft.

  10. Delayed development of neural language organization in very preterm born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürner-Lavanchy, Ines; Steinlin, Maja; Kiefer, Claus; Weisstanner, Christian; Ritter, Barbara Catherine; Perrig, Walter; Everts, Regula

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates neural language organization in very preterm born children compared to control children and examines the relationship between language organization, age, and language performance. Fifty-six preterms and 38 controls (7-12 y) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging language task. Lateralization and signal change were computed for language-relevant brain regions. Younger preterms showed a bilateral language network whereas older preterms revealed left-sided language organization. No age-related differences in language organization were observed in controls. Results indicate that preterms maintain atypical bilateral language organization longer than term born controls. This might reflect a delay of neural language organization due to very premature birth.

  11. [Delay and cessation of aging processes by manipulation of reproduction, food intake and development in insects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collatz, K-G

    2004-06-01

    Insects can serve as excellent models to show that the genetically determined life span of organisms as well as that of other traits is characterized by high phenotypic plasticity. Depending on different environmental conditions the life cycle strategy can therefore be highly variable. Thus developmental and aging processes are subjected to delaying or accelerating influences or can even be interrupted. Availability of protein to fulfill reproductive requirements, intermittent starvation, and the photoperiodic induction of reproductive diapause were taken as examples for the study of selected abiotic factors which influence the life history of the blowfly Phormia terraenovae and the beetle Gastroidea viridula.

  12. A Coding System with Independent Annotations of Gesture Forms and Functions during Verbal Communication: Development of a Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin; Law, Sam-Po; Kwan, Connie Ching-Yin; Lai, Christy; Lam, Vivian

    2015-03-01

    Gestures are commonly used together with spoken language in human communication. One major limitation of gesture investigations in the existing literature lies in the fact that the coding of forms and functions of gestures has not been clearly differentiated. This paper first described a recently developed Database of Speech and GEsture (DoSaGE) based on independent annotation of gesture forms and functions among 119 neurologically unimpaired right-handed native speakers of Cantonese (divided into three age and two education levels), and presented findings of an investigation examining how gesture use was related to age and linguistic performance. Consideration of these two factors, for which normative data are currently very limited or lacking in the literature, is relevant and necessary when one evaluates gesture employment among individuals with and without language impairment. Three speech tasks, including monologue of a personally important event, sequential description, and story-telling, were used for elicitation. The EUDICO Linguistic ANnotator (ELAN) software was used to independently annotate each participant's linguistic information of the transcript, forms of gestures used, and the function for each gesture. About one-third of the subjects did not use any co-verbal gestures. While the majority of gestures were non-content-carrying, which functioned mainly for reinforcing speech intonation or controlling speech flow, the content-carrying ones were used to enhance speech content. Furthermore, individuals who are younger or linguistically more proficient tended to use fewer gestures, suggesting that normal speakers gesture differently as a function of age and linguistic performance.

  13. Preliminary development of flaw evaluation procedures for delayed hydride cracking initiation under hydride non-ratcheting conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.; Cui, J.; Kawa, D.; Shek, G.K.; Scarth, D.A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The flaw evaluation procedure for Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) initiation currently provided in the CSA Standard N285.8 was developed for hydride ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides do not completely dissolve at peak temperature. Test results have shown that hydrided regions formed under non-ratcheting conditions, in which flaw-tip hydrides completely dissolve at peak temperature, have significantly higher resistance to cracking than those formed under ratcheting conditions. This paper presents some preliminary work on the development of a procedure for the evaluation of DHC initiation for flaws under hydride non-ratcheting conditions. (author)

  14. Speech in Mobile and Pervasive Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Rajput, Nitendra

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together the latest research in one comprehensive volume that deals with issues related to speech processing on resource-constrained, wireless, and mobile devices, such as speech recognition in noisy environments, specialized hardware for speech recognition and synthesis, the use of context to enhance recognition, the emerging and new standards required for interoperability, speech applications on mobile devices, distributed processing between the client and the server, and the relevance of Speech in Mobile and Pervasive Environments for developing regions--an area of explosiv

  15. Text To Speech System for Telugu Language

    OpenAIRE

    Siva kumar, M; E. Prakash Babu

    2014-01-01

    Telugu is one of the oldest languages in India. This paper describes the development of Telugu Text-to-Speech System (TTS).In Telugu TTS the input is Telugu text in Unicode. The voices are sampled from real recorded speech. The objective of a text to speech system is to convert an arbitrary text into its corresponding spoken waveform. Speech synthesis is a process of building machinery that can generate human-like speech from any text input to imitate human speakers. Text proc...

  16. Birth Order Effects on Early Language Development: Do Secondborn Children Learn from Overheard Speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima-Takane, Yuriko; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Compared language development of 16 firstborn and 16 secondborn children at 21 months to investigate whether secondborn children benefit from overheard conversations between caregivers and older siblings. Found that secondborn children were more advanced that firstborn in pronoun production, while not differing general language development,…

  17. Sustainable Product Development Through a Life-Cycle Approach to Product and Service Creation (Keynote speech)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Timothy Charles

    . These two schools of environmental re-search practice are mirrored in the way in which industry approaches environmental problems. Since the definition in 1987 of Sustainable Development [2] efforts have been made to relate the goals and ideals of sustainabil-ity to the domain of product development, thus...

  18. Speech and Language Developmental Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also use special spoken tests to evaluate your child. A hearing test is often included in the evaluation because a hearing problem can affect speech and language development. Depending on the result of the evaluation, the ...

  19. DELAYED FLOWERING, an Arabidopsis Gene That Acts in the Autonomous Flowering Promotion Pathway and Is Required for Normal Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jie Chen; Zheng Yuan; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    The control of flowering time in higher plants is one of the most important physiological processes and is critical for their reproductive success. To investigate the mechanisms controlling flowering time, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with late-flowering phenotypes. One mutant, designated delayed flowering (dfr) in the Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, was identified with delayed flowering time. Genetic analysis revealed that dfr is a single gene recessive nuclear mutant and the mutation was mapped to a locus tightly linked to UFO on chromosome 1. To our knowledge, no gene regulating flowering time has been reported yet in this region. The dfr mutant plant showed a delayed flowering time under the different growth conditions examined,including long- and short-day photoperiods and gibberellic acid GA3 treatments, suggesting that DFR is a gene involved in the autonomous flowering promotion pathway. The Arabidopsis gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) plays a central role in repressing flowering and its transcripts are undetectable in wild-type Ler.However, FLCexpression was upregulated in the dfrmutant, suggesting that DFR is a negative regulator of FLC. In addition, the dfr mutant plant displayed altered valve shapes of the silique and the number of trichomes and branches of each trichome were both reduced, indicating that the DRFgene is also required for normal plant development. Moreover, dfr leafy-5 (Ify-5) double mutant plants showed a much later flowering time than either dfr or Ify-5 single mutants, indicating that DFR and LFYact synergistically to promote flowering in Arabidopsis.

  20. Speech communications in noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  1. E-learning-based speech therapy: a web application for speech training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijer, L.J.; Rietveld, T.C.; Beers, M.M. van; Slangen, R.M.; Heuvel, H. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In The Netherlands, a web application for speech training, E-learning-based speech therapy (EST), has been developed for patients with dysarthria, a speech disorder resulting from acquired neurological impairments such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. In this report, the EST infrastructure

  2. Telephone based speech interfaces in the developing world, from the perspective of human-human communication

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, S

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Telephone-based information services hold tremendous potential as a means of information access in the developing world. However,surprisingly little research has been done on the design of such systems - whether basic Interactive Voice Response...

  3. Deficiency of inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthase results in diminished bone formation and delayed union and nonunion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, D M; Neubert, S; Wijnands, K A P; Heyer, F L; Zeiter, S; Ito, K; Brink, P R G; Poeze, M

    2016-02-01

    Between 5% and 10% of all fractures fail to heal adequately resulting in nonunion of the fracture fragments. This can significantly decrease a patient's quality of life and create associated psychosocial and socio-economic problems. Nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthases (NOS) have been found to be involved in fracture healing, but until now it is not known if disturbances in these mechanisms play a role in nonunion and delayed union development. In this study, we explored the role of endothelial and inducible NOS deficiency in a delayed union model in mice. A 0.45mm femur osteotomy with periosteal cauterization followed by plate-screw osteosynthesis was performed in the left leg of 20-24week old wild type, Nos2(-/-) and Nos3(-/-) mice. Contralateral unfractured legs were used as a control. Callus volume was measured using micro-computed tomography (μCT) after 28 and 42days of fracture healing. Immuno histochemical myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining was performed on paraffin embedded sections to assess neutrophil influx in callus tissue and surrounding proximal and distal marrow cavities of the femur. After 7 and 28days of fracture healing, femurs were collected for amino acid and RNA analysis to study arginine-NO metabolism. With μCT, delayed union was observed in wild type animals, whereas in both Nos2(-/-) and Nos3(-/-) mice nonunion development was evident. Both knock-out strains also showed a significantly increased influx of MPO when compared with wild type mice. Concentrations of amino acids and expression of enzymes related to the arginine-NO metabolism were aberrant in NOS deficient mice when compared to contralateral control femurs and wild type samples. In the present study we show for the first time that the absence of nitric oxide synthases results in a disturbed arginine-NO metabolism and inadequate fracture healing with the transition of delayed union into a nonunion in mice after a femur osteotomy. Based on these data we suggest that the

  4. Investigating Pragmatics of Complaint Speech Acts in English and Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖卉; 李尚哲

    2013-01-01

    The speech act of complaint is an important research subject of pragmatics, which is worthy of research among speech acts. With the development of research into speech acts, some scholars have performed investigations of complaints ,but they have done little work on Chinese language complaints. Therefore, it is necessary to make a further study on complaint as a speech act in Chinese. This thesis is based on speech act theory and the politeness principle as an empirical study of the speech act of com-plaint in Chinese. It aims to provide a more complete and comprehensive result of participant production of the speech act of complaint.

  5. Study on effective correction of Japanese students' speech drafts

    OpenAIRE

    竹野, 茂; Shigeru, TAKENO

    2000-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effective correction of students' speech drafts. Japanese students are not familiar not only with the speech performance in English but also with speech writing. This paper exposes the difficulties in speech writing in English for Japanese students, and in the way they develop their opinions. The author considers that the difficulities in speech writing for students come from the interference of Japanese (L1), that is "cultural conflict". Through the correctio...

  6. The prosody and the music of the human speech

    CERN Document Server

    D'Autilia, R

    2004-01-01

    We propose the use of a self-oscillating dynamical system --the pre-Galileian clock equation-- for modeling the laryngeal tone. The parameters are shown to be the minimal control needed for generating the prosody of the human speech. Based on this model, we outline a peak delay detection algorithm for extracting the prosody of the real speech.

  7. The relationship of bottle feeding and other sucking behaviors with speech disorder in Patagonian preschoolers

    OpenAIRE

    Yanez N David; Jackson Chanaye; Gonzalez Juan; Parada Mary A; Vasquez Sandra; Barbosa Clarita; Gelaye Bizu; Fitzpatrick Annette L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that children's nonnutritive sucking habits may lead to delayed development of their oral anatomy and functioning. However, these findings were inconsistent. We investigated associations between use of bottles, pacifiers, and other sucking behaviors with speech disorders in children attending three preschools in Punta Arenas (Patagonia), Chile. Methods Information on infant feeding and sucking behaviors, age starting and stopping breast- and bot...

  8. Study Abroad and Interlanguage Pragmatic Development in Request and Apology Speech Acts among Iranian Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Hassan Rasouli

    2013-01-01

    This research study empirically investigated the impact of study abroad context on L2 learners' pragmatic development compared with study at home group in Iran. For the study abroad group the participants were selected from the Iranian students who registered in a six-month program in language institutes in India (Mysore) and for the study at home…

  9. Phonotactic Probabilities at the Onset of Language Development: Speech Production and Word Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuner, Tania S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of phonotactic probabilities at the onset of language development, in a new language (Dutch), while controlling for word position. Method: Using a nonword imitation task, 64 Dutch-learning children (age 2;2-2;8 [years;months]) were tested on how they imitated segments in low- and high-phonotactic probability…

  10. Does Instruction Alter the Naturalistic Pattern of Pragmatic Development? A Case of Request Speech Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Naoko; Naganuma, Naeko; Budding, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of explicit instruction on the development of pragmatic competence in L2 English. The study is based on Taguchi's (2012) study conducted in an English-medium university in Japan, which revealed patterns of change in Japanese EFL students' production of requests in high- and low-imposition situations. Students showed…

  11. Choline supplementation mitigates trace, but not delay, eyeblink conditioning deficits in rats exposed to alcohol during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jennifer D; Tran, Tuan D

    2012-03-01

    Children exposed to alcohol prenatally suffer from a range of physical, neuropathological, and behavioral alterations, referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Both the cerebellum and hippocampus are affected by alcohol exposure during development, which may contribute to behavioral and cognitive deficits observed in children with FASD. Despite the known neuropathology associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, many pregnant women continue to drink (heavy drinkers, in particular), creating a need to identify effective treatments for their children who are adversely affected by alcohol. We previously reported that choline supplementation can mitigate alcohol's effects on cognitive development, specifically on tasks which depend on the functional integrity of the hippocampus. The present study examined whether choline supplementation could differentially mitigate alcohol's effects on trace eyeblink classical conditioning (ECC, a hippocampal-dependent task) and delay ECC (a cerebellar-dependent task). Long-Evans rats were exposed to 5.25 g/kg/day alcohol via gastric intubation from postnatal days (PD) 4-9, a period of brain development equivalent to late gestation in humans. A sham-intubated control group was included. From PD 10-30, subjects received subcutaneous injections of 100 mg/kg choline chloride or vehicle. Beginning on PD 32-34, subjects were trained on either delay or trace eyeblink conditioning. Performance of subjects exposed to alcohol was significantly impaired on both tasks, as indicated by significant reductions in percentage and amplitude of conditioned eyeblink responses, an effect that was attenuated by choline supplementation on the trace, but not delay conditioning task. Indeed, alcohol-exposed subjects treated with choline performed at control levels on the trace eyeblink conditioning task. There were no significant main or interactive effects of sex. These data indicate that choline supplementation can significantly reduce the

  12. Speech on the general states of enterprises and the sustainable development; Discours devant les Etats generaux des entreprises et du developpement durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In this speech the author points out two main recommendations. The first message concerns the necessity of a whole mobilization in favor of the sustainable development, from the government policy and the enterprises management to the human behavior. He presents then three main axis to heighten the enterprises (reinforce the information on the environmental and social impact of the economic activities, the development of sustainable investments, the development of the environmental sponsorship). The second message concerns the necessity to place the environment in the economic growth by the development of the ecology and the eco-technology. (A.L.B.)

  13. Development and Evaluation of Automotive Speech Interfaces: Useful Information from the Human Factors and the Related Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ei-Wen Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drivers often use infotainment systems in motor vehicles, such as systems for navigation, music, and phones. However, operating visual-manual interfaces for these systems can distract drivers. Speech interfaces may be less distracting. To help designing easy-to-use speech interfaces, this paper identifies key speech interfaces (e.g., CHAT, Linguatronic, SYNC, Siri, and Google Voice, their features, and what was learned from evaluating them and other systems. Also included is information on key technical standards (e.g., ISO 9921, ITU P.800 and relevant design guidelines. This paper also describes relevant design and evaluation methods (e.g., Wizard of Oz and how to make driving studies replicable (e.g., by referencing SAE J2944. Throughout the paper, there is discussion of linguistic terms (e.g., turn-taking and principles (e.g., Grice’s Conversational Maxims that provide a basis for describing user-device interactions and errors in evaluations.

  14. Sustainable Product Development Through a Life-Cycle Approach to Product and Service Creation (Keynote speech)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Timothy Charles

    at the accounting and evaluation of environmental impacts of a given product or process; and a synthesis-oriented school of practice, targeted at the creation of environmentally improved products or processes, based upon life-cycle insight into the actual use and orientation of existing products on the market....... These two schools of environmental re-search practice are mirrored in the way in which industry approaches environmental problems. Since the definition in 1987 of Sustainable Development [2] efforts have been made to relate the goals and ideals of sustainabil-ity to the domain of product development, thus...... ingredients of the product or the processes used to create it. Rather, the focus for improvement of a product¿s environmental performance most often lies in the manner in which the product is used and consumed. A product¿s use phase is often environmentally significant, as this is the largest source...

  15. Speech and Language Disorders. Fact Sheet = Trastornos del Habla y Lenguaje. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on speech and language disorders is presented in English and Spanish. It provides information on the definition of speech and language disorders and possible causes; the incidence (about one in ten people); and characteristics of delayed communication, speech disorders, and language disorders. It notes educational implications,…

  16. Speech and Language Disorders. Fact Sheet = Trastornos del Habla y Lenguaje. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on speech and language disorders is presented in English and Spanish. It provides information on the definition of speech and language disorders and possible causes; the incidence (about one in ten people); and characteristics of delayed communication, speech disorders, and language disorders. It notes educational implications,…

  17. Speech at the Roundtable on Cooperation & Development of Cities along the Silk Road Economic Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li; Jinjun

    2014-01-01

    <正>His Excellency Hussain Muhammad Ershad,Former President of Bangladesh,His Excellency Dimitrios Christofias,Former President of Cyprus,Distinguished guests,Ladies and gentlemen,Good morning!It’s really an honor to attend the Roundtable on Cooperation&Development of Cities along the Silk Road Economic Belt.On behalf of the International Department of the CPC Central Committee and the Chinese People’s Association for Peace and Disarmament(CAPAD),I’d like to take this

  18. Speech of people with autism: Echolalia and echolalic speech

    OpenAIRE

    Błeszyński, Jacek Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Speech of people with autism is recognised as one of the basic diagnostic, therapeutic and theoretical problems. One of the most common symptoms of autism in children is echolalia, described here as being of different types and severity. This paper presents the results of studies into different levels of echolalia, both in normally developing children and in children diagnosed with autism, discusses the differences between simple echolalia and echolalic speech - which can be considered to b...

  19. Using on-line altered auditory feedback treating Parkinsonian speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Emily; Verhagen, Leo; de Vries, Meinou H.

    2005-09-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease tend to have dysarthric speech that is hesitant, accelerated, and repetitive, and that is often resistant to behavior speech therapy. In this pilot study, the speech disturbances were treated using on-line altered feedbacks (AF) provided by SpeechEasy (SE), an in-the-ear device registered with the FDA for use in humans to treat chronic stuttering. Eight PD patients participated in the study. All had moderate to severe speech disturbances. In addition, two patients had moderate recurring stuttering at the onset of PD after long remission since adolescence, two had bilateral STN DBS, and two bilateral pallidal DBS. An effective combination of delayed auditory feedback and frequency-altered feedback was selected for each subject and provided via SE worn in one ear. All subjects produced speech samples (structured-monologue and reading) under three conditions: baseline, with SE without, and with feedbacks. The speech samples were randomly presented and rated for speech intelligibility goodness using UPDRS-III item 18 and the speaking rate. The results indicted that SpeechEasy is well tolerated and AF can improve speech intelligibility in spontaneous speech. Further investigational use of this device for treating speech disorders in PD is warranted [Work partially supported by Janus Dev. Group, Inc.].

  20. Speech and non-speech audio-visual illusions: a developmental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Tremblay

    Full Text Available It is well known that simultaneous presentation of incongruent audio and visual stimuli can lead to illusory percepts. Recent data suggest that distinct processes underlie non-specific intersensory speech as opposed to non-speech perception. However, the development of both speech and non-speech intersensory perception across childhood and adolescence remains poorly defined. Thirty-eight observers aged 5 to 19 were tested on the McGurk effect (an audio-visual illusion involving speech, the Illusory Flash effect and the Fusion effect (two audio-visual illusions not involving speech to investigate the development of audio-visual interactions and contrast speech vs. non-speech developmental patterns. Whereas the strength of audio-visual speech illusions varied as a direct function of maturational level, performance on non-speech illusory tasks appeared to be homogeneous across all ages. These data support the existence of independent maturational processes underlying speech and non-speech audio-visual illusory effects.

  1. The impact of speech material on speech judgement in children with and without cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Svensson, Henry; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    The chosen method of speech assessment, including type of speech material, may affect speech judgement in children with cleft palate. To assess the effect of different speech materials on speech judgement in 5-year-old children born with or without cleft palate, as well as the reliability of materials by means of intra- and inter-transcriber agreement of consonant transcriptions. Altogether 40 children were studied, 20 born with cleft palate, 20 without. The children were audio recorded at 5 years of age. Speech materials used were: single-word naming, sentence repetition (both developed for cleft palate speech assessment), retelling of a narrative and conversational speech. The samples were phonetically transcribed and inter- and intra-transcriber agreement was calculated. Percentage correct consonants (PCC), percentage correct places (PCP), percentage correct manners (PCM), and percentage active cleft speech characteristics (CSC) were assessed. In addition, an analysis of phonological simplification processes (PSP) was performed. The PCC and CSC results were significantly more accurate in word naming than in all other speech materials in the children with cleft palate, who also achieved more accurate PCP results in word naming than in sentence repetition and conversational speech. Regarding PCM and PSP, performance was significantly more accurate in word naming than in conversational speech. Children without cleft palate did better, irrespective of the speech material. The medians of intra- and inter-transcriber agreement were good in both groups and all speech materials. The closest agreement in the cleft palate group was seen in word naming and the weakest in the retelling task. The results indicate that word naming is the most reliable speech material when the purpose is to assess the best speech performance of a child with cleft palate. If the purpose is to assess connected speech, sentence repetition is a reliable and also valid speech material, with good

  2. Going to a Speech Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Going to a Speech Therapist KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to a Speech Therapist ... therapists (also called speech-language pathologists ). What Do Speech Therapists Help With? Speech therapists help people of all ...

  3. Undernutrition during the brain growth period of the rat significantly delays the development of processes mediating Pavlovian trace conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, J W; Castro, C A

    1990-05-01

    Pavlovian trace conditioning procedures allow one to assess the ability of animals to associate events that are temporally separated because the conditioned stimulus terminates prior to the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus. We report that undernutrition during Postnatal Days 2-18 significantly delays the development of trace conditioning to a visual stimulus. Previously undernourished 20-day-old rats conditioned when no temporal interval separated the termination of the CS and US onset (0-s trace interval). However, it was not until the undernourished pups were 30 days old that they conditioned when the trace interval was 10 or 30 s. In contrast, control pups only 20 days old were able to condition when a 10-s trace interval separated the CS and US events, and 25-day-old control pups conditioned when the interval was either 10 or 30 s. These results suggest that undernutrition delays the development of processes that enable the rat to sustain a representation of a visual CS during the trace interval.

  4. Relationship between Speech, Oromotor, Language and Cognitive Abilities in Children with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joanne; Wood, Sara; Hardcastle, William; Wishart, Jennifer; Timmins, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children and young people with Down's syndrome present with deficits in expressive speech and language, accompanied by strengths in vocabulary comprehension compared with non-verbal mental age. Intelligibility is particularly low, but whether speech is delayed or disordered is a controversial topic. Most studies suggest a delay, but no…

  5. Relationship between Speech, Oromotor, Language and Cognitive Abilities in Children with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Joanne; Wood, Sara; Hardcastle, William; Wishart, Jennifer; Timmins, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children and young people with Down's syndrome present with deficits in expressive speech and language, accompanied by strengths in vocabulary comprehension compared with non-verbal mental age. Intelligibility is particularly low, but whether speech is delayed or disordered is a controversial topic. Most studies suggest a delay, but no…

  6. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition ...... mineral density) and psychological (e.g., low self-esteem) and underline the importance of careful clinical assessment of the patients.......Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition...

  7. Risk Factors and Relationship Between Intestinal Parasites and the Growth Retardation and Psychomotor Development Delays of Children in Şanlıurfa, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yentur Doni, Nebiye; Yildiz Zeyrek, Fadile; Simsek, Zeynep; Gurses, Gulcan; Sahin, İbrahim

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors for and relationship among parasitic infections, growth retardation, and psychomotor developmental delays in children aged 6 years and below. This case-control study was performed in Şanlıurfa in southeastern Turkey between October and December 2007. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, anthropometry, Ankara Development Screening Inventory, and laboratory analysis of stool specimens. The most common parasite was Giardia intestinalis (42.53%) followed by Enterobius vermicularis (27.58%), Ascaris lumbricoides (18.39%), Hymenolepis nana (5.75%), Trichuris trichiura (3.45%), Escherichia coli (1.15%), and Blastocystis spp. (1.15%). Fifty-eight percent of all children were infected with intestinal parasites; 55.2% had only one parasite, whereas 44.8% had multiple parasites. The children infected with G. intestinalis and other intestinal parasites had significantly higher levels of growth retardation and psychomotor development delay than non-infected children. Children with parasitic infections had growth delay up to 2.9 times, general development delay up to 1.9 times, language-cognitive development delay up to 2.2 times, and fine motor development delay up to 2.9 times higher than children without any parasitic infections. However, no significant relationship among intestinal parasites, gross motor development, social-self skills, and development delay was identified. The education level of parents, poor economic situation, number of households, not washing hands, playing with soil, family history of parasitic infection were the significant risk factors for intestinal parasites. Our study indicates that the presence of either malnutrition or intestinal parasites may put a child in a high-risk group for developmental delays and growth retardation. Therefore, public health interventions can embrace nationwide deworming in children.

  8. Speech research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Phonology is traditionally seen as the discipline that concerns itself with the building blocks of linguistic messages. It is the study of the structure of sound inventories of languages and of the participation of sounds in rules or processes. Phonetics, in contrast, concerns speech sounds as produced and perceived. Two extreme positions on the relationship between phonological messages and phonetic realizations are represented in the literature. One holds that the primary home for linguistic symbols, including phonological ones, is the human mind, itself housed in the human brain. The second holds that their primary home is the human vocal tract.

  9. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  10. Automatic speech recognition (ASR) based approach for speech therapy of aphasic patients: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Norezmi; Shanta, Shahnoor; Mahmud, Farhanahani; Sha'abani, MNAH

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art an automatic speech recognition (ASR) based approach for speech therapy of aphasic patients. Aphasia is a condition in which the affected person suffers from speech and language disorder resulting from a stroke or brain injury. Since there is a growing body of evidence indicating the possibility of improving the symptoms at an early stage, ASR based solutions are increasingly being researched for speech and language therapy. ASR is a technology that transfers human speech into transcript text by matching with the system's library. This is particularly useful in speech rehabilitation therapies as they provide accurate, real-time evaluation for speech input from an individual with speech disorder. ASR based approaches for speech therapy recognize the speech input from the aphasic patient and provide real-time feedback response to their mistakes. However, the accuracy of ASR is dependent on many factors such as, phoneme recognition, speech continuity, speaker and environmental differences as well as our depth of knowledge on human language understanding. Hence, the review examines recent development of ASR technologies and its performance for individuals with speech and language disorders.

  11. Sensorimotor influences on speech perception in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruderer, Alison G; Danielson, D Kyle; Kandhadai, Padmapriya; Werker, Janet F

    2015-11-01

    The influence of speech production on speech perception is well established in adults. However, because adults have a long history of both perceiving and producing speech, the extent to which the perception-production linkage is due to experience is unknown. We addressed this issue by asking whether articulatory configurations can influence infants' speech perception performance. To eliminate influences from specific linguistic experience, we studied preverbal, 6-mo-old infants and tested the discrimination of a nonnative, and hence never-before-experienced, speech sound distinction. In three experimental studies, we used teething toys to control the position and movement of the tongue tip while the infants listened to the speech sounds. Using ultrasound imaging technology, we verified that the teething toys consistently and effectively constrained the movement and positioning of infants' tongues. With a looking-time procedure, we found that temporarily restraining infants' articulators impeded their discrimination of a nonnative consonant contrast but only when the relevant articulator was selectively restrained to prevent the movements associated with producing those sounds. Our results provide striking evidence that even before infants speak their first words and without specific listening experience, sensorimotor information from the articulators influences speech perception. These results transform theories of speech perception by suggesting that even at the initial stages of development, oral-motor movements influence speech sound discrimination. Moreover, an experimentally induced "impairment" in articulator movement can compromise speech perception performance, raising the question of whether long-term oral-motor impairments may impact perceptual development.

  12. Regular physical activity attenuates the blood pressure response to public speaking and delays the development of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatini, Paolo; Bratti, Paolo; Palomba, Daniela; Saladini, Francesca; Zanatta, Nello; Maraglino, Giuseppe

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of regular physical activity on the haemodynamic response to public speaking and to evaluate the long-term effect of exercise on development of hypertension. We assessed 75 sedentary and 44 active participants screened for stage 1 hypertension with consistent activity habits and 63 normotensive individuals as control. The blood pressure (BP) response to public speaking was assessed with beat-to-beat noninvasive recording. Definition of incident hypertension was based either on clinic or 24-h BP measurement. The BP response to public speaking was greater in the hypertensive than the normotensive participants (P=0.018/0.009). Among the former, sedentary participants showed increased BP reactivity to the speech test (45.2+/-22.6/22.2+/-11.5mmHg, Ppublic speaking into the Cox model influenced the strength of the association only marginally [hazard ratio=0.55 (95% CI 0.30-0.97) and hazard ratio=0.59 (95% CI 0.36-0.99), respectively]. Regular physical activity attenuates the BP reaction to psychosocial stressors. However, this mechanism seems to be only partially responsible for the long-term effect of exercise on BP.

  13. A scheme of improving the quality of speech mixing in multi-media conference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meilian; Xu, Jiang; Chen, Pengfei

    2013-03-01

    The factors which influence the voice quality in multi-media conference on IP network, such as delay and the accumulation of delay is analyzed. A scheme which adopts mixing buffer and method of uniform mixing period to increase the quality of mixed speech is proposed. The prototype of multi-media conference system which using this scheme proves that the quality issue of speech mixing can be solved well, and the speech quality is good in the local area network.

  14. Emotion Recognition using Speech Features

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa

    2013-01-01

    “Emotion Recognition Using Speech Features” covers emotion-specific features present in speech and discussion of suitable models for capturing emotion-specific information for distinguishing different emotions.  The content of this book is important for designing and developing  natural and sophisticated speech systems. Drs. Rao and Koolagudi lead a discussion of how emotion-specific information is embedded in speech and how to acquire emotion-specific knowledge using appropriate statistical models. Additionally, the authors provide information about using evidence derived from various features and models. The acquired emotion-specific knowledge is useful for synthesizing emotions. Discussion includes global and local prosodic features at syllable, word and phrase levels, helpful for capturing emotion-discriminative information; use of complementary evidences obtained from excitation sources, vocal tract systems and prosodic features in order to enhance the emotion recognition performance;  and pro...

  15. Predicting masking release of lateralized speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabot-Leclerc, Alexandre; MacDonald, Ewen; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    al., 2013, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130], which uses a short-term equalization-cancellation process to model binaural unmasking. In the conditions where informational masking (IM) was involved, the predicted SRTs were lower than the measured values because the model is blind to confusions experienced......Locsei et al. (2015) [Speech in Noise Workshop, Copenhagen, 46] measured ˝ speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in anechoic conditions where the target speech and the maskers were lateralized using interaural time delays. The maskers were speech-shaped noise (SSN) and reversed babble with 2, 4, or 8...... talkers. For a given interferer type, the number of maskers presented on the target’s side was varied, such that none, some, or all maskers were presented on the same side as the target. In general, SRTs did not vary significantly when at least one masker was presented on the same side as the target...

  16. Delay and impairment in brain development and function in rat offspring after maternal exposure to methylmercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radonjic, M.; Cappaert, N.L.M.; Vries, E.F.J.; Esch, C.E.F.; Kuper, F.C.; van Waarde, A.; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Wadman, W.J.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Stierum, R.H.; de Groot, D.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal exposure to the neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg) has been shown to have adverse effects on neural development of the offspring in man. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which MeHg affects the developing brain. To explore the neurodevelopmental defects and the underlying

  17. Delay and Impairment in Brain Development and Function in Rat Offspring After Maternal Exposure to Methylmercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radonjic, Marijana; Cappaert, Natalie L. M.; de Vries, Erik F. J.; de Esch, Celine E. F.; Kuper, Frieke C.; van Waarde, Aren; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Wadman, Wytse J.; Wolterbeek, Andre P. M.; Stierum, Rob H.; de Groot, Didima M. G.

    Maternal exposure to the neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg) has been shown to have adverse effects on neural development of the offspring in man. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms by which MeHg affects the developing brain. To explore the neurodevelopmental defects and the underlying

  18. Speech production, Psychology of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schriefers, H.J.; Vigliocco, G.

    2015-01-01

    Research on speech production investigates the cognitive processes involved in transforming thoughts into speech. This article starts with a discussion of the methodological issues inherent to research in speech production that illustrates how empirical approaches to speech production must differ fr

  19. Child patterns of growth delay and cognitive development in a Bolivian mining city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castell, María; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Barbieri, Flavia-Laura; Paco, Pamela; Gardon, Jacques; Sunyer, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to (1) follow up and characterize infant growth patterns during the first year of life in Bolivia, and (2) determine whether there exists an association between weight gain and cognitive development in children living near contaminated mining industries. Data on 175 children participating to the ToxBol (Toxicity in Bolivia) birth cohort were analyzed. Rapid-growth during the first 6 months was defined as a change in weight z-score > 0.67 while slow-growth was defined as a weight z-score change of Development at 10.5-12.5 months of age. Mixed models were used to examine the association between cognitive development and weight gain. Rapid growers weighed less at birth (P cognitive development (coef = 0.49, 95% confidence interval = -4.10, 5.08). In this Bolivian cohort, children born smaller were more likely to grow/develop faster and attain greater weight and length. Their cognitive development was not affected by their growth patterns. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Coevolutionary Investments in Human Speech and Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Bulte, Erwin H; Horan, Richard D.; Shogren, Jason F.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel explanation for the emergence of language in modern humans, and the lack thereof in other hominids. A coevolutionary process, where trade facilitates speech and speech facilitates trade, driven by expectations and potentially influenced by geography, gives rise to multiple stable development trajectories. While the trade-speech equilibrium is not an inevitable outcome for modern humans, we do find that it is a relatively likely result given that our species evolved in Afric...