WorldWideScience

Sample records for delayed sleep onset

  1. Objective measures of sleep and dim light melatonin onset in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxvig, Ingvild W; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Pallesen, Ståle; Vedaa, Oystein; Nordhus, Inger H; Sørensen, Eli; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2013-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder is characterized by a delay in the timing of the major sleep period relative to conventional norms. The sleep period itself has traditionally been described as normal. Nevertheless, it is possible that sleep regulatory mechanism disturbances associated with the disorder may affect sleep duration and/or architecture. Polysomnographic data that may shed light on the issue are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine polysomnographic measures of sleep in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder, and to compare findings to that of healthy controls. A second aim was to estimate dim light melatonin onset as a marker of circadian rhythm and to investigate the phase angle relationship (time interval) between dim light melatonin onset and the sleep period. Data from 54 adolescents and young adults were analysed, 35 diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder and 19 healthy controls. Results show delayed timing of sleep in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but once sleep was initiated no group differences in sleep parameters were observed. Dim light melatonin onset was delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but no difference in phase angle was observed between the groups. In conclusion, both sleep and dim light melatonin onset were delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder. The sleep period appeared to occur at the same circadian phase in both groups, and once sleep was initiated no differences in sleep parameters were observed. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. Home dim light melatonin onsets with measures of compliance in delayed sleep phase disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Wyatt, James K; Fogg, Louis F

    2016-06-01

    The dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) assists with the diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Home DLMOs are attractive for cost savings and convenience, but can be confounded by home lighting and sample timing errors. We developed a home saliva collection kit with objective measures of light exposure and sample timing. We report on our first test of the kit in a clinical population. Thirty-two participants with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD; 17 women, aged 18-52 years) participated in two back-to-back home and laboratory phase assessments. Most participants (66%) received at least one 30-s epoch of light >50 lux during the home phase assessments, but for only 1.5% of the time. Most participants (56%) collected every saliva sample within 5 min of the scheduled time. Eighty-three per cent of home DLMOs were not affected by light or sampling errors. The home DLMOs occurred, on average, 10.2 min before the laboratory DLMOs, and were correlated highly with the laboratory DLMOs (r = 0.93, P light exposure and sample timing, can assist in identifying accurate home DLMOs. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Delayed Circadian Rhythm in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, M.M.; Kooij, J.J.S; Boonstra, A. M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest circadian rhythm disturbances in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sleep-onset insomnia (SOI). We investigate here sleep and rhythms in activity and melatonin in adults with ADHD. Methods: Sleep logs and actigraphy data were

  4. Termination of short term melatonin treatment in children with delayed Dim Light Melatonin Onset: effects on sleep, health, behavior problems, and parenting stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, Annette; Meijer, Anne Marie; Smits, Marcel G.; Oort, Frans J.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of termination of short term melatonin treatment on sleep, health, behavior, and parenting stress in children with delayed Dim Light Melatonin Onset. Forty-one children (24 boys, 17 girls; mean age=9.43 years) entered melatonin treatment for 3 weeks and then discontinued

  5. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

  6. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.

  7. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder and effects of melatonin treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, Annette; Dewald-Kaufmann, Julia F.; Smits, Marcel G.; Oort, Frans J.; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic and circadian changes that occur during adolescence can result in chronic sleep reduction. This may particularly be true for adolescents with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD), which is associated with late Dim Light Melatonin Onset (DLMO). This study assessed the influence of

  8. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, Roy J. E. M.; Swaab, Dick F.; van Someren, Eus J. W.

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin

  9. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin

  10. Delayed Sleep and Sleep Loss in University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Leon C.

    1986-01-01

    A sample of 211 first-year psychology students completed a questionnaire of sleep habits and difficulities. It was discovered that Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome may be a significant problem in university student populations. (Author/JD)

  11. Delayed sleep phase disorder: clinical perspective with a focus on light therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USAAbstract: Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD is common among adolescents and further increases their susceptibility to chronic sleep restriction and associated detrimental outcomes, including increased risk of depression, drug and alcohol use, behavioral problems, and poor scholastic performance. DSPD is characterized by sleep onset that occurs significantly later than desired bedtimes and societal norms. Individuals with DSPD exhibit long sleep latencies when attempting to sleep at conventional bedtimes. Circadian sleep disorders such as DSPD can occur when there is misalignment between sleep timing and societal norms. This review discusses studies using light therapy to advance the timing of sleep in adolescents and college students, in particular on those suffering from DSPD. A discussion on how to increase effectiveness of light therapy in the field will also be provided.Keywords: circadian, melatonin, light, sleep, sleep phase disorder, adolescents

  12. Sleep and circadian variability in people with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder versus healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Helen J; Park, Margaret; Wyatt, James K; Rizvydeen, Muneer; Fogg, Louis F

    2017-06-01

    To compare sleep and circadian variability in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD) to healthy controls. Forty participants (22 DSWPD, 18 healthy controls) completed a ten-day protocol, consisting of DLMO assessments on two consecutive nights, a five-day study break, followed by two more DLMO assessments. All participants were instructed to sleep within one hour of their self-reported average sleep schedule for the last four days of the study break. We analyzed the participants' wrist actigraphy data during these four days to examine intraindividual variability in sleep timing, duration and efficiency. We also examined shifts in the DLMO from before and after the study break. Under the same conditions, people with DSWPD had significantly more variable wake times and total sleep time than healthy controls (p ≤ 0.015). Intraindividual variability in sleep onset time and sleep efficiency was similar between the two groups (p ≥ 0.30). The DLMO was relatively stable across the study break, with only 11% of controls but 27% of DSWPDs showed more than a one hour shift in the DLMO. Only in the DSWPD sample was greater sleep variability associated with a larger shift in the DLMO (r = 0.46, p = 0.03). These results suggest that intraindividual variability in sleep can be higher in DSWPD versus healthy controls, and this may impact variability in the DLMO. DSWPD patients with higher intraindividual variability in sleep are more likely to have a shifting DLMO, which could impact sleep symptoms and the optimal timing of light and/or melatonin treatment for DSWPD. Circadian Phase Assessments at Home, http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01487252, NCT01487252. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, X.; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Aarts, R.M.; Haakma, R.; Fonseca, P.; Rolink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by

  14. Delayed sleep phase disorder: clinical perspective with a focus on light therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiro, Mariana G

    2016-01-01

    Mariana G Figueiro Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USAAbstract: Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is common among adolescents and further increases their susceptibility to chronic sleep restriction and associated detrimental outcomes, including increased risk of depression, drug and alcohol use, behavioral problems, and poor scholastic performance. DSPD is characterized by sleep onset that occurs significantly later than desired bedtimes and societal no...

  15. Effect of Melatonin on Sleep, Behavior, and Cognition in ADHD and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Smits, Marcel G.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Gunning, W. Boudewijn

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on sleep, behavior, cognition, and quality of life in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and chronic sleep onset insomnia. Method: A total of 105 medication-free children, ages 6 to 12 years, with rigorously diagnosed ADHD and chronic sleep onset insomnia…

  16. The association between prolonged sleep onset latency and heart rate dynamics among young sleep-onset insomniacs and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Kuo, Terry B J; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2015-12-30

    A blunting of heart rate (HR) reduction during sleep has been reported to be associated with increased all-cause mortality. An increased incident of cardiovascular events has been observed in patients with insomnia but the relationship between nighttime HR and insomnia remains unclear. Here we investigated the HR patterns during the sleep onset period and its association with the length of sleep onset latency (SOL). Nineteen sleep-onset insomniacs (SOI) and 14 good sleepers had their sleep analyzed. Linear regression and nonlinear Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of the HR slope were performed in order to analyze HR dynamics during the sleep onset period. A significant depression in HR fluctuation was identified among the SOI group during the sleep onset period when linear regression and HHT analysis were applied. The magnitude of the HR reduction was associated with both polysomnography-defined and subjective SOL; moreover, we found that the linear regression and HHT slopes of the HR showed great sensitivity with respect to sleep quality. Our findings indicate that HR dynamics during the sleep onset period are sensitive to sleep initiation difficulty and respond to the SOL, which indicates that the presence of autonomic dysfunction would seem to affect the progress of falling asleep. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Significant Sleep Dysregulation in a Toddler With Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Martin T; Owens, Judith; Abbott, Myles

    Derrick's parents made an appointment with a new pediatrician for a second opinion about disordered sleep. Now 22-months old, he was evaluated at 18 months of age for developmental delay when he was found to have "a regulatory disorder associated with delays in language and motor development, hypotonia and significant sleep problems." The parents are now most concerned about his sleeping pattern. Prolonged sleep onset and frequent night awaking occur each night since 6-months of age. These problems are more severe in the past few months when he awakes screaming and cannot be settled. The awakening episodes occur 2 to 4 times each night when "he screams and thrashes his body for up to an hour." Daytime tantrums increased. After the parents read a book about sleep in young children, they provided a calm atmosphere at bedtime including a dark room and singing a quiet lullaby. When these changes did not alter sleep, they purchased a vibrating mattress which was also unsuccessful.Derrick was born full term after an uncomplicated prenatal and perinatal course. He sat at 10 months, crawled at 12 months, and walked at 18 months. He currently drinks from a sippy cup and he can use a utensil to eat. He has few words saying only "no" and "mama" in the past month. Imitation of some words occurred recently. He has responded to simple directions in the past 2 months. Derrick passed the newborn audiology screen. He does not have difficulty swallowing and he does not drool. He plays with many different toys and he plays in parallel with his older brother who also experienced delays in motor and language development. His brother is now doing very well in school. There is no family history of cognitive delay, seizure disorder, cerebral palsy, early developmental delay (other than the brother) or a significant sleep problem. PHYSICAL EXAMINATION:: head circumference, length and weight (75th percentile). He had mild generalized hypotonia, mild weakness, 2+ symmetrical deep tendon

  18. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T C Y; Fu, D R; Liu, X G; Tian, Z X, E-mail: liutcy@scnu.edu.cn [Lab Laser Sports Medicine, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou, GD 510006 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  19. Contributions of circadian tendencies and behavioral problems to sleep onset problems of children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Reut

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are two to three times more likely to experience sleep problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative contributions of circadian preferences and behavioral problems to sleep onset problems experienced by children with ADHD and to test for a moderation effect of ADHD diagnosis on the impact of circadian preferences and externalizing problems on sleep onset problems. Methods After initial screening, parents of children meeting inclusion criteria documented child bedtime over 4 nights, using a sleep log, and completed questionnaires regarding sleep, ADHD and demographics to assess bedtime routine prior to PSG. On the fifth night of the study, sleep was recorded via ambulatory assessment of sleep architecture in the child’s natural sleep environment employing portable polysomnography equipment. Seventy-five children (26 with ADHD and 49 controls aged 7–11 years (mean age 8.61 years, SD 1.27 years participated in the present study. Results In both groups of children, externalizing problems yielded significant independent contributions to the explained variance in parental reports of bedtime resistance, whereas an evening circadian tendency contributed both to parental reports of sleep onset delay and to PSG-measured sleep-onset latency. No significant interaction effect of behavioral/circadian tendency with ADHD status was evident. Conclusions Sleep onset problems in ADHD are related to different etiologies that might require different interventional strategies and can be distinguished using the parental reports on the CSHQ.

  20. Delayed onset of a daytime nap facilitates retention of declarative memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E Alger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Learning followed by a period of sleep, even as little as a nap, promotes memory consolidation. It is now generally recognized that sleep facilitates the stabilization of information acquired prior to sleep. However, the temporal nature of the effect of sleep on retention of declarative memory is yet to be understood. We examined the impact of a delayed nap onset on the recognition of neutral pictorial stimuli with an added spatial component. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants completed an initial study session involving 150 neutral pictures of people, places, and objects. Immediately following the picture presentation, participants were asked to make recognition judgments on a subset of "old", previously seen, pictures versus intermixed "new" pictures. Participants were then divided into one of four groups who either took a 90-minute nap immediately, 2 hours, or 4 hours after learning, or remained awake for the duration of the experiment. 6 hours after initial learning, participants were again tested on the remaining "old" pictures, with "new" pictures intermixed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Interestingly, we found a stabilizing benefit of sleep on the memory trace reflected as a significant negative correlation between the average time elapsed before napping and decline in performance from test to retest (p = .001. We found a significant interaction between the groups and their performance from test to retest (p = .010, with the 4-hour delay group performing significantly better than both those who slept immediately and those who remained awake (p = .044, p = .010, respectively. Analysis of sleep data revealed a significant positive correlation between amount of slow wave sleep (SWS achieved and length of the delay before sleep onset (p = .048. The findings add to the understanding of memory processing in humans, suggesting that factors such as waking processing and homeostatic increases in need for sleep over time modulate

  1. Delayed sleep phase cases and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nievergelt Caroline M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD is a condition in which patients have difficulty falling asleep before the early morning hours and commonly have trouble awakening before late morning or even early afternoon. Several studies have suggested that variations in habitual bedtime are 40–50% heritable. Methods We recruited a case series of 205 participants, along with 221 controls (DSPD-C with normal sleep, roughly matched for age, gender, and ancestry. A representative sample of San Diego adults recruited some years before was already available to confirm the control group. Both DSPD and DSPD-C provided blood or saliva samples for DNA and completed extensive questionnaires about sleep habits, sleep history, family history, sleep quality, morningness-eveningness traits, depression, mania, and seasonality of symptoms. The DSPD group wore wrist actigraphs for a median of 13.2 days. The representative sample collected previously had undergone actigraphic recordings, from which 48 hours of data were generally available. Results The DSPD and DSPD-C samples showed almost no overlap on morningness-eveningness scores. DSPD cases went to bed and arose about 3 hours later than the DSPD-C and the representative sample. DSPD cases reported more difficulties with sleep, poorer sleep quality, and more depression, but there was no significant difference in a history of mania. DSPD cases reported more family history of late bedtimes, but female DSPD reported that their fathers' bedtimes were later than the fathers of male DSPD. Conclusion These results indicate a DSPD phenotype is familial and associated with unipolar depression.

  2. Onset of Impaired Sleep and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula; Lange, Theis

    2016-01-01

    , and dyslipidemia). METHODS: In a longitudinal cohort study with 3 survey waves (2000, 2004, 2008) from the Finnish Public Sector study we used repeated information on sleep duration and disturbances to determine onset of impaired sleep. Information on development of CVD risk factors, as indicated by initiation...... of medication for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia was derived from electronic medical records within 8 years of follow-up. Data on 45,647 participants was structured as two data-cycles to examine the effect of change in sleep (between two waves) on incident CVD events. We applied strict inclusion...... and exclusion criteria to determine temporality between changes in sleep and the outcomes. RESULTS: While we did not find consistent effects of onset of short or long sleep, we found onset of disturbed sleep to predict subsequent risk of hypertension (hazard ratio = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.04-1.44) and dyslipidemia (HR...

  3. Lack of short-wavelength light during the school day delays dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Rea, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Circadian timing affects sleep onset. Delayed sleep onset can reduce sleep duration in adolescents required to awake early for a fixed school schedule. The absence of short-wavelength ("blue") morning light, which helps entrain the circadian system, can hypothetically delay sleep onset and decrease sleep duration in adolescents. The goal of this study was to investigate whether removal of short-wavelength light during the morning hours delayed the onset of melatonin in young adults. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was measured in eleven 8th-grade students before and after wearing orange glasses, which removed short-wavelength light, for a five-day school week. DLMO was significantly delayed (30 minutes) after the five-day intervention, demonstrating that short-wavelength light exposure during the day can be important for advancing circadian rhythms in students. Lack of short-wavelength light in the morning has been shown to delay the circadian clock in controlled laboratory conditions. The results presented here are the first to show, outside laboratory conditions, that removal of short-wavelength light in the morning hours can delay DLMO in 8th-grade students. These field data, consistent with results from controlled laboratory studies, are directly relevant to lighting practice in schools.

  4. Association between delayed bedtime and sleep-related problems among community-dwelling 2-year-old children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Shingo; Enomoto, Minori; Kamei, Yuichi; Inada, Naoko; Moriwaki, Aiko; Kamio, Yoko; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-03-13

    Although delayed sleep timing causes many socio-psycho-biological problems such as sleep loss, excessive daytime sleepiness, obesity, and impaired daytime neurocognitive performance in adults, there are insufficient data showing the clinical significance of a 'night owl lifestyle' in early life. This study examined the association between habitual delayed bedtime and sleep-related problems among community-dwelling 2-year-old children in Japan. Parents/caregivers of 708 community-dwelling 2-year-old children in Nishitokyo City, Tokyo, participated in the study. The participants answered a questionnaire to evaluate their child's sleep habits and sleep-related problems for the past 1 month. Of the 425 children for whom complete data were collected, 90 (21.2%) went to bed at 22:00 or later. Children with delayed bedtime showed significantly more irregular bedtime, delayed wake time, shorter total sleep time, and difficulty in initiating and terminating sleep. Although this relationship indicated the presence of sleep debt in children with delayed bedtime, sleep onset latency did not differ between children with earlier bedtime and those with delayed bedtime. Rather, delayed bedtime was significantly associated with bedtime resistance and problems in the morning even when adjusting for nighttime and daytime sleep time. Even in 2-year-old children, delayed bedtime was associated with various sleep-related problems. The causal factors may include diminished homeostatic sleep drive due to prolonged daytime nap as well as diurnal preference (morning or night type) regulated by the biological clock.

  5. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. Results: We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. Conclusions: The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination. PMID:21060095

  6. Delayed-onset dementia after stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Vincent C T; Lam, Bonnie Y K; Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Wenyan; Au, Lisa; Leung, Eric Y L; Chen, Sirong; Yang, Jie; Chu, Winnie C W; Lau, Alexander Y L; Chan, Anne Y Y; Shi, Lin; Fan, Florence; Ma, Sze H; Ip, Vincent; Soo, Yannie O Y; Leung, Thomas W H; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Ho, Chi L; Wong, Lawrence K S; Wong, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Patients surviving stroke without immediate dementia are at high risk of delayed-onset dementia. Mechanisms underlying delayed-onset dementia are complex and may involve vascular and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Dementia-free patients with stroke and/or transient ischemic attack (TIA; n = 919) were studied for 3 years prospectively, excluding those who developed dementia 3 to 6 months after stroke and/or TIA. Forty subjects (4.4%) developed dementia during the study period. Imaging markers of severe small vessel disease (SVD), namely presence of ≥3 lacunes and confluent white matter changes; history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus independently predicted delayed-onset dementia after adjustment for age, gender, and education. Only 6 of 31 (19.4%) subjects with delayed cognitive decline harbored Alzheimer's disease-like Pittsburg compound B (PiB) retention. Most PiB cases (16/25, 64%) had evidence of severe SVD. Severe SVD contributes importantly to delayed-onset dementia after stroke and/or TIA. Future clinical trials aiming to prevent delayed-onset dementia after stroke and/or TIA should target this high-risk group. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Difficult weaning in delayed onset diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Syed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic injuries are relatively rare and result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Regardless of the mechanism, diagnosis is often missed and high index of suspicion is vital. The clinical signs associated with a diaphragmatic hernia can range from no outward signs to immediately life-threatening respiratory compromise. Establishing the clinical diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries (DI can be challenging as it is often clinically occult. Accurate diagnosis is critical since missed DI may result in grave sequelae due to herniation and strangulation of displaced intra-abdominal organs. We present a case of polytrauma with rib fracture and delayed appearance of diaphragmatic hernia manifesting as difficult weaning from ventilatory support.

  8. Humans Optimize Decision-Making by Delaying Decision Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Grinband, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Why do humans make errors on seemingly trivial perceptual decisions? It has been shown that such errors occur in part because the decision process (evidence accumulation) is initiated before selective attention has isolated the relevant sensory information from salient distractors. Nevertheless, it is typically assumed that subjects increase accuracy by prolonging the decision process rather than delaying decision onset. To date it has not been tested whether humans can strategically delay decision onset to increase response accuracy. To address this question we measured the time course of selective attention in a motion interference task using a novel variant of the response signal paradigm. Based on these measurements we estimated time-dependent drift rate and showed that subjects should in principle be able trade speed for accuracy very effectively by delaying decision onset. Using the time-dependent estimate of drift rate we show that subjects indeed delay decision onset in addition to raising response threshold when asked to stress accuracy over speed in a free reaction version of the same motion-interference task. These findings show that decision onset is a critical aspect of the decision process that can be adjusted to effectively improve decision accuracy. PMID:24599295

  9. A pilot study of a novel smartphone application for the estimation of sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hannah; Lack, Leon; Lovato, Nicole

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the accuracy of Sleep On Cue: a novel iPhone application that uses behavioural responses to auditory stimuli to estimate sleep onset. Twelve young adults underwent polysomnography recording while simultaneously using Sleep On Cue. Participants completed as many sleep-onset trials as possible within a 2-h period following their normal bedtime. On each trial, participants were awoken by the app following behavioural sleep onset. Then, after a short break of wakefulness, commenced the next trial. There was a high degree of correspondence between polysomnography-determined sleep onset and Sleep On Cue behavioural sleep onset, r = 0.79, P Sleep On Cue overestimated sleep-onset latency by 3.17 min (SD = 3.04). When polysomnography sleep onset was defined as the beginning of N2 sleep, the discrepancy was reduced considerably (M = 0.81, SD = 1.96). The discrepancy between polysomnography and Sleep On Cue varied between individuals, which was potentially due to variations in auditory stimulus intensity. Further research is required to determine whether modifications to the stimulus intensity and behavioural response could improve the accuracy of the app. Nonetheless, Sleep On Cue is a viable option for estimating sleep onset and may be used to administer Intensive Sleep Retraining or facilitate power naps in the home environment. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. The Correlation between Clinical Variables and Sleep Onset Rapid Eye Movement Period Frequencies in Narcoleptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hwa Jeong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective A diagnosis of narcolepsy is defined by less than 8 minutes of mean sleep latency, and two or more sleep onset rapid eye movement periods on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. This study examined the relationship between the sleep onset rapid eye movement period frequencies during Multiple Sleep Latency Test and narcoleptic symptom severity. Methods From March 2004 to August 2009, 126 patients suffering from excessive daytime sleepiness who visited the Sleep Disorders Clinic of St. Vincent’s Hospital at the Catholic University of Korea were tested by polysomnography and Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Subjects were divided into three groups according to the number of sleep onset rapid eye movement periods that appeared on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Symptom severity instruments included the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Sleep Inventory, and various sleep parameters. In addition, we performed human leukocyte antigen genotyping for human leukocyte antigen-DQB1*0602 on all patients. Results Among the three groups classified by the number of sleep onset rapid eye movement periods during Multiple Sleep Latency Test, we found no significant differences in demographic features, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and most polysomnographic findings. However, we observed cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, sleep paralysis, and human leukocyte antigen-DQB1*0602 positivity more frequently in groups with higher sleep onset rapid eye movement period frequencies. In addition, the proportions of stage II sleep, REM sleep latency from polysomnography, and mean sleep latency and mean REM sleep latency from the Multiple Sleep Latency Test significantly decreased with increasing sleep onset rapid eye movement period frequency. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that sleep onset rapid eye movement period frequency during Multiple Sleep Latency Test correlated with sleep architecture, daytime symptom

  11. Delayed-onset bilateral abducens paresis after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Salunke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral sixth nerve paresis following closed head injury, though rare, is a known entity. However, delayed-onset post-traumatic bilateral abducens paresis is extremely rare. We present two cases. The first patient had onset of bilateral abducens paresis 2 weeks after closed head injury and the second patient after 3 days. The cause in the former was detected to be chronic subdural hematoma and in the latter is speculated to be edema/ischemia due to injury to soft tissue structures housing these nerves. The delayed onset of bilateral abducens paresis following head injury may vary according to the cause. There may be another mechanism of injury apart from direct trauma. Though rare, it needs to be evaluated and may have a treatable cause like elevated intracranial pressure.

  12. Irregular sleep/wake patterns are associated with poorer academic performance and delayed circadian and sleep/wake timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew J K; Clerx, William M; O'Brien, Conor S; Sano, Akane; Barger, Laura K; Picard, Rosalind W; Lockley, Steven W; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Czeisler, Charles A

    2017-06-12

    The association of irregular sleep schedules with circadian timing and academic performance has not been systematically examined. We studied 61 undergraduates for 30 days using sleep diaries, and quantified sleep regularity using a novel metric, the sleep regularity index (SRI). In the most and least regular quintiles, circadian phase and light exposure were assessed using salivary dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) and wrist-worn photometry, respectively. DLMO occurred later (00:08 ± 1:54 vs. 21:32 ± 1:48; p sleep propensity rhythm peaked later (06:33 ± 0:19 vs. 04:45 ± 0:11; p academic performance and SRI was observed. These findings show that irregular sleep and light exposure patterns in college students are associated with delayed circadian rhythms and lower academic performance. Moreover, the modeling results reveal that light-based interventions may be therapeutically effective in improving sleep regularity in this population.

  13. Circadian phase, dynamics of subjective sleepiness and sensitivity to blue light in young adults complaining of a delayed sleep schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moderie, Christophe; Van der Maren, Solenne; Dumont, Marie

    2017-06-01

    To assess factors that might contribute to a delayed sleep schedule in young adults with sub-clinical features of delayed sleep phase disorder. Two groups of 14 young adults (eight women) were compared: one group complaining of a delayed sleep schedule and a control group with an earlier bedtime and no complaint. For one week, each subject maintained a target bedtime reflecting their habitual sleep schedule. Subjects were then admitted to the laboratory for the assessment of circadian phase (dim light melatonin onset), subjective sleepiness, and non-visual light sensitivity. All measures were timed relative to each participant's target bedtime. Non-visual light sensitivity was evaluated using subjective sleepiness and salivary melatonin during 1.5-h exposure to blue light, starting one hour after target bedtime. Compared to control subjects, delayed subjects had a later circadian phase and a slower increase of subjective sleepiness in the late evening. There was no group difference in non-visual sensitivity to blue light, but we found a positive correlation between melatonin suppression and circadian phase within the delayed group. Our results suggest that a late circadian phase, a slow build-up of sleep need, and an increased circadian sensitivity to blue light contribute to the complaint of a delayed sleep schedule. These findings provide targets for strategies aiming to decreasing the severity of a sleep delay and the negative consequences on daytime functioning and health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep Phase Delay in Cystic Fibrosis: A Potential New Manifestation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Judy L; Jones, Christopher R; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Packer, Kristyn A; Adler, Frederick R; Liou, Theodore G

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein dysfunction causes CF. Improving survival allows detection of increasingly subtle disease manifestations. CFTR dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) may disturb circadian rhythm and thus sleep phase. We studied sleep in adults to better understand potential CNS CFTR dysfunction. We recruited participants from April 2012 through April 2015 and administered the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ). We compared free-day sleep measurements between CF and non-CF participants and investigated associations with CF survival predictors. We recruited 23 female and 22 male adults with CF aged 18 to 46 years and 26 female and 22 male volunteers aged 18 to 45 years. Compared with volunteers without CF, patients with CF had delayed sleep onset (0.612 h; P = .015), midsleep (1.11 h; P < .001), and wake (1.15 h; P < .001) times and prolonged sleep latency (7.21 min; P = .05) and duration (0.489 h; P = .05). Every hour delay in sleep onset was associated with shorter sleep duration by 0.29 h in patients with CF and 0.75 h in subjects without CF (P = .007) and longer sleep latency by 7.51 min in patients with CF and 1.6 min in volunteers without CF (P = .035). Among patients with CF, FEV 1 % predicted, prior acute pulmonary exacerbations, and weight were independent of all free-day sleep measurements. CF in adults is associated with marked delays in sleep phase consistent with circadian rhythm phase delays. Independence from disease characteristics predictive of survival suggests that sleep phase delay is a primary manifestation of CFTR dysfunction in the CNS. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Q Le

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org, (2 records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3 records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders.

  16. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT

    OpenAIRE

    van Geijlswijk, Ingeborg M.; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Korzilius, Hubert P. L. M.; Smits, Marcel G.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to establish a dose-response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and 12 years with chronic sleep onset insomnia (CSOI). METHODS: The method used for this study is the randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial. Children with CSOI (n = 72) received either mel...

  17. Classical conditioning for preserving the effects of short melatonin treatment in children with delayed sleep: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maanen A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Annette van Maanen,1 Anne Marie Meijer,1 Marcel G Smits,2 Frans J Oort1 1Research Institute Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 2Centre for Sleep-Wake Disorders and Chronobiology, Hospital Gelderse Vallei, Ede, the Netherlands Abstract: Melatonin treatment is effective in treating sleep onset problems in children with delayed melatonin onset, but effects usually disappear when treatment is discontinued. In this pilot study, we investigated whether classical conditioning might help in preserving treatment effects of melatonin in children with sleep onset problems, with and without comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or autism. After a baseline week, 16 children (mean age: 9.92 years, 31% ADHD/autism received melatonin treatment for 3 weeks and then gradually discontinued the treatment. Classical conditioning was applied by having children drink organic lemonade while taking melatonin and by using a dim red light lamp that was turned on when children went to bed. Results were compared with a group of 41 children (mean age: 9.43 years, 34% ADHD/autism who received melatonin without classical conditioning. Melatonin treatment was effective in advancing dim light melatonin onset and reducing sleep onset problems, and positive effects were found on health and behavior problems. After stopping melatonin, sleep returned to baseline levels. We found that for children without comorbidity in the experimental group, sleep latency and sleep start delayed less in the stop week, which suggests an effect of classical conditioning. However, classical conditioning seems counterproductive in children with ADHD or autism. Further research is needed to establish these results and to examine other ways to preserve melatonin treatment effects, for example, by applying morning light. Keywords: melatonin, classical conditioning, children, delayed sleep

  18. Auditory Verbal Experience and Agency in Waking, Sleep Onset, REM, and Non-REM Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Jana; Harley, Trevor A; Speth, Clemens

    2017-04-01

    We present one of the first quantitative studies on auditory verbal experiences ("hearing voices") and auditory verbal agency (inner speech, and specifically "talking to (imaginary) voices or characters") in healthy participants across states of consciousness. Tools of quantitative linguistic analysis were used to measure participants' implicit knowledge of auditory verbal experiences (VE) and auditory verbal agencies (VA), displayed in mentation reports from four different states. Analysis was conducted on a total of 569 mentation reports from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, non-REM sleep, sleep onset, and waking. Physiology was controlled with the nightcap sleep-wake mentation monitoring system. Sleep-onset hallucinations, traditionally at the focus of scientific attention on auditory verbal hallucinations, showed the lowest degree of VE and VA, whereas REM sleep showed the highest degrees. Degrees of different linguistic-pragmatic aspects of VE and VA likewise depend on the physiological states. The quantity and pragmatics of VE and VA are a function of the physiologically distinct state of consciousness in which they are conceived. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Freedman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer’s disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia.

  20. Delaying onset of dementia: are two languages enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Morris; Alladi, Suvarna; Chertkow, Howard; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I M; Phillips, Natalie A; Duggirala, Vasanta; Raju, Surampudi Bapi; Bak, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer's disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia.

  1. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Heijden, K.B. van der; Egberts, A.C.G.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. Objectives This study aims to establish a dose–response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and

  2. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.; van der Heijden, K.B.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Korzilius, H.P.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to establish a dose-response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and

  3. Thalamic deactivation at sleep onset precedes that of the cerebral cortex in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, Michel; Rey, Marc; Bastuji, Hélène; Guillemant, Philippe; Mauguière, François; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Thalamic and cortical activities are assumed to be time-locked throughout all vigilance states. Using simultaneous intracortical and intrathalamic recordings, we demonstrate here that the thalamic deactivation occurring at sleep onset most often precedes that of the cortex by several minutes, whereas reactivation of both structures during awakening is synchronized. Delays between thalamus and cortex deactivations can vary from one subject to another when a similar cortical region is considered. In addition, heterogeneity in activity levels throughout the cortical mantle is larger than previously thought during the descent into sleep. Thus, asynchronous thalamo-cortical deactivation while falling asleep probably explains the production of hypnagogic hallucinations by a still-activated cortex and the common self-overestimation of the time needed to fall asleep. PMID:20142493

  4. Sleep Problems in Infants Decrease following Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of pre-bedtime massages for infants and toddlers with sleep onset problems. Found that, compared to bedtime stories, massages produced fewer sleep delays and a shortened latency to sleep onset. (Author/DLH)

  5. Therapeutic Approaches to Delay the Onset of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The key cytopathologies in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients include mitochondrial dysfunction and energy hypometabolism, which are likely caused by the accumulation of small aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides. Thus, targeting these two abnormalities of the AD brain may hold promising therapeutic value for delaying the onset of AD. In his paper, we discuss two potential approaches to delay the onset of AD. The first is the use of low dose of diaminophenothiazins (redox active agents to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and to attenuate energy hypometabolism. Diaminophenothiazines enhance mitochondrial metabolic activity and heme synthesis, both key factors in intermediary metabolism of the AD brain.The second is to use the naturally occurring osmolytes to prevent the formation of toxic forms of Aβ and prevent oxidative stress. Scientific evidence suggests that both approaches may change course of the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration in AD. Osmolytes are brain metabolites which accumulate in tissues at relatively high concentrations following stress conditions. Osmolytes enhance thermodynamic stability of proteins by stabilizing natively-folded protein conformation, thus preventing aggregation without perturbing other cellular processes. Osmolytes may inhibit the formation of Aβ oligomers in vivo, thus preventing the formation of soluble oligomers. The potential significance of combining diaminophenothiazins and osmolytes to treat AD is discussed.

  6. Delay in solar energetic particle onsets at high heliographic latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dalla

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulysses observations have shown that solar energetic particles (SEPs can easily reach high heliographic latitudes. To obtain information on the release and propagation of SEPs prior to their arrival at Ulysses, we analyse the onsets of nine large high-latitude particle events. We measure the onset times in several energy channels, and plot them versus inverse particle speed. This allows us to derive an experimental path length and time of release from the solar atmosphere. We repeat the procedure for near-Earth observations by Wind and SOHO. We find that the derived path lengths at Ulysses are 1.06 to 2.45 times the length of a Parker spiral magnetic field line connecting the spacecraft to the Sun. The time of particle release from the Sun is between 100 and 350 min later than the release time derived from in-ecliptic measurements. We find no evidence of correlation between the delay in release and the inverse of the speed of the CME associated with the event, or the inverse of the speed of the corresponding interplanetary shock. The main parameter determining the magnitude of the delay appears to be the difference in latitude between the flare and the footpoint of the spacecraft.Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles, flares and mass ejections

  7. Predictors of children's sleep onset and maintenance problems after road traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Lutz; Zehnder, Daniel; Jenni, Oskar G; Landolt, Markus A

    2012-01-01

    Sleep onset and maintenance problems are a frequent complaint after traumatic events in children. However, the association of traumatic experiences and disturbed sleep remains to be explained. To examine the incidence of sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after road traffic accidents and identify potential predictors of sleep onset and maintenance problems, including putative psychopathological mechanisms as well as stressors affecting the family system. In 33 children treated for injuries after road traffic accidents, sleep and measures of psychopathology were assessed 10 days, 2 months, and 6 months after hospital admission. The predictive value of four clusters of predictor variables for children's sleep onset and maintenance problems was prospectively tested by multiple regression analyses. These clusters included socio-demographic, injury- and accident-related, and psychopathological variable clusters as well as factors reflecting stressors concerning mothers and family. Children suffering from posttraumatic stress reported a prolonged subjective sleep latency. The severity of sleep onset and maintenance problems was predicted by female sex and the child's as well as mothers' posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity. Sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after trauma appear to result from a complex interaction of multiple factors. Our findings support the transactional model of sleep-wake regulation that bears implications for the development of adequate intervention strategies.

  8. Melatonin for chronic sleep onset insomnia in children: A Randomized placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Heijden, J.A.M. van der; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of melatonin treatment in childhood sleep onset insomnia, 40 elementary school children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more than 1 year from chronic sleep onset insomnia, were studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The children were randomly assigned to

  9. Suvorexant: a dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of sleep onset and sleep maintenance insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kunal V; Aspesi, Anthony V; Evoy, Kirk E

    2015-04-01

    To review the efficacy, safety, and pharmacology data available for suvorexant and determine its role in therapy as compared with other agents available for the treatment of insomnia. A PubMed search using the terms suvorexant and MK-4305 (the original name given to suvorexant during early trials) was conducted in December 2014 to identify initial literature sources. No time frame was used for exclusion of older trials. Animal studies and trials written in a language other than English were excluded. Abstracts of the remaining trials were evaluated for determination of relevance to this review. References from these studies along with suvorexant prescriber information were used to identify additional literature. Three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were identified showing suvorexant to be safe, effective, and tolerable for the treatment of insomnia. After 4 weeks of therapy, relative to placebo, the 10- and 20-mg doses improved subjective total sleep time (22.3 and 49.9 minutes, respectively), wake after sleep onset (-21.4 and -28.1 minutes), and latency to persistent sleep (-2.3 and -22.3 minutes). Suvorexant is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of insomnia. Clinical trials have shown that it is relatively safe and effective for the treatment of both sleep onset and sleep maintenance at doses of 20 mg or less. Higher doses were studied but not approved because of concerns for next-day somnolence and effects on driving. Further studies are needed to assess this medication in patients with a history of addiction, because they were excluded from clinical trials, as well as to compare suvorexant with other insomnia medications available because no head-to-head studies have yet been conducted. However, its novel mechanism of action and theoretically lower addiction liability make suvorexant an appealing new option. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Delayed sleep phase: An important circadian subtype of sleep disturbance in bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinan, Mette Kvisten; Morken, Gunnar; Lagerberg, Trine V; Melle, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Vaaler, Arne E; Scott, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical models of Bipolar Disorder (BD) highlight that sleep disturbances may be a marker of underlying circadian dysregulation. However, few studies of sleep in BD have reported on the most prevalent circadian sleep abnormality, namely Delayed Sleep Phase (DSP). A cross-sectional study of 404 adults with BD who met published clinical criteria for insomnia, hypersomnia or DSP, and who had previously participated in a study of sleep in BD using a comprehensive structured interview assessment. About 10% of BD cases with a sleep problem met criteria for a DSP profile. The DSP group was younger and had a higher mean Body Mass Index (BMI) than the other groups. Also, DSP cases were significantly more likely to be prescribed mood stabilizers and antidepressant than insomnia cases. An exploratory analysis of selected symptom item ratings indicated that DSP was significantly more likely to be associated with impaired energy and activity levels. The cross-sectional design precludes examination of longitudinal changes. DSP is identified by sleep profile, not by diagnostic criteria or objective sleep records such as actigraphy. The study uses data from a previous study to identify and examine the DSP group. The DSP group identified in this study can be differentiated from hypersomnia and insomnia groups on the basis of clinical and demographic features. The association of DSP with younger age, higher BMI and impaired energy and activity also suggest that this clinical profile may be a good proxy for underlying circadian dysregulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ventilation is unstable during drowsiness before sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Stuart; Morrell, Mary J; Cordingley, Jeremy J; Semple, Stephen J

    2005-11-01

    Ventilation is unstable during drowsiness before sleep onset. We have studied the effects of transitory changes in cerebral state during drowsiness on breath duration and lung volume in eight healthy subjects in the absence of changes in airway resistance and fluctuations of ventilation and CO2 tension, characteristic of the onset of non-rapid eye movement sleep. A volume-cycled ventilator in the assist control mode was used to maintain CO2 tension close to that when awake. Changes in cerebral state were determined by the EEG on a breath-by-breath basis and classified as alpha or theta breaths. Breath duration and the pause in gas flow between the end of expiratory airflow and the next breath were computed for two alpha breaths which preceded a theta breath and for the theta breath itself. The group mean (SD) results for this alpha-to-theta transition was associated with a prolongation in breath duration from 5.2 (SD 1.3) to 13.0 s (SD 2.1) and expiratory pause from 0.7 (SD 0.4) to 7.5 s (SD 2.2). Because the changes in arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) are unknown during the theta breaths, we made in two subjects a continuous record of PaCO2 in the radial artery. PaCO2 remained constant from the alpha breaths through to the expiratory period of the theta breath by which time the duration of breath was already prolonged, representing an immediate and altered ventilatory response to the prevailing PaCO2. In the eight subjects, the CO2 tension awake was 39.6 Torr (SD 2.3) and on assisted ventilation 38.0 Torr (1.4). We conclude that the ventilatory instability recorded in the present experiments is due to the apneic threshold for CO2 being at or just below that when awake.

  12. Effects of Melatonin and Bright Light Treatment in Childhood Chronic Sleep Onset Insomnia With Late Melatonin Onset: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Annette; Meijer, Anne Marie; Smits, Marcel G; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Oort, Frans J

    2017-02-01

    Chronic sleep onset insomnia with late melatonin onset is prevalent in childhood, and has negative daytime consequences. Melatonin treatment is known to be effective in treating these sleep problems. Bright light therapy might be an alternative treatment, with potential advantages over melatonin treatment. In this study, we compare the effects of melatonin and bright light treatment with a placebo condition in children with chronic sleep onset insomnia and late melatonin onset. Eighty-four children (mean age 10.0 years, 61% boys) first entered a baseline week, after which they received melatonin (N = 26), light (N = 30), or placebo pills (N = 28) for 3 to 4 weeks. Sleep was measured daily with sleep diaries and actigraphy. Before and after treatment children completed a questionnaire on chronic sleep reduction, and Dim Light Melatonin Onset (DLMO) was measured. Results were analyzed with linear mixed model analyses. Melatonin treatment and light therapy decreased sleep latency (sleep diary) and advanced sleep onset (sleep diary and actigraphy), although for sleep onset the effects of melatonin were stronger. In addition, melatonin treatment advanced DLMO and had positive effects on sleep latency and sleep efficiency (actigraphy data), and sleep time (sleep diary and actigraphy data). However, wake after sleep onset (actigraphy) increased with melatonin treatment. No effects on chronic sleep reduction were found. We found positive effects of both melatonin and light treatment on various sleep outcomes, but more and stronger effects were found for melatonin treatment. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Academic performance in adolescents with delayed sleep phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Børge; Glozier, Nick; Harvey, Allison G; Hysing, Mari

    2015-09-01

    Delayed sleep phase (DSP) in adolescence has been linked to reduced academic performance, but there are few population-based studies examining this association using validated sleep measures and objective outcomes. The youth@hordaland-survey, a large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, surveyed 8347 high-school students aged 16-19 years (54% girls). DSP was assessed by self-report sleep measures, and it was operationalized according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders - Second Edition. School performance (grade point average, GPA) was obtained from official administrative registries, and it was linked individually to health data. DSP was associated with increased odds for poor school performance. After adjusting for age and gender, DSP was associated with a threefold increased odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile) [odds ratio (OR) = 2.95; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.03-4.30], and adjustment for sociodemographics and lifestyle factors did not, or only slightly, attenuate this association. Adjustment for nonattendance at school reduced the association substantially, and in the fully adjusted model, the effect of DSP on poor academic performance was reduced to a non-significant level. Mediation analyses confirmed both direct and significant indirect effects of DSP on school performance based on school absence, daytime sleepiness, and sleep duration. Poor academic performance may reflect an independent effect of underlying circadian disruption, which in part could be mediated by school attendance, as well as daytime sleepiness and short sleep duration. This suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted in addressing educational difficulties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep Problems and Early Developmental Delay: Implications for Early Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen; Grant, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders negatively impact behavior, cognition, and growth--the same areas targeted by early intervention. Conversely, developmental delays and disabilities may themselves precipitate sleep disorders. Young children with developmental delays experience sleep disorders at a higher rate than do typically developing children; the most common…

  15. Long-Term Melatonin Therapy for Adolescents and Young Adults with Chronic Sleep Onset Insomnia and Late Melatonin Onset: Evaluation of Sleep Quality, Chronotype, and Lifestyle Factors Compared to Age-Related Randomly Selected Population Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Tom C; Smits, Marcel G; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; van Geijlswijk, Ingeborg M

    2018-03-02

    The extent of continuance of melatonin therapy initiated in pre-pubertal children with chronic sleep onset insomnia (CSOI) was investigated in young adult life. Sleep timing, sleep quality, adverse events, reasons for cessation of therapy, and patient characteristics with regard to therapy regimen, chronotype and lifestyle factors possibly influencing sleeping behavior were assessed. With an online survey using questionnaires (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, and Munich Chronotype Questionnaire), outcomes were measured and compared with age-related controls. These controls were extracted from published epidemiological research programs applying the same questionnaires. At the moment of the survey, melatonin was still continued by 27.3% of the patients, with a mean treatment duration of 10.8 years. The overall average treatment duration was 7.1 years. Sleep quality of both discontinued and persistent melatonin users did not deviate from controls. Sleep timing and chronotype scores indicated evening type preference in all responders. Adverse events were scarce but the perceived timing of pubertal development suggested a tendency towards delayed puberty in former and current users of melatonin. This study may underestimate the number of children that are able to stop using melatonin due to the response rate (47.8%) and appeal for continuing users. Sleep timing parameters were based on self-reported estimates. Control populations were predominantly students and were of varying nationalities. The statistical power of this study is low due to the limited sample size. Melatonin therapy sustained for 7.1 years does not result in substantial deviations of sleep quality as compared to controls and appears to be safe. The evening type preference suggests a causal relation with CSOI. This study shows that ten years after initiation of treatment with melatonin for CSOI, approximately 75% of the patients will have

  16. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eHerrera-Marschitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified.In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by over expression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, competing for NAD+ during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat foetuses into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that it constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles.

  17. The prevalence of probable delayed-sleep-phase syndrome in students from junior high school to university in Tottori, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Gen-i; Inoue, Yuichi; Kojima, Kazushige; Ueta, Toshiyuki; Nakagome, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder with a typical onset in the second decade of life. DSPS is characterized by the sleep-onset insomnia and the difficulty in waking at the desired time in the morning. Although DSPS is associated with inability to attend school, the prevalence has been controversial. To elucidate a change in the prevalence of DSPS among young population, epidemiological survey was conducted on Japanese students. A total of 4,971 students of junior high school, senior high school, and university were enrolled in this cross sectional study in Tottori Prefecture. They answered anonymous screening questionnaire regarding school schedule, sleep hygiene and symptomatic items of sleep disorders. The prevalence of probable DSPS was estimated at 0.48% among the total subject students without gender difference. In university, the prevalence of the last year students showed the highest value (1.66%), while that of the first year students showed the lowest value (0.09%) among all school years from junior high school to university. The prevalence increased with advancing university school years. Thus, a considerable number of Japanese students are affected with DSPS. Senior students of university are more vulnerable to the disorder than younger students. Appropriate school schedule may decrease the mismatch between the individual's sleep-wake cycle and the school schedule. Promotion of a regular sleep habit is necessary to prevent DSPS among this population.

  18. Insomnia, Sleep Duration, Depressive Symptoms, and the Onset of Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generaal, Ellen; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Dekker, Joost

    2017-01-01

    The temporal relationships among sleep, depressive symptoms, and pain are unclear. This longitudinal study examines whether insomnia and sleep duration predict the onset of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain over 6 years and whether this association is mediated by depressive symptoms. 1860 subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, free from chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain at baseline, were followed up for the onset of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain over 6 years (Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire). We determined baseline insomnia (Women's Health Initiative Insomnia Rating Scale ≥9) and sleep duration (short: ≤6 hr, normal: 7-9 hr, long: ≥10 hr). Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and as a change score over time (Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology). Insomnia (hazard ratio [HR] [95% confidence interval, 95%CI] = 1.60 [1.30-1.96], p insomnia and short sleep with chronic pain onset (∆B = 40% and 26%, respectively). Adding the change score of depressive symptoms further weakened the association for insomnia (∆B = 16%) but not for short sleep. All direct effects for sleep measures with chronic pain onset remained statistically significant (p insomnia and short sleep duration are risk factors for developing chronic pain. Depressive symptoms partially mediate the effect for insomnia and short sleep with developing chronic pain. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Phase delaying the human circadian clock with a single light pulse and moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode: no influence of iris color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jillian L; Smith, Mark R; Choi, Ho-Sun; Eastman, Charmane I

    2009-07-17

    Light exposure in the late evening and nighttime and a delay of the sleep/dark episode can phase delay the circadian clock. This study assessed the size of the phase delay produced by a single light pulse combined with a moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode for one day. Because iris color or race has been reported to influence light-induced melatonin suppression, and we have recently reported racial differences in free-running circadian period and circadian phase shifting in response to light pulses, we also tested for differences in the magnitude of the phase delay in subjects with blue and brown irises. Subjects (blue-eyed n = 7; brown eyed n = 6) maintained a regular sleep schedule for 1 week before coming to the laboratory for a baseline phase assessment, during which saliva was collected every 30 minutes to determine the time of the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Immediately following the baseline phase assessment, which ended 2 hours after baseline bedtime, subjects received a 2-hour bright light pulse (~4,000 lux). An 8-hour sleep episode followed the light pulse (i.e. was delayed 4 hours from baseline). A final phase assessment was conducted the subsequent night to determine the phase shift of the DLMO from the baseline to final phase assessment.Phase delays of the DLMO were compared in subjects with blue and brown irises. Iris color was also quantified from photographs using the three dimensions of red-green-blue color axes, as well as a lightness scale. These variables were correlated with phase shift of the DLMO, with the hypothesis that subjects with lighter irises would have larger phase delays. The average phase delay of the DLMO was -1.3 +/- 0.6 h, with a maximum delay of ~2 hours, and was similar for subjects with blue and brown irises. There were no significant correlations between any of the iris color variables and the magnitude of the phase delay. A single 2-hour bright light pulse combined with a moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode

  20. Phase delaying the human circadian clock with a single light pulse and moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode: no influence of iris color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Ho-Sun

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Light exposure in the late evening and nighttime and a delay of the sleep/dark episode can phase delay the circadian clock. This study assessed the size of the phase delay produced by a single light pulse combined with a moderate delay of the sleep/dark episode for one day. Because iris color or race has been reported to influence light-induced melatonin suppression, and we have recently reported racial differences in free-running circadian period and circadian phase shifting in response to light pulses, we also tested for differences in the magnitude of the phase delay in subjects with blue and brown irises. Methods Subjects (blue-eyed n = 7; brown eyed n = 6 maintained a regular sleep schedule for 1 week before coming to the laboratory for a baseline phase assessment, during which saliva was collected every 30 minutes to determine the time of the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO. Immediately following the baseline phase assessment, which ended 2 hours after baseline bedtime, subjects received a 2-hour bright light pulse (~4,000 lux. An 8-hour sleep episode followed the light pulse (i.e. was delayed 4 hours from baseline. A final phase assessment was conducted the subsequent night to determine the phase shift of the DLMO from the baseline to final phase assessment. Phase delays of the DLMO were compared in subjects with blue and brown irises. Iris color was also quantified from photographs using the three dimensions of red-green-blue color axes, as well as a lightness scale. These variables were correlated with phase shift of the DLMO, with the hypothesis that subjects with lighter irises would have larger phase delays. Results The average phase delay of the DLMO was -1.3 ± 0.6 h, with a maximum delay of ~2 hours, and was similar for subjects with blue and brown irises. There were no significant correlations between any of the iris color variables and the magnitude of the phase delay. Conclusion A single 2-hour bright light

  1. Delayed onset muscle soreness : treatment strategies and performance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karoline; Hume, Patria; Maxwell, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a familiar experience for the elite or novice athlete. Symptoms can range from muscle tenderness to severe debilitating pain. The mechanisms, treatment strategies, and impact on athletic performance remain uncertain, despite the high incidence of DOMS. DOMS is most prevalent at the beginning of the sporting season when athletes are returning to training following a period of reduced activity. DOMS is also common when athletes are first introduced to certain types of activities regardless of the time of year. Eccentric activities induce micro-injury at a greater frequency and severity than other types of muscle actions. The intensity and duration of exercise are also important factors in DOMS onset. Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. However, an integration of two or more theories is likely to explain muscle soreness. DOMS can affect athletic performance by causing a reduction in joint range of motion, shock attenuation and peak torque. Alterations in muscle sequencing and recruitment patterns may also occur, causing unaccustomed stress to be placed on muscle ligaments and tendons. These compensatory mechanisms may increase the risk of further injury if a premature return to sport is attempted.A number of treatment strategies have been introduced to help alleviate the severity of DOMS and to restore the maximal function of the muscles as rapidly as possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated dosage-dependent effects that may also be influenced by the time of administration. Similarly, massage has shown varying results that may be attributed to the time of massage application and the type of massage technique used. Cryotherapy, stretching, homeopathy, ultrasound and electrical current modalities have demonstrated no effect on the alleviation of

  2. Eye Movement Control in Scene Viewing and Reading: Evidence from the Stimulus Onset Delay Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Steven G.; Nuthmann, Antje; Henderson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study used the stimulus onset delay paradigm to investigate eye movement control in reading and in scene viewing in a within-participants design. Short onset delays (0, 25, 50, 200, and 350 ms) were chosen to simulate the type of natural processing difficulty encountered in reading and scene viewing. Fixation duration increased…

  3. Discharge patterns of human tensor palatini motor units during sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christian L; Jordan, Amy S; Heckel, Leila; Worsnop, Christopher; Bei, Bei; Saboisky, Julian P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Trinder, John

    2012-05-01

    Upper airway muscles such as genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) reduce activity at sleep onset. In GG reduced muscle activity is primarily due to inspiratory modulated motor units becoming silent, suggesting reduced respiratory pattern generator (RPG) output. However, unlike GG, TP shows minimal respiratory modulation and presumably has few inspiratory modulated motor units and minimal input from the RPG. Thus, we investigated the mechanism by which TP reduces activity at sleep onset. The activity of TP motor units were studied during relaxed wakefulness and over the transition from wakefulness to sleep. Sleep laboratory. Nine young (21.4 ± 3.4 years) males were studied on a total of 11 nights. Sleep onset. Two TP EMGs (thin, hooked wire electrodes), and sleep and respiratory measures were recorded. One hundred twenty-one sleep onsets were identified (13.4 ± 7.2/subject), resulting in 128 motor units (14.3 ± 13.0/subject); 29% of units were tonic, 43% inspiratory modulated (inspiratory phasic 18%, inspiratory tonic 25%), and 28% expiratory modulated (expiratory phasic 21%, expiratory tonic 7%). There was a reduction in both expiratory and inspiratory modulated units, but not tonic units, at sleep onset. Reduced TP activity was almost entirely due to de-recruitment. TP showed a similar distribution of motor units as other airway muscles. However, a greater proportion of expiratory modulated motor units were active in TP and these expiratory units, along with inspiratory units, tended to become silent over sleep onset. The data suggest that both expiratory and inspiratory drive components from the RPG are reduced at sleep onset in TP.

  4. [Effects of massage on delayed-onset muscle soreness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowski, Paweł; Musielak, Bartosz; Sip, Paweł; Biegański, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is the pain or discomfort often felt 12 to 24 hours after exercising and subsides generally within 4 to 6 days. Once thought to be caused by lactic acid buildup, a more recent theory is that it is caused by inflammatory process or tiny tears in the muscle fibers caused by eccentric contraction, or unaccustomed training levels. Exercises that involve many eccentric contractions will result in the most severe DOMS. Fourteen healthy men with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training were recruited. The mean age, height, and mass of the subjects were 22.8 +/- 1.2 years, 178.3 +/- 10.3 cm, and 75.0 +/- 14.2 kg, respectively. Subjects performed 8 sets of concentric and eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm according to Stay protocol. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 30 minutes after exercise, the contralateral arm received no treatment. Measurements were taken at 9 assessment times: pre-exercise and postexercise at 10 min, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Dependent variables were range of motion, perceived soreness and upper arm circumference. There was noticed difference in perceived soreness across time between groups. The analysis indicated that massage resulted in a 10% to 20% decrease in the severity of soreness, but the differences were not significant. Difference in range of motion and arm circumference was not observed. Massage administered 30 minutes after exercises could have a beneficial influence on DOMS but without influence on muscle swelling and range of motion.

  5. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 μm and 6.45 μm pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 μm as compared to 6.45 μm. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy Plus Bright Light Therapy for Adolescent Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Design: Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Setting: Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. Patients: 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs WL: N = 17). Interventions: CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. Measurements and Results: DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed. Clinical Trial Information: Australia – New Zealand Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12610001041044. Citation: Gradisar M; Dohnt H; Gardner G; Paine S; Starkey

  7. Onset of impaired sleep as a predictor of change in health-related behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula; Lange, Theis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in health-related behaviour may be a key mechanism linking impaired sleep to poor health, but evidence on this is limited. In this study, we analysed observational data to determine whether onset of impaired sleep is followed by changes in health-related behaviours. METHODS: W...

  8. The Use of Exogenous Melatonin in Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder: a Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To perform a meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of exogenous melatonin in advancing sleep-wake rhythm in patients with delayed sleep phase disorder. Design: Meta analysis of papers indexed for PubMed, Embase, and the abstracts of sleep and chronobiologic societies

  9. Cortical connectivity modulation during sleep onset: A study via graph theory on EEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Gorgoni, Maurizio; Ferrara, Michele; Iberite, Francesco; Bramanti, Placido; De Gennaro, Luigi; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2017-11-01

    Sleep onset is characterized by a specific and orchestrated pattern of frequency and topographical EEG changes. Conventional power analyses of electroencephalographic (EEG) and computational assessments of network dynamics have described an earlier synchronization of the centrofrontal areas rhythms and a spread of synchronizing signals from associative prefrontal to posterior areas. Here, we assess how "small world" characteristics of the brain networks, as reflected in the EEG rhythms, are modified in the wakefulness-sleep transition comparing the pre- and post-sleep onset epochs. The results show that sleep onset is characterized by a less ordered brain network (as reflected by the higher value of small world) in the sigma band for the frontal lobes indicating stronger connectivity, and a more ordered brain network in the low frequency delta and theta bands indicating disconnection on the remaining brain areas. Our results depict the timing and topography of the specific mechanisms for the maintenance of functional connectivity of frontal brain regions at the sleep onset, also providing a possible explanation for the prevalence of the frontal-to-posterior information flow directionality previously observed after sleep onset. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5456-5464, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effects of melatonin and bright light treatment in childhood chronic sleep onset insomnia with late melatonin onset: A randomised controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.; Meijer, A.M.; Smits, M.G.; van der Heijden, K.B.; Oort, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Chronic sleep onset insomnia with late melatonin onset is prevalent in childhood, and has negative daytime consequences. Melatonin treatment is known to be effective in treating these sleep problems. Bright light therapy might be an alternative treatment, with potential advantages

  11. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available biological regeneration in athletes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of lymphatic kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

  12. Delayed onset muscle soreness: No pain, no gain? The truth behind ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is muscle pain and stiffness that develops ... limited success in reducing the symptoms.1,4-6 The DOMS phenomenon ... Nutritional supplementation (antioxidants and L-carnitine) shows promise, but ...

  13. Analysis of Delayed Sea Breeze Onset for Fort Ord Prescribed Burning Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    DELAYED SEA BREEZE ONSET FOR FORT ORD PRESCRIBED BURNING OPERATIONS by Dustin D. Hocking December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Wendell Nuss Second...AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANALYSIS OF DELAYED SEA BREEZE ONSET FOR FORT ORD PRESCRIBED BURNING OPERATIONS 5...release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The U.S. Army conducts prescribed burns at Fort Ord

  14. Occurrence of delayed-onset post-traumatic stress disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzon-Frank, Nicolai; Breinegaard, Nina; Bertelsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops according to consensus criteria within the first 1-6 months after a horrifying traumatic event, but it is alleged that PTSD may develop later. The objective was to review the evidence addressing occurrence of PTSD with onset >6 months after a traumatic...

  15. The effect of sleep onset on upper airway muscle activity in patients with sleep apnoea versus controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Robert B; Trinder, John; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Raneri, Jill; Schory, Karen; Kleverlaan, Darci; Pierce, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    Pharyngeal dilator muscles are important in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA). We have previously shown that during wakefulness, the activity of both the genioglossus (GGEMG) and tensor palatini (TPEMG) is greater in patients with OSA compared with controls. Further, EMG activity decreases at sleep onset, and the decrement is greater in apnoea patients than in healthy controls. In addition, it is known that the prevalence of OSA is greater in middle-aged compared with younger men. Thus, we had two goals in this study. First we compared upper airway muscle activity between young and middle-aged healthy men compared with men with OSA. We also explored the mechanisms responsible for the decrement in muscle activity at sleep onset in these groups. We investigated muscle activity, ventilation , and upper airway resistance (UAR) during wakefulness and sleep onset (transition from α to θ EEG activity) in all three groups. Measurements were obtained during basal breathing (BB) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was applied to reduce negative pressure-mediated muscle activation). We found that during wakefulness there was a gradation of GGEMG and UAR (younger < older < OSA) and that muscle activity was reduced by the application of nasal CPAP (to a greater degree in the OSA patients). Although CPAP eliminated differences in UAR during wakefulness and sleep, GGEMG remained greater in the OSA patients. During sleep onset, a greater initial fall in GGEMG was seen in the OSA patients followed by subsequent muscle recruitment in the third to fifth breaths following the α to θ transition. On the CPAP night, and GGEMG still fell further in the OSA patients compared with control subjects. CPAP prevented the rise in UAR at sleep onset along with the associated recruitment in GGEMG. Differences in TPEMG among the groups were not significant. These data suggest that the middle-aged men had upper airway function midway between that of

  16. Delayed-onset complications of facial soft tissue augmentation with permanent fillers in 85 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadouch, Jonathan A.; Kadouch, Daniel J.; Fortuin, Shai; van Rozelaar, Leo; Karim, Refaat B.; Hoekzema, Rick

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate factors influencing the onset and type of adverse events in patients injected with permanent fillers in the face and to propose a therapeutic strategy for these complications. A prospectively attained series of 85 patients with delayed-onset complications after facial injection with

  17. Lifetime treatment contact and delay in treatment seeking after first onset of a mental disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Have, M.; de Graaf, R.; van Dorsselaer, S.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined lifetime treatment contact and delays in treatment seeking, including rates for receipt of helpful treatment, after the onset of specific mental disorders and evaluated factors that predicted treatment seeking and delays in treatment seeking. Methods: Data were from

  18. Sleep restriction and delayed sleep associate with psychological health and biomarkers of stress and inflammation in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartar, Jaime L; Fins, Ana I; Lopez, Andrea; Sierra, Linett A; Silverman, Sarah A; Thomas, Samuel V; Craddock, Travis J A

    2015-12-01

    Despite strong associations between sleep duration and health, there is no clear understanding of how volitional chronic sleep restriction (CSR) alters the physiological processes that lead to poor health in women. We focused on biochemical and psychological factors that previous research suggests are essential to uncovering the role of sleep in health. Cross-sectional study. University-based. Sixty female participants (mean age, 19.3; SD, 2.1 years). We analyzed the association between self-reported volitional CSR and time to go to sleep on a series of sleep and psychological health measures as well as biomarkers of immune functioning/inflammation (interleukin [IL]-1β), stress (cortisol), and sleep regulation (melatonin). Across multiple measures, poor sleep was associated with decreased psychological health and a reduced perception of self-reported physical health. Volitional CSR was related to increased cortisol and increased IL-1β levels. We separately looked at individuals who experienced CSR with and without delayed sleep time and found that IL-1β levels were significantly elevated in CSR alone and in CSR combined with a late sleep time. Cortisol, however, was only elevated in those women who experienced CSR combined with a late sleep time. We did not observe any changes in melatonin across groups, and melatonin levels were not related to any sleep measures. New to our study is the demonstration of how an increase in a proinflammatory process and an increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity both relate to volitional CSR, with and without a delayed sleep time. We further show how these mechanisms relate back to psychological and self-reported health in young adult women. Copyright © 2015 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic variants in RBFOX3 are associated with sleep latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Amin (Najaf); K.V. Allebrandt; A. van der Spek (Ashley); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); K. Hek (Karin); M. Teder-Laving (Maris); C. Hayward (Caroline); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. van Mill; H. Mbarek; N.F. Watson (Nathaniel F); S.A. Melville (Scott); F.M. Del Greco (Fabiola); E.M. Byrne (Enda); E. Oole (Edwin); I. Kolcic (Ivana); T.H. Chen; D.S. Evans (Daniel); J. Coresh (Josef); N. Vogelzangs (Nicole); J. Karjalainen (Juha); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); S.A. Gharib (Sina); L. Zgaga (Lina); E. Mihailov (Evelin); K.L. Stone (Katie L); H. Campbell (Harry); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); Z. Dogas; K. Marciante (Kristin); S. Campbell (Susan); F. Borovecki (Fran); A.I. Luik (Annemarie I); M. Li (Man); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); P.R. Gehrman (Philip); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A. Hofman (Albert); W.H.L. Kao (Wen Hong Linda); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Wright (Alan); J.M. Vink (Jacqueline); J.F. Wilson (James F); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); O. Polasek (Ozren); N.M. Punjabi (Naresh); S. Redline (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); M. Merrow; G.J. Tranah (Gregory); D.J. Gottlieb (Daniel J); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I. Rudan (Igor); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); B.W.J.H. Penninx; A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Meitinger (Thomas); L. Franke (Lude); T. Roenneberg; C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTime to fall asleep (sleep latency) is a major determinant of sleep quality. Chronic, long sleep latency is a major characteristic of sleep-onset insomnia and/or delayed sleep phase syndrome. In this study we aimed to discover common polymorphisms that contribute to the genetics of sleep

  20. Genetic variants in RBFOX3 are associated with sleep latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, N.; Allebrandt, K.V.; Spek, A.; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Hek, K.; Teder-Laving, M.; Hayward, C.; Esko, T.; van Mill, J.G.; Mbarek, H.; Watson, N.F.; Melville, S.A.; Del Greco, M.F.; Byrne, E.M.; Oole, E.; Kolcic, I.; Chen, T.; Evans, D.S.; Coresh, J.; Vogelzangs, N.; Karjalainen, J.; Willemsen, G.; Gharib, S.A.; Zgaga, L.; Mihailov, E.; Stone, K.L.; Campbell, H.; Brouwer, R.W.W.; Demirkan, A.; Isaacs, A.; Dogas, Z.; Marciante, K.; Campbell, S.; Borovecki, F.; Luik, A.I.; Li, M.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huffman, J.E.; van den Hout, M.C.G.N.; Cummings, S.R.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Gehrman, P.R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Wichmann, H.E.; Müller-Nurasyid, M.; Fehrmann, R.S.N.; Montgomery, G.W.; Hofman, A.; Hong, W.; Kao, L.; Oostra, B.A.; Wright, A.F.; Vink, J.M.; Wilson, J.F.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Hicks, A.A.; Polasek, O.; Punjabi, N.M.; Redline, S.; Psaty, B.M.; Heath, A.C.; Merrow, M.; Tranah, G.J.; Gottlieb, D.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.; Rudan, I.; Tiemeier, H.; van Ijcken, W.F.J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Metspalu, A.; Meitinger, T.; Franke, L.; Roenneberg, T.; van Duijn, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Time to fall asleep (sleep latency) is a major determinant of sleep quality. Chronic, long sleep latency is a major characteristic of sleep-onset insomnia and/or delayed sleep phase syndrome. In this study we aimed to discover common polymorphisms that contribute to the genetics of sleep latency. We

  1. Melatonin Improves Health Status and Sleep in Children With Idiopathic Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; Stel, H.F. van; Heijden, K.B. van der; Meijer, A.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on health status and sleep in children with idiopathic sleep-onset insomnia. Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a Dutch sleep center, involving 62 children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more

  2. A shower before bedtime may improve the sleep onset latency of youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth-Turner, Craig; Di Michele, Rocco; Muir, Ian; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry

    2017-10-01

    During the competitive season, soccer players are likely exposed to numerous factors that may disrupt the process of sleep. The current investigation looked to evaluate a practical sleep hygiene strategy (10-min showering at ∼40°C before lights out), within a group of 11 youth soccer players in comparison to normal sleeping conditions (control). Each condition consisted of three days within a randomised crossover trial design. Sleep information was collected using a commercial wireless bedside sleep monitor. Measures of skin temperature were evaluated using iButton skin thermistors to establish both distal and proximal skin temperatures and distal to proximal gradient. The shower intervention elevated distal skin temperature by 1.1°C (95% CI: 0.1-2.1°C, p = .04) on average prior to lights out. The elevation in distal temperature was also present during the first 30-min following lights out (1.0°C, 95% CI: 0.4-1.6°C, p sleep latency of the youth soccer players was -7-min lower (95% CI: -13 to -2 min, p sleep efficiency +2% higher (95% CI: 1-3%; p sleep onset latency and improve sleep efficiency in athletes.

  3. Melanopsin gene variations interact with season to predict sleep onset and chronotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecklein, Kathryn A; Wong, Patricia M; Franzen, Peter L; Hasler, Brant P; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Miller, Megan A; Kepreos, Kyle M; Ferrell, Robert E; Manuck, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    The human melanopsin gene has been reported to mediate risk for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is hypothesized to be caused by decreased photic input during winter when light levels fall below threshold, resulting in differences in circadian phase and/or sleep. However, it is unclear if melanopsin increases risk of SAD by causing differences in sleep or circadian phase, or if those differences are symptoms of the mood disorder. To determine if melanopsin sequence variations are associated with differences in sleep-wake behavior among those not suffering from a mood disorder, the authors tested associations between melanopsin gene polymorphisms and self-reported sleep timing (sleep onset and wake time) in a community sample (N = 234) of non-Hispanic Caucasian participants (age 30-54 yrs) with no history of psychological, neurological, or sleep disorders. The authors also tested the effect of melanopsin variations on differences in preferred sleep and activity timing (i.e., chronotype), which may reflect differences in circadian phase, sleep homeostasis, or both. Daylength on the day of assessment was measured and included in analyses. DNA samples were genotyped for melanopsin gene polymorphisms using fluorescence polarization. P10L genotype interacted with daylength to predict self-reported sleep onset (interaction p sleep onset among those with the TT genotype was later in the day when individuals were assessed on longer days and earlier in the day on shorter days, whereas individuals in the other genotype groups (i.e., CC and CT) did not show this interaction effect. P10L genotype also interacted in an analogous way with daylength to predict self-reported morningness (interaction p sleep onset and chronotype as a function of daylength, whereas other genotypes at P10L do not seem to have effects that vary by daylength. A better understanding of how melanopsin confers heightened responsivity to daylength may improve our understanding of a broad range of

  4. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Pamela V.; Onyper, Serge V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. Methods: We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the “Owl-Lark” Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010–2011 through 2013–2014. Results: Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Conclusions: Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. Citation: Thacher PV, Onyper SV. Longitudinal outcomes of start time delay on sleep, behavior, and achievement in high school. SLEEP 2016;39(2):271–281. PMID

  5. Long-Term Melatonin Therapy for Adolescents and Young Adults with Chronic Sleep Onset Insomnia and Late Melatonin Onset : Evaluation of Sleep Quality, Chronotype, and Lifestyle Factors Compared to Age-Related Randomly Selected Population Cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Tom; Smits, Marcel G; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; van Geijlswijk, Ingeborg M

    2018-01-01

    The extent of continuance of melatonin therapy initiated in pre-pubertal children with chronic sleep onset insomnia (CSOI) was investigated in young adult life. Sleep timing, sleep quality, adverse events, reasons for cessation of therapy, and patient characteristics with regard to therapy regimen,

  6. Delayed-onset complications of facial soft tissue augmentation with permanent fillers in 85 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadouch, Jonathan A; Kadouch, Daniel J; Fortuin, Shai; van Rozelaar, Leo; Karim, Refaat B; Hoekzema, Rick

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate factors influencing the onset and type of adverse events in patients injected with permanent fillers in the face and to propose a therapeutic strategy for these complications. A prospectively attained series of 85 patients with delayed-onset complications after facial injection with permanent fillers underwent clinical follow-up and treatment of the complications. Lag times until onset and type of delayed-onset complication varied according to filler material. In 28% (n = 24) of the cases, patients reported the onset of complications after dental procedures, additional injections with fillers, or other invasive treatments in the facial area. Forty-eight (57%) patients required invasive treatment. Abscess formation was significantly more frequent in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and facial lipoatrophy (p = .001). The intrinsic characteristics of the injected filler and the immune status of the patient play important roles in the diversity of time of onset and type of delayed-onset adverse events observed. It seems that invasive facial or oral procedures in the vicinity of filler depots can provoke such complications. We propose a strategy for treating these complications and advise great caution when using permanent filling agents. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Can Better Management of Periodontal Disease Delay the Onset and Progression of Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice; Robinson, Sarita; Crean, StJohn; Singhrao, Sim K

    2017-01-01

    A risk factor relationship exists between periodontal disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD) via tooth loss, and improved memory following dental intervention. This links the microbial contribution from indigenous oral periodontal pathogens to the manifestation of chronic conditions, such as AD. Here, we use Porphyromonas gingivalis infection to illustrate its effect on mental health. P. gingivalis infection, in its primary sub-gingival niche, can cause polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis. Dysbiosis describes the residency of select commensals from the oral cavity following co-aggregation around the dominant keystone pathogen, such as P. gingivalis, to gain greater virulence. The initial process involves P. gingivalis disturbing neutrophil mediated innate immune responses in the healthy gingivae and then downregulating adaptive immune cell differentiation and development to invade, and subsequently, establish new dysbiotic bacterial communities. Immune responses affect the host in general and functionally via dietary adjustments caused by tooth loss. Studies from animals orally infected with P. gingivalis confirm this bacterium can transmigrate to distant organ sites (the brain) and contribute toward peripheral and intracerebral inflammation, and compromise vascular and microvascular integrity. In another study, P. gingivalis infection caused sleep pattern disturbances by altering glial cell light/dark molecular clock activity, and this, in turn, can affect the clearance of danger associated molecular patterns, such as amyloid-β, via the glymphatic system. Since P. gingivalis can transmigrate to the brain and modulate organ-specific inflammatory innate and adaptive immune responses, this paper explores whether better management of indigenous periodontal bacteria could delay/prevent the onset and/or progression of dementia.

  8. Impact of delaying school start time on adolescent sleep, mood, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A; Belon, Katherine; Moss, Patricia

    2010-07-01

    To examine the impact of a 30-minute delay in school start time on adolescents' sleep, mood, and behavior. Participants completed the online retrospective Sleep Habits Survey before and after a change in school start time. An independent high school in Rhode Island. Students (n = 201) in grades 9 through 12. Intervention Institution of a delay in school start time from 8 to 8:30 am. Sleep patterns and behavior, daytime sleepiness, mood, data from the Health Center, and absences/tardies. After the start time delay, mean school night sleep duration increased by 45 minutes, and average bedtime advanced by 18 minutes (95% confidence interval, 7-29 minutes [t(423) = 3.36; P students getting less than 7 hours of sleep decreased by 79.4%, and those reporting at least 8 hours of sleep increased from 16.4% to 54.7%. Students reported significantly more satisfaction with sleep and experienced improved motivation. Daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and depressed mood were all reduced. Most health-related variables, including Health Center visits for fatigue-related complaints, and class attendance also improved. A modest delay in school start time was associated with significant improvements in measures of adolescent alertness, mood, and health. The results of this study support the potential benefits of adjusting school schedules to adolescents' sleep needs, circadian rhythm, and developmental stage.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of delayed sleep phase in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxvig, Ingvild W; Pallesen, Ståle; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Molde, Helge; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2012-02-01

    To investigate prevalence and correlates of delayed sleep phase, characterized by problems falling asleep in the evening and rising at adequate times in the morning, in a large sample of Norwegian high school students. A randomized sample of 1285 high school students (aged 16-19 years) participated in an internet based study answering questions about sleep habits, height, weight, smoking, alcohol use, school grades, and anxiety and depression symptoms. Delayed sleep phase was operationalized as difficulties falling asleep before 2 a.m. at least three nights per week together with much or very much difficulty waking up in the morning. The results show a prevalence of delayed sleep phase of 8.4%. In all, 68% of these students (5.7% of the total sample) also reported problems advancing their sleep period as well as one daytime consequence (oversleeping at least two days a week or experiencing much/very much sleepiness at school). Delayed sleep phase was associated with lower average school grades, smoking, alcohol usage, and elevated anxiety and depression scores. Delayed sleep phase appears to be common amongst Norwegian adolescents and is associated with negative outcomes such as lower average school grades, smoking, alcohol usage, and elevated anxiety and depression scores. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors Delaying Hospital Arrival Aftr Acute Stroke Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiasian M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Optimal time of referral aftr stroke and the use of new therapies, such as r-tPA and blood pressure control, could accelerate symptoms recovery aftr stroke. Th aim of this study was to investigate factors contributing to the delay in referral to hospitals aftr the occurrence of acute stroke. Methods: Ths analytic-descriptive study included 425 patients, who had referred to the Hamadan Farshchian hospital during years 2015 and 2016. Demographic data, time of referring to medical center, the time of occurrence of stroke, risk factors, clinical symptoms of stroke, way of referring, distance from medical center and type of stroke by using a questionnaire and checklist were recorded. Th SPSS (version 16 softare was used for all calculations. Results: Th mean age of patients in this study was 70.12 years old. Overall, 260 patients (61.2% were male and 85.6% had ischemic stroke. Mean time of referral to fist treatment center and Farshchian hospital was 2.06 and 4.77 hours, respectively. A total of 36.2% patients arrived to Farshchian hospital, within less than 2 hours. Factors that prolonged time to presentation were male gender, ischemic stroke, low education, being at a location far from the medical center, referral from other medical centers, being single, having no witness during stroke, and having a stroke at home, and during night. Th most common symptoms in patients who were referred within less than two hours were confusion and loss of consciousness with frequency of 29.2%. Th most common risk factor in 61.4% of patients, who were referred within less than 2 hours, was high blood pressure. Conclusion: Ths study showed mean time of referral for treatment aftr stroke was high. Inflential elements that could possibly delay hospital arrival include, being at a location far from the medical center, no adequate knowledge about stroke symptom, having stroke at night, not referring directly to the medical center, being single, and no

  11. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the onset of dementia, specifically Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A literature review was conducted in the world’s acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and MEDLINE. Altogether, 14 original studies focusing on the research topic were detected. These included six prospective cohort studies and eight retrospective studies. Both types of studies suggest different conclusions. The findings from the prospective cohort studies state that there is no association between bilingualism and the delay of the onset of AD, while the retrospective studies claim the opposite. Despite the negative results of the prospective cohort studies, more research should be conducted on bilingualism and its impact on the delay of the onset of AD, since the brain studies have brought positive findings as far as the enhancement of cognitive reserve is concerned. PMID:29089747

  12. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the onset of dementia, specifically Alzheimer's disease (AD). A literature review was conducted in the world's acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and MEDLINE. Altogether, 14 original studies focusing on the research topic were detected. These included six prospective cohort studies and eight retrospective studies. Both types of studies suggest different conclusions. The findings from the prospective cohort studies state that there is no association between bilingualism and the delay of the onset of AD, while the retrospective studies claim the opposite. Despite the negative results of the prospective cohort studies, more research should be conducted on bilingualism and its impact on the delay of the onset of AD, since the brain studies have brought positive findings as far as the enhancement of cognitive reserve is concerned.

  13. Typical versus delayed speech onset influences verbal reporting of autistic interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodo, Liliane; Majerus, Steve; Mottron, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The distinction between autism and Asperger syndrome has been abandoned in the DSM-5. However, this clinical categorization largely overlaps with the presence or absence of a speech onset delay which is associated with clinical, cognitive, and neural differences. It is unknown whether these different speech development pathways and associated cognitive differences are involved in the heterogeneity of the restricted interests that characterize autistic adults. This study tested the hypothesis that speech onset delay, or conversely, early mastery of speech, orients the nature and verbal reporting of adult autistic interests. The occurrence of a priori defined descriptors for perceptual and thematic dimensions were determined, as well as the perceived function and benefits, in the response of autistic people to a semi-structured interview on their intense interests. The number of words, grammatical categories, and proportion of perceptual / thematic descriptors were computed and compared between groups by variance analyses. The participants comprised 40 autistic adults grouped according to the presence ( N  = 20) or absence ( N  = 20) of speech onset delay, as well as 20 non-autistic adults, also with intense interests, matched for non-verbal intelligence using Raven's Progressive Matrices. The overall nature, function, and benefit of intense interests were similar across autistic subgroups, and between autistic and non-autistic groups. However, autistic participants with a history of speech onset delay used more perceptual than thematic descriptors when talking about their interests, whereas the opposite was true for autistic individuals without speech onset delay. This finding remained significant after controlling for linguistic differences observed between the two groups. Verbal reporting, but not the nature or positive function, of intense interests differed between adult autistic individuals depending on their speech acquisition history: oral reporting of

  14. Quantitative estimation on delaying of onset of corrosion of rebar in surface treated concrete using sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sivasankar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface treatment on the concrete surface using sealers reduces the rate of permeability of chloride and moisture through the concrete. The delaying of onset of corrosion is evaluated for surface treated and untreated concrete using electrochemical techniques. After conducting rapid chloride permeability test (RCPT, using Nernst–Plank equation, the diffusion coefficient of chloride (Deff is calculated. Substituting threshold chloride concentration of rebar (Cth from cyclic polarization test in the ficks second law, the time to initiation of corrosion (Ti is arrived. From the results it is found that the treated concrete with alkyltrialkoxy silane sealer delays the onset of corrosion by four times than that of untreated concrete.

  15. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Pamela V; Onyper, Serge V

    2016-02-01

    To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the "Owl-Lark" Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010-2011 through 2013-2014. Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Web survey of sleep problems associated with early-onset bipolar spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthouse, Nicholas; Fristad, Mary; Splaingard, Mark; Kelleher, Kelly; Hayes, John; Resko, Susan

    2008-05-01

    As research on sleep difficulties associated with Early-Onset Bipolar Spectrum Disorders (EBSD) is limited, a web-based survey was developed to further explore these problems. 494 parents of 4-to-12 year-olds, identified by parents as being diagnosed with EBSD, completed a web survey about past and current EBSD-related sleep problems. The survey included Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) items and sleep problems from the International Classification of Sleep Disorders 2nd edition. Nearly all parents reported some type of past or current EBSD-sleep problem. Most occurred during a worst mood period, particularly with mixed manic-depressive symptoms. Symptoms caused impairments at home, school, or with peers in 96.9% of the sample and across all three contexts in 64.0% of children. Sleep problems were also noted after three-day weekends and Spring and Fall Daylight Savings time changes. Findings, study limitations, and implications for treatment and etiology are discussed.

  17. Short-term total sleep deprivation alters delay-conditioned memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shweta; Jha, Sushil K

    2016-06-01

    Short-term sleep deprivation soon after training may impair memory consolidation. Also, a particular sleep stage or its components increase after learning some tasks, such as negative and positive reinforcement tasks, avoidance tasks, and spatial learning tasks, and so forth. It suggests that discrete memory types may require specific sleep stage or its components for their optimal processing. The classical conditioning paradigms are widely used to study learning and memory but the role of sleep in a complex conditioned learning is unclear. Here, we have investigated the effects of short-term sleep deprivation on the consolidation of delay-conditioned memory and the changes in sleep architecture after conditioning. Rats were trained for the delay-conditioned task (for conditioning, house-light [conditioned stimulus] was paired with fruit juice [unconditioned stimulus]). Animals were divided into 3 groups: (a) sleep deprived (SD); (b) nonsleep deprived (NSD); and (c) stress control (SC) groups. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between groups and days (training and testing) during the conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus presentation. Further, Tukey post hoc comparison revealed that the NSD and SC animals exhibited significant increase in performances during testing. The SD animals, however, performed significantly less during testing. Further, we observed that wakefulness and NREM sleep did not change after training and testing. Interestingly, REM sleep increased significantly on both days compared to baseline more specifically during the initial 4-hr time window after conditioning. Our results suggest that the consolidation of delay-conditioned memory is sleep-dependent and requires augmented REM sleep during an explicit time window soon after training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Mild toxic anterior segment syndrome mimicking delayed onset toxic anterior segment syndrome after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Na Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is an acute sterile postoperative anterior segment inflammation that may occur after anterior segment surgery. I report herein a case that developed mild TASS in one eye after bilateral uneventful cataract surgery, which was masked during early postoperative period under steroid eye drop and mimicking delayed onset TASS after switching to weaker steroid eye drop.

  19. Early-Onset Bipolar Disorder and Treatment Delay Are Risk Factors for Poor Outcome in Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Frye, Mark A.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Nolen, Willem A.

    Objective: We examined the influence of age at onset of illness and the delay in time to first treatment on morbidity in adulthood. Method: 529 adult outpatients with a mean age of 42 years, who entered our research network from 1996 through 2001 and who were diagnosed with bipolar disorder

  20. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  1. Melatonin for chronic whiplash syndrome with delayed melatonin onset randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringen, S. van; Jansen, T.; Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of melatonin in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and delayed melatonin onset. Design: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. One-week baseline was followed by a 4-week treatment period with either melatonin or placebo. In the

  2. Sleep deprivation accelerates delay-related loss of visual short-term memories without affecting precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Natalie; Asplund, Christopher L; Chee, Michael W L

    2013-06-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is an important measure of information processing capacity and supports many higher-order cognitive processes. We examined how sleep deprivation (SD) and maintenance duration interact to influence the number and precision of items in VSTM using an experimental design that limits the contribution of lapses at encoding. For each trial, participants attempted to maintain the location and color of three stimuli over a delay. After a retention interval of either 1 or 10 seconds, participants reported the color of the item at the cued location by selecting it on a color wheel. The probability of reporting the probed item, the precision of report, and the probability of reporting a nonprobed item were determined using a mixture-modeling analysis. Participants were studied twice in counterbalanced order, once after a night of normal sleep and once following a night of sleep deprivation. Sleep laboratory. Nineteen healthy college age volunteers (seven females) with regular sleep patterns. Approximately 24 hours of total SD. SD selectively reduced the number of integrated representations that can be retrieved after a delay, while leaving the precision of object information in the stored representations intact. Delay interacted with SD to lower the rate of successful recall. Visual short-term memory is compromised during sleep deprivation, an effect compounded by delay. However, when memories are retrieved, they tend to be intact.

  3. Bilingualism delays the onset of behavioral but not aphasic forms of frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladi, Suvarna; Bak, Thomas H; Shailaja, Mekala; Gollahalli, Divyaraj; Rajan, Amulya; Surampudi, Bapiraju; Hornberger, Michael; Duggirala, Vasanta; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kaul, Subhash

    2017-05-01

    Bilingualism has been found to delay onset of dementia and this has been attributed to an advantage in executive control in bilinguals. However, the relationship between bilingualism and cognition is complex, with costs as well as benefits to language functions. To further explore the cognitive consequences of bilingualism, the study used Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, to examine whether bilingualism modifies the age at onset of behavioral and language variants of Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) differently. Case records of 193 patients presenting with FTD (121 of them bilingual) were examined and the age at onset of the first symptoms were compared between monolinguals and bilinguals. A significant effect of bilingualism delaying the age at onset of dementia was found in behavioral variant FTD (5.7 years) but not in progressive nonfluent aphasia (0.7 years), semantic dementia (0.5 years), corticobasal syndrome (0.4 years), progressive supranuclear palsy (4.3 years) and FTD-motor neuron disease (3 years). On dividing all patients predominantly behavioral and predominantly aphasic groups, age at onset in the bilingual behavioral group (62.6) was over 6 years higher than in the monolingual patients (56.5, p=0.006), while there was no difference in the aphasic FTD group (60.9 vs. 60.6 years, p=0.851). The bilingual effect on age of bvFTD onset was shown independently of other potential confounding factors such as education, gender, occupation, and urban vs rural dwelling of subjects. To conclude, bilingualism delays the age at onset in the behavioral but not in the aphasic variants of FTD. The results are in line with similar findings based on research in stroke and with the current views of the interaction between bilingualism and cognition, pointing to advantages in executive functions and disadvantages in lexical tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The impact of sleep on true and false memory across long delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardilla-Delgado, Enmanuelle; Payne, Jessica D

    2017-01-01

    While the influence of sleep on memory has a long history, sleep's role in the formation of false memories is less clear. Moreover, virtually nothing is known about the development of false memories beyond delays of about 12h. Here, for the first time, we assess post-sleep development of true and false memories across longer delay intervals of 24 and 48h. Although technically a false memory, remembering information that is related to the theme, or gist, of an experience can be considered an adaptive process. Some evidence suggests that sleep, compared to a wake period, increases both true and gist-based false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) task, but not all studies have returned this result, and most studies cannot rule out the possibility that sleep is merely protecting the information from interference, as opposed to actively aiding its consolidation. Here, to equate amount of time spent awake and asleep across groups, we assess how the positioning of sleep relative to memory encoding impacts retention across longer delays of 24 and 48h. Participants encoded 16 DRM lists in the morning (WAKE 1st Groups) or evening (SLEEP 1st Groups), and were tested either 24 or 48h later at the same time of day. Results demonstrate that true memory is better when participants sleep soon after learning. Sleeping first also increased false memory, but only in low performers. Importantly, and similar to previous studies, we found a negative correlation between slow-wave sleep (SWS) and false memory, suggesting that SWS may be detrimental for semantic/gist processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lateralization of noise-burst trains based on onset and ongoing interaural delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, Richard L; Balakrishnan, Uma; Zurek, Patrick M

    2010-07-01

    The lateralization of 250-ms trains of brief noise bursts was measured using an acoustic pointing technique. Stimuli were designed to assess the contribution of the interaural time delay (ITD) of the onset binaural burst relative to that of the ITDs in the ongoing part of the train. Lateralization was measured by listeners' adjustments of the ITD of a pointer stimulus, a 50-ms burst of noise, to match the lateral position of the target train. Results confirmed previous reports of lateralization dominance by the onset burst under conditions in which the train is composed of frozen tokens and the ongoing part contains multiple ambiguous interaural delays. In contrast, lateralization of ongoing trains in which fresh noise tokens were used for each set of two alternating (left-leading/right-leading) binaural pairs followed the ITD of the first pair in each set, regardless of the ITD of the onset burst of the entire stimulus and even when the onset burst was removed by gradual gating. This clear lateralization of a long-duration stimulus with ambiguous interaural delay cues suggests precedence mechanisms that involve not only the interaural cues at the beginning of a sound, but also the pattern of cues within an ongoing sound.

  6. Control of upper airway muscle activity in younger versus older men during sleep onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Robert B; White, David P; Pierce, Robert J; Malhotra, Atul; Edwards, Jill K; Dunai, Judy; Kleverlaan, Darci; Trinder, John

    2003-01-01

    Pharyngeal dilator muscles are clearly important in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSA). We have previously shown that the activity of both the genioglossus (GGEMG) and tensor palatini (TPEMG) are decreased at sleep onset, and that this decrement in muscle activity is greater in the apnoea patient than in healthy controls. We have also previously shown this decrement to be greater in older men when compared with younger ones. In order to explore the mechanisms responsible for this decrement in muscle activity nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was applied to reduce negative pressure mediated muscle activation. We then investigated the effect of sleep onset (transition from predominantly α to predominantly θ EEG activity) on ventilation, upper airway muscle activation and upper airway resistance (UAR) in middle-aged and younger healthy men. We found that both GGEMG and TPEMG were reduced by the application of nasal CPAP during wakefulness, but that CPAP did not alter the decrement in activity in either muscle seen in the first two breaths following an α to θ transition. However, CPAP prevented both the rise in UAR at sleep onset that occurred on the control night, and the recruitment in GGEMG seen in the third to fifth breaths following the α to θ transition. Further, GGEMG was higher in the middle-aged men than in the younger men during wakefulness and was decreased more in the middle-aged men with the application of nasal CPAP. No differences were seen in TPEMG between the two age groups. These data suggest that the initial sleep onset reduction in upper airway muscle activity is due to loss of a ‘wakefulness’ stimulus, rather than to loss of responsiveness to negative pressure. In addition, it suggests that in older men, higher wakeful muscle activity is due to an anatomically more collapsible upper airway with more negative pressure driven muscle activation. Sleep onset per se does not appear to have a greater

  7. Delay-aware adaptive sleep mechanism for green wireless-optical broadband access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruyan; Liang, Alei; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Dalei

    2017-07-01

    Wireless-Optical Broadband Access Network (WOBAN) is capacity-high, reliable, flexible, and ubiquitous, as it takes full advantage of the merits from both optical communication and wireless communication technologies. Similar to other access networks, the high energy consumption poses a great challenge for building up WOBANs. To shot this problem, we can make some load-light Optical Network Units (ONUs) sleep to reduce the energy consumption. Such operation, however, causes the increased packet delay. Jointly considering the energy consumption and transmission delay, we propose a delay-aware adaptive sleep mechanism. Specifically, we develop a new analytical method to evaluate the transmission delay and queuing delay over the optical part, instead of adopting M/M/1 queuing model. Meanwhile, we also analyze the access delay and queuing delay of the wireless part. Based on such developed delay models, we mathematically derive ONU's optimal sleep time. In addition, we provide numerous simulation results to show the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism.

  8. Tracking the sleep onset process: an empirical model of behavioral and physiological dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Prerau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sleep onset process (SOP is a dynamic process correlated with a multitude of behavioral and physiological markers. A principled analysis of the SOP can serve as a foundation for answering questions of fundamental importance in basic neuroscience and sleep medicine. Unfortunately, current methods for analyzing the SOP fail to account for the overwhelming evidence that the wake/sleep transition is governed by continuous, dynamic physiological processes. Instead, current practices coarsely discretize sleep both in terms of state, where it is viewed as a binary (wake or sleep process, and in time, where it is viewed as a single time point derived from subjectively scored stages in 30-second epochs, effectively eliminating SOP dynamics from the analysis. These methods also fail to integrate information from both behavioral and physiological data. It is thus imperative to resolve the mismatch between the physiological evidence and analysis methodologies. In this paper, we develop a statistically and physiologically principled dynamic framework and empirical SOP model, combining simultaneously-recorded physiological measurements with behavioral data from a novel breathing task requiring no arousing external sensory stimuli. We fit the model using data from healthy subjects, and estimate the instantaneous probability that a subject is awake during the SOP. The model successfully tracked physiological and behavioral dynamics for individual nights, and significantly outperformed the instantaneous transition models implicit in clinical definitions of sleep onset. Our framework also provides a principled means for cross-subject data alignment as a function of wake probability, allowing us to characterize and compare SOP dynamics across different populations. This analysis enabled us to quantitatively compare the EEG of subjects showing reduced alpha power with the remaining subjects at identical response probabilities. Thus, by incorporating both

  9. Delayed school start times and adolescent sleep: A systematic review of the experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minges, Karl E; Redeker, Nancy S

    2016-08-01

    Many schools have instituted later morning start times to improve sleep, academic, and other outcomes in response to the mismatch between youth circadian rhythms and early morning start times. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of the evidence on the effects of this practice. To examine the impact of delayed school start time on students' sleep, health, and academic outcomes, electronic databases were systematically searched and data were extracted using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Six studies satisfied selection criteria and used pre-post, no control (n = 3), randomized controlled trial (n = 2), and quasi-experimental (n = 1) designs. School start times were delayed 25-60 min, and correspondingly, total sleep time increased from 25 to 77 min per weeknight. Some studies revealed reduced daytime sleepiness, depression, caffeine use, tardiness to class, and trouble staying awake. Overall, the evidence supports recent non-experimental study findings and calls for policy that advocates for delayed school start time to improve sleep. This presents a potential long-term solution to chronic sleep restriction during adolescence. However, there is a need for rigorous randomized study designs and reporting of consistent outcomes, including objective sleep measures and consistent measures of health and academic performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleep onset uncovers thalamic abnormalities in patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Bagshaw

    Full Text Available The thalamus is crucial for sleep regulation and the pathophysiology of idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE, and may serve as the underlying basis for the links between the two. We investigated this using EEG-fMRI and a specific emphasis on the role and functional connectivity (FC of the thalamus. We defined three types of thalamic FC: thalamocortical, inter-hemispheric thalamic, and intra-hemispheric thalamic. Patients and controls differed in all three measures, and during wakefulness and sleep, indicating disorder-dependent and state-dependent modification of thalamic FC. Inter-hemispheric thalamic FC differed between patients and controls in somatosensory regions during wakefulness, and occipital regions during sleep. Intra-hemispheric thalamic FC was significantly higher in patients than controls following sleep onset, and disorder-dependent alterations to FC were seen in several thalamic regions always involving somatomotor and occipital regions. As interactions between thalamic sub-regions are indirect and mediated by the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN, the results suggest abnormal TRN function in patients with IGE, with a regional distribution which could suggest a link with the thalamocortical networks involved in the generation of alpha rhythms. Intra-thalamic FC could be a more widely applicable marker beyond patients with IGE. Keywords: Functional connectivity, Generalised epilepsy, Sleep, Thalamic reticular nucleus thalamus

  11. Oncoplastic breast surgery does not delay the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Anders; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Kroman, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only a few studies of limited size have examined whether oncoplastic breast surgery delays the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy as compared to conventional breast surgery. We investigated whether oncoplastic breast surgery causes a delay in the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy in comparison...... to lumpectomy and mastectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a population-based cohort study. Within the nationwide registry of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG), we identified 1798 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy following mastectomy, lumpectomy or oncoplastic breast surgery for early...... and unilateral invasive breast cancer. Women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. RESULTS: We found no significant difference between the three groups (mastectomy, lumpectomy, oncoplastic breast surgery) in the time from biopsy to surgery (mean time 17.9, 17.0 and 18.3 days, respectively...

  12. ASPECTS REGARDING THE EFFECT OF ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ON DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Honceriu C.; Hagiu B.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to investigate the effects of using Diclofenac ointment for delayed onset muscle soreness. The research has been conducted on two groups of junior football players, males, the number of 9 each (control and treated), which has been induced by this type of muscle soreness with specific exercises. The treated group used Diclofenac gel for the relief of musculoskeletal pain. The evaluation of values of muscular strength (Squat Jump, Jump Countermovement, Free Jump,...

  13. Experience of Comamonas Acidovorans Keratitis with Delayed Onset and Treatment Response in Immunocompromised Cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Mok; Kim, Mee Kum; Lee, Jae Lim; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To report 2 cases of Comamonas Acidovorans keratitis in immunocompromised cornea. Methods A complete review of the medical records of the two cases of Comamonas acidovorans keratitis. Results We found some similarities in clinical courses of two cases. Both of them showed development of keratitis during the management with corticosteroids, delayed onset, slow response to antibiotics, and relatively less affected corneal epithelium. Conclusions Comamonas Acidovorans is known as a less ...

  14. Marine oil dietary supplementation reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after a 30 km run

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Klaus; Telford, Richard D; Cunningham, Ross B

    2013-01-01

    Klaus Baum,1 Richard D Telford,2 Ross B Cunningham,3 1Trainingsinstitut Prof Baum, Köln, Germany; 2College of Medicine, Biology, and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3The Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia Objective: Runners are prone to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) during long distance training. This especially holds for unaccustomed training volumes at moderate to high int...

  15. Bilingualism delays age at onset of dementia, independent of education and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, James A

    2014-05-27

    Editors' Note: Mortimer argues that important confounding variables may have biased the conclusion by Alladi et al. on the role of bilingualism in delaying the onset of dementia. Following Mortimer’s comments, Alladi et al. conducted additional analysis of their data to support their conclusion. The attitude of "close enough" is not appropriate when determining brain death. Stadlan comments and supports Frank’s call for action regarding this sensitive issue.

  16. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimova B

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Blanka Klimova,1,2 Martin Valis,2 Kamil Kuca3,4 1Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, 2Department of Neurology, 3Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the onset of dementia, specifically Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A literature review was conducted in the world’s acknowledged databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and MEDLINE. Altogether, 14 original studies focusing on the research topic were detected. These included six prospective cohort studies and eight retrospective studies. Both types of studies suggest different conclusions. The findings from the prospective cohort studies state that there is no association between bilingualism and the delay of the onset of AD, while the retrospective studies claim the opposite. Despite the negative results of the prospective cohort studies, more research should be conducted on bilingualism and its impact on the delay of the onset of AD, since the brain studies have brought positive findings as far as the enhancement of cognitive reserve is concerned. Keywords: older people, evidence, effectiveness, review, cognition

  17. Delayed sleep timing and symptoms in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a controlled actigraphy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Karen L; May, Roberta S; Besing, Rachel C; Tankersly, Amelia P; Fargason, Rachel E

    2013-05-01

    Patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often exhibit disrupted sleep and circadian rhythms. Determination of whether sleep disturbance and/or circadian disruption are differentially associated with symptom severity is necessary to guide development of future treatment strategies. Therefore, we measured sleep and ADHD symptoms in participants aged 19-65 who met the DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision) criteria for ADHD and insomnia without psychiatric comorbidities by monitoring actigraphy and daily sleep logs for 2 wks, as well as the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS), and a clinic-designed sleep behavior questionnaire. Principal components analysis identified correlated circadian- and sleep-related variables in all participants with ADHD who completed the study (n = 24). The identified components were entered into a backwards stepwise linear regression analysis, which indicated that delayed sleep timing and increased sleepiness (ESS) (but not sleep duration or sleep efficiency) significantly predicted greater severity of both hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive ADHD symptoms (p sleep quality (PSQI scores; p sleep" compared with 57.2% and 50% of inattentive and symptom-controlled participants, respectively (p sleep timing and daytime sleepiness, suggesting that treatment interventions aimed at advancing circadian phase may improve daytime sleepiness. In addition, ADHD adults with combined hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive symptoms have decreased sleep quality as well as the delayed sleep timing of predominately inattentive subtypes.

  18. Sleep wake pattern analysis: Study of 131 medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Nita Ninama; Jaydeep Kangathara

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Sleep is part of the rhythm of life. Without a good sleep the mind is less adapts, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep wake cycle of the students is quite different and characterized by delayed onset, partial sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, insufficient sleep duration and occurrence of napping episodes during the day The aim of the present study is to know sleep wake pattern in medical student, role of residence and individual characterization...

  19. Diagnostic delays in children with early-onset epilepsy: impact, reasons, and opportunities to improve care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Baca, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Delayed diagnosis of early-onset epilepsy is a potentially important and avoidable complication in epilepsy care. We examined the frequency of diagnostic delays in young children with newly presenting epilepsy, their developmental impact, and reasons for delays. Methods Children who developed epilepsy before their third birthday were identified in a prospective community-based cohort. An interval ≥1 month from second seizure to diagnosis was considered a delay. Testing of development at baseline and for up to three years after and of IQ 8–9 years later was performed. Detailed parental baseline interview accounts and medical records were reviewed to identify potential reasons for delays. Factors associated with delays included the parent, child, pediatrician, neurologist, and scheduling. Results Diagnostic delays occurred in 70/172 (41%) children. Delays occurred less often if children had received medical attention for the first seizure (p<0.0001), previously had neonatal or febrile seizures (p=0.02), had only convulsions before diagnosis (p=0.005) or had a college-educated parent (p=0.01). A ≥1 month diagnostic delay was associated with an average 7.4 point drop (p=0.02) in the Vineland Scales of Adaptive Behavior motor score. The effect was present at diagnosis, persisted for at least three years, and was also apparent in IQ scores 8–9 years later which were lower in association with a diagnostic delay by 8.4 points (p=0.06) for processing speed up to 14.5 points (p=0.004) for full scale IQ, after adjustment for parental education and other epilepsy-related clinical factors. Factors associated with delayed diagnosis included parents not recognizing events as seizures (N=47), pediatricians missing or deferring diagnosis (N=15), neurologists deferring diagnosis (N=7), and scheduling problems (N=11). Significance Diagnostic delays occur in many young children with epilepsy. They are associated with substantial decrements in development and IQ later

  20. A randomised controlled trial of bright light therapy and morning activity for adolescents and young adults with Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, C; Cain, N; Bartel, K; Micic, G; Maddock, B; Gradisar, M

    2018-05-01

    A randomised controlled trial evaluated bright light therapy and morning activity for the treatment of Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD) in young people. 60 adolescents and young adults (range = 13-24 years, mean = 15.9 ± 2.2 y, 63% f) diagnosed with DSWPD were randomised to receive three weeks of post-awakening Green Bright Light Therapy (∼507 nm) and Sedentary Activity (sitting, watching TV), Green Bright Light Therapy and Morning Activity (standing, playing motion-sensing videogame), Red Light Therapy (∼643 nm) and Sedentary Activity or Red Light Therapy and Morning Activity. Sleep (ie sleep onset time, wake up time, sleep onset latency, total sleep time) and daytime functioning (ie morning alertness, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, functional impairment) were measured pre-treatment, post-treatment and at one and three month follow-up. Contrary to predictions, there were no significant differences in outcomes between treatment groups; and interaction effects between treatment group and time for all outcome variables were not statistically significant. However, adolescents and young adults in morning activity conditions did not meaningfully increase their objective activity (ie movement frequency). Overall, adolescents reported significantly improved sleep timing (d = 0.30-0.46), sleep onset latency (d = 0.32) and daytime functioning (d = 0.45-0.87) post-treatment. Improvements in sleep timing (d = 0.53-0.61), sleep onset latency (d = 0.57), total sleep time (d = 0.51), and daytime functioning (d = 0.52-1.02) were maintained, or improved upon, at the three month follow-up. However, relapse of symptomology was common and 38% of adolescents and young adults requested further treatment in addition to the three weeks of light therapy. Although there is convincing evidence for the short-term efficacy of chronobiological treatments for DSWPD, long-term treatment outcomes can be improved. To address this gap in our current knowledge

  1. Longitudinal association of delta activity at sleep onset with cognitive and affective function in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Makoto; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Gould, Christine E; Hantke, Nathan C; Cotto, Isabelle; Jordan, Josh T; Hirst, Rayna B; O'Hara, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    This investigation sought to determine whether delta activity at sleep onset (DASO) in the sleep electroencephalography of older adults represents normal variation or is associated with clinical pathology. To this end, we examined its longitudinal associations with cognitive and affective function in older adults without dementia. Participants were 153 community-dwelling older adults without dementia. We evaluated polysomnography (PSG), cognitive performance, and affective function at four time points: baseline, 12, 24, and 36 months. All participants completed PSG and measures of global cognition, delayed verbal memory, information processing speed, attention, inhibition, verbal naming, visuospatial ability, and measures of anxiety and depression. DASO was defined as sequences of rhythmic anterior delta activity on PSG in the transition from awake to sleep during the baseline assessment (Figure ). At the baseline, 83 women and 70 men, mean age 71.3 ± 0.6 years participated and 19.6% of participants exhibited DASO. Age, years of education, gender, and body mass index did not differ according to DASO status. Linear mixed modeling showed that the presence of DASO was actually associated with lower levels of anxiety and depression. Further, participants with DASO, versus those without DASO, exhibited a trend towards better cognitive performance over time, although none of these associations reached statistical significance. Whereas DASO was associated with better affective function, no significant association was found between DASO and cognitive change over time. These longitudinal findings support the view that the presence of DASO in healthy older adults represents normal variation rather than pathological aging. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Bilingualism delays age at onset of dementia, independent of education and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladi, Suvarna; Bak, Thomas H; Duggirala, Vasanta; Surampudi, Bapiraju; Shailaja, Mekala; Shukla, Anuj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kaul, Subhash

    2013-11-26

    The purpose of the study was to determine the association between bilingualism and age at onset of dementia and its subtypes, taking into account potential confounding factors. Case records of 648 patients with dementia (391 of them bilingual) diagnosed in a specialist clinic were reviewed. The age at onset of first symptoms was compared between monolingual and bilingual groups. The influence of number of languages spoken, education, occupation, and other potentially interacting variables was examined. Overall, bilingual patients developed dementia 4.5 years later than the monolingual ones. A significant difference in age at onset was found across Alzheimer disease dementia as well as frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia, and was also observed in illiterate patients. There was no additional benefit to speaking more than 2 languages. The bilingual effect on age at dementia onset was shown independently of other potential confounding factors such as education, sex, occupation, and urban vs rural dwelling of subjects. This is the largest study so far documenting a delayed onset of dementia in bilingual patients and the first one to show it separately in different dementia subtypes. It is the first study reporting a bilingual advantage in those who are illiterate, suggesting that education is not a sufficient explanation for the observed difference. The findings are interpreted in the context of the bilingual advantages in attention and executive functions.

  3. Early-onset sleep defects in Drosophila models of Huntington's disease reflect alterations of PKA/CREB signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Erin D.; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; Zhang, Jiabin; Chaffee, Ryan P.; Yin, Jerry C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurological disorder whose non-motor symptoms include sleep disturbances. Whether sleep and activity abnormalities are primary molecular disruptions of mutant Huntingtin (mutHtt) expression or result from neurodegeneration is unclear. Here, we report Drosophila models of HD exhibit sleep and activity disruptions very early in adulthood, as soon as sleep patterns have developed. Pan-neuronal expression of full-length or N-terminally truncated mutHtt recapitulates sleep phenotypes of HD patients: impaired sleep initiation, fragmented and diminished sleep, and nighttime hyperactivity. Sleep deprivation of HD model flies results in exacerbated sleep deficits, indicating that homeostatic regulation of sleep is impaired. Elevated PKA/CREB activity in healthy flies produces patterns of sleep and activity similar to those in our HD models. We were curious whether aberrations in PKA/CREB signaling were responsible for our early-onset sleep/activity phenotypes. Decreasing signaling through the cAMP/PKA pathway suppresses mutHtt-induced developmental lethality. Genetically reducing PKA abolishes sleep/activity deficits in HD model flies, restores the homeostatic response and extends median lifespan. In vivo reporters, however, show dCREB2 activity is unchanged, or decreased when sleep/activity patterns are abnormal, suggesting dissociation of PKA and dCREB2 occurs early in pathogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that sleep defects may reflect a primary pathological process in HD, and that measurements of sleep and cAMP/PKA could be prodromal indicators of disease, and serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. PMID:26604145

  4. Onset Symptoms, Tobacco Smoking, and Progressive-Onset Phenotype Are Associated With a Delayed Onset of Multiple Sclerosis, and Marijuana Use With an Earlier Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Tao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age at symptom onset (ASO is a prognostic factor that could affect the accrual of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Some factors are known to influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS, but their influence on the ASO is less well-investigated.Objective: Examine the associations between known or emerging MS risk factors and ASO.Methods: This was a multicenter study, incident cases (n = 279 with first clinical diagnosis of demyelinating event aged 18–59 years recruited at four Australian centres (latitudes 27°-43°S, from 1 November 2003 to 31 December 2006. Environmental/behavioral variables and initial symptoms were recorded at baseline interview. Linear regression was used to assess the association between risk factors and ASO.Results: Five factors were significantly associated with ASO: a history of tobacco smoking was associated with 3.05-years later ASO (p = 0.002; a history of marijuana use was associated with 6.03-years earlier ASO (p < 0.001; progressive-onset cases had 5.61-years later ASO (p = 0.001; an initial presentation of bowel & bladder and cerebral dysfunctional were associated with 3.39 (p = 0.017 and 4.37-years (p = 0.006 later ASO, respectively. Other factors, including sex, offspring number, latitude of study site, history of infectious mononucleosis, HLA-DR15 & HLA-A2 genotype, 25(OHD levels, and ultraviolet radiation exposure were not associated with ASO. Including all five significant variables into one model explained 12% of the total variance in ASO.Conclusion: We found a novel association between a history of tobacco smoking and later onset, whereas marijuana use was associated with earlier onset. Behavioral factors seem important drivers of MS onset timing although much of the variance remains unexplained.

  5. Losing the left side of the world: rightward shift in human spatial attention with sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareham, Corinne A; Manly, Tom; Pustovaya, Olga V; Scott, Sophie K; Bekinschtein, Tristan A

    2014-05-28

    Unilateral brain damage can lead to a striking deficit in awareness of stimuli on one side of space called Spatial Neglect. Patient studies show that neglect of the left is markedly more persistent than of the right and that its severity increases under states of low alertness. There have been suggestions that this alertness-spatial awareness link may be detectable in the general population. Here, healthy human volunteers performed an auditory spatial localisation task whilst transitioning in and out of sleep. We show, using independent electroencephalographic measures, that normal drowsiness is linked with a remarkable unidirectional tendency to mislocate left-sided stimuli to the right. The effect may form a useful healthy model of neglect and help in understanding why leftward inattention is disproportionately persistent after brain injury. The results also cast light on marked changes in conscious experience before full sleep onset.

  6. Prehospital and hospital delays after stroke onset--United States, 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-18

    Each year approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have a new or recurrent stroke; of these persons, 15%-30% become permanently disabled, and 20% require institutionalization during the first 3 months after the stroke. The severity of stroke-related disability can be reduced if timely and appropriate treatment is received. Patients with ischemic stroke may be eligible for treatment with intravenous thrombolytic (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) therapy within 3 hours of symptom onset. Receipt of this treatment usually requires patients to recognize stroke symptoms and receive prompt transport to a hospital emergency department (ED), where timely evaluation and brain imaging (i.e., computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) can take place. For patients eligible for t-PA, evidence suggests that the earlier patients are treated after the onset of symptoms the greater the likelihood of a more favorable outcome. In 2001, Congress established the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to measure and track the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients. To assess prehospital delays from onset of stroke symptoms to ED arrival and hospital delays from ED arrival to receipt of brain imaging, CDC analyzed data from the four states participating in the national stroke registry. The results of that analysis indicated that fewer than half (48.0%) of stroke patients for whom onset data were available arrived at the ED within 2 hours of symptom onset, and prehospital delays were shorter for persons transported to the ED by ambulance (i.e., emergency medical services) than for persons who did not receive ambulance transport. The interval between ED arrival and brain imaging also was significantly reduced for those arriving by ambulance. More extensive public education is needed regarding early recognition of stroke and the urgency of telephoning 9-1-1 to receive ambulance transport. Shortening prehospital and hospital delays will increase

  7. Photobiomodulation delays the onset of skeletal muscle fatigue in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A; Borsa, Paul A; Baweja, Harsimran S; Moore, Molly A; Tillman, Mark D; George, Steven Z; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-09-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy has been implicated as an effective ergogenic aid to delay the onset of muscle fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the dose-response ergogenic properties of PBM therapy and its ability to prolong time to task failure by enhancing muscle activity and delaying the onset of muscle fatigue using a static positioning task. Nine participants (24.3 ± 4.9 years) received three doses of near-infrared (NIR) light therapy randomly on three separate sessions (sham, 240, and 480 J). For the positioning task, participants held a 30 % one-repetition maximum (1-RM) load using the index finger until volitional fatigue. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle was recorded for the length of the positioning task. Outcomes included time to task failure (TTF), muscle fatigue, movement accuracy, motor output variability, and muscle activity (sEMG). The 240-J dose significantly extended TTF by 26 % (p = 0.032) compared with the sham dose. TTF for the 240-J dose was strongly associated with a decrease in muscle fatigue (R (2) = 0.54, p = 0.024). Our findings show that a 240-J dose of NIR light therapy is efficacious in delaying the onset and extent of muscle fatigue during submaximal isometric positioning tasks. Our findings suggest that NIR light therapy may be used as an ergogenic aid during functional tasks or post-injury rehabilitation.

  8. Distinct Neuropsychological Mechanisms May Explain Delayed- Versus Rapid-Onset Antidepressant Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Sarah A; Butler, Paul; Munafò, Marcus R; Nutt, David J; Robinson, Emma SJ

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical targets for antidepressants are relatively well established, but we lack a clear understanding of how actions at these proteins translate to clinical benefits. This study used a novel rodent assay to investigate how different antidepressant drugs act to modify affective biases that have been implicated in depression. In this bowl-digging task, rats encounter two equal value learning experiences on separate days (one during an affective manipulation and the other during control conditions). This induces an affective bias that is quantified using a preference test in which both digging substrates are presented together and the individual rats’ choices recorded. The assay can be used to measure affective biases associated with learning (when the treatment is given at the time of the experience) or examine the modification of previously acquired biases (when the treatment is administered before the preference test). The rapid-onset antidepressant ketamine, but not the delayed-onset antidepressant, venlafaxine, attenuated the previously acquired FG7142-induced negative bias following systemic administration. Venlafaxine but not ketamine induced a positive bias when administered before learning. We then used local drug infusions and excitotoxic lesions to localize the effects of ketamine to the medial prefrontal cortex and venlafaxine to the amygdala. Using a modified protocol we also showed that positive and negative biases amplified further when the numbers of substrate–reinforcer associations are increased. We propose that this pattern of results could explain the delayed onset of action of venlafaxine and the rapid onset of action but lack of long-term efficacy seen with ketamine. PMID:25740288

  9. Experience of Comamonas acidovorans keratitis with delayed onset and treatment response in immunocompromised cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Mok; Kim, Mee Kum; Lee, Jae Lim; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Jin Hak

    2008-03-01

    To report 2 cases of Comamonas acidovorans keratitis in immunocompromised cornea. A complete review of the medical records of the two cases of Comamonas acidovorans keratitis. We found some similarities in clinical courses of two cases. Both of them showed development of keratitis during the management with corticosteroids, delayed onset, slow response to antibiotics, and relatively less affected corneal epithelium. Comamonas acidovorans is known as a less virulent organism. However it can cause an indolent infection that responds slowly even to adequate antibiotics therapy in immunocompromised corneas.

  10. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Velickovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention.

  11. Sleep deprivation alters effort discounting but not delay discounting of monetary rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Massar, Stijn A A; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Weiyan; Huettel, Scott A; Chee, Michael W L

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether sleep deprivation would affect the discounting of delayed rewards, of rewards entailing the expense of effort, or both. We measured rates of two types of reward discounting under conditions of rested wakefulness (RW) and sleep deprivation (SD). Delay discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller monetary rewards sooner rather than larger monetary rewards later. Effort discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller rewards that require less effort to obtain (e.g., typing a small number of letter strings backward) over larger but more effortful rewards (e.g., typing more letter strings to receive the reward). The first two experiments used a crossover design in which one session was conducted after a normal night of sleep (RW), and the other after a night without sleep (SD). The first experiment evaluated only temporal discounting whereas the second evaluated temporal and effort discounting. In the second experiment, the discounting tasks were repeatedly administered prior to the state comparisons to minimize the effects of order and/or repeated testing. In a third experiment, participants were studied only once in a between-subject evaluation of discounting across states. The study took place in a research laboratory. Seventy-seven healthy young adult participants: 20 in Experiment 1, 27 in Experiment 2, and 30 in Experiment 3. N/A. Sleep deprivation elicited increased effort discounting but did not affect delay discounting. The dissociable effects of sleep deprivation on two forms of discounting behavior suggest that they may have differing underlying neural mechanisms.

  12. High-speed Imaging of Vocal Fold Vibration Onset Delay: Normal Versus Abnormal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Peak

    2017-05-01

    Vocal fold vibration onset delay (VFVOD) is heard frequently in spasmodic dysphonia and in muscle tension dysphonia. VFVOD changes due to other vocal pathologies have not been investigated. VFVOD during sustained vowel production was estimated with high-speed video in 10 normal and 40 pathologic subjects (scars, vocal fold paralysis, vocal fold nodules, and polyps). Analysis of high-speed video was done using digital kymography. VFVOD can be divided into two portions. Pre-phonation delay (PPD) is the duration when the vocal folds are nearly approximated to the time of first observed oscillation. Steady state delay (SSD) is the time when vocal folds are observed to come into oscillation until steady state of oscillation is observed. Normal subjects have almost zero PPD with vocal fold oscillation observed before full vocal fold adduction. Pathologic cases showed prolonged PPD because of (1) false cord adduction, (2) prolonged true vocal fold adduction, and (3) delay to onset of vocal fold vibration. Normal subjects have SSD of three to five cycles before steady state. Pathologic states result in increased SSD. Causes for increased SSD include (1) slow ramping up to steady state, (2) partial vibration of vocal folds, and (3) diplophonia with alternating beats before achieving steady state. There are significant differences between normal and pathology groups in both PPD and SSD. VFVOD is elevated in pathologic states. This can be due to increase in PPD or SSD. VFVOD is an under-recognized phenomenon that may contribute to complaints of vocal fatigue and dysphonia. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 INTAKE ON DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORNESS IN NON-ATHLET MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rajabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is classified as a muscle strain that presents with tenderness and stiffness one to two days after exercise. At present there are multiple proposed methods for treating DOMS, including anti-inflammatory medication, stretching, homeopathy, L-carnitine, rest and light exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigation of the effects of omega-3 intake on delayed onset muscle soreness in non-athlete men. 20 healthy subjects (age: 20.5±1.8 years participated as subjects in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (experimental and control. In the experimental group, subjects consume daily 2000 mg of omega-3; 2 times per day for 1 month before and 48 hours after perform leg press exercise with eccentric pattern. Similarly, the was taking in the control group. The results showed significant decrease in severity of DOMS (CK and LDH levels and decreased knee's range of motion in experimental group in comparison with control group (p<0.05. As a result of our study it is suggested that the use of omega-3 supplement can effectively reduce DOMS caused by eccentric exercise.

  14. Audiovisual Integration Delayed by Stimulus Onset Asynchrony Between Auditory and Visual Stimuli in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanna; Yang, Weiping; Nakahashi, Kohei; Takahashi, Satoshi; Wu, Jinglong

    2017-02-01

    Although neuronal studies have shown that audiovisual integration is regulated by temporal factors, there is still little knowledge about the impact of temporal factors on audiovisual integration in older adults. To clarify how stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between auditory and visual stimuli modulates age-related audiovisual integration, 20 younger adults (21-24 years) and 20 older adults (61-80 years) were instructed to perform an auditory or visual stimuli discrimination experiment. The results showed that in younger adults, audiovisual integration was altered from an enhancement (AV, A ± 50 V) to a depression (A ± 150 V). In older adults, the alterative pattern was similar to that for younger adults with the expansion of SOA; however, older adults showed significantly delayed onset for the time-window-of-integration and peak latency in all conditions, which further demonstrated that audiovisual integration was delayed more severely with the expansion of SOA, especially in the peak latency for V-preceded-A conditions in older adults. Our study suggested that audiovisual facilitative integration occurs only within a certain SOA range (e.g., -50 to 50 ms) in both younger and older adults. Moreover, our results confirm that the response for older adults was slowed and provided empirical evidence that integration ability is much more sensitive to the temporal alignment of audiovisual stimuli in older adults.

  15. Serotonin transporter polymorphism modifies the association between depressive symptoms and sleep onset latency complaint in elderly people: results from the 'InveCe.Ab' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Letizia; Davin, Annalisa; Vaccaro, Roberta; Abbondanza, Simona; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Guaita, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have documented the involvement of the central nervous system serotonin in promoting wakefulness. There are few and conflicting results over whether there is an actual association between bearing the short allele of serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and worse sleep quality. This study examined whether sleep onset latency complaint is associated with the 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism in the SLC6A4 gene promoter and whether this polymorphism influences the relationship between sleep onset latency complaint and depressive symptoms in elderly people. A total of 1321 community-dwelling individuals aged 70-74 years were interviewed for sleep onset latency complaint and for sleep medication consumption. Participants' genomic DNA was typed for 5-HTTLPR and rs25531 polymorphisms. Depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Geriatric Depression Scale Short form and general medical comorbidity was assessed by the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The presence of a past history of depression was recorded. The S' allele of the 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism was associated with sleep onset latency complaint. This association was maintained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, sex, age, history of depression and medical comorbidity. After stratification for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531, only in S'S' individuals high depressive symptoms were actually associated with sleep onset latency complaint. These data indicate that the low-expressing 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism is an independent risk factor for sleep onset latency disturbance. Furthermore, the 5-HTTLPR genotype influences the association between depressive symptoms and sleep onset latency complaint. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Driving in Parkinson's disease: mobility, accidents, and sudden onset of sleep at the wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindorfner, Charlotte; Körner, Yvonne; Möller, Jens Carsten; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Oertel, Wolfgang Hermann; Krüger, Hans-Peter

    2005-07-01

    Only few studies have addressed driving ability in Parkinson's disease (PD) to date. However, studies investigating accident proneness of PD patients are urgently needed in the light of motor disability in PD and--particularly--the report of "sleep attacks" at the wheel. We sent a questionnaire about sudden onset of sleep (SOS) and driving behavior to 12,000 PD patients. Subsequently, of 6,620 complete data sets, 361 patients were interviewed by phone. A total of 82% of those 6,620 patients held a driving license, and 60% of them still participated in traffic. Of the patients holding a driving license, 15% had been involved in and 11% had caused at least one accident during the past 5 years. The risk of causing accidents was significantly increased for patients who felt moderately impaired by PD, had an increased Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, and had experienced SOS while driving. Sleep attacks at the wheel usually occurred in easy driving situations and resulted in typical fatigue-related accidents. Those having retired from driving had a more advanced (subjective) disease severity, higher age, more frequently female gender, an increased ESS score, and a longer disease duration. The study revealed SOS and daytime sleepiness as critical factors for traffic safety in addition to motor disabilities of PD patients. The results suggest that real sleep attacks without any prior sleepiness are rare. However, our data underline the importance of mobility for patients and the need for further studies addressing the ability to drive in PD. Copyright 2005 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Multilingualism (but not always bilingualism) delays the onset of Alzheimer disease: evidence from a bilingual community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkow, Howard; Whitehead, Victor; Phillips, Natalie; Wolfson, Christina; Atherton, Julie; Bergman, Howard

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper by Bialystok et al in Neuropsychologia (vol. 45, pgs. 459 to 464) suggested that early bilingualism produced a statistically significant 4.1-year delay in onset of memory loss symptoms in older individuals with Alzheimer disease, possibly reflecting an increase in the cognitive reserve of these individuals. That study focused on multilingual elderly patients of whom 90% were immigrants. Our memory clinic, in Montreal Canada, has the advantage of having a large set of individuals who are either multilingual immigrants to Canada, or who are nonimmigrants but raised in both official languages of Canada--French and English. We thus attempted to replicate the above findings using a larger cohort in a different setting. We examined age at diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and age at symptom onset for all unilingual versus multilingual participants, and then for those who were nonimmigrant English/French bilinguals. Overall, we found a small but significant protective effect of more than 2 languages spoken, but we found no significant benefit in bilinguals overall in relation to age at diagnosis or age at symptom onset. However, in the immigrant group, the results mirrored those of Bialystok et al with 2 or more languages delaying the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease by almost 5 years. A trend toward the same effect was also seen in nonimmigrants whose first language was French. In contrast, in nonimmigrants whose first language was English, no such effect was found. These results are discussed in relation to the earlier findings and the theory of cognitive reserve.

  18. Sleep/wake scheduling scheme for minimizing end-to-end delay in multi-hop wireless sensor networks

    OpenAIRE

    Madani Sajjad; Nazir Babar; Hasbullah Halabi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We present a sleep/wake schedule protocol for minimizing end-to-end delay for event driven multi-hop wireless sensor networks. In contrast to generic sleep/wake scheduling schemes, our proposed algorithm performs scheduling that is dependent on traffic loads. Nodes adapt their sleep/wake schedule based on traffic loads in response to three important factors, (a) the distance of the node from the sink node, (b) the importance of the node's location from connectivity's perspective, and...

  19. Are cognitive "insomnia" processes involved in the development and maintenance of delayed sleep wake phase disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Cele E; Gradisar, Michael; Barbero, Sebastian C

    2016-04-01

    Although individuals with delayed sleep wake phase disorder (DSWPD) and chronic insomnia disorder (CID) share many of the same phenomenological experiences, theories relating to the development and maintenance of these disorders are distinct in focus. Unlike CID, theory relating to DSWPD is primarily physiologically based and assumes almost no cognitive pathway. However, recent research findings suggest that individuals with DSWPD also display many of the sleep-disordered cognitive processes that were previously assumed to be unique to the insomnia experience. As such, this review aims to summarise current research findings to address the question "Could cognitive processes be involved in the development and maintenance of DSWPD?" In particular, the presence of cognitive and physiological pre-sleep arousal, sleep-related attentional bias, distorted perception of sleep and daytime functioning, dysfunctional beliefs and safety behaviours will be investigated. As this emerging area of research requires a stronger evidence base, we highlight suggestions for future investigation and provide preliminary practice points for clinicians assessing and treating "insomnia" in patients with DSWPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Screening of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool children in the mid-south of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanming; Fu, Siqing; Luo, Shaojun; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Guoqiang

    2013-08-01

    Newborn hearing screening has been successfully implemented worldwide to improve the detection of hearing loss. However, delayed-onset hearing loss subsequent to newborn hearing screening remains a concern. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool children who previously passed newborn hearing screening in Hubei Province in mid-south China. Preschool children were screened by transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) for delayed-onset hearing loss. Children referred after the TEOAE screening were assessed audiologically. Between March 2010 and September 2011, 28 546 preschool children (4.86 ± 1.67 years old), who had passed newborn hearing screening were targeted for screening from four cities in Hubei Province, China. During the study period, 540 children (1.89%) were referred for audiologic assessment and 22 (0.77/1000) of them had permanent delayed-onset hearing loss, including 8 (0.28/1000) with bilateral moderate hearing loss, 10 (0.35/1000) with mild bilateral hearing loss, 2 (0.07/1000) with unilateral moderate hearing loss, and 2 (0.07/1000) with unilateral mild hearing loss. Despite the success of newborn hearing screening, the provision of hearing screening in preschool remains essential for identifying delayed-onset hearing loss.

  1. Delayed-Onset Post-Stroke Delusional Disorder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa B. Barboza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders among patients with cerebrovascular illness is relatively high, there are only few case reports describing post-stroke psychotic symptoms. In general, post-stroke psychoses have been reported to emerge few days after the vascular event and to vanish soon afterwards. In this report, we describe delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder, persecutory type. A middle-aged female patient developed a persistent delusional disorder with homicidal behavior about one year after a cerebrovascular accident affecting the right fronto-temporo-parietal region and a long period of chronic post-stroke mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our case suggests that there might be long intervals between stroke and the appearance of psychotic symptoms.

  2. DRESS with delayed onset acute interstitial nephritis and profound refractory eosinophilia secondary to Vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Meara Paloma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS is a relatively rare clinical entity; even more so in response to vancomycin. Methods Case report. Results We present a severe case of vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome, which on presentation included only skin, hematological and mild liver involvement. The patient further developed severe acute interstitial nephritis, eosinophilic pneumonitis, central nervous system (CNS involvement and worsening hematological abnormalities despite immediate discontinuation of vancomycin and parenteral corticosteroids. High-dose corticosteroids for a prolonged period were necessary and tapering of steroids a challenge due to rebound-eosinophilia and skin involvement. Conclusion Patients with DRESS who are relatively resistant to corticosteroids with delayed onset of certain organ involvement should be treated with a more prolonged corticosteroid tapering schedule. Vancomycin is increasingly being recognized as a culprit agent in this syndrome.

  3. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog, Liraglutide, Delays Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis in Lewis Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    (GLP-1) family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is, moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing...... the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 μg/kg s.c.) or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n = 6, liraglutide, n = 7). Clinical score and weight were assessed daily...... treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0) by 2 days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p = 0.0003). Fourteen of 15 (93%) of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4) by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33%) of liraglutide...

  4. Atypical presentation in Rasmussen encephalitis: delayed late-onset periodic epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Taíssa P F; Hamad, Ana P A; Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Scattolin, Monica; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Lancellotti, Carmem L P; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2011-09-01

    A five-and-a-half-year-old girl started experiencing progressive left hemiparesis at age two and a half years. At age five years and four months she started presenting clusters of asymmetric periodic epileptic spasms with no hypsarrhythmia. The ictal EEG showed periodic, constant and stereotyped complexes. Serial brain imaging revealed progressive atrophy of the right hemisphere with increased T2 signal on MRI. She underwent a right hemispherotomy, and histological examination showed signs of inflammation and features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). She has been seizure-free for 16 months. This case is unique in the following aspects: the presence of typical Rasmussen encephalitis features of progressive unilateral brain involvement without seizures, a delay of almost three years prior to seizure onset; an atypical seizure type presentation with periodic epileptic spasms and the presence of FCD associated with inflammatory changes. [Published with video sequences].

  5. Delayed-onset streptococcus pyogenes endophthalmitis following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Zerrin; Kapran, Ziya; Bayraktar, Sükrü; Acar, Nur; Unver, Yaprak Banu; Gök, Kemran

    2005-01-01

    To report a case of delayed-onset Streptococcus pyogenes endophthalmitis following implantation of an Ahmed glaucoma valve. A 10-year-old patient presented with acute endophthalmitis 1 year after Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. The conjunctiva and Tenon's capsule over the valve plate had been penetrated by one of the polypropylene fixation sutures. The valve was removed, and pars plana vitrectomy was performed. Vitreous specimens and removal of the discharge over the plate revealed Streptococcus pyogenes. This is the first documented case of Streptococcus pyogenes endophthalmitis following Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation. We think the conjunctival buttonhole caused by the polypropylene suture provided an entry site for the infection. (c) Japanese Ophthalmological Society 2005.

  6. Voluntary wheel running delays disease onset and reduces pain hypersensitivity in early experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Curtis; Paylor, John W; Tenorio, Gustavo; Winship, Ian; Baker, Glen; Kerr, Bradley J

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is classically defined by motor deficits, but it is also associated with the secondary symptoms of pain, depression, and anxiety. Up to this point modifying these secondary symptoms has been difficult. There is evidence that both MS and the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), commonly used to study the pathophysiology of the disease, can be modulated by exercise. To examine whether limited voluntary wheel running could modulate EAE disease progression and the co-morbid symptoms of pain, mice with EAE were allowed access to running wheels for 1h every day. Allowing only 1h every day of voluntary running led to a significant delay in the onset of clinical signs of the disease. The development of mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey hairs and indicated that wheel running had a modest positive effect on the pain hypersensitivity associated with EAE. These behavioral changes were associated with reduced numbers of cFOS and phosphorylated NR1 positive cells in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord compared to no-run EAE controls. In addition, within the dorsal horn, voluntary wheel running reduced the number of infiltrating CD3(+) T-cells and reduced the overall levels of Iba1 immunoreactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we observed that wheel-running lead to significant changes in the spinal cord levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Oxidative stress has separately been shown to contribute to EAE disease progression and neuropathic pain. Together these results indicate that in mice with EAE, voluntary motor activity can delay the onset of clinical signs and reduce pain symptoms associated with the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. South American climate during the Last Glacial Maximum: Delayed onset of the South American monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, K. H.; Vizy, E. K.

    2006-01-01

    The climate of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) over South America is simulated using a regional climate model with 60-km resolution, providing a simulation that is superior to those available from global models that do not resolve the topography and regional-scale features of the South American climate realistically. LGM conditions on SST, insolation, vegetation, and reduced atmospheric CO2 on the South American climate are imposed together and individually. Remote influences are not included. Annual rainfall is 25-35% lower in the LGM than in the present day simulation throughout the Amazon basin. A primary cause is a 2-3 month delay in the onset of the rainy season, so that the dry season is about twice as long as in the present day. The delayed onset occurs because the low-level inflow from the tropical Atlantic onto the South American continent is drier than in the present day simulation due to reduced evaporation from cooler surface waters, and this slows the springtime buildup of moist static energy that is needed to initiate convection. Once the monsoon begins in the Southern Hemisphere, LGM rainfall rates are similar to those in the present day. In the Northern Hemisphere, however, rainfall is lower throughout the (shortened) rainy season. Regional-scale structure includes slight precipitation increases in the Nordeste region of Brazil and along the eastern foothills of the Andes, and a region in the center of the Amazon basin that does not experience annual drying. In the Andes Mountains, the signal is complicated, with regions of significant rainfall increases adjacent to regions with reduced precipitation.

  8. Sudden onset of sleep due to hypothalamic lesions in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder positive for anti-aquaporin-4 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, H; Matsumura, K; Hatanaka, Y; Saito, F; Sonoo, M

    2014-09-01

    We report a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders who presented with sudden onset of sleep as the sole manifestation. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation revealed lesions in the hypothalamus bilaterally, which vanished completely after methylprednisolone pulse therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Delayed Diagnosis, Range of Severity, and Multiple Sleep Comorbidities: A Clinical and Polysomnographic Analysis of 100 Patients of the Innsbruck Narcolepsy Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Mitterling, Thomas; Gabelia, David; Gschliesser, Viola; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is reported to affect 26-56/100,000 in the general population. We aimed to describe clinical and polysomnographic features of a large narcolepsy cohort in order to comprehensively characterize the narcoleptic spectrum. Methods: We performed a chart- and polysomnographybased review of all narcolepsy patients of the Innsbruck narcolepsy cohort. Results: A total of 100 consecutive narcolepsy patients (87 with cataplexy [NC], 13 without cataplexy [N]) were included in the analysis. All subjects had either excessive daytime sleepiness or cataplexy as their initial presenting clinical feature. Age at symptom onset was 20 (6-69) years. Diagnostic delay was 6.5 (0-39) years. The complete narcolepsy tetrad was present in 36/100 patients; 28/100 patients had three cardinal symptoms; 29/100 had two; and 7/100 had only excessive daytime sleepiness. Severity varied broadly with respect to excessive daytime sleepiness (median Epworth Sleepiness Scale score: 18, range 10-24), cataplexy (8-point Likert scale: median 4.5, range 1-8), hypnagogic hallucinations (median 4.5, range 1-7), and sleep paralysis (median 3, range 1-7). Sleep comorbidity was highly prevalent and ranged from sleeprelated movement disorders (n = 55/100), parasomnias (n = 34/100), and sleeprelated breathing disorders (n = 24/100), to insomnia (n = 28/100). REM sleep without atonia or a periodic limb movement in sleep index > 5/h were present in most patients (90/100 and 75/100). A high percentage of narcoleptic patients in the present study had high frequency leg movements (35%) and excessive fragmentary myoclonus (22%). Of the narcolepsy patients with clinical features of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), 76.5% had EMG evidence for RBD on the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), based on a standard cutoff of a minimum of 18% of 3-sec miniepochs. Conclusion: This study is one of the largest monocentric polysomnographic studies to date of patients with narcolepsy and confirms the

  10. Delayed onset of tricuspid valve flow in repaired tetralogy of Fallot: an additional mechanism of diastolic dysfunction and interventricular dyssynchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Lee N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diastolic dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV is common after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. While restrictive physiology in late diastole has been well known, dysfunction in early diastole has not been described. The present study sought to assess the prevalence and mechanism of early diastolic dysfunction of the RV defined as delayed onset of the tricuspid valve (TV flow after TOF repair. Methods The study population consisted of 31 children with repaired TOF (mean age ± SD, 12.3 ± 4.1 years who underwent postoperative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. The CMR protocol included simultaneous phase-contrast velocity mapping of the atrioventricular valves, which enabled direct comparison of the timing and patterns of tricuspid (TV and mitral (MV valve flow. The TV flow was defined to have delayed onset when its onset was > 20 ms later than the onset of the MV flow. The TV and MV flow from 14 normal children was used for comparison. The CMR results were correlated with the findings on echocardiography and electrocardiography. Result Delayed onset of the TV flow was observed in 16/31 patients and in none of the controls. The mean delay time was 64.81 ± 27.07 ms (8.7 ± 3.2% of R-R interval. The delay time correlated with the differences in duration of the TV and MV flow (55.94 ± 32.88 ms (r = 0.90, p Conclusions Early diastolic dysfunction with delayed onset of TV flow is common after TOF repair, and is associated with reduced RV ejection fraction. It is a further manifestation of interventricular dyssynchrony and represent an additional mechanism of ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  11. Delayed-Onset Post-Keratoplasty Endophthalmitis Caused by Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Hernandez-Camarena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE endophthalmitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP is very rare, the management is a challenge due to both the pattern of antibiotic resistance and the aggressive nature of the infectious process. We report the first delayed-onset case of VRE endophthalmitis after PKP. Materials and Methods: Case report of a 51-year-old female with a 7-week history of PKP who arrived at the emergency room with signs and symptoms of endophthalmitis. Initial visual acuity was light perception, and a posterior pole exam was not possible due to the intense vitreous reaction. Mode B ultrasound was used to assess the posterior pole. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and received intravitreous antibiotics. Results: Vitreous stains and cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium resistant to vancomycin. Donor rim cultures and viral PCR were negative. Treatment was carried out by repeated intravitreal antibiotics and systemic linezolid. Clinical improvement was seen after the second dose of intravitreous antibiotics and systemic linezolid, but visual acuity remained at light perception consistent with the ischemic changes observed in the posterior pole. Conclusion: VRE endophthalmitis might be associated with positive donor rim cultures. Prompt use of systemic linezolid in addition to intravitreous antibiotics is recommendable, but even with prompt treatment, visual prognosis is guarded.

  12. Why cold water delays the onset of vestibular vertigo-An functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhi [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: zhiwang76@gmail.com; Chen Min [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Gong Xia; Huang Weining [Department of E.N.T., Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Xu Liang [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhou Cheng [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: chengzhou2000@yahoo.com

    2008-09-15

    The mechanism of vertigo is unclear. Generally, the peak time or the latency of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect is about 6 s. However, clinically, the latency of vertigo or nystagmus induced by caloric stimulations is much longer than 6 s, commonly about 30 s induced by water of 30 deg. C or 44 deg. C. We hypothesize that there is an inhibitive power or mechanism for the occurrence of vestibular vertigo, since it is an unpleasant feeling. The caloric test was performed in healthy volunteers during the BOLD fMRI scanning. The overlaid results of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) showed that three brain regions showed neural activation during vestibular dizziness while deactivation occurred in response to cold water simulation: (1) supplementary motor area (SMA); (2) middle temporal area/medial superior temporal area (MT/MST); (3) visual association area (BA19). The time course of the regions further demonstrated that the signal decreased during the cold-water stimulation and increased during the period of vertigo. We therefore further hypothesize that there may be two forces for the production of vertigo: inhibitory power (IP) and promotive power (PP). The delayed onset of vertigo was the result of the interaction between IP and PP. All of our findings, for the first time, suggested such an original mechanism of vertigo.

  13. Why cold water delays the onset of vestibular vertigo-An functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; Chen Min; Gong Xia; Huang Weining; Xu Liang; Zhou Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of vertigo is unclear. Generally, the peak time or the latency of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect is about 6 s. However, clinically, the latency of vertigo or nystagmus induced by caloric stimulations is much longer than 6 s, commonly about 30 s induced by water of 30 deg. C or 44 deg. C. We hypothesize that there is an inhibitive power or mechanism for the occurrence of vestibular vertigo, since it is an unpleasant feeling. The caloric test was performed in healthy volunteers during the BOLD fMRI scanning. The overlaid results of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) showed that three brain regions showed neural activation during vestibular dizziness while deactivation occurred in response to cold water simulation: (1) supplementary motor area (SMA); (2) middle temporal area/medial superior temporal area (MT/MST); (3) visual association area (BA19). The time course of the regions further demonstrated that the signal decreased during the cold-water stimulation and increased during the period of vertigo. We therefore further hypothesize that there may be two forces for the production of vertigo: inhibitory power (IP) and promotive power (PP). The delayed onset of vertigo was the result of the interaction between IP and PP. All of our findings, for the first time, suggested such an original mechanism of vertigo

  14. Effects of total glucosides of paeony for delaying onset of Sjogren's syndrome: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Lei; He, Jing; Li, Zhan Guo; Zheng, Li Wu; Hua, Hong

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of total glucosides of paeony (TGP) on Sjogren's syndrome (SS) using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. Twenty-seven 8-week-old female NOD mice were assigned into TGP group, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) group and normal saline (NS) group, receiving corresponding drugs respectively and sacrificed at 24-week-old. Saliva flow rate (SFR), ration of regulatory T cells, level of anti-SSA/SSB, histological changes in submandibular glands (SMG) and microarray analysis were assessed. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Compared to NS group, in TGP group, SFR, SMG index and the ration of regulatory T cells were significantly higher, while anti-SSA/SSB and lymphocytic foci were significantly lower. HCQ group demonstrated similar results except SMG index. Altered gene expression was found in 10.71% of TGP and 13.09% of HCQ of the profile. TGP demonstrated a similar effectiveness as HCQ in delaying the onset of SS-like disease in NOD mice. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Meamarbashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role.Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized.Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS.Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered.

  16. Mastoid bone fracture presenting as unusual delayed onset of facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ko-Chiang; Wang, Ann-Ching; Chen, Shyi-Jou

    2008-03-01

    Delayed-onset facial nerve paralysis is a rather uncommon complication of a mastoid bone fracture for children younger than 10 years. We routinely arrange a cranial computed tomography (CT) for patients encountering initial loss of consciousness, severe headache, intractable vomiting, and/or any neurologic deficit arising from trauma to the head. However, minor symptomatic cranial nerve damage may be missed and the presenting symptom diagnosed as being a peripheral nerve problem. Herein, we report a case of a young boy who presented at our emergency department (ED) 3 days subsequent to his accident, complaining of hearing loss in the right ear and paralysis of the ipsilateral face. Unpredictably, we observed his cranial CT scan revealing a linear fracture of the skull over the right temporal bone involving the right mastoid air cells. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered well without any adverse neurologic consequences. We emphasize that ED physicians should arrange a cranial CT scan for a head-injured child with symptomatic facial nerve palsy, even if there are no symptoms such as severe headache, vomiting, Battle sign, and/or initial loss of consciousness.

  17. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Optogenetic delay of status epilepticus onset in an in vivo rodent epilepsy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Sukhotinsky

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a devastating disease, currently treated with medications, surgery or electrical stimulation. None of these approaches is totally effective and our ability to control seizures remains limited and complicated by frequent side effects. The emerging revolutionary technique of optogenetics enables manipulation of the activity of specific neuronal populations in vivo with exquisite spatiotemporal resolution using light. We used optogenetic approaches to test the role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in the lithium-pilocarpine model of acute elicited seizures in awake behaving rats. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons were transduced in vivo with a virus carrying an enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR, a yellow light activated chloride pump, and acute seizure progression was then monitored behaviorally and electrophysiologically in the presence and absence of illumination delivered via an optical fiber. Inhibition of those neurons with illumination prior to seizure onset significantly delayed electrographic and behavioral initiation of status epilepticus, and altered the dynamics of ictal activity development. These results reveal an essential role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in this model of ictogenesis and illustrate the power of optogenetic approaches for elucidation of seizure mechanisms. This early success in controlling seizures also suggests future therapeutic avenues.

  19. Sleep education with self-help treatment and sleep health promotion for mental and physical wellness in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Hideki; Tamura, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the effects of the sleep education with self-help treatment for student, teacher, and local resident and sleep health promotion for mental and physical wellness for elderly with actual examples of public health from the community and schools. Sleep education with self-help treatment in schools revealed that delayed or irregular sleep/wake patterns were significantly improved. Also, it was effective for improving sleep-onset latency, sl...

  20. The borderlands of waking: Quantifying the transition from reflective thought to hallucination in sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Clemens; Speth, Jana

    2016-04-01

    We lose waking consciousness spontaneously and regularly over the circadian cycle. It seems that every time we fall asleep, reflective thinking gradually gives way to our interactions with an imaginary, hallucinatory world that brings multimodal experiences in the absence of adequate external stimuli. The present study investigates this transition, proposing a new measure of hallucinatory states. Reflective thinking and motor imagery were quantified in 150 mentation reports provided by 16 participants after forced awakenings from different physiology-monitored time intervals after sleep onset. Cognitive agency analysis and motor agency analysis--which are objective (grammatical-semantic) tools derived from linguistic theories--show (i) a decrease in reflective thinking which sleepers would need to acknowledge the hallucinatory quality of their state, and (ii) an increase in motor imagery, indicating interactions with a hallucinatory world. By mapping these spontaneous changes in human consciousness onto physiology, we can in the long run explore the conditions of its decline, and possibilities for treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Attention bias for sleep-related stimuli in primary insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome using the dot-probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Broomfield, Niall M; Espie, Colin A

    2006-11-01

    Cognitive models of primary insomnia (PI) suggest attention bias as a maintaining process. This study used a hallmark measure of attention bias, the dot-probe task, to determine whether attention bias to sleep-related stimuli is present in individuals with PI. Control groups of good sleepers (GS) and individuals with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), a sleep disorder with no presumed cognitive pathway and, hence, no predicted association with attention bias, were included. A between-groups (PI, DSPS, GS) design was employed. Participants completed a dot-probe task with stimuli comprising sleep-related and neutral words, balanced for length and frequency of usage. It was predicted a priori that PI would show greater attention bias to sleep stimuli compared with GS and DSPS groups. No difference between GS and DSPS was predicted. Sixty-three individuals completed the study (PI = 21; DSPS = 22; GS = 20), with those in PI and DSPS classified by International Classification of Sleep Disorders criteria according to self-report sleep diaries and actigraphy. GS scored Sleep Quality Index, reported being good sleepers, and met no criteria for a current or previous sleep disorder. N/A. As predicted, PI showed increased vigilance for sleep-related stimuli relative to GS and DSPS. No differences between GS and those with DSPS were found. The PI group showed shorter response latencies relative to the GS and DSPS groups. Results support an association between attention bias and PI. Further work must determine whether or not attention bias is a causal factor. Speeded responses in the PI group suggest heightened arousal, indicating that physiologic factors may play a related role.

  2. Mobile Healthcare for Automatic Driving Sleep-Onset Detection Using Wavelet-Based EEG and Respiration Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon-Giin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Driving drowsiness is a major cause of traffic accidents worldwide and has drawn the attention of researchers in recent decades. This paper presents an application for in-vehicle non-intrusive mobile-device-based automatic detection of driver sleep-onset in real time. The proposed application classifies the driving mental fatigue condition by analyzing the electroencephalogram (EEG and respiration signals of a driver in the time and frequency domains. Our concept is heavily reliant on mobile technology, particularly remote physiological monitoring using Bluetooth. Respiratory events are gathered, and eight-channel EEG readings are captured from the frontal, central, and parietal (Fpz-Cz, Pz-Oz regions. EEGs are preprocessed with a Butterworth bandpass filter, and features are subsequently extracted from the filtered EEG signals by employing the wavelet-packet-transform (WPT method to categorize the signals into four frequency bands: α, β, θ, and δ. A mutual information (MI technique selects the most descriptive features for further classification. The reduction in the number of prominent features improves the sleep-onset classification speed in the support vector machine (SVM and results in a high sleep-onset recognition rate. Test results reveal that the combined use of the EEG and respiration signals results in 98.6% recognition accuracy. Our proposed application explores the possibility of processing long-term multi-channel signals.

  3. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  4. Massage Alleviates Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness after Strenuous Exercise: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of massage on alleviating delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS and muscle performance after strenuous exercise.Method: Seven databases consisting of PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang were searched up to December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were eligible and the outcomes of muscle soreness, performance (including muscle maximal isometric force (MIF and peak torque and creatine kinase (CK were used to assess the effectiveness of massage intervention on DOMS.Results: Eleven articles with a total of 23 data points (involving 504 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria and were pooled in the meta-analysis. The findings demonstrated that muscle soreness rating decreased significantly when the participants received massage intervention compared with no intervention at 24 h (SMD: –0.61, 95% CI: –1.17 to –0.05, P = 0.03, 48 h (SMD: –1.51, 95% CI: –2.24 to –0.77, P < 0.001, 72 h (SMD: –1.46, 95% CI: –2.59 to –0.33, P = 0.01 and in total (SMD: –1.16, 95% CI: –1.60 to –0.72, P < 0.001 after intense exercise. Additionally, massage therapy improved MIF (SMD: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.21–0.90, P = 0.002 and peak torque (SMD: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.04–0.71, P = 0.03 as total effects. Furthermore, the serum CK level was reduced when participants received massage intervention (SMD: –0.64, 95% CI: –1.04 to –0.25, P = 0.001.Conclusion: The current evidence suggests that massage therapy after strenuous exercise could be effective for alleviating DOMS and improving muscle performance.

  5. Effects of acupuncture on symptoms and muscle function in delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübscher, Markus; Vogt, Lutz; Bernhörster, Marcus; Rosenhagen, Andreas; Banzer, Winfried

    2008-10-01

    This study was done to investigate the effects of a standardized acupuncture treatment on symptoms and muscle function in exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). A prospective, randomized, controlled, observer and subject-blinded trial was undertaken. Twenty-two (22) healthy subjects (22-30 years; 10 males and 12 females) were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: real acupuncture (deep needling at classic acupuncture points and tender points; n = 7), sham-acupuncture (superficial needling at nonacupuncture points; n = 8), and control (no needling; n = 7). DOMS of the nondominant elbow-flexors was experimentally induced through eccentric contractions until exhaustion. The outcome measures were pain perception (visual analogue scale; VAS; range: 0-10 cm), mechanical pain threshold (MPT; pressure algometer), and maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF; force transducer). Treatment was applied immediately, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS induction. Measurements of MPT and MIVF were made prior to DOMS induction as well as before and after every treatment session. VAS data were acquired after DOMS induction as well as pre- and post-treatment. Final pain, MPT, and MIVF measurements were performed 72 hours after DOMS induction. Following nonparametric testing, there were no significant differences between groups in outcome measures at baseline. After 72 hours, pain perception (VAS) was significantly lower in the acupuncture group compared to the sham acupuncture and control subjects. However, the mean MPT and MIVF scores were not significantly different between groups. Although acupuncture seemed to have no effects on mechanical pain threshold and muscle function, it proved to reduce perceived pain arising from exercise-induced muscle soreness.

  6. Effect of hydrotherapy on the signs and symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaile, Joanna; Halson, Shona; Gill, Nicholas; Dawson, Brian

    2008-03-01

    This study independently examined the effects of three hydrotherapy interventions on the physiological and functional symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Strength trained males (n = 38) completed two experimental trials separated by 8 months in a randomised crossover design; one trial involved passive recovery (PAS, control), the other a specific hydrotherapy protocol for 72 h post-exercise; either: (1) cold water immersion (CWI: n = 12), (2) hot water immersion (HWI: n = 11) or (3) contrast water therapy (CWT: n = 15). For each trial, subjects performed a DOMS-inducing leg press protocol followed by PAS or one of the hydrotherapy interventions for 14 min. Weighted squat jump, isometric squat, perceived pain, thigh girths and blood variables were measured prior to, immediately after, and at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Squat jump performance and isometric force recovery were significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise following CWT and at 48 and 72 h post-exercise following CWI when compared to PAS. Isometric force recovery was also greater (P < 0.05) at 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise following HWI when compared to PAS. Perceived pain improved (P < 0.01) following CWT at 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. Overall, CWI and CWT were found to be effective in reducing the physiological and functional deficits associated with DOMS, including improved recovery of isometric force and dynamic power and a reduction in localised oedema. While HWI was effective in the recovery of isometric force, it was ineffective for recovery of all other markers compared to PAS.

  7. Characteristics of New-Onset and Chronic Sleep Medication Users Among Older Adults: A Retrospective Study of a US Medigap Plan Population using Propensity Score Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Shirley; Wang, Shaohung S; Slindee, Luke B; Saphire, Lynn; Wicker, Ellen

    2018-05-01

    Prescription sleep medications are often utilized to manage sleep problems among older adults even though these drugs are associated with multiple risks. The aim was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of new-onset compared to chronic sleep medication users and to examine factors associated with the conversion from new to chronic use. A secondary objective was to investigate the impact of sleep medications on health outcomes of injurious falls and patterns of healthcare utilization and expenditures. A 25% random sample of adults ≥ 65 years with 3-year continuous AARP ® Medicare Supplement medical and AARP ® MedicareRx drug plan enrollment was utilized to identify new-onset and chronic sleep medication users. Prescription sleep medication drugs were defined using National Drug Codes (NDCs); falls or hip fractures were identified from diagnosis codes. New users had no sleep medication use in 2014, but initiated medication use in 2015; chronic users had at least one sleep medication prescription in 2014 and in 2015; both groups had follow-up through 2016. Characteristics associated with new users, new users who converted to chronic use, and chronic users were determined using multivariate logistic regression. Prevalence of falls, healthcare utilization and expenditures were regression adjusted. Among eligible insureds, 3 and 9% were identified as new-onset and chronic sleep medication users, respectively. New-onset sleep medication prescriptions were often associated with an inpatient hospitalization. The strongest characteristics associated with new users, those who converted to chronic use, and chronic users were sleep disorders, depression and opioid use. About 50% of new users had > 30 days' supply; 25% converted to chronic use with ≥ 90 days' supply. The prevalence of falls for new-onset users increased by 70% compared to a 22% increase among chronic users. New-onset and chronic sleep medication users were characterized by sleep

  8. Estimating dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase in adolescents using summer or school-year sleep/wake schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Acebo, Christine; Fallone, Gahan; Carskadon, Mary A

    2006-12-01

    This analysis examined associations between the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase and self-selected sleep/ wake schedules in groups of children and adolescents during summer vacation and during the school year to determine the degree to which sleep/wake patterns can estimate salivary DLMO phase. Participants slept at home on self-selected schedules for 5 consecutive nights and reported their bedtime and wake-up time via daily telephone messages. Salivary melatonin was sampled in the laboratory on one evening every 30 minutes in dim light (females) contributed 149 DLMO phase and sleep/wake pattern measures while on a school year schedule ("school group"). A separate group, ages 9 to 16 years (mean age = 13.1, SD = 1.3 years, 30 males, 29 females) contributed 59 DLMO phase and sleep/wake pattern measures while on a summer schedule ("summer group"). Bedtime, midsleep time, and wake-up time were positively correlated with DLMO phase in both groups. Although all correlation coefficients for the summer group were statistically greater compared to the school group, the regression equations predicted DLMO phase within +/- 1 hour of the measured DLMO phase in approximately 80% for both groups. DLMO phase can be estimated using self-selected sleep/wake patterns during the school year or summer vacation in healthy children and adolescents.

  9. Pathophysiology and therapy of irinotecan-induced delayed-onset diarrhea in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, F; Hagipantelli, R; Misset, J L; Bastian, G; Vassal, G; Bonnay, M; Herait, P; Cote, C; Mahjoubi, M; Mignard, D; Cvitkovic, E

    1998-08-01

    Irinotecan (CPT-11), a camptothecin derivative, has shown efficacy against colorectal cancer. Delayed-onset diarrhea is its main limiting toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the pathophysiology of CPT-11-induced delayed-onset diarrhea and assess the efficacy of combined antidiarrheal medication in a phase II, prospective, successive-cohorts, open study. Twenty-eight patients with advanced colorectal cancer refractory to fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy received CPT-11 350 mg/m2 every 3 weeks. The first cohort of 14 consecutive patients explored for the mechanism of diarrhea received acetorphan (a new enkephalinase inhibitor) 100 mg three times daily; the second 14-patient cohort received, in addition to acetorphan, loperamide 4 mg three times daily. Before treatment, and if late diarrhea occurred, patients underwent colon mucosal biopsies for CPT-11 and topoisomerase I levels; intestinal transit time; fecalogram; fat and protein excretion; alpha1-antitrypsin clearance; D-xylose test; blood levels for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, glucagon, gastrin, somatostatin, prostaglandin E2, and carboxylesterase; CPT-11/SN-38 and SN-38 glucuronide pharmacokinetics; and stool cultures. Delayed-onset diarrhea occurred during the first three treatment cycles in 23 patients (82%). Electrolyte fecal measurements showed a negative or small osmotic gap in nine of nine patients and an increased alpha1-antitrypsin clearance in six of six patients. There were no modifications in stool cultures or hormonal dysfunction. Four of 11 patients (36%) with delayed-onset diarrhea in the first cohort responded to acetorphan, whereas nine of 10 patients (90%) responded to the combination of acetorphan and loperamide (P diarrhea is caused by a secretory mechanism with an exudative component. Early combined treatment with loperamide and acetorphan seems effective in controlling the diarrheal episodes.

  10. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  11. Marine oil dietary supplementation reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after a 30 km run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baum K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Klaus Baum,1 Richard D Telford,2 Ross B Cunningham,3 1Trainingsinstitut Prof Baum, Köln, Germany; 2College of Medicine, Biology, and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3The Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia Objective: Runners are prone to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS during long distance training. This especially holds for unaccustomed training volumes at moderate to high intensities. We investigated the effects of a marine oil complex, PCSO-524®, derived from the New Zealand green-lipped mussel (formulated as Lyprinol® and Omega XL® on DOMS after a 30 km training run. Methods: Initially, peak oxygen uptake of 32 distance runners (4 female, 28 male; median age 45 years, range 28–53 was measured on a treadmill with a 1.5 km hour-1 increase every 4 minutes starting from 8.5 km hour-1. At least 1-week after this initial test, they participated in a 30 km road run at a speed corresponding to about 70% of their individual peak oxygen uptake on a flat terrain. Before and after (0, 24, and 48 hours the run, blood concentration of creatine kinase (CK were measured and pain sensation was determined (pain scale from 0 = no pain to 10 = extremely painful. Runners were then matched in pairs based on maximal CK and peak oxygen uptake, and allocated randomly into two different groups. One group was supplemented with 400 mg per day of PCSO-524® for 11 weeks, the other group with an olive oil placebo. After that period, CK and pain sensations were remeasured following a second 30 km run at the same speed and on the same terrain. Results: The general pattern of soreness in the PCSO-524® supplemented group was reduced by 1.1 units (standard error 0.41 compared to the placebo (P < 0.05, the effects being greater in lesser trained runners (P < 0.05. CK levels were positively associated with pain sensation (P < 0.05, but trends toward lower CK in the

  12. Risk Factors for Immediate and Delayed-Onset Fever After Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatelli, Pierleone, E-mail: pierleone.lucatelli@gmail.com [Sapienza University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-pathological Sciences (Italy); Corradini, Stefano Ginanni, E-mail: stefano.corradini@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Gastroenterology Division, Department of Clinical Medicine (Italy); Corona, Mario, E-mail: mario.corona@uniroma1.it; Corradini, Luca Ginanni, E-mail: lucagino@hotmail.it; Cirelli, Carlo, E-mail: dottcirelli@gmail.com [Sapienza University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-pathological Sciences (Italy); Saba, Luca, E-mail: lucasabamd@gmail.com [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.) of Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Department of Medical Imaging (Italy); Poli, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.poli88@gmail.com [Sapienza University of Rome, Gastroenterology Division, Department of Clinical Medicine (Italy); Fanelli, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.fanelli@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-pathological Sciences (Italy); Wang, Haofan, E-mail: wanghaof@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Vascular Interventional Radiology of the 3rd Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University (China); Bezzi, Mario, E-mail: mario.bezzi@uniroma1.it; Catalano, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.catalano@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomo-pathological Sciences (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    ObjectivesTo prospectively investigate the pre and intra-procedural risk factors for immediate (IF) and delayed-onset (DOF) fever development after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD).MethodsInstitutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained. Between February 2013 and February 2014, 97 afebrile patients (77 at the Sapienza University of Rome, Italy and 20 at the Sun Yat-sen University of Guangzhou, China) with benign (n = 31) and malignant (n = 66) indications for a first PTBD were prospectively enrolled. Thirty pre- and intra-procedural clinical/radiological characteristics, including the amount of contrast media injected prior to PTBD placement, were collected in relation to the development of IF (within 24 h) or DOF (after 24 h). Fever was defined as ≥37.5 °C. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent associations with IF and DOF.ResultsFourteen (14.4 %) patients developed IF and 17 (17.5 %) developed DOF. At multivariable analysis, IF was associated with pre-procedural absence of intrahepatic bile duct dilatation (OR 63.359; 95 % CI 2.658–1510.055; P = 0.010) and low INR (OR 4.7 × 10{sup −4}; 95 % CI 0.000–0.376; P = 0.025), while DOF was associated with unsatisfactory biliary drainage at the end of PTBD (OR 4.571; 95 % CI 1.161–17.992; P = 0.030).ConclusionsThe amount of contrast injected is not associated with post-PTBD fever development. Unsatisfactory biliary drainage at the end of PTBD is associated with DOF, suggesting that complete biliary tree decompression should be pursued within the first PTBD. Patients with unsatisfactory drainage and those with the absence of pre-procedural intrahepatic bile duct dilatation, which is associated with IF, require tailored post-PTBD management.

  13. Risk Factors for Immediate and Delayed-Onset Fever After Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatelli, Pierleone; Corradini, Stefano Ginanni; Corona, Mario; Corradini, Luca Ginanni; Cirelli, Carlo; Saba, Luca; Poli, Edoardo; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Wang, Haofan; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesTo prospectively investigate the pre and intra-procedural risk factors for immediate (IF) and delayed-onset (DOF) fever development after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD).MethodsInstitutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained. Between February 2013 and February 2014, 97 afebrile patients (77 at the Sapienza University of Rome, Italy and 20 at the Sun Yat-sen University of Guangzhou, China) with benign (n = 31) and malignant (n = 66) indications for a first PTBD were prospectively enrolled. Thirty pre- and intra-procedural clinical/radiological characteristics, including the amount of contrast media injected prior to PTBD placement, were collected in relation to the development of IF (within 24 h) or DOF (after 24 h). Fever was defined as ≥37.5 °C. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent associations with IF and DOF.ResultsFourteen (14.4 %) patients developed IF and 17 (17.5 %) developed DOF. At multivariable analysis, IF was associated with pre-procedural absence of intrahepatic bile duct dilatation (OR 63.359; 95 % CI 2.658–1510.055; P = 0.010) and low INR (OR 4.7 × 10"−"4; 95 % CI 0.000–0.376; P = 0.025), while DOF was associated with unsatisfactory biliary drainage at the end of PTBD (OR 4.571; 95 % CI 1.161–17.992; P = 0.030).ConclusionsThe amount of contrast injected is not associated with post-PTBD fever development. Unsatisfactory biliary drainage at the end of PTBD is associated with DOF, suggesting that complete biliary tree decompression should be pursued within the first PTBD. Patients with unsatisfactory drainage and those with the absence of pre-procedural intrahepatic bile duct dilatation, which is associated with IF, require tailored post-PTBD management.

  14. Effects of light exposure and sleep displacement on dim light melatonin onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, MCM; Beersma, DGM; Korte, HJ; Van den Hoofdakker, RH

    The purpose of the study was to induce in two different ways, a phase-angle difference between the circadian pacemaker and the imposed sleep-wake cycle in humans, we intended to: (i) shift the circadian pacemaker by exposure to bright light and keep the timing of the sleep-wake cycle fixed; and (ii)

  15. A Novel Therapy for Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia: A Retrospective, Nonrandomized Controlled Study of Auto-Adjusting, Dual-Level, Positive Airway Pressure Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakow, Barry; Ulibarri, Victor A; McIver, Natalia D; Nadorff, Michael R

    2016-09-29

    Evidence indicates that behavioral or drug therapy may not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms for chronic insomnia, possibly due to previously unrecognized high rates (30%-90%) of sleep apnea in chronic insomnia patients. Although treatment studies with positive airway pressure (PAP) demonstrate decreased severity of chronic sleep maintenance insomnia in patients with co-occurring sleep apnea, sleep-onset insomnia has not shown similar results. We hypothesized advanced PAP technology would be associated with decreased sleep-onset insomnia severity in a sample of predominantly psychiatric patients with comorbid sleep apnea. We reviewed charts of 74 severe sleep-onset insomnia patients seen from March 2011 to August 2015, all meeting American Academy of Sleep Medicine Work Group criteria for a chronic insomnia disorder and all affirming behavioral and psychological origins for insomnia (averaging 10 of 18 indicators/patient), as well as averaging 2 or more psychiatric symptoms or conditions: depression (65.2%), anxiety (41.9%), traumatic exposure (35.1%), claustrophobia (29.7%), panic attacks (28.4%), and posttraumatic stress disorder (20.3%). All patients failed continuous or bilevel PAP and were manually titrated with auto-adjusting PAP modes (auto-bilevel and adaptive-servo ventilation). At 1-year follow-up, patients were compared through nonrandom assignment on the basis of a PAP compliance metric of > 20 h/wk (56 PAP users) versus insomnia severity (Hedges' g = 1.72) and sleep-onset insomnia (g = 2.07) compared to partial users (g = 1.04 and 0.91, respectively). Both global and sleep-onset insomnia severity decreased below moderate levels in PAP users compared to partial users whose outcomes persisted at moderately severe levels. In a nonrandomized controlled retrospective study, advanced PAP technology (both auto-bilevel and adaptive servo-ventilation) were associated with large decreases in insomnia severity for sleep-onset insomnia patients who

  16. Interventions for preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael G; Béland, François; Julien, Dominic; Gauvin, Lise; Guindon, G Emmanuel; Roy, Denis; Campbell, Kaitryn; Comeau, Donna G; Davidson, Heather; Raina, Parminder; Sattler, Deborah; Vrkljan, Brenda

    2015-09-25

    Many systematic reviews have evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to prevent, delay, or decrease frailty symptoms, but no effort has been made to identify, map, and synthesize the findings from reviews across the full spectrum of interventions. Our objectives are to (1) synthesize findings from all existing systematic reviews evaluating interventions for preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty symptoms; (2) examine different conceptualizations of frailty that have been used in the development and implementation of interventions; and (3) inform policy by convening a stakeholder dialogue with Canadian health-system leaders. We will conduct an overview of systematic reviews to identify and synthesize all of the systematic reviews addressing interventions to preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty symptoms. To identify relevant systematic reviews, we will conduct database searches for published and grey literature as well as contact key experts and search reference lists of included reviews. Two reviewers will independently review all search results for inclusion and then conceptually map, extract key findings (including the conceptualization/definition of frailty used) and assess the methodological quality of all included reviews. We will then synthesize the findings by producing a 'gap map' (i.e. mapping reviews in a matrix according to the interventions and outcomes assessed), and narratively synthesize the key messages across reviews related to type of interventions. Following the completion of the synthesis, we will use the findings to develop an evidence brief that mobilizes the best available evidence about the problem related to preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty symptoms in older adults, policy and programmatic options to address the problem and implementation considerations. The evidence brief will then be used as the input into a stakeholder dialogue, which will

  17. Neurokinin B receptor antagonism decreases luteinising hormone pulse frequency and amplitude and delays puberty onset in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S Y; Li, X F; Hu, M H; Shao, B; Poston, L; Lightman, S L; O'Byrne, K T

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling puberty onset remain enigmatic. Humans with loss of function mutations in TAC3 or TACR3, the genes encoding neurokinin B (NKB) or its receptor, neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R), respectively, present with severe congenital gonadotrophin deficiency and pubertal failure. Animal studies have shown ambiguous actions of NKB-NK3R signalling with respect to controlling puberty onset. The present study aimed to determine the role of endogenous NKB-NK3R signalling in the control of pulsatile luteinising hormone (LH) secretion and the timing of puberty onset, and also whether precocious pubertal onset as a result of an obesogenic diet is similarly regulated by this neuropeptide system. Prepubertal female rats, chronically implanted with i.c.v. cannulae, were administered SB222200, a NK3R antagonist, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid via an osmotic mini-pump for 14 days. SB222200 significantly delayed the onset of vaginal opening and first oestrus (as markers of puberty) compared to controls in both normal and high-fat diet fed animals. Additionally, serial blood sampling, via chronic indwelling cardiac catheters, revealed that the increase in LH pulse frequency was delayed and that the LH pulse amplitude was reduced in response to NK3R antagonism, regardless of dietary status. These data suggest that endogenous NKB-NK3R signalling plays a role in controlling the timing of puberty and the associated acceleration of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone pulse generator frequency in the female rat. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  18. Relationship between physical exercise, muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical exercise involving muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. A literature review of national and international periodicals was carried out. Muscle structures (membranes, Z-line, sarcomeres, T tubules and myofi brils can become damaged as a result of an imposed mechanical overload. Of greatest note are exercises requiring strength, particularly when muscular action is eccentric. Damage to skeletal musculature can be analyzed by direct methods (muscle biopsy or magnetic resonance or by indirect methods (maximum voluntary movement, subjective pain perception scales, analysis of enzyme and protein concentrations in blood. Creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, myosin heavy chain fragments, troponin-I and myoglobin can be used as indirect markers of muscle damage. Both DOMS and muscle damage can be infl uenced by the type of activity, with emphasis on eccentric muscle movements, type of exercise, velocity of the movement, interval period between series, the level of individual fi tness, this last primarily affecting beginners. When myotrauma occurs, muscle damage repair is initiated by leukocytes migrating to the injured area, although, the histamines, prostaglandins, kinins and K+ produced by neutrophils and macrophages stimulate free nerve endings in the muscle, causing the DOMS. Despite this apparent relationship between muscle damage and DOMS, it is not possible toestablish a linear relationship between these two variables, since published data are divergent. RESUMO O objetivo desse estudo foi investigar as relações do exercício físico com o dano muscular e dor muscular de início tardio (DMIT. Para tanto, foi realizada uma revisão de literatura de periódicos nacionais e internacionais. O dano muscular pode ocorrer em estruturas musculares (membranas, linha Z, sarcolema, túbulos T e miofi brilas em função da sobrecarga mec

  19. Melanopsin Gene Variations Interact With Season to Predict Sleep Onset and Chronotype

    OpenAIRE

    Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Wong, Patricia M.; Franzen, Peter L.; Hasler, Brant P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Miller, Megan A.; Kepreos, Kyle M.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    The human melanopsin gene has been reported to mediate risk for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is hypothesized to be caused by decreased photic input during winter when light levels fall below threshold, resulting in differences in circadian phase and/or sleep. However, it is unclear if melanopsin increases risk of SAD by causing differences in sleep or circadian phase, or if those differences are symptoms of the mood disorder. To determine if melanopsin sequence variations are asso...

  20. Sleep/wake scheduling scheme for minimizing end-to-end delay in multi-hop wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madani Sajjad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a sleep/wake schedule protocol for minimizing end-to-end delay for event driven multi-hop wireless sensor networks. In contrast to generic sleep/wake scheduling schemes, our proposed algorithm performs scheduling that is dependent on traffic loads. Nodes adapt their sleep/wake schedule based on traffic loads in response to three important factors, (a the distance of the node from the sink node, (b the importance of the node's location from connectivity's perspective, and (c if the node is in the proximity where an event occurs. Using these heuristics, the proposed scheme reduces end-to-end delay and maximizes the throughput by minimizing the congestion at nodes having heavy traffic load. Simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed protocol, by comparing its performance with S-MAC and Anycast protocols. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed protocol has significantly reduced the end-to-end delay, as well as has improved the other QoS parameters, like average energy per packet, average delay, packet loss ratio, throughput, and coverage lifetime.

  1. Disturbed sleep as risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder--Data from a 10-year prospective-longitudinal study among adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Philipp S; Höfler, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Bauer, Michael; Pfennig, Andrea; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-09-01

    There is ample data suggesting that individuals with bipolar disorder more frequently suffer from disturbed sleep even when euthymic. Since sleep is a process that is crucial for affective homeostasis, disturbed sleep in healthy individuals may be a risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Utilizing data from a large cohort of adolescents and young adults, this study tests the hypothesis that disturbed sleep constitutes a risk factor for the later onset of bipolar disorder. A representative community sample of N = 3021 adolescents and young adults (baseline age 14-24) was assessed using the standardized Composite International Diagnostic Interview and followed-up prospectively up to 3 times over up to 10 years. Disturbed sleep at baseline was quantified utilizing the corresponding items from the self-report inventory SCL-90-R. The compound value (insomnia-score) as an ordinal parameter for the severity of sleep disturbances was used to assess associations with the incidence of bipolar disorder among participants free of major mental disorder at baseline (N = 1943) using odds ratios (OR) from logistic regressions. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, parental mood disorder and lifetime alcohol or cannabis dependence. Poor sleep quality significantly increased the risk for the subsequent development of bipolar disorder (OR = 1.75; p = 0.001). Regarding individual sleep items, trouble falling asleep and early morning awakening were predictive for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Disturbed sleep in persons otherwise free of major mental disorders appears to confer an increased risk for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Repeated delayed onset cerebellar radiation injuries after linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujifuku, Kenta; Matsuo, Takayuki; Toyoda, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with right hearing disturbance and vertigo. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed the presence of right vestibular schwannoma (VS). Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was performed with a tumor marginal dose of 14 Gy using two isocenters. She was followed up clinically and neuroradiologically using three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo MR imaging. She experienced temporal neurological deterioration due to peritumoral edema in her right cerebellar peduncle and pons for a few months beginning 1.5 years after SRS, when she experienced transient right facial dysesthesia and hearing deterioration. Ten years after SRS, the patient presented with sudden onset of vertigo, gait disturbance, diplopia, dysarthria, and nausea. MR imaging demonstrated a new lesion in the right cerebellar peduncle, which was diagnosed as radiation-induced stroke. The patient was followed up conservatively and her symptoms disappeared within a few months. Multiple delayed onset radiation injuries are possible sequelae of SRS for VS. (author)

  3. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease: bilingualism as a form of cognitive reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-11-09

    There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology.

  4. Why the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) should be measured before treatment of patients with circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzer, Henry; Smits, Marcel G; Duffy, Jeanne F; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) may include light therapy, chronotherapy and melatonin. Exogenous melatonin is increasingly being used in patients with insomnia or CRSD. Although pharmacopoeias and the European food safety authority (EFSA) recommend administering melatonin 1-2 h before desired bedtime, several studies have shown that melatonin is not always effective if administered according to that recommendation. Crucial for optimal treatment of CRSD, melatonin and other treatments should be administered at a time related to individual circadian timing (typically assessed using the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO)). If not administered according to the individual patient's circadian timing, melatonin and other treatments may not only be ineffective, they may even result in contrary effects. Endogenous melatonin levels can be measured reliably in saliva collected at the patient's home. A clinically reliably DLMO can be calculated using a fixed threshold. Diary and polysomnographic sleep-onset time do not reliably predict DLMO or circadian timing in patients with CRSD. Knowing the patient's individual circadian timing by assessing DLMO can improve diagnosis and treatment of CRSD with melatonin as well as other therapies such as light or chronotherapy, and optimizing treatment timing will shorten the time required to achieve results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Short-Term Sleep Disturbance-Induced Stress Does not Affect Basal Pain Perception, but Does Delay Postsurgical Pain Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-Kai; Cao, Jing; Wang, Hongzhen; Liang, Lingli; Zhang, Jun; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Chronic sleep disturbance-induced stress is known to increase basal pain sensitivity. However, most surgical patients frequently report short-term sleep disturbance/deprivation during the pre- and postoperation periods and have normal pain perception presurgery. Whether this short-term sleep disturbance affects postsurgical pain is elusive. Here, we report that pre- or postexposure to rapid eye movement sleep disturbance (REMSD) for 6 hours daily for 3 consecutive days did not alter basal responses to mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli, but did delay recovery in incision-induced reductions in paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation and paw withdrawal latencies to heat and cold stimuli on the ipsilateral side of male or female rats. This short-term REMSD led to stress shown by an increase in swim immobility time, a decrease in sucrose consumption, and an increase in the level of corticosterone in serum. Blocking this stress via intrathecal RU38486 or bilateral adrenalectomy abolished REMSD-caused delay in recovery of incision-induced reductions in behavioral responses to mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli. Moreover, this short-term REMSD produced significant reductions in the levels of mu opioid receptor and kappa opioid receptor, but not Kv1.2, in the ipsilateral L4/5 spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia on day 9 after incision (but not after sham surgery). Our findings show that short-term sleep disturbance either pre- or postsurgery does not alter basal pain perception, but does exacerbate postsurgical pain hypersensitivity. The latter may be related to the reductions of mu and kappa opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia caused by REMSD plus incision. Prevention of short-term sleep disturbance may help recovery from postsurgical pain in patients. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Parent-Based Sleep Education for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth A.; Adkins, Karen W.; Reynolds, Ann; Weiss, Shelly K.; Loh, Alvin; Fawkes, Diane; Katz, Terry; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Madduri, Niru; Hundley, Rachel; Clemons, Traci

    2014-01-01

    This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent…

  7. Stoma creation: does onset of ostomy care education delay hospital length of stay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Laila; Long, Kevin; Hawkins, Melinda; Menon, Raman; Bellevue, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Balancing patient safety with hospital length of stay (LOS) and associated cost is critically important. Subjectively, we have observed that patients undergoing ostomy creation early in the week have a shorter LOS. We retrospectively reviewed LOS based on day of the week the operation was performed. We reviewed 180 patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery with planned ostomy. Group 1 underwent surgery on Monday to Wednesday (n = 77), Group 2 on Thursday (n = 49), and Group 3 on Friday (n = 54). The average LOS for Group 1, 2, and 3 was 6.2, 4.9, and 7.2 days, respectively. The average number of visits with ostomy nursing for Group 1, 2, and 3 was 2.7, 1.8, and 2.3, respectively. Day of initial ostomy nursing visit was significantly correlated between the delay to initial visit and LOS with Group 3 delayed most. Patients with the longest delay to initial nurse visit had the longest LOS, with Friday operations being most delayed. A contributing factor may be absence of ostomy teaching over the weekend. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of delayed onset prostacyclin on markers of endothelial function and damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gybel-Brask, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Rune; Stensballe, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurological emergency. Delayed ischemic neurological deficit is one of the main causes of poor outcome after SAH and is probably caused, at least in part, by cerebral vasospasm. The pathophysiology of this is multifaceted, but endothelial damage...

  9. Sleep and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Jessica L; Reynolds, Amy C; Ferguson, Sally A; Dawson, Drew

    2013-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic mental illness that can have a debilitating effect on daily functioning. A body of research reveals altered sleep behaviour in OCD sufferers; however, findings are inconsistent and there is no consensus on the nature of this relationship. Understanding sleep disturbance in OCD is of critical importance given the known negative consequences of disturbed sleep for mood and emotional wellbeing. A systematic literature search was conducted of five databases for studies assessing sleep in adults diagnosed with OCD. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria and qualitative data analysis methods were used to identify common themes. There was some evidence of reduced total sleep time and sleep efficiency in OCD patients. Many of the sleep disturbances noted were characteristic of depression. However, some OCD sufferers displayed delayed sleep onset and offset and an increased prevalence of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Severe OCD symptoms were consistently associated with greater sleep disturbance. While the sleep of OCD patients has not been a major focus to date, the existing literature suggests that addressing sleep disturbance in OCD patients may ensure a holistic approach to treatment, enhance treatment efficacy, mitigate relapse and protect against the onset of co-morbid psychiatric illnesses. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytokine polymorphisms and plasma levels are associated with sleep onset insomnia in adults living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Caryl L; Zak, Rochelle S; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Lee, Kathryn A

    2015-07-01

    Sleep disturbance has been associated with inflammation and cytokine activity, and we previously described genetic associations between cytokine polymorphisms and sleep maintenance and duration among adults with HIV/AIDS. Although sleep onset insomnia (SOI) is also a commonly reported sleep problem, associations between cytokine biomarkers and SOI have not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to describe SOI in relation to cytokine plasma concentrations and gene polymorphisms in a convenience sample of 307 adults (212 men, 72 women, and 23 transgender) living with HIV/AIDS. Based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index item that asks the time it usually took to fall asleep in the past month, participants were categorized as either >30min to fall asleep (n=70, 23%) or 30min or less to fall asleep (n=237). Plasma cytokines were analyzed, and genotyping was conducted for 15 candidate genes involved in cytokine signaling: interferon-gamma (IFNG), IFNG receptor 1 (IFNGR1), interleukins (IL1R2, IL2, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL13, IL17A), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NFKB1 and NFKB2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA). Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. After adjusting for genomic estimates of ancestry, self-reported race/ethnicity and viral load, SOI was associated with higher IL-13 plasma levels and with six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): IL1B rs1143642 and rs1143623, IL6 rs4719714, IL13 rs1295686, NFKB1 rs4648110, and TNFA rs2857602. In addition, the IL1B rs1143642 polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of IL-1β in adjusted analyses. This study strengthens the evidence for an association between inflammation and sleep disturbance, particularly self-report of habitual SOI. In this chronic illness population, the cytokine polymorphisms associated with SOI provide direction for future personalized medicine intervention research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  11. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institute (NHLBI). 1 Mood. Sleep affects your mood. Insufficient sleep can cause irritability that can lead to trouble with relationships, ... basics/understanding_sleep.htm#dynamic_activity Centers for Disease ... insufficient rest or sleep among adults—United States, 2008. MMWR, 58 (42), ...

  12. Delayed-onset Reversible Cortical Blindness after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Aaron; de Souza, Rainha J.; Pai Kakode, Varun R.

    2017-01-01

    We present a patient who presented with cortical blindness (CB) 1 week after repeated cardiac arrest while undergoing treatment for an acute myocardial infarction. He had been revived within 5 min in each instance and was apparently neurologically normal until presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed subtle hyperintensities on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging in both temporooccipital cortices. A rapid recovery over the next 2 weeks was remarkable for the appearance of metamorphopsia. CB may present even days to weeks after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy following cardiac arrest, even in patients apparently without immediate neurological sequelae. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon remains to be fully elucidated, but is likely to be due to delayed effects of anoxia on the occipital cortex and may be analogous to the previously described syndrome of delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy. Prognosis for visual recovery appears to be good. PMID:28936091

  13. Bilingualism as a strategy to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Klimova, Blanka; Valis, Martin; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Blanka Klimova,1,2 Martin Valis,2 Kamil Kuca3,4 1Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Kralove, 2Department of Neurology, 3Biomedical Research Centre, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 4Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore original studies which provide evidence about the effects of bilingualism on the delay of the ...

  14. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, R. Robert; Burgess, Helen J.; Emens, Jonathan S.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Sharkey, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed and the GRADE approach was used to update the previous American Academy of Sleep Medicine Practice Parameters on the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Available data allowed for positive endorsement (at a second-tier degree of confidence) of strategically timed melatonin (for the treatment of DSWPD, blind adults with N24SWD, and children/ adolescents with ISWRD and comorbid neurological disorders), and light therapy with or without accompanying behavioral interventions (adults with ASWPD, children/adolescents with DSWPD, and elderly with dementia). Recommendations against the use of melatonin and discrete sleep-promoting medications are provided for demented elderly patients, at a second- and first-tier degree of confidence, respectively. No recommendations were provided for remaining treatments/ populations, due to either insufficient or absent data. Areas where further research is needed are discussed. Citation: Auger RR, Burgess HJ, Emens JS, Deriy LV, Thomas SM, Sharkey KM. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD), non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD), and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder (ISWRD). An update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1199–1236. PMID:26414986

  15. Poor weight control, alcoholic beverage consumption and sudden sleep onset at the wheel among Italian truck drivers: A preliminary pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Gian Luca Rosso; Cristina Montomoli; Stefano M. Candura

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of obesity, alcoholic beverage consumption, unhealthy alcohol use and sudden sleep onset at the wheel among Italian truck drivers. In addition to prevalence rates, this study also aimed at investigating potential predictors for sudden-onset sleepiness and obesity. Material and Methods: A sample of truck drivers was extracted from the database of the High Risk Professional Driver Study. Data concerning demographics, anthropome...

  16. Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems in Healthy Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, C L Srinivasa; Bharti, Bhavneet; Malhi, Prahbhjot; Khadwal, Alka

    2015-07-01

    To describe the sleep patterns and problems in children aged between 12 and 36 mo of age. This cross sectional survey was collected over a span of 1 y in Advanced Pediatric Centre, PGIMER, Chandigarh and crèches of Chandigarh. Children in the age group of 12 to 36 mo were included in study. Children with chronic illness, developmental delay, seizure disorder and lack of consent were excluded. A total of 368 children were enrolled. Main outcome measures were sleep duration over 1 to 3 y of life; sleep behavior at onset, during and waking of sleep and parent reported sleep problems and their predictors. The average duration of sleep was 12.5 h (S.D = 1.9). The mean total sleep duration and mean day time sleep duration decreased, while mean night time sleep increased as the age advanced from 12 to 36 mo. Following were the frequency of sleep habits seen in the index study; bed time routine was seen only in 68(18.5 %), a regular bed time ritual was seen in 281(76.4 %), 329(89.4 %) children frequently required 0-20 min time to fall asleep, 11(3 %) parents used sleep inducing drugs. Night waking (1 to 3 times a night) was seen in 297(80.7 %) and its frequency declined with age. Parent reported sleep problems were seen in 12.8 % (47/368). Lack of co-sleeping and night waking were considered as strongest predictors of parent reported sleep problems. Toddlers' sleep duration, night waking behavior, and day time naps decrease as the age progress while night time sleep duration increases with age. Lack of co-sleeping and night waking are considered as strongest predictors of parent reported sleep problems.

  17. Polymorphism in the PER3 promoter associates with diurnal preference and delayed sleep phase disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Simon N; Carpen, Jayshan D; Gibson, Mark; Lim, Gim Hui; Johnston, Jonathan D; Skene, Debra J; von Schantz, Malcolm

    2010-05-01

    To screen the PER3 promoter for polymorphisms and investigate the phenotypic associations of these polymorphisms with diurnal preference, delayed sleep phase disorder/syndrome (DSPD/DSPS), and their effects on reporter gene expression. Interspecific comparison was used to define the approximate extent of the PER3 promoter as the region between the transcriptional start site and nucleotide position -874. This region was screened in DNA pools using PCR and direct sequencing, which was also used to screen DNA from individual participants. The different promoter alleles were cloned into a luciferase expression vector and a deletion library created. Promoter activation was measured by chemiluminescence. N/A. DNA samples were obtained from volunteers with defined diurnal preference (3 x 80, selected from a pool of 1,590), and DSPD patients (n=23). N/A. We verified three single nucleotide polymorphisms (G -320T, C -319A, G -294A), and found a novel variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism (-318 1/2 VNTR). The -320T and -319A alleles occurred more frequently in DSPD compared to morning (P = 0.042 for each) or evening types (P = 0.006 and 0.033). The allele combination TA2G was more prevalent in DSPD compared to morning (P 0.033) or evening types (P = 0.002). Luciferase expression driven by the TA2G combination was greater than for the more common GC2A (P < 0.05) and the rarer TA1G (P < 0.001) combinations. Deletion reporter constructs identified two enhancer regions (-703 to -605, and -283 to -80). Polymorphisms in the PER3 promoter could affect its expression, leading to potential differences in the observed functions of PER3.

  18. Sleep in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Are Measures of Parent Report and Actigraphy Related and Affected by Sleep Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Olivia J; Reynolds, Ann; Katz, Terry; Weiss, Shelly K; Loh, Alvin; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in children with autism, resulting in a great need for effective treatments. To evaluate treatments for sleep disturbance in this population, it is critical to understand the relationship between measures of sleep captured by parent report and objective measures. The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and actigraphy-measured data from 80 children with autism and sleep-onset delay were evaluated. Reported problems with sleep-onset delay were concurrent with sleep duration problems in 66% of children, night wakings in 72% of children, and bedtime resistance in 66% of children; 38% of children were reported to have problems with all CSHQ insomnia domains. Actigraphy-measured sleep duration was correlated with estimates using CSHQ-reported bed and wake times.

  19. Onset of Coagulation Function Recovery Is Delayed in Severely Injured Trauma Patients with Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Belinda H; Connelly, Christopher R; Fair, Kelly A; Holcomb, John B; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Bulger, Eileen M; Schreiber, Martin A

    2017-07-01

    Altered coagulation function after trauma can contribute to development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Severe trauma impairs coagulation function, but the trajectory for recovery is not known. We hypothesized that enhanced, early recovery of coagulation function increases VTE risk in severely injured trauma patients. Secondary analysis was performed on data from the Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratio (PROPPR) trial, excluding patients who died within 24 hours or were on pre-injury anticoagulants. Patient characteristics, adverse outcomes, and parameters of platelet function and coagulation (thromboelastography) were compared from admission to 72 hours between VTE (n = 83) and non-VTE (n = 475) patients. A p value value (48 vs 24 hours), α-angle (no recovery), maximum amplitude (24 vs 12 hours), and clot lysis at 30 minutes (48 vs 12 hours). Platelet function recovery mediated by arachidonic acid (72 vs 4 hours), ADP (72 vs 12 hours), and collagen (48 vs 12 hours) was delayed in VTE patients. The VTE patients had lower mortality (4% vs 13%; p < 0.05), but fewer hospital-free days (0 days [interquartile range 0 to 8 days] vs 10 days [interquartile range 0 to 20 days]; p < 0.05) and higher complication rates (p < 0.05). Recovery from platelet dysfunction and coagulopathy after severe trauma were delayed in VTE patients. Suppressed clot lysis and compensatory mechanisms associated with altered coagulation that can potentiate VTE formation require additional investigation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Delayed onset Mycobacterium intracellulare keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, JaeSang; Kim, Se Kyung; Yong, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae-Im; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2017-12-01

    Infectious keratitis is a relatively uncommon but potentially sight-threatening complication of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Mycobacterial keratitis is usually regarded as late onset keratitis among post-LASIK keratitis. There has been no documented case of Mycobacterium intracellulare post-LASIK keratitis of a long-latent period. A 36-year-old man was referred to our out-patient clinic, for persistent corneal epithelial defect with intrastromal infiltration. He had undergone uneventful bilateral LASIK procedure 4 years before. He complained decreased vision, accompanied by ocular pain, photophobia, and redness in his left eye for 7 months. Lamellar keratectomy was taken using femtosecond laser. Bacterial culture with sequenced bacterial 16s ribosomal DNA confirmed the organism to be M intracellulare. After 3 months of administration of topical clarithromycin, amikacin, and moxifloxacin, the corneal epithelial defect was resolved and the infiltration was much improved. However, newly developed diffuse haziness with surrounding granular infiltration in the central cornea was noted. Drug toxicity was suspected and topical moxifloxacin was discontinued, resulting in resolution of the diffuse haze with infiltration. The patient was followed up regularly without medication thereafter and recurrence was not found for 7 years. This case presents the first case of M intracellulare keratitis after LASIK. LASIK surgeons should aware that post-LASIK keratitis can develop long after the operation and careful suspicion of infectious disease with meticulous diagnostic test is needed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed Onset of Atrial Fibrillation and Ventricular Tachycardia after an Automobile Lightning Strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigalla, Dorian; Essler, Shannon E; Stone, C Keith

    2017-11-01

    Lightning strike is a rare medical emergency. The primary cause of death in lightning strike victims is immediate cardiac arrest. The mortality rate from lightning exposure can be as high as 30%, with up to 70% of patients left with significant morbidity. An 86-year-old male was struck by lightning while driving his vehicle and crashed. On initial emergency medical services evaluation, he was asymptomatic with normal vital signs. During his transport, he lost consciousness several times and was found to be in atrial fibrillation with intermittent runs of ventricular tachycardia during the unconscious periods. In the emergency department, atrial fibrillation persisted and he experienced additional episodes of ventricular tachycardia. He was treated with i.v. amiodarone and admitted to cardiovascular intensive care unit, where he converted to a normal sinus rhythm on the amiodarone drip. He was discharged home without rhythm-control medications and did not have further episodes of dysrhythmias on follow-up visits. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Lightning strikes are one of the most common injuries suffered from natural phenomenon, and short-term mortality ordinarily depends on the cardiac effects. This case demonstrates that the cardiac effects can be multiple, delayed, and recurrent, which compels the emergency physician to be vigilant in the initial evaluation and ongoing observation of patients with lightning injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Delayed onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Olig1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Olig1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that is essential for oligodendrogenesis and efficient remyelination. However, its role in neurodegenerative disorders has not been well-elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of Olig1 deficiency on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. We show that the mean disease onset of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in Olig1(-/- mice is significantly slower than wide-type (WT mice (19.8 ± 2.2 in Olig1(-/- mice and 9.5 ± 0.3 days in WT mice. In addition, 10% of Olig1(-/- mice did not develop EAE by the end of the observation periods (60 days. The severity of EAE, the extent of demyelination, and the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes in spinal cords, were significantly milder in Olig1(-/- mice compared with WT mice in the early stage. Moreover, the visual function, as assessed by the second-kernel of multifocal electroretinograms, was better preserved, and the number of degenerating axons in the optic nerve was significantly reduced in Olig1(-/- mice. Interestingly, Olig1 deficiency had no effect on T cell response capability, however, it reduced the expression of myelin proteins such as MOG, myelin basic protein (MBP and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG. The expression of Olig2 remained unchanged in the optic nerve and brain, and it was reduced in the spinal cord of Olig1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the Olig1 signaling pathways may be involved in the incidence rate and the severity of neurological symptoms in MS.

  3. Delayed-onset of procoagulant signalling revealed by kinetic analysis of COAT platelet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberio, Lorenzo; Ravanat, Catherine; Hechler, Béatrice; Mangin, Pierre H; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian

    2017-06-02

    The combined action of collagen and thrombin induces the formation of COAT platelets, which are characterised by a coat of procoagulant and adhesive molecules on their surface. Although recent work has started to highlight their clinical relevance, the exact mechanisms regulating the formation of procoagulant COAT platelets remain unclear. Therefore, we employed flow cytometry in order to visualise in real time surface and intracellular events following simultaneous platelet activation with convulxin and thrombin. After a rapid initial response pattern characterised by the homogenous activation of the fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in all platelets, starting with a delay of about 2 minutes an increasing fraction transforms to procoagulant COAT platelets. Their surface is characterised by progressive loss of PAC-1 binding, expression of negative phospholipids and retention of α-granule von Willebrand factor. Intracellular events in procoagulant COAT platelets are a marked increase of free calcium into the low micromolar range, concomitantly with early depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane and activation of caspase-3, while non-COAT platelets keep the intracellular free calcium in the nanomolar range and maintain an intact mitochondrial membrane. We show for the first time that the flow-cytometrically distinct fractions of COAT and non-COAT platelets differentially phosphorylate two signalling proteins, PKCα and p38MAPK, which may be involved in the regulation of the different calcium fluxes observed in COAT versus non-COAT platelets. This study demonstrates the utility of concomitant cellular and signalling evaluation using flow cytometry in order to further dissect the mechanisms underlying the dichotomous platelet response observed after collagen/thrombin stimulation.

  4. Sleep Habits of Elementary and Middle School Children in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surani, Salim; Hesselbacher, Sean; Surani, Saherish; Sadasiva, Sreevidya; Surani, Zoya; Surani, Sara S; Khimani, Amina; Subramanian, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Sleep difficulties, including insufficient sleep and inadequate sleep hygiene, have been prevalent among children. Sleep deprivation can lead to poor grades, sleepiness, and moodiness. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of sleep abnormalities among elementary and middle school students in South Texas and how the groups compare with one another. Method. After approval from the appropriate school district for a sleep education program, a baseline survey was taken of elementary and middle school students, using the Children's Sleep Habit Questionnaire-Sleep Self-Report Form, which assessed the domains of bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, sleep duration, night awakening, and daytime sleepiness. Results. The survey was completed by 499 elementary and 1008 middle school children. Trouble sleeping was reported by 43% in elementary school, compared with 29% of middle school children. Fifty percent of middle school children did not like sleeping, compared with 26% in elementary school. Bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, and nighttime awakening were more common among elementary school students. Daytime sleepiness was more common among the middle school children when compared to elementary school children. Conclusions. Sleep abnormalities are present in elementary school children with changes in sleep habits into middle school.

  5. Sleep Habits of Elementary and Middle School Children in South Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Surani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sleep difficulties, including insufficient sleep and inadequate sleep hygiene, have been prevalent among children. Sleep deprivation can lead to poor grades, sleepiness, and moodiness. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of sleep abnormalities among elementary and middle school students in South Texas and how the groups compare with one another. Method. After approval from the appropriate school district for a sleep education program, a baseline survey was taken of elementary and middle school students, using the Children’s Sleep Habit Questionnaire-Sleep Self-Report Form, which assessed the domains of bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, sleep duration, night awakening, and daytime sleepiness. Results. The survey was completed by 499 elementary and 1008 middle school children. Trouble sleeping was reported by 43% in elementary school, compared with 29% of middle school children. Fifty percent of middle school children did not like sleeping, compared with 26% in elementary school. Bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, and nighttime awakening were more common among elementary school students. Daytime sleepiness was more common among the middle school children when compared to elementary school children. Conclusions. Sleep abnormalities are present in elementary school children with changes in sleep habits into middle school.

  6. Sudden onset of cervical spondylotic myelopathy during sleep: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Irene A; Burns, Stephen P; Little, James W

    2002-03-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is a common cause of compressive spinal cord dysfunction. The typical course involves either a gradual or an episodic increase in symptoms and neurologic deficits, with impairment evolving over a period of months to years. Acute neurologic deterioration in conjunction with cervical spondylosis has been described almost exclusively in traumatic situations such as disk herniation. We report a case of an acute, nontraumatic onset of tetraplegia in association with cervical spondylosis. A 56-year-old man developed tetraplegia during a 1-hour nap, with loss of volitional control of his extremities, impaired sensation below the C3 dermatome, and increased muscle tone. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed canal stenosis and increased T2 signal within the cord. This case report describes the rehabilitation course for this patient and reviews the clinical spectrum of onset and progression of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  7. Sleep-Related Disorders in Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Preliminary Results of a Full Sleep Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Silvia; Esposito, Maria; Foderaro, Giuseppe; Ramelli, Gian Paolo; Pezzoli, Valdo; Manconi, Mauro

    2016-11-01

    We present the preliminary results of a prospective case-control sleep study in children with a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A deep sleep assessment including sleep questionnaires, sleep habits, a video-polysomnographic recording with full high-density electroencephalography (EEG) and cardiorespiratory polygraphy, multiple sleep latency test, and 1-week actigraphic recording were performed to verify whether children with ADHD may be classified into one of the following five phenotypes: (1) hypoarousal state, resembling narcolepsy, which may be considered a "primary" form of ADHD; (2) delayed sleep onset insomnia; (3) sleep-disordered breathing; (4) restless legs syndrome and/or periodic limb movements; and (5) sleep epilepsy and/or EEG interictal epileptiform discharges. Fifteen consecutive outpatients with ADHD were recruited (two female, mean age 10.6 ± 2.2, age range 8-13.7 years) over 6 months. The narcolepsy-like sleep phenotype was observed in three children, the sleep onset insomnia phenotype was observed in one child, mild obstructive sleep apnea was observed in three children, sleep hyperkinesia and/or PLMs were observed in five children, while IEDs and or nocturnal epilepsy were observed in three children. Depending on the sleep phenotype, children received melatonin, iron supplementation, antiepileptic drugs, or stimulants. Our study further highlights the need to design an efficient sleep diagnostic algorithm for children with ADHD, thereby more accurately identifying cases in which a full sleep assessment is indicated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Role of Chronic Mesh Infection in Delayed-Onset Vaginal Mesh Complications or Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections: Results From Explanted Mesh Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellano, Erin M; Nakamura, Leah Y; Choi, Judy M; Kang, Diana C; Grisales, Tamara; Raz, Shlomo; Rodriguez, Larissa V

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal mesh complications necessitating excision are increasingly prevalent. We aim to study whether subclinical chronically infected mesh contributes to the development of delayed-onset mesh complications or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Women undergoing mesh removal from August 2013 through May 2014 were identified by surgical code for vaginal mesh removal. Only women undergoing removal of anti-incontinence mesh were included. Exclusion criteria included any women undergoing simultaneous prolapse mesh removal. We abstracted preoperative and postoperative information from the medical record and compared mesh culture results from patients with and without mesh extrusion, de novo recurrent UTIs, and delayed-onset pain. One hundred seven women with only anti-incontinence mesh removed were included in the analysis. Onset of complications after mesh placement was within the first 6 months in 70 (65%) of 107 and delayed (≥6 months) in 37 (35%) of 107. A positive culture from the explanted mesh was obtained from 82 (77%) of 107 patients, and 40 (37%) of 107 were positive with potential pathogens. There were no significant differences in culture results when comparing patients with delayed-onset versus immediate pain, extrusion with no extrusion, and de novo recurrent UTIs with no infections. In this large cohort of patients with mesh removed for a diverse array of complications, cultures of the explanted vaginal mesh demonstrate frequent low-density bacterial colonization. We found no differences in culture results from women with delayed-onset pain versus acute pain, vaginal mesh extrusions versus no extrusions, or recurrent UTIs using standard culture methods. Chronic prosthetic infections in other areas of medicine are associated with bacterial biofilms, which are resistant to typical culture techniques. Further studies using culture-independent methods are needed to investigate the potential role of chronic bacterial infections in delayed vaginal mesh

  9. "Boomerang Neuropathology" of Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease is Shrouded in Harmful "BDDS": Breathing, Diet, Drinking, and Sleep During Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2015-07-01

    Brain damage begins years before substantial neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's dementia. Crucial fundamental activities of life are breathing, eating, drinking, and sleeping. When these pivotal functions are maligned over a prolonged period, they impart escalating dyshomeostasis. The latter may lead to disastrous consequences including cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current theme here is that multiple pathophysiological derangements are promoted over a prolonged period by the very fundamental activities of life-when "rendered unhealthy." They may converge on several regulating/modulating factors (e.g., mitochondrial energy production, oxidative stress, innate immunity, and vascular function) and promote insidious neuropathology that culminates in cognitive decline in the aged. This is of course associated with the accumulation of amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau in the brain. Epidemiological, biomarker, and neuroimaging studies have provided significant copious evidence on the presence of indolent prodromal AD neuropathology many years prior to symptomatic onset. Progressive oxidative damage to specific gene promoters may result in gene silencing. A mechanistic link may possibly exist between epigenomic state, DNA damage, and chronically unhealthy/dysfunctional body systems. This paper, therefore, addresses and delineates the deleterious pathophysiological impact triggered by dysfunctional breathing, harmful diet, excess of alcohol consumption, and sleep deprivation; indeed, their impact may alter epigenetic state. It is mandatory, therefore, to abrogate cognitive decline and attenuate AD pathology through adoption of a healthy lifestyle, in conjunction with combination therapy with known moderators of cognitive decline. This strategy may thwart multiple concurrent and synergistic pathologies, including epigenetic dysfunction. A multi-factorial therapeutic intervention is required to overcome wide ranging neuropathology and multi

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, delays onset and reduces severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in Lewis rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian DellaValle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention towards anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE.Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 µg/kg s.c. or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n=6, liraglutide, n=7. Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11 or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4. Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, amyloid precursor protein (APP, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP were determined.Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0 by two days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p=0.0003. Fourteen of 15 (93% of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4 by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33% of liraglutide-treated rats (p=0.0004. Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p<0.01 and reduced the neurodegenerative marker APP (p=0.036 in the brain. GFAP levels were not significantly changed with drug treatment (p=0.09Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1 receptor

  11. Sleep structure in blindness is influenced by circadian desynchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubin, Sébrina; Jennum, Poul; Nielsen, Tore

    2018-01-01

    We examined the structure, duration and quality of sleep, including non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep, in 11 blind individuals without conscious light perception and 11 age- and sex-matched sighted controls. Because blindness is associated with a greater incidence of free......-running circadian rhythms, we controlled for circadian phase by a measure of melatonin onset timing. When circadian rhythm was entrained and melatonin onset occurred at normal times, sleep structure did not differ between blind and sighted individuals. On the other hand, an abnormal timing of the circadian phase......, including delayed, shifted and unclassifiable melatonin onsets, led to larger rapid eye movement sleep latencies and increased wake times. No differences were observed for stages of non-rapid eye movement sleep, either between congenital and late blind and sighted individuals, or across the different...

  12. Comparison between hearing screening-detected cases and sporadic cases of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jingrong; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Yan; Li, Yun; Mei, Ling; Yao, Guoyin; Wang, Yu; Shen, Xiaoming; Wu, Hao

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnosis and ages of intervention for cases of delayed-onset hearing loss identified sporadically or via a preschool hearing screening program. Retrospective study with the comparative analysis of two groups of children. Cases identified from screening were selected from 34 321 preschool children who underwent screening for delayed-onset hearing loss between October 2009 and May 2011. Sporadic cases of delayed-onset hearing loss were selected from pediatric clinical records. Cases from the first group were excluded from the latter to avoid duplication. Two groups were given the same questionnaire to record risk indicators, diagnosis, and age at intervention. The average age of 26 children at the time of diagnosis in the screening group (52.81 ± 13.23 months) was significantly earlier than in the 33 cases identified in the sporadic group (62.03 ± 12.86 months; p children with bilateral moderate to severe hearing loss in the screening group (50.40 ± 10.76 months) was also earlier than in the sporadic group (62.73 ± 13.77 months; p hearing screening for preschool children with no significant symptoms of delayed-onset hearing loss.

  13. Estimating adolescent sleep need using dose-response modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michelle A; Weber, Nathan; Reynolds, Chelsea; Coussens, Scott; Carskadon, Mary A

    2018-04-01

    This study will (1) estimate the nightly sleep need of human adolescents, (2) determine the time course and severity of sleep-related deficits when sleep is reduced below this optimal quantity, and (3) determine whether sleep restriction perturbs the circadian system as well as the sleep homeostat. Thirty-four adolescents aged 15 to 17 years spent 10 days and nine nights in the sleep laboratory. Between two baseline nights and two recovery nights with 10 hours' time in bed (TIB) per night, participants experienced either severe sleep restriction (5-hour TIB), moderate sleep restriction (7.5-hour TIB), or no sleep restriction (10-hour TIB) for five nights. A 10-minute psychomotor vigilance task (PVT; lapse = response after 500 ms) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale were administered every 3 hours during wake. Salivary dim-light melatonin onset was calculated at baseline and after four nights of each sleep dose to estimate circadian phase. Dose-dependent deficits to sleep duration, circadian phase timing, lapses of attention, and subjective sleepiness occurred. Less TIB resulted in less sleep, more lapses of attention, greater subjective sleepiness, and larger circadian phase delays. Sleep need estimated from 10-hour TIB sleep opportunities was approximately 9 hours, while modeling PVT lapse data suggested that 9.35 hours of sleep is needed to maintain optimal sustained attention performance. Sleep restriction perturbs homeostatic and circadian systems, leading to dose-dependent deficits to sustained attention and sleepiness. Adolescents require more sleep for optimal functioning than typically obtained.

  14. Delaying Middle School and High School Start Times Promotes Student Health and Performance: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F; Martin, Jennifer L; Wise, Merrill S; Carden, Kelly A; Kirsch, Douglas B; Kristo, David A; Malhotra, Raman K; Olson, Eric J; Ramar, Kannan; Rosen, Ilene M; Rowley, James A; Weaver, Terri E; Chervin, Ronald D

    2017-04-15

    During adolescence, internal circadian rhythms and biological sleep drive change to result in later sleep and wake times. As a result of these changes, early middle school and high school start times curtail sleep, hamper a student's preparedness to learn, negatively impact physical and mental health, and impair driving safety. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence shows that delaying school start times positively impacts student achievement, health, and safety. Public awareness of the hazards of early school start times and the benefits of later start times are largely unappreciated. As a result, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine is calling on communities, school boards, and educational institutions to implement start times of 8:30 AM or later for middle schools and high schools to ensure that every student arrives at school healthy, awake, alert, and ready to learn. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  15. MIF inhibition interferes with the inflammatory and T cell-stimulatory capacity of NOD macrophages and delays autoimmune diabetes onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannelie Korf

    Full Text Available Macrophages contribute in the initiation and progression of insulitis during type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, the mechanisms governing their recruitment into the islets as well as the manner of retention and activation are incompletely understood. Here, we investigated a role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF and its transmembrane receptor, CD74, in the progression of T1D. Our data indicated elevated MIF concentrations especially in long-standing T1D patients and mice. Additionally, NOD mice featured increased MIF gene expression and CD74+ leukocyte frequencies in the pancreas. We identified F4/80+ macrophages as the main immune cells in the pancreas expressing CD74 and showed that MIF antagonism of NOD macrophages prevented their activation-induced cytokine production. The physiological importance was highlighted by the fact that inhibition of MIF delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in two different diabetogenic T cell transfer models. Mechanistically, macrophages pre-conditioned with the MIF inhibitor featured a refractory capacity to trigger T cell activation by keeping them in a naïve state. This study underlines a possible role for MIF/CD74 signaling pathways in promoting macrophage-mediated inflammation in T1D. As therapies directed at the MIF/CD74 pathway are in clinical development, new opportunities may be proposed for arresting T1D progression.

  16. The effects of a repeated bout of eccentric exercise on indices of muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddon-Jones, D; Muthalib, M; Jenkins, D

    2000-03-01

    This study examined markers of muscle damage following a repeated bout of maximal isokinetic eccentric exercise performed prior to full recovery from a previous bout. Twenty non-resistance trained volunteers were randomly assigned to a control (CON, n=10) or experimental (EXP, n=10) group. Both groups performed 36 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors of the non-dominant arm (ECC1). The EXP group repeated the same eccentric exercise bout two days later (ECC2). Total work and peak eccentric torque were recorded during each set of ECC1 and ECC2. Isometric torque, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), flexed elbow angle and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured prior to and immediately following ECC1 and ECC2. at 24h intervals for 7 days following ECC1 and finally on day 11. In both groups, all dependent variables changed significantly during the 2 days following ECC1. A further acute post-exercise impairment in isometric torque (30 +/- 5%) and flexed elbow angle (20 +/- 4%) was observed following ECC2 (p0.05). These findings suggest that when maximal isokinetic eccentric exercise is repeated two days after experiencing of contraction-induced muscle damage, the recovery time course is not significantly altered.

  17. Behavioral symptoms and sleep problems in children with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadare, Yoshitaka; Kamei, Yuichi; Usami, Masahide; Ushijima, Hirokage; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kyota; Kodaira, Masaki; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disorders are frequently associated with childhood behavioral problems and mental illnesses such as anxiety disorder. To identify promising behavioral targets for pediatric anxiety disorder therapy, we investigated the associations between specific sleep and behavioral problems. We conducted retrospective reviews of 105 patients aged 4-12 years who met the DSM-IV criteria for primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (n = 33), separation anxiety disorder (n = 23), social phobia (n = 21), or obsessive compulsive disorder (n = 28). Sleep problems were evaluated using the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and behavioral problems by the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale, Oppositional Defiant Behavior Inventory (ODBI), and Depression Self-Rating Scale for Children. Depressive behavior was weakly correlated with CSHQ subscores for sleep onset delay and night waking but not with total sleep disturbance. Anxiety was correlated with bedtime resistance, night waking, and total sleep disturbance score. Oppositional defiance was correlated with bedtime resistance, daytime sleepiness, sleep onset delay, and most strongly with total sleep disturbance. On multiple regression analysis ODBI score had the strongest positive association with total sleep disturbance and the strongest negative association with total sleep duration. Sleep problems in children with anxiety disorders are closely related to anxiety and oppositional defiant symptoms. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Evening daylight may cause adolescents to sleep less in spring than in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G.; Rea, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep restriction commonly experienced by adolescents can stem from greater sleep pressure by the homeostatic processes and from phase delays of the circadian system. With regard to the latter potential cause, we hypothesized that because there is more natural evening light during the spring than winter, a sample of adolescent students would be more phase delayed in spring than in winter, would have later sleep onset times and, because of fixed school schedules, would have shorter sleep durations. Sixteen eighth-grade subjects were recruited for the study. We collected sleep logs and saliva samples to determine their dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), a well-established circadian marker. Actual circadian light exposures experienced by a subset of twelve subjects over the course of seven days in winter and in spring using a personal, head-worn, circadian light measurement device are also reported here. Results showed that this sample of adolescents was exposed to significantly more circadian light in spring than in winter, especially in the evening hours when light exposure would likely delay circadian phase. Consistent with the light data, DLMO and sleep onset times were significantly more delayed, and sleep durations were significantly shorter in spring than in winter. The present ecological study of light, circadian phase, and self-reported sleep suggests that greater access to evening daylight in the spring may lead to sleep restriction in adolescents while attending school. Therefore, lighting schemes that reduce evening light in the spring may encourage longer sleep times in adolescents. PMID:20653452

  19. Epoxy fatty acids and inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase selectively modulate GABA mediated neurotransmission to delay onset of seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Inceoglu

    Full Text Available In the brain, seizures lead to release of large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids including arachidonic acid (ARA. ARA is a substrate for three major enzymatic routes of metabolism by cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 enzymes. These enzymes convert ARA to potent lipid mediators including prostanoids, leukotrienes and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs. The prostanoids and leukotrienes are largely pro-inflammatory molecules that sensitize neurons whereas EETs are anti-inflammatory and reduce the excitability of neurons. Recent evidence suggests a GABA-related mode of action potentially mediated by neurosteroids. Here we tested this hypothesis using models of chemically induced seizures. The level of EETs in the brain was modulated by inhibiting the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, the major enzyme that metabolizes EETs to inactive molecules, by genetic deletion of sEH and by direct administration of EETs into the brain. All three approaches delayed onset of seizures instigated by GABA antagonists but not seizures through other mechanisms. Inhibition of neurosteroid synthesis by finasteride partially blocked the anticonvulsant effects of sEH inhibitors while the efficacy of an inactive dose of neurosteroid allopregnanolone was enhanced by sEH inhibition. Consistent with earlier findings, levels of prostanoids in the brain were elevated. In contrast, levels of bioactive EpFAs were decreased following seizures. Overall these results demonstrate that EETs are natural molecules which suppress the tonic component of seizure related excitability through modulating the GABA activity and that exploration of the EET mediated signaling in the brain could yield alternative approaches to treat convulsive disorders.

  20. Long-term resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy following occipital condyle fracture: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Vadivelu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the case of a patient that demonstrates resolution of delayed onset hypoglossal nerve palsy (HNP subsequent to occipital condyle fracture following a motor vehicle accident. Decompression of the hypoglossal nerve and craniocervical fixation led to satisfactory long-term (>5 years outcome. There is a scarcity of literature in recognizing HNPs following trauma and a lack of pathophysiological understanding to both a delayed presentation and to resolution versus persistence. This is the first report demonstrating long-term resolution of hypoglossal nerve injury following trauma to the craniocervical junction.

  1. Phenotypes of sleep-disordered breathing symptoms to two years of age based on age of onset and duration of symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muna; Tamana, Sukhpreet K; Smithson, Lisa; Ding, Linda; Lau, Amanda; Chikuma, Joyce; Mariasine, Jennifer; Lefebvre, Diana L; Subbarao, Padmaja; Becker, Allan B; Turvey, Stuart E; Sears, Malcolm R; Pei, Jacqueline; Mandhane, Piush J

    2018-05-03

    Childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms may comprise multiple phenotypes depending on craniofacial anatomy, tonsil and adenoid growth, body habitus, and rhinitis symptoms. The primary objective of this study is to identify and characterize the different SDB phenotypes to two years of age. Data from 770 infants in the Edmonton sub-cohort of the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Study (CHILD) were analyzed to identify SDB phenotypes based on age of onset and duration of symptoms. Parents completed the 22-item sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) scale. Children with a SRBD ratio greater than 0.33 were considered positive for SDB at each quarterly assessment between three months and two years. The STATA Proc trajectory extension identified SDB phenotypes based on their age of onset and duration of symptoms and attributed the percentage chance of a participant being assigned to each phenotype. Multivariate linear regression identified factors associated with increased risk of being assigned to each SDB phenotype. Trajectory analysis identified four phenotypes: no SDB (65.7%), early-onset SDB (15.7%) with peak symptoms at nine months, late-onset SDB (14.2%) with peak symptoms at 18 months, and persistent SDB (5.3%) with symptoms from 3 to 24 months. Rhinitis was associated with all three SDB symptom trajectories (p sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) was associated with persistent (p = 0.01) and late SDB (p < 0.001). Atopy (positive skin prick test at one year) was associated with persistent SDB (p = 0.04). Infants born prior to 36.5 weeks gestational age were more likely to present with late SDB (p = 0.03). Childhood SDB symptoms, rather than being a homogenous disorder, may comprise multiple overlapping phenotypes each with unique risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of an herbal/botanical supplement on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynders, Corey A; Weltman, Judy Y; Rynders, Sara D; Patrie, James; McKnight, John; Katch, Frank I; Hertel, Jay; Weltman, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of a proprietary herbal/botanical supplement (StemSport, Stemtech, San Clemente, CA.) suggested to increase circulating stem cells, decrease inflammation, and attenuate exercise induced muscle damage on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Sixteen subjects (male = 7, female = 9; age 23.8 ± 10 years; height 171.9 ± 10 cm, mass 72.2 ± 15 kg) were randomized in a crossover, double-blind, placebo controlled trial to receive a placebo or StemSport supplement (6150 mg/day) for 14 days. DOMS was induced on day 7 for both placebo and active conditions in the non-dominant elbow flexor group with repeated eccentric repetitions. Muscle swelling (biceps girth), elbow flexor isometric strength (hand held dynamometer), muscle pain/tenderness (visual analog scale), range of motion (active elbow flexion and extension), and inflammation (hsCRP, IL6, and TNF-α) were measured at baseline and at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 168 h (1 week) post eccentric exercise. The crossover washout period was ≥14 days. No significant condition-by-time interactions between placebo and StemSport supplementation were observed with regard to measures of pain (p = 0.59), tenderness (p = 0.71), isometric strength (p = 0.32), elbow flexion (p = 0.45), muscle swelling (p = 0.90), or inflammation (p > 0.90). Decrements in elbow extension range of motion 48 h post-exercise were less after StemSport supplementation (Δ elbow extension 48 h post; StemSport, -2.0 deg; placebo, -10 deg; p = 0.003). These data suggest that compared to placebo, StemSport supplementation does not improve outcome measures related to muscle recovery after acute upper-arm induced DOMS.

  3. The temporal profile of the reaction of microglia, astrocytes, and macrophages in the delayed onset paraplegia after transient spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Mishiya; Yamashita, Atsuo; Ohtake, Kazunobu; Ishida, Kazuyoshi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro; Sakabe, Takefumi

    2003-06-01

    In the present study, we sought to elucidate the temporal profile of the reaction of microglia, astrocytes, and macrophages in the progression of delayed onset motor dysfunction after spinal cord ischemia (15 min) in rabbits. At 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h after reperfusion (9 animals in each), hind limb motor function was assessed, and the lumbar spinal cord was histologically examined. Delayed motor dysfunction was observed in most animals at 48 h after ischemia, which could be predicted by a poor recovery of segmental spinal cord evoked potentials at 15 min of reperfusion. In the gray matter of the lumbar spinal cord, both microglia and astrocytes were activated early (2 h) after reperfusion. Microglia were diffusely activated and engulfed motor neurons irrespective of the recovery of segmental spinal cord evoked potentials. In contrast, early astrocytic activation was confined to the area where neurons started to show degeneration. Macrophages were first detected at 8 h after reperfusion and mainly surrounded the infarction area later. Although the precise roles of the activation of microglia, astrocytes, and macrophages are to be further determined, the results indicate that understanding functional changes of astrocytes may be important in the mechanism of delayed onset motor dysfunction including paraplegia. Microglia and macrophages play a role in removing tissue debris after transient spinal cord ischemia. Disturbance of astrocytic defense mechanism, breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier, or both seemed to be involved in the development of delayed motor dysfunction.

  4. Short-term sleep disturbance-induced stress does not affect basal pain perception, but does delay postsurgical pain recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Po-Kai; Cao, Jing; Wang, Hongzhen; Liang, Lingli; Zhang, Jun; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Shieh, Kun-Ruey; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic sleep disturbance-induced stress is known to increase basal pain sensitivity. However, most surgical patients frequently report short-term sleep disturbance/deprivation during pre- and post-operation periods and have normal pain perception pre-surgery. Whether this short-term sleep disturbance affects postsurgical pain is elusive. We here reported that pre- or post-exposure to rapid eye movement sleep disturbance (REMSD) 6 h daily for 3 consecutive days did not alter basal responses t...

  5. Delay between Onset of Symptoms and Seeking Physician Intervention Increases Risk of Diabetic Foot Complications: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norina A. Gavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a post hoc analysis of 17,530 questionnaires collected as part of the 2012 screening for neuropathy using Norfolk Quality of Life tool in patients with diabetes in Romania, to assess the impact on foot complications of time between the onset of symptoms of diabetes/its complications and the physician visit. Odds ratios (ORs for self-reporting neuropathy increased from 1.16 (95% CI: 1.07–1.25 in those who sought medical care in 1–6 months from symptoms of diabetes/its complications onset to 2.27 in those who sought medical care >2 years after symptoms onset. The ORs for having a history of foot ulcers were 1.43 (95% CI: 1.26–1.63 in those who sought medical care in 1–6 months and increased to 3.08 (95% CI: 2.59–3.66 in those who sought medical care after >2 years from symptoms of diabetes/its complications onset. The highest ORs for a history of gangrene (2.49 [95% CI: 1.90–3.26] and amputations (2.18 [95% CI: 1.60–2.97] were observed in those who sought medical care after >2 years following symptoms onset. In conclusion, we showed that waiting for >1 month after symptoms onset dramatically increases the risk of diabetic foot complications. These results show the need for accessible educational programs on diabetes and its chronic complications and the need to avoid delays in reporting.

  6. De Novo Truncating Mutations in AHDC1 in Individuals with Syndromic Expressive Language Delay, Hypotonia, and Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fan; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Tan, Tiong Yang; Wangler, Michael F.; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Harr, Margaret H.; Sutton, V. Reid; Nalam, Roopa L.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Nash, Margot; Ryan, Monique M.; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Hunter, Jill V.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Penney, Samantha J.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Plon, Sharon E.; Boerwinkle, Eric A.; Lupski, James R.; Eng, Christine M.; Muzny, Donna M.; Yang, Yaping; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical whole-exome sequencing (WES) for identification of mutations leading to Mendelian disease has been offered to the medical community since 2011. Clinically undiagnosed neurological disorders are the most frequent basis for test referral, and currently, approximately 25% of such cases are diagnosed at the molecular level. To date, there are approximately 4,000 “known” disease-associated loci, and many are associated with striking dysmorphic features, making genotype-phenotype correlations relatively straightforward. A significant fraction of cases, however, lack characteristic dysmorphism or clinical pathognomonic traits and are dependent upon molecular tests for definitive diagnoses. Further, many molecular diagnoses are guided by recent gene-disease association discoveries. Hence, there is a critical interplay between clinical testing and research leading to gene-disease association discovery. Here, we describe four probands, all of whom presented with hypotonia, intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and mildly dysmorphic facial features. Three of the four also had sleep apnea. Each was a simplex case without a remarkable family history. Using WES, we identified AHDC1 de novo truncating mutations that most likely cause this genetic syndrome. PMID:24791903

  7. Supplementation with a Polyphenol-Rich Extract, TensLess® , Attenuates Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness and Improves Muscle Recovery from Damages After Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Cindy; Freitas, Tomás T; Martínez-Noguera, Francisco J; Laurent, Caroline; Gaillet, Sylvie; Chung, Linda H; Alcaraz, Pedro E; Cases, Julien

    2017-11-01

    High-intensity exercises are known to provoke delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Delayed onset muscle soreness typically occurs within the first 24 h, peaks between 24 and 72 h, and can last as long as 5-7 days post-exercise. Delayed onset muscle soreness is a multifactorial process involving both mechanical and biochemical components, associated with clinical features that may limit range of motion, and athletes seek for effective recovery strategies to optimize future training sessions. TensLess ® is a food supplement developed to help manage post-exercise recovery. The supplement has been investigated on 13 recreationally active athletes of both sex, during a randomized, double-blind, and crossover clinical investigation, including a 3-week washout period. The clinical investigation was based on the study of TensLess ® effects for DOMS management and on the reduction of associated muscle damages following an eccentric exercise protocol. Supplementation with TensLess ® induced significant decrease in DOMS perception (-33%; p = 0.008) as of the first 24 h; this was significantly correlated with a lowered release of muscle damage-associated biomarkers, namely myoglobin, creatinine, and creatine kinase, for the whole length of the recovery period. Taken together, these positive results clearly indicate that post-exercise supplementation with TensLess ® may preserve myocytes and reduce soreness following eccentric exercise-induced damages, and, accordingly, significantly shorten muscle recovery. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Sleep, arousal, and circadian rhythms in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Jacob A; Sharkey, Katherine M; Coles, Meredith E

    2015-04-01

    Findings of this meta-analysis show that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is related to disruptions in both the duration and timing of sleep. PsycINFO and Google Scholar database searches identified 12 relevant studies that compared measures of sleep in individuals with OCD to those of either a healthy control group or published norms. Sleep measures included sleep onset latency, sleep duration, awakening after sleep onset, percentage of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, percentage of slow wave sleep, and prevalence of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Individual effect sizes were pooled using a random effects model. Sleep duration was found to be shorter, and the prevalence of DSPD higher, in individuals with OCD compared to controls. Further, excluding samples with comorbid depression did not meaningfully reduce the magnitude of these effects (although the results were no longer statistically significant) and medication use by participants is unlikely to have systematically altered sleep timing. Overall, available data suggest that sleep disruption is associated with OCD but further research on both sleep duration and sleep timing in individuals with OCD is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep disturbance and neuropsychological function in young children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Heather E; Lam, Janet C; Mahone, E Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbance, common among children with ADHD, can contribute to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction. It is therefore challenging to determine whether neurobehavioral dysfunction should be attributed to ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbance, or both. The present study examined parent-reported sleep problems (Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire) and their relationship to neuropsychological function in 64 children, aged 4-7 years, with and without ADHD. Compared to typically developing controls, children with ADHD were reported by parents to have significantly greater sleep disturbance--including sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, night awakenings, and daytime sleepiness--(all p ≤ .01), and significantly poorer performance on tasks of attention, executive control, processing speed, and working memory (all p sleep disturbance was significantly associated with deficits in attention and executive control skills (all p ≤ .01); however, significant group differences (relative to controls) on these measures remained (p sleep disturbance. While sleep problems are common among young children with ADHD, these findings suggest that inattention and executive dysfunction appear to be attributable to symptoms of ADHD rather than to sleep disturbance. The relationships among sleep, ADHD symptoms, and neurobehavioral function in older children may show different patterns as a function of the chronicity of disordered sleep.

  10. Poor weight control, alcoholic beverage consumption and sudden sleep onset at the wheel among Italian truck drivers: A preliminary pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luca Rosso

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of obesity, alcoholic beverage consumption, unhealthy alcohol use and sudden sleep onset at the wheel among Italian truck drivers. In addition to prevalence rates, this study also aimed at investigating potential predictors for sudden-onset sleepiness and obesity. Material and Methods: A sample of truck drivers was extracted from the database of the High Risk Professional Driver Study. Data concerning demographics, anthropometry, medical information and working conditions were collected using anonymous questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association of the reported body mass index (BMI, alcohol consumption and sudden sleep onset with working conditions and general lifestyle factors. Results: Three hundred and thirty-five questionnaires were collected. According to their BMI, 45% of the participants were overweight and 21.4% of them were obese. Twenty-four point two percent declared they drank alcoholic beverages during working hours or work breaks and 21.3% of the drivers had an Alcohol Use Disorders Identyfication Test Consumption (AUDIT C score ≥ 5 (the threshold value for unhealthy alcohol use. Forty-one point six percent of the interviewees experienced one episode of sudden sleep onset at the wheel per month (5.5% per week and 0.9% daily. Predictive factors for obesity were: length of service (odds ratio (OR = 1.09, confidence interval (95% CI: 1.04–1.15, p 55 years old (OR = 5.22, 95% CI: 1.29–21.1, p = 0.020, driving more than 50 000 km per year (OR = 2.89, 95% CI: 1.37–6.11, p = 0.006 and the Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire (CFQ score > 11 (adjusted OR = 2.97, 95% CI: 1.22–7.21, p = 0.016. Conclusions: This study strongly emphasizes the need for intervention in order to reduce and prevent important risk factors for the sake of road safety and truck drivers’ health.

  11. A longitudinal analysis of early risk factors for adult-onset offending: What predicts a delayed criminal career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Georgia; Farrington, David P

    2010-10-01

    Late-onset offending, at the age of 21 or thereafter, is an underexplored dimension of the criminal career. Our aims were to explore which factors are precursors of late-onset offending, and the extent to which adult criminality can be predicted in childhood and adolescence. This is the first study that defines late-onset offending based on a combination of official records and self-reports. Longitudinal data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development (CSDD) were used. Four hundred and three South London men, followed from ages 8-10 to ages 48-50, were divided into late-starters (LS, n = 51), early-starters (ES, n = 140) and non-offenders (NO, n = 212). LS men were more likely than NO men to have been neurotic, truants or in poor housing at ages 8-10. At ages 12-14, they tended to be neurotic, and at ages 16-18, they had high unemployment and spent time hanging about on the streets. Compared with ES, LS were nervous at ages 8-10, and at age 18 they were more likely to be sexual virgins. Overall, LS men were more similar to NO men before age 21, but more similar to ES men by age 32. Our hypotheses that late-onset offenders would be particularly characterised by neuroticism or nervousness, but that this would buffer rather than fully protect over the life course, were sustained. Intervention to increase the resilience of children and adolescents who are rated as high on neurotic characteristics may lessen the burden that these factors impose in adult life and reduce the risk of a deteriorating quality of life and late onset criminal careers. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Sleep phenotypes in infants and toddlers with neurogenetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Emily A; Tonnsen, Bridgette L

    2017-10-01

    Although sleep problems are well characterized in preschool- and school-age children with neurogenetic syndromes, little is known regarding the early emergence of these problems in infancy and toddlerhood. To inform syndrome-specific profiles and targets for intervention, we compared parent-reported sleep problems in infants and toddlers with Angelman syndrome (AS), Williams syndrome (WS), and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) with patterns observed among same-aged typically developing (TD) controls. Mothers of 80 children (18 AS, 19 WS, 19 PWS, and 24 TD) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire. Primary dependent variables included (1) sleep onset latency, (2) total sleep duration, (3) daytime and nighttime sleep duration, and (4) sleep problem severity, as measured by both maternal impression and National Sleep Foundation guidelines. Sleep problems are relatively common in children with neurogenetic syndromes, with 41% of mothers reporting problematic sleep and 29% of children exhibiting abnormal sleep durations as per national guidelines. Across genetic subgroups, problems are most severe in children with AS and WS, particularly in relation to nighttime sleep duration. Although atypical sleep is characteristically reported in each syndrome later in development, infants and toddlers with PWS exhibited largely typical patterns, potentially indicating delayed onset of sleep problems in concordance with other medical features of PWS. Our findings suggest that sleep problems in neurogenetic syndromes emerge as early as infancy and toddlerhood, with variable profiles across genetic subgroups. This work underscores the importance of early sleep screenings as part of routine medical care of neurosyndromic populations and the need for targeted, syndrome-sensitive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Syphacia muris infection delays the onset of hyperglycemia in WBN/Kob-Leprfa rats, a new type 2 diabetes mellitus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taira K.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders and its continuous global increase is due to factors as population growth, urbanization, aging, and increasing prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity. The effect of pinworm infection on the development of hyperglycemia was examined in WBN/K-Lepf (fa/fa rats, a new model of the obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with pancreatitis. The rats were orally administered Syphacia muris eggs (infected group and distilled water (control group. Hyperglycemia onset in the infected group was significantly delayed compared to the control group. Neither body weight nor intake of food and water were affected by S. muris infection. This study demonstrated that S. muris infection delayed the onset of T2DM in fa/fa rats and suggested that elucidation of the underlying mechanism and relevant pathways in the helminth-mediated protection may lead to the development of a new strategy to prevent diabetes mellitus.

  14. Deletion of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 from Forebrain Neurons Delays Infertility and Onset of Hypothalamic Leptin Resistance in Response to a High Caloric Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Hayden J L; Inglis, Megan A; Quennell, Janette H; Grattan, David R; Anderson, Greg M

    2016-07-06

    The cellular processes that cause high caloric diet (HCD)-induced infertility are poorly understood but may involve upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-3) proteins that are associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance. Deletion of SOCS-3 from brain cells is known to protect mice from diet-induced obesity, but the effects on HCD-induced infertility are unknown. We used neuron-specific SOCS3 knock-out mice to elucidate this and the effects on regional hypothalamic leptin resistance. As expected, male and female neuron-specific SOCS3 knock-out mice were protected from HCD-induced obesity. While female wild-type mice became infertile after 4 months of HCD feeding, infertility onset in knock-out females was delayed by 4 weeks. Similarly, knock-out mice had delayed leptin resistance development in the medial preoptic area and anteroventral periventricular nucleus, regions important for generation of the surge of GnRH and LH that induces ovulation. We therefore tested whether the suppressive effects of HCD on the estradiol-induced GnRH/LH surge were overcome by neuron-specific SOCS3 knock-out. Although only 20% of control HCD-mice experienced a preovulatory-like LH surge, LH surges could be induced in almost all neuron-specific SOCS3 knock-out mice on this diet. In contrast to females, HCD-fed male mice did not exhibit any fertility decline compared with low caloric diet-fed males despite their resistance to the satiety effects of leptin. These data show that deletion of SOCS3 delays the onset of leptin resistance and infertility in HCD-fed female mice, but given continued HCD feeding this state does eventually occur, presumably in response to other mechanisms inhibiting leptin signal transduction. Obesity is commonly associated with infertility in humans and other animals. Treatments for human infertility show a decreased success rate with increasing body mass index. A hallmark of obesity is an increase in circulating leptin levels; despite this, the

  15. Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spires Tara L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the cerebral cortex and striatum. Transgenic mice (R6/1 line, expressing a CAG repeat encoding an expanded polyglutamine tract in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein, closely model HD. We have previously shown that environmental enrichment of these HD mice delays the onset of motor deficits. Furthermore, wheel running initiated in adulthood ameliorates the rear-paw clasping motor sign, but not an accelerating rotarod deficit. Results We have now examined the effects of enhanced physical activity via wheel running, commenced at a juvenile age (4 weeks, with respect to the onset of various behavioral deficits and their neuropathological correlates in R6/1 HD mice. HD mice housed post-weaning with running wheels only, to enhance voluntary physical exercise, have delayed onset of a motor co-ordination deficit on the static horizontal rod, as well as rear-paw clasping, although the accelerating rotarod deficit remains unaffected. Both wheel running and environmental enrichment rescued HD-induced abnormal habituation of locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in the open field. We have found that neither environment enrichment nor wheel running ameliorates the shrinkage of the striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in HD mice, nor the overall decrease in brain weight, measured at 9 months of age. At this age, the density of ubiquitinated protein aggregates in the striatum and ACC is also not significantly ameliorated by environmental enrichment or wheel running. Conclusion These results indicate that enhanced voluntary physical activity, commenced at an early presymptomatic stage, contributes to the positive effects of environmental enrichment. However, sensory and cognitive stimulation, as well as motor stimulation not associated with running, may constitute major components of the therapeutic benefits associated with enrichment

  16. Trying to fall asleep while catastrophising: what sleep-disordered adolescents think and feel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Rachel M; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Oliver, Mike; Slater, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophising is a repetitive cognitive process related to sleep disturbance in adult insomnia patients. More recently catastrophising has been associated with increased sleep disturbances in community samples of children and adolescents, with this association mediated by anxiety and depression. However, there currently is no evidence of these processes outside of community samples; impeding our ability to draw clinical conclusions. Knowledge on such dysfunctional cognitive processes in adolescents experiencing sleep disturbance would be clinically beneficial in aetiology and intervention. Our research examined the link between catastrophising, anxiety, depression and sleep latency in a sample of sleep-disordered adolescents. We also explored specific catastrophising themes which may impact the sleep latency of these adolescents. Forty adolescents (age=15.1±1.5 years, 53% boys) diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder completed a 7-day sleep diary, along with measures of anxiety and depression and a catastrophising interview with a trained sleep therapist. Several catastrophisation themes were generated, the most common concerning interpersonal and performance aspects of school. Bootstrapping analyses showed depression did not mediate the relationship between catastrophising and sleep; however, an indirect relationship was found between catastrophising, anticipatory anxiety, and sleep latency. These findings have implications for the role of dysfunctional thinking in prolonging sleep onset for adolescents and providing a clinical framework for health professionals when assessing and treating adolescents with delayed sleep timing. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Habits and problems of sleep in adolescent students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaratou, E; Dikeos, D; Anagnostopoulos, D; Soldatos, C

    2008-07-01

    The evaluation of sleep habits and sleep related problems in high school adolescent students in the Athens area and the assessment of these problems' relation to demographic and other variables was investigated by the Athens Insomnia Scale - 5 item version (AIS-5), which was administered to 713 adolescent Senior High School students in the Greater Athens Area. Data such as age, sex, school records, and time spent per week in school-related and extracurricular activities were collected. The sample's mean sleep duration was 7,5 hours, mean bedtime 12:20 am and wake-up time 7:15 am. Total sleep time was not affected by gender, but was influenced by time spent in various activities. Sleep complaints were related to delayed sleep, onset latency and insufficient total duration of sleep. Girls complained more than boys, while correlations showed that students with lower academic per formance and those in second grade were more likely to have higher AIS-5 scores. The results show that sleep time of high school students is dependent on practical matters such as school schedule and other activities, while sleep complaints are related to female gender, bad school performance as well as to the second grade. The difference between actual sleep time and sleep complaints should be considered when studying the sleep of adolescents.

  18. [How to characterize and treat sleep complaints in bipolar disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, P A; Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Lopez, R; Poirot, I; Brion, A; Royant-Parola, S; Etain, B

    2017-08-01

    Sleep complaints are very common in bipolar disorders (BD) both during acute phases (manic and depressive episodes) and remission (about 80 % of patients with remitted BD have poor sleep quality). Sleep complaints during remission are of particular importance since they are associated with more mood relapses and worse outcomes. In this context, this review discusses the characterization and treatment of sleep complaints in BD. We examined the international scientific literature in June 2016 and performed a literature search with PubMed electronic database using the following headings: "bipolar disorder" and ("sleep" or "insomnia" or "hypersomnia" or "circadian" or "apnoea" or "apnea" or "restless legs"). Patients with BD suffer from sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during major depressive episodes (insomnia or hypersomnia, nightmares, nocturnal and/or early awakenings, non-restorative sleep) and manic episodes (insomnia, decreased need for sleep without fatigue), but also some of these abnormalities may persist during remission. These remission phases are characterized by a reduced quality and quantity of sleep, with a longer sleep duration, increased sleep latency, a lengthening of the wake time after sleep onset (WASO), a decrease of sleep efficiency, and greater variability in sleep/wake rhythms. Patients also present frequent sleep comorbidities: chronic insomnia, sleepiness, sleep phase delay syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). These disorders are insufficiently diagnosed and treated whereas they are associated with mood relapses, treatment resistance, affect cognitive global functioning, reduce the quality of life, and contribute to weight gain or metabolic syndrome. Sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities have been also associated with suicidal behaviors. Therefore, a clinical exploration with characterization of these abnormalities and disorders is essential. This exploration should be

  19. Osteopontin deficiency delays inflammatory infiltration and the onset of muscle regeneration in a mouse model of muscle injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitipong Uaesoontrachoon

    2013-01-01

    Osteopontin is secreted by skeletal muscle myoblasts and stimulates their proliferation. Expression of osteopontin in skeletal muscle is upregulated in pathological conditions including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and recent evidence suggests that osteopontin might influence the course of this disease. The current study was undertaken to determine whether osteopontin regulates skeletal muscle regeneration. A whole muscle autografting model of regeneration in osteopontin-null and wild-type mice was used. Osteopontin expression was found to be strongly upregulated in wild-type grafts during the initial degeneration and subsequent early regeneration phases that are observed in this model. Grafted muscle from osteopontin-null mice degenerated more slowly than that of wild-type mice, as determined by histological assessment, fibre diameter and fibre number. The delayed degeneration in osteopontin-null grafts was associated with a delay in neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. Centrally nucleated (regenerating muscle fibres also appeared more slowly in osteopontin-null grafts than in wild-type grafts. These results demonstrate that osteopontin plays a non-redundant role in muscle remodelling following injury.

  20. Delayed Onset of Isolated Unilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Caused by Post-Traumatic Pituitary Apoplexy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Ishigaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic pituitary apoplexy is uncommon, most of which present with a sudden onset of severe headache and visual impairments associated with a dumbbell-shaped pituitary tumor. We experienced an unusual case of post-traumatic pituitary apoplexy with atypical clinical features. A 66-year-old man presented with mild cerebral contusion and an incidentally diagnosed intrasellar tumor after a fall accident with no loss of consciousness. The patients denied any symptoms before the accident. After 4 days, the left oculomotor nerve palsy developed and deteriorated associated with no severe headache. Repeated neuroimages suggested that pituitary apoplexy had occurred at admission and showed that the tumor compressed the left cavernous sinus. The patient underwent endonasal transsphenoidal surgery at 6 days after head injury, and the mass reduction improved the oculomotor nerve palsy completely within the following 14 days. The pathologic diagnosis was nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma with hemorrhage and necrosis.

  1. Dare to Delay?: The Impacts of Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Use Onset on Cognition, Brain Struture and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista M. Lisdahl

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, drug and alcohol use has a clear adolescent onset (Degenhardt et al., 2008. Alcohol continues to be the most popular drug among teens and emerging adults, with almost a third of 12th graders and 40% of college students reporting recent binge drinking (Johnston et al., 2010; Johnston et al., 2009, and marijuana (MJ is the second most popular drug in teens (Johnston et al., 2010. The initiation of drug use is consistent with an overall increase in risk-taking behaviors during adolescence that coincides with significant neurodevelopmental changes in both gray and white matter (Barnea-Goraly et al., 2005; Giedd, Snell et al., 1996; Gogtay et al., 2004; Lenroot & Giedd, 2006; Paus et al., 1999; Sowell et al., 2004; Sowell, Thompson, Holmes, Jernigan, & Toga, 1999; Sowell, Trauner, Gamst, & Jernigan, 2002. Animal studies have suggested that compared to adults, adolescents may be particularly vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of drugs, especially alcohol and MJ (see Barron et al., 2005; Cha, White, Kuhn, Wilson, & Swartzwelder, 2006; Monti et al., 2005; Rubino et al., 2009; Schneider & Koch, 2003; Spear, 2010. In this review, we will provide a detailed overview of studies that examined the impact of early adolescent onset of alcohol and MJ use on neurocognition (e.g., Ehrenreich et al., 1999; Fried et al., 2005; Gruber et al., 2011; Gruber et al., 2012; Hanson et al., 2011; Hartley et al., 2004; Lisdahl et al., 2012; McQueeny et al., 2009; Medina et al., 2007; Tapert et al., 2002; Townshend & Duka, 2005; Wilson et al., 2000, with a special emphasis on recent prospective longitudinal studies (e.g., Hicks et al., 2012; Meier et al., 2012; White et al., 2011. Finally, we will explore potential clinical and public health implications of these findings.

  2. A longitudinal assessment of sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across human adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Crowley

    Full Text Available The aim of this descriptive analysis was to examine sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across adolescence in a longitudinal study design. Ninety-four adolescents participated; 38 (21 boys were 9-10 years ("younger cohort" and 56 (30 boys were 15-16 years ("older cohort" at the baseline assessment. Participants completed a baseline and then follow-up assessments approximately every six months for 2.5 years. At each assessment, participants wore a wrist actigraph for at least one week at home to measure self-selected sleep timing before salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO phase - a marker of the circadian timing system - was measured in the laboratory. Weekday and weekend sleep onset and offset and weekend-weekday differences were derived from actigraphy. Phase angles were the time durations from DLMO to weekday sleep onset and offset times. Each cohort showed later sleep onset (weekend and weekday, later weekend sleep offset, and later DLMO with age. Weekday sleep offset shifted earlier with age in the younger cohort and later in the older cohort after age 17. Weekend-weekday sleep offset differences increased with age in the younger cohort and decreased in the older cohort after age 17. DLMO to sleep offset phase angle narrowed with age in the younger cohort and became broader in the older cohort. The older cohort had a wider sleep onset phase angle compared to the younger cohort; however, an age-related phase angle increase was seen in the younger cohort only. Individual differences were seen in these developmental trajectories. This descriptive study indicated that circadian phase and self-selected sleep delayed across adolescence, though school-day sleep offset advanced until no longer in high school, whereupon offset was later. Phase angle changes are described as an interaction of developmental changes in sleep regulation interacting with psychosocial factors (e.g., bedtime autonomy.

  3. Delayed-Onset Edematous Foreign Body Granulomas 40 Years After Augmentation Rhinoplasty by Silicone Implant Combined with Liquid Silicone Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao-Chun; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chiu, Yu-Hsun

    2017-06-01

    Despite the widespread application of augmentation rhinoplasty in Asia, reports on the interaction between alloplastic implants and injectable filler are scarce. This paper reports on a patient with delayed-onset edematous foreign body granuloma that had been caused by augmentation rhinoplasty performed using a silicone implant in conjunction with a liquid silicone injection 40 years earlier. This is the longest reported duration between initial rhinoplasty and the exacerbation of foreign body granuloma. This case report also presents intraoperative findings pertaining to the interlocking structures between silicone implants and injected liquid silicone. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. Disinhibiting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus delays the onset of exertional fatigue and exhaustion in rats exercising in a warm environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Dmitry V; Kline, Hannah; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Brown, Mary Beth; Durant, Pamela J; Alves, Nathan J; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2018-06-15

    Stimulants cause hyperthermia, in part, by increasing heat generation through exercise. Stimulants also delay the onset of fatigue and exhaustion allowing animals to exercise longer. If used in a warm environment, this combination (increased exercise and decreased fatigue) can cause heat stroke. The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) is involved in mediating locomotion from stimulants. Furthermore, inhibiting the DMH decreases locomotion and prevents hyperthermia in rats given stimulants in a warm environment. Whether the DMH is involved in mediating exercise-induced fatigue and exhaustion is not known. We hypothesized that disinhibiting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) would delay the onset of fatigue and exhaustion in animals exercising in a warm environment. To test this hypothesis, we used automated video tracking software to measure fatigue and exhaustion. In rats, using wearable mini-pumps, we demonstrated that disinhibiting the DMH, via bicuculline perfusion (5 µM), increased the duration of exercise in a warm environment as compared to control animals (25 ± 3 min vs 15 ± 2 min). Bicuculline-perfused animals also had higher temperatures at exhaustion (41.4 ± 0.2 °C vs 40.0 ± 0.4 °C). Disinhibiting neurons in the DMH also increased the time to fatigue. Our data show that the same region of the hypothalamus that is involved in mediating locomotion to stimulants, is also involved in controlling exhaustion and fatigue. These findings have implications for understanding the cause and treatment of stimulant-induced-hyperthermia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bedtime Electronic Media Use and Sleep in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Micah O; Engelhardt, Christopher R; Hilgard, Joseph; Sohl, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the use of screen-based media at bedtime among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study specifically examined whether the presence of media devices in the child's bedroom, the use of media as part of the bedtime routine, and exposure to media with violent content just before bedtime were associated with sleep difficulties. Parents of 101 children with ASD completed questionnaires assessing their children's sleep habits, bedroom media access (including television, video game devices, and computers), and patterns of nighttime media use (including timing of media exposure and violent media content). Children with ASD who used media as part of the bedtime routine showed significantly greater sleep onset latency than those who did not (39.8 vs 16.0 minutes). Similarly, children who were exposed to media with violent content within the 30-minute period before bedtime experienced significantly greater sleep onset delays and shorter overall sleep duration. In contrast, the mere presence of bedroom media was not associated with either sleep onset latency or sleep duration. Overall, these findings indicate that incorporating television and video games into the bedtime routine is associated with sleep onset difficulties among children with ASD. Exposure to violent media before bed is also associated with poor sleep. Families of children with ASD should be encouraged to regulate and monitor the timing and content of television and video game use, whether or not such devices are physically present in the child's bedroom.

  6. Preventing the Androgen Receptor N/C Interaction Delays Disease Onset in a Mouse Model of SBMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Zboray

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR and is associated with misfolding and aggregation of the mutant AR. We investigated the role of an interdomain interaction between the amino (N-terminal FxxLF motif and carboxyl (C-terminal AF-2 domain in a mouse model of SBMA. Male transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded AR with a mutation in the FxxLF motif (F23A to prevent the N/C interaction displayed substantially improved motor function compared with N/C-intact AR-expressing mice and showed reduced pathological features of SBMA. Serine 16 phosphorylation was substantially enhanced by the F23A mutation; moreover, the protective effect of AR F23A was dependent on this phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for the N/C interaction on disease onset in mice and suggest that targeting AR conformation could be a therapeutic strategy for patients with SBMA.

  7. A novel two-nucleotide deletion in the ATP7A gene associated with delayed infantile onset of Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takahito; Haddad, Marie Reine; Yi, Ling; Murakami, Tomomi; Sasaki, Akiko; Shimbo, Hiroko; Kodama, Hiroko; Osaka, Hitoshi; Kaler, Stephen G

    2014-04-01

    Determining the relationship between clinical phenotype and genotype in genetic diseases is important in clinical practice. In general, frameshift mutations are expected to produce premature termination codons, leading to production of mutant transcripts destined for degradation by nonsense-mediated decay. In X-linked recessive diseases, male patients with frameshift mutations typically have a severe or even lethal phenotype. We report a case of a 17-month-old boy with Menkes disease (NIM #309400), an X-linked recessive copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the ATP7A copper transporter gene. He exhibited an unexpectedly late onset and experienced milder symptoms. His genomic DNA showed a de novo two-nucleotide deletion in exon 4 of ATP7A, predicting a translational frameshift and premature stop codon, and a classic severe phenotype. Characterization of his ATP7A mRNA showed no abnormal splicing. We speculate that translation reinitiation could occur downstream to the premature termination codon and produce a partially functional ATP7A protein. Study of the child's fibroblasts found no evidence of translation reinitiation; however, the possibility remains that this phenomenon occurred in neural tissues and influenced the clinical phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Repeated exposure to conditioned fear stress increases anxiety and delays sleep recovery following exposure to an acute traumatic stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Greenwood

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep-wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by humans, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to either no, mild (10, or severe (100 acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced REM and NREM sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep / wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep / wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders.

  9. The S/T-Rich Motif in the DNAJB6 Chaperone Delays Polyglutamine Aggregation and the Onset of Disease in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Månsson, Cecilia; de Mattos, Eduardo P; Bergink, Steven; van der Zwaag, Marianne; van Waarde, Maria A W H; Kloosterhuis, Niels J; Melki, Ronald; van Cruchten, Remco T P; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Arosio, Paolo; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Bates, Gillian P; van Deursen, Jan M; Linse, Sara; van de Sluis, Bart; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-21

    Expanded CAG repeats lead to debilitating neurodegenerative disorders characterized by aggregation of proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts. The mechanism of aggregation involves primary and secondary nucleation steps. We show how a noncanonical member of the DNAJ-chaperone family, DNAJB6, inhibits the conversion of soluble polyQ peptides into amyloid fibrils, in particular by suppressing primary nucleation. This inhibition is mediated by a serine/threonine-rich region that provides an array of surface-exposed hydroxyl groups that bind to polyQ peptides and may disrupt the formation of the H bonds essential for the stability of amyloid fibrils. Early prevention of polyQ aggregation by DNAJB6 occurs also in cells and leads to delayed neurite retraction even before aggregates are visible. In a mouse model, brain-specific coexpression of DNAJB6 delays polyQ aggregation, relieves symptoms, and prolongs lifespan, pointing to DNAJB6 as a potential target for disease therapy and tool for unraveling early events in the onset of polyQ diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intranasal Delivery of miR-146a Mimics Delayed Seizure Onset in the Lithium-Pilocarpine Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Unveiling the key mechanism of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE for the development of novel treatments is of increasing interest, and anti-inflammatory miR-146a is now considered a promising molecular target for TLE. In the current study, a C57BL/6 TLE mouse model was established using the lithium-pilocarpine protocol. The seizure degree was evaluated according to the Racine scale, and level 5 was considered the threshold for generalized convulsions. Animals were sacrificed to analyze the hippocampus at three time points (2 h and 4 and 8 weeks after pilocarpine administration to evaluate the acute, latent, and chronic phases, resp.. After intranasal delivery of miR-146a mimics (30 min before pilocarpine injection, the percent of animals with no induced seizures increased by 6.7%, the latency to generalized convulsions was extended, and seizure severity was reduced. Additionally, hippocampal damage was alleviated. While the relative miR-146a levels significantly increased, the expression of its target mRNAs (IRAK-1 and TRAF-6 and typical inflammatory modulators (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 decreased, supporting an anti-inflammatory role of miR-146a via the TLR pathway. This study is the first to demonstrate that intranasal delivery of miR-146a mimics can improve seizure onset and hippocampal damage in the acute phase of lithium-pilocarpine-induced seizures, which provides inflammation-based clues for the development of novel TLE treatments.

  11. Sleep disorder among medical students: relationship to their academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Hamza M; Alrowais, Norah A; Bin-Saad, Norah S; Al-Subaie, Nourah M; Haji, Alhan M A; Alhaqwi, Ali I

    2012-01-01

    Medical students are exposed to a significant level of pressure due to academic demands. Their sleep pattern is characterized by insufficient sleep duration, delayed sleep onset, and occurrence of napping episodes during the day. To examine the prevalence of sleep disorder among medical students and investigate any relationship between sleep disorder and academic performance. This is a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire-based study. The participants were medical students of the first, second, and third academic years. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was also included to identify sleep disorder and grade point average was recorded for academic performance. There were 491 responses with a response rate of 55%. The ESS score demonstrated that 36.6% of participants were considered to have abnormal sleep habits, with a statistically significant increase in female students (p = 0.000). Sleeping between 6-10 h per day was associated with normal ESS scores (p = 0.019) as well as the academic grades ≥ 3.75. Abnormal ESS scores were associated with lower academic achievement (p = 0.002). A high prevalence of sleep disorder was found in this group of students, specifically female students. Analysis of the relationship between sleep disorder and academic performance indicates a significant relationship between abnormal ESS scores, total sleeping hours, and academic performance.

  12. Comparision of Parent Reported Sleeping Habits and Sleep Problems Between Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ozturk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD children has been shown to affect the quality of sleep. In this study it is aimed to evaluate sleep habits and sleep problems between the cases who are diagnosed with ADHD and healthy controls. The study group consisted of 61 children (8-12 years old with ADHD; the control group (87 children comprised patients of other clinics at hospital. The Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL and DuPaul ADHD Rating Scale vere used. Children's sleep habits and sleep problems were assessed with the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire. ADHD group compared to healthy controls; statistical significant difference was found in bedtime resistance, the sleep onset delay, the sleep duration, the sleep anxiety, the night wakings, the parasomnias and the daytime sleepiness but statistical significant difference wasn’t found the sleep disordered breathing. In our study, problems in the sleep habits evaluated by parents ADHD are more than campared with healty controls likewise literature. However, further studies with larger sample size and objective measures such as actigraphy and polysomnography may allow us to have more knowledge in this area. [JCBPR 2017; 6(3.000: 108-114

  13. Predictors of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students: association between evening typology, lifestyle behaviors, and sleep habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabrita, Colette S; Hajjar-Muça, Theresa A; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2014-01-01

    Adequate, good night sleep is fundamental to well-being and is known to be influenced by myriad biological and environmental factors. Given the unavailability of sleep data about Lebanon, the cultural shifts and socioeconomic pressures that have affected many aspects of society, particularly for students and working adults, as well as our understanding of sleep in university students in other countries, we conducted a national study to assess sleep quality and factors contributing to sleep and general health in a culture-specific context. A self-filled questionnaire, inquiring about sociodemographics, health-risk behaviors, personal health, and evaluating sleep quality and chronotype using standard scales was completed by 540 students at private and public universities in Lebanon. Overall, they reported sleeping 7.95±1.34 hours per night, although 12.3% reported sleeping Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Sleep timing differed markedly between weekdays and weekends, with bedtimes and wake-up times delayed by 1.51 and 2.43 hours, respectively, on weekends. While most scored in the "neither type" category on the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), 24.5% were evening types and 7.3% were morning types. MEQ score was significantly correlated with smoking behavior and daily study onset, as well as with PSQI score, with eveningness associated with greater number of cigarettes, later study times, and poor sleep. We conclude that the prevalence of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students is associated with reduced sleep duration and shifts in sleep timing between weekdays and weekends, especially among evening types. While chronotype and certain behavioral choices interact to affect sleep dimensions and quality, raising awareness about the importance of obtaining adequate nighttime sleep on daily performance and avoiding risky behaviors may help Lebanese students make better choices in school and work schedules.

  14. National data showed that delayed sleep in six-year-old children was associated with excessive use of electronic devices at 12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tsuguhiko; Yorifuji, Takashi; Yamakawa, Michiyo; Inoue, Sachiko

    2018-01-31

    Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between adolescent sleep problems and the use of electronic devices, such as mobile phones, but longitudinal studies remain scarce. We explored any association between delayed bedtimes at six years old and the excessive use of electronic devices at 12 years of age. Texting was a prime focus. We analysed 9607 adolescents who owned mobile phones in 2013 using the Japanese Longitudinal Survey of Newborns in the 21st Century, which started in 2001. The outcomes were daily excessive use of a mobile phone, television (TV) and video games. Delayed bedtime at the age of six years was associated with excessive texting at weekends. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals obtained from logistic regression analyses were 1.88 (1.14-3.10) for the 10-11 pm group and 1.98 (1.08-3.63) for the after 11 pm group, compared with the before 9 pm group. Later bedtimes were also associated with increased risks of excessive TV viewing and video game use. Our study indicated that six-year-olds who regularly stayed up late at night used electronic devices more frequently, or for longer, at the age of 12. Parents need to be more aware of links between sleep issues and electronic devices. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of exposure to evening light on sleep initiation in the elderly: a longitudinal analysis for repeated measurements in home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Kenji; Saeki, Keigo; Iwamoto, Junko; Okamoto, Nozomi; Tomioka, Kimiko; Nezu, Satoko; Ikada, Yoshito; Kurumatani, Norio

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic data have demonstrated associations of sleep-onset insomnia with a variety of diseases, including depression, dementia, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Sleep initiation is controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and endogenous melatonin, both of which are influenced by environmental light. Exposure to evening light is hypothesized to cause circadian phase delay and melatonin suppression before bedtime, resulting in circadian misalignment and sleep-onset insomnia; however, whether exposure to evening light disturbs sleep initiation in home settings remains unclear. In this longitudinal analysis of 192 elderly individuals (mean age: 69.9 years), we measured evening light exposure and sleep-onset latency for 4 days using a wrist actigraph incorporating a light meter and an accelerometer. Mixed-effect linear regression analysis for repeated measurements was used to evaluate the effect of evening light exposure on subsequent sleep-onset latency. The median intensity of evening light exposure and the median sleep-onset latency were 27.3 lux (interquartile range, 17.9-43.4) and 17 min (interquartile range, 7-33), respectively. Univariate models showed significant associations between sleep-onset latency and age, gender, daytime physical activity, in-bed time, day length and average intensity of evening and nighttime light exposures. In a multivariate model, log-transformed average intensity of evening light exposure was significantly associated with log-transformed sleep-onset latency independent of the former potential confounding factors (regression coefficient, 0.133; 95% CI, 0.020-0.247; p = 0.021). Day length and nighttime light exposure were also significantly associated with log-transformed sleep-onset latency (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, exposure to evening light in home setting prolongs subsequent sleep-onset latency in the elderly.

  16. Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges of Sighted Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkani, Roneil G; Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2018-04-15

    To report the diagnostic and treatment challenges of sighted non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (N24SWD). We report a series of seven sighted patients with N24SWD clinically evaluated by history and sleep diaries, and when available wrist actigraphy and salivary melatonin levels, and treated with timed melatonin and bright light therapy. Most patients had a history of a delayed sleep-wake pattern prior to developing N24SWD. The typical sleep-wake pattern of N24SWD was seen in the sleep diaries (and in actigraphy when available) in all patients with a daily delay in midpoint of sleep ranging 0.8 to 1.8 hours. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was evaluated in four patients but was missed in one. The estimated phase angle from DLMO to sleep onset ranged from 5.25 to 9 hours. All six patients who attempted timed melatonin and bright light therapy were able to entrain their sleep-wake schedules. Entrainment occurred at a late circadian phase, possibly related to the late timing of melatonin administration, though the patients often preferred late sleep times. Most did not continue treatment and continued to have a non-24-hour sleep-wake pattern. N24SWD is a chronic debilitating disorder that is often overlooked in sighted people and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Tools to assess circadian pattern and timing can be effectively applied to aid the diagnosis. The progressive delay of the circadian rhythm poses a challenge for determining the most effective timing for melatonin and bright light therapies. Furthermore, once the circadian sleep-wake rhythm is entrained, long-term effectiveness is limited because of the behavioral and environmental structure that is required to maintain stable entrainment. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  17. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  18. Additional effects of taurine on the benefits of BCAA intake for the delayed-onset muscle soreness and muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ishikura, Keisuke; Nagayama, Hisashi; Suzuki, Takafumi; Maeda, Seiji; Ito, Masaharu; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (TAU) has a lot of the biological, physiological, and pharmocological functions including anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress. Although previous studies have appreciated the effectiveness of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), consistent finding has not still convinced. The aim of this study was to examine the additional effect of TAU with BCAA on the DOMS and muscle damages after eccentric exercise. Thirty-six untrained male volunteers were equally divided into four groups, and ingested a combination with 2.0 g TAU (or placebo) and 3.2 g BCAA (or placebo), thrice a day, 2 weeks prior to and 4 days after elbow flexion eccentric exercise. Following the period after eccentric exercise, the physiological and blood biochemical markers for DOMS and muscle damage showed improvement in the combination of TAU and BCAA supplementation rather than in the single or placebo supplementations. In conclusion, additional supplement of TAU with BCAA would be a useful way to attenuate DOMS and muscle damages induced by high-intensity exercise.

  19. Dynamics in numbers of group-roosting individuals in relation to pair-sleeping occurrence and onset of egg-laying in European Bee-eaters Merops apiaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pârâu, Liviu G.; Kingma, Sjouke A.; Weigl, Simon E.; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Lessells, Catherine M.; Schroeder, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Sleeping in the nest at the beginning of the breeding season is common for birds nesting in cavities. Here, we report evidence that European Bee-eaters Merops apiaster sleep in pairs in the nesting burrow. In 3.2% of the nest checks, we found two individuals sleeping together. This behaviour ceased

  20. Sleep Sleeping Patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Sleep Sleeping Patch is a new kind of external patch based on modern sleep medicine research achievements, which uses the internationally advanced transdermal therapeutic system (TTS). The Sleep Sleeping Patch transmits natural sleep inducers such as peppermint and liquorice extracts and melatonin through the skin to induce sleep. Clinical research proves that the Sleep Sleeping Patch can effectively improve insomnia and the quality of sleep. Highly effective: With the modern TTS therapy,

  1. Application of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Elastography in Imaging of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS): A Comparative Analysis With 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Kellermann, Marion; Swoboda, Bernd; Wildner, Dane; Golditz, Tobias; Grim, Casper; Raithel, Martin; Uder, Michael; Heiss, Rafael

    2017-05-17

    DOMS is one of the most common reasons for impaired muscle performance in sports and is associated with reduced muscle strength and frequently observed both in professional and recreational athletes. To emphasize the diagnostic value of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) in imaging of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness by comparing findings to high-resolution 3T MRI T2 weighted sequences. Case series. Laboratory environment. Fifteen healthy students (7 female, 8 male, age 24 ± 4 years, height 178 ± 10 cm, body weight 67 ± 12 kg). ARFI values, represented as shear wave velocities (SWV) of the gastrocnemius muscle (GM) and soleus muscle (SM), as well as conventional ultrasound, high-resolution 3T MRI, creatine kinase activity, extension range of the ankle joint, calf circumference and muscle soreness were assessed before (baseline) and 60 hours after (post-intervention, PI) a standardized eccentric exercise. ARFI SWV values of the GM revealed a statistically significant decrease of 19.1% between baseline (2.2 ± 0.26 m/s) and PI (1.78 ± 0.24 m/s); p = 0.008. At follow-up, the MRI investigations showed intramuscular oedema for the GM in all participants corresponding to a significant raise in T2 signal intensity (p = 0.001) and in T2-time values (p = 0.004). ARFI elastography seems to be an additional sensitive diagnostic modality in the diagnostic work up of DOMS. Intramuscular SWV could represent an additional imaging marker for the assessment and monitoring of ultrastructural muscle injuries and therefore be helpful for individual training composition in elite sports.

  2. A Keto-Mediet Approach with Coconut Substitution and Exercise May Delay the Onset of Alzheimer's Disease among Middle-Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, B C; Chen, M; Perng, J C; Jambazian, P

    2017-01-01

    Coconut oil has been widely used to improve health because there is much information available by word of mouth, in books, and on the internet. However, researchers still continue to search for the best diets to improve the quality of life, especially for people with cognitive decline. The aim of this review is to develop a novel dietary approach, the Keto-Mediet, which may help prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Evidence gained through literature review from 1982 to 2015 on gene-by-diet interaction and lipid and glucose metabolism in the brains of Alzheimer's patients is converted into the new Keto-Mediet approach. The Keto-Mediet approach combines the benefits of a Ketogenic diet and a Mediterranean diet into a pyramidal model that is rich in various types of vitamins and substitutes coconuts for saturated animal fats. Limited glucose intake is intended to delay brain degeneration. A revised adult food pyramid was created to illustrate the principles of the Keto-Mediet approach. The Keto-Mediet approach represents and interprets food groups according to the revised adult food pyramid. This approach also encourages adherence to this healthy diet and lifestyle changes including exercise for people whose age ranges from 40 to 75 years. Those who comply with this approach will significantly enhance their knowledge and adopt a healthier lifestyle, as compared to those whose modern eating patterns are typically less healthy. Therefore, the Keto-Mediet approach can be applied in hopes of preventing and decreasing Alzheimer's disease in different ethnicities and cultural groups.

  3. The Effect of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness on Positioning Sense and Shooting Percentage in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Serinken

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eccentric exercise is defined as a type of exercise in which the muscle produces power by extending. In contrast to isometric and concentric exercises, eccentric muscle activity is much more effective mechanically; however, it may expose the muscle to soreness. Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS emerges a couple of hours after an eccentric activity, especially in individuals who are not used to this kind of exercise, and causes a temporary decrease in muscle performance, joint movement angle and muscle power, and also a temporary increase in the blood creatine kinase (CK activity. Aims: This study investigates the effect of DOMS on the upper extremities motor performance by conducting an eccentric exercise load on the elbow flexor muscles. Study design: Cross sectional study. Methods: The study included 10 wheelchair basketball players. First, the participants underwent blood CK activity, positioning sense, muscle pain, shooting performance measurements tests at the base, and after 30 minutes and 24 and 48 hours. Then, one week later, the one-repetition-maximums of biceps curls were determined in order to define the intensity of the eccentric exercise. An eccentric exercise protocol which would cause DOMS was applied to all players. All tests were replaced with acute exhaustive eccentric exercise; the same tests were repeated in the same order after the exercise. Blood CK activity was measured by taking an earlobe capillary blood sample. The muscle pain level was measured by using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Positioning sense loss was assessed via goniometer at 30º, 60º and 90º degrees horizontally. Results: The study found a statistically significant increase in blood CK activity and positioning sense loss, and a decrease in the pressure-pain threshold, as well as the shooting percentages in the exercise group when compared with the control. Conclusion: These findings suggest that DOMS negatively affects the upper extremities

  4. The anti-inflammatory peptide stearyl-norleucine-VIP delays disease onset and extends survival in a rat model of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goursaud, Stéphanie; Schäfer, Sabrina; Dumont, Amélie O; Vergouts, Maxime; Gallo, Alessandro; Desmet, Nathalie; Deumens, Ronald; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has potent immune modulatory actions that may influence the course of neurodegenerative disorders associated with chronic inflammation. Here, we show the therapeutic benefits of a modified peptide agonist stearyl-norleucine-VIP (SNV) in a transgenic rat model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (mutated superoxide dismutase 1, hSOD1(G93A)). When administered by systemic every-other-day intraperitoneal injections during a period of 80 days before disease, SNV delayed the onset of motor dysfunction by no less than three weeks, while survival was extended by nearly two months. SNV-treated rats showed reduced astro- and microgliosis in the lumbar ventral spinal cord and a significant degree of motor neuron preservation. Throughout the treatment, SNV promoted the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 as well as neurotrophic factors commonly considered as beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis management (glial derived neuroptrophic factor, insulin like growth factor, brain derived neurotrophic factor). The peptide nearly totally suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and repressed the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin-1β, nitric oxide and of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α likely accounted for the observed down-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B that modulates the transcription of genes specifically involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sod1 and the glutamate transporter slc1a2). In line with this, levels of human superoxide dismutase 1 mRNA and protein were decreased by SNV treatment, while the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter-1 was promoted. Considering the large diversity of influences of this peptide on both clinical features of the disease and associated biochemical markers, we propose that SNV or related peptides may constitute promising candidates for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  5. Novel sublingual low-dose zolpidem tablet reduces latency to sleep onset following spontaneous middle-of-the-night awakening in insomnia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, outpatient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Krystal, Andrew; Steinberg, Frank J; Singh, Nikhilesh N; Moline, Margaret

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of 3.5-mg zolpidem tartrate sublingual tablets (ZST) on latency to sleep onset after middle-of-the-night (MOTN) awakenings in patients with insomnia characterized by difficulty returning to sleep after MOTN awakenings. Multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group. Outpatient. There were 295 adults (median age 43 y; 68.1% female) with primary insomnia and difficulty returning to sleep after MOTN awakenings (three or more MOTN awakenings/wk during screening). After a 2-wk, single-blind placebo eligibility period, participants were randomized 1:1 to as-needed MOTN dosing with 3.5 mg ZST or placebo for 28 nights. An interactive voice response system determined if the study drug could be taken and recorded sleep/wake efficacy measures. ZST significantly (P Zolpidem Tartrate Tablet in Adult Patients with Insomnia" http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00466193?spons=%22Transcept+Pharmaceuticals%22&spons_ex=Y&rank=2

  6. Middle school start times: the importance of a good night's sleep for young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R; Spaulding, Noah L; Dandrow, Craig; Baroni, Elizabeth M

    2007-01-01

    With the onset of adolescence, teenagers require 9.2 hr of sleep and experience a delay in the timing of sleep. In the "real world" with early school start times, however, they report less sleep, striking differences between their school-weekend sleep schedules, and significant daytime sleepiness. Prior studies demonstrated that high schoolers with later school starts do not further delay bedtime but obtain more sleep due to later wake times. This study examined sleep-wake patterns of young adolescents attending urban, public middle schools with early (7:15 a.m.) versus late (8:37 a.m.) start times. Students (N = 205) were assessed at 2 time periods. Students at the late-starting school reported waking up over 1 hr later on school mornings and obtaining 50 min more sleep each night, less sleepiness, and fewer tardies than students at the early school. All students reported similar school-night bedtime, sleep hygiene practices, and weekend sleep schedules.

  7. Vigilant attention to threat, sleep patterns, and anxiety in peripubertal youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Emily J; Price, Rebecca B; Siegle, Greg J; Silk, Jennifer S; Forbes, Erika E; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Harvey, Allison G; Ryan, Neal D; Dahl, Ronald E; McMakin, Dana L

    2018-05-02

    Vigilant attention to threat is commonly observed in anxiety, undergoes developmental changes in early adolescence, and has been proposed to interfere with sleep initiation and maintenance. We present one of the first studies to use objective measures to examine associations between vigilant attention to threat and difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep in an early adolescent anxious sample. We also explore the moderating role of development (age, puberty) and sex. Participants were 66 peripubertal youth (ages 9-14) with a primary anxiety disorder and 24 healthy control subjects. A dot-probe task was used to assess attentional bias to fearful relative to neutral face stimuli. Eye-tracking indexed selective attentional bias to threat, and reaction time bias indexed action readiness to threat. Sleep was assessed via actigraphy (e.g. sleep onset delay, wake after sleep onset, etc.), parent report (Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire), and child report (Sleep Self-Report). The Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale assessed anxiety severity. Eye-tracking initial threat fixation bias (β = .33, p = .001) and threat dwell time bias (β = .22, p = .041) were positively associated with sleep onset latency. Reaction time bias was positively associated with wake after sleep onset (β = .24, p = .026) and parent-reported sleep disturbance (β = .25, p = .019). Anxiety (severity, diagnosis) was not associated with these outcomes. Sex (β = -.32, p = .036) moderated the relation between initial threat fixation bias and sleep onset latency, with a positive association for males (p = .005), but not for females (p = .289). Age and pubertal status did not moderate effects. Vigilant attention to threat is related to longer sleep onset and reduced sleep maintenance. These associations are not stronger in early adolescents with anxiety. Implications for early intervention or prevention that targets vigilant attention to threat to impact sleep disturbance, and

  8. Sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder: examining the contributions of sensory over-responsivity and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Micah O; Petroski, Gregory F

    2015-02-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at high risk for sleep problems. Previous research suggests that sensory problems and anxiety may be related to the development and maintenance of sleep problems in children with ASD. However, the relationships among these co-occurring conditions have not been previously studied. The current study examined the interrelations of these symptoms in a large well-characterized sample of children and adolescents with ASD. The current study examined the relationships among sleep problems, sensory over-responsivity, and anxiety in 1347 children enrolled in the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network. The primary measures included the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Short Sensory Profile. In bivariate correlations and multivariate path analyses, anxiety was associated with all types of sleep problems (ie, bedtime resistance, sleep-onset delay, sleep duration, sleep anxiety, and night wakings; p children, while SOR was no longer significantly associated with bedtime resistance or sleep anxiety for younger children. Children with ASD who have anxiety and SOR may be particularly predisposed to sleep problems. These findings suggest that some children with ASD and sleep disturbance may have difficulties with hyperarousal. Future research using physiological measures of arousal and objective measures of sleep are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students: association between evening typology, lifestyle behaviors, and sleep habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabrita CS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colette S Kabrita,1 Theresa A Hajjar-Muça,2 Jeanne F Duffy31Department of Sciences, 2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Notre Dame University – Louaize, Zouk Mosbeh, Lebanon; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Adequate, good night sleep is fundamental to well-being and is known to be influenced by myriad biological and environmental factors. Given the unavailability of sleep data about Lebanon, the cultural shifts and socioeconomic pressures that have affected many aspects of society, particularly for students and working adults, as well as our understanding of sleep in university students in other countries, we conducted a national study to assess sleep quality and factors contributing to sleep and general health in a culture-specific context. A self-filled questionnaire, inquiring about sociodemographics, health-risk behaviors, personal health, and evaluating sleep quality and chronotype using standard scales was completed by 540 students at private and public universities in Lebanon. Overall, they reported sleeping 7.95±1.34 hours per night, although 12.3% reported sleeping <6.5 hours and more than half scored in the poor-sleeper category on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Sleep timing differed markedly between weekdays and weekends, with bedtimes and wake-up times delayed by 1.51 and 2.43 hours, respectively, on weekends. While most scored in the "neither type" category on the Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ, 24.5% were evening types and 7.3% were morning types. MEQ score was significantly correlated with smoking behavior and daily study onset, as well as with PSQI score, with eveningness associated with greater number of cigarettes, later study times, and poor sleep. We conclude that the prevalence of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students is associated

  10. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adolescent sleep misalignment: a chronic jet lag and a matter of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    Sleep is a key element, both physiologically and psychologically, in adolescent development. The prevalence of sleep disorders in western countries is important, as with age the sleep-wake cycle of adolescents becomes irregular and delayed in relation with later sleep onset and waking time resulting in rhythm desynchronization. A large number of adolescents sleep for 7-8h instead of 9-10h per night, which can lead to a cumulative sleep debt with fatigue, behavioral problems and poor academic achievement. The effect of electronic media use (such as television, mobile phone, computer, and electronic gaming) on sleep has been the object of several international studies, though pubertal changes may also impact adolescent sleep. Adolescents and their parents should be educated by professionals, including physicians and nurses, on the key role of sleep in adolescent well being and quality of life. A number of basic rules are proposed to improve sleep in adolescents. The permanent social jet lag experienced by a number of adolescents should be considered as a matter of public health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Abnormal secretion of melatonin and cortisol in relation to sleep disturbances in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniecinska-Cooper, Anna Maria; Iles, Ray Kruse; Butler, Stephen Andrew; Jones, Huw; Bayford, Richard; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    A high rate of sleep disturbances has been reported in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) but the underlying aetiology has yet to be identified. Melatonin and cortisol levels display circadian rhythmicity and are known to affect and regulate sleep/wake patterns. The current study examined the levels of these two endocrine markers and explored a possible relationship with sleep patterns in children with WS. Twenty-five children with WS and 27 typically developing age- and gender-matched comparison children were recruited. Saliva was collected from each child at three time points: 4-6 pm, before natural bedtime, and after awakening. The levels of salivary melatonin and cortisol were analysed by specific enzyme-linked immunoassays. Sleep patterns were examined using actigraphy and the Children's Sleep Habit Questionnaire. The WS group had shallower drops in cortisol and less pronounced increase in melatonin at bedtime compared to the controls. Furthermore, they also had significantly higher levels of cortisol before bedtime. Increased bedtime cortisol and less pronounced rise in melatonin levels before sleep may play a role in the occurrence of sleep disturbances, such as delayed sleep onset, observed in children with WS. As both markers play a significant role in our circadian rhythm and sleep/wake cycle, it is necessary to examine sleep using multi-system analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  14. A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal® Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika K. Ross

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH, underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal®, in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Immunocal® is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1G93A mice receiving Immunocal® displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1G93A controls. Additionally, Immunocal® treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1G93A mice. However, Immunocal® did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal® and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1G93A mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal® only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1G93A mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal® to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS.

  15. Daytime Ayahuasca administration modulates REM and slow-wave sleep in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Clos, S; Giménez, S; Grasa, E; Romero, S

    2008-02-01

    Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage and the central sacrament of Brazilian-based religious groups, with followers in Europe and the United States. The tea contains the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and beta-carboline alkaloids with monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties that render DMT orally active. DMT interacts with serotonergic neurotransmission acting as a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor sites. Given the role played by serotonin in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle, we investigated the effects of daytime ayahuasca consumption in sleep parameters. Subjective sleep quality, polysomnography (PSG), and spectral analysis were assessed in a group of 22 healthy male volunteers after the administration of a placebo, an ayahuasca dose equivalent to 1 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, and 20 mg d-amphetamine, a proaminergic drug, as a positive control. Results show that ayahuasca did not induce any subjectively perceived deterioration of sleep quality or PSG-measured disruptions of sleep initiation or maintenance, in contrast with d-amphetamine, which delayed sleep initiation, disrupted sleep maintenance, induced a predominance of 'light' vs 'deep' sleep and significantly impaired subjective sleep quality. PSG analysis also showed that similarly to d-amphetamine, ayahuasca inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, decreasing its duration, both in absolute values and as a percentage of total sleep time, and shows a trend increase in its onset latency. Spectral analysis showed that d-amphetamine and ayahuasca increased power in the high frequency range, mainly during stage 2. Remarkably, whereas slow-wave sleep (SWS) power in the first night cycle, an indicator of sleep pressure, was decreased by d-amphetamine, ayahuasca enhanced power in this frequency band. Results show that daytime serotonergic psychedelic drug administration leads to measurable changes in PSG and sleep power spectrum and suggest an

  16. Environmental Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields Exposure at Home, Mobile and Cordless Phone Use, and Sleep Problems in 7-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Anke; van Eijsden, Manon; Guxens, Monica; Beekhuizen, Johan; van Strien, Rob; Kromhout, Hans; Vrijkotte, Tania; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated if exposure to RF-EMF was associated with reported quality of sleep in 2,361 children, aged 7 years. Methods This study was embedded in the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) birth cohort study. When children were about five years old, school and residential exposure to RF-EMF from base stations was assessed with a geospatial model (NISMap) and from indoor sources (cordless phone/WiFi) using parental self-reports. Parents also reported their children’s use of mobile or cordless phones. When children were seven years old, we evaluated sleep quality as measured with the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) filled in by parents. Of eight CSHQ subscales, we evaluated sleep onset delay, sleep duration, night wakenings, parasomnias and daytime sleepiness with logistic or negative binomial regression models, adjusting for child’s age and sex and indicators of socio-economic position of the parents. We evaluated the remaining three subscales (bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, sleep disordered breathing) as unrelated outcomes (negative control) because these were a priori hypothesised not to be associated with RF-EMF. Results Sleep onset delay, night wakenings, parasomnias and daytime sleepiness were not associated with residential exposure to RF-EMF from base stations. Sleep duration scores were associated with RF-EMF levels from base stations. Higher use mobile phones was associated with less favourable sleep duration, night wakenings and parasomnias, and also with bedtime resistance. Cordless phone use was not related to any of the sleeping scores. Conclusion Given the different results across the evaluated RF-EMF exposure sources and the observed association between mobile phone use and the negative control sleep scale, our study does not support the hypothesis that it is the exposure to RF-EMF that is detrimental to sleep quality in 7-year old children, but potentially other factors that are related to mobile phone

  17. Sleep Quality Changes during Overwintering at the German Antarctic Stations Neumayer II and III: The Gender Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Steinach

    Full Text Available Antarctic residence holds many challenges to human physiology, like increased psycho-social tension and altered circadian rhythm, known to influence sleep. We assessed changes in sleep patterns during 13 months of overwintering at the German Stations Neumayer II and III from 2008 to 2014, with focus on gender, as many previous investigations were inconclusive regarding gender-based differences or had only included men.Time in bed, sleep time, sleep efficiency, number of arousals, sleep latency, sleep onset, sleep offset, and physical activity level were determined twice per month during seven overwintering campaigns of n = 54 participants (37 male, 17 female using actimetry. Data were analyzed using polynomial regression and analysis of covariance for change over time with the covariates gender, inhabited station, overwintering season and influence of physical activity and local sunshine radiation.We found overall longer times in bed (p = 0.004 and sleep time (p = 0.014 for women. The covariate gender had a significant influence on time in bed (p<0.001, sleep time (p<0.001, number of arousals (p = 0.04, sleep latency (p = 0.04, and sleep onset (p<0.001. Women separately (p = 0.02, but not men (p = 0.165, showed a linear increase in number of arousals. Physical activity decreased over overwintering time for men (p = 0.003, but not for women (p = 0.174. The decline in local sunshine radiation led to a 48 minutes longer time in bed (p<0.001, 3.8% lower sleep efficiency (p<0.001, a delay of 32 minutes in sleep onset (p<0.001, a delay of 54 minutes in sleep offset (p<0.001, and 11% less daily energy expenditure (p<0.001, for all participants in reaction to the Antarctic winter's darkness-phase.Overwinterings at the Stations Neumayer II and III are associated with significant changes in sleep patterns, with dependences from overwintering time and local sunshine radiation. Gender appears to be an influence, as women showed a declining sleep quality

  18. Sleep Quality Changes during Overwintering at the German Antarctic Stations Neumayer II and III: The Gender Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinach, Mathias; Kohlberg, Eberhard; Maggioni, Martina Anna; Mendt, Stefan; Opatz, Oliver; Stahn, Alexander; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic residence holds many challenges to human physiology, like increased psycho-social tension and altered circadian rhythm, known to influence sleep. We assessed changes in sleep patterns during 13 months of overwintering at the German Stations Neumayer II and III from 2008 to 2014, with focus on gender, as many previous investigations were inconclusive regarding gender-based differences or had only included men. Time in bed, sleep time, sleep efficiency, number of arousals, sleep latency, sleep onset, sleep offset, and physical activity level were determined twice per month during seven overwintering campaigns of n = 54 participants (37 male, 17 female) using actimetry. Data were analyzed using polynomial regression and analysis of covariance for change over time with the covariates gender, inhabited station, overwintering season and influence of physical activity and local sunshine radiation. We found overall longer times in bed (p = 0.004) and sleep time (p = 0.014) for women. The covariate gender had a significant influence on time in bed (p<0.001), sleep time (p<0.001), number of arousals (p = 0.04), sleep latency (p = 0.04), and sleep onset (p<0.001). Women separately (p = 0.02), but not men (p = 0.165), showed a linear increase in number of arousals. Physical activity decreased over overwintering time for men (p = 0.003), but not for women (p = 0.174). The decline in local sunshine radiation led to a 48 minutes longer time in bed (p<0.001), 3.8% lower sleep efficiency (p<0.001), a delay of 32 minutes in sleep onset (p<0.001), a delay of 54 minutes in sleep offset (p<0.001), and 11% less daily energy expenditure (p<0.001), for all participants in reaction to the Antarctic winter's darkness-phase. Overwinterings at the Stations Neumayer II and III are associated with significant changes in sleep patterns, with dependences from overwintering time and local sunshine radiation. Gender appears to be an influence, as women showed a declining sleep quality

  19. The Timing of the Circadian Clock and Sleep Differ between Napping and Non-Napping Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akacem, Lameese D; Simpkin, Charles T; Carskadon, Mary A; Wright, Kenneth P; Jenni, Oskar G; Achermann, Peter; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2015-01-01

    The timing of the internal circadian clock shows large inter-individual variability across the lifespan. Although the sleep-wakefulness pattern of most toddlers includes an afternoon nap, the association between napping and circadian phase in early childhood remains unexplored. This study examined differences in circadian phase and sleep between napping and non-napping toddlers. Data were collected on 20 toddlers (34.2±2.0 months; 12 females; 15 nappers). Children followed their habitual napping and non-napping sleep schedules (monitored with actigraphy) for 5 days before an in-home salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) assessment. On average, napping children fell asleep during their nap opportunities on 3.6±1.2 of the 5 days before the DLMO assessment. For these napping children, melatonin onset time was 38 min later (p = 0.044; d = 0.93), actigraphically-estimated bedtime was 43 min later (p = 0.014; d = 1.24), sleep onset time was 59 min later (p = 0.006; d = 1.46), and sleep onset latency was 16 min longer (p = 0.030; d = 1.03) than those not napping. Midsleep and wake time did not differ by napping status. No difference was observed in the bedtime, sleep onset, or midsleep phase relationships with DLMO; however, the wake time phase difference was 47 min smaller for napping toddlers (p = 0.029; d = 1.23). On average, nappers had 69 min shorter nighttime sleep durations (p = 0.006; d = 1.47) and spent 49 min less time in bed (p = 0.019; d = 1.16) than non-nappers. Number of days napping was correlated with melatonin onset time (r = 0.49; p = 0.014). Our findings indicate that napping influences individual variability in melatonin onset time in early childhood. The delayed bedtimes of napping toddlers likely permits light exposure later in the evening, thereby delaying the timing of the clock and sleep. Whether the early developmental trajectory of circadian phase involves an advance associated with the decline in napping is a question necessitating

  20. The Timing of the Circadian Clock and Sleep Differ between Napping and Non-Napping Toddlers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lameese D Akacem

    Full Text Available The timing of the internal circadian clock shows large inter-individual variability across the lifespan. Although the sleep-wakefulness pattern of most toddlers includes an afternoon nap, the association between napping and circadian phase in early childhood remains unexplored. This study examined differences in circadian phase and sleep between napping and non-napping toddlers. Data were collected on 20 toddlers (34.2±2.0 months; 12 females; 15 nappers. Children followed their habitual napping and non-napping sleep schedules (monitored with actigraphy for 5 days before an in-home salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO assessment. On average, napping children fell asleep during their nap opportunities on 3.6±1.2 of the 5 days before the DLMO assessment. For these napping children, melatonin onset time was 38 min later (p = 0.044; d = 0.93, actigraphically-estimated bedtime was 43 min later (p = 0.014; d = 1.24, sleep onset time was 59 min later (p = 0.006; d = 1.46, and sleep onset latency was 16 min longer (p = 0.030; d = 1.03 than those not napping. Midsleep and wake time did not differ by napping status. No difference was observed in the bedtime, sleep onset, or midsleep phase relationships with DLMO; however, the wake time phase difference was 47 min smaller for napping toddlers (p = 0.029; d = 1.23. On average, nappers had 69 min shorter nighttime sleep durations (p = 0.006; d = 1.47 and spent 49 min less time in bed (p = 0.019; d = 1.16 than non-nappers. Number of days napping was correlated with melatonin onset time (r = 0.49; p = 0.014. Our findings indicate that napping influences individual variability in melatonin onset time in early childhood. The delayed bedtimes of napping toddlers likely permits light exposure later in the evening, thereby delaying the timing of the clock and sleep. Whether the early developmental trajectory of circadian phase involves an advance associated with the decline in napping is a question

  1. A mitochondrial tRNA(Met) mutation causing developmental delay, exercise intolerance and limb girdle phenotype with onset in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Duno, Morten; Rafiq, Jabin

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl presented with exercise intolerance, learning difficulty, and muscle weakness in a limb girdle distribution. She had delayed achievement of motor milestones and difficulties with social interaction at pre-school age. Muscle biopsy showed no myopathic or dystrophic features...

  2. Adolescents' sleep behaviors and perceptions of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Heather; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph; Telljohann, Susan K

    2009-05-01

    Sleep duration affects the health of children and adolescents. Shorter sleep durations have been associated with poorer academic performance, unintentional injuries, and obesity in adolescents. This study extends our understanding of how adolescents perceive and deal with their sleep issues. General education classes were randomly selected from a convenience sample of three high schools in the Midwest. Three hundred eighty-four ninth- to twelfth-grade students (57%) completed a self-administered valid and reliable questionnaire on sleep behaviors and perceptions of sleep. Most respondents (91.9%) obtained inadequate sleep (sleep each week night. The majority indicated that not getting enough sleep had the following effects on them: being more tired during the day (93.7%), having difficulty paying attention (83.6%), lower grades (60.8%), increase in stress (59.0%), and having difficulty getting along with others (57.7%). Some students reported engaging in harmful behaviors to help them sleep: taking sleeping pills (6.0%), smoking a cigarette to relax (5.7%), and drinking alcohol in the evening (2.9%). Students who received fewer hours of sleep were significantly more likely to report being stressed (p = .02) and were more likely to be overweight (p = .04). Inadequate sleep time may be contributing to adolescent health problems such as increased stress and obesity. Findings indicate a need for sleep hygiene education for adolescents and their parents. A long-term solution to chronic sleep deprivation among high school students could include delaying high school start times, such as was done successfully in the Minneapolis Public School District.

  3. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linden M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael Linden,1,2 Marie Dietz,1 Christian Veauthier,3 Ingo Fietze3 1Research Group Psychosomatic Rehabilitation, Charité University Medicine Berlin, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Rehabilitation Centre Seehof, Teltow, 3Interdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Objective: To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients.Method: A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80 and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19. They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night’s sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP].Results: In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes, evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often, and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective

  4. Effect of Daytime Exercise on Sleep Eeg and Subjective Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Y.; Kawada, T.; Kiryu, Y.

    1997-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of daytime physical exercise on the quality of objective and subjective sleep by examining all-night sleep EEGs. The subjects were five male students, aged 19 to 20 years, who were in the habit of performing regular daytime exercise. The sleep polygraphic parameters in this study were sleep stage time as a percentage of total sleep time (%S1, %S2, %S(3+4), %SREM, %MT), time in bed (TIB), sleep time (ST), total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), waking from sleep, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, number of stage shifts, number of spindles, and percentages of α and δ waves, all of which were determined by an automatic computer analysis system. The OSA questionnaire was used to investigate subjective sleep. The five scales of the OSA used were sleepiness, sleep maintenance, worry, integrated sleep feeling, and sleep initiation. Each sleep parameter was compared in the exercise and the non-exercise groups. Two-way analysis of variance was applied using subject factor and exercise factor. The main effect of the subject was significant in all parameters and the main effect of exercise in %S(3+4), SOL and sleep efficiency, among the objective sleep parameters. The main effects of the subject, except sleepiness, were significant, as was the main effect of exercise on sleep initiation, among the subjective sleep parameters. These findings suggest that daytime exercise shortened sleep latency and prolonged slow-wave sleep, and that the subjects fell asleep more easily on exercise days. There were also significant individual differences in both the objective and subjective sleep parameters.

  5. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascetti GG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gian Gastone Mascetti Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Abstract: Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes' closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use

  6. Sleep Insufficiency, Sleep Health Problems and Performance in High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ming, Xue; Koransky, Rebecca; Kang, Victor; Buchman, Sarah; Sarris, Christina E.; Wagner, George C.

    2011-01-01

    A survey on sleep schedule, sleep health, school performance and school start times was conducted in 1,941 adolescents. A high level of early and circadian-disadvantaged sleep/wake schedules during weekdays was observed. Shorter sleep duration on weekdays was reported, especially in upper classmen. Complaints of inadequate sleep and sleepiness during weekdays, alarm clock use, and napping were prevalent. Night awakening and prolonged sleep onset were common and associated with poor school per...

  7. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascetti, Gian Gastone

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes' closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use-dependent process (local sleep).

  8. Infant sleep problems: The sleep characteristics of the "Don't Know" response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shao-Yu; Lee, Chien-Chang; Chen, Li-Chiou; Tung, Yi-Ching

    2018-01-01

    To examine the sleep characteristics of infants with parentally reported sleep problems, with parentally reported no sleep problems and with parentally reported uncertain sleep conditions. Infant sleep problems are recognized as a major health issue worldwide. However, in our daily clinical practices, it is not uncommon for parents not to know whether their infant sleep is problematic. A prospective study conducted between 2012 - 2015 where 219 parents completed questionnaires and infants wore an actigraph monitor for 7 days. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to evaluate the actigraphic and parentally reported infant sleep behaviours between the groups. Thirty-two (14.61%) parents did not know whether their infant sleep was problematic and 118 (53.88%) parents considered their infant sleep a problem. Compared with infants without sleep problems, infants with uncertain sleep conditions had significantly increased odds of having shortened longest sleep duration according to parental report. A significant association was found for infants without sleep problems compared with those with sleep problems who had significantly more wake after sleep onset as measured by actigraphy, as well as reduced longest sleep duration according to parental report. Infants with uncertain sleep conditions have the same problematic sleep behaviours resembling those of children with reported sleep problems. Healthcare professionals should actively disseminate sleep knowledge to help parents interpret infant sleep behaviours and consider possible intervention strategies for improving parental sleep-related knowledge and infant sleep. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Train hard, sleep well? Perceived training load, sleep quantity and sleep stage distribution in elite level athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knufinke, Melanie; Nieuwenhuys, Arne; Geurts, Sabine A E; Møst, Els I S; Maase, Kamiel; Moen, Maarten H; Coenen, Anton M L; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2018-04-01

    Sleep is essential for recovery and performance in elite athletes. While it is generally assumed that exercise benefits sleep, high training load may jeopardize sleep and hence limit adequate recovery. To examine this, the current study assessed objective sleep quantity and sleep stage distributions in elite athletes and calculated their association with perceived training load. Mixed-methods. Perceived training load, actigraphy and one-channel EEG recordings were collected among 98 elite athletes during 7 consecutive days of regular training. Actigraphy revealed total sleep durations of 7:50±1:08h, sleep onset latencies of 13±15min, wake after sleep onset of 33±17min and sleep efficiencies of 88±5%. Distribution of sleep stages indicated 51±9% light sleep, 21±8% deep sleep, and 27±7% REM sleep. On average, perceived training load was 5.40±2.50 (scale 1-10), showing large daily variability. Mixed-effects models revealed no alteration in sleep quantity or sleep stage distributions as a function of day-to-day variation in preceding training load (all p's>.05). Results indicate healthy sleep durations, but elevated wake after sleep onset, suggesting a potential need for sleep optimization. Large proportions of deep sleep potentially reflect an elevated recovery need. With sleep quantity and sleep stage distributions remaining irresponsive to variations in perceived training load, it is questionable whether athletes' current sleep provides sufficient recovery after strenuous exercise. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to melatonin and reduction of sleep onset latency (ID 1698, 1780, 4080) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    in healthy subjects combined with subjects with insomnia. On the basis of the data presented, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of melatonin and reduction of sleep onset latency. The Panel considers that in order to obtain the claimed effect...

  11. [The use of social media modifies teenagers' sleep-related behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royant-Parola, S; Londe, V; Tréhout, S; Hartley, S

    2017-06-08

    Modification of sleep behaviors in teenagers has been observed over the past 30years with a reduction in overall sleep time and an increasing number of teenagers suffering from sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is linked to physical problems such as obesity but also to change in performance at school and mood disorders. Changes have been associated with the use of screens, cell phones, Internet and social media. Use of screens has been shown to delay sleep onset and melatonin secretion and stimulation of wake systems by interaction with social media may exacerbate these effects. The links between the use of social media and sleep patterns have not been fully explored. Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of social media on teenagers' sleep and the impact of sleep deprivation. As part of a sleep education program conducted in middle schools, teenagers from 6th to 9th grade were invited to complete an online questionnaire on sleep habits with teacher supervision and after parental consent. Outcome measures were sleep and wake times with estimated sleep duration in school (SP) and rest periods (RP), use of screens (computers, tablets, smartphones and video game consoles), the use of social media and impact on visual analogue scales of sleep quality, mood and daytime functioning. Students were divided into those with clear sleep deprivation (sleep timevideo games or television). During the night, some teens woke up to continue screen-based activities: 6.1 % in order to play online video games, 15.3 % to send texts and 11 % to use social media. Bedtimes were later in PR compared with PS (22h06±132 vs. 23h54±02; Pnegative effect on mood was evident: in sleep, deprived teenagers irritability (5.28±3.12 vs. 3.30±2.34; Pnegative effects on daily functioning and mood which increases with increasing age. Education about use of social media and sleep for teenagers needs to start early as modifications in sleep and evening use of screens was present on our

  12. High incidence of sleep problems in children with developmental disorders: results of a questionnaire survey in a Japanese elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Michiko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Iwasaki, Mizue; Iemura, Akiko; Yamashita, Yushiro; Maeda, Masaharu; Kitani, Shingo; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uchimura, Naohisa; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present school-based questionnaire was to analyze the sleep problems of children with developmental disorders, such as pervasive developmental disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The sleep problems of 43 children with developmental disorders were compared with those of 372 healthy children (control group). All children attended one public elementary school in Kurume, Japan; thus, the study avoided the potential bias associated with hospital-based surveys (i.e. a high prevalence of sleep disturbance) and provided a more complete picture of the children's academic performance and family situation compared with a control group under identical conditions. Children's sleep problems were measured with the Japanese version of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Children with developmental disorders had significantly higher total CSHQ scores, as well as mean scores on the parasomnias and sleep breathing subscales, than children in the control group. The total CSHQ score, bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, and daytime sleepiness worsened with increasing age in children with developmental disorders; in contrast, these parameters were unchanged or became better with age in the control group. In children with developmental disorders, there was a significant association between a higher total CSHQ score and lower academic performance, but no such association was found in the control group. For both groups, children's sleep problems affected their parents' quality of sleep. There were no significant differences in physical, lifestyle, and sleep environmental factors, or in sleep/wake patterns, between the two groups. Children with developmental disorders have poor sleep quality, which may affect academic performance. It is important for physicians to be aware of age-related differences in sleep problems in children with developmental disorders. Further studies are needed to identify the association between sleep quality and

  13. Melanopsin Regulates Both Sleep-Promoting and Arousal-Promoting Responses to Light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Pilorz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Light plays a critical role in the regulation of numerous aspects of physiology and behaviour, including the entrainment of circadian rhythms and the regulation of sleep. These responses involve melanopsin (OPN4-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs in addition to rods and cones. Nocturnal light exposure in rodents has been shown to result in rapid sleep induction, in which melanopsin plays a key role. However, studies have also shown that light exposure can result in elevated corticosterone, a response that is not compatible with sleep. To investigate these contradictory findings and to dissect the relative contribution of pRGCs and rods/cones, we assessed the effects of light of different wavelengths on behaviourally defined sleep. Here, we show that blue light (470 nm causes behavioural arousal, elevating corticosterone and delaying sleep onset. By contrast, green light (530 nm produces rapid sleep induction. Compared to wildtype mice, these responses are altered in melanopsin-deficient mice (Opn4-/-, resulting in enhanced sleep in response to blue light but delayed sleep induction in response to green or white light. We go on to show that blue light evokes higher Fos induction in the SCN compared to the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO, whereas green light produced greater responses in the VLPO. Collectively, our data demonstrates that nocturnal light exposure can have either an arousal- or sleep-promoting effect, and that these responses are melanopsin-mediated via different neural pathways with different spectral sensitivities. These findings raise important questions relating to how artificial light may alter behaviour in both the work and domestic setting.

  14. Circadian Rhythm and Sleep During Prolonged Antarctic Residence at Chinese Zhongshan Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wu, Quan; Xiong, Yanlei; Chen, Guang; Song, Dandan; Xu, Chengli

    2016-12-01

    Residence at Zhongshan Station (69°22'24″S, 76°22'40″E) for over 1 year exposes winter-over members to marked changes of light-dark cycle, ranging from the constant daylight of polar days to the constant darkness of polar nights, in addition to geographic and social isolation. This extreme photoperiodic environment may increase the risk of sleep disturbances and circadian desynchrony. The aim of this study was to investigate the circadian rhythm and sleep phase of Chinese winter-over expeditioners at Zhongshan Station. This study was conducted on 17 healthy male participants before departure from Shanghai and during residence at Zhongshan Station for 1 year (before winter, mid-winter, and end of winter). Sequential urine samples over 48 hours were obtained, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin in urine was assessed, and the circadian rhythm was analyzed by a cosine curve-fitting method. Participants' sleep parameters were obtained from wrist actigraphy and sleep logs. Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire were completed. The acrophase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm, sleep onset, sleep offset, and mid-sleep time were delayed significantly (P circadian rhythm and sleep phase, later chronotype, and incidence of subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. An appropriate combination of artificial bright light during dark winter months and a strict social schedule are recommended in a winter-over station in Antarctica. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    . The underlying reasons for the large variation in the age at pubertal onset are not fully established; however, nutritional status and socioeconomic and environmental factors are known to be influencing, and a significant amount of influencing genetic factors have also been identified. The challenges...... optimal in discriminating especially CDGP from HH. Management of the delayed puberty depends on the etiology. For boys with CDGP an observational period will often reveal imminent puberty. If puberty is not progressing spontaneously, sex steroid replacement is effective in stimulating the development...

  16. Rapid eye movement sleep disturbances in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnulf, I.; Nielsen, J.; Lohmann, E.

    2008-01-01

    and shortened rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and increased periodic leg movements. Three HD patients (12%) had REM sleep behavior disorders. No sleep abnormality correlated with CAG repeat length. Reduced REM sleep duration (but not REM sleep behavior disorders) was present in premanifest carriers and patients...... with very mild HD and worsened with disease severity. In contrast to narcoleptic patients, HD patients had no cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, or sleep paralysis. Four HD patients had abnormally low (sleep latencies, but none had multiple sleep-onset REM periods. Conclusions......: The sleep phenotype of HD includes insomnia, advanced sleep phase, periodic leg movements, REM sleep behavior disorders, and reduced REM sleep but not narcolepsy. Reduced REM sleep may precede chorea. Mutant huntingtin may exert an effect on REM sleep and motor control during sleep Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  17. CD44-deficiency attenuates the immunologic responses to LPS and delays the onset of endotoxic shock-induced renal inflammation and dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rampanelli

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, a potentially deadly clinical condition characterized by whole-body inflammatory state and organ dysfunction. CD44 is a ubiquitously expressed cell-surface transmembrane receptor with multiple functions in inflammatory processes, including sterile renal inflammation. The present study aimed to assess the role of CD44 in endotoxic shock-induced kidney inflammation and dysfunction by using CD44 KO and WT mice exposed intraperitoneally to LPS for 2, 4, and 24 hours . Upon LPS administration, CD44 expression in WT kidneys was augmented at all time-points. At 2 and 4 hours, CD44 KO animals showed a preserved renal function in comparison to WT mice. In absence of CD44, the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in plasma and kidneys were lower, while renal expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was higher. The cytokine levels were associated with decreased leukocyte influx and endothelial activation in CD44 KO kidneys. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated a role of CD44 in enhancing macrophage cytokine responses to LPS and leukocyte migration. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that lack of CD44 impairs the early pro-inflammatory cytokine response to LPS, diminishes leukocyte migration/chemotaxis and endothelial activation, hence, delays endotoxic shock-induced AKI.

  18. Effect of treatment with cyclophosphamide in low doses upon the onset of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: involvement of heart interstitial dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torriceli Souza The

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi results in intense myocarditis, which progresses to a chronic, asymptomatic indeterminate form. The evolution toward this chronic cardiac form occurs in approximately 30% of all cases of T. cruzi infection. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH has been proposed as a potential explanation of the indeterminate form. We investigated the effect of cyclophosphamide (CYCL treatment on the regulatory mechanism of DTH and the participation of heart interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs in this process using BALB/c mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. One group was treated with CYCL (20 mg/kg body weight for one month. A DTH skin test was performed by intradermal injection of T. cruzi antigen (3 mg/mL in the hind-footpad and measured the skin thickness after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The skin test revealed increased thickness in antigen-injected footpads, which was more evident in the mice treated with CYCL than in those mice that did not receive treatment. The thickened regions were characterised by perivascular infiltrates and areas of necrosis. Intense lesions of the myocardium were present in three/16 cases and included large areas of necrosis. Morphometric evaluation of lymphocytes showed a predominance of TCD8 cells. Heart IDCs were immunolabelled with specific antibodies (CD11b and CD11c and T. cruzi antigens were detected using a specific anti-T. cruzi antibody. Identification of T. cruzi antigens, sequestered in these cells using specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies was done, showing a significant increase in the number of these cells in treated mice. These results indicate that IDCs participate in the regulatory mechanisms of DTH response to T. cruzi infection.

  19. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  20. Sleep Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 101 KB) En Español Medicines to Help You Sleep Tips for Better Sleep Basic Facts about Sleep ...

  1. Alcohol and the sleeping brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colrain, Ian M; Nicholas, Christian L; Baker, Fiona C

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol acts as a sedative that interacts with several neurotransmitter systems important in the regulation of sleep. Acute administration of large amounts of alcohol prior to sleep leads to decreased sleep-onset latency and changes in sleep architecture early in the night, when blood alcohol levels are high, with subsequent disrupted, poor-quality sleep later in the night. Alcohol abuse and dependence are associated with chronic sleep disturbance, lower slow-wave sleep, and more rapid-eye-movement sleep than normal, that last long into periods of abstinence and may play a role in relapse. This chapter outlines the evidence for acute and chronic alcohol effects on sleep architecture and sleep electroencephalogram, evidence for tolerance with repeated administration, and possible underlying neurochemical mechanisms for alcohol's effects on sleep. Also discussed are sex differences as well as effects of alcohol on sleep homeostasis and circadian regulation. Evidence for the role of sleep disruption as a risk factor for developing alcohol dependence is discussed in the context of research conducted in adolescents. The utility of sleep-evoked potentials in the assessment of the effects of alcoholism on sleep and the brain and in abstinence-mediated recovery is also outlined. The chapter concludes with a series of questions that need to be answered to determine the role of sleep and sleep disturbance in the development and maintenance of problem drinking and the potential beneficial effects of the treatment of sleep disorders for maintenance of abstinence in alcoholism. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea alters sleep stage transition dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt T Bianchi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced characterization of sleep architecture, compared with routine polysomnographic metrics such as stage percentages and sleep efficiency, may improve the predictive phenotyping of fragmented sleep. One approach involves using stage transition analysis to characterize sleep continuity.We analyzed hypnograms from Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS participants using the following stage designations: wake after sleep onset (WASO, non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, and REM sleep. We show that individual patient hypnograms contain insufficient number of bouts to adequately describe the transition kinetics, necessitating pooling of data. We compared a control group of individuals free of medications, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, medical co-morbidities, or sleepiness (n = 374 with mild (n = 496 or severe OSA (n = 338. WASO, REM sleep, and NREM sleep bout durations exhibited multi-exponential temporal dynamics. The presence of OSA accelerated the "decay" rate of NREM and REM sleep bouts, resulting in instability manifesting as shorter bouts and increased number of stage transitions. For WASO bouts, previously attributed to a power law process, a multi-exponential decay described the data well. Simulations demonstrated that a multi-exponential process can mimic a power law distribution.OSA alters sleep architecture dynamics by decreasing the temporal stability of NREM and REM sleep bouts. Multi-exponential fitting is superior to routine mono-exponential fitting, and may thus provide improved predictive metrics of sleep continuity. However, because a single night of sleep contains insufficient transitions to characterize these dynamics, extended monitoring of sleep, probably at home, would be necessary for individualized clinical application.

  3. Sleep to implement an intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Wilhelm, Ines; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Sleep supports the consolidation of new memories. However, this effect has mainly been shown for memories of past events. Here we investigated the role of sleep for the implementation of intentions for the future. Subjects were instructed on a plan that had to be executed after a delay of 2 days. After plan instruction, subjects were either allowed to sleep or stayed awake for one night (Exp. 1) or had a 3-h sleep period either during the early night (SWS-rich sleep) or late night (REM-rich sleep; Exp. 2). In both experiments, retesting took place 2 days later after one recovery night. Sleep laboratory. A total of 56 healthy young adults participated in the study. N/A. All of the subjects who were allowed to sleep after plan instruction executed the intention 2 days later, whereas only 61% of wake subjects did so (P = 0.004; Exp. 1). Also after early SWS-rich sleep all of the subjects remembered to execute the intention, but only 55% did so after late REM-rich sleep (P = 0.015; Exp. 2). Sleep, especially SWS, plays an important role for the successful implementation of delayed intentions.

  4. Delayed Disease Onset and Extended Survival in the SOD1G93A Rat Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis after Suppression of Mutant SOD1 in the Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Gretchen M.; Gowing, Genevieve; Latter, Jessica; Chen, Maximus; Vit, Jean-Philippe; Staggenborg, Kevin; Avalos, Pablo; Alkaslasi, Mor; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Kaspar, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease with unknown etiology, characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons leading to paralysis and death typically within 3–5 years of onset. Recently, there has been remarkable progress in understanding inherited forms of ALS in which well defined mutations are known to cause the disease. Rodent models in which the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutation is overexpressed recapitulate hallmark signs of ALS in patients. Early anatomical changes in mouse models of fALS are seen in the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and lower motor neurons, and selective reduction of toxic mutant SOD1 in the spinal cord and muscle of these models has beneficial effects. Therefore, much of ALS research has focused on spinal motor neuron and NMJ aspects of the disease. Here we show that, in the SOD1G93A rat model of ALS, spinal motor neuron loss occurs presymptomatically and before degeneration of ventral root axons and denervation of NMJs. Although overt cell death of corticospinal motor neurons does not occur until disease endpoint, we wanted to establish whether the upper motor neuron might still play a critical role in disease progression. Surprisingly, the knockdown of mutant SOD1 in only the motor cortex of presymptomatic SOD1G93A rats through targeted delivery of AAV9–SOD1–shRNA resulted in a significant delay of disease onset, expansion of lifespan, enhanced survival of spinal motor neurons, and maintenance of NMJs. This datum suggests an early dysfunction and thus an important role of the upper motor neuron in this animal model of ALS and perhaps patients with the disease. PMID:25411487

  5. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvolby, A.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals......, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian......-rhythm sleep disorders). Psychostimulant medications are associated with disrupted or disturbed sleep, but also 'paradoxically' calm some patients with ADHD for sleep by alleviating their symptoms. Long-acting formulations may have insufficient duration of action, leading to symptom rebound at bedtime. Current...

  6. The role of sleep in migraine attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Inamorato

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine attacks may be precipitated by sleep deprivation or excessive sleep and sleep is also associated with relief of migraine attacks. In view of this variable relationship we studied the records of 159 consecutive outpatients of our Headache Unit. In 121 records there was reference to sleep involvement, in 55% by a single form and in 45% by more than one form. When only one form was related, relief was most common (70%. 30% of that group of patients had the migraine attack precipitated by sleep, 24% by deprivation and 6% by sleep excess. When the effects of sleep were multiple, these effects were as expected logically in 65%: «in accordance» group (e.g attack precipitated by sleep deprivation and relieved by sleep onset. In a second group, («conflicting» where the involvement was not logical, there were three different combinations of sleep involvement, possibly due to more than one pathophysiological mechanism.

  7. Pulsing blue light through closed eyelids: effects on acute melatonin suppression and phase shifting of dim light melatonin onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Barbara Plitnick, Mark S Rea Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythm disturbances parallel the increased prevalence of sleep disorders in older adults. Light therapies that specifically target regulation of the circadian system in principle could be used to treat sleep disorders in this population. Current recommendations for light treatment require the patients to sit in front of a bright light box for at least 1 hour daily, perhaps limiting their willingness to comply. Light applied through closed eyelids during sleep might not only be efficacious for changing circadian phase but also lead to better compliance because patients would receive light treatment while sleeping. Reported here are the results of two studies investigating the impact of a train of 480 nm (blue light pulses presented to the retina through closed eyelids on melatonin suppression (laboratory study and on delaying circadian phase (field study. Both studies employed a sleep mask that provided narrowband blue light pulses of 2-second duration every 30 seconds from arrays of light-emitting diodes. The results of the laboratory study demonstrated that the blue light pulses significantly suppressed melatonin by an amount similar to that previously shown in the same protocol at half the frequency (ie, one 2-second pulse every minute for 1 hour. The results of the field study demonstrated that blue light pulses given early in the sleep episode significantly delayed circadian phase in older adults; these results are the first to demonstrate the efficacy and practicality of light treatment by a sleep mask aimed at adjusting circadian phase in a home setting. Keywords: circadian phase, dim light melatonin onset, light through closed eyelids, blue light, sleep

  8. Sleep can eliminate list-method directed forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Magdalena; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2013-05-01

    Recent work suggests a link between sleep and memory consolidation, indicating that sleep in comparison to wakefulness stabilizes memories. However, relatively little is known about how sleep affects forgetting. Here we examined whether sleep influences directed forgetting, the finding that people can intentionally forget obsolete memories when cued to do so. We applied the list-method directed forgetting task and assessed memory performance after 3 delay intervals. Directed forgetting was present after a short 20-min delay and after a 12-hr delay filled with diurnal wakefulness; in contrast, the forgetting was absent after a 12-hr delay that included regular nocturnal sleep. Successful directed forgetting after a delay thus can depend on whether sleep or wakefulness follows upon encoding: When wakefulness follows upon encoding, the forgetting can be successful; when sleep follows upon encoding, no forgetting may arise. Connections of the results to recent studies on the interplay between forgetting and sleep are discussed.

  9. Meeting Teen Sleep Needs Creatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    Research on the sleep needs of adolescents and the influence of sleep on learning and behavior have captured the interest of school districts nationwide and in other countries as well. As a result, school officials are being urged to acknowledge the evidence and to adjust school schedules accordingly (e.g., to delay high school start times). The…

  10. Caffeine use in a Super Rugby game and its relationship to post-game sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunican, Ian C; Higgins, Charles C; Jones, Maddison J; Clarke, Michael W; Murray, Kevin; Dawson, Brian; Caldwell, John A; Halson, Shona L; Eastwood, Peter R

    2018-05-01

    To examine the relationship between regular game-related caffeine consumption on sleep after an evening Super Rugby game. Twenty elite rugby union players wore a wrist-activity monitor to measure sleep for three days before, three days after and on the night of an evening Super Rugby game (19:00-21:00). Players ingested caffeine as they would normally (i.e. before and sometimes during a game) and saliva samples were collected before (17:00) and after (21:30) the game for caffeine concentration. Compared to the nights leading up to the game, on the night of the game, players went to bed 3 h later (23:08 ± 66 min vs 02:11 ± 114 min; p sleep (5:54 ± 2:59 vs 8:02 ± 1:24 hh:mm; p sleep after the game. Post-game caffeine saliva concentrations were greater than pre-game levels in 17 players (Pre-game 0.40 µg/mL vs Post-game 2.77 µg/mL; p sleep latency (p sleep efficiency (p sleep duration (p = .06) on game night. Caffeine consumption before a Super Rugby game markedly increases post-game saliva caffeine levels. This may contribute to the observed 3.5 h delay in time at sleep onset and the 1.5 h reduction in sleep duration on the night of the game. This study highlights the need for a strategic approach to the use of caffeine within a Super Rugby team considering the potential effect on post-game sleep.

  11. Differential sleep, sleepiness, and neurophysiology in the insomnia phenotypes of shift work disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Belcher, Ren; Drake, Christopher L; Roth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To characterize and compare insomnia symptoms within two common phenotypes of Shift Work Disorder. Observational laboratory and field study. Hospital sleep center. 34 permanent night workers. Subjects were classified by Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Insomnia Severity Index into 3 subgroups: asymptomatic controls, alert insomniacs (AI), and sleepy insomniacs (SI). Sleep parameters were assessed by sleep diary. Circadian phase was evaluated by dim-light salivary melatonin onset (DLMO). Objective sleepiness was measured using the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Brain activity was measured using the N1 event-related potential (ERP). A tandem repeat in PER3 was genotyped from saliva DNA. (1) AI group showed normal MSLT scores but elevated N1 amplitudes indicating cortical hyperarousal. (2) SI group showed pathologically low MSLT scores but normal N1 amplitudes. (3) AI and SI groups were not significantly different from one another in circadian phase, while controls were significantly phase-delayed relative to both SWD groups. (4) AI showed significantly longer sleep latencies and lower sleep efficiency than controls during both nocturnal and diurnal sleep. SI significantly differed from controls in nocturnal sleep parameters, but differences during diurnal sleep periods were smaller and not statistically significant. (5) Genotype × phenotype χ² analysis showed significant differences in the PER3 VNTR: 9 of 10 shift workers reporting sleepiness in a post hoc genetic substudy were found to carry the long tandem repeat on PER3, while 4 of 14 shift workers without excessive sleepiness carried the long allele. Our results suggest that the sleepy insomnia phenotype is comprehensively explained by circadian misalignment, while the alert insomnia phenotype resembles an insomnia disorder precipitated by shift work. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  12. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase.

  13. Frey's syndrome - unusually long delayed clinical onset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frey's syndrome is a complication of parotidectomy that is thought to occur as a result of aberrant regeneration of the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fibres supplying the parotid gland to severed ostganglionic sympathetic fibres which innervate the sweat glands of the face. Frey's syndrome is difficult to treat but is a ...

  14. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas....... As every organ in the body is affected by sleep directly or indirectly, sleep and sleep-associated disorders are frequent and only now starting to be understood....

  15. Sleep-Active Neurons: Conserved Motors of Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Sleep is crucial for survival and well-being. This behavioral and physiological state has been studied in all major genetically accessible model animals, including rodents, fish, flies, and worms. Genetic and optogenetic studies have identified several neurons that control sleep, making it now possible to compare circuit mechanisms across species. The “motor” of sleep across animal species is formed by neurons that depolarize at the onset of sleep to actively induce this state by directly inhibiting wakefulness. These sleep-inducing neurons are themselves controlled by inhibitory or activating upstream pathways, which act as the “drivers” of the sleep motor: arousal inhibits “sleep-active” neurons whereas various sleep-promoting “tiredness” pathways converge onto sleep-active neurons to depolarize them. This review provides the first overview of sleep-active neurons across the major model animals. The occurrence of sleep-active neurons and their regulation by upstream pathways in both vertebrate and invertebrate species suggests that these neurons are general and ancient components that evolved early in the history of nervous systems. PMID:29618588

  16. Association between Sleep Patterns and Health in Families with Exceptional Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavy Klein

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSleep patterns such as longer sleep duration or napping are associated with poor health outcomes. Although centenarians and their offspring demonstrate a delayed onset of age-related diseases, it is not known whether they have healthier sleep patterns or are protected against the negative effects of sleep disturbances.MethodsData on sleep patterns and health history were collected from Ashkenazi Jewish subjects of the Longevity Genes Project using standardized questionnaires. Participants included individuals with exceptional longevity (centenarians with preserved cognition (n = 348, median age 97 years, their offspring (n = 513, median age 69 years, and controls (n = 199 age-matched to the offspring. Centenarians reported on their sleep patterns at age 70, while the offspring and controls on their current sleep patterns. Biochemical parameters were measured at baseline. Models were adjusted for age, sex, BMI, and use of sleep medication.ResultsThe offspring and controls reported similar sleep patterns, with 33% sleeping ≥8 h and 17% napping in each group. At age 70, centenarians were more likely to have slept ≥8 h (55% and to have napped (28% compared with offspring and controls, p < 0.01. Among centenarians, no association was noted between sleep patterns and health outcomes. Sleeping for ≥8 h was associated with lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in the offspring and controls, and with insulin resistance in the offspring, but not with diabetes. Napping was associated with insulin resistance among the controls (p < 0.01, but not the offspring. Controls, but not offspring, who napped were 2.79 times more likely to have one or more of the following diseases: hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, or diabetes (OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.08–7.21, p = 0.04.ConclusionDespite being more likely to exhibit risky sleep patterns at age 70 compared with the offspring and controls, the

  17. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Sleep Quiz Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents ... on. Photo: iStock Take the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research Sleep Quiz TRUE OR FALSE ? _____1. ...

  18. Effects of Light-Emitting Diode Therapy on Muscle Hypertrophy, Gene Expression, Performance, Damage, and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: Case-control Study with a Pair of Identical Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Bertucci, Danilo; Schiavinato, Josiane; Reiff, Rodrigo; Araújo, Amélia; Panepucci, Rodrigo; Matheucci, Euclides; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Arakelian, Vivian Maria; Hamblin, Michael R; Parizotto, Nivaldo; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify how a pair of monozygotic twins would respond to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) or placebo combined with a strength-training program during 12 weeks. This case-control study enrolled a pair of male monozygotic twins, allocated randomly to LEDT or placebo therapies. Light-emitting diode therapy or placebo was applied from a flexible light-emitting diode array (λ = 850 nm, total energy = 75 J, t = 15 seconds) to both quadriceps femoris muscles of each twin immediately after each strength training session (3 times/wk for 12 weeks) consisting of leg press and leg extension exercises with load of 80% and 50% of the 1-repetition maximum test, respectively. Muscle biopsies, magnetic resonance imaging, maximal load, and fatigue resistance tests were conducted before and after the training program to assess gene expression, muscle hypertrophy and performance, respectively. Creatine kinase levels in blood and visual analog scale assessed muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness, respectively, during the training program. Compared with placebo, LEDT increased the maximal load in exercise and reduced fatigue, creatine kinase, and visual analog scale. Gene expression analyses showed decreases in markers of inflammation (interleukin 1β) and muscle atrophy (myostatin) with LEDT. Protein synthesis (mammalian target of rapamycin) and oxidative stress defense (SOD2 [mitochondrial superoxide dismutase]) were up-regulated with LEDT, together with increases in thigh muscle hypertrophy. Light-emitting diode therapy can be useful to reduce muscle damage, pain, and atrophy, as well as to increase muscle mass, recovery, and athletic performance in rehabilitation programs and sports medicine.

  19. Sleep During Pregnancy: The nuMoM2b Pregnancy and Sleep Duration and Continuity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kathryn J; Facco, Francesca L; Grobman, William A; Parker, Corette B; Herbas, Marcos; Hunter, Shannon; Silver, Robert M; Basner, Robert C; Saade, George R; Pien, Grace W; Manchanda, Shalini; Louis, Judette M; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Lang; Chung, Judith H; Wing, Deborah A; Simhan, Hyagriv N; Haas, David M; Iams, Jay; Parry, Samuel; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-05-01

    To characterize sleep duration, timing and continuity measures in pregnancy and their association with key demographic variables. Multisite prospective cohort study. Women enrolled in the nuMoM2b study (nulliparous women with a singleton gestation) were recruited at the second study visit (16-21 weeks of gestation) to participate in the Sleep Duration and Continuity substudy. Women sleep log for 7 consecutive days. Time in bed, sleep duration, fragmentation index, sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset, and sleep midpoint were averaged across valid primary sleep periods for each participant. Valid data were available from 782 women with mean age of 27.3 (5.5) years. Median sleep duration was 7.4 hours. Approximately 27.9% of women had a sleep duration of sleep duration of >9 hours. In multivariable models including age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, insurance status, and recent smoking history, sleep duration was significantly associated with race/ethnicity and insurance status, while time in bed was only associated with insurance status. Sleep continuity measures and sleep midpoint were significantly associated with all covariates in the model, with the exception of age for fragmentation index and smoking for wake after sleep onset. Our results demonstrate the relationship between sleep and important demographic characteristics during pregnancy. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Sleep deprivation: consequences for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhefka, Julie King

    2011-09-01

    During the adolescent years, a delayed pattern of the sleep-wake cycle occurs. Many parents and health care providers are not aware that once established, these poor sleep habits can continue into adulthood. Early school hours start a pattern of sleep loss that begins a cycle of daytime sleepiness, which may affect mood, behavior, and increase risk for accidents or injury. These sleep-deprived habits established in adolescence can often lead to problems during college years. Sleep hygiene can be initiated to help break the cycle, along with education and implementation of a strict regimen. Monitoring all adolescents and college-aged students for sleep insufficiency is imperative to improve both academic and emotional well-being. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. AASM standards of practice compliant validation of actigraphic sleep analysis from SOMNOwatch(TM) versus polysomnographic sleep diagnostics shows high conformity also among subjects with sleep disordered breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, R; Schulz, J; Penzel, T; Fietze, I; Partinen, M; Hein, H

    2010-01-01

    In recent AASM practice, parameter actimetry is cited to measure total sleep time in obstructive sleep apnoea patients, when polysomnography is not available. An actigraph was therefore compared to polysomnographic data in 28 subjects with known sleep disordered breathing. Total sleep time (TST), sleep period time (SPT), sleep efficiency (SE), sustained sleep efficiency (SSE), sleep onset latency (SL) and sleep/wake pattern were compared to gold standard polysomnography. The results of an epoch-by-epoch comparison of sleep/wake from actigraphy to sleep stages from polysomnography gave a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 95.2% and an overall accuracy of 85.9%. Correlations were moderately strong for SE (0.71, p < 0.001) and SSE (0.65, p < 0.001) and high for TST (0.89, p < 0.001), SPT (0.91, p < 0.001) and SL (0.89, p < 0.001). It was concluded that actigraphy is not identical with PSG recording but gives good results in sleep/wake patterns and predicting TST, SPT, SSE, SE and SL also in sleep apnoea patients not suffering from other sleep disorders. The difficult detection of correct sleep onset causes SSE and SL to be less predictable. Therefore a 15-epoch criterion was introduced and resulted in high correlation of 0.89 for sleep latency, but has to be tested on a bigger population

  2. Auditory stimuli elicit hippocampal neuronal responses during sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina eVinnik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate how hippocampal neurons code behaviorally salient stimuli, we recorded from neurons in the CA1 region of hippocampus in rats while they learned to associate the presence of sound with water reward. Rats learned to alternate between two reward ports at which, in 50 percent of the trials, sound stimuli were presented followed by water reward after a 3-second delay. Sound at the water port predicted subsequent reward delivery in 100 percent of the trials and the absence of sound predicted reward omission. During this task, 40% of recorded neurons fired differently according to which of the 2 reward ports the rat was visiting. A smaller fraction of neurons demonstrated onset response to sound/nosepoke (19% and reward delivery (24%. When the sounds were played during passive wakefulness, 8% of neurons responded with short latency onset responses; 25% of neurons responded to sounds when they were played during sleep. Based on the current findings and the results of previous experiments we propose the existence of two types of hippocampal neuronal responses to sounds: sound-onset responses with very short latency and longer-lasting sound-specific responses that are likely to be present when the animal is actively engaged in the task. During sleep the short-latency responses in hippocampus are intermingled with sustained activity which in the current experiment was detected for 1-2 seconds.

  3. Actigraphic Sleep Duration and Fragmentation in Older Women: Associations With Performance Across Cognitive Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spira, Adam P; Stone, Katie L; Redline, Susan; Ensrud, Kristine E; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Cauley, Jane A; Yaffe, Kristine

    2017-08-01

    To determine the association of actigraphic sleep duration and fragmentation with cognition in community-dwelling older women. We studied 782 women (mean age = 87.4) of varied cognitive status from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures who completed wrist actigraphy and the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS), California Verbal Learning Test-II-Short Form, digit span, verbal fluency tests, and the Trailmaking Test, Part B (Trails B). Total sleep time (TST) and wake after sleep onset (WASO) tertiles were our primary predictors. There were few significant associations in adjusted analyses. Compared to women with intermediate TST (mean = 430.1 minutes), those with the longest (508.7 minutes) had significantly poorer performance on the 3MS and phonemic and semantic fluency. Compared to women with the least WASO (31.5 minutes), those in the middle tertile (61.5 minutes) had significantly poorer delayed recall and those in the middle tertile and highest tertile (126.2 minutes) had poorer total recall and semantic fluency. We observed significant adjusted associations of TST with impaired 3MS performance and of WASO with impaired delayed recall, semantic fluency, and digit span. After excluding participants with adjudicated dementia diagnoses or indeterminate cognitive status, some adjusted associations remained but decreased in magnitude, others became nonsignificant, and a new association emerged. In community-dwelling older women, longer objectively measured sleep duration and greater sleep fragmentation are associated with poorer performance and impairment in only a subset of cognitive domains. Some of these associations may be driven by women with dementia in whom disturbed sleep and cognitive performance share an underlying neuropathological basis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Sleep Research Society (SRS) 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Determinants of perceived sleep quality in normal sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelema, M S; Regis, M; Haakma, R; van den Heuvel, E R; Markopoulos, P; Overeem, S

    2017-09-20

    This study aimed to establish the determinants of perceived sleep quality over a longer period of time, taking into account the separate contributions of actigraphy-based sleep measures and self-reported sleep indices. Fifty participants (52 ± 6.6 years; 27 females) completed two consecutive weeks of home monitoring, during which they kept a sleep-wake diary while their sleep was monitored using a wrist-worn actigraph. The diary included questions on perceived sleep quality, sleep-wake information, and additional factors such as well-being and stress. The data were analyzed using multilevel models to compare a model that included only actigraphy-based sleep measures (model Acti) to a model that included only self-reported sleep measures to explain perceived sleep quality (model Self). In addition, a model based on the self-reported sleep measures and extended with nonsleep-related factors was analyzed to find the most significant determinants of perceived sleep quality (model Extended). Self-reported sleep measures (model Self) explained 61% of the total variance, while actigraphy-based sleep measures (model Acti) only accounted for 41% of the perceived sleep quality. The main predictors in the self-reported model were number of awakenings during the night, sleep onset latency, and wake time after sleep onset. In the extended model, the number of awakenings during the night and total sleep time of the previous night were the strongest determinants of perceived sleep quality, with 64% of the variance explained. In our cohort, perceived sleep quality was mainly determined by self-reported sleep measures and less by actigraphy-based sleep indices. These data further stress the importance of taking multiple nights into account when trying to understand perceived sleep quality.

  5. Sleep board review questions: the late riser

    OpenAIRE

    Afaq T; Burhiraja R

    2012-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 22-year-old male presents to Sleep Clinic for sleep onset insomnia and difficulty waking up in the morning. He plans to begin a new job in a few weeks, which would require him to wake up at 6 AM. He usually goes to sleep at 2 AM and wakes up at 10 AM. He remembers having this problem through high school and college. He admits to being unable to sleep even if he goes to bed at an earlier time. He reports sleeping through alarms in the...

  6. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  7. REM sleep deprivation during 5 hours leads to an immediate REM sleep rebound and to suppression of non-REM sleep intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, D.G.M.; Dijk, D.J.; Blok, Guus; Everhardus, I.

    Nine healthy male subjects were deprived of REM sleep during the first 5 h after sleep onset. Afterwards recovery sleep was undisturbed. During the deprivation period the non-REM EEG power spectrum was reduced when compared to baseline for the frequencies up to 7 Hz, despite the fact that non-REM

  8. Assessment of sleep quality in powernapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooravand Takht Sabzy, Bashaer; Thomsen, Carsten E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the Sleep Quality (SQ) in powernapping. The contributed factors for SQ assessment are time of Sleep Onset (SO), Sleep Length (SL), Sleep Depth (SD), and detection of sleep events (K-complex (KC) and Sleep Spindle (SS)). Data from daytime nap for 10 subjects, 2...... days each, including EEG and ECG were recorded. The SD and sleep events were analyzed by applying spectral analysis. The SO time was detected by a combination of signal spectral analysis, Slow Rolling Eye Movement (SREM) detection, Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis and EEG segmentation using both...... Autocorrelation Function (ACF), and Crosscorrelation Function (CCF) methods. The EEG derivation FP1-FP2 filtered in a narrow band and used as an alternative to EOG for SREM detection. The ACF and CCF segmentation methods were also applied for detection of sleep events. The ACF method detects segment boundaries...

  9. Individual differences in compliance and agreement for sleep logs and wrist actigraphy: A longitudinal study of naturalistic sleep in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Thurman

    Full Text Available There is extensive laboratory research studying the effects of acute sleep deprivation on biological and cognitive functions, yet much less is known about naturalistic patterns of sleep loss and the potential impact on daily or weekly functioning of an individual. Longitudinal studies are needed to advance our understanding of relationships between naturalistic sleep and fluctuations in human health and performance, but it is first necessary to understand the efficacy of current tools for long-term sleep monitoring. The present study used wrist actigraphy and sleep log diaries to obtain daily measurements of sleep from 30 healthy adults for up to 16 consecutive weeks. We used non-parametric Bland-Altman analysis and correlation coefficients to calculate agreement between subjectively and objectively measured variables including sleep onset time, sleep offset time, sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, the amount of wake time after sleep onset, and total sleep time. We also examined compliance data on the submission of daily sleep logs according to the experimental protocol. Overall, we found strong agreement for sleep onset and sleep offset times, but relatively poor agreement for variables related to wakefulness including sleep onset latency, awakenings, and wake after sleep onset. Compliance tended to decrease significantly over time according to a linear function, but there were substantial individual differences in overall compliance rates. There were also individual differences in agreement that could be explained, in part, by differences in compliance. Individuals who were consistently more compliant over time also tended to show the best agreement and lower scores on behavioral avoidance scale (BIS. Our results provide evidence for convergent validity in measuring sleep onset and sleep offset with wrist actigraphy and sleep logs, and we conclude by proposing an analysis method to mitigate the impact of non-compliance and measurement

  10. Sleep Paralysis and Hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Stores

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty features prominently in the folklore of various countries.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David P; Younes, Magdy K

    2012-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by repetitive collapse of the pharyngeal airway during sleep. Control of pharyngeal patency is a complex process relating primarily to basic anatomy and the activity of many pharyngeal dilator muscles. The control of these muscles is regulated by a number of processes including respiratory drive, negative pressure reflexes, and state (sleep) effects. In general, patients with OSA have an anatomically small airway the patency of which is maintained during wakefulness by reflex-driven augmented dilator muscle activation. At sleep onset, muscle activity falls, thereby compromising the upper airway. However, recent data suggest that the mechanism of OSA differs substantially among patients, with variable contributions from several physiologic characteristics including, among others: level of upper airway dilator muscle activation required to open the airway, increase in chemical drive required to recruit the pharyngeal muscles, chemical control loop gain, and arousal threshold. Thus, the cause of sleep apnea likely varies substantially between patients. Other physiologic mechanisms likely contributing to OSA pathogenesis include falling lung volume during sleep, shifts in blood volume from peripheral tissues to the neck, and airway edema. Apnea severity may progress over time, likely due to weight gain, muscle/nerve injury, aging effects on airway anatomy/collapsibility, and changes in ventilatory control stability. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  12. Effects of daily maladaptive coping on nightly sleep in mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jennifer N; Epel, Elissa S; Coccia, Michael; Puterman, Eli; Prather, Aric A

    2018-01-01

    We examined effects of daily rumination and suppression in response to stressors on objective and subjective sleep among mothers. Participants were 183 mothers, including chronically stressed mothers of children with an autism spectrum disorder (M-ASD; n = 92) and age-matched mothers of neurotypical children (M-NT; n = 91). In an intensive longitudinal design, participants provided reports of daily rumination and suppression, nightly objective actigraphy-defined sleep and nightly subjective sleep quality for seven consecutive days at baseline, 9 months and 18 months. Total sleep time, sleep fragmentation, sleep onset latency, and subjective sleep quality. Among M-NT with above average depressive symptoms, higher daily rumination was associated with shorter total sleep time. Rumination was associated with more sleep fragmentation among M-NT at the trend level. Rumination was not associated with sleep onset latency among M-NT, or with any sleep outcomes among M-ASD. Suppression was not associated with any sleep outcomes. We provide novel evidence of the effect of rumination on objectively measured sleep duration among M-NT. Coping was not related to sleep among M-ASD. Given the prevalence of poor sleep among mothers, future work should examine modifiable factors perpetuating sleep disturbance.

  13. Sleep Insufficiency, Sleep Health Problems and Performance in High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Ming

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey on sleep schedule, sleep health, school performance and school start times was conducted in 1,941 adolescents. A high level of early and circadian-disadvantaged sleep/wake schedules during weekdays was observed. Shorter sleep duration on weekdays was reported, especially in upper classmen. Complaints of inadequate sleep and sleepiness during weekdays, alarm clock use, and napping were prevalent. Night awakening and prolonged sleep onset were common and associated with poor school performance. Students with a sleep length of less than 7 hours on both weekdays and weekends exhibited poorer performance, while those who made up this sleep loss on weekends did not. The total number of poor sleep factors in an individual also correlated with poor school performance. Earlier school start times were associated with a perception of poor sleep quality, shorter sleep duration and more sleep health problems. We conclude that sleep inadequacies and sleep health problems were prevalent in this population, especially in those who started school earlier in the morning, and that these poor sleep factors were associated with school performance.

  14. Sleep and Mental Health in Undergraduate Students with Generally Healthy Sleep Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevich, Helen M; Lukowski, Angela F

    2016-01-01

    Whereas previous research has indicated that sleep problems tend to co-occur with increased mental health issues in university students, relatively little is known about relations between sleep quality and mental health in university students with generally healthy sleep habits. Understanding relations between sleep and mental health in individuals with generally healthy sleep habits is important because (a) student sleep habits tend to worsen over time and (b) even time-limited experience of sleep problems may have significant implications for the onset of mental health problems. In the present research, 69 university students with generally healthy sleep habits completed questionnaires about sleep quality and mental health. Although participants did not report clinically concerning mental health issues as a group, global sleep quality was associated with mental health. Regression analyses revealed that nighttime sleep duration and the frequency of nighttime sleep disruptions were differentially related to total problems and clinically-relevant symptoms of psychological distress. These results indicate that understanding relations between sleep and mental health in university students with generally healthy sleep habits is important not only due to the large number of undergraduates who experience sleep problems and mental health issues over time but also due to the potential to intervene and improve mental health outcomes before they become clinically concerning.

  15. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna eMantua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations. Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of word pairs in the morning or evening, and recall was assessed 12-hrs later, following an interval awake or with overnight sleep. Young adult participants (18-22 yrs were assigned to one of four experimental groups: TBI Sleep (n=14, TBI Wake (n=12, non-TBI Sleep (n=15, non-TBI Wake (n=15. Each TBI participant was >1 yr post-injury. Sleep physiology was measured with polysomnography. Memory consolidation was assessed by comparing change in word-pair recall over 12-hr intersession intervals. The TBI group spent a significantly greater proportion of the night in SWS than the non-TBI group at the expense of NREM1. The TBI group also had marginally lower EEG delta power during SWS in the central region. Intersession changes in recall were greater for intervals with sleep than without sleep in both groups. However, despite abnormal sleep stage proportions for individuals with a TBI history, there was no difference in the intersession change in recall following sleep for the TBI and non-TBI groups. In both Sleep groups combined, there was a positive correlation between Intersession Change and the proportion of the night in NREM2 + SWS. Overall, sleep composition is altered following TBI but such deficits do not yield insufficiencies in sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

  16. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    OpenAIRE

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages) may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. Th...

  17. Low Activity Microstates During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Hiroyuki; Billeh, Yazan N; Diba, Kamran

    2017-06-01

    To better understand the distinct activity patterns of the brain during sleep, we observed and investigated periods of diminished oscillatory and population spiking activity lasting for seconds during non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep, which we call "LOW" activity sleep. We analyzed spiking and local field potential (LFP) activity of hippocampal CA1 region alongside neocortical electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) in 19 sessions from four male Long-Evans rats (260-360 g) during natural wake/sleep across the 24-hr cycle as well as data from other brain regions obtained from http://crcns.org.1,2. LOW states lasted longer than OFF/DOWN states and were distinguished by a subset of "LOW-active" cells. LOW activity sleep was preceded and followed by increased sharp-wave ripple activity. We also observed decreased slow-wave activity and sleep spindles in the hippocampal LFP and neocortical EEG upon LOW onset, with a partial rebound immediately after LOW. LOW states demonstrated activity patterns consistent with sleep but frequently transitioned into microarousals and showed EMG and LFP differences from small-amplitude irregular activity during quiet waking. Their likelihood decreased within individual non-REM epochs yet increased over the course of sleep. By analyzing data from the entorhinal cortex of rats,1 as well as the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex, the postsubiculum, and the anterior thalamus of mice,2 obtained from http://crcns.org, we confirmed that LOW states corresponded to markedly diminished activity simultaneously in all of these regions. We propose that LOW states are an important microstate within non-REM sleep that provide respite from high-activity sleep and may serve a restorative function. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  18. Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality of Third-Trimester Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shao-Yu; Lee, Chien-Nan; Wu, Wei-Wen; Landis, Carol A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the associations of sleep hygiene and actigraphy measures of sleep with self-reported sleep quality in 197 pregnant women in northern Taiwan. Third-trimester pregnant women completed the Sleep Hygiene Practice Scale (SHPS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as well as the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and wore an actigraph for 7 consecutive days. Student's t-test was used to compare the SHPS scores and means as well as variability of actigraphy sleep variables between poor sleepers (i.e., PSQI global score >5) and good sleepers (i.e., PSQI global score ≤5). Compared to good sleepers, poor sleepers reported significantly worse sleep hygiene, with higher SHPS scores and higher sleep schedule, arousal-related behavior, and sleep environment subscale scores. Poor sleepers had significantly greater intra-individual variability of sleep onset latency, total nighttime sleep, and wake after sleep onset than good sleepers. In stepwise linear regression, older maternal age (p = .01), fewer employment hours per week (p = .01), higher CES-D total score (p hygiene intervention in women during pregnancy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Healthy Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea Testing CPAP Healthy Sleep Habits Healthy Sleep Habits Your behaviors during the day, and especially ... team at an AASM accredited sleep center . Quick Sleep Tips Follow these tips to establish healthy sleep ...

  20. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ...

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ...

  2. Binary combination of epsilon-poly-L-lysine and isoeugenol affect progression of spoilage microbiota in fresh turkey meat, and delay onset of spoilage in Pseudomonas putida challenged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Meyer, Rikke L; Peng, Min; Hibberd, Ashley A; Fischer, Jana; Sigmundsson, Arnar; Mygind, Tina

    2015-12-23

    abundance species. We observed a similar shift among the dominant species in meat treated with ε-PL or the antimicrobial blend, but the samples differed markedly in the composition of less abundant species. In contrast, the overall species diversity was constant during incubation of turkey meat challenged with P. putida although the microbiota composition did change over time. Untreated or ε-PL treated samples progressed from a Pseudomonas spp. to a Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae dominated food matrix, while treatment with the antimicrobial blend resulted in increased relative abundance of Hafnia spp., Enterococcaceae, and Photobacterium spp. We conclude that the blend delayed the onset of spoilage of challenged meat, and that all antimicrobial treatments of unchallenged or challenged meat affect the progression of the microbial community composition. Our study confirms that the antimicrobial effects observed in vitro can be extrapolated to a food matrix such as turkey meat. However, it also underlines the consequence of species-to-species variation in susceptibility to antimicrobials, namely that the microbial community change while the CFU remains the same. Addition of antimicrobials may thus prevent the growth of some microorganisms, allowing others to proliferate in their place. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  4. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized...... by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however...... with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic...

  5. Sleep and Premenstrual Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehan, Shazia; Auguste, Evan; Hussain, Mahjabeen; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Brzezinski, Amon; Gupta, Ravi; Attarian, Hrayr; Jean-Louis, Giradin; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is unknown; it may be due to the normal effect of hormones during the menstrual cycle as it occurs in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.PMS affects women of childbearing age and remits with the onset of menstruation. The menstrual phase is known to influence stage 2 and REM sleep in women, irrespective of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Women with PMDD showed a decreased response to melatonin in their luteal phase as compared to the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. However, melatonin duration or timing of offset in the morning has not been reported to correlate with the mood. Rather, improvement in mood-related symptoms of PMDD has been found to be influenced by sleep deprivation, be it sleep restrictions in early or late night. Sleep disturbance and decreased melatonin secretions due to hormonal fluctuations during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle could explain the sleep complaints of PMDD. PMID:28239684

  6. Preserved sleep microstructure in blind individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubin, Sébrina; Christensen, Julie A.E.; Jennum, Poul

    2018-01-01

    , as light is the primary zeitgeber of the master biological clock found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a greater number of sleep disturbances is often reported in blind individuals. Here, we examined various electroencephalographic microstructural components of sleep, both...... during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep, between blind individuals, including both of early and late onset, and normal-sighted controls. During wakefulness, occipital alpha oscillations were lower, or absent in blind individuals. During sleep, differences were observed across...... electrode derivations between the early and late blind samples, which may reflect altered cortical networking in early blindness. Despite these differences in power spectra density, the electroencephalography microstructure of sleep, including sleep spindles, slow wave activity, and sawtooth waves, remained...

  7. How Many Sleep Diary Entries Are Needed to Reliably Estimate Adolescent Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Teresa; Gradisar, Michael; Taheri, Shahrad; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Study Objectives: To investigate (1) how many nights of sleep diary entries are required for reliable estimates of five sleep-related outcomes (bedtime, wake time, sleep onset latency [SOL], sleep duration, and wake after sleep onset [WASO]) and (2) the test–retest reliability of sleep diary estimates of school night sleep across 12 weeks. Methods: Data were drawn from four adolescent samples (Australia [n = 385], Qatar [n = 245], United Kingdom [n = 770], and United States [n = 366]), who provided 1766 eligible sleep diary weeks for reliability analyses. We performed reliability analyses for each cohort using complete data (7 days), one to five school nights, and one to two weekend nights. We also performed test–retest reliability analyses on 12-week sleep diary data available from a subgroup of 55 US adolescents. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients for bedtime, SOL, and sleep duration indicated good-to-excellent reliability from five weekday nights of sleep diary entries across all adolescent cohorts. Four school nights was sufficient for wake times in the Australian and UK samples, but not the US or Qatari samples. Only Australian adolescents showed good reliability for two weekend nights of bedtime reports; estimates of SOL were adequate for UK adolescents based on two weekend nights. WASO was not reliably estimated using 1 week of sleep diaries. We observed excellent test–rest reliability across 12 weeks of sleep diary data in a subsample of US adolescents. Conclusion: We recommend at least five weekday nights of sleep dairy entries to be made when studying adolescent bedtimes, SOL, and sleep duration. Adolescent sleep patterns were stable across 12 consecutive school weeks. PMID:28199718

  8. Does sleep quality affect involuntary attention switching system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Juha; Huotilainen, Minna; Pakarinen, Satu; Siren, Teo; Alho, Kimmo; Aronen, Eeva T

    2005-12-30

    We studied the relationship between sleep quality and quantity and subsequently recorded automatically evoked event-related potential (ERP) responses. In previous studies decrement of attentional processing has been associated with changes in sleep. Sleep is shown to associate also with ERPs elicited by unattended sound stream, however, there is no consensus on these effects. A recent study suggested that the early anterior P3a to novel stimuli in attended stream is attenuated and the late parietal P3a is strengthened by total sleep deprivation. We carried out 72-h consecutive actigraphy measurements in a naturalistic setting to collect information about variation in sleep duration, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, and percentage of sleep. MMN and P3a deflections to infrequent changes in sound duration and pitch in unattended sound stream were obtained in a separate recording session from the same subjects when they were awake. No significant correlations were found between sleep and MMN parameters, indicating that MMN is resistant to normal variation in sleep. However, P3a to both pitch and duration changes correlated positively with sleep onset latency, and P3a to duration changes correlated negatively with sleep efficiency and percentage of sleep. The correlation was higher in the posterior scalp areas. Our results suggest that the involuntary attention switching system, reflected by the P3a is sensitized as a function of decreased sleep quality.

  9. Adolescent sleep patterns and night-time technology use: results of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Big Sleep Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Gamble

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Electronic devices in the bedroom are broadly linked with poor sleep in adolescents. This study investigated whether there is a dose-response relationship between use of electronic devices (computers, cellphones, televisions and radios in bed prior to sleep and adolescent sleep patterns. METHODS: Adolescents aged 11-17 yrs (n = 1,184; 67.6% female completed an Australia-wide internet survey that examined sleep patterns, sleepiness, sleep disorders, the presence of electronic devices in the bedroom and frequency of use in bed at night. RESULTS: Over 70% of adolescents reported 2 or more electronic devices in their bedroom at night. Use of devices in bed a few nights per week or more was 46.8% cellphone, 38.5% computer, 23.2% TV, and 15.8% radio. Device use had dose-dependent associations with later sleep onset on weekdays (highest-dose computer adjOR  = 3.75: 99% CI  = 2.17-6.46; cellphone 2.29: 1.22-4.30 and weekends (computer 3.68: 2.14-6.32; cellphone 3.24: 1.70-6.19; TV 2.32: 1.30-4.14, and later waking on weekdays (computer 2.08: 1.25-3.44; TV 2.31: 1.33-4.02 and weekends (computer 1.99: 1.21-3.26; cellphone 2.33: 1.33-4.08; TV 2.04: 1.18-3.55. Only 'almost every night' computer use (: 2.43: 1.45-4.08 was associated with short weekday sleep duration, and only 'almost every night' cellphone use (2.23: 1.26-3.94 was associated with wake lag (waking later on weekends. CONCLUSIONS: Use of computers, cell-phones and televisions at higher doses was associated with delayed sleep/wake schedules and wake lag, potentially impairing health and educational outcomes.

  10. Comparing the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and Munich ChronoType Questionnaire to the Dim Light Melatonin Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Sung, Haein; Burgess, Helen J

    2015-10-01

    The dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is the most reliable measure of central circadian timing in humans. However, it is not always possible to measure the DLMO because sample collection has to occur in the hours before usual sleep onset, it requires staff support and considerable participant effort, and it is relatively expensive. Questionnaires that ask people about the timing of their behavior, such as their sleep, may provide an easier and less expensive estimate of circadian timing. The objective of this analysis was to compare the MEQ score derived from the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) and the MSFsc derived from the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ) to the DLMO in the largest sample to date (N = 60). Our hypothesis was that MSFsc would correlate more highly with the DLMO than MEQ score. Our sample of 36 healthy controls and 24 patients with delayed sleep phase disorder ranged in age from 18 to 62 years. All participants slept at times of their own choosing for a week before the assessment of their DLMO. The DLMO correlated significantly with both the MEQ score (r = -0.70, p light or exogenous melatonin treatment, as this could result in the mistiming of these treatments relative to the DLMO, thereby potentially worsening circadian misalignment. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Description of a Sleep-Restriction Program to Reduce Bedtime Disturbances and Night Waking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, V. Mark; Christodulu, Kristin V.

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe a behavioral intervention designed to reduce sleep problems without increasing disruption at bedtime or throughout the evening. Sleep restriction was used to reduce the bedtime and nighttime sleep problems of two children, a 4-year-old girl with autism and a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay. Sleep restriction involved…

  12. Sleep problems in pediatric epilepsy and ADHD: The impact of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Okuyaz, Çetin; Gunes, Serkan; Ekinci, Nuran; Kalınlı, Merve; Tan, Muhammet Emin; Teke, Halenur; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğulları; Erdoğan, Semra

    2017-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a frequent comorbidity in pediatric epilepsy. Although sleep problems are commonly reported in both children with primary ADHD and epilepsy, those with epilepsy-ADHD comorbidity have not been well studied. This study aimed to compare sleep problems among three groups of children: 1) children with epilepsy, 2) children with epilepsy and ADHD (epilepsy-ADHD), and 3) children with primary ADHD. 53 children with epilepsy, 35 children with epilepsy-ADHD, and 52 children with primary ADHD completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Neurology clinic charts were reviewed for the epilepsy-related variables. ADHD subtypes were diagnosed according to the DSM-IV. Children with epilepsy-ADHD had the highest CSHQ total scores, while children with primary ADHD had higher scores than those with epilepsy. Besides the total score, epilepsy-ADHD group differed from the primary ADHD and epilepsy groups with higher CSHQ subscores on sleep onset delay and sleep anxiety. The frequency of moderate-severe sleep problems (CSHQ>56) was 62.9% in children with epilepsy-ADHD, while it was 40.4% and 26.4% in children with primary ADHD and epilepsy, respectively. CSHQ total scores were not different between ADHD subtypes in both children with epilepsy-ADHD and those with primary ADHD. None of the epilepsy-related variables were found to be associated with CSHQ scores. Epilepsy-ADHD is associated with a significantly poor sleep quality which is beyond that of primary ADHD and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley M; Jim, Heather S L; Small, Brent J; Nishihori, Taiga; Gonzalez, Brian D; Cessna, Julie M; Hyland, Kelly A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2018-03-01

    Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6-18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p valuesdisruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

  14. Mammalian sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  15. EEG Changes across Multiple Nights of Sleep Restriction and Recovery in Adolescents: The Need for Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ju Lynn; Lo, June C; Gooley, Joshua J; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-06-01

    To investigate sleep EEG changes in adolescents across 7 nights of sleep restriction to 5 h time in bed [TIB]) and 3 recovery nights of 9 h TIB. A parallel-group design, quasi-laboratory study was conducted in a boarding school. Fifty-five healthy adolescents (25 males, age = 15-19 y) who reported habitual TIBs of approximately 6 h on week nights (group average) but extended their sleep on weekends were randomly assigned to Sleep Restriction (SR) or Control groups. Participants underwent a 2-week protocol comprising 3 baseline nights (TIB = 9 h), 7 nights of sleep opportunity manipulation (TIB = 5 h for the SR and 9 h for the Control group), and 3 nights of recovery sleep (TIB = 9 h). Polysomnography was obtained on two baseline, three manipulation, and two recovery nights. Across the sleep restriction nights, total SWS duration was preserved relative to the 9 h baseline sleep opportunity, while other sleep stages were reduced. Considering only the first 5 h of sleep opportunity, SR participants had reduced N1 duration and wake after sleep onset (WASO), and increased total sleep time (TST), rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and slow wave sleep (SWS) relative to baseline. Total REM sleep, N2, and TST duration remained above baseline levels by the third recovery sleep episode. In spite of preservation of SWS duration over multiple nights of sleep restriction, adolescents accustomed to curtailing nocturnal sleep on school day nights evidence residual effects on sleep macro-structure, even after three nights of recovery sleep. Older teenagers may not be as resilient to successive nights of sleep restriction as is commonly believed. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Systematic review: relationships between sleep and gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, J; Holloway, R H; Eastwood, P R

    2013-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) adversely impacts on sleep, but the mechanism remains unclear. To review the literature concerning gastro-oesophageal reflux during the sleep period, with particular reference to the sleep/awake state at reflux onset. Studies identified by systematic literature searches were assessed. Overall patterns of reflux during the sleep period show consistently that oesophageal acid clearance is slower, and reflux frequency and oesophageal acid exposure are higher in patients with GERD than in healthy individuals. Of the 17 mechanistic studies identified by the searches, 15 reported that a minority of reflux episodes occurred during stable sleep, but the prevailing sleep state at the onset of reflux in these studies remains unclear owing to insufficient temporal resolution of recording or analysis methods. Two studies, in healthy individuals and patients with GERD, analysed sleep and pH with adequate resolution for temporal alignment of sleep state and the onset of reflux: all 232 sleep period reflux episodes evaluated occurred during arousals from sleep lasting less than 15 s or during longer duration awakenings. Six mechanistic studies found that transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations were the most common mechanism of sleep period reflux. Contrary to the prevailing view, subjective impairment of sleep in GERD is unlikely to be due to the occurrence of reflux during stable sleep, but could result from slow clearance of acid reflux that occurs during arousals or awakenings from sleep. Definitive studies are needed on the sleep/awake state at reflux onset across the full GERD spectrum. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...

  18. Preliminary evidence that light through the eyelids can suppress melatonin and phase shift dim light melatonin onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Rea, Mark S

    2012-05-07

    A previous study reported a method for measuring the spectral transmittance of individual human eyelids. A prototype light mask using narrow-band "green" light (λmax = 527 nm) was used to deliver light through closed eyelids in two within-subjects studies. The first study investigated whether an individual-specific light dose could suppress melatonin by 40% through the closed eyelid without disrupting sleep. The light doses were delivered at three times during the night: 1) beginning (while subjects were awake), 2) middle (during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep), and 3) end (during non-REM sleep). The second study investigated whether two individual-specific light doses expected to suppress melatonin by 30% and 60% and delivered through subjects' closed eyelids before the time of their predicted minimum core body temperature would phase delay the timing of their dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Compared to a dark control night, light delivered through eyelids suppressed melatonin by 36% (p = 0.01) after 60-minute light exposure at the beginning, 45% (p = 0.01) at the middle, and 56% (p light levels 1 and 2, respectively. These studies demonstrate that individual-specific doses of light delivered through closed eyelids can suppress melatonin and phase shift DLMO and may be used to treat circadian sleep disorders.

  19. Temperature biofeedback and sleep: limited findings and methodological challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Koninck J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Geneviève Forest,1,2 Cameron van den Heuvel,3 Kurt Lushington,4 Joseph De Koninck21Sleep Laboratory, Département de Psychoéducation et de Psychologie, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, Québec, Canada; 2Sleep and Dreams Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 3Research Branch University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 4School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, South Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Given the close link between body temperature and sleep, the perspective of manipulating core and peripheral temperature by self-regulation techniques is very appealing. We report here on a series of attempts conducted independently in two laboratories to use self-regulation (biofeedback of oral (central and hand (peripheral temperature, and measured the impact on sleep-onset latency, sleep architecture, and circadian phase. We found that hand temperature was more successful than oral temperature biofeedback. Moreover, an increase in hand temperature was associated with reduced sleep-onset latency. However, most participants found the procedure difficult to implement. The temperature response to biofeedback was reduced in the aged and weakest at the time of sleep onset, and there was not a systematic relationship between the change in temperature and change in sleep latency. Methodological limitations and individual differences may account for these results. Recommendations for future research are presented.Keywords: biofeedback, core body temperature, sleep, circadian rhythm, sleep onset

  20. Subjective-objective sleep discrepancy among older adults: associations with insomnia diagnosis and insomnia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Daniel B; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Monk, Timothy H

    2015-02-01

    Discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of sleep is associated with insomnia and increasing age. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia improves sleep quality and decreases subjective-objective sleep discrepancy. This study describes differences between older adults with insomnia and controls in sleep discrepancy, and tests the hypothesis that reduced sleep discrepancy following cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia correlates with the magnitude of symptom improvement reported by older adults with insomnia. Participants were 63 adults >60 years of age with insomnia, and 51 controls. At baseline, participants completed sleep diaries for 7 days while wearing wrist actigraphs. After receiving cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia, insomnia patients repeated this sleep assessment. Sleep discrepancy variables were calculated by subtracting actigraphic sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset from respective self-reported estimates, pre- and post-treatment. Mean level and night-to-night variability in sleep discrepancy were investigated. Baseline sleep discrepancies were compared between groups. Pre-post-treatment changes in Insomnia Severity Index score and sleep discrepancy variables were investigated within older adults with insomnia. Sleep discrepancy was significantly greater and more variable across nights in older adults with insomnia than controls, P ≤ 0.001 for all. Treatment with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia was associated with significant reduction in the Insomnia Severity Index score that correlated with changes in mean level and night-to-night variability in wake after sleep onset discrepancy, P insomnia. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Impact of Sleep Telemedicine Protocol in Management of Sleep Apnea: A 5-Year VA Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza M; Antonescu-Turcu, Andrea; Ratarasarn, Kavita

    2016-05-01

    There is growing evidence that demonstrates an important role for telemedicine technologies in enhancing healthcare delivery. A comprehensive sleep telemedicine protocol was implemented at the Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), Milwaukee, WI, in 2008 in an effort to improve access to sleep specialty care. The telemedicine protocol relied heavily on sleep specialist interventions based on chart review (electronic consult [e-consult]). This was done in response to long wait time for sleep clinic visits as well as delayed sleep study appointments. Since 2008 all consults are screened by sleep service to determine the next step in intervention. Based on chart review, the following steps are undertaken: (1) eligibility for portable versus in-lab sleep study is determined, and a sleep study order is placed accordingly, (2) positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is prescribed for confirmed sleep apnea, and (3) need for in-person evaluation in the sleep clinic is determined, and the visit is scheduled. This study summarizes the 5-year trend in various aspects of access to sleep care after implementation of sleep telemedicine protocol at the Milwaukee VAMC. This is a retrospective system efficiency study. The electronic medical record was interrogated 5 years after starting the sleep telemedicine protocol to study annual trends in the following outcomes: (1) interval between sleep consult and prescription of PAP equipment, (2) total sleep consults, and (3) sleep clinic wait time. Two part-time sleep physicians provided sleep-related care at the Milwaukee VAMC between 2008 and 2012. During this period, the interval between sleep consult and PAP prescription decreased from ≥60 days to ≤7 days. This occurred in spite of an increase in total sleep consults and sleep studies. There was also a significant increase in data downloads, indicating overall improved follow-up. There was no change in clinic wait time of ≥60 days. Implementation of a sleep telemedicine

  2. THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF SLEEP AND WAKEFULNESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael D.; Kilduff, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Since the discovery of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep in the late 1950s, identification of the neural circuitry underlying wakefulness, sleep onset and the alternation between REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep has been an active area of investigation. Synchronization and desynchronization of cortical activity as detected in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is due to a corticothalamocortical loop, intrinsic cortical oscillators, monoaminergic and cholinergic afferent input to the thalamus, and the basal forebrain cholinergic input directly to the cortex. The monoaminergic and cholinergic systems are largely wake-promoting; the brainstem cholinergic nuclei are also involved in REM sleep regulation. These wake-promoting systems receive excitatory input from the hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin system. Sleep-promoting nuclei are GABAergic in nature and found in the preoptic area, brainstem and lateral hypothalamus. Although the pons is critical for the expression of REM sleep, recent research has suggested that melanin-concentrating hormone/GABAergic cells in the lateral hypothalamus "gate" REM sleep. The temporal distribution of sleep and wakefulness is due to interaction between the circadian system and the sleep homeostatic system. Although the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei contain the circadian pacemaker, the neural circuitry underlying the sleep homeostat is less clear. Prolonged wakefulness results in the accumulation of extracellular adenosine, possibly from glial sources, which is an important feedback molecule for the sleep homeostatic system. Cortical neuronal nitric oxide (nNOS) neurons may also play a role in propagating slow waves through the cortex in NREM sleep. Several neuropeptides and other neurochemicals likely play important roles in sleep/wake control. Although the control of sleep and wakefulness seemingly involves multiple redundant systems, each of these systems provides a vulnerability that can result in sleep/wake dysfunction that may

  3. Sleep disorders - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insomnia; Narcolepsy; Hypersomina; Daytime sleepiness; Sleep rhythm; Sleep disruptive behaviors; Jet lag ... excessive daytime sleepiness) Problems sticking to a regular sleep schedule (sleep rhythm problem) Unusual behaviors during sleep ( ...

  4. Central sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - central; Obesity - central sleep apnea; Cheyne-Stokes - central sleep apnea; Heart failure - central sleep apnea ... Central sleep apnea results when the brain temporarily stops sending signals to the muscles that control breathing. The condition ...

  5. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth / For Parents / Obstructive Sleep Apnea What's ... How Is Sleep Apnea Treated? Print What Is Sleep Apnea? Brief pauses in breathing during sleep are ...

  6. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  7. Sleep-Dependent Modulation of Metabolic Rate in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Bethany A; Slocumb, Melissa E; Chaitin, Hersh; DiAngelo, Justin R; Keene, Alex C

    2017-08-01

    Dysregulation of sleep is associated with metabolic diseases, and metabolic rate (MR) is acutely regulated by sleep-wake behavior. In humans and rodent models, sleep loss is associated with obesity, reduced metabolic rate, and negative energy balance, yet little is known about the neural mechanisms governing interactions between sleep and metabolism. We have developed a system to simultaneously measure sleep and MR in individual Drosophila, allowing for interrogation of neural systems governing interactions between sleep and metabolic rate. Like mammals, MR in flies is reduced during sleep and increased during sleep deprivation suggesting sleep-dependent regulation of MR is conserved across phyla. The reduction of MR during sleep is not simply a consequence of inactivity because MR is reduced ~30 minutes following the onset of sleep, raising the possibility that CO2 production provides a metric to distinguish different sleep states in the fruit fly. To examine the relationship between sleep and metabolism, we determined basal and sleep-dependent changes in MR is reduced in starved flies, suggesting that starvation inhibits normal sleep-associated effects on metabolic rate. Further, translin mutant flies that fail to suppress sleep during starvation demonstrate a lower basal metabolic rate, but this rate was further reduced in response to starvation, revealing that regulation of starvation-induced changes in MR and sleep duration are genetically distinct. Therefore, this system provides the unique ability to simultaneously measure sleep and oxidative metabolism, providing novel insight into the physiological changes associated with sleep and wakefulness in the fruit fly. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A cluster-randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of delaying onset of adolescent substance abuse on cognitive development and addiction following a selective, personality-targeted intervention programme: the Co-Venture trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary-Barrett, Maeve; Mâsse, Benoit; Pihl, Robert O; Stewart, Sherry H; Séguin, Jean R; Conrod, Patricia J

    2017-10-01

    Substance use and binge drinking during early adolescence are associated with neurocognitive abnormalities, mental health problems and an increased risk for future addiction. The trial aims to evaluate the protective effects of an evidence-based substance use prevention programme on the onset of alcohol and drug use in adolescence, as well as on cognitive, mental health and addiction outcomes over 5 years. Thirty-eight high schools will be recruited, with a final sample of 31 schools assigned to intervention or control conditions (3826 youth). Brief personality-targeted interventions will be delivered to high-risk youth attending intervention schools during the first year of the trial. Control school participants will receive no intervention above what is offered to them in the regular curriculum by their respective schools. Public/private French and English high schools in Montreal (Canada). All grade 7 students (12-13 years old) will be invited to participate. High-risk youth will be identified as those scoring one standard deviation or more above the school mean on one of the four personality subscales of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (40-45% youth). Self-reported substance use and mental health symptoms and cognitive functioning measured annually throughout 5 years. Primary outcomes are the onset of substance use disorders at 4 years post-intervention (year 5). Secondary intermediate outcomes are the onset of alcohol and substance use 2 years post-intervention and neuropsychological functions; namely, the protective effects of substance use prevention on cognitive functions generally, and executive functions and reward sensitivity specifically. This longitudinal, cluster-randomized controlled trial will investigate the impact of a brief personality-targeted intervention program on reducing the onset of addiction 4 years-post intervention. Results will tease apart the developmental sequences of uptake and growth in substance use and cognitive

  9. Sleep in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of duration and individual characteristics of sleep and chronotype on body weight, eating behavior, anxiety, depression, life quality, metabolic and hormonal parameters of obese patients. Materials and methods: 200 patients with primary obesity were studied: 83 men and 117 women at age from 18 to 61 years old, median age 41,5 years [31,0; 50,0]; body weight 107 kg [94; 128,5], waist circumference 112 cm [102; 124]; neck circumference 41 cm [38; 46], body mass index (BMI 36,9 [32,8; 42,3]. Results: We found an association between sleep duration, chronotype and the emotional eating. Significant sleep reduction (to less than 6 hours was associated with high level of anxiety, depression, emotional eating and insomnia. Younger age, early onset and shorter duration of obesity and brisk weight gain during last is connected to the evening chronotype. The emotional eating associated with hypersomnolence in the absence of statistically significant increase of anxiety and depression in individuals with evening chronotype. Sleep duration and chronotype have no significant effect on the body weight, metabolic, hormonal parameters and the dynamics of body. weight after 7±1 months of treatment of obesity.

  10. Alpha-wave frequency characteristics in health and insomnia during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabedal, Justus T C; Riedl, Maik; Penzel, Thomas; Wessel, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Appearances of alpha waves in the sleep electrencephalogram indicate physiological, brief states of awakening that lie in between wakefulness and sleep. These microstates may also cause the loss in sleep quality experienced by individuals suffering from insomnia. To distinguish such pathological awakenings from physiological ones, differences in alpha-wave characteristics between transient awakening and wakefulness observed before the onset of sleep were studied. In polysomnographic datasets of sleep-healthy participants (n = 18) and patients with insomnia (n = 10), alpha waves were extracted from the relaxed, wake state before sleep onset, wake after sleep-onset periods and arousals of sleep. In these, alpha frequency and variability were determined as the median and standard deviation of inverse peak-to-peak intervals. Before sleep onset, patients with insomnia showed a decreased alpha variability compared with healthy participants (P insomnia, alpha variability increased for short wake after sleep-onset periods. Major differences between the two groups were encountered during arousal. In particular, the alpha frequency in patients with insomnia rebounded to wake levels, while the frequency in healthy participants remained at the reduced level of short wake after sleep-onset periods. Reductions in alpha frequency during wake after sleep-onset periods may be related to the microstate between sleep and wakefulness that was described for such brief awakenings. Reduced alpha variability before sleep may indicate a dysfunction of the alpha generation mechanism in insomnia. Alpha characteristics may also prove valuable in the study of other sleep and attention disorders. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Preprohypocretin polymorphisms in Parkinson disease patients reporting "sleep attacks".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissling, Ida; Körner, Yvonne; Geller, Frank; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Möller, J Carsten

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we found a significant association between the dopamine D2 receptor gene polymorphism Taq IA and sudden onset of sleep in patients with Parkinson disease. Here we evaluated the association between the preprohypocretin (-909T/C), (-22C/T), and (-20C/A) polymorphisms and sudden onset of sleep in the same population of patients with Parkinson disease. We conducted an association study analyzing the distribution of preprohypocretin polymorphisms in Germanic, caucasian Parkinson disease patients with and without sudden onset of sleep, matched according to drug therapy, disease duration, sex, and age. Movement disorders section at a university hospital. 132 Parkinson disease patients with sudden onset of sleep and 132 Parkinson disease patients without sudden onset of sleep. Blood samples were taken from each participant and used for DNA extraction. Polymorphisms were analyzed by established polymerase chain reaction protocols or direct sequencing. The variant allele T of the (-909T/C) preprohypocretin polymorphism was more commonly found in Parkinson disease patients with sudden onset of sleep. Statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences in the genotype (P = .024) and allele (P = .018) distribution between both groups. For heterozygous and homozygous carriers of allele T, the genotype relative-risk estimates for the presence of sudden onset of sleep were 2.01 (95% confidence interval: 0.76-5.34) and 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.09-7.25), respectively. Our results show a significant association between the (-909T/C) preprohypocretin polymorphism and sudden onset of sleep in Parkinson disease. However, we could not demonstrate any interaction between the Taq IA and (-909T/C) polymorphisms with respect to the occurrence of sudden onset of sleep, suggesting that multiple genetic factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of this phenomenon.

  12. High self-perceived exercise exertion before bedtime is associated with greater objectively assessed sleep efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Kalak, Nadeem; Gerber, Markus; Kirov, Roumen; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2014-09-01

    To assess the association between self-perceived exercise exertion before bedtime and objectively measured sleep. Fifty-two regularly exercising young adults (mean age, 19.70 years; 54% females) underwent sleep electroencephalographic recordings 1.5 h after completing moderate to vigorous exercise in the evening. Before sleeping, participants answered questions regarding degree of exertion of the exercise undertaken. Greater self-perceived exertion before bedtime was associated with higher objectively assessed sleep efficiency (r = 0.69, P associated with more deep sleep, shortened sleep onset time, fewer awakenings after sleep onset, and shorter wake duration after sleep onset. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that objective sleep efficiency was predicted by increased exercise exertion, shortened sleep onset time, increased deep sleep, and decreased light sleep. Against expectations and general recommendations for sleep hygiene, high self-perceived exercise exertion before bedtime was associated with better sleep patterns in a sample of healthy young adults. Further studies should also focus on elderly adults and adults suffering from insomnia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Disruption of adolescents' circadian clock: The vicious circle of media use, exposure to light at night, sleep loss and risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan; Touitou, David; Reinberg, Alain

    2016-11-01

    Although sleep is a key element in adolescent development, teens are spending increasing amounts of time online with health risks related to excessive use of electronic media (computers, smartphones, tablets, consoles…) negatively associated with daytime functioning and sleep outcomes. Adolescent sleep becomes irregular, shortened and delayed in relation with later sleep onset and early waking time due to early school starting times on weekdays which results in rhythm desynchronization and sleep loss. In addition, exposure of adolescents to the numerous electronic devices prior to bedtime has become a great concern because LEDs emit much more blue light than white incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent bulbs and have therefore a greater impact on the biological clock. A large number of adolescents move to evening chronotype and experience a misalignment between biological and social rhythms which, added to sleep loss, results in e.g. fatigue, daytime sleepiness, behavioral problems and poor academic achievement. This paper on adolescent circadian disruption will review the sensitivity of adolescents to light including LEDs with the effects on the circadian system, the crosstalk between the clock and the pineal gland, the role of melatonin, and the behavior of some adolescents(media use, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, smoking habits, stimulant use…). Lastly, some practical recommendations and perspectives are put forward. The permanent social jet lag resulting in clock misalignment experienced by a number of adolescents should be considered as a matter of public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acquired auditory agnosia in childhood and normal sleep electroencephalography subsequently diagnosed as Landau-Kleffner syndrome: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bogaert, Patrick; King, Mary D; Paquier, Philippe; Wetzburger, Catherine; Labasse, Catherine; Dubru, Jean-Marie; Deonna, Thierry

    2013-06-01

      We report three cases of Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) in children (two females, one male) in whom diagnosis was delayed because the sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was initially normal.   Case histories including EEG, positron emission tomography findings, and long-term outcome were reviewed.   Auditory agnosia occurred between the age of 2 years and 3 years 6 months, after a period of normal language development. Initial awake and sleep EEG, recorded weeks to months after the onset of language regression, during a nap period in two cases and during a full night of sleep in the third case, was normal. Repeat EEG between 2 months and 2 years later showed epileptiform discharges during wakefulness and strongly activated by sleep, with a pattern of continuous spike-waves during slow-wave sleep in two patients. Patients were diagnosed with LKS and treated with various antiepileptic regimens, including corticosteroids. One patient in whom EEG became normal on hydrocortisone is making significant recovery. The other two patients did not exhibit a sustained response to treatment and remained severely impaired.   Sleep EEG may be normal in the early phase of acquired auditory agnosia. EEG should be repeated frequently in individuals in whom a firm clinical diagnosis is made to facilitate early treatment. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  15. The Role of Sleep in Predicting College Academic Performance: Is It A Unique Predictor?

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Daniel J.; Vatthauer, Karlyn E.; Bramoweth, Adam D.; Ruggero, Camilo; Roane, Brandy

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have looked at the predictability of academic performance (i.e., cumulative grade point average [GPA]) using sleep when common nonsleep predictors of academic performance are included. The present project studied psychological, demographic, educational, and sleep risk factors of decreased academic performance in college undergraduates. Subjects (N = 867) completed a questionnaire packet and sleep diary. It was hypothesized that low total sleep time (TST), increased sleep onset lat...

  16. Influence of fatigue, stress, muscle soreness and sleep on perceived exertion during submaximal effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Monoem; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Castagna, Carlo; Hambli, Mourad; Hue, Olivier; Chamari, Karim

    2013-07-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Hooper's Index variations (i.e., self-ratings of fatigue, stress, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and sleep) on rating of perceived exertion during a 10 min submaximal exercise training session (RPE-10 min) and then check the stability and the internal consistency of RPE-10 min. Seventeen junior soccer players took part in this study. The individual Hooper's indices taken before each training session were correlated with RPE-10 min during a constant intensity and duration effort (10 min) using Pearson product moment correlation. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was used to assess the internal consistency of the RPE-10 min. All individual correlations between RPE-10 min and quality of sleep and quantity of fatigue, stress, and DOMS were non-significant (p>0.05). No significant correlations were resulted between RPE-10 min and Hooper's Index in all athletes. The ICC of RPE-10 min was 0.77 thus demonstrating internal consistency. The results of the present study demonstrated the objectivity and utility of RPE as a psychological tool for monitoring training during traditional soccer training. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep are not major contributors of perceived exertion during traditional soccer training without excessive training loads. It seems that psychobiological factors other than fatigue, stress, DOMS and sleep may have mediated the 10 min exercise perceptual intensity. © 2013.

  17. Characterization of sleep need dissipation using EEG based slow-wave activity analysis in two age groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Molina, G.; Baehr, K.; Steele, B.; Tsoneva, T.K.; Pfundtner, S.; Mahadevan, A.; Papas, N.; Riedner, B.; Tononi, G.; White, D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the two-process model of sleep regulation, slow-wave activity (SWA, EEG power in the 0.5–4 Hz band) is a direct indicator of sleep need. SWA builds up during NREM sleep, declines before the onset of REM sleep, remains low during REM and the level of increase in successive NREM

  18. Getting a Good Night's Sleep in Adolescence: Do Strategies for Coping With Stress Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A; Hall, Martica H; Cousins, Jennifer; Lee, Laisze

    2016-01-01

    Getting a good night's sleep is challenging for adolescents because of early school start times and adolescents' substantial social and physical changes. We tested whether key indices of sleep health are associated with usual styles of coping with stress and interpersonal conflict in healthy black and white adolescents. Two hundred forty-two (57% female, 56% black) high school students completed daily sleep diaries, questionnaires, and actigraphy across a school week. Linear regression models tested associations, independent of race, gender, and other covariates. Students who reported using disengagement coping exhibited poor sleep health. They had shorter sleep duration, more fragmented sleep, delayed sleep, and increased daytime sleepiness. Unexpectedly, positive engagement coping was related to daytime sleepiness and delayed sleep, although not in models that included disengagement coping. Coping strategies may be an important influence on adolescent sleep. Future research should evaluate the antecedent-consequent relationships among coping, sleep, and stress.

  19. Temporal sleep patterns in adults using actigraph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Matuzaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to characterize the temporal patterns of sleep and wakefulness in a sample of the adult subjects from São Paulo city. All subjects filled the Morningness/Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ and wore an actigraph for at least three consecutive days. A total of 359 subjects were considered for the analyses. The mean age was 43±14 years, the mean body mass index was 26.7±5.7 kg/m2, and 60% were female. The mean MEQ score was 58.0±10.7. The sleep pattern evaluated by the actigraphic analyses showed that 92% had a monophasic sleep pattern, 7% biphasic, and 1% polyphasic sleep pattern. Cluster analysis, based on time to sleep onset, sleep efficiency, sleep latency, and total sleep time, was able to identify three different groups denominated: morning type, evening type, and undefined type. Morning type subjects were more frequent, older, and had higher MEQ scores than evening type subjects. Our results showed that the actigraph objectively assessed the sleep-wake cycle and was able to discriminate between morning and evening type individuals. These findings suggest that the actigraph could be a valuable tool for assessing temporal sleep patterns, including the circadian preferences.

  20. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  1. Deconstructing delayed posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, G

    2011-01-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, delayed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) must be diagnosed in individuals fulfilling criteria for PTSD if the onset of symptoms is at least six months after the trauma. The purpose of this thesis was to establish the

  2. Sleep-induced periodic breathing and apnea: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M C; Gottschalk, A; Pack, A I

    1991-05-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms that lead to sleep-disordered breathing, we have developed a mathematical model that allows for dynamic interactions among the chemical control of respiration, changes in sleep-waking state, and changes in upper airway patency. The increase in steady-state arterial PCO2 accompanying sleep is shown to be inversely related to the ventilatory response to CO2. Chemical control of respiration becomes less stable during the light stage of sleep, despite a reduction in chemoresponsiveness, due to a concomitant increase in "plant gain" (i.e., responsiveness of blood gases to ventilatory changes). The withdrawal of the "wakefulness drive" during sleep onset represents a strong perturbation to respiratory control: higher magnitudes and rates of withdrawal of this drive favor instability. These results may account for the higher incidence of periodic breathing observed during light sleep and sleep onset. Periodic ventilation can also result from repetitive alternations between sleep onset and arousal. The potential for instability is further compounded if the possibility of upper airway occlusion is also included. In systems with high controller gains, instability is mediated primarily through chemoreflex overcompensation. However, in systems with depressed chemoresponsiveness, rapid sleep onset and large blood gas fluctuations trigger repetitive episodes of arousal and hyperpnea alternating with apneas that may or may not be obstructive. Between these extremes, more complex patterns can arise from the interaction between chemoreflex-mediated oscillations of shorter-cycle-duration (approximately 36 s) and longer-wavelength (approximately 60-80 s) state-driven oscillations.

  3. Sleep patterns and predictors of disturbed sleep in a large population of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Hannah G; Reider, Brian D; Whiting, Annie B; Prichard, J Roxanne

    2010-02-01

    To characterize sleep patterns and predictors of poor sleep quality in a large population of college students. This study extends the 2006 National Sleep Foundation examination of sleep in early adolescence by examining sleep in older adolescents. One thousand one hundred twenty-five students aged 17 to 24 years from an urban Midwestern university completed a cross-sectional online survey about sleep habits that included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Scale, the Profile of Mood States, the Subjective Units of Distress Scale, and questions about academic performance, physical health, and psychoactive drug use. Students reported disturbed sleep; over 60% were categorized as poor-quality sleepers by the PSQI, bedtimes and risetimes were delayed during weekends, and students reported frequently taking prescription, over the counter, and recreational psychoactive drugs to alter sleep/wakefulness. Students classified as poor-quality sleepers reported significantly more problems with physical and psychological health than did good-quality sleepers. Students overwhelmingly stated that emotional and academic stress negatively impacted sleep. Multiple regression analyses revealed that tension and stress accounted for 24% of the variance in the PSQI score, whereas exercise, alcohol and caffeine consumption, and consistency of sleep schedule were not significant predictors of sleep quality. These results demonstrate that insufficient sleep and irregular sleep-wake patterns, which have been extensively documented in younger adolescents, are also present at alarming levels in the college student population. Given the close relationships between sleep quality and physical and mental health, intervention programs for sleep disturbance in this population should be considered. Copyright 2010 Society for Adolescent Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of train noise and vibration on human heart rate during sleep: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Ilona; Smith, Michael G; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2013-05-28

    Transportation of goods on railways is increasing and the majority of the increased numbers of freight trains run during the night. Transportation noise has adverse effects on sleep structure, affects the heart rate (HR) during sleep and may be linked to cardiovascular disease. Freight trains also generate vibration and little is known regarding the impact of vibration on human sleep. A laboratory study was conducted to examine how a realistic nocturnal railway traffic scenario influences HR during sleep. Case-control. Healthy participants. 24 healthy volunteers (11 men, 13 women, 19-28 years) spent six consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. All participants slept during one habituation night, one control and four experimental nights in which train noise and vibration were reproduced. In the experimental nights, 20 or 36 trains with low-vibration or high-vibration characteristics were presented. Polysomnographical data and ECG were recorded. The train exposure led to a significant change of HR within 1 min of exposure onset (p=0.002), characterised by an initial and a delayed increase of HR. The high-vibration condition provoked an average increase of at least 3 bpm per train in 79% of the participants. Cardiac responses were in general higher in the high-vibration condition than in the low-vibration condition (p=0.006). No significant effect of noise sensitivity and gender was revealed, although there was a tendency for men to exhibit stronger HR acceleration than women. Freight trains provoke HR accelerations during sleep, and the vibration characteristics of the trains are of special importance. In the long term, this may affect cardiovascular functioning of persons living close to railways.

  5. Sleep and quality of life in children with traumatic brain injury and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Okuyaz, Çetin; Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Nuran; Örekeci, Gülhan; Teke, Halenur; Çobanoğulları Direk, Meltem

    2017-01-01

    Objective Attention problems are common in children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The differential features of TBI-related Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and primary ADHD are largely unknown. This study aimed to compare sleep problems and quality of life between children with TBI and ADHD and children with primary ADHD. Methods Twenty children with TBI (mean age = 12.7 ± 3.1 years) who had clinically significant ADHD symptoms according to the structured diagnostic interview and rating scales and a control group with primary ADHD (n = 20) were included. Parents completed Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and Kinder Lebensqualitätsfragebogen: Children's Quality of Life Questionnaire-revised (KINDL-R). Neurology clinic charts were reviewed for TBI-related variables. Results When compared to children with primary ADHD, the Total Score and Sleep Onset Delay, Daytime Sleepiness, Parasomnias, and Sleep Disordered Breathing subscores of CSHQ were found to be higher in children with TBI and ADHD. The Total Score and Emotional Well-Being and Self-Esteem subscores of the KINDL-R were found to be low (poorer) in children with TBI and ADHD. The Total Score and certain subscores of KINDL-R were found to be lower in TBI patients with a CSHQ > 56 (corresponds to significant sleep problems) when compared to those with a CSHQ sleep quality and quality of life than children with primary ADHD. ADHD in TBI may be considered as a highly impairing condition which must be early diagnosed and treated.

  6. Agreement Between Actigraphy and Diary-Recorded Measures of Sleep in Children With Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shao-Yu; Lee, Wang-Tso; Lee, Chien-Chang; Jeng, Suh-Fang; Weng, Wen-Chin

    2018-03-01

    To describe sleep patterns in young children with epilepsy and to examine levels of agreement between measurements derived from actigraphy and diary recordings. Cross-sectional study. Eighty-nine toddlers and preschool-aged children with epilepsy wore an actigraph on their wrists for 7 consecutive days. Parents and caregivers maintained a concurrent sleep diary while the child was wearing the monitor. Levels of agreement between actigraphy and diary recordings were examined using the Bland and Altman method separately for all recording days, weekdays, and weekends. Discrepancies between actigraphy-derived and diary-documented sleep onset, sleep offset, actual sleep at night, wake after sleep onset, and daytime sleep were ±35, ±15, ±82, ±70, and ±29 min, respectively. Differences between actigraphy and diary-derived sleep variables were consistently greater for weekends than for weekdays. Discrepancies between actigraphy and diary-derived actual sleep at night were significantly greater for children who slept alone than for those who co-slept with a parent. Our study demonstrates an acceptable agreement between actigraphy and diary recordings for sleep onset, sleep offset, and daytime sleep, but insufficient agreement for actual sleep at night and wake after sleep onset, with parents of children sleeping alone more likely to misestimate child sleep behaviors. Deviation of weekend sleep from weekdays further decreased the accuracy of parental sleep estimates and increased the discrepancies between actigraphy and diary. Sleep in children with epilepsy assessed using diary recordings alone could be misleading, and actigraphy should be preferred over diaries when resources are available. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Sleep and Physiological Dysregulation: A Closer Look at Sleep Intraindividual Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Seeman, Teresa E; Carroll, Judith E; Wiley, Joshua F

    2017-09-01

    Variable daily sleep (ie, higher intraindividual variability; IIV) is associated with negative health consequences, but potential physiological mechanisms are poorly understood. This study examined how the IIV of sleep timing, duration, and quality is associated with physiological dysregulation, with diurnal cortisol trajectories as a proximal outcome and allostatic load (AL) as a multisystem distal outcome. Participants are 436 adults (Mage ± standard deviation = 54.1 ± 11.7, 60.3% women) from the Midlife in the United States study. Sleep was objectively assessed using 7-day actigraphy. Diurnal cortisol was measured via saliva samples (four/day for 4 consecutive days). AL was measured using 23 biomarkers from seven systems (inflammatory, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, metabolic glucose and lipid, cardiovascular, parasympathetic, sympathetic) using a validated bifactor model. Linear and quadratic effects of sleep IIV were estimated using a validated Bayesian model. Controlling for covariates, more variable sleep timing (p = .04 for risetime, p = .097 for bedtime) and total sleep time (TST; p = .02), but not mean sleep variables, were associated with flatter cortisol diurnal slope. More variable sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset, later average bedtime, and shorter TST were associated with higher AL adjusting for age and sex (p-values sleep patterns were associated with blunted diurnal cortisol trajectories but not with higher multisystem physiological dysregulation. The associations between sleep IIV and overall health are likely complex, including multiple biopsychosocial determinants and require further investigation. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Time, not sleep, unbinds contexts from item memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Cox

    Full Text Available Contextual cues are known to benefit memory retrieval, but whether and how sleep affects this context effect remains unresolved. We manipulated contextual congruence during memory retrieval in human volunteers across 12 h and 24 h intervals beginning with either sleep or wakefulness. Our data suggest that whereas contextual cues lose their potency with time, sleep does not modulate this process. Furthermore, our results are consistent with the idea that sleep's beneficial effect on memory retention depends on the amount of waking time that has passed between encoding and sleep onset. The findings are discussed in the framework of competitive consolidation theory.

  9. Sleep-related Issues for Recovery and Performance in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölling, Sarah; Duffield, Rob; Erlacher, Daniel; Venter, Ranel; Halson, Shona L

    2018-04-13

    The body of research that reports the relevance of sleep in high-performance sports is growing steadily. While the identification of sleep cycles and diagnosis of sleep disorders is limited to lab-based assessment via polysomnography, the development of activity-based devices estimating sleep patterns provides greater insight into the sleep behaviour of athletes in ecological settings. Overall, small sleep quantity and/or poor quality appears to exist in many athletic populations, though this may be related to training and competition context. Typical sleep-affecting factors are the scheduling of training sessions and competitions as well as impaired sleep-onset as a result of increased arousal prior to competition or due to the use of electronic devices before bedtime. Further challenges are travel demands which may be accompanied by jet-lag symptoms and disruption of sleep habits. Promotion of sleep may be approached via behavioural strategies, such as sleep hygiene, extending night-time sleep or daytime napping. Pharmacological interventions should be limited to clinically-induced treatments as evidence among healthy and athletic populations is lacking. To optimise and manage sleep in athletes, it is recommended to implement routine sleep monitoring on an individual basis.

  10. Circadian phase assessment by ambulatory monitoring in humans: correlation with dim light melatonin onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati-Carrion, M A; Middleton, B; Revell, V; Skene, D J; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2014-02-01

    The increased prevalence of circadian disruptions due to abnormal coupling between internal and external time makes the detection of circadian phase in humans by ambulatory recordings a compelling need. Here, we propose an accurate practical procedure to estimate circadian phase with the least possible burden for the subject, that is, without the restraints of a constant routine protocol or laboratory techniques such as melatonin quantification, both of which are standard procedures. In this validation study, subjects (N = 13) wore ambulatory monitoring devices, kept daily sleep diaries and went about their daily routine for 10 days. The devices measured skin temperature at wrist level (WT), motor activity and body position on the arm, and light exposure by means of a sensor placed on the chest. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy of the ambulatory variables in assessing circadian phase. An evening increase in WT: WTOnset (WTOn) and "WT increase onset" (WTiO) was found to anticipate the evening increase in melatonin, while decreases in motor activity (Activity Offset or AcOff), body position (Position Offset (POff)), integrative TAP (a combination of WT, activity and body position) (TAPOffset or TAPOff) and an increase in declared sleep propensity were phase delayed with respect to DLMO. The phase markers obtained from subjective sleep (R = 0.811), WT (R = 0.756) and the composite variable TAP (R = 0.720) were highly and significantly correlated with DLMO. The findings strongly support a new method to calculate circadian phase based on WT (WTiO) that accurately predicts and shows a temporal association with DLMO. WTiO is especially recommended due to its simplicity and applicability to clinical use under conditions where knowing endogenous circadian phase is important, such as in cancer chronotherapy and light therapy.

  11. Insufficient sleep in adolescents: causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A; Weiss, Miriam R

    2017-08-01

    Insufficient sleep poses an important and complicated set of health risks in the adolescent population. Not only is deficient sleep (defined as both sleep duration inadequate to meet sleep needs and sleep timing misaligned with the body's circadian rhythms) at epidemic levels in this population, but the contributing factors are both complex and numerous and there are a myriad of negative physical and mental health, safety and performance consequences. Causes of inadequate sleep identified in this population include internal biological processes such as the normal shift (delay) in circadian rhythm that occurs in association with puberty and a developmentally-based slowing of the "sleep drive", and external factors including extracurricular activities, excessive homework load, evening use of electronic media, caffeine intake and early school start times. Consequences range from inattentiveness, reduction in executive functioning and poor academic performance to increased risk of obesity and cardio-metabolic dysfunction, mood disturbances which include increased suicidal ideation, a higher risk of engaging in health risk behaviors such as alcohol and substance use, and increased rates of car crashes, occupational injuries and sports-related injuries. In response to these concerns, a number of promising measures have been proposed to reduce the burden of adolescent sleep loss, including healthy sleep education for students and families, and later school start times to allow adolescents to obtain sufficient and appropriately-timed sleep.

  12. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, it is due to a combination of physical and psychological concerns. Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include: Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication ...

  13. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; Growth delay Images Toddler development References Cooke DW, Divall SA, Radovick S. Normal and aberrant growth in children. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, ...

  14. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  15. Sick and tired: how molecular regulators of human sleep schedules and duration impact immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Philip A; Chong, S Y Christin; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Why do we need to sleep? What regulates when we sleep? And what dictates the number of hours we require? These are often viewed as three separate biological questions. Here, we propose they share molecular etiologies, whereby regulators of sleep schedules and sleep duration also govern the physiological purposes of sleep. To support our hypothesis, we review Mendelian human genetic variants sufficient to advance sleep-wake onset (PER2) and shorten sleep length (DEC2), and evaluate their emerging roles in immune responses that may rely on a sound night of slumber. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Symptoms of Sleep Disturbance in the Elderly with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Emiko

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia. In 19 subjects, normal sleep was observed for a 20-day control period, inhalation aromatherapy was then applied for a 20-day intervention period, and the control and intervention periods were compared. During the intervention period, essential oils were placed nightly on towels around the subjects' pillows. The measured sleep conditions were sleep latency, total sleep time, sleep efficacy, duration of the longest sustained sleep period, wake time after sleep onset, early morning awakening, total daytime sleep, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Total sleep time was significantly longer in the intervention period than in the control period (p aromatherapy on symptoms of sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia. PMID:28400839

  17. Status Cataplecticus as Initial Presentation of Late Onset Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Samhita

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy, one of the important causes of hypersomnia, is an under diagnosed sleep disorder. It has a bimodal age of onset around 15 and 35 years. It is characterized by the tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic/ hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Cataplexy is by far the most predictive feature of narcolepsy. Status cataplecticus is the occurrence of cataplexy repeatedly for hours or days, a rare presentation of narcolepsy. This report describes an elderly gentleman with late onset narcolepsy in the sixth decade of life presenting with initial and chief symptom of status cataplecticus. Citation: Panda S. Status cataplecticus as initial presentation of late onset narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):207-209. PMID:24533005

  18. Exercise to improve sleep in insomnia: exploration of the bidirectional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2013-08-15

    Exercise improves sleep quality, mood, and quality of life among older adults with insomnia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the daily bidirectional relationships between exercise and sleep in a sample of women with insomnia. Participants included 11 women (age M = 61.27, SD 4.15) with insomnia who engaged in 30 min of aerobic exercise 3 times per week. Self-reported sleep quality was assessed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Sleep and exercise logs and wrist activity were collected continuously. Sleep variables included subjective sleep quality and objective measures recorded via wrist actigraphy (sleep onset latency [SOL], total sleep time [TST], sleep efficiency [SE], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and fragmentation index [FI]). Age, subjective sleep quality, TST, SOL, and physical fitness at baseline were tested as moderators of the daily effects. TST, SE, and self-reported global sleep quality improved from baseline to 16 weeks (p values exercise session duration (p exercise was not associated with subjective or objective sleep variables during the corresponding night. However, participants had shorter exercise duration following nights with longer SOL (p exercise duration (p exercise was stronger in participants who had shorter TST at baseline. Results suggest that sleep influences next day exercise rather than exercise influencing sleep. The relationship between TST and next day exercise was stronger for those with shorter TST at baseline. These results suggest that improving sleep may encourage exercise participation.

  19. Sleep-wake patterns and sleep disturbance among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Cheung, Miao-Miao

    2008-02-01

    To determine sleep-wake patterns and evaluate sleep disturbance in Hong Kong adolescents; to identify factors that are associated with sleep disturbance; and to examine the relationship of sleep-wake variables and academic performance. A school-based cross-sectional survey. Sample included 1629 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. Self-report questionnaires, including sleep-wake habit questionnaire, Sleep Quality Index, Morningness/ Eveningness scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, academic performance, and personal data were administered. The average school-night bedtime was 23:24, and total sleep time was 7.3 hr. During weekends, the average bedtime and rise time was delayed by 64 min and 195 min, respectively. The prevalence of sleep disturbances occurring > or = 3 days per week in the preceding 3 months were: difficulty falling asleep (5.6%), waking up during the night (7.2%), and waking up too early in the morning (10.4%). The prevalence of > or = 1 of these three symptoms was 19.1%. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that circadian phase preference was the most significant predictor for school night bedtime, weekend oversleep, and daytime sleepiness. Perceived stress was the most significant risk factor for sleep disturbance. Students with marginal academic performance reported later bedtimes and shorter sleep during school nights, greater weekend delays in bedtime, and more daytime sleepiness than those with better grades. The prevalence of sleep deprivation and sleep disturbance among Hong Kong adolescents is comparable to those found in other countries. An intervention program for sleep problems in adolescents should be considered.

  20. Effects of Acute Sleep Deprivation Resulting from Night Shift Work on Young Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Inês; Teixeira, Fátima; dos Santos, José Moutinho; Ferreira, António Jorge

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate sleep deprivation and its effects on young physicians in relation to concentration capacity and psychomotor performance. Eighteen physicians aged 26 - 33 years were divided into 2 groups: non-sleep deprived group (with no night work) and sleep deprived group (minimum 12 hour of night work/week). We applied Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to screen the presence of sleep pathology and Epworth Sleepiness Scale to evaluate subjective daytime sleepiness; we used actigraphy and sleep diary to assess sleep hygiene and standard sleep-wake cycles. To demonstrate the effects of sleep deprivation, we applied Toulouse-Piéron's test (concentration test) and a battery of three reaction time tasks after the night duty. Sleep deprived group had higher daytime sleepiness on Epworth Sleepiness Scale (p sleep deprivation was higher (p sleep during the period of night duty was 184.2 minutes to sleep deprived group and 397.7 minutes to non-sleep deprived group (p sleep deprived group had more omissions (p Sleep deprived group; in reaction to instruction test the sleep deprived group showed worse perfection index (p sleep deprivation resulting from nocturnal work in medical professions is associated with a reduction in attention and concentration and delayed response to stimuli. This may compromise patient care as well as the physician's health and quality of life. It is essential to study the effects of acute sleep deprivation on the cognitive abilities and performance of health professionals.

  1. Anxiety Sensitivity and Sleep-Related Problems in Anxious Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Courtney L.; Elkins, Meredith; Pincus, Donna; Comer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders constitute the most common mental health disturbance experienced by youth. Sleep-related problems (SRPs) are highly prevalent among anxious youth and encompass a variety of problems including nighttime fears, insomnia, and refusal to sleep alone. Given that chronic sleep disturbance is associated with a range of behavioral and physical problems in youth and predicts future psychopathology, it is important to elucidate the nature of SRPs in anxious youth. The present study investigated the relationship between sleep problems and anxiety sensitivity in a sample of 101 anxious youth, ages 6–17. Heightened anxiety sensitivity significantly predicted prolonged sleep onset latency across the sample, even after accounting for severity of anxiety, depression, and age. Results support previous research indicating that SRPs are common among anxious youth and suggest that anxiety sensitivity may play a particularly important role in sleep onset latency. PMID:25863826

  2. Healthy Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality sleep, ask yourself Do you have trouble getting up in the morning? Do you have trouble focusing during the day? Do you doze off during the day? If you answered yes to these three questions, you should work on ...

  3. Impact of Sleep and Circadian Disruption on Energy Balance and Diabetes: A Summary of Workshop Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arble, Deanna M.; Bass, Joseph; Behn, Cecilia Diniz; Butler, Matthew P.; Challet, Etienne; Czeisler, Charles; Depner, Christopher M.; Elmquist, Joel; Franken, Paul; Grandner, Michael A.; Hanlon, Erin C.; Keene, Alex C.; Joyner, Michael J.; Karatsoreos, Ilia; Kern, Philip A.; Klein, Samuel; Morris, Christopher J.; Pack, Allan I.; Panda, Satchidananda; Ptacek, Louis J.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Scheer, Frank A.; Saxena, Richa; Seaquest, Elizabeth R.; Thimgan, Matthew S.; Van Cauter, Eve; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    A workshop was held at the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases with a focus on the impact of sleep and circadian disruption on energy balance and diabetes. The workshop identified a number of key principles for research in this area and a number of specific opportunities. Studies in this area would be facilitated by active collaboration between investigators in sleep/circadian research and investigators in metabolism/diabetes. There is a need to translate the elegant findings from basic research into improving the metabolic health of the American public. There is also a need for investigators studying the impact of sleep/circadian disruption in humans to move beyond measurements of insulin and glucose and conduct more in-depth phenotyping. There is also a need for the assessments of sleep and circadian rhythms as well as assessments for sleep-disordered breathing to be incorporated into all ongoing cohort studies related to diabetes risk. Studies in humans need to complement the elegant short-term laboratory-based human studies of simulated short sleep and shift work etc. with studies in subjects in the general population with these disorders. It is conceivable that chronic adaptations occur, and if so, the mechanisms by which they occur needs to be identified and understood. Particular areas of opportunity that are ready for translation are studies to address whether CPAP treatment of patients with pre-diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) prevents or delays the onset of diabetes and whether temporal restricted feeding has the same impact on obesity rates in humans as it does in mice. Citation: Arble DM, Bass J, Behn CD, Butler MP, Challet E, Czeisler C, Depner CM, Elmquist J, Franken P, Grandner MA, Hanlon EC, Keene AC, Joyner MJ, Karatsoreos I, Kern PA, Klein S, Morris CJ, Pack AI, Panda S, Ptacek LJ, Punjabi NM, Sassone-Corsi P, Scheer FA, Saxena R, Seaquest ER, Thimgan MS, Van Cauter E, Wright KP. Impact of sleep and

  4. An approach to understanding sleep and depressed mood in adolescents: person-centred sleep classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shochat, Tamar; Barker, David H; Sharkey, Katherine M; Van Reen, Eliza; Roane, Brandy M; Carskadon, Mary A

    2017-12-01

    Depressive mood in youth has been associated with distinct sleep dimensions, such as timing, duration and quality. To identify discrete sleep phenotypes, we applied person-centred analysis (latent class mixture models) based on self-reported sleep patterns and quality, and examined associations between phenotypes and mood in high-school seniors. Students (n = 1451; mean age = 18.4 ± 0.3 years; 648 M) completed a survey near the end of high-school. Indicators used for classification included school night bed- and rise-times, differences between non-school night and school night bed- and rise-times, sleep-onset latency, number of awakenings, naps, and sleep quality and disturbance. Mood was measured using the total score on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. One-way anova tested differences between phenotype for mood. Fit indexes were split between 3-, 4- and 5-phenotype solutions. For all solutions, between phenotype differences were shown for all indicators: bedtime showed the largest difference; thus, classes were labelled from earliest to latest bedtime as 'A' (n = 751), 'B' (n = 428) and 'C' (n = 272) in the 3-class solution. Class B showed the lowest sleep disturbances and remained stable, whereas classes C and A each split in the 4- and 5-class solutions, respectively. Associations with mood were consistent, albeit small, with class B showing the lowest scores. Person-centred analysis identified sleep phenotypes that differed in mood, such that those with the fewest depressive symptoms had moderate sleep timing, shorter sleep-onset latencies and fewer arousals. Sleep characteristics in these groups may add to our understanding of how sleep and depressed mood associate in teens. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  5. A meta-analysis and model of the relationship between sleep and depression in adolescents: recommendations for future research and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to quantify the strength of evidence for a directional relationship between sleep disturbance and depression in adolescents. A literature search was conducted to identify research investigating the relationship between sleep disturbance and depression in adolescent samples (12-20 y). Twenty-three studies were identified; 13 explored associations between depression and sleep disturbance; seven examined the prospective role of sleep disturbance in the development of depression; and three investigated the role of adolescent depression in the development of subsequent sleep disturbance. Average weighted mean differences in sleep/depression-related outcome variables were calculated between adolescents with depression, and non-clinical adolescents, or those in remission. Adolescents with depression experienced significantly more wakefulness in bed (sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, number of awakenings and sleep efficiency), lighter sleep (more stage 1), and reported more subjective sleep disturbance. Overall effect sizes from longitudinal and treatment studies suggest sleep disturbance acts as a precursor to the development of depression. At follow-up, depressed adolescents had significantly longer sleep onset, more wake after sleep onset, and lower sleep efficiency compared to adolescents who were non-clinical, or had undergone remission. Little support was found for a predictive role of depressive symptoms in the development of sleep disturbance. Based on these findings we propose a model to understand the development of depression from initial sleep disturbance, provide recommendations for clinicians and recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between sleep stages and hunger scores in 36 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, R; Pina, P; Rubin, D; Erichsen, D

    2016-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing health challenge. Recent studies show that children with late bedtime and late awakening are more obese independent of total sleep time. In adolescents and adults, a delayed sleep phase has been associated with higher caloric intake. Furthermore, an adult study showed a positive correlation between REM sleep and energy balance. This relationship has not been demonstrated in children. However, it may be important as a delayed sleep phase would increase the proportion of REM sleep. This study investigated the relationship between hunger score and sleep physiology in a paediatric population. Thirty-six patients referred for a polysomnogram for suspected obstructive sleep apnoea were enrolled in the study. Sleep stages were recorded as part of the polysomnogram. Hunger scores were obtained using a visual analogue scale. Mean age was 9.6 ± 3.5 years. Mean hunger scores were 2.07 ± 2.78. Hunger scores were positively correlated with percentage of total rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (r = 0.438, P hunger score (r = -0.360, P hunger scores. These findings suggest that delayed bedtime, which increases the proportion of REM sleep and decreases the proportion of SWS, results in higher hunger levels in children. © 2015 World Obesity.

  7. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  8. Changing your sleep habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... falling asleep; Sleep hygiene References American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Insomnia. Updated March 4, 2015. SleepEducation.org. sleepeducation. ... T, Dement WC, eds. Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 86. ...

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration), obstructive sleep apnoea and mixed or complex sleep apnoea.1. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common of these three disorders and is defined as airway obstruction during sleep, accompanied by at least ...

  10. Snoring and Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Snoring and Sleep Apnea Snoring and Sleep Apnea Patient Health Information ... newsroom@entnet.org . Insight into sleeping disorders and sleep apnea Forty-five percent of normal adults snore ...

  11. Sleep-time sizing and scheduling in green passive optical networks

    KAUST Repository

    Elrasad, Amr; Khafagy, Mohammad G.; Shihada, Basem

    2012-01-01

    of traffic, control and data. Control traffic are delay intolerant with higher priority than the data traffic. Closed form model for average ONU sleeping time and end-to-end data traffic delay are presented and evaluated. Our framework decouples

  12. Sleep patterns and insomnia among adolescents: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell M; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine sleep patterns and rates of insomnia in a population-based study of adolescents aged 16-19 years. Gender differences in sleep patterns and insomnia, as well as a comparison of insomnia rates according to DSM-IV, DSM-V and quantitative criteria for insomnia (Behav. Res. Ther., 41, 2003, 427), were explored. We used a large population-based study in Hordaland county in Norway, conducted in 2012. The sample included 10,220 adolescents aged 16-18 years (54% girls). Self-reported sleep measurements included bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, rate and frequency and duration of difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep and rate and frequency of tiredness and sleepiness. The adolescents reported short sleep duration on weekdays (mean 6:25 hours), resulting in a sleep deficiency of about 2 h. A majority of the adolescents (65%) reported sleep onset latency exceeding 30 min. Girls reported longer sleep onset latency and a higher rate of insomnia than boys, while boys reported later bedtimes and a larger weekday-weekend discrepancy on several sleep parameters. Insomnia prevalence rates ranged from a total prevalence of 23.8 (DSM-IV criteria), 18.5 (DSM-V criteria) and 13.6% (quantitative criteria for insomnia). We conclude that short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and insomnia were prevalent in adolescents. This warrants attention as a public health concern in this age group. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. (Mis)perception of Sleep in Insomnia: A Puzzle and a Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G.; Tang, Nicole K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is prevalent, causing severe distress and impairment. This review focuses on illuminating the puzzling finding that many insomnia patients misperceive their sleep. They overestimate their sleep onset latency (SOL) and underestimate their total sleep time (TST), relative to objective measures. This tendency is ubiquitous (although not…

  14. Sleep instability and cognitive status in drug-resistant epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alessandra Marques; Bruni, Oliviero; Ferri, Raffaele; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2012-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the sleep habits of children with drug resistant epilepsy and to correlate sleep abnormalities with epilepsy and level of intelligence. Twenty five subjects with drug resistant epilepsy (14 males, age range 2-16.4 years) were recruited for this study. A control group was formed by 23 normal children. Two instruments to assess sleep habits were administered to the patients with epilepsy: a questionnaire on sleep habits (to preschool children) and a questionnaire on sleep behavior (for children aged more than seven years old); a cognitive test (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-WISC) was also performed. Patients underwent a complete polysomnographic study and sleep parameters, including CAP, were analyzed and correlated according to cognitive-behavioral measures in children with epilepsy. Children with drug-resistant epilepsy and severe mental retardation showed sleep abnormalities such as low sleep efficiency, high percentage of wakefulness after sleep onset, reduced slow wave sleep, and reduced REM sleep. Sleep microstructure evaluated by means of CAP analysis showed a decrease in A1 index during N3 in patients with more severe cognitive impairment. Children with epilepsy and cognitive impairment (n=10) had higher Sleep Behavior Questionnaire for Children (SBQC) total scores (65.60 ± 18.56) compared to children with epilepsy and normal IQ (50.00 ± 10.40), pintellectual disability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sleep in Othello

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Some of our best descriptions of sleep disorders come from literature. While Shakespeare is well known for his references to insomnia and sleep walking, his works also demonstrate a keen awareness of many other sleep disorders. This paper examines sleep themes in Shakespeare's play Othello. The play indicates Shakespeare's astute eye for sleep deprivation, sexual parasomnias, and effects of stress and drugs on sleep. Citation: Dimsdale JE. Sleep in Othello. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):280-281. PMID:19960651

  16. Sleep Tips: 7 Steps to Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn every night. Consider simple tips for better sleep, from setting a sleep schedule to including physical activity in your daily ... factors that can interfere with a good night's sleep — from work stress and family responsibilities to unexpected ...

  17. Fiber and Saturated Fat Are Associated with Sleep Arousals and Slow Wave Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Roberts, Amy; Shechter, Ari; Choudhury, Arindam Roy

    2016-01-01

    Sleep restriction alters food intake, but less is known about how dietary patterns affect sleep. Current goals were to determine whether: (1) sleep is different after consumption of a controlled diet vs. an ad libitum diet, and (2) dietary intake during ad libitum feeding is related to nocturnal sleep. Twenty-six normal weight adults (30-45 y), habitually sleeping 7-9 h/night, participated in a randomized-crossover inpatient study with 2 phases of 5 nights: short (4 h in bed) or habitual (9 h in bed) sleep. Only data from the habitual sleep phase were used for the present analyses. During the first 4 days, participants consumed a controlled diet; on day 5, food intake was self-selected. Linear regression was used to determine relations between daytime food intake and nighttime sleep on day 5. Sleep duration did not differ after 3 days of controlled feeding vs. a day of ad libitum intake. However, sleep after ad libitum eating had less slow wave sleep (SWS, P = 0.0430) and longer onset latency (P = 0.0085). Greater fiber intake predicted less stage 1 (P = 0.0198) and more SWS (P = 0.0286). Percent of energy from saturated fat predicted less SWS (P = 0.0422). Higher percent of energy from sugar and other carbohydrates not considered sugar or fiber was associated with arousals (P = 0.0320 and 0.0481, respectively). Low fiber and high saturated fat and sugar intake is associated with lighter, less restorative sleep with more arousals. Diet could be useful in the management of sleep disorders but this needs to be tested. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, #NCT00935402. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  18. Does Bilingualism Delay the Development of Dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Atkinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that bilingualism (where individuals speak two languages may delay the development of dementia. However, much of the research is inconclusive. Some researchers have reported that bilingualism delays the onset and diagnosis of dementia, whilst other studies have found weak or even detrimental effects. This paper reviews a series of nine empirical studies, published up until March 2016, which investigated whether bilingualism significantly delays the onset of dementia. The article also explores whether the inconsistent findings can be attributed to differences in study designs or the definitions of bilingualism used between studies. Based on current evidence, it appears that lifelong bilingualism, where individuals frequently use both languages, may be protective against dementia. However, becoming bilingual in adulthood or using the second language infrequently is unlikely to substantially delay onset of the disease.

  19. Sleep Behaviors and Sleep Quality in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souders, Margaret C.; Mason, Thorton B. A.; Valladares, Otto; Bucan, Maja; Levy, Susan E.; Mandell, David S.; Weaver, Terri E.; Pinto-Martin, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: (1) Compare sleep behaviors of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with sleep behaviors of typically developing (TD) children using the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ); (2) compare sleep quality—defined as mean activity, sleep latency, number of awakenings, sleep efficiency and total sleep time—of the cohort of children with ASD and TD, as measured by 10 nights of actigraphy; and (3) estimate the prevalence of sleep disturbances in the ASD and TD cohorts. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Participants: Randomly selected children from the Regional Autism Center. The ASD cohort of 59 children, aged 4 to 10 years, (26 with autism, 21 with pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified [PDD-NOS], and 12 with Asperger disorder) were compared with 40 TD control subjects. Measurements and Results: The CSHQ, sleep diaries, and 10 nights of actigraphy using the Sadeh algorithm of children with ASD and TD control subjects were compared. CSHQ showed 66.1% of parents of children with ASD (62.5% autism, 76.2% PDD-NOS, 58.3% Asperger disorder) and 45% of parents of the control subjects reported that their children had sleep problems. Actigraphic data showed that 66.7% of children with ASD (75% autism, 52.4% PDD-NOS, 75% Asperger disorder) and 45.9% of the control subjects had disturbed sleep. Conclusions: The prevalence estimate of 45% for mild sleep disturbances in the TD cohort highlights pediatric sleep debt as a public health problem of concern. The prevalence estimate of 66% for moderate sleep disturbances in the ASD cohort underscores the significant sleep problems that the families of these children face. The predominant sleep disorders in the ASD cohort were behavioral insomnia sleep-onset type and insomnia due to PDD. Citation: Souders MC; Mason TBA; Valladares O; Bucan M; Levy SE; Mandell DS; Weaver TE; Pinto-Martin D. Sleep behaviors and sleep quality in

  20. Sleep in Othello

    OpenAIRE

    Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Some of our best descriptions of sleep disorders come from literature. While Shakespeare is well known for his references to insomnia and sleep walking, his works also demonstrate a keen awareness of many other sleep disorders. This paper examines sleep themes in Shakespeare's play Othello. The play indicates Shakespeare's astute eye for sleep deprivation, sexual parasomnias, and effects of stress and drugs on sleep.

  1. Altered Sleep Homeostasis in Rev-erbα Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Géraldine M; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequences of a loss of REV-ERBα on the homeostatic regulation of sleep. EEG/EMG signals were recorded in Rev-erbα knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates during baseline, sleep deprivation, and recovery. Cortical gene expression measurements after sleep deprivation were contrasted to baseline. Although baseline sleep/wake duration was remarkably similar, KO mice showed an advance of the sleep/wake distribution relative to the light-dark cycle. After sleep onset in baseline and after sleep deprivation, both EEG delta power (1-4 Hz) and sleep consolidation were reduced in KO mice indicating a slower increase of homeostatic sleep need during wakefulness. This slower increase might relate to the smaller increase in theta and gamma power observed in the waking EEG prior to sleep onset under both conditions. Indeed, the increased theta activity during wakefulness predicted delta power in subsequent NREM sleep. Lack of Rev-erbα increased Bmal1, Npas2, Clock, and Fabp7 expression, confirming the direct regulation of these genes by REV-ERBα also in the brain. Our results add further proof to the notion that clock genes are involved in sleep homeostasis. Because accumulating evidence directly links REV-ERBα to dopamine signaling the altered homeostatic regulation of sleep reported here are discussed in that context. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Subjective and objective napping and sleep in older adults: are evening naps "bad" for nighttime sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautovich, Natalie D; McCrae, Christina S; Rowe, Meredeth

    2008-09-01

    To compare objective and subjective measurements of napping and to examine the relationship between evening napping and nocturnal sleep in older adults. For 12 days, participants wore actigraphs and completed sleep diaries. Community. One hundred individuals who napped, aged 60 to 89 (including good and poor sleepers with typical age-related medical comorbidities). Twelve days of sleep diary and actigraphy provided subjective and objective napping and sleep data. Evening naps (within 2 hours of bedtime) were characteristic of the sample, with peak nap time occurring between 20:30 and 21:00 (average nap time occurred between 14:30 and 15:00). Two categories of nappers were identified: those who took daytime and evening naps and daytime-only. No participants napped during the evening only. Day-and-evening nappers significantly underreported evening napping and demonstrated lower objectively measured sleep onset latencies (20.0 vs 26.5 minutes), less wake after sleep onset (51.4 vs 72.8 minutes), and higher sleep efficiencies (76.8 vs 82%) than daytime-only nappers. Day and evening napping was prevalent in this sample of community-dwelling good and poor sleepers but was not associated with impaired nocturnal sleep. Although the elimination or restriction of napping is a common element of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, these results suggest that a uniform recommendation to restrict or eliminate napping (particularly evening napping) may not meet the needs of all older individuals with insomnia.

  3. Polysomnographic sleep disturbances in nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and cannabis use: A focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alexandra N; Salloum, Ihsan M

    2015-10-01

    In the United States, approximately 60 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and about 22 million Americans report substance dependence or use disorders annually. Sleep disturbances are common consequences of substance use disorders and are likely found in primary care as well as in specialty practices. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of the most frequently used substances-nicotine, alcohol, opioids, cocaine, caffeine, and cannabis-have on sleep parameters measured by polysomnography (PSG) and related clinical manifestations. We used electronic databases such as PubMED and PsycINFO to search for relevant articles. We only included studies that assessed sleep disturbances using polysomnography and reviewed the effects of these substances on six clinically relevant sleep parameters: Total sleep time, sleep onset latency, rapid-eye movement, REM latency, wake after sleep onset, and slow wave sleep. Our review indicates that these substances have significant impact on sleep and that their effects differ during intoxication, withdrawal, and chronic use. Many of the substance-induced sleep disturbances overlap with those encountered in sleep disorders, medical, and psychiatric conditions. Sleep difficulties also increase the likelihood of substance use disorder relapse, further emphasizing the need for optimizing treatment interventions in these patients. Our review highlights the importance of systematically screening for substance use in patients with sleep disturbances and highlights the need for further research to understand mechanisms underlying substances-induced sleep disturbances and on effective interventions addressing these conditions. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  4. Sleep habits in adolescents of Saudi Arabia; distinct patterns and extreme sleep schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdad, Roah A; Merdad, Leena A; Nassif, Rawan A; El-Derwi, Douaa; Wali, Siraj O

    2014-11-01

    There is a need for comprehensive studies on adolescents' sleep habits in the Middle Eastern region. The aim of this study was to investigate the sleep-wake patterns, prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and disturbed sleep among adolescents in Saudi Arabia and to identify the associated factors. The study was a cross-sectional survey done on a random sample of 1035 high school students, ages 14-23 years, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The response rate was 91%. Students filled a self-reported questionnaire that included sleep-wake questions, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, academic performance, and personal data. Students slept an average of 7.0 hours on school nights, with an average delay of 2.8 and 6.0 hours in weekend sleep and rise times, respectively. Around 1 in 10 students stayed up all night and slept after returning from school (exhibiting a reversed sleep cycle) on weeknights. This pattern was more prevalent among boys and students with lower grade point averages. The prevalence of sleep disturbance was 65%, and EDS was found in 37% of the students. Predictors of EDS were school type, stress, napping and caffeine use, while gender was a predictor of disturbed sleep. Adolescents in Saudi Arabia showed a high percentage of poor sleep quality. Compared with adolescents from other countries, they had a larger delay in weekend sleep and rise times. An alarming reversed sleep cycle on weekdays is present and highlights the need for further assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucose Induces Slow-Wave Sleep by Exciting the Sleep-Promoting Neurons in the Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus: A New Link between Sleep and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varin, Christophe; Rancillac, Armelle; Geoffroy, Hélène; Arthaud, Sébastien; Fort, Patrice; Gallopin, Thierry

    2015-07-08

    Sleep-active neurons located in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of slow-wave sleep (SWS). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for their activation at sleep onset remain poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that a rise in extracellular glucose concentration in the VLPO can promote sleep by increasing the activity of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. We find that infusion of a glucose concentration into the VLPO of mice promotes SWS and increases the density of c-Fos-labeled neurons selectively in the VLPO. Moreover, we show in patch-clamp recordings from brain slices that VLPO neurons exhibiting properties of sleep-promoting neurons are selectively excited by glucose within physiological range. This glucose-induced excitation implies the catabolism of glucose, leading to a closure of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The extracellular glucose concentration monitors the gating of KATP channels of sleep-promoting neurons, highlighting that these neurons can adapt their excitability according to the extracellular energy status. Together, these results provide evidence that glucose may participate in the mechanisms of SWS promotion and/or consolidation. Although the brain circuitry underlying vigilance states is well described, the molecular mechanisms responsible for sleep onset remain largely unknown. Combining in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that glucose likely contributes to sleep onset facilitation by increasing the excitability of sleep-promoting neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). We find here that these neurons integrate energetic signals such as ambient glucose directly to regulate vigilance states accordingly. Glucose-induced excitation of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons should therefore be involved in the drowsiness that one feels after a high-sugar meal. This novel mechanism regulating the activity of VLPO neurons reinforces the

  6. [Sleep habits, sleep quality and sleep medicine use of the Swiss population result].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Gilberte; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-11-01

    A survey in a representative sample of the Swiss population revealed an average sleep duration of 7.5 hours on workdays and of 8.5 hours on free days, which reflected a more than half an hour (38 min) shorter sleep duration than 28 years ago. The mean time in bed was between 22:41 and 06:37 on workdays and between 23:29 and 08:27 on free days. On workdays as well as on free days the bedtime was delayed by 47 minutes in comparison to a similar survey 28 years ago. By contrast, the mean rise times on workdays and free days did not change. The sleep duration required to feel refreshed was indicated with 7 hours, which was 41 minutes less than 28 years ago. Roughly 90 % of the interviewees answered that they felt healthy, and 75 % described their sleep as good or very good compared to 79 % 28 years ago. The most frequent reasons stated for bad sleep were personal problems and strain at the workplace. The effect of bad quality sleep on every day functioning was considered as essential by 65 % of the respondents compared to 69 % 28 years ago. The use of medication to improve sleep was declared by 2.8 % (2.7 % 28 years ago), most often benzodiazepines, but also Valerian products and so-called z-drugs. In comparison with similar surveys in other countries (France, Great Britain and USA), Swiss residents slept roughly half an hour longer, but these other countries alike showed a sizable shortening of their habitual sleep duration over the last decades.

  7. Developmental delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  8. Reduction in time-to-sleep through EEG based brain state detection and audio stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo Zhang; Cuntai Guan; Ti Eu Chan; Juanhong Yu; Aung Aung Phyo Wai; Chuanchu Wang; Haihong Zhang

    2015-08-01

    We developed an EEG- and audio-based sleep sensing and enhancing system, called iSleep (interactive Sleep enhancement apparatus). The system adopts a closed-loop approach which optimizes the audio recording selection based on user's sleep status detected through our online EEG computing algorithm. The iSleep prototype comprises two major parts: 1) a sleeping mask integrated with a single channel EEG electrode and amplifier, a pair of stereo earphones and a microcontroller with wireless circuit for control and data streaming; 2) a mobile app to receive EEG signals for online sleep monitoring and audio playback control. In this study we attempt to validate our hypothesis that appropriate audio stimulation in relation to brain state can induce faster onset of sleep and improve the quality of a nap. We conduct experiments on 28 healthy subjects, each undergoing two nap sessions - one with a quiet background and one with our audio-stimulation. We compare the time-to-sleep in both sessions between two groups of subjects, e.g., fast and slow sleep onset groups. The p-value obtained from Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test is 1.22e-04 for slow onset group, which demonstrates that iSleep can significantly reduce the time-to-sleep for people with difficulty in falling sleep.

  9. Sleep Disruption and Daytime Sleepiness Correlating with Disease Severity and Insulin Resistance in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Comparison with Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsmeier, Christine; Weisskopf, Diego M; Pflueger, Marlon O; Mosimann, Jan; Campana, Benedetta; Terracciano, Luigi; Beglinger, Christoph; Heim, Markus H; Cajochen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with the development of obesity, diabetes and hepatic steatosis in murine models. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation oscillates in a circadian rhythm regulated by clock genes, light-dark cycle and feeding time in mice. The role of the sleep-wake cycle in the pathogenesis of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is indeterminate. We sought to detail sleep characteristics, daytime sleepiness and meal times in relation to disease severity in patients with NAFLD. Basic Sleep duration and latency, daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale), Pittsburgh sleep quality index, positive and negative affect scale, Munich Chronotype Questionnaire and an eating habit questionnaire were assessed in 46 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 22 healthy controls, and correlated with biochemical and histological parameters. In NAFLD compared to healthy controls, time to fall asleep was vastly prolonged (26.9 vs. 9.8 min., p = 0.0176) and sleep duration was shortened (6.3 vs. 7.2 hours, p = 0.0149). Sleep quality was poor (Pittsburgh sleep quality index 8.2 vs. 4.7, p = 0.0074) and correlated with changes in affect. Meal frequency was shifted towards night-times (p = 0.001). In NAFLD but not controls, daytime sleepiness significantly correlated with liver enzymes (ALAT [r = 0.44, p = 0.0029], ASAT [r = 0.46, p = 0.0017]) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR [r = 0.5, p = 0.0009]) independent of cirrhosis. In patients with fibrosis, daytime sleepiness correlated with the degree of fibrosis (r = 0.364, p = 0.019). In NAFLD sleep duration was shortened, sleep onset was delayed and sleep quality poor. Food-intake was shifted towards the night. Daytime sleepiness was positively linked to biochemical and histologic surrogates of disease severity. The data may indicate a role for sleep-wake cycle regulation and timing of food-intake in the pathogenesis of human NAFLD as suggested from murine models.

  10. Sleep Disruption and Daytime Sleepiness Correlating with Disease Severity and Insulin Resistance in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Comparison with Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bernsmeier

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is associated with the development of obesity, diabetes and hepatic steatosis in murine models. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation oscillates in a circadian rhythm regulated by clock genes, light-dark cycle and feeding time in mice. The role of the sleep-wake cycle in the pathogenesis of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is indeterminate. We sought to detail sleep characteristics, daytime sleepiness and meal times in relation to disease severity in patients with NAFLD.Basic Sleep duration and latency, daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index, positive and negative affect scale, Munich Chronotype Questionnaire and an eating habit questionnaire were assessed in 46 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 22 healthy controls, and correlated with biochemical and histological parameters.In NAFLD compared to healthy controls, time to fall asleep was vastly prolonged (26.9 vs. 9.8 min., p = 0.0176 and sleep duration was shortened (6.3 vs. 7.2 hours, p = 0.0149. Sleep quality was poor (Pittsburgh sleep quality index 8.2 vs. 4.7, p = 0.0074 and correlated with changes in affect. Meal frequency was shifted towards night-times (p = 0.001. In NAFLD but not controls, daytime sleepiness significantly correlated with liver enzymes (ALAT [r = 0.44, p = 0.0029], ASAT [r = 0.46, p = 0.0017] and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR [r = 0.5, p = 0.0009] independent of cirrhosis. In patients with fibrosis, daytime sleepiness correlated with the degree of fibrosis (r = 0.364, p = 0.019.In NAFLD sleep duration was shortened, sleep onset was delayed and sleep quality poor. Food-intake was shifted towards the night. Daytime sleepiness was positively linked to biochemical and histologic surrogates of disease severity. The data may indicate a role for sleep-wake cycle regulation and timing of food-intake in the pathogenesis of human NAFLD as suggested from murine models.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Włodarska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related breathing disorders in children are a clinical problem which is more and more often diagnosed by doctors nowadays. They can be the basis for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome that causes a number of complications: lowering the quality of life, behavioural problems, complications involving cardiovascular system. The incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in the paediatric population is estimated to be at the level of 2%. The symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome can be divided into daytime and night ones. Night symptoms in children include: snoring, apnoea, breathing with open mouth (both during the day and at night, dry tongue and mouth during sleep, agitated sleep in unnatural positions. Among daytime symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome there are: irritability, aggressiveness, hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder, delayed development and growth pattern (mainly failure to thrive, learning problems, morning headaches. Parents often do not connect the night and daytime symptoms with the possible development of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in their children. The main predisposing factor of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Effective and in most cases preferred treatment for the management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children is adenotonsillectomy. Polysomnography and polygraphy are diagnostic tools helpful in the study of sleep-related disorders. The objective of this study was to systematise the knowledge on the epidemiology, aetiology, clinical image and prevention of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children.

  12. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and 3 H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by α-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S 2 episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. 3 H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system

  13. Sleep Characteristics and Daytime Cortisol Levels in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ethan; Schumm, L Philip; McClintock, Martha; Waite, Linda; Lauderdale, Diane S

    2017-05-01

    Older adults frequently report sleep problems and are at increased risk of cardiometabolic disruption. Experimental sleep restriction of younger adults has suggested that cortisol may be on the pathway between sleep restriction and cardiometabolic disease. We investigated whether the natural variation in sleep among older adults is associated with daytime cortisol level. Salivary cortisol samples and actigraphy sleep data were collected from a random subsample of participants in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, a nationally representative probability sample of adults aged 62-90 (N = 672). Salivary cortisol was measured with 3 timed samples at the beginning, middle, and end of a 2-hr in-home interview. Sleep characteristics were derived from wrist actigraphy (fragmentation, wake after sleep onset [WASO], and duration) and from survey responses about usual sleep duration and sleep problems. For each individual, a single summary daytime cortisol level was estimated by fitting a marginal longitudinal model for the 3 time-stamped cortisol samples. The resulting estimates were then regressed on each sleep measure, adjusting for sociodemographics, health behaviors, and comorbidities. From actigraphy, both higher fragmentation score (β = 0.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.00 to 0.03) and longer WASO (β = 0.27; 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.51) were significantly associated with higher daytime cortisol; sleep duration was not. Self-reported sleep duration and sleep problems were also not associated with cortisol. Actigraph measures of sleep disturbance are associated with higher daytime cortisol among older adults. However, cross-sectional data cannot distinguish causal direction or whether cortisol and sleep disruption have a common cause. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease patients and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claassen DO

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel O Claassen, Scott J KutscherDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Sleep disturbances are among the most common nonmotor complaints of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, and can have a great impact on quality of life. These disturbances manifest in a variety of ways; for instance, insomnia, sleep fragmentation, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep-related movement disorders such as restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movements may share a common pathophysiology, and occurrence of rapid eye movement behavior disorder may predate the onset of PD or other synucleinopathies by several years. Medications for PD can have a significant impact on sleep, representing a great challenge to the treating physician. Awareness of the complex relationship between PD and sleep disorders, as well as the varied way in which sleep disturbances appear, is imperative for successful long-term management.Keywords: sleep disorders, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, Parkinson disease, fatigue, REM behavior disorder

  15. Sleep Differences by Race in Preschool Children: The Roles of Parenting Behaviors and Socioeconomic Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Kristina E; Millet, Genevieve; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether socioeconomic variables (SES) and parenting behaviors mediate differences in sleep problems between Black and White preschool-aged children. Parents of 191 preschool-aged children (53% male; 77% White) completed questionnaires regarding SES and sleep behaviors. Parenting behaviors and SES were analyzed as mediators of differences in sleep problems between Black and White children. Parent behaviors related to bedtime routine and independence mediated the relationship between race and parent-reported bedtime difficulty, parent confidence managing sleep, and sleep onset latency. SES mediated the relationship between race and sleep onset latency. Sleep differences between Black and White preschool children were primarily mediated by parent behaviors rather than socioeconomic variables. Results may reflect differences in cultural practices and provide important information for treatment and parent-directed intervention regarding improving sleep in young children.

  16. Attenuated heart rate response in REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Kempfner, Jacob; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with Parkinson's disease with and without rapid‐eye‐movement sleep behavior disorder and patients with idiopathic rapid‐eye‐movement sleep behavior disorder have an attenuated heart rate response to arousals or to leg movements during...... sleep compared with healthy controls. Fourteen and 16 Parkinson's patients with and without rapid‐eye‐movement sleep behavior disorder, respectively, 11 idiopathic rapid‐eye‐movement sleep behavior disorder patients, and 17 control subjects underwent 1 night of polysomnography. The heart rate response...... associated with arousal or leg movement from all sleep stages was analyzed from 10 heartbeats before the onset of the sleep event to 15 heartbeats following onset of the sleep event. The heart rate reponse to arousals was significantly lower in both parkinsonian groups compared with the control group...

  17. Objective and subjective measurement of sleep disturbance in female trauma survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kimberly B; Griffin, Michael G; Galovski, Tara E

    2016-06-30

    Sleep disturbance may be the most often endorsed symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Much of this research is based on subjective reports from trauma survivors; however, objective measures of sleep-related impairment have yielded findings inconsistent with self-report data. More studies investigating subjective and objective assessments concordantly are needed to understand sleep impairment in PTSD. The current study examined PTSD-related sleep disturbance in a female interpersonal violence cohort with full PTSD diagnoses (N=51) assessing subjective (global and daily diary measures) and objective (actigraphy) sleep measures concurrently. PTSD severity was positively associated with global, subjective reports of sleep impairment and insomnia. Subjective measures of sleep (including global sleep impairment, insomnia, and daily sleep diary reports of total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and sleep onset latency) were moderately to strongly correlated. However, no significant correlations between subjective and objective reports of sleep impairment were found in this cohort. Analyses demonstrated an overall elevation in subjectively reported sleep impairment when compared to objective measurement assessed concurrently. Findings demonstrate a lack of agreement between subjective and objective measurements of sleep in a PTSD-positive female cohort, suggesting objective and subjective sleep impairments are distinct sleep parameters that do not necessarily directly co-vary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep Patterns in Chinese Preschool Children: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ran; Wang, Guang-Hai; Zhu, Hong; Jiang, Fan; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2018-04-15

    This study aimed to (1) provide data on normal sleep patterns in Chinese preschool children, (2) identify cross-cultural differences of sleep patterns among children from China and other countries, (3) estimate the prevalence of sleep duration not meeting the optimal amount, and (4) characterize delayed weekend sleep pattern. A population-based sample of 1,610 children aged 3-6 years was recruited from 10 cities across China. Parents completed questions about their child's sleep patterns adapted from the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). The mean bedtime was 9:31 PM, wake time was 7:27 AM, nighttime sleep duration was 9 hours 30 minutes, daytime sleep duration was 1 hour 31 minutes, and total sleep duration was 11 hours 2 minutes. The children had a shorter nighttime sleep duration but longer daytime naps, resulting in no differences in total sleep duration compared with counterparts predominantly in the west. Of the children, 85.3% met the recommended amount of sleep of 10 to 13 hours, and 10.8% slept fewer than 10 hours. The prevalence of sleep less than 10 hours was higher in older children and children from eastern China. Children went to bed and woke up more than 30 minutes later on weekends than weekdays, accounting for 40.1% and 50%, respectively. Children in western China showed longer delay than children in eastern China ( P < .05). Age- and region-specific variability of sleep patterns are reported as well as insufficient sleep and delayed weekend sleep pattern in Chinese preschool children. The cross-cultural difference of sleep patterns was in temporal placement rather than sleep duration. © 2018 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  19. Later Start, Longer Sleep: Implications of Middle School Start Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Deborah A.; Princiotta, Daniel; Ryberg, Renee; Lewin, Daniel S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Although adolescents generally get less than the recommended 9 hours of sleep per night, research and effort to delay school start times have generally focused on high schools. This study assesses the relation between school start times and sleep in middle school students while accounting for potentially confounding demographic…

  20. Software thresholds alter the bias of actigraphy for monitoring sleep in team-sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kate L; Juliff, Laura; Gore, Christopher J; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Halson, Shona L

    2017-08-01

    Actical ® actigraphy is commonly used to monitor athlete sleep. The proprietary software, called Actiware ® , processes data with three different sleep-wake thresholds (Low, Medium or High), but there is no standardisation regarding their use. The purpose of this study was to examine validity and bias of the sleep-wake thresholds for processing Actical ® sleep data in team sport athletes. Validation study comparing actigraph against accepted gold standard polysomnography (PSG). Sixty seven nights of sleep were recorded simultaneously with polysomnography and Actical ® devices. Individual night data was compared across five sleep measures for each sleep-wake threshold using Actiware ® software. Accuracy of each sleep-wake threshold compared with PSG was evaluated from mean bias with 95% confidence limits, Pearson moment-product correlation and associated standard error of estimate. The Medium threshold generated the smallest mean bias compared with polysomnography for total sleep time (8.5min), sleep efficiency (1.8%) and wake after sleep onset (-4.1min); whereas the Low threshold had the smallest bias (7.5min) for wake bouts. Bias in sleep onset latency was the same across thresholds (-9.5min). The standard error of the estimate was similar across all thresholds; total sleep time ∼25min, sleep efficiency ∼4.5%, wake after sleep onset ∼21min, and wake bouts ∼8 counts. Sleep parameters measured by the Actical ® device are greatly influenced by the sleep-wake threshold applied. In the present study the Medium threshold produced the smallest bias for most parameters compared with PSG. Given the magnitude of measurement variability, confidence limits should be employed when interpreting changes in sleep parameters. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  1. No Compromise of Competition Sleep Compared With Habitual Sleep in Elite Australian Footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Benita J; Halson, Shona L; Tran, Jacqueline; Kemp, Justin G; Cormack, Stuart J

    2018-01-01

    To assess the impact of match-start time and days relative to match compared with the habitual sleep characteristics of elite Australian Football (AF) players. 45 elite male AF players were assessed during the preseason (habitual) and across 4 home matches during the season. Players wore an activity monitor the night before (-1), night of (0), 1 night after (+1), and 2 nights (+2) after each match and completed a self-reported rating of sleep quality. A 2-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc was used to determine differences in sleep characteristics between match-start times and days relative to the match. Two-way nested ANOVA was conducted to examine differences between competition and habitual phases. Effect size ± 90% confidence interval (ES ± 90% CI) was calculated to quantify the magnitude of pairwise differences. Differences observed in sleep-onset latency (ES = 0.11 ± 0.16), sleep rating (ES = 0.08 ± 0.14), and sleep duration (ES = 0.08 ± 0.01) between competition and habitual periods were trivial. Sleep efficiency was almost certainly higher during competition than habitual, but this was not reflected in the subjective rating of sleep quality. Elite AF competition does not cause substantial disruption to sleep characteristics compared with habitual sleep. While match-start time has some impact on sleep variables, it appears that the match itself is more of a disruption than the start time. Subjective ratings of sleep from well-being questionnaires appear limited in their ability to accurately provide an indication of sleep quality.

  2. Chronic Stress is Prospectively Associated with Sleep in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Martica H; Casement, Melynda D; Troxel, Wendy M; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T; Kravitz, Howard M; Krafty, Robert T; Buysse, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate whether levels of upsetting life events measured over a 9-y period prospectively predict subjective and objective sleep outcomes in midlife women. Prospective cohort study. Four sites across the United States. 330 women (46-57 y of age) enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study. N/A. Upsetting life events were assessed annually for up to 9 y. Trajectory analysis applied to life events data quantitatively identified three distinct chronic stress groups: low stress, moderate stress, and high stress. Sleep was assessed by self-report and in-home polysomnography (PSG) during the ninth year of the study. Multivariate analyses tested the prospective association between chronic stress group and sleep, adjusting for race, baseline sleep complaints, marital status, body mass index, symptoms of depression, and acute life events at the time of the Sleep Study. Women characterized by high chronic stress had lower subjective sleep quality, were more likely to report insomnia, and exhibited increased PSG-assessed wake after sleep onset (WASO) relative to women with low to moderate chronic stress profiles. The effect of chronic stress group on WASO persisted in the subsample of participants without baseline sleep complaints. Chronic stress is prospectively associated with sleep disturbance in midlife women, even after adjusting for acute stressors at the time of the sleep study and other factors known to disrupt sleep. These results are consistent with current models of stress that emphasize the cumulative effect of stressors on health over time. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Chronic Low Quality Sleep Impairs Postural Control in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Fabianne; Gonçalves, Bruno da Silva B; Abranches, Isabela Lopes Laguardia; Abrantes, Ana Flávia; Forner-Cordero, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The lack of sleep, both in quality and quantity, is an increasing problem in modern society, often related to workload and stress. A number of studies have addressed the effects of acute (total) sleep deprivation on postural control. However, up to date, the effects of chronic sleep deficits, either in quantity or quality, have not been analyzed. Thirty healthy adults participated in the study that consisted of registering activity with a wrist actigraph for more than a week before performing a series of postural control tests. Sleep and circadian rhythm variables were correlated and the sum of activity of the least active 5-h period, L5, a rhythm variable, obtained the greater coefficient value with sleep quality variables (wake after sleep onset WASO and efficiency sleep). Cluster analysis was performed to classify subjects into two groups based on L5 (low and high). The balance tests scores used to asses postural control were measured using Biodex Balance System and were compared between the two groups with different sleep quality. The postural tests were divided into dynamic (platform tilt with eyes open, closed and cursor) and static (clinical test of sensory integration). The results showed that during the tests with eyes closed, the group with worse sleep quality had also worse postural control performance. Lack of vision impairs postural balance more deeply in subjects with chronic sleep inefficiency. Chronic poor sleep quality impairs postural control similarly to total sleep deprivation.

  4. Chronic Low Quality Sleep Impairs Postural Control in Healthy Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabianne Furtado

    Full Text Available The lack of sleep, both in quality and quantity, is an increasing problem in modern society, often related to workload and stress. A number of studies have addressed the effects of acute (total sleep deprivation on postural control. However, up to date, the effects of chronic sleep deficits, either in quantity or quality, have not been analyzed. Thirty healthy adults participated in the study that consisted of registering activity with a wrist actigraph for more than a week before performing a series of postural control tests. Sleep and circadian rhythm variables were correlated and the sum of activity of the least active 5-h period, L5, a rhythm variable, obtained the greater coefficient value with sleep quality variables (wake after sleep onset WASO and efficiency sleep. Cluster analysis was performed to classify subjects into two groups based on L5 (low and high. The balance tests scores used to asses postural control were measured using Biodex Balance System and were compared between the two groups with different sleep quality. The postural tests were divided into dynamic (platform tilt with eyes open, closed and cursor and static (clinical test of sensory integration. The results showed that during the tests with eyes closed, the group with worse sleep quality had also worse postural control performance. Lack of vision impairs postural balance more deeply in subjects with chronic sleep inefficiency. Chronic poor sleep quality impairs postural control similarly to total sleep deprivation.

  5. Sleep disturbances in drug naïve Parkinson′s disease (PD patients and effect of levodopa on sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Parkinson′s disease (PD is associated with sleep disturbances, attributed to the neurodegenerative process and therapeutic drugs. Studies have found levodopa to increase wakefulness in some patients while increasing sleepiness in others. Aims: To confirm sleep disturbances in drug naïve PD patients and understand the impact of levodopa on their sleep. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three drug naοve PD patients and 31 age-gender matched controls were compared using the Parkinson′s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS. A polysomnogram objectively compared sleep quality. Of the 23 patients, the 12 initiated on levodopa were reassessed subjectively and through polysomnography after 2 months of therapy. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation, median, and range. Continuous variables were analyzed by Student′s T test for normally distributed data and Mann-Whitney U test for skewed data. Discrete variables were compared by Chi Square tests (Pearson Chi square Test or Fisher′s Exact Test. Wilcoxon signed ranks test was applied in the analysis of paired data pre- and post-levodopa. A P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Statistical analysis of the data was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 12. Results: Drug naïve PD patients had lower PDSS scores than controls. The sleep architecture changes observed on polysomnogram were reduced NREM Stage III and REM sleep and increased sleep latency and wake after sleep onset time. Following levodopa, improved sleep efficiency with reduced sleep latency and wake after sleep onset time was noted, coupled with improved PDSS scores. However, NREM Stage III and REM sleep duration did not increase. Discussion: PD patients take longer to fall asleep and have difficulty in sleep maintenance. Sleep maintenance is affected by nocturia, REM behavioral disorder, nocturnal cramps, akinesia, and

  6. Disruptive effects of light pollution on sleep in free-living birds: Season and/or light intensity-dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Thomas; Sun, Jiachen; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic environmental pollutant posing an important potential threat for wildlife. Evidence of its effects on animal physiology and behaviour is accumulating. However, in order to effectively mitigate light pollution it is important to determine which factors contribute to the severity of effects of ALAN. In this experimental study we explored whether there are seasonal-dependent effects of ALAN on sleep in free-living great tits (Parus major), an important model species. Additionally, we looked at whether light intensity determined the severity of effects of ALAN on sleep. We therefore exposed animals to artificial light inside the nest box (3lx) in December (winter) and February (pre-breeding season). Results from February were compared with the results from a previous study in February, using a lower light intensity (1.6lx). We found little evidence for a season-dependent response. Effects of ALAN hardly differed between high and low light intensity. ALAN disrupted sleep with as main effect a decrease in sleep duration (≈-40min) as animals woke up earlier (≈-24min). However, compared to a natural dark situation sleep onset was delayed by high but not by low light intensity of ALAN. Our study underlines earlier found disruptive effects of ALAN on sleep of free-living animals. While we found no conclusive evidence for seasonal or light intensity-dependent effects of ALAN, additional experimental work using lower light intensities might show such differences. Examining potential management options is crucial in mitigating disruptive effects of light pollution, which will be an important focus for future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bright-light exposure during daytime sleeping affects nocturnal melatonin secretion after simulated night work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shunsuke; Osawa, Madoka; Matsuyama, Hiroto; Ohoka, Wataru; Ahn, Aemi; Wakamura, Tomoko

    2018-02-01

    The guidelines for night and shift workers recommend that after night work, they should sleep in a dark environment during the daytime. However, staying in a dark environment during the daytime reduces nocturnal melatonin secretion and delays its onset. Daytime bright-light exposure after night work is important for melatonin synthesis the subsequent night and for maintaining the circadian rhythms. However, it is not clear whether daytime sleeping after night work should be in a dim- or a bright-light environment for maintaining melatonin secretion. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate the effect of bright-light exposure during daytime sleeping on nocturnal melatonin secretion after simulated night work. Twelve healthy male subjects, aged 24.8 ± 4.6 (mean ± SD), participated in 3-day sessions under two experimental conditions, bright light or dim light, in a random order. On the first day, the subjects entered the experimental room at 16:00 and saliva samples were collected every hour between 18:00 and 00:00 under dim-light conditions. Between 00:00 and 08:00, they participated in tasks that simulated night work. At 10:00 the next morning, they slept for 6 hours under either a bright-light condition (>3000 lx) or a dim-light condition (night work were compared between the light conditions using paired t-tests. The ANOVA results indicated a significant interaction (light condition and3 day) (p = .006). Post hoc tests indicated that in the dim-light condition, the melatonin concentration was significantly lower on the second day than on the first day (p = .046); however, in the bright-light condition, there was no significant difference in the melatonin concentration between the days (p = .560). There was a significant difference in ΔDLMO between the conditions (p = .015): DLMO after sleeping was advanced by 11.1 ± 17.4 min under bright-light conditions but delayed for 7.2 ± 13.6 min after sleeping under dim-light conditions. No

  8. Sleep Disturbances in Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Yasova Barbeau, Daphna; Weiss, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to serve as an introduction to understanding sleep in the fetus, the preterm neonate and the term neonate. Sleep appears to have numerous important roles, particularly in the consolidation of new information. The sleep cycle changes over time, neonates spend the most time in active sleep and have a progressive shortening of active sleep and lengthening of quiet sleep. Additionally, the sleep cycle is disrupted by many things including disease state and environmen...

  9. Vitamin D and actigraphic sleep outcomes in older community-dwelling men: the MrOS sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Jennifer; Stone, Katie L; Wei, Esther K; Harrison, Stephanie L; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Lane, Nancy E; Paudel, Misti; Redline, Susan; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Orwoll, Eric; Schernhammer, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining adequate serum levels of vitamin D may be important for sleep duration and quality; however, these associations are not well understood. We examined whether levels of serum 25(OH)D are associated with objective measures of sleep in older men. Cross-sectional study within a large cohort of community-dwelling older men, the MrOS study. Among 3,048 men age 68 years or older, we measured total serum vitamin D. Objective estimates of nightly total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake time after sleep onset (WASO) were obtained using wrist actigraphy worn for an average of 5 consecutive 24-h periods. 16.4% of this study population had low levels of vitamin D (sleep duration, (odds ratio [OR] for the highest (≥ 40.06 ng/mL) versus lowest (sleep efficiency of less than 70% (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.97-2.18; Ptrend = 0.004), after controlling for age, clinic, season, comorbidities, body mass index, and physical and cognitive function. Lower vitamin D levels were also associated with increased WASO in age-adjusted, but not multivariable adjusted models. Among older men, low levels of total serum 25(OH)D are associated with poorer sleep including short sleep duration and lower sleep efficiency. These findings, if confirmed by others, suggest a potential role for vitamin D in maintaining healthy sleep. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Sleep Patterns and Other Sleep Related Factors Affecting the Students of Islamic Azad University, Rasht Branch, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Adequate sleep is essential for general health. Several factors disrupt sleep patterns. The quality of sleep affects health and daily functions. Objectives The current study aimed to determine the students' sleep patterns and other sleep related factors. Patients and Methods The current cross-sectional study was conducted on 350 female students of the Islamic Azad University, Rasht branch (Rasht, Iran who were selected by multistage random sampling method. Data collection tool was a self-reporting questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, employing Chi-square, and Pearson product moment correlation coefficients. Results The mean age of the subjects was 22.16 ± 2.86 years. Results showed 35.7% disruption of sleep onset, 46.3% impairment of sleep continuity, and 32% awakening early in the morning. Also, 42.3% of the subjects expressed excellent sleep quality. There was a significant relationship among sleep quality with the time of going to bed, difficulty in sleeping, awakening by noise, repeated awakening at night, waking up early in the morning, fatigue, and sleepiness in classroom. Conclusions The results of the current study showed a high prevalence of sleep problems among the students. Identification and treatment of students’ sleep disorders may improve academic performance and life quality.

  11. Sleep-wake stability in narcolepsy patients with normal, low and unmeasurable hypocretin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    movement (REM) sleep, and the occurrence of sleep onset REM (SOREM) in the nocturnal polysomnography were also measured. RESULTS: Participants with undetectable hypocretin-1 levels had significantly higher frequencies of transitions than controls and those with normal hypocretin-1 levels. Participants...... hypocretin-1 levels in particular, but also low hypocretin-1 levels, were associated with a less stable phenotype featuring more sleep state transitions and SOREM episodes. In addition, there was a distinction between nocturnal and diurnal REM sleep in hypocretin-deficient participants, expressed...... as increased diurnal REM sleep, which was not reflected in nocturnal sleep....

  12. Non-contact assessment of obstructive sleep apnea cardiovascular biomarkers using photoplethysmography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Jagani, Shubh; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 20% of the adult population, and is associated with cardiovascular and cognitive morbidities. However, it is estimated that up to 80% of treatable OSA cases remain undiagnosed. Cur- rent methods for diagnosing OSA are expensive, labor-intensive, and involve uncomfortable wearable sensors. This study explored the feasibility of non-contact biophotonic assessment of OSA cardiovascular biomarkers via photoplethysmography imaging (PPGI). In particular, PPGI was used to mon