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Sample records for delayed sleep onset

  1. Objective measures of sleep and dim light melatonin onset in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxvig, Ingvild W; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Pallesen, Ståle; Vedaa, Oystein; Nordhus, Inger H; Sørensen, Eli; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2013-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder is characterized by a delay in the timing of the major sleep period relative to conventional norms. The sleep period itself has traditionally been described as normal. Nevertheless, it is possible that sleep regulatory mechanism disturbances associated with the disorder may affect sleep duration and/or architecture. Polysomnographic data that may shed light on the issue are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine polysomnographic measures of sleep in adolescents and young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder, and to compare findings to that of healthy controls. A second aim was to estimate dim light melatonin onset as a marker of circadian rhythm and to investigate the phase angle relationship (time interval) between dim light melatonin onset and the sleep period. Data from 54 adolescents and young adults were analysed, 35 diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder and 19 healthy controls. Results show delayed timing of sleep in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but once sleep was initiated no group differences in sleep parameters were observed. Dim light melatonin onset was delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder, but no difference in phase angle was observed between the groups. In conclusion, both sleep and dim light melatonin onset were delayed in participants with delayed sleep phase disorder. The sleep period appeared to occur at the same circadian phase in both groups, and once sleep was initiated no differences in sleep parameters were observed.

  2. Daily touchscreen use in infants and toddlers is associated with reduced sleep and delayed sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Celeste H M; Bedford, Rachael; Saez De Urabain, Irati R; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Smith, Tim J

    2017-04-13

    Traditional screen time (e.g. TV and videogaming) has been linked to sleep problems and poorer developmental outcomes in children. With the advent of portable touchscreen devices, this association may be extending down in age to disrupt the sleep of infants and toddlers, an age when sleep is essential for cognitive development. However, this association has not been demonstrated empirically. This study aims to examine whether frequency of touchscreen use is associated with sleep in infants and toddlers between 6 and 36 months of age. An online survey was administered to 715 parents reporting on child media use (daily exposure to TV and use of touchscreens), sleep patterns (night-time and daytime sleep duration, sleep onset - time to fall asleep, and frequencies of night awakenings). Structural equation models controlling for age, sex, TV exposure and maternal education indicated a significant association between touchscreen use and night-time sleep, daytime sleep and sleep onset. No significant effect was observed for the number of night awakenings. To our knowledge, this is the first report linking the use of touchscreen with sleep problems in infants and toddlers. Future longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the direction of effects and the mechanisms underlying these associations using detailed sleep tracking.

  3. Mobile phone 'talk-mode' signal delays EEG-determined sleep onset.

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    Hung, Ching-Sui; Anderson, Clare; Horne, James A; McEvoy, Patrick

    2007-06-21

    Mobile phones signals are pulse-modulated microwaves, and EEG studies suggest that the extremely low-frequency (ELF) pulse modulation has sleep effects. However, 'talk', 'listen' and 'standby' modes differ in the ELF (2, 8, and 217Hz) spectral components and specific absorption rates, but no sleep study has differentiated these modes. We used a GSM900 mobile phone controlled by a base-station simulator and a test SIM card to simulate these three specific modes, transmitted at 12.5% (23dBm) of maximum power. At weekly intervals, 10 healthy young adults, sleep restricted to 6h, were randomly and single-blind exposed to one of: talk, listen, standby and sham (nil signal) modes, for 30 min, at 13:30 h, whilst lying in a sound-proof, lit bedroom, with a thermally insulated silent phone beside the right ear. Bipolar EEGs were recorded continuously, and subjective ratings of sleepiness obtained every 3 min (before, during and after exposure). After exposure the phone and base-station were switched off, the bedroom darkened, and a 90 min sleep opportunity followed. We report on sleep onset using: (i) visually scored latency to onset of stage 2 sleep, (ii) EEG power spectral analysis. There was no condition effect for subjective sleepiness. Post-exposure, sleep latency after talk mode was markedly and significantly delayed beyond listen and sham modes. This condition effect over time was also quite evident in 1-4Hz EEG frontal power, which is a frequency range particularly sensitive to sleep onset. It is possible that 2, 8, 217Hz modulation may differentially affect sleep onset.

  4. Daily touchscreen use in infants and toddlers is associated with reduced sleep and delayed sleep onset

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Celeste H M Cheung; Rachael Bedford; Irati R Saez De Urabain; Annette Karmiloff-smith; Tim J Smith

    2017-01-01

    .... However, this association has not been demonstrated empirically. This study aims to examine whether frequency of touchscreen use is associated with sleep in infants and toddlers between 6 and 36 months of age...

  5. Delayed Circadian Rhythm in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, J. J. Sandra; Boonstra, A. Marije; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest circadian rhythm disturbances in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sleep-onset insomnia (SOI). We investigate here sleep and rhythms in activity and melatonin in adults with ADHD. Methods: Sleep logs and actigraphy data were collec

  6. Delayed Circadian Rhythm in Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, J. J. Sandra; Boonstra, A. Marije; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest circadian rhythm disturbances in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sleep-onset insomnia (SOI). We investigate here sleep and rhythms in activity and melatonin in adults with ADHD. Methods: Sleep logs and actigraphy data were collec

  7. Total sleep deprivation study in delayed sleep-phase syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed sleep-phase syndrome (DSPS is characterized by delayed sleep onset against the desired clock time. It often presents with symptoms of sleep-onset insomnia or difficulty in awakening at the desired time. We report the finding of sleep studies after 24 h total sleep deprivation (TSD in a 28-year-old DSPS male patient. He had characteristics of mild chronic DSPS, which may have been precipitated by his frequent night shift assignments. The TSD improved the patients sleep latency and efficiency but all other sleep variables showed marked differences.

  8. Termination of short term melatonin treatment in children with delayed Dim Light Melatonin Onset: effects on sleep, health, behavior problems, and parenting stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.; Meijer, A.M.; Smits, M.G.; Oort, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of termination of short term melatonin treatment on sleep, health, behavior, and parenting stress in children with delayed Dim Light Melatonin Onset. Forty-one children (24 boys, 17 girls; mean age=9.43 years) entered melatonin treatment for 3 weeks and then discontinued t

  9. Delayed sleep phase syndrome: A placebo-controlled cross-over study on the effects of melatonin administered five hours before the individual dim light melatonin onset.

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    Nagtegaal, J E; Kerkhof, G A; Smits, M G; Swart, A C; Van Der Meer, Y G

    1998-06-01

    In a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, 30 patients with Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS) were included, of whom 25 finished the study. Melatonin 5 mg was administered during two weeks in a double-blind setting and two weeks in an open setting successively or interrupted by two week of placebo. The study's impact was assessed by measurements of the 24-h curves of endogenous melatonin production and rectal temperature (n = 14), polysomnography (n = 22), actigraphy (n = 13), sleep log (n = 22), and subjective sleep quality (n = 25). Mean dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) (+/- SD), before treatment, occurred at 23.17 hours (+/- 138 min). Melatonin was administered five hours before the individual DLMO. After treatment, the onset of the nocturnal melatonin profile was significantly advanced by approximately 1.5 hour. Body temperature trough did not advance significantly. During melatonin use, actigraphy showed a significant advance of sleep onset and polysomnography, a significant decreased sleep latency. Sleep architecture was not influenced. During melatonin treatment patients felt significantly more refreshed in the morning. These results show that analysis of DLMO of patients suffering from DSPS is important both for diagnosis and therapy. These results are discussed in terms of the biochemistry of the pineal.

  10. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

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    Raymann, Roy J E M; Swaab, Dick F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2005-06-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warming and heat loss. We have proposed that these intrinsically occurring changes in core and skin temperatures could modulate neuronal activity in sleep-regulating brain areas (Van Someren EJW, Chronobiol Int 17: 313-54, 2000). We here provide results compatible with this hypothesis. We obtained 144 sleep-onset latencies while directly manipulating core and skin temperatures within the comfortable range in eight healthy subjects under controlled conditions. The induction of a proximal skin temperature difference of only 0.78 +/- 0.03 degrees C (mean +/- SE) around a mean of 35.13 +/- 0.11 degrees C changed sleep-onset latency by 26%, i.e., by 3.09 minutes [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91 to 4.28] around a mean of 11.85 min (CI, 9.74 to 14.41), with faster sleep onsets when the proximal skin was warmed. The reduction in sleep-onset latency occurred despite a small but significant decrease in subjective comfort during proximal skin warming. The induction of changes in core temperature (delta = 0.20 +/- 0.02 degrees C) and distal skin temperature (delta = 0.74 +/- 0.05 degrees C) were ineffective. Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between skin temperature and sleep-onset latency. Also, sleep disruption by ambient temperatures that activate thermoregulatory defense mechanisms has been shown. The present study is the first to experimentally demonstrate a causal contribution to sleep-onset latency of skin temperature manipulations within the normal nocturnal fluctuation range. Circadian and sleep-appetitive behavior-induced variations in skin temperature might act as an input signal to sleep-regulating systems.

  11. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

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    Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

  12. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

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    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.

  13. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy J. E. M. Raymann; Dick F. Swaab; Eus J. W. Van Someren

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining...

  14. Sleep hygiene and actigraphically evaluated sleep characteristics in children with ADHD and chronic sleep onset insomnia.

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    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Smits, Marcel G; Gunning, W Boudewijn

    2006-03-01

    In the present study we investigated sleep hygiene and actigraphically evaluated sleep in 74 medication-naïve children, aged 6-12 years, with rigorously diagnosed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and chronic sleep onset insomnia (ADHD-SOI) and 23 ADHD controls without insomnia (ADHD-noSOI). Between-group differences were analysed for lights out (sleep log), actigraphically evaluated sleep onset, sleep latency, total sleep duration, actual sleep time and sleep hygiene as measured with the Children's Sleep Hygiene Scale. We found a significant difference (P sleep hygiene score between the ADHD-SOI (56.4 +/- 10.5) and ADHD-noSOI groups (53.0 +/- 10.6). We conclude that there were differences in sleep onset and sleep latency in ADHD children with chronic SOI and those without insomnia; however, sleep hygiene practices were similar and did not relate to sleep characteristics.

  15. SLEEP TIMING AND CIRCADIAN PHASE IN DELAYED SLEEP PHASE

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder in which the timing of the sleep episode occurs later than desired and is associated with difficulty falling asleep, problems awakening on time (e.g., to meet work or school obligations), and daytime sleepiness. The phase relationship between the timing of sleep and endogenous circadian rhythms is critical to the initiation and maintenance of sleep, and significant alteration leads to impairment of sleep quality and dura...

  16. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder and effects of melatonin treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.; Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Smits, M.G; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic and circadian changes that occur during adolescence can result in chronic sleep reduction. This may particularly be true for adolescents with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD), which is associated with late Dim Light Melatonin Onset (DLMO). This study assessed the influence of

  17. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder and effects of melatonin treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.; Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.; Smits, M.G; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic and circadian changes that occur during adolescence can result in chronic sleep reduction. This may particularly be true for adolescents with Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD), which is associated with late Dim Light Melatonin Onset (DLMO). This study assessed the influence of melatoni

  18. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin

  19. Cutaneous warming promotes sleep onset.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J.W. van

    2005-01-01

    Sleep occurs in close relation to changes in body temperature. Both the monophasic sleep period in humans and the polyphasic sleep periods in rodents tend to be initiated when core body temperature is declining. This decline is mainly due to an increase in skin blood flow and consequently skin warmi

  20. Sleep timing and circadian phase in delayed sleep phase syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anne-Marie; Reid, Kathryn J; Gourineni, Ramadevi; Zee, Phyllis C

    2009-08-01

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder in which the timing of the sleep episode occurs later than desired and is associated with difficulty falling asleep, problems awakening on time (e.g., to meet work or school obligations), and daytime sleepiness. The phase relationship between the timing of sleep and endogenous circadian rhythms is critical to the initiation and maintenance of sleep, and significant alteration leads to impairment of sleep quality and duration. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the phase relationship between sleep-wake times and physiological markers of circadian timing in clinic patients with DSPS. Objective and subjective measures of sleep timing and circadian phase markers (core body temperature and melatonin) were measured in patients with DSPS and compared with age-matched controls. As expected, significant delays in the timing of the major sleep episode and circadian phase of body temperature and melatonin rhythms were seen in the DSPS group when allowed to sleep at their own habitual schedules, but the phase relationship between sleep-wake times and circadian phase was similar between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the symptoms of insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness in DSPS patients living under entrained real-life conditions cannot be explained by an alteration in the phase relationship between sleep-wake patterns and other physiological circadian rhythms.

  1. Delayed-onset akathisia due to amisulpride

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    Murad Atmaca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that second-generation antipsychotics have a lower potential to cause extrapyramidal side-effects, including akathisia, their incidence is not negligible. Recent work suggests that tardive akathisia may have pharmacological differences from acute akathisia. In the present study, we have evaluated the nature of delayed-onset akathisia in patients on amisülpride monotherapy. Overall, we screened 56 patients on amisulpride treatment for 2 months at a stabilized amisulpride dose. However, 18 patients with diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV (DSM-IV presented with acute or delayed-onset akathisia, and all of them also met the entry criteria. The patients were evaluated at baseline and at the time when akathisia presented clinically, with respect to the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Barnes Akathisia Scale (BAS. Using the primary categorical criterion of akathisia (≥2 points of the BAS global scale, 12 (21.4% of the 56 patients experienced delayed-onset akathisia, and six (10.7% showed acute akathisia. The mean time for onset of acute or delayed-onset akathisia was 5.8 ± 2.1 and 39.4 ± 11.3 days, respectively. The mean BAS scores at baseline and after the period of 2 months were 1.3 ± 0.6 and 3.9 ± 2.4, respectively (P < 0.001. Our results revealed that amisulpride could considerably lead to delayed-onset akathisia. However, studies comprising larger samples receiving different antipsychotics, and more comprehensive assessment, will help to ascertain the role of amisulpride in delayed-onset akathisia.

  2. Delayed onset of clozapine-induced leucopenia.

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    Nongpiur, Arvind; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Sarkar, Sukanto; Das, Basudeb

    2012-05-01

    Clozapine has been reported to cause agranulocytosis, neutropenia, and leucopenia that usually occur within 18 weeks of initiation of treatment. We report a case of delayed onset leucopenia after 11 years of treatment with clozapine, which reversed within a few days after discontinuation of medication.

  3. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise.

  4. Multiple application delayed onset contact urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Maibach, H I

    1984-01-01

    An unusual type of contact urticaria to formalin is described, based on 4 patients and experiments in 14 volunteers. The contact urticaria appeared on healthy skin only following repeated open applications or after a single application on slightly diseased skin. The possible relation...... of this phenomenon for patients claiming textile intolerance is discussed. Further tests are required to reveal the mechanism of this delayed onset contact urticaria to formalin....

  5. Effect of Melatonin on Sleep, Behavior, and Cognition in ADHD and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Smits, Marcel G.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Gunning, W. Boudewijn

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on sleep, behavior, cognition, and quality of life in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and chronic sleep onset insomnia. Method: A total of 105 medication-free children, ages 6 to 12 years, with rigorously diagnosed ADHD and chronic sleep onset insomnia…

  6. The association between prolonged sleep onset latency and heart rate dynamics among young sleep-onset insomniacs and good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Kuo, Terry B J; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2015-12-30

    A blunting of heart rate (HR) reduction during sleep has been reported to be associated with increased all-cause mortality. An increased incident of cardiovascular events has been observed in patients with insomnia but the relationship between nighttime HR and insomnia remains unclear. Here we investigated the HR patterns during the sleep onset period and its association with the length of sleep onset latency (SOL). Nineteen sleep-onset insomniacs (SOI) and 14 good sleepers had their sleep analyzed. Linear regression and nonlinear Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) of the HR slope were performed in order to analyze HR dynamics during the sleep onset period. A significant depression in HR fluctuation was identified among the SOI group during the sleep onset period when linear regression and HHT analysis were applied. The magnitude of the HR reduction was associated with both polysomnography-defined and subjective SOL; moreover, we found that the linear regression and HHT slopes of the HR showed great sensitivity with respect to sleep quality. Our findings indicate that HR dynamics during the sleep onset period are sensitive to sleep initiation difficulty and respond to the SOL, which indicates that the presence of autonomic dysfunction would seem to affect the progress of falling asleep.

  7. Contributions of circadian tendencies and behavioral problems to sleep onset problems of children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Reut

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are two to three times more likely to experience sleep problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the relative contributions of circadian preferences and behavioral problems to sleep onset problems experienced by children with ADHD and to test for a moderation effect of ADHD diagnosis on the impact of circadian preferences and externalizing problems on sleep onset problems. Methods After initial screening, parents of children meeting inclusion criteria documented child bedtime over 4 nights, using a sleep log, and completed questionnaires regarding sleep, ADHD and demographics to assess bedtime routine prior to PSG. On the fifth night of the study, sleep was recorded via ambulatory assessment of sleep architecture in the child’s natural sleep environment employing portable polysomnography equipment. Seventy-five children (26 with ADHD and 49 controls aged 7–11 years (mean age 8.61 years, SD 1.27 years participated in the present study. Results In both groups of children, externalizing problems yielded significant independent contributions to the explained variance in parental reports of bedtime resistance, whereas an evening circadian tendency contributed both to parental reports of sleep onset delay and to PSG-measured sleep-onset latency. No significant interaction effect of behavioral/circadian tendency with ADHD status was evident. Conclusions Sleep onset problems in ADHD are related to different etiologies that might require different interventional strategies and can be distinguished using the parental reports on the CSHQ.

  8. Delayed onset of a daytime nap facilitates retention of declarative memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E Alger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Learning followed by a period of sleep, even as little as a nap, promotes memory consolidation. It is now generally recognized that sleep facilitates the stabilization of information acquired prior to sleep. However, the temporal nature of the effect of sleep on retention of declarative memory is yet to be understood. We examined the impact of a delayed nap onset on the recognition of neutral pictorial stimuli with an added spatial component. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Participants completed an initial study session involving 150 neutral pictures of people, places, and objects. Immediately following the picture presentation, participants were asked to make recognition judgments on a subset of "old", previously seen, pictures versus intermixed "new" pictures. Participants were then divided into one of four groups who either took a 90-minute nap immediately, 2 hours, or 4 hours after learning, or remained awake for the duration of the experiment. 6 hours after initial learning, participants were again tested on the remaining "old" pictures, with "new" pictures intermixed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Interestingly, we found a stabilizing benefit of sleep on the memory trace reflected as a significant negative correlation between the average time elapsed before napping and decline in performance from test to retest (p = .001. We found a significant interaction between the groups and their performance from test to retest (p = .010, with the 4-hour delay group performing significantly better than both those who slept immediately and those who remained awake (p = .044, p = .010, respectively. Analysis of sleep data revealed a significant positive correlation between amount of slow wave sleep (SWS achieved and length of the delay before sleep onset (p = .048. The findings add to the understanding of memory processing in humans, suggesting that factors such as waking processing and homeostatic increases in need for sleep over time modulate

  9. Laser homeostatics on delayed onset muscle soreness

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    Liu, T. C. Y.; Fu, D. R.; Liu, X. G.; Tian, Z. X.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and its photobiomodulation were reviewed from the viewpoint of function-specific homeostasis (FSH) in this paper. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stressor may destroy a FSH. A stress is a response of a biosystem to a stressor and may also be in stress-specific homeostasis (StSH). A low level light (LLL) is so defined that it has no effects on a function in its FSH or a stress in its StSH, but it modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. For DOMS recovery, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is the essential process, but the inflammation, pain and soreness are non-essential processes. For many DOMS phenomena, protein metabolism in the Z-line streaming muscular cell is in protein metabolism-specific homeostasis (PmSH) so that there are no effects of LLL although the inflammation can be inhibited and the pain can be relieved. An athlete or animal in the dysfunctional conditions such as blood flow restriction and exercise exhaustion is far from PmSH and the protein metabolism can be improved with LLL.

  10. Onset of Impaired Sleep and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula; Lange, Theis

    2016-01-01

    , and dyslipidemia). METHODS: In a longitudinal cohort study with 3 survey waves (2000, 2004, 2008) from the Finnish Public Sector study we used repeated information on sleep duration and disturbances to determine onset of impaired sleep. Information on development of CVD risk factors, as indicated by initiation......STUDY OBJECTIVES: Impaired sleep has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the underlying mechanisms are still unsettled. We sought to determine how onset of impaired sleep affects the risk of established physiological CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, diabetes...... of medication for hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia was derived from electronic medical records within 8 years of follow-up. Data on 45,647 participants was structured as two data-cycles to examine the effect of change in sleep (between two waves) on incident CVD events. We applied strict inclusion...

  11. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis associated with multiple sleep onset REM periods.

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    Iranzo, A; Santamaria, J

    1999-12-15

    A 24-year-old man with sporadic hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) presented with moderate excessive daytime sleepiness and transitory episodes of weakness which occurred during and after sleep. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) demonstrated the presence of five sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs) and a sleep latency of five minutes. Treatment with a diuretic which decreases serum potassium resolved all the clinical symtomps and a new MSLT showed the absence of SOREMPs and a sleep latency of 13.5 minutes. To our knowledge, the patient herein reported is the first case that associates sleep abnormalities and multiple SOREMPs with HPP. Furthermore, the present case suggests that SOREMPs may be explained by an increased extracellular potassium conductance related to HPP.

  12. Onset and stability of melatonin treatment effect in childhood sleep onset insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Didden, H.C.M.; Heijden, K.B. van der; Smits, M.G.; Leeuwe, J.F.J. van

    2010-01-01

    Backgroud and objective: To evaluate onset and stability of therapeutic effect of 4-week melatonin treatment for chronic sleep onset insomnia in elementary school-aged children. Methods: Retrospective analysis of unpublished data obtained from two previously published randomized, double-blind and pl

  13. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease

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    Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Methods: Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. Results: We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. Conclusions: The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination. PMID:21060095

  14. The influence of pre-sleep cognitive arousal on sleep onset processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Johan; De Valck, Elke; Vandekerckhove, Marie; Pattyn, Nathalie; Bulckaert, Arnoud; Berckmans, Daniel; Haex, Bart; Verbraecken, Johan; Cluydts, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive hyperarousal, resulting in enhanced cognitive activation, has been cited as an important contributor to the development and preservation of insomnia. To further understand this process, our study examined the effects of acutely-induced pre-sleep cognitive hyperarousal on sleep onset processes in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptation night, 15 subjects slept two nights in our sleep laboratory: one reference night and another one with cognitive arousal induction, in a counterbalanced order. In the cognitive arousal condition, subjects worked through half an hour of cognitive tasks without interference of an emotional component prior to retiring to bed. Objective sleep onset latency was significantly prolonged in the cognitive arousal condition compared to the reference condition. Significantly more high frequency activity was recorded during the first and second deep-sleep period. Moreover, differences in heart rate and proximal temperature during and after sleep onset were observed in the nights after the cognitive induction. Pre-sleep cognitive activation successfully induced a significant cognitive load and activation in our subjects to influence subsequent sleep (onset) processes.

  15. Difficult weaning in delayed onset diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Syed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic injuries are relatively rare and result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Regardless of the mechanism, diagnosis is often missed and high index of suspicion is vital. The clinical signs associated with a diaphragmatic hernia can range from no outward signs to immediately life-threatening respiratory compromise. Establishing the clinical diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries (DI can be challenging as it is often clinically occult. Accurate diagnosis is critical since missed DI may result in grave sequelae due to herniation and strangulation of displaced intra-abdominal organs. We present a case of polytrauma with rib fracture and delayed appearance of diaphragmatic hernia manifesting as difficult weaning from ventilatory support.

  16. Delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis secondary to Exophiala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Estades, Jose Alberto; Walter, Scott; Valenzuela, Felipe; Amescua, Guillermo

    2015-02-17

    Exophiala is a genus of slow-growing, melanin-producing, saprophytic fungi most commonly found in soil, faeces and decaying plant matter. It is an unusual fungal pathogen capable of causing a variety of ophthalmic manifestations, including keratitis, scleritis and endophthalmitis. In this report, we present a rare case of delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis confined to the anterior segment, secondary to Exophiala species. Previous reported cases of delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis have been treated medically, with suboptimal outcomes. Our experience supports the use of anterior segment surgery to clear the nidus of disease combined with intravitreal voriconazole to prevent recurrence of the infection.

  17. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  18. Effects of delayed-onset muscle soreness on masticatory function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, E.; Lobbezoo, F.; Fueki, K.; Naeije, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to clarify the effects of experimentally provoked delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the jaw-closing muscles on subjective and objective measures of masticatory function. Twenty-one dentate female subjects, without pain-related signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, part

  19. Delayed-onset bilateral abducens paresis after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Salunke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral sixth nerve paresis following closed head injury, though rare, is a known entity. However, delayed-onset post-traumatic bilateral abducens paresis is extremely rare. We present two cases. The first patient had onset of bilateral abducens paresis 2 weeks after closed head injury and the second patient after 3 days. The cause in the former was detected to be chronic subdural hematoma and in the latter is speculated to be edema/ischemia due to injury to soft tissue structures housing these nerves. The delayed onset of bilateral abducens paresis following head injury may vary according to the cause. There may be another mechanism of injury apart from direct trauma. Though rare, it needs to be evaluated and may have a treatable cause like elevated intracranial pressure.

  20. Classical conditioning for preserving the effects of short melatonin treatment in children with delayed sleep: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Annette; Meijer, Anne Marie; Smits, Marcel G; Oort, Frans J

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin treatment is effective in treating sleep onset problems in children with delayed melatonin onset, but effects usually disappear when treatment is discontinued. In this pilot study, we investigated whether classical conditioning might help in preserving treatment effects of melatonin in children with sleep onset problems, with and without comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism. After a baseline week, 16 children (mean age: 9.92 years, 31% ADHD/autism) received melatonin treatment for 3 weeks and then gradually discontinued the treatment. Classical conditioning was applied by having children drink organic lemonade while taking melatonin and by using a dim red light lamp that was turned on when children went to bed. Results were compared with a group of 41 children (mean age: 9.43 years, 34% ADHD/autism) who received melatonin without classical conditioning. Melatonin treatment was effective in advancing dim light melatonin onset and reducing sleep onset problems, and positive effects were found on health and behavior problems. After stopping melatonin, sleep returned to baseline levels. We found that for children without comorbidity in the experimental group, sleep latency and sleep start delayed less in the stop week, which suggests an effect of classical conditioning. However, classical conditioning seems counterproductive in children with ADHD or autism. Further research is needed to establish these results and to examine other ways to preserve melatonin treatment effects, for example, by applying morning light.

  1. Sleep apnea detection using time-delayed heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nano, Marina-Marinela; Xi Long; Werth, Jan; Aarts, Ronald M; Heusdens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder distinguished by repetitive absence of breathing. Compared with the traditional expensive and cumbersome methods, sleep apnea diagnosis or screening with physiological information that can be easily acquired is needed. This paper describes algorithms using heart rate variability (HRV) to automatically detect sleep apneas as long as it can be easily acquired with unobtrusive sensors. Because the changes in cardiac activity are usually hysteretic than the presence of apneas with a few minutes, we propose to use the delayed HRV features to identify the episodes with sleep apneic events. This is expected to help improve the apnea detection performance. Experiments were conducted with a data set of 23 sleep apnea patients using support vector machine (SVM) classifiers and cross validations. Results show that using eleven HRV features with a time delay of 1.5 minutes rather than the features without time delay for SA detection, the overall accuracy increased from 74.9% to 76.2% and the Cohen's Kappa coefficient increased from 0.49 to 0.52. Further, an accuracy of 94.5% and a Kappa of 0.89 were achieved when applying subject-specific classifiers.

  2. Long-term follow-up of melatonin treatment in children with ADHD and chronic sleep onset insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebert, Michel; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; van Geijlswijk, Ingeborg M; Smits, Marcel G

    2009-08-01

    We conducted this study to assess long-term melatonin treatment course, effectiveness and safety in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and chronic sleep onset insomnia (CSOI). This was conducted by means of a structured questionnaire for the parents. The subjects of this study consisted of participants who previously participated in a randomised clinical trial on melatonin efficacy. The response rate was 93% (94/101). The mean time to follow up was 3.7 yr. No serious adverse events or treatment related co-morbidities were reported. Sixty-five percent of the children still used melatonin daily and 12% occasionally. Temporal discontinuation of treatment resulted in a delay of sleep onset in 92% of the children. Nine percent of the children could discontinue melatonin completely because of improvement of sleep onset insomnia. Long-term melatonin treatment was judged to be effective against sleep onset problems in 88% of the cases. Improvement of behaviour and mood was reported in 71% and 61% respectively. We conclude that melatonin remains an effective therapy on the long term for the treatment of CSOI in children with ADHD and has no safety concerns regarding serious adverse events or treatment related co-morbidity. Discontinuation of melatonin treatment usually leads to a relapse of sleep onset insomnia and in resuming melatonin treatment, even after several years of treatment.

  3. Severe delayed-onset hypersensitivity reactions to amoxicillin in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Chopra, R; Roberts, J.; Warrington, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Amoxicillin, a semisynthetic aminopenicillin, has achieved widespread use in recent years for the treatment of respiratory tract and otic infections. Serious reactions have been relatively infrequent. From July 1986 to June 1987, 11 children aged 6 months to 10 years presented with delayed-onset hypersensitivity reactions. In 10 the symptoms were consistent with a serum-sickness-like illness, including urticaria, angioedema, arthritis and arthralgia. Radioallergosorbent testing for IgE antibo...

  4. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-01-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of inj...

  5. Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Morris Freedman; Suvarna Alladi; Howard Chertkow; Ellen Bialystok; Craik, Fergus I.M.; Phillips, Natalie A.; Vasanta Duggirala; Surampudi Bapi Raju; Bak, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance e...

  6. Melatonin treatment and light therapy for chronic sleep onset insomnia in children : Effects on sleep, cognition, health, and psychosocial functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin treatment is known to be an effective treatment for chronic sleep onset problems in children, as it can advance the sleep-wake rhythm and improve sleep. However, it is currently not known how long melatonin treatment should be continued, while especially in young children, short term treat

  7. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Heijden, K.B. van der; Egberts, A.C.G.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. Objectives This study aims to establish a dose–response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and 1

  8. Dose finding of melatonin for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia: an RCT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.; van der Heijden, K.B.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Korzilius, H.P.; Smits, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in children might differ from that in adults. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to establish a dose-response relationship for melatonin in advancing dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), sleep onset (SO), and reducing sleep onset latency (SOL) in children between 6 and

  9. Sleep Problems in Infants Decrease following Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of pre-bedtime massages for infants and toddlers with sleep onset problems. Found that, compared to bedtime stories, massages produced fewer sleep delays and a shortened latency to sleep onset. (Author/DLH)

  10. Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Morris; Alladi, Suvarna; Chertkow, Howard; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Phillips, Natalie A.; Duggirala, Vasanta; Raju, Surampudi Bapi; Bak, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer's disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia. PMID:24959001

  11. Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Freedman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer’s disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia.

  12. Sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset REM periods in MSLT predicts treatment response in patients with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakatos, Panagis; Patel, Kishankumar; Thakrar, Chiraag; Williams, Adrian J; Kent, Brian D; Leschziner, Guy D

    2016-04-01

    Current treatment recommendations for narcolepsy suggest that modafinil should be used as a first-line treatment ahead of conventional stimulants or sodium oxybate. In this study, performed in a tertiary sleep disorders centre, treatment responses were examined following these recommendations, and the ability of sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in the multiple sleep latency test to predict treatment response. Over a 3.5-year period, 255 patients were retrospectively identified in the authors' database as patients diagnosed with narcolepsy, type 1 (with cataplexy) or type 2 (without) using clinical and polysomnographic criteria. Eligible patients were examined in detail, sleep study data were abstracted and sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods were analysed. Response to treatment was graded utilizing an internally developed scale. Seventy-five patients were included (39% males). Forty (53%) were diagnosed with type 1 narcolepsy with a mean follow-up of 2.37 ± 1.35 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were initially started on modafinil, and overall 59% reported complete response on the last follow-up. Twenty-nine patients (39%) had the sequence of sleep stage 1 or wake to rapid eye movement in all of their sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods, with most of these diagnosed as narcolepsy type 1 (72%). The presence of this specific sleep-stage sequence in all sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods was associated with worse treatment response (P = 0.0023). Sleep-stage sequence analysis of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in the multiple sleep latency test may aid the prediction of treatment response in narcoleptics and provide a useful prognostic tool in clinical practice, above and beyond their classification as narcolepsy type 1 or 2.

  13. Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay (congenital ocular motor apraxia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay, also known as congenital ocular motor apraxia, typically presents in early infancy with horizontal head thrusts once head control is achieved. Defective initiation of horizontal saccades and saccade hypometria with normal saccadic velocity are characteristic findings. Isolated impairment of vertical saccades is rare. Impaired smooth ocular pursuit may be seen. Other relatively common features include developmental delay, hypotonia, ataxia, or clumsiness. Brain MRI may be normal or show a diverse range of abnormalities, most commonly involving the cerebellum. Defective slow phases of the optokinetic response are commonly associated with brain MRI abnormalities. Isolated defect of vertical saccade initiation may indicate supratentorial brain abnormalities on MRI. Joubert syndrome, a developmental midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and ataxia telangiectasia are both commonly associated with defective volitional and reflexive saccade initiation, saccade hypometria, and head thrusts. Both horizontal and vertical saccades are impaired in these two disorders.

  14. Late-Onset Capsular Block Syndrome: Unusually Delayed Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Rana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Capsular block syndrome (CBS has been known to occur as a rare complication of cataract surgery with continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis and a posterior-chamber lens implant. Typically, it presents with reduced vision in the early postoperative period and is characterised by a forward displacement of the posterior-chamber intra-ocular lens and an accumulation of intra-capsular opaque material. Management of CBS is usually by Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy. In this report, we describe a unique case of very-delayed-onset CBS with good visual acuity, occurring 8 years after surgery. It was treated successfully with surgical removal of the opaque material.

  15. Skin temperature and sleep-onset latency: changes with age and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymann, Roy J E M; Swaab, Dick F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2007-02-28

    Throughout the 24-hour day, the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness is closely related to changes in body temperatures. Changes in skin temperature may causally affect the ability to initiate and maintain sleep. First, we briefly summarize a previously proposed neurobiological mechanism that couples skin temperature to sleep propensity. Next we review previous findings on the relation between skin temperature and sleep-onset latency, indicating that sleep propensity can be enhanced by warming the skin to the level that normally occurs prior to--and during--sleep. Finally, we present new data indicating age- and insomnia-related changes in the sleep-onset latency response to foot warming, and evaluate whether different methods of foot warming could provide an applicable strategy to address sleep complaints. Foot temperature manipulations included footbaths before sleep onset (1), and heatable bed socks applied either before (2) or after lights-off (3). In adults, sleep-onset was accelerated by warm and neutral bed socks after lights-off and correlated to the increase in foot temperature. This increase was attenuated in elderly subjects. In elderly subjects without sleep difficulties, sleep onset could be accelerated with neutral bed socks after lights-off and a warm footbath prior to lights-off. In elderly insomniacs, none of the treatments accelerated sleep onset. We illustrate that elderly subjects show an attenuated increase in foot temperature after lights-off and lose the relationship between pre-sleep heat-loss activation and sleep latency. The sensitivity of sleep propensity to foot warming changes with age and is attenuated in age-related insomnia.

  16. Body temperature, activity and melatonin profiles in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and delayed sleep: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlenga, Denise; Van Someren, Eus J W; Gruber, Reut; Bron, Tannetje I; Kruithof, I Femke; Spanbroek, Elise C A; Kooij, J J Sandra

    2013-12-01

    Irregular sleep-wake patterns and delayed sleep times are common in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, but mechanisms underlying these problems are unknown. The present case-control study examined whether circadian abnormalities underlie these sleep problems in a naturalistic home setting. We included 12 medication-naïve patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and delayed sleep phase syndrome, and 12 matched healthy controls. We examined associations between sleep/wake rhythm in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and circadian parameters (i.e. salivary melatonin concentrations, core and skin temperatures, and activity patterns) of the patients and controls during five consecutive days and nights. Daily bedtimes were more variable within patients compared with controls (F = 8.19, P sleep onset was on average 1 h longer in patients compared with controls (U = 1117, Z = -2.62, P = 0.009). This interval was even longer in patients with extremely late chronotype. Melatonin, activity and body temperatures were delayed to comparable degrees in patients. Overall temperatures were lower in patients than controls. Sleep-onset difficulties correlated with greater distal-proximal temperature gradient (DPG; i.e. colder hands, r(2)  = -0.32, P = 0.028) in patients. Observed day-to-day bedtime variability of individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and delayed sleep phase syndrome were not reflected in their melatonin profiles. Irregular sleep-wake patterns and delayed sleep in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and delayed sleep phase syndrome are associated with delays and dysregulations of the core and skin temperatures.

  17. Predictors of children's sleep onset and maintenance problems after road traffic accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Wittmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep onset and maintenance problems are a frequent complaint after traumatic events in children. However, the association of traumatic experiences and disturbed sleep remains to be explained. Objective: To examine the incidence of sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after road traffic accidents and identify potential predictors of sleep onset and maintenance problems, including putative psychopathological mechanisms as well as stressors affecting the family system. Method: In 33 children treated for injuries after road traffic accidents, sleep and measures of psychopathology were assessed 10 days, 2 months, and 6 months after hospital admission. The predictive value of four clusters of predictor variables for children's sleep onset and maintenance problems was prospectively tested by multiple regression analyses. These clusters included socio-demographic, injury- and accident-related, and psychopathological variable clusters as well as factors reflecting stressors concerning mothers and family. Results: Children suffering from posttraumatic stress reported a prolonged subjective sleep latency. The severity of sleep onset and maintenance problems was predicted by female sex and the child's as well as mothers’ posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD severity. Conclusions: Sleep onset and maintenance problems in children after trauma appear to result from a complex interaction of multiple factors. Our findings support the transactional model of sleep-wake regulation that bears implications for the development of adequate intervention strategies.

  18. Prevalence of Circadian Misalignment and Its Association With Depressive Symptoms in Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jade M; Sletten, Tracey L; Magee, Michelle; Gordon, Christopher; Lovato, Nicole; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Kennaway, David J; Lack, Leon C; Grunstein, Ronald R; Lockley, Steven W; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W

    2017-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of circadian misalignment in clinically diagnosed delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) and to compare mood and daytime functioning in those with and without a circadian basis for the disorder. One hundred and eighty-two DSPD patients aged 16-64 years, engaged in regular employment or school, underwent sleep-wake monitoring in the home, followed by a sleep laboratory visit for assessment of salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Based on the DLMO assessments, patients were classified into two groups: circadian DSPD, defined as DLMO occurring at or after desired bedtime (DBT), or non-circadian DSPD, defined as DLMO occurring before DBT. One hundred and three patients (57%) were classified as circadian DSPD and 79 (43%) as non-circadian DSPD. DLMO occurred 1.66 hours later in circadian DSPD compared to non-circadian DSPD (p sleep at the DBT are unlikely to be explained by the (mis)timing of the circadian rhythm of sleep propensity. Circadian misalignment in DSPD is associated with increased depressive symptoms and DSPD symptom severity.

  19. Melatonin for chronic sleep onset insomnia in children: A Randomized placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Heijden, J.A.M. van der; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of melatonin treatment in childhood sleep onset insomnia, 40 elementary school children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more than 1 year from chronic sleep onset insomnia, were studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The children were randomly assigned to

  20. Melatonin for chronic sleep onset insomnia in children: A Randomized placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Heijden, J.A.M. van der; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    To establish the efficacy of melatonin treatment in childhood sleep onset insomnia, 40 elementary school children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more than 1 year from chronic sleep onset insomnia, were studied in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The children were randomly assigned to r

  1. Sleep Problems and Early Developmental Delay: Implications for Early Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen; Grant, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders negatively impact behavior, cognition, and growth--the same areas targeted by early intervention. Conversely, developmental delays and disabilities may themselves precipitate sleep disorders. Young children with developmental delays experience sleep disorders at a higher rate than do typically developing children; the most common…

  2. Sleep Problems and Early Developmental Delay: Implications for Early Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen; Grant, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders negatively impact behavior, cognition, and growth--the same areas targeted by early intervention. Conversely, developmental delays and disabilities may themselves precipitate sleep disorders. Young children with developmental delays experience sleep disorders at a higher rate than do typically developing children; the most common…

  3. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy for adolescent delayed sleep phase disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Gardner, Greg; Paine, Sarah; Starkey, Karina; Menne, Annemarie; Slater, Amy; Wright, Helen; Hudson, Jennifer L; Weaver, Edward; Trenowden, Sophie

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate cognitive-behavior therapy plus bright light therapy (CBT plus BLT) for adolescents diagnosed with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Randomized controlled trial of CBT plus BLT vs. waitlist (WL) control with comparisons at pre- and post-treatment. There was 6-month follow-up for the CBT plus BLT group only. Flinders University Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic, Adelaide, South Australia. 49 adolescents (mean age 14.6 ± 1.0 y, 53% males) diagnosed with DSPD; mean chronicity 4 y 8 months; 16% not attending school. Eighteen percent of adolescents dropped out of the study (CBT plus BLT: N = 23 vs. WL: N = 17). CBT plus BLT consisted of 6 individual sessions, including morning bright light therapy to advance adolescents' circadian rhythms, and cognitive restructuring and sleep education to target associated insomnia and sleep hygiene. DSPD diagnosis was performed via a clinical interview and 7-day sleep diary. Measurements at each time-point included online sleep diaries and scales measuring sleepiness, fatigue, and depression symptoms. Compared to WL, moderate-to-large improvements (d = 0.65-1.24) were found at post-treatment for CBT plus BLT adolescents, including reduced sleep latency, earlier sleep onset and rise times, total sleep time (school nights), wake after sleep onset, sleepiness, and fatigue. At 6-month follow-up (N = 15), small-to-large improvements (d = 0.24-1.53) continued for CBT plus BLT adolescents, with effects found for all measures. Significantly fewer adolescents receiving CBT plus BLT met DPSD criteria at post-treatment (WL = 82% vs. CBT plus BLT = 13%, P CBT plus BLT for adolescent DSPD is effective for improving multiple sleep and daytime impairments in the immediate and long-term. Studies evaluating the treatment effectiveness of each treatment component are needed. Australia-New Zealand Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12610001041044.

  4. Ultrasound Findings of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Victor; Jacobson, Jon A; Fessell, David P; Mautner, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this series was to retrospectively characterize the ultrasound findings of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The Institutional Review Board approved our study, and informed consent was waived. A retrospective search of radiology reports using the key phrase "delayed-onset muscle soreness" and key word "DOMS" from 2001 to 2015 and teaching files was completed to identify cases. The sonograms were reviewed by 3 fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Sonograms were retrospectively characterized with respect to echogenicity (hypoechoic, isoechoic, or hyperechoic), distribution of muscle involvement, and intramuscular pattern (focal versus diffuse and well defined versus poorly defined). Images were also reviewed for muscle enlargement, fluid collection, muscle fiber disruption, and increased flow on color or power Doppler imaging. There were a total of 6 patients identified (5 male and 1 female). The average age was 22 years (range, 7-44 years). Of the 6 patients, there were a total of 11 affected muscles in 7 extremities (1 bilateral case). The involved muscles were in the upper extremity: triceps brachii in 27% (3 of 11), biceps brachii in 18% (2 of 11), brachialis in 18% (2 of 11), brachioradialis in 18% (2 of 11), infraspinatus in 9% (1 of 11), and deltoid in 9% (1 of 11). On ultrasound imaging, the abnormal muscle was hyperechoic in 100% (11 of 11), well defined in 73% (8 of 11), poorly defined in 27% (3 of 11), diffuse in 73% (8 of 11), and focal in 27% (3 of 11). Increased muscle size was found in 82% (9 of 11) and minimal hyperemia in 87.5% (7 of 8). The ultrasound findings of DOMS include hyperechoic involvement of an upper extremity muscle, most commonly appearing well defined and diffuse with increased muscle size and minimal hyperemia.

  5. The boundary between wakefulness and sleep: quantitative electroencephalographic changes during the sleep onset period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gennaro, L; Ferrara, M; Bertini, M

    2001-01-01

    Microstructural electroencephalographic changes during the wakefulness-sleep transition have been investigated by comparing two definitions of sleep onset: the first occurrence of stage 1 and of stage 2. Power values were calculated across a 1-28-Hz frequency range in a 1-Hz bin resolution in the sleep recordings of 26 normal subjects. Quantitative changes were assessed after averaging individual time series, aligned with respect to the first occurrence of stage 1 or of stage 2. The time course of the single-Hz activity revealed a linear increase of power in the 1-6-Hz range and a linear decrease in the 9-12- and 16-28-Hz ranges during the stage 1 transition. During the stage 2 transition, electroencephalogram power linearly increased in the 1-7- and 14-15-Hz ranges and decreased in the 18-28-Hz range, while the 8-12-Hz range fitted a second-order polynomial curve. The two 'switch' points were also compared in their ability to differentiate Hz by Hz wakefulness from sleep: a lower mean power was found after stage 1 onset in the 9-11-Hz and 20-28-Hz bins and a higher one in the 1-5-Hz bins, while a higher power was found in the 1-8-Hz and 12-16-Hz bins and a lower one in 18-28-Hz bins after stage 2 onset. The time course of three electroencephalographic frequency ranges [delta/theta/sigma (1-7 and 12-16 Hz); beta (17-28 Hz); alpha (8-11 Hz)], grouped on the basis of a principal component analysis, fitted a first-order polynomial curve for the first two ranges, and a second-order polynomial curve for the last, with a progressive decrease during wakefulness, a minimum point during stage 1, and a subsequent increase during stage 2. The uniformly increasing electroencephalographic power across the 1-16-Hz frequency range during stage 2 and the shift of functional meaning for the alpha power during stage 1 point to the start of stage 2 as a more reliable boundary between wakefulness and sleep.

  6. Queueing Delay and Energy Efficiency Analyses of Sleep Based Power Saving Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Yiqun; Niu, Zhisheng

    In wireless networks, sleep mode based power saving mechanisms can reduce the energy consumption at the expense of additional packet delay. This letter analyzes its packet queueing delay and wireless terminals' energy efficiency. Based on the analysis, optimal sleep window size can be derived to optimize terminal energy efficiency with delay constraint.

  7. Onset of impaired sleep as a predictor of change in health-related behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Salo, Paula; Lange, Theis

    2015-01-01

    used data from 37 508 adults from the longitudinal Finnish Public Sector Study. In analysis of 59 152 person-observations on duration and quality of sleep and health-related behaviours (alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity and weight control), data were treated as a series of non......BACKGROUND: Changes in health-related behaviour may be a key mechanism linking impaired sleep to poor health, but evidence on this is limited. In this study, we analysed observational data to determine whether onset of impaired sleep is followed by changes in health-related behaviours. METHODS: We......-randomized pseudo-trials with strict predefined criteria for data inclusion and temporality. RESULTS: Smokers who experienced onset of short sleep were less likely to quit smoking than those with persistent normal sleep [odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64-0.97]. Onset of short sleep also...

  8. Prediction of melatonin efficacy by pretreatment dim light melatonin onset in children with idiopathic chronic sleep onset insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Smits, Marcel G; van Someren, Eus J W; Boudewijn Gunning, W

    2005-06-01

    Research has shown efficacy of melatonin treatment to advance sleep-wake rhythms in insomnia. In healthy adults, direction and magnitude of the phase shift depends on the timing of administration relative to the phase position of the circadian system. Therefore, in the present study we investigated whether in children with chronic sleep onset insomnia (SOI) efficacy of melatonin treatment in the early evening could be predicted from dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), a phase marker of the circadian system. We combined data of two previously published double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in 110 participants, aged 6-12 years. Sleep was actigraphically estimated, and saliva collected, at baseline and in the third week of a 4-week treatment period with 5 mg melatonin or placebo at 18:00 or 19:00 hours. Primary outcome measures were pre- to post-treatment changes in dim light melatonin onset (DeltaDLMO), sleep onset (DeltaSO), sleep latency (DeltaSL), and total sleep duration (DeltaTSD). Melatonin advanced DLMO with +1:12 h (P melatonin-treated group, but not in the placebo-treated group, pretreatment DLMO was significantly related to DeltaDLMO [F(1, 29) = 7.28, P = 0.012] and DeltaSO [F(1, 25) = 7.72, P = 0.010]. The time interval between treatment administration and pretreatment DLMO (INT) was only significantly related to DeltaSO [F(1,26) = 5.40, P = 0.028]. The results suggest that in children with SOI, the efficacy of early evening melatonin to advance sleep onset and endogenous melatonin onset increases the later the pretreatment DLMO is.

  9. Perinatal asphyxia: CNS development and deficits with delayed onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eHerrera-Marschitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia constitutes a prototype of obstetric complications occurring when pulmonary oxygenation is delayed or interrupted. The primary insult relates to the duration of the period lacking oxygenation, leading to death if not re-established. Re-oxygenation leads to a secondary insult, related to a cascade of biochemical events required for restoring proper function. Perinatal asphyxia interferes with neonatal development, resulting in long-term deficits associated to mental and neurological diseases with delayed clinical onset, by mechanisms not yet clarified.In the experimental scenario, the effects observed long after perinatal asphyxia have been explained by over expression of sentinel proteins, such as poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, competing for NAD+ during re-oxygenation, leading to the idea that sentinel protein inhibition constitutes a suitable therapeutic strategy. Asphyxia induces transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory factors, in tandem with PARP-1 overactivation, and pharmacologically induced PARP-1 inhibition also down-regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Nicotinamide has been proposed as a suitable PARP-1 inhibitor. Its effect has been studied in an experimental model of global hypoxia in rats. In that model, the insult is induced by immersing rat foetuses into a water bath for various periods of time. Following asphyxia, the pups are delivered, treated, and nursed by surrogate dams, pending further experiments. Nicotinamide rapidly distributes into the brain following systemic administration, reaching steady state concentrations sufficient to inhibit PARP-1 activity for several hours, preventing several of the long-term consequences of perinatal asphyxia, supporting the idea that it constitutes a lead for exploring compounds with similar or better pharmacological profiles.

  10. Factors in delayed onset muscular soreness of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, M F; Hollander, A P; Huijing, P A

    1986-02-01

    In this study 11 subjects performed exercise resulting in delayed onset muscular soreness in m. gastrocnemius with one leg, the experimental leg. The other leg served as control. Pre-exercise and 24, 48 and 72 h postexercise, soreness perception, resting EMG level of m. gastrocnemius, and volume and skin temperature of both legs were measured, and a leukocyte count was performed. Perception of soreness in m. gastrocnemius reported 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise was not accompanied by an increase in resting EMG level. This result indicates that soreness perception is not related to a tonic localized spasm in sore muscles. A rise in volume of the experimental leg relative to volume of the control leg was found 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise (P less than 0.05). It is suggested that the volume rise is due to edema formation in the experimental leg and that this edema formation is responsible for soreness perception. Since granulocytosis was not found, the hypothesis that edema formation reflects muscle inflammation is not substantiated.

  11. Delayed onset muscle soreness: Involvement of neurotrophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumura, Kazue; Taguchi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is quite a common consequence of unaccustomed strenuous exercise, especially exercise containing eccentric contraction (lengthening contraction, LC). Its typical sign is mechanical hyperalgesia (tenderness and movement related pain). Its cause has been commonly believed to be micro-damage of the muscle and subsequent inflammation. Here we present a brief historical overview of the damage-inflammation theory followed by a discussion of our new findings. Different from previous observations, we have observed mechanical hyperalgesia in rats 1-3 days after LC without any apparent microscopic damage of the muscle or signs of inflammation. With our model we have found that two pathways are involved in inducing mechanical hyperalgesia after LC: activation of the B2 bradykinin receptor-nerve growth factor (NGF) pathway and activation of the COX-2-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway. These neurotrophic factors were produced by muscle fibers and/or satellite cells. This means that muscle fiber damage is not essential, although it is sufficient, for induction of DOMS, instead, NGF and GDNF produced by muscle fibers/satellite cells play crucial roles in DOMS.

  12. The effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, J; Sforzo, G; Swensen, T

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Methods: Eighteen volunteers were randomly assigned to either a massage or control group. DOMS was induced with six sets of eight maximal eccentric contractions of the right hamstring, which were followed 2 h later by 20 min of massage or sham massage (control). Peak torque and mood were assessed at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Range of motion (ROM) and intensity and unpleasantness of soreness were assessed at 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Neutrophil count was assessed at 6 and 24 h postexercise. Results: A two factor ANOVA (treatment v time) with repeated measures on the second factor showed no significant treatment differences for peak torque, ROM, neutrophils, unpleasantness of soreness, and mood (p > 0.05). The intensity of soreness, however, was significantly lower in the massage group relative to the control group at 48 h postexercise (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage administered 2 h after exercise induced muscle injury did not improve hamstring function but did reduce the intensity of soreness 48 h after muscle insult. PMID:12547748

  13. Delayed onset muscle soreness : treatment strategies and performance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karoline; Hume, Patria; Maxwell, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a familiar experience for the elite or novice athlete. Symptoms can range from muscle tenderness to severe debilitating pain. The mechanisms, treatment strategies, and impact on athletic performance remain uncertain, despite the high incidence of DOMS. DOMS is most prevalent at the beginning of the sporting season when athletes are returning to training following a period of reduced activity. DOMS is also common when athletes are first introduced to certain types of activities regardless of the time of year. Eccentric activities induce micro-injury at a greater frequency and severity than other types of muscle actions. The intensity and duration of exercise are also important factors in DOMS onset. Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. However, an integration of two or more theories is likely to explain muscle soreness. DOMS can affect athletic performance by causing a reduction in joint range of motion, shock attenuation and peak torque. Alterations in muscle sequencing and recruitment patterns may also occur, causing unaccustomed stress to be placed on muscle ligaments and tendons. These compensatory mechanisms may increase the risk of further injury if a premature return to sport is attempted.A number of treatment strategies have been introduced to help alleviate the severity of DOMS and to restore the maximal function of the muscles as rapidly as possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated dosage-dependent effects that may also be influenced by the time of administration. Similarly, massage has shown varying results that may be attributed to the time of massage application and the type of massage technique used. Cryotherapy, stretching, homeopathy, ultrasound and electrical current modalities have demonstrated no effect on the alleviation of

  14. Daytime Sleep Patterns in Preschool Children with Autism, Developmental Delay, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, A. J.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Goodlin-Jones, Beth; Tang, Karen; Anders, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined daytime sleep patterns in 3 groups of preschool-aged children: children with autism, children with developmental delay, and children who were developing typically. Sleep was assessed in 194 children via actigraphy and parent-report sleep diaries for 7 consecutive days on 3 separate occasions over 6 months. Children with…

  15. Sleep Patterns in Preschool-Age Children with Autism, Developmental Delay, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodlin-Jones, Beth L.; Tang, Karen; Liu, Jingyi; Anders, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates sleep disorders by assessing the quantity and quality of sleep in preschool children with autism and comparing them with developmental delay without autism, and typical development. The results prove that sleep patterns are different in preschool children across all three categories.

  16. The Use of Exogenous Melatonin in Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder: a Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijlswijk, I.M. van; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Smits, M.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To perform a meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of exogenous melatonin in advancing sleep-wake rhythm in patients with delayed sleep phase disorder. Design: Meta analysis of papers indexed for PubMed, Embase, and the abstracts of sleep and chronobiologic societies (1990–2009

  17. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Lamb, J.A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  18. Vibration Therapy in Management of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veqar, Zubia; Imtiyaz, Shagufta

    2014-06-01

    Both athletic and nonathletic population when subjected to any unaccustomed or unfamiliar exercise will experience pain 24-72 hours postexercise. This exercise especially eccentric in nature caused primarily by muscle damage is known as delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This damage is characterized by muscular pain, decreased muscle force production, reduce range of motion and discomfort experienced. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears. The presence of DOMS increases risk of injury. A reduced range of motion may lead to the incapability to efficiently absorb the shock that affect physical activity. Alterations to mechanical motion may increase strain placed on soft tissue structures. Reduced force output may signal compensatory recruitment of muscles, thus leading to unaccustomed stress on musculature. Differences in strength ratios may also cause excessive strain on unaccustomed musculature. A range of interventions aimed at decreasing symptoms of DOMS have been proposed. Although voluminous research has been done in this regard, there is little consensus among the practitioners regarding the most effective way of treating DOMS. Mechanical oscillatory motion provided by vibration therapy. Vibration could represent an effective exercise intervention for enhancing neuromuscular performance in athletes. Vibration has shown effectiveness in flexibility and explosive power. Vibration can apply either local area or whole body vibration. Vibration therapy improves muscular strength, power development, kinesthetic awareness, decreased muscle sore, increased range of motion, and increased blood flow under the skin. VT was effective for reduction of DOMS and regaining full ROM. Application of whole body vibration therapy in postexercise demonstrates less pressure pain threshold, muscle soreness along with less reduction maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength and lower creatine kinase levels in the blood.

  19. The effect of caffeine ingestion on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Caitlin F; Hatfield, Disa L; Riebe, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    The beneficial effects of caffeine on aerobic activity and resistance training performance are well documented. However, less is known concerning caffeine's potential role in reducing perception of pain and soreness during exercise. In addition, there is no information regarding the effects of caffeine on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle soreness, blood enzyme activity, and performance after a bout of elbow flexion/extension exercise. Nine low-caffeine-consuming males (body mass: 76.68 ± 8.13 kg; height: 179.18 ± 9.35 cm; age: 20 ± 1 year) were randomly assigned to ingest either caffeine or placebo 1 hour before completing 4 sets of 10 bicep curls on a preacher bench, followed by a fifth set in which subjects completed as many repetitions as possible. Soreness and soreness on palpation intensity were measured using three 0-10 visual analog scales before exercise, and 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after exercise. After a washout period, subjects crossed over to the other treatment group. Caffeine ingestion resulted in significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower levels of soreness on day 2 and day 3 compared with placebo. Total repetitions in the final set of exercise increased with caffeine ingestion compared with placebo. This study demonstrates that caffeine ingestion immediately before an upper-body resistance training out enhances performance. A further beneficial effect of sustained caffeine ingestion in the days after the exercise bout is an attenuation of DOMS. This decreased perception of soreness in the days after a strenuous resistance training workout may allow individuals to increase the number of training sessions in a given time period.

  20. Cold-water immersion versus passive therapy to decrease delayed onset muscular soreness: a CAT

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Late onset muscle soreness, also known as delayed onset muscle soreness, is a painful musculoskeletal condition that may occur 24-48 and up to 72 hours after the completion of unusual physical or high intensity exercise involving eccentric muscle activity. In the field of physical rehabilitation, immersion in cold water is a common intervention mainly used in sports medicine, to minimize delayed onset muscle soreness and promote recovery after exercise. Objective To ass...

  1. Delayed Language Onset as a Predictor of Clinical Symptoms in Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmajer, Richard; Prior, Margot; Leekam, Sue; Wing, Lorna; Ong, Ben; Gould, Judith; Welham, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A comparison of 46 language-delayed and 62 normal language onset children examined whether early language delay would predict autistic symptomatology in children diagnosed with autism when young and at an older age. Results found that early language delays predicted more autistic symptomatology when young, but not at an older age. (Author/CR)

  2. Melanopsin Gene Variations Interact With Season to Predict Sleep Onset and Chronotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Wong, Patricia M.; Franzen, Peter L.; Hasler, Brant P.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Miller, Megan A.; Kepreos, Kyle M.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    The human melanopsin gene has been reported to mediate risk for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is hypothesized to be caused by decreased photic input during winter when light levels fall below threshold, resulting in differences in circadian phase and/or sleep. However, it is unclear if melanopsin increases risk of SAD by causing differences in sleep or circadian phase, or if those differences are symptoms of the mood disorder. To determine if melanopsin sequence variations are associated with differences in sleep-wake behavior among those not suffering from a mood disorder, the authors tested associations between melanopsin gene polymorphisms and self-reported sleep timing (sleep onset and wake time) in a community sample (N = 234) of non-Hispanic Caucasian participants (age 30–54 yrs) with no history of psychological, neurological, or sleep disorders. The authors also tested the effect of melanopsin variations on differences in preferred sleep and activity timing (i.e., chronotype), which may reflect differences in circadian phase, sleep homeostasis, or both. Daylength on the day of assessment was measured and included in analyses. DNA samples were genotyped for melanopsin gene polymorphisms using fluorescence polarization. P10L genotype interacted with daylength to predict self-reported sleep onset (interaction p seasonal patterns of recurrence or exacerbation. PMID:22881342

  3. Genetic variants in RBFOX3 are associated with sleep latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Najaf; Allebrandt, Karla V.; van der Spek, Ashley; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Hek, Karin; Teder-Laving, Maris; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tonu; van Mill, Josine G.; Mbarek, Hamdi; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Melville, Scott A.; Del Greco, Fabiola M.; Byrne, Enda M.; Oole, Edwin; Kolcic, Ivana; Chen, Ting-hsu; Evans, Daniel S.; Coresh, Josef; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Karjalainen, Juha; Willemsen, Gonneke; Gharib, Sina A.; Zgaga, Lina; Mihailov, Evelin; Stone, Katie L.; Campbell, Harry; Brouwer, Rutger Ww; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Dogas, Zoran; Marciante, Kristin D.; Campbell, Susan; Borovecki, Fran; Luik, Annemarie I.; Li, Man; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; van den Hout, Mirjam C. G. N.; Cummings, Steven R.; Aulchenko, Yuru S.; Gehrman, Philip R.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hofman, Albert; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Oostra, Ben A.; Wright, Alan F.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wilson, James F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Polasek, Ozren; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Redline, Susan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Merrow, Martha; Tranah, Gregory J.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Rudan, Igor; Tiemeier, Henning; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Metspalu, Andres; Meitinger, Thomas; Franke, Lude; Roenneberg, Till; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Time to fall asleep (sleep latency) is a major determinant of sleep quality. Chronic, long sleep latency is a major characteristic of sleep-onset insomnia and/or delayed sleep phase syndrome. In this study we aimed to discover common polymorphisms that contribute to the genetics of sleep latency. We

  4. Genetic variants in RBFOX3 are associated with sleep latency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Amin (Najaf); K.V. Allebrandt; A. van der Spek (Ashley); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); K. Hek (Karin); M. Teder-Laving (Maris); C. Hayward (Caroline); T. Esko (Tõnu); J. van Mill; H. Mbarek; N.F. Watson (Nathaniel F); S.A. Melville (Scott); F.M. Del Greco (Fabiola); E.M. Byrne (Enda); E. Oole (Edwin); I. Kolcic (Ivana); T.H. Chen; D.S. Evans (Daniel); J. Coresh (Josef); N. Vogelzangs (Nicole); J. Karjalainen (Juha); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); S.A. Gharib (Sina); L. Zgaga (Lina); E. Mihailov (Evelin); K.L. Stone (Katie L); H. Campbell (Harry); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); Z. Dogas; K. Marciante (Kristin); S. Campbell (Susan); F. Borovecki (Fran); A.I. Luik (Annemarie I); M. Li (Man); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); P.R. Gehrman (Philip); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); A. Hofman (Albert); W.H.L. Kao (Wen Hong Linda); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Wright (Alan); J.M. Vink (Jacqueline); J.F. Wilson (James F); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); O. Polasek (Ozren); N.M. Punjabi (Naresh); S. Redline (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); M. Merrow; G.J. Tranah (Gregory); D.J. Gottlieb (Daniel J); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); I. Rudan (Igor); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); B.W.J.H. Penninx; A. Metspalu (Andres); T. Meitinger (Thomas); L. Franke (Lude); T. Roenneberg; C.M. van Duijn (Cock)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTime to fall asleep (sleep latency) is a major determinant of sleep quality. Chronic, long sleep latency is a major characteristic of sleep-onset insomnia and/or delayed sleep phase syndrome. In this study we aimed to discover common polymorphisms that contribute to the genetics of sleep

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguszewski Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available biological regeneration in athletes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the application of lymphatic kinesiotaping in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

  6. Melatonin improves health status and sleep in children with idiopathic chronic sleep-onset insomnia: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; van Stel, H.F.; van der Heijden, K.; Meijer, A.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on health status and sleep in children with idiopathic sleep-onset insomnia. Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a Dutch sleep center, involving 62 children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more

  7. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Pamela V.; Onyper, Serge V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. Methods: We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the “Owl-Lark” Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010–2011 through 2013–2014. Results: Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Conclusions: Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. Citation: Thacher PV, Onyper SV. Longitudinal outcomes of start time delay on sleep, behavior, and achievement in high school. SLEEP 2016;39(2):271–281. PMID

  8. Occurrence of delayed-onset post-traumatic stress disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzon-Frank, Nicolai; Breinegaard, Nina; Bertelsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops according to consensus criteria within the first 1-6 months after a horrifying traumatic event, but it is alleged that PTSD may develop later. The objective was to review the evidence addressing occurrence of PTSD with onset >6 months after a traumatic...

  9. Melanopsin gene variations interact with season to predict sleep onset and chronotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecklein, Kathryn A; Wong, Patricia M; Franzen, Peter L; Hasler, Brant P; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Miller, Megan A; Kepreos, Kyle M; Ferrell, Robert E; Manuck, Stephen B

    2012-10-01

    The human melanopsin gene has been reported to mediate risk for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is hypothesized to be caused by decreased photic input during winter when light levels fall below threshold, resulting in differences in circadian phase and/or sleep. However, it is unclear if melanopsin increases risk of SAD by causing differences in sleep or circadian phase, or if those differences are symptoms of the mood disorder. To determine if melanopsin sequence variations are associated with differences in sleep-wake behavior among those not suffering from a mood disorder, the authors tested associations between melanopsin gene polymorphisms and self-reported sleep timing (sleep onset and wake time) in a community sample (N = 234) of non-Hispanic Caucasian participants (age 30-54 yrs) with no history of psychological, neurological, or sleep disorders. The authors also tested the effect of melanopsin variations on differences in preferred sleep and activity timing (i.e., chronotype), which may reflect differences in circadian phase, sleep homeostasis, or both. Daylength on the day of assessment was measured and included in analyses. DNA samples were genotyped for melanopsin gene polymorphisms using fluorescence polarization. P10L genotype interacted with daylength to predict self-reported sleep onset (interaction p sleep onset among those with the TT genotype was later in the day when individuals were assessed on longer days and earlier in the day on shorter days, whereas individuals in the other genotype groups (i.e., CC and CT) did not show this interaction effect. P10L genotype also interacted in an analogous way with daylength to predict self-reported morningness (interaction p sleep onset and chronotype as a function of daylength, whereas other genotypes at P10L do not seem to have effects that vary by daylength. A better understanding of how melanopsin confers heightened responsivity to daylength may improve our understanding of a broad range of

  10. Advanced sleep schedules affect circadian gene expression in young adults with delayed sleep schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Fu, Alan; Hoffman, Aaron E; Figueiro, Mariana G; Carskadon, Mary A; Sharkey, Katherine M; Rea, Mark S

    2013-05-01

    Human circadian rhythms are regulated by the interplay between circadian genes and environmental stimuli. The influence of altered sleep-wake schedules or light on human circadian gene expression patterns is not well characterized. Twenty-one young adults were asked to keep to their usual sleep schedules and two blood samples were drawn at the end of the first week from each subject based on estimated time of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO); the first sample was obtained one and a half hours before the estimated DLMO and the second three hours later, at one and a half hours after the estimated DLMO. During the second week, participants were randomized into two groups, one that received a one hour blue-light (λmax=470 nm) exposure in the morning and one that received a comparable morning dim-light exposure. Two blood samples were obtained at the same clock times as the previous week at the end of the second week. We measured the expression of 10 circadian genes in response to sleep-wake schedule advancement and morning blue-light stimulation in the peripheral blood of 21 participants during a two-week field study. We found that nine of the 10 circadian genes showed significant expression changes from the first to the second week for participants in both the blue-light and dim-light groups, likely reflecting significant advances in circadian phase. This wholesale change in circadian gene expression may reflect considerable advances in circadian phase (i.e., advance in DLMO) from the first to the second week resulting from the advanced, daily personal light exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of melatonin on the quality of life in patients with delayed sleep phase syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagtegaal, J.E.; Laurant, M.W.; Kerkhof, G.A.; Smits, M.G.; Meer, Y.G.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Compared health-related quality of life of 43 delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) patients (mean age 34.1 yrs) with a random Dutch sample of 1,063 Ss (aged 18-89 yrs) and 95 sleep apnea, 262 clinical depression, 546 migraine, and 194 osteoarthritis patients. The effectiveness of treatment with 5 mg

  12. Resting-State Subjective Experience and EEG Biomarkers Are Associated with Sleep-Onset Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, B. Alexander; Hardstone, Richard; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Difficulties initiating sleep are common in several disorders, including insomnia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. These disorders are prevalent, bearing significant societal and financial costs which require the consideration of new treatment strategies and a better understanding of the physiological and cognitive processes surrounding the time of preparing for sleep or falling asleep. Here, we search for neuro-cognitive associations in the resting state and examine their relevance for predicting sleep-onset latency using multi-level mixed models. Multiple EEG recordings were obtained from healthy male participants (N = 13) during a series of 5 min eyes-closed resting-state trials (in total, n = 223) followed by a period–varying in length up to 30 min–that either allowed subjects to transition into sleep (“sleep trials,” nsleep = 144) or was ended while they were still awake (“wake trials,” nwake = 79). After both eyes-closed rest, sleep and wake trials, subjective experience was assessed using the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ). Our data revealed multiple associations between eyes-closed rest alpha and theta oscillations and ARSQ-dimensions Discontinuity of Mind, Self, Theory of Mind, Planning, and Sleepiness. The sleep trials showed that the transition toward the first sleep stage exclusively affected subjective experiences related to Theory of Mind, Planning, and Sleepiness. Importantly, sleep-onset latency was negatively associated both with eyes-closed rest ratings on the ARSQ dimension of Sleepiness and with the long-range temporal correlations of parietal theta oscillations derived by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). These results could be relevant to the development of personalized tools that help evaluate the success of falling asleep based on measures of resting-state cognition and EEG biomarkers. PMID:27148107

  13. Delayed onset of nemaline myopathy: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩燕; 郑惠民; 丁素菊

    2003-01-01

    @@ Nemaline myopathy (NM), first reported by Shy et al1 in 1963, is characterized by the presence of nemaline rods in myofibers and in the nucleus in severe cases. NM is a clinically rare, heterogeneous congenital muscle disorder, displaying dominant or recessive autosomal forms, and in rare cases, sporadic as well. Its chief manifestations are proximal muscle weakness and atrophy followed by further progress to generalized weakness and weakness of facial muscles, tongue muscles and throat muscles. Below is the case of an adult onset nemaline myopathy.

  14. Delay time for the onset of beam plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, J. L.; Denig, W. F.; Raitt, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of a nonrelativistic electron beam with a neutral gas in a large chamber is considered, and the time interval before ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) is studied. A new theoretical expression for the time delay before BPD ignition is found as a function of the critical current necessary for BPD to be established. There are two parameters in the theoretical expression, and both are derived from two different experiments. These parameters are used to write the time evolution equation for plasma density as a function of time.

  15. Increased electroencephalographic high frequencies during the sleep onset period in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; Cosentino, Filomena I I; Manconi, Mauro; Rundo, Francesco; Bruni, Oliviero; Zucconi, Marco

    2014-08-01

    To analyze the electroencephalographic (EEG) spectral content in untreated patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) during the sleep onset period (SOP) and during the quiet wakefulness preceding sleep, in order to test the hypothesis that a state of hyperarousal might be present during the SOP with RLS. Sleep Research Centre. Twenty-seven untreated consecutive patients with RLS (mean age = 53.6 y), 11 untreated consecutive patients with primary insomnia (mean age = 58.9 y), and 14 normal controls (mean age = 50.3 y). SOP was defined as the 10-min period centered with the occurrence of the first sleep spindle in the EEG, and then subdivided into SOP-1 (period of 5 min before the first spindle) and SOP-2 (period of 5 min following). Leg movements occurring during SOP were counted and used as a covariate in the statistical analysis. Also, one period of 1 min of artifact-free quiet wakefulness after lights off was identified. EEG spectral analysis was run during these periods using the C3/A2 or C4/A1 channel. Increased EEG alpha and beta bands and/or beta/delta ratio in RLS versus normal controls, during both wakefulness preceding sleep and SOP (both parts SOP-1 and SOP-2) were found, which were, however, smaller than the increases found in patients with insomnia. The results of this study support the hypothesis of the presence of a state of hyperarousal in restless legs syndrome (RLS) during the sleep onset period. Treatment for RLS might need to take these findings into consideration. Ferri R, Cosentino FI, Manconi M, Rundo F, Bruni O, Zucconi M. Increased electroencephalographic high frequencies during the sleep onset period in patients with restless legs syndrome.

  16. Short-term total sleep deprivation alters delay-conditioned memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shweta; Jha, Sushil K

    2016-06-01

    Short-term sleep deprivation soon after training may impair memory consolidation. Also, a particular sleep stage or its components increase after learning some tasks, such as negative and positive reinforcement tasks, avoidance tasks, and spatial learning tasks, and so forth. It suggests that discrete memory types may require specific sleep stage or its components for their optimal processing. The classical conditioning paradigms are widely used to study learning and memory but the role of sleep in a complex conditioned learning is unclear. Here, we have investigated the effects of short-term sleep deprivation on the consolidation of delay-conditioned memory and the changes in sleep architecture after conditioning. Rats were trained for the delay-conditioned task (for conditioning, house-light [conditioned stimulus] was paired with fruit juice [unconditioned stimulus]). Animals were divided into 3 groups: (a) sleep deprived (SD); (b) nonsleep deprived (NSD); and (c) stress control (SC) groups. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between groups and days (training and testing) during the conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus presentation. Further, Tukey post hoc comparison revealed that the NSD and SC animals exhibited significant increase in performances during testing. The SD animals, however, performed significantly less during testing. Further, we observed that wakefulness and NREM sleep did not change after training and testing. Interestingly, REM sleep increased significantly on both days compared to baseline more specifically during the initial 4-hr time window after conditioning. Our results suggest that the consolidation of delay-conditioned memory is sleep-dependent and requires augmented REM sleep during an explicit time window soon after training. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Classical conditioning for preserving the effects of short melatonin treatment in children with delayed sleep: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Maanen A; Meijer AM; Smits MG; Oort FJ

    2017-01-01

    .... In this pilot study, we investigated whether classical conditioning might help in preserving treatment effects of melatonin in children with sleep onset problems, with and without comorbid attention...

  18. Sleep-disordered breathing as a delayed complication of iatrogenic vocal cord trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Kodali, Lavanya; Hessel, Amy C; Evans, Scott E; Balachandran, Diwakar D

    2016-06-01

    A case of a 55-year-old woman with iatrogenic vocal cord trauma and sleep-related symptoms is reported. In particular, this case highlights sleep-disordered breathing as a delayed complication after iatrogenic vocal cord trauma. The patient developed acute stridor from a contralateral vocal cord hematoma following vocal fold injection for right vocal cord paralysis. Acute respiratory symptoms resolved with oxygen, steroids, and nebulized therapy, but nocturnal symptoms persisted and polysomnography revealed sleep-related hypoventilation and mild obstructive sleep apnea. Positive pressure therapy was successfully used to ameliorate her symptoms and treat sleep-disordered breathing until her hematoma resolved. In addition to the typically acute respiratory symptoms that may result from vocal cord dysfunction, sleep-disordered breathing may also present as a significant subacute or chronic problem. Management of the acute respiratory symptoms is relatively well established, but clinicians should be alert for more subtle nocturnal symptoms that may require further study with polysomnography.

  19. Sleep deprivation accelerates delay-related loss of visual short-term memories without affecting precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Natalie; Asplund, Christopher L; Chee, Michael W L

    2013-06-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is an important measure of information processing capacity and supports many higher-order cognitive processes. We examined how sleep deprivation (SD) and maintenance duration interact to influence the number and precision of items in VSTM using an experimental design that limits the contribution of lapses at encoding. For each trial, participants attempted to maintain the location and color of three stimuli over a delay. After a retention interval of either 1 or 10 seconds, participants reported the color of the item at the cued location by selecting it on a color wheel. The probability of reporting the probed item, the precision of report, and the probability of reporting a nonprobed item were determined using a mixture-modeling analysis. Participants were studied twice in counterbalanced order, once after a night of normal sleep and once following a night of sleep deprivation. Sleep laboratory. Nineteen healthy college age volunteers (seven females) with regular sleep patterns. Approximately 24 hours of total SD. SD selectively reduced the number of integrated representations that can be retrieved after a delay, while leaving the precision of object information in the stored representations intact. Delay interacted with SD to lower the rate of successful recall. Visual short-term memory is compromised during sleep deprivation, an effect compounded by delay. However, when memories are retrieved, they tend to be intact.

  20. Delay-aware adaptive sleep mechanism for green wireless-optical broadband access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruyan; Liang, Alei; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Dalei

    2017-07-01

    Wireless-Optical Broadband Access Network (WOBAN) is capacity-high, reliable, flexible, and ubiquitous, as it takes full advantage of the merits from both optical communication and wireless communication technologies. Similar to other access networks, the high energy consumption poses a great challenge for building up WOBANs. To shot this problem, we can make some load-light Optical Network Units (ONUs) sleep to reduce the energy consumption. Such operation, however, causes the increased packet delay. Jointly considering the energy consumption and transmission delay, we propose a delay-aware adaptive sleep mechanism. Specifically, we develop a new analytical method to evaluate the transmission delay and queuing delay over the optical part, instead of adopting M/M/1 queuing model. Meanwhile, we also analyze the access delay and queuing delay of the wireless part. Based on such developed delay models, we mathematically derive ONU's optimal sleep time. In addition, we provide numerous simulation results to show the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism.

  1. Melatonin for chronic whiplash syndrome with delayed melatonin onset randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringen, S. van; Jansen, T.; Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of melatonin in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and delayed melatonin onset. Design: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. One-week baseline was followed by a 4-week treatment period with either melatonin or placebo. In the ba

  2. Is myofascial pain in temporomandibular disorder patients a manifestation of delayed-onset muscle soreness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutris, M.; Lobbezoo, F.; Sümer, N.C.; Atis, E.S.; Türker, K.S.; Naeije, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In a study to the possible role of overuse of the jaw muscles in the pathogenesis of jaw muscle pain, we used a protocol involving concentric and eccentric muscle contractions to provoke a state of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the jaw muscles of healthy individuals. We tested

  3. Early-Onset Bipolar Disorder and Treatment Delay Are Risk Factors for Poor Outcome in Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Frye, Mark A.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Nolen, Willem A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined the influence of age at onset of illness and the delay in time to first treatment on morbidity in adulthood. Method: 529 adult outpatients with a mean age of 42 years, who entered our research network from 1996 through 2001 and who were diagnosed with bipolar disorder accordin

  4. Mild toxic anterior segment syndrome mimicking delayed onset toxic anterior segment syndrome after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Na Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is an acute sterile postoperative anterior segment inflammation that may occur after anterior segment surgery. I report herein a case that developed mild TASS in one eye after bilateral uneventful cataract surgery, which was masked during early postoperative period under steroid eye drop and mimicking delayed onset TASS after switching to weaker steroid eye drop.

  5. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  6. Is myofascial pain in temporomandibular disorder patients a manifestation of delayed-onset muscle soreness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutris, M.; Lobbezoo, F.; Sümer, N.C.; Atis, E.S.; Türker, K.S.; Naeije, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In a study to the possible role of overuse of the jaw muscles in the pathogenesis of jaw muscle pain, we used a protocol involving concentric and eccentric muscle contractions to provoke a state of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the jaw muscles of healthy individuals. We tested w

  7. Interleukin-6 and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Do Not Vary during the Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Morgan E.; Berg, Kris E.; Meendering, Jessica R.; Llewellyn, Tamra L.; French, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Jeremy E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a difference in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) exists in two different phases of the menstrual cycle. Nine runners performed one 75-min high-intensity interval running session during the early follicular (EF) phase and once during the midluteal (ML) phase of the…

  8. Trajectories of Language Delay from Age 3 to 5: Persistence, Recovery and Late Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana, Imac Maria; Pons, Francisco; Eadie, Patricia; Ystrom, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge is scarce on what contributes to whether children with early language delay (LD) show persistent, recovering or sometimes late-onset LD without a prior history of early LD in subsequent preschool years. Aims: To explore whether an integrative model of vital risk factors, including poor early communication skills, family…

  9. Developmental pathways to antisocial behavior: the delayed-onset pathway in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, P; Frick, P J

    1999-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that there are two distinct trajectories for the development of antisocial behavior in boys: a childhood-onset pathway and an adolescent-onset pathway. After reviewing the limited available research on antisocial girls, we propose that this influential method of conceptualizing the development of severe antisocial behavior may not apply to girls without some important modifications. Antisocial girls appear to show many of the correlates that have been associated with the childhood-onset pathway in boys, and they tend to show impaired adult adjustment, which is also similar to boys in the childhood-onset pathway. However, antisocial girls typically show an adolescent-onset to their antisocial behavior. We have proposed that these girls show a third developmental pathway which we have labeled the "delayed-onset" pathway. This model rests on the assumption that many of the putative pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the development of antisocial behavior in girls, such as cognitive and neuropsychological deficits, a dysfunctional family environment, and/or the presence of a callous and unemotional interpersonal style, may be present in childhood, but they do not lead to severe and overt antisocial behavior until adolescence. Therefore, we propose that the delayed-onset pathway for girls is analogous to the childhood-onset pathway in boys and that there is no analogous pathway in girls to the adolescent-onset pathway in boys. Although this model clearly needs to be tested in future research, it highlights the need to test the applicability of current theoretical models for explaining the development of antisocial behavior in girls.

  10. Bilingualism delays the onset of behavioral but not aphasic forms of frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladi, Suvarna; Bak, Thomas H; Shailaja, Mekala; Gollahalli, Divyaraj; Rajan, Amuya; Surampudi, Bapiraju; Hornberger, Michael; Duggirala, Vasanta; Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kaul, Subhash

    2017-03-18

    Bilingualism has been found to delay onset of dementia and this has been attributed to an advantage in executive control in bilinguals. However, the relationship between bilingualism and cognition is complex, with costs as well as benefits to language functions. To further explore the cognitive consequences of bilingualism, the study used Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes, to examine whether bilingualism modifies the age at onset of behavioral and language variants of Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) differently. Case records of 193 patients presenting with FTD (121 of them bilingual) were examined and the age at onset of the first symptoms were compared between monolinguals and bilinguals. A significant effect of bilingualism delaying the age at onset of dementia was found in behavioral variant FTD (5.7 years) but not in progressive nonfluent aphasia (0.7 years), semantic dementia (0.5 years), corticobasal syndrome (0.4 years), progressive supranuclear palsy (4.3 years) and FTD-motor neuron disease (3 years). On dividing all patients predominantly behavioral and predominantly aphasic groups, age at onset in the bilingual behavioral group (62.6) was over 6 years higher than in the monolingual patients (56.5, p=0.006), while there was no difference in the aphasic FTD group (60.9 vs. 60.6 years, p=0.851). The bilingual effect on age of bvFTD onset was shown independently of other potential confounding factors such as education, gender, occupation, and urban vs rural dwelling of subjects. To conclude, bilingualism delays the age at onset in the behavioral but not in the aphasic variants of FTD. The results are in line with similar findings based on research in stroke and with the current views of the interaction between bilingualism and cognition, pointing to advantages in executive functions and disadvantages in lexical tasks.

  11. Sudden onset of sleep due to hypothalamic lesions in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder positive for anti-aquaporin-4 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, H; Matsumura, K; Hatanaka, Y; Saito, F; Sonoo, M

    2014-09-01

    We report a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders who presented with sudden onset of sleep as the sole manifestation. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation revealed lesions in the hypothalamus bilaterally, which vanished completely after methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  12. Lateralization of noise-burst trains based on onset and ongoing interaural delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, Richard L; Balakrishnan, Uma; Zurek, Patrick M

    2010-07-01

    The lateralization of 250-ms trains of brief noise bursts was measured using an acoustic pointing technique. Stimuli were designed to assess the contribution of the interaural time delay (ITD) of the onset binaural burst relative to that of the ITDs in the ongoing part of the train. Lateralization was measured by listeners' adjustments of the ITD of a pointer stimulus, a 50-ms burst of noise, to match the lateral position of the target train. Results confirmed previous reports of lateralization dominance by the onset burst under conditions in which the train is composed of frozen tokens and the ongoing part contains multiple ambiguous interaural delays. In contrast, lateralization of ongoing trains in which fresh noise tokens were used for each set of two alternating (left-leading/right-leading) binaural pairs followed the ITD of the first pair in each set, regardless of the ITD of the onset burst of the entire stimulus and even when the onset burst was removed by gradual gating. This clear lateralization of a long-duration stimulus with ambiguous interaural delay cues suggests precedence mechanisms that involve not only the interaural cues at the beginning of a sound, but also the pattern of cues within an ongoing sound.

  13. Effects of melatonin on the quality of life in patients with delayed sleep phase syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagtegaal, J.E.; Laurant, M.W.; Kerkhof, G.A.; Smits, M.G.; Meer, Y.G. van der; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare health-related quality of life of delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) patients with a random Dutch sample and four samples of patients with other chronic conditions. We also investigated the effectiveness of treatment with 5 mg of melatonin on the

  14. Millisecond flashes of light phase delay the human circadian clock during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Fisicaro, Ryan A.; Ruby, Norman F.; Heller, H. Craig

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian timing system is most sensitive to the phase shifting effects of light during the biological nighttime, a time at which humans are most typically asleep. The overlap of sleep with peak sensitivity to the phase shifting effects of light minimizes the effectiveness of using light as a countermeasure to circadian misalignment in humans. Most current light exposure treatments for such misalignment are mostly ineffective due to poor compliance and secondary changes that cause sleep deprivation. Using a 16-day, parallel group design, we examined whether a novel sequence of light flashes delivered during sleep could evoke phase changes in the circadian system without disrupting sleep. Healthy volunteers participated in a two-week circadian stabilization protocol followed by a two-night laboratory stay. During the laboratory session, they were exposed during sleep to either darkness (n=7) or a sequence of 2-msec light flashes given every 30 seconds (n=6) from hours 2–3 after habitual bed time. Changes in circadian timing (phase), micro- and macroarchitecture of sleep were all assessed. Subjects exposed to the flash sequence during sleep exhibited a delay in the timing of their circadian salivary melatonin rhythm as compared to the control dark condition (P0.30) during the flash stimulus. Exposing sleeping individuals to 0.24 seconds of light spread over an hour shifted the timing of the circadian clock and did so without major alterations to sleep itself. While a greater number of matched subjects and more research will be necessary to ascertain whether there is an effect of these light flashes on sleep, our data suggest that this type of passive phototherapy might be developed as a useful treatment for circadian misalignment in humans. PMID:25227334

  15. Delay of the Onset of Puberty in Female Rats by Prepubertal Exposure to T-2 Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence has revealed the deleterious influence of environmental and food contaminants on puberty onset and development in both animals and children, provoking an increasing health concern. T-2 toxin, a naturally-produced Type A trichothecene mycotoxin which is frequently found in cereal grains and products intended for human and animal consumption, has been shown to impair the reproduction and development in animals. Nevertheless, whether this trichothecene mycotoxin can disturb the onset of puberty in females remains unclear. To clarify this point, infantile female rats were given a daily intragastric administration of vehicle or 187.5 μg/kg body weight of T-2 toxin for five consecutive days from postnatal day 15 to 19, and the effects on puberty onset were evaluated in the present study. The results revealed that the days of vaginal opening, first dioestrus, and first estrus in regular estrous cycle were delayed following prepubertal exposure to T-2 toxin. The relative weights of reproductive organs uterus, ovaries, and vagina, and the incidence of corpora lutea were all diminished in T-2 toxin-treated rats. Serum levels of gonadotropins luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol were also reduced by T-2 toxin treatment. The mRNA expressions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH and pituitary GnRH receptor displayed significant reductions following exposure to T-2 toxin, which were consistent with the changes of serum gonadotropins, delayed reproductive organ development, and delayed vaginal opening. In conclusion, the present study reveals that prepubertal exposure to T-2 toxin delays the onset of puberty in immature female rats, probably by the mechanism of disturbance of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis function. Considering the vulnerability of developmental children to food contaminants and the relative high level of dietary intake of T-2 toxin in children, we think the findings of

  16. Bilingualism delays age at onset of dementia, independent of education and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, James A

    2014-05-27

    Editors' Note: Mortimer argues that important confounding variables may have biased the conclusion by Alladi et al. on the role of bilingualism in delaying the onset of dementia. Following Mortimer’s comments, Alladi et al. conducted additional analysis of their data to support their conclusion. The attitude of "close enough" is not appropriate when determining brain death. Stadlan comments and supports Frank’s call for action regarding this sensitive issue.

  17. Effect of warm-up exercise on delayed-onset muscle soreness

    OpenAIRE

    Takizawa, Kazuki; Soma, Toshio; Nosaka, Kazunori; Ishikawa, Tomoji; Ishii, Kojiro

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether a warm-up exercise consisting of 100 submaximal concentric contractions would attenuate delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and decreases in muscle strength associated with eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Ten male students performed two bouts of the elbow flexor exercise consisting of 12 maximal eccentric contractions with a warm-up exercise for one arm (WU) and without warm-up for the other arm (control: CON) in a randomised, counterbalanced order s...

  18. Delay of the Onset of Puberty in Female Rats by Prepubertal Exposure to T-2 Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Yi-Mei; Zhang, Li-Shi; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Zeng-Ming; Zhao, Jun; Peng, Shuang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence has revealed the deleterious influence of environmental and food contaminants on puberty onset and development in both animals and children, provoking an increasing health concern. T-2 toxin, a naturally-produced Type A trichothecene mycotoxin which is frequently found in cereal grains and products intended for human and animal consumption, has been shown to impair the reproduction and development in animals. Nevertheless, whether this trichothecene mycotoxin can disturb the onset of puberty in females remains unclear. To clarify this point, infantile female rats were given a daily intragastric administration of vehicle or 187.5 μg/kg body weight of T-2 toxin for five consecutive days from postnatal day 15 to 19, and the effects on puberty onset were evaluated in the present study. The results revealed that the days of vaginal opening, first dioestrus, and first estrus in regular estrous cycle were delayed following prepubertal exposure to T-2 toxin. The relative weights of reproductive organs uterus, ovaries, and vagina, and the incidence of corpora lutea were all diminished in T-2 toxin-treated rats. Serum levels of gonadotropins luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol were also reduced by T-2 toxin treatment. The mRNA expressions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and pituitary GnRH receptor displayed significant reductions following exposure to T-2 toxin, which were consistent with the changes of serum gonadotropins, delayed reproductive organ development, and delayed vaginal opening. In conclusion, the present study reveals that prepubertal exposure to T-2 toxin delays the onset of puberty in immature female rats, probably by the mechanism of disturbance of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function. Considering the vulnerability of developmental children to food contaminants and the relative high level of dietary intake of T-2 toxin in children, we think the findings of the present study

  19. Cold-water immersion versus passive therapy to decrease delayed onset muscular soreness: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Alberto Aguilera Eguía

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Late onset muscle soreness, also known as delayed onset muscle soreness, is a painful musculoskeletal condition that may occur 24-48 and up to 72 hours after the completion of unusual physical or high intensity exercise involving eccentric muscle activity. In the field of physical rehabilitation, immersion in cold water is a common intervention mainly used in sports medicine, to minimize delayed onset muscle soreness and promote recovery after exercise. Objective To assess the validity and applicability of the results regarding the effectiveness of immersion in cold water after high intensity exercise and answer the following question: In subjects who exercise regularly, can cold-water immersion compared to passive therapy (rest reduce late-onset muscle soreness? Methods The article "Cold Water Immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise," a Cochrane systematic review authored by Bleakley et al (2012, was analyzed. Results Immersion in cold water can decrease delayed onset of muscle pain after high intensity exercise. Twenty-four hours after the intervention, the mean standardized difference was -0.55 (95% CI: -0.84 to -0.27; 48 hours after, the mean standardized difference was -0.66 (95% CI: -0.97 to -0.35; 72 hours after, the mean standardized difference was -0.93 (95% CI: -1.36 to -0.51 and up to 96 hours after, mean standardized difference was -0.58 (95% CI: -1.00 to -0.16. Conclusion Despite the methodological limitations present in the studies included in the systematic review analyzed, we found the recommendation for cold water immersion (cryotherapy reasonable in individuals with late muscle pain caused by high intensity sports.

  20. The affect on delayed onset muscle soreness recovery for ultrasound with bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Kyun; Kim, Myung Chul

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom is effective in treating delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii muscle, using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test (flexion and extension), and serum creatine kinase level. [Subjects] Twenty women participated in this study. [Methods] Repeated eccentric contractions were used to induce delayed onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexor of the subjects. The subjects were randomized to be treated with ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom. We evaluated the effects of treatments in the 2 groups. Individual subjects were assessed using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test, and serum creatine kinase level. The assessment parameters were evaluated 4 times: before exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The visual analogue scale scores were significantly different before and after the experiment in both the group treated with ultrasound and the group treated with ultrasound and bee venom. The difference in elbow flexion and extension before and after the experiment was significantly different in both groups. No significant difference was found in the serum creatine kinase levels before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] Treatment with ultrasound and bee venom is effective for managing delayed onset muscle soreness.

  1. Delayed-onset heparin-induced thrombocytopenia presenting with multiple arteriovenous thromboses: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Abbas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed-onset heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis, albeit rare, is a severe side effect of heparin exposure. It can occur within one month after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG with manifestation of different thrombotic events. Case presentation A 59-year-old man presented with weakness, malaise, bilateral lower limb pitting edema and a suspected diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis 18 days after CABG. Heparin infusion was administered as an anticoagulant. Clinical and paraclinical work-up revealed multiple thrombotic events (stroke, renal failure, deep vein thrombosis, large clots in heart chambers and 48 ×103/μl platelet count, whereupon heparin-induced thrombocytopenia was suspected. Heparin was discontinued immediately and an alternative anticoagulant agent was administered, as a result of which platelet count recovered. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, which causes thrombosis, is a serious side effect of heparin therapy. It is worthy of note that no case of delayed-onset heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis associated with cardiopulmonary bypass surgery has thus far been reported in Iran. Conclusion Delayed-onset heparin-induced thrombocytopenia should be suspected in any patient presenting with arterial or venous thromboembolic disorders after recent heparin therapy, even though the heparin exposure dates back to more than a week prior to presentation; and it should be ruled-out before the initiation of heparin therapy.

  2. Diagnostic delays in children with early-onset epilepsy: impact, reasons, and opportunities to improve care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Baca, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Delayed diagnosis of early-onset epilepsy is a potentially important and avoidable complication in epilepsy care. We examined the frequency of diagnostic delays in young children with newly presenting epilepsy, their developmental impact, and reasons for delays. Methods Children who developed epilepsy before their third birthday were identified in a prospective community-based cohort. An interval ≥1 month from second seizure to diagnosis was considered a delay. Testing of development at baseline and for up to three years after and of IQ 8–9 years later was performed. Detailed parental baseline interview accounts and medical records were reviewed to identify potential reasons for delays. Factors associated with delays included the parent, child, pediatrician, neurologist, and scheduling. Results Diagnostic delays occurred in 70/172 (41%) children. Delays occurred less often if children had received medical attention for the first seizure (p<0.0001), previously had neonatal or febrile seizures (p=0.02), had only convulsions before diagnosis (p=0.005) or had a college-educated parent (p=0.01). A ≥1 month diagnostic delay was associated with an average 7.4 point drop (p=0.02) in the Vineland Scales of Adaptive Behavior motor score. The effect was present at diagnosis, persisted for at least three years, and was also apparent in IQ scores 8–9 years later which were lower in association with a diagnostic delay by 8.4 points (p=0.06) for processing speed up to 14.5 points (p=0.004) for full scale IQ, after adjustment for parental education and other epilepsy-related clinical factors. Factors associated with delayed diagnosis included parents not recognizing events as seizures (N=47), pediatricians missing or deferring diagnosis (N=15), neurologists deferring diagnosis (N=7), and scheduling problems (N=11). Significance Diagnostic delays occur in many young children with epilepsy. They are associated with substantial decrements in development and IQ later

  3. Sleep deprivation alters effort discounting but not delay discounting of monetary rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libedinsky, Camilo; Massar, Stijn A A; Ling, Aiqing; Chee, Weiyan; Huettel, Scott A; Chee, Michael W L

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether sleep deprivation would affect the discounting of delayed rewards, of rewards entailing the expense of effort, or both. We measured rates of two types of reward discounting under conditions of rested wakefulness (RW) and sleep deprivation (SD). Delay discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller monetary rewards sooner rather than larger monetary rewards later. Effort discounting was defined as the willingness to accept smaller rewards that require less effort to obtain (e.g., typing a small number of letter strings backward) over larger but more effortful rewards (e.g., typing more letter strings to receive the reward). The first two experiments used a crossover design in which one session was conducted after a normal night of sleep (RW), and the other after a night without sleep (SD). The first experiment evaluated only temporal discounting whereas the second evaluated temporal and effort discounting. In the second experiment, the discounting tasks were repeatedly administered prior to the state comparisons to minimize the effects of order and/or repeated testing. In a third experiment, participants were studied only once in a between-subject evaluation of discounting across states. The study took place in a research laboratory. Seventy-seven healthy young adult participants: 20 in Experiment 1, 27 in Experiment 2, and 30 in Experiment 3. N/A. Sleep deprivation elicited increased effort discounting but did not affect delay discounting. The dissociable effects of sleep deprivation on two forms of discounting behavior suggest that they may have differing underlying neural mechanisms.

  4. Mechanisms mediating nitroglycerin-induced delayed-onset hyperalgesia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D; Green, P G

    2016-03-11

    Nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate, GTN) induces headache in migraineurs, an effect that has been used both diagnostically and in the study of the pathophysiology of this neurovascular pain syndrome. An important feature of this headache is a delay from the administration of GTN to headache onset that, because of GTN's very rapid metabolism, cannot be due to its pharmacokinetic profile. It has recently been suggested that activation of perivascular mast cells, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine, may contribute to this delay. We reported that hyperalgesia induced by intradermal GTN has a delay to onset of ∼ 30 min in male and ∼ 45 min in female rats. This hyperalgesia was greater in females, was prevented by pretreatment with the anti-migraine drug, sumatriptan, as well as by chronic pretreatment with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80. The acute administration of GTN and compound 48/80 both induced hyperalgesia that was prevented by pretreatment with octoxynol-9, which attenuates endothelial function, suggesting that GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia are endothelial cell-dependent. Furthermore, A-317491, a P2X3 antagonist, which inhibits endothelial cell-dependent hyperalgesia, also prevents GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia. We conclude that delayed-onset mechanical hyperalgesia induced by GTN is mediated by activation of mast cells, which in turn release mediators that stimulate endothelial cells to release ATP, to act on P2X3, a ligand-gated ion channel, in perivascular nociceptors. A role of the mast and endothelial cell in GTN-induced hyperalgesia suggests potential novel risk factors and targets for the treatment of migraine.

  5. Manipulation of stimulus onset delay in reading: evidence for parallel programming of saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R E

    1984-10-01

    On-line eye movement recording of 12 subjects who read short stories on a cathode ray tube enabled a test of direct control and preprogramming models of eye movements in reading. Contingent upon eye position, a mask was displayed in place of the letters in central vision after each saccade, delaying the onset of the stimulus in each eye fixation. The duration of the delay was manipulated in fixed or randomized blocks. Although the length of the delay strongly affected the duration of the fixations, there was no difference due to the conditions of delay manipulation, indicating that fixation duration is under direct control. However, not all fixations were lengthened by the period of the delay. Some ended while the mask was still present, suggesting they had been preprogrammed. But these "anticipation" eye movements could not have been completely determined before the fixation was processed because their fixation durations and saccade lengths were affected by the spatial extent of the mask, which varied randomly. Neither preprogramming nor existing serial direct control models of eye guidance can adequately account for these data. Instead, a model with direct control and parallel programming of saccades is proposed to explain the data and eye movements in reading in general.

  6. Developing a cognitive behavioral therapy manual for delayed sleep-wake phase disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Danielsson, Katarina; Markström, Agneta; Broman, Jan-Erik

    2016-11-01

    This article reports the development of a treatment protocol, based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) principles, for delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD). The protocol consists of psycho-education, presenting a CBT model for DSWPD, case formulation, motivational interviewing, registering sleep in a diary, strategies to improve the rhythm of sleep and wakefulness, relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, strategies to cope with daytime symptoms, constructing an individualized CBT program, and learning how to deal with relapses. Qualitative data, focusing on how the patients perceived the protocol, were collected within the realm of a trial exploring the efficacy of the protocol. These findings highlighted several advantages but also disadvantages of the therapy. It is our hope that this paper might act as a platform for further clinical work and future research efforts in patients with DSWPD.

  7. Increase of Reproductive Life Span Delays Age of Onset of Parkinson’s Disease

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    Dominik Frentzel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available One striking observation in Parkinson’s disease (PD is the remarkable gender difference in incidence and prevalence of the disease. Data on gender differences with regard to disease onset, motor and non-motor symptoms, and dopaminergic medication are limited. Furthermore, whether estrogen status affects disease onset and progression of PD is controversially discussed. In this retrospective single center study, we extracted clinical data of 226 ambulatory PD patients and compared age of disease onset, disease stage, motor impairment, non-motor symptoms, and dopaminergic medication between genders. We applied a matched-pairs design to adjust for age and disease duration. To determine the effect of estrogen-related reproductive factors including number of children, age at menarche, and menopause on the age of onset, we applied a standardized questionnaire and performed a regression analysis. The male to female ratio in the present PD cohort was 1.9:1 (147 men vs. 79 women. Male patients showed increased motor impairment than female patients. The levodopa equivalent daily dose was increased by 18.9% in male patients compared to female patients. Matched-pairs analysis confirmed the increased dose of dopaminergic medication in male patients. No differences were observed in age of onset, type of medication, and non-motor symptoms between both groups. Female reproductive factors including number of children, age at menarche, and age at menopause were positively associated with a delay of disease onset up to 30 months. The disease-modifying role of estrogen-related outcome measures warrants further clinical and experimental studies targeting gender differences, specifically hormone-dependent pathways in PD.

  8. Increase of Reproductive Life Span Delays Age of Onset of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentzel, Dominik; Judanin, Grigorij; Borozdina, Olga; Klucken, Jochen; Winkler, Jürgen; Schlachetzki, Johannes C. M.

    2017-01-01

    One striking observation in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the remarkable gender difference in incidence and prevalence of the disease. Data on gender differences with regard to disease onset, motor and non-motor symptoms, and dopaminergic medication are limited. Furthermore, whether estrogen status affects disease onset and progression of PD is controversially discussed. In this retrospective single center study, we extracted clinical data of 226 ambulatory PD patients and compared age of disease onset, disease stage, motor impairment, non-motor symptoms, and dopaminergic medication between genders. We applied a matched-pairs design to adjust for age and disease duration. To determine the effect of estrogen-related reproductive factors including number of children, age at menarche, and menopause on the age of onset, we applied a standardized questionnaire and performed a regression analysis. The male to female ratio in the present PD cohort was 1.9:1 (147 men vs. 79 women). Male patients showed increased motor impairment than female patients. The levodopa equivalent daily dose was increased by 18.9% in male patients compared to female patients. Matched-pairs analysis confirmed the increased dose of dopaminergic medication in male patients. No differences were observed in age of onset, type of medication, and non-motor symptoms between both groups. Female reproductive factors including number of children, age at menarche, and age at menopause were positively associated with a delay of disease onset up to 30 months. The disease-modifying role of estrogen-related outcome measures warrants further clinical and experimental studies targeting gender differences, specifically hormone-dependent pathways in PD. PMID:28871235

  9. Photobiomodulation delays the onset of skeletal muscle fatigue in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A; Borsa, Paul A; Baweja, Harsimran S; Moore, Molly A; Tillman, Mark D; George, Steven Z; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-09-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy has been implicated as an effective ergogenic aid to delay the onset of muscle fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the dose-response ergogenic properties of PBM therapy and its ability to prolong time to task failure by enhancing muscle activity and delaying the onset of muscle fatigue using a static positioning task. Nine participants (24.3 ± 4.9 years) received three doses of near-infrared (NIR) light therapy randomly on three separate sessions (sham, 240, and 480 J). For the positioning task, participants held a 30 % one-repetition maximum (1-RM) load using the index finger until volitional fatigue. Surface electromyography (sEMG) of the first dorsal interosseous muscle was recorded for the length of the positioning task. Outcomes included time to task failure (TTF), muscle fatigue, movement accuracy, motor output variability, and muscle activity (sEMG). The 240-J dose significantly extended TTF by 26 % (p = 0.032) compared with the sham dose. TTF for the 240-J dose was strongly associated with a decrease in muscle fatigue (R (2) = 0.54, p = 0.024). Our findings show that a 240-J dose of NIR light therapy is efficacious in delaying the onset and extent of muscle fatigue during submaximal isometric positioning tasks. Our findings suggest that NIR light therapy may be used as an ergogenic aid during functional tasks or post-injury rehabilitation.

  10. Delayed Onset Urticaria in Depressive Patients with Bupropion Prescription: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ti; Hu, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Shen, Cheng-Che; Chang, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Mu-Hong; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chiang, Huey-Ling; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Wang, Wei-Shu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Bupropion, which is widely used in patients with depressive disorder, may cause allergic reactions. However, the real prevalence of these side effects may be overlooked and underreported due to the delayed onset phenomenon. Objective This study aimed to estimate the real incidence of bupropion-induced urticaria and clarify the delayed onset phenomenon. Methods We conducted a nationwide cohort study between 2000 and 2009 using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Dataset. Among 65,988 patients with depressive disorders, we identified new users of bupropion with depressive disorders (bupropion cohort, n = 2,839) and matched them at a ratio of 1:4 regarding age and sex (non-bupropion matched cohort, n = 11,356). The risk of urticaria was compared between the two cohorts. Results The risk of urticaria occurrence was higher in bupropion users than in matched controls within 4 weeks of starting the medication (risk ratio 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.28–2.54; p = 0.001). The occurrence of urticaria in the bupropion cohort were more frequent on Days 15–28 than Day 1–14 (p = 0.002). Cox proportional hazards model showed that a history of urticaria was an independent risk factor for developing bupropion-induced urticaria. Conclusions Of the antidepressants, bupropion may pose a higher risk of drug-induced urticaria, and this condition might be ignored due to the delayed onset phenomenon. Depressive patients with a history of urticaria are at higher risk of the adverse drug reaction. This study emphasizes the need for increased clinical awareness of this adverse outcome to bupropion use. PMID:24244611

  11. Development of a novel mouse model of amodiaquine-induced liver injury with a delayed onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metushi, Imir G; Cai, Ping; Dervovic, Dzana; Liu, Feng; Lobach, Alexandra; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Uetrecht, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Amodiaquine (AQ) treatment is associated with a high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. Evidence suggests that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated. A significant impediment to mechanistic studies of IDILI is the lack of valid animal models. This study reports the first animal model of IDILI with characteristics similar to mild IDILI in humans. Treatment of female C57BL/6 mice with AQ led to liver injury with delayed onset, which resolved despite continued treatment. Covalent binding of AQ was detected in the liver, which was greater in female than in male mice, and higher in the liver than in other organs. Covalent binding in the liver was maximal by Day 3, which did not explain the delayed onset of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation. However, coincident with the elevated serum ALT, infiltration of liver and splenic mononuclear cells and activation of CD8 T-cells within the liver were identified. By Week 7, when ALT levels had returned close to normal, down-regulation of several inflammatory cytokines and up-regulation of PD-1 on T-cells suggested induction of immune tolerance. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) mice with AQ resulted in higher ALT activities than C57BL/6 mice, which suggested that the adaptive immune response was responsible for immune tolerance. In contrast, depletion of NK cells significantly attenuated the increase in ALT, which implied a role for NK cells in mild AQ-induced IDILI. This is the first example of a delayed-onset animal model of IDILI that appears to be immune-mediated.

  12. Na+/H+ exchange inhibition delays the onset of hypovolemic circulatory shock in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongmei; Arias, Jaqueline; Bassuk, Jorge; Doods, Henri; Seidler, Randolph; Adams, Jose A; Abraham, William M

    2008-04-01

    Severe blood loss is a major cause of death occurring within hours of traumatic injury. Na+/H+ exchange (NHE-1) activity is an important determinant of the extent of ischemic myocardial injury. The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that NHE-1 inhibition delays the onset of hypovolemic circulatory shock, thereby preventing early death due to severe hemorrhage in pigs. Severe hypovolemia was studied in 16 (25.2 kg) anesthetized male pigs in steps of 10-, 20-, 30-, 40-, and 50-mL kg(-1) blood loss, each in 30-min intervals. Shed blood resuscitation was started 30 min after 50 mL kg(-1) blood loss. The experiment was terminated after 3 h of resuscitation. Eight pigs were used as seline control. Eight pigs received 3 mg kg(-1) benzamide, N-(aminoiminomethyl)-4-[4-(2-furanylcarbonyl)-1-piperazinyl]-3-(methylsulfonyl), methanesulfonate (NHE-1 inhibitor) 15 min before hemorrhage. Seven control pigs died at 40- to 50-mL kg(-1) blood loss. One control pig survived initial resuscitation but died soon after. In contrast, all animals treated with NHE-1 inhibitor survived the entire protocol. In control animals, cardiac output and MAP gradually decreased at each step of blood loss with marked increase in heart rate. Cardiovascular decompensation occurred at 40 mL kg(-1) blood loss. Na+/H+ exchange inhibition increased oxygen delivery, attenuated cardiovascular decompensation, delayed the onset of irreversible hypovolemic circulatory shock, and enabled resuscitation to survival. Echocardiography analysis showed that myocardial hypercontracture gradually developed with each step of blood loss in control animals, but this hypercontracture was attenuated in the animals receiving the NHE-1 inhibitor. We conclude that NHE-1 inhibition attenuates ischemic myocardial hypercontracture, cardiovascular decompensation, delays the onset of hypovolemic circulatory shock, and prevents early death in severe hemorrhage.

  13. Delayed onset urticaria in depressive patients with bupropion prescription: a nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yu Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bupropion, which is widely used in patients with depressive disorder, may cause allergic reactions. However, the real prevalence of these side effects may be overlooked and underreported due to the delayed onset phenomenon. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to estimate the real incidence of bupropion-induced urticaria and clarify the delayed onset phenomenon. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide cohort study between 2000 and 2009 using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Dataset. Among 65,988 patients with depressive disorders, we identified new users of bupropion with depressive disorders (bupropion cohort, n = 2,839 and matched them at a ratio of 1:4 regarding age and sex (non-bupropion matched cohort, n = 11,356. The risk of urticaria was compared between the two cohorts. RESULTS: The risk of urticaria occurrence was higher in bupropion users than in matched controls within 4 weeks of starting the medication (risk ratio 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.28-2.54; p = 0.001. The occurrence of urticaria in the bupropion cohort were more frequent on Days 15-28 than Day 1-14 (p = 0.002. Cox proportional hazards model showed that a history of urticaria was an independent risk factor for developing bupropion-induced urticaria. CONCLUSIONS: Of the antidepressants, bupropion may pose a higher risk of drug-induced urticaria, and this condition might be ignored due to the delayed onset phenomenon. Depressive patients with a history of urticaria are at higher risk of the adverse drug reaction. This study emphasizes the need for increased clinical awareness of this adverse outcome to bupropion use.

  14. Frey’s syndrome - unusually long delayed clinical onset post-parotidectomy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inchien Chamisa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frey’s syndrome is a complication of parotidectomy that is thought to occur as a result of aberrant regeneration of the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fibres supplying the parotid gland to severed postganglionic sympathetic fibres which innervate the sweat glands of the face. Frey’s syndrome is difficult to treat but is a preventable phenomenon and surgeons must be aware of the available preventative methods during the initial surgery. An unusual case is presented involving a patient with delayed onset of Frey’s syndrome 40 years after parotidectomy in childhood. The potential for this long-delayed clinical presentation should be discussed with the patient before surgery in the parotid gland. Diagnostic methods, preventive measures and management options are briefly discussed.

  15. Delayed onset, protracted delirium and aspiration pneumonitis associated with a combination of clozapine and electroconvulsive therapy

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    N Manjunatha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies reported the efficacy and safety in combination of clozapine and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in schizophrenia; systematic studies are lacking. Side effects like seizure, and confusional state are reported. Authors report two cases of delayed onset/protracted delirium with ECT and clozapine in schizophrenia, one of whom developed aspiration pneumonitis possibly due to clozapine hyper-salivation. Delirium improved with stopping of ECT and clozapine. Clozapine monotherapy restarted to previous dosages in both cases without recurrence of delirium. Authors recommend for careful monitoring for delirium in ECT augmentation on high dose clozapine. Unilateral ECT may be preferred for augmenting clozapine.

  16. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

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    Mirko Velickovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention.

  17. Delaying cord clamping until ventilation onset improves cardiovascular function at birth in preterm lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sasmira; Alison, Beth J; Wallace, Euan M; Crossley, Kelly J; Gill, Andrew W; Kluckow, Martin; te Pas, Arjan B; Morley, Colin J; Polglase, Graeme R; Hooper, Stuart B

    2013-04-15

    Delayed cord clamping improves circulatory stability in preterm infants at birth, but the underlying physiology is unclear. We investigated the effects of umbilical cord clamping, before and after ventilation onset, on cardiovascular function at birth. Prenatal surgery was performed on lambs (123 days) to implant catheters into the pulmonary and carotid arteries and probes to measure pulmonary (PBF), carotid (CaBF) and ductus arteriosus blood flows. Lambs were delivered at 126 ± 1 days and: (1) the umbilical cord was clamped at delivery and ventilation was delayed for about 2 min (Clamp 1st; n = 6), and (2) umbilical cord clamping was delayed for 3-4 min, until after ventilation was established (Vent 1st; n = 6). All lambs were subsequently ventilated for 30 min. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping rapidly (within four heartbeats), but transiently, increased pulmonary and carotid arterial pressures (by ∼30%) and CaBF (from 30.2 ± 5.6 to 40.1 ± 4.6 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), which then decreased again within 30-60 s. Following ventilation onset, these parameters rapidly increased again. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced heart rate (by ∼40%) and right ventricular output (RVO; from 114.6 ± 14.4 to 38.8 ± 9.7 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), which were restored by ventilation. In Vent 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced RVO from 153.5 ± 3.8 to 119.2 ± 10.6 ml min(-1) kg(-1), did not affect heart rates and resulted in stable blood flows and pressures during transition. Delaying cord clamping for 3-4 min until after ventilation is established improves cardiovascular function by increasing pulmonary blood flow before the cord is clamped. As a result, cardiac output remains stable, leading to a smoother cardiovascular transition throughout the early newborn period.

  18. Delaying cord clamping until ventilation onset improves cardiovascular function at birth in preterm lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sasmira; Alison, Beth J; Wallace, Euan M; Crossley, Kelly J; Gill, Andrew W; Kluckow, Martin; te Pas, Arjan B; Morley, Colin J; Polglase, Graeme R; Hooper, Stuart B

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cord clamping improves circulatory stability in preterm infants at birth, but the underlying physiology is unclear. We investigated the effects of umbilical cord clamping, before and after ventilation onset, on cardiovascular function at birth. Prenatal surgery was performed on lambs (123 days) to implant catheters into the pulmonary and carotid arteries and probes to measure pulmonary (PBF), carotid (CaBF) and ductus arteriosus blood flows. Lambs were delivered at 126 ± 1 days and: (1) the umbilical cord was clamped at delivery and ventilation was delayed for about 2 min (Clamp 1st; n = 6), and (2) umbilical cord clamping was delayed for 3–4 min, until after ventilation was established (Vent 1st; n = 6). All lambs were subsequently ventilated for 30 min. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping rapidly (within four heartbeats), but transiently, increased pulmonary and carotid arterial pressures (by ∼30%) and CaBF (from 30.2 ± 5.6 to 40.1 ± 4.6 ml min−1 kg−1), which then decreased again within 30–60 s. Following ventilation onset, these parameters rapidly increased again. In Clamp 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced heart rate (by ∼40%) and right ventricular output (RVO; from 114.6 ± 14.4 to 38.8 ± 9.7 ml min−1 kg−1), which were restored by ventilation. In Vent 1st lambs, cord clamping reduced RVO from 153.5 ± 3.8 to 119.2 ± 10.6 ml min−1 kg−1, did not affect heart rates and resulted in stable blood flows and pressures during transition. Delaying cord clamping for 3–4 min until after ventilation is established improves cardiovascular function by increasing pulmonary blood flow before the cord is clamped. As a result, cardiac output remains stable, leading to a smoother cardiovascular transition throughout the early newborn period. PMID:23401615

  19. [Consensus document on the clinical use of melatonin in children and adolescents with sleep-onset insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin Arboledas, G; Merino Andreu, M; de la Calle Cabrera, T; Hidalgo Vicario, M I; Rodríguez Hernández, P J; Soto Insuga, V; Madrid Pérez, J A

    2014-11-01

    Sleep problems are highly prevalent among our children and adolescents. Its treatment is mainly based on cognitive behavioural therapies and habit modification procedures. However, the use of sleep promoting drugs and substances is widespread without being supported by clinical guidelines. Exogenous melatonin is a neurohormone marketed as a nutritional supplement that is being increasingly used in the management of sleep problems, and with no control over its use. The consensus document is presented on the use of melatonin in sleep-onset insomnia prepared by representatives of the Spanish Paediatric Association, the Spanish Society of Sleep, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Outpatients and Primary Care, the Spanish Society for Adolescent Medicine, the Spanish Society of Child Psychiatry, and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Neurology.

  20. Are cognitive "insomnia" processes involved in the development and maintenance of delayed sleep wake phase disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Cele E; Gradisar, Michael; Barbero, Sebastian C

    2016-04-01

    Although individuals with delayed sleep wake phase disorder (DSWPD) and chronic insomnia disorder (CID) share many of the same phenomenological experiences, theories relating to the development and maintenance of these disorders are distinct in focus. Unlike CID, theory relating to DSWPD is primarily physiologically based and assumes almost no cognitive pathway. However, recent research findings suggest that individuals with DSWPD also display many of the sleep-disordered cognitive processes that were previously assumed to be unique to the insomnia experience. As such, this review aims to summarise current research findings to address the question "Could cognitive processes be involved in the development and maintenance of DSWPD?" In particular, the presence of cognitive and physiological pre-sleep arousal, sleep-related attentional bias, distorted perception of sleep and daytime functioning, dysfunctional beliefs and safety behaviours will be investigated. As this emerging area of research requires a stronger evidence base, we highlight suggestions for future investigation and provide preliminary practice points for clinicians assessing and treating "insomnia" in patients with DSWPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Audiovisual Integration Delayed by Stimulus Onset Asynchrony Between Auditory and Visual Stimuli in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanna; Yang, Weiping; Nakahashi, Kohei; Takahashi, Satoshi; Wu, Jinglong

    2017-02-01

    Although neuronal studies have shown that audiovisual integration is regulated by temporal factors, there is still little knowledge about the impact of temporal factors on audiovisual integration in older adults. To clarify how stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between auditory and visual stimuli modulates age-related audiovisual integration, 20 younger adults (21-24 years) and 20 older adults (61-80 years) were instructed to perform an auditory or visual stimuli discrimination experiment. The results showed that in younger adults, audiovisual integration was altered from an enhancement (AV, A ± 50 V) to a depression (A ± 150 V). In older adults, the alterative pattern was similar to that for younger adults with the expansion of SOA; however, older adults showed significantly delayed onset for the time-window-of-integration and peak latency in all conditions, which further demonstrated that audiovisual integration was delayed more severely with the expansion of SOA, especially in the peak latency for V-preceded-A conditions in older adults. Our study suggested that audiovisual facilitative integration occurs only within a certain SOA range (e.g., -50 to 50 ms) in both younger and older adults. Moreover, our results confirm that the response for older adults was slowed and provided empirical evidence that integration ability is much more sensitive to the temporal alignment of audiovisual stimuli in older adults.

  2. Effect of Whirlpool Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Lori A.; Lephart, Scott M.; Giannantonio, Frank P.; Blanc, Rob O.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of warm whirlpool, cold whirlpool, and contrast therapy in the treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness. Design and Setting: Subjects performed eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors and received 4 treatments: immediately postexercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Treatments consisted of 24-minute treatments with warm whirlpool, cold whirlpool, contrast therapy, or no treatment. Subjects: Fifty-six sex-matched volunteers from the University of Pittsburgh. Measurements: Measurements were taken at 5 assessment times: pre-exercise (0 hours); prior to treatment at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise; and at 96 hours postexercise. Dependent variables were degrees of resting elbow flexion, active elbow flexion, and extension; perceived soreness values on a Graphic Pain Rating Scale; and maximal voluntary isometric contraction. A repeated-measures analysis of variance (group by time) and Tukey post hoc analysis were used to determine which treatment groups differed significantly in returning subjects to pre-exercise values. Results: Cold whirlpool and contrast therapy were found to return subjects to baseline values of resting elbow flexion and perceived soreness significantly more than warm whirlpool or no treatment (P < .01). Additionally, warm whirlpool was found to be more effective than no treatment in the return of resting elbow flexion (P < .01). Conclusions: These results suggest that cold whirlpool and contrast therapy are more effective than warm whirlpool or no treatment in alleviating delayed-onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexors. PMID:16558514

  3. Effects of Inter-electrode Distance on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Microcurrent Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kang, Ji-Sun; Park, Soo-Ji; Yoon, Se-Won; Jeong, Seong-Kwan; Heo, Myoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the distance between the two electrodes on delayed onset muscle soreness during microcurrent therapy. [Methods] In this study 24 healthy women who hadn't exercised regularly for six months were selected and randomly divided into two groups. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was induced and experimental Group 1 were given microcurrent treatment with the electrodes attached at a close distance evaluated. Experimental Group 2 received the same treatment with the electrodes attached at a greater distance apart. Visual analogue scale pain and the RIII reflex were evaluated after inducing DOMS and after one day, two days, three days and four days of microcurrent treatment. [Results] The visual analogue scale and amplitude of RIII amplitude only showed significant differences with the length of time of the treatment. [Conclusion] This study found that difference of interelectrode distance has no influence on VAS pain and the RIII reflex of DOMS. Although there were no significant differences in RIII amplitude, we suspect that it may be influenced by current parameters such as frequency and intensity.

  4. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness After Inspiratory Threshold Loading in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Sunita; Sheel, A. William; Road, Jeremy D.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Skeletal muscle damage occurs following high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise; however, it is difficult to monitor damage to the respiratory muscles, particularly in humans. The aim of this study was to use clinical measures to investigate the presence of skeletal muscle damage in the inspiratory muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent 60 minutes of voluntary inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) at 70% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures, delayed onset muscle soreness on a visual analogue scale and plasma creatine kinase were measured prior to ITL, and at repeated time points after ITL (4, 24 and 48 hours post-ITL). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness was present in all subjects 24 hours following ITL (intensity = 22 ± 6 mm; significantly higher than baseline p = 0.02). Muscle soreness was reported primarily in the anterior neck region, and was correlated to the amount of work done by the inspiratory muscles during ITL (r = 0.72, p = 0.02). However, no significant change was observed in maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures or creatine kinase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an intense bout of ITL results in muscle soreness primarily in the accessory muscles of inspiration, however, may be insufficient to cause significant muscle damage in healthy adults. PMID:20467514

  5. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness.

  6. Pulsed Ultrasound Fails To Diminish Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stay, Jeffrey C.; Richard, Mark D.; Draper, David O.; Schulthies, Shane S.; Durrant, Earlene

    1998-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of pulsed ultrasound on swelling, muscle soreness perception, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and muscular strength. Design and Setting: Eight sets of concentric and eccentric actions induced delayed-onset muscle soreness of the elbow flexors. Group 1 received 20% pulsed ultrasound treatments (1-MHz, 7 minutes, 1.5 W/ cm2 temporal peak intensity) twice a day immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3, 24, 27, 48, 51, 72, and 75 hours postexercise. Group 2 received sham treatments immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3,27, 51, and 75 hours postexercise and true treatments of pulsed ultrasound at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Group 3 received sham treatments of no ultrasonic output immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3, 24, 27, 48, 51, 72, and 75 hours postexercise. Subjects: Thirty-six college-age females. Measurements: We recorded upper-arm circumference, perceived soreness, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and elbow-flexion strength before (pretest), immediately postexercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours postexercise. Results: We noted differences over time but no treatment effect between groups or interactions between time and group for upper-arm circumference, perceived soreness, relaxed-elbow extension angle, or elbow-flexion strength. Conclusions: Pulsed ultrasound as used in this study did not significantly diminish the effects of delayed-onset muscle soreness on soreness perception, swelling, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and strength. PMID:16558532

  7. THE EFFECTS OF OMEGA-3 INTAKE ON DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORNESS IN NON-ATHLET MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rajabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is classified as a muscle strain that presents with tenderness and stiffness one to two days after exercise. At present there are multiple proposed methods for treating DOMS, including anti-inflammatory medication, stretching, homeopathy, L-carnitine, rest and light exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigation of the effects of omega-3 intake on delayed onset muscle soreness in non-athlete men. 20 healthy subjects (age: 20.5±1.8 years participated as subjects in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (experimental and control. In the experimental group, subjects consume daily 2000 mg of omega-3; 2 times per day for 1 month before and 48 hours after perform leg press exercise with eccentric pattern. Similarly, the с was taking in the control group. The results showed significant decrease in severity of DOMS (CK and LDH levels and decreased knee's range of motion in experimental group in comparison with control group (p<0.05. As a result of our study it is suggested that the use of omega-3 supplement can effectively reduce DOMS caused by eccentric exercise.

  8. Daily Feeding of Fructooligosaccharide or Glucomannan Delays Onset of Senescence in SAMP8 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadako Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that daily intake of nondigestible saccharides delays senescence onset through the improvement of intestinal microflora. Here, we raised senescence accelerated mice prone 8 (SAMP8 on the AIN93 diet (CONT, with sucrose being substituted for 5% of fructooligosaccharide (FOS or 5% of glucomannan (GM, 15 mice per group. Ten SAMR1 were raised as reference of normal aging with control diet. Grading of senescence was conducted using the method developed by Hosokawa, and body weight, dietary intake, and drinking water intake were measured on alternate days. Following 38 weeks of these diets we evaluated learning and memory abilities using a passive avoidance apparatus and investigated effects on the intestinal microflora, measured oxidative stress markers, and inflammatory cytokines. Continuous intake of FOS and GM significantly enhanced learning and memory ability and decelerated senescence development when compared with the CONT group. Bifidobacterium levels were significantly increased in FOS and GM-fed mice. Urinary 8OHdG, 15-isoprostane, serum TNF-α, and IL-6 were also lower in FOS-fed mice, while IL-10 in FOS and GM groups was higher than in CONT group. These findings suggest that daily intake of nondigestible saccharides delays the onset of senescence via improvement of intestinal microflora.

  9. Multilingualism (but not always bilingualism) delays the onset of Alzheimer disease: evidence from a bilingual community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkow, Howard; Whitehead, Victor; Phillips, Natalie; Wolfson, Christina; Atherton, Julie; Bergman, Howard

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper by Bialystok et al in Neuropsychologia (vol. 45, pgs. 459 to 464) suggested that early bilingualism produced a statistically significant 4.1-year delay in onset of memory loss symptoms in older individuals with Alzheimer disease, possibly reflecting an increase in the cognitive reserve of these individuals. That study focused on multilingual elderly patients of whom 90% were immigrants. Our memory clinic, in Montreal Canada, has the advantage of having a large set of individuals who are either multilingual immigrants to Canada, or who are nonimmigrants but raised in both official languages of Canada--French and English. We thus attempted to replicate the above findings using a larger cohort in a different setting. We examined age at diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and age at symptom onset for all unilingual versus multilingual participants, and then for those who were nonimmigrant English/French bilinguals. Overall, we found a small but significant protective effect of more than 2 languages spoken, but we found no significant benefit in bilinguals overall in relation to age at diagnosis or age at symptom onset. However, in the immigrant group, the results mirrored those of Bialystok et al with 2 or more languages delaying the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease by almost 5 years. A trend toward the same effect was also seen in nonimmigrants whose first language was French. In contrast, in nonimmigrants whose first language was English, no such effect was found. These results are discussed in relation to the earlier findings and the theory of cognitive reserve.

  10. Delayed Diagnosis, Range of Severity, and Multiple Sleep Comorbidities: A Clinical and Polysomnographic Analysis of 100 Patients of the Innsbruck Narcolepsy Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Mitterling, Thomas; Gabelia, David; Gschliesser, Viola; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is reported to affect 26-56/100,000 in the general population. We aimed to describe clinical and polysomnographic features of a large narcolepsy cohort in order to comprehensively characterize the narcoleptic spectrum. Methods: We performed a chart- and polysomnographybased review of all narcolepsy patients of the Innsbruck narcolepsy cohort. Results: A total of 100 consecutive narcolepsy patients (87 with cataplexy [NC], 13 without cataplexy [N]) were included in the analysis. All subjects had either excessive daytime sleepiness or cataplexy as their initial presenting clinical feature. Age at symptom onset was 20 (6-69) years. Diagnostic delay was 6.5 (0-39) years. The complete narcolepsy tetrad was present in 36/100 patients; 28/100 patients had three cardinal symptoms; 29/100 had two; and 7/100 had only excessive daytime sleepiness. Severity varied broadly with respect to excessive daytime sleepiness (median Epworth Sleepiness Scale score: 18, range 10-24), cataplexy (8-point Likert scale: median 4.5, range 1-8), hypnagogic hallucinations (median 4.5, range 1-7), and sleep paralysis (median 3, range 1-7). Sleep comorbidity was highly prevalent and ranged from sleeprelated movement disorders (n = 55/100), parasomnias (n = 34/100), and sleeprelated breathing disorders (n = 24/100), to insomnia (n = 28/100). REM sleep without atonia or a periodic limb movement in sleep index > 5/h were present in most patients (90/100 and 75/100). A high percentage of narcoleptic patients in the present study had high frequency leg movements (35%) and excessive fragmentary myoclonus (22%). Of the narcolepsy patients with clinical features of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), 76.5% had EMG evidence for RBD on the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), based on a standard cutoff of a minimum of 18% of 3-sec miniepochs. Conclusion: This study is one of the largest monocentric polysomnographic studies to date of patients with narcolepsy and confirms the

  11. Melatonin and sleep effects on health, behavior problems and parenting stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.; Meijer, A.M.; Smits, M.G.; Oort, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    In children with sleep-onset insomnia and delayed dim-light melatonin onset, melatonin treatment not only improves sleep but also health, behavior and parenting stress. The aim of the present study was to see whether the latter effects are dependent on the direct effects on sleep. Data come from 41

  12. Melatonin and sleep effects on health, behavior problems and parenting stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, A.; Meijer, A.M.; Smits, M.G.; Oort, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    In children with sleep-onset insomnia and delayed dim-light melatonin onset, melatonin treatment not only improves sleep but also health, behavior and parenting stress. The aim of the present study was to see whether the latter effects are dependent on the direct effects on sleep. Data come from 41

  13. Rapid eye movement sleep disturbances in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnulf, I.; Nielsen, J.; Lohmann, E.

    2008-01-01

    with very mild HD and worsened with disease severity. In contrast to narcoleptic patients, HD patients had no cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, or sleep paralysis. Four HD patients had abnormally low (sleep latencies, but none had multiple sleep-onset REM periods. Conclusions......Background: Sleep disorders including insomnia, movements during sleep, and daytime sleepiness are common but poorly studied in Huntington disease (HD). Objective: To evaluate the HD sleep-wake phenotype (including abnormal motor activity during sleep) in patients with various HD stages...... interview, nighttime video and sleep monitoring, and daytime multiple sleep latency tests. Their results were compared with those of patients with narcolepsy and control patients. Results: The HD patients had frequent insomnia, earlier sleep onset, lower sleep efficiency, increased stage I sleep, delayed...

  14. Bifurcation onset delay in magnetic bearing systems by time varying stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, M. R.; Sun, Q.

    2017-06-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics behaviours of a rigid rotor supported by magnetic bearings. In particular, we consider the effect of rotor unbalanced mass and geometric coupling. Existing works in literature have mostly focused on a single value of parameter or a smaller range of the nonlinearities introduced by rotor imbalance and geometric coupling. This is partly due to the use of a linear PD controller which limits the system performance. In this paper, we use a nonlinear PD controller by adopting a time varying stiffness term. The control gains are chosen according to the stability chart for a Mathieu's equation. Consequently, we observe a delay in the onset of bifurcation indicating an improved rotor performance.

  15. Delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Raíssa B; De Freitas, Gabriel R; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2013-01-01

    Although the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders among patients with cerebrovascular illness is relatively high, there are only few case reports describing post-stroke psychotic symptoms. In general, post-stroke psychoses have been reported to emerge few days after the vascular event and to vanish soon afterwards. In this report, we describe delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder, persecutory type. A middle-aged female patient developed a persistent delusional disorder with homicidal behavior about one year after a cerebrovascular accident affecting the right fronto-temporo-parietal region and a long period of chronic post-stroke mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our case suggests that there might be long intervals between stroke and the appearance of psychotic symptoms.

  16. Delayed-Onset Post-Stroke Delusional Disorder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa B. Barboza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders among patients with cerebrovascular illness is relatively high, there are only few case reports describing post-stroke psychotic symptoms. In general, post-stroke psychoses have been reported to emerge few days after the vascular event and to vanish soon afterwards. In this report, we describe delayed-onset post-stroke delusional disorder, persecutory type. A middle-aged female patient developed a persistent delusional disorder with homicidal behavior about one year after a cerebrovascular accident affecting the right fronto-temporo-parietal region and a long period of chronic post-stroke mixed anxiety and depressive symptoms. Our case suggests that there might be long intervals between stroke and the appearance of psychotic symptoms.

  17. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog, Liraglutide, Delays Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis in Lewis Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 μg/kg s.c.) or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n = 6, liraglutide, n = 7). Clinical score and weight were assessed daily...... by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11) or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4). Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined. Results: Liraglutide......, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1 receptor agonists should be investigated further as a potential therapy for MS....

  18. DRESS with delayed onset acute interstitial nephritis and profound refractory eosinophilia secondary to Vancomycin

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    O'Meara Paloma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS is a relatively rare clinical entity; even more so in response to vancomycin. Methods Case report. Results We present a severe case of vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome, which on presentation included only skin, hematological and mild liver involvement. The patient further developed severe acute interstitial nephritis, eosinophilic pneumonitis, central nervous system (CNS involvement and worsening hematological abnormalities despite immediate discontinuation of vancomycin and parenteral corticosteroids. High-dose corticosteroids for a prolonged period were necessary and tapering of steroids a challenge due to rebound-eosinophilia and skin involvement. Conclusion Patients with DRESS who are relatively resistant to corticosteroids with delayed onset of certain organ involvement should be treated with a more prolonged corticosteroid tapering schedule. Vancomycin is increasingly being recognized as a culprit agent in this syndrome.

  19. Suppression of Somatic Expansion Delays the Onset of Pathophysiology in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

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    Helen Budworth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's Disease (HD is caused by inheritance of a single disease-length allele harboring an expanded CAG repeat, which continues to expand in somatic tissues with age. The inherited disease allele expresses a toxic protein, and whether further somatic expansion adds to toxicity is unknown. We have created an HD mouse model that resolves the effects of the inherited and somatic expansions. We show here that suppressing somatic expansion substantially delays the onset of disease in littermates that inherit the same disease-length allele. Furthermore, a pharmacological inhibitor, XJB-5-131, inhibits the lengthening of the repeat tracks, and correlates with rescue of motor decline in these animals. The results provide evidence that pharmacological approaches to offset disease progression are possible.

  20. Submaximal delayed-onset muscle soreness: correlations between MR imaging findings and clinical measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G. F.; Haller, R. G.; Wyrick, P. S.; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess correlations between muscle edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images and clinical indexes of muscle injury in delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) produced by submaximal exercise protocols. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen subjects performed 36 elbow flexions ("biceps curls") at one of two submaximal workloads that emphasized eccentric contractions. Changes in MR imaging findings, plasma levels of creatine kinase, and pain scores were correlated. RESULTS: Both exercise protocols produced DOMS in all subjects. The best correlation was between change in creatine kinase level and volume of muscle edema on MR images, regardless of the workload. Correlations tended to be better with the easier exercise protocol. CONCLUSION: Whereas many previous studies of DOMS focused on intense exercise protocols to ensure positive results, the present investigation showed that submaximal workloads are adequate to produce DOMS and that correlations between conventionally measured indexes of injury may be enhanced at lighter exercise intensities.

  1. Effects of tender point acupuncture on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS – a pragmatic trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitakoji Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture is used to reduce inflammation and decrease pain in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS. This study investigates the efficacy of acupuncture on the symptoms of DOMS. Methods Thirty subjects were assigned randomly to there groups, namely the control, non-tender point and tender point groups. Measurement of pain with full elbow flexion was used as indices of efficacy. Measurements were taken before and after exercise, immediately after treatment and seven days after treatment. Results Significant differences in visual analog scores for pain were found between the control group and tender point group immediately after treatment and three days after exercise (P Conclusion The results show that tender point acupuncture relieves muscle pain of DOMS.

  2. Effects of vibratory stimulations on maximal voluntary isometric contraction from delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hyung-Woo; Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Cho, Byung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Woo; Bo, Kak Hwang

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vibratory stimulation on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). [Subjects] Sixty healthy adults participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic disease. [Methods] The researchers induced DOMS in the musculus extensor carpi radialis longus of each participant. Subjects in the control group received no treatment. The ultrasound group received ultrasound treatment (intensity, 1.0 W/cm(2;) frequency 1 MHz; time, 10 minutes). The vibration group received vibration stimulation (frequency, 20 MHz; time, 10 minutes). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was recorded at baseline, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] MVIC measurements showed statistically significant differences in the vibration group compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Vibratory stimulation had a positive effect on recovery of muscle function from DOMS.

  3. Homoeopathy for delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, A J; Fisher, P; Smith, C; Wyllie, S E; Lewith, G T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a model for determining whether a homoeopathic medicine is superior to placebo for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). DESIGN: Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Physiotherapy department of a homoeopathic hospital. SUBJECTS: Sixty eight healthy volunteers (average age 30; 41% men) undertook a 10 minute period of bench stepping carrying a small weight and were randomised to a homoeopathic medicine or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean muscle soreness in the five day period after the exercise test, symptom free days, maximum soreness score, days to no soreness, days on medication. RESULTS: The difference between group means was 0.17 in favour of placebo with 95% confidence intervals +/- 0.50. Similar results were found for other outcome measures. CONCLUSION: The study did not find benefit of the homoeopathic remedy in DOMS. Bench stepping may not be an appropriate model to evaluate the effects of a treatment on DOMS because of wide variation between subject soreness scores. PMID:9429007

  4. Effects of tender point acupuncture on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) – a pragmatic trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kazunori; Ochi, Hideki; Kitakoji, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is used to reduce inflammation and decrease pain in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). This study investigates the efficacy of acupuncture on the symptoms of DOMS. Methods Thirty subjects were assigned randomly to there groups, namely the control, non-tender point and tender point groups. Measurement of pain with full elbow flexion was used as indices of efficacy. Measurements were taken before and after exercise, immediately after treatment and seven days after treatment. Results Significant differences in visual analog scores for pain were found between the control group and tender point group immediately after treatment and three days after exercise (P < 0.05, Dunnetts multiple test). Conclusion The results show that tender point acupuncture relieves muscle pain of DOMS. PMID:19032777

  5. Does post-exercise massage treatment reduce delayed onset muscle soreness? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a frequent problem after unaccustomed exercise. No universally accepted treatment exists. Massage therapy is often recommended for this condition but uncertainty exists about its effectiveness. AIM: To determine whether post-exercise massage alleviates the symptoms of DOMS after a bout of strenuous exercise. METHOD: Various computerised literature searches were carried out and located seven controlled trials. RESULTS: Most of the trials were burdened with serious methodological flaws, and their results are far from uniform. However, most suggest that post-exercise massage may alleviate symptoms of DOMS. CONCLUSIONS: Massage therapy may be a promising treatment for DOMS. Definitive studies are warranted. 


 PMID:9773168

  6. EFFECTS OF MESSAGE VS ACTIVE EXERCISES ON EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DELAYED ONSET OF MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chaturvedi Pilladi *,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:To evaluate the effect of massage of versus active exercises on experimentally induced delayedonset of muscle soreness.Method:30 subjects were divided into two groups, Experimental group received Massage and control groupreceived active exercises, results were taken by measurement of pain and functional stair climbing capacity ofknee joint were taken by visual analog score and functional knee rating score.Results:obtained results were analyzed with the use of Paired T-test, which has been carried out to observethetreatment impact between the groups before and after the treatment. After a 4 week treatment period,thesubjects in the Group I (Quadriceps message compared with the subjects in the Group II (Active exercise hadshown a statistically significant improvement with the outcome measures at 0.05 level.Conclusion:Quadriceps massagewas found much effective in decreasing Delayed onset of muscle sorenessthan active exercises.

  7. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog, Liraglutide, Delays Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis in Lewis Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Landau, Anne M; Møller, Arne; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention toward anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is, moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 μg/kg s.c.) or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n = 6, liraglutide, n = 7). Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11) or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4). Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined. Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0) by 2 days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p = 0.0003). Fourteen of 15 (93%) of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4) by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33%) of liraglutide-treated rats (p = 0.0004). Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p drug treatment (p = 0.09). Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1 receptor agonists should be investigated further as a potential therapy for MS.

  8. Effect of Microcurrent Stimulation on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: A Double-Blind Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Perrin, David H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) treatment on pain and loss of range of motion (ROM) associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: We assigned subjects to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received treatment with microcurrent stimulation (200 μA, 30 Hz, for 10 minutes, then 100 μA, 0.3 Hz, for 10 minutes) 24, 48, and 72 hours after DOMS induction. Group 2 served as a sham group and was treated using a machine altered by the manufacturer so that no current could flow through the electrodes. Subjects: DOMS was induced in the biceps brachii of the nondominant arm of 18 subjects (3 males, 15 females: age = 20.33 ± 2.3 years, ht = 170.81 ± 7.3 cm, wt = 69.61 ± 13.1 kg). Dominance was defined as the arm used by the subject to throw a ball. Measurements: Subjective pain and active elbow extension ROM were evaluated before and after treatment each day. Two methods were used to assess pain: constant pressure using a weighted Orthoplast sphere and full elbow extension to the limit of pain tolerance. Subjective pain was measured with a graphic rating scale and active elbow extension ROM using a standard, plastic, double-armed goniometer. Three repeated-measures ANOVAs (between-subjects variable was group, within- subjects variables were day and test) were used to assess ROM and pain scores for the 2 groups. Results: We found no significant difference in the measurement of subjective pain scores or elbow extension ROM when the MENS group was compared with the sham group. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the MENS treatment, within the parameters used for this experiment, was not effective in reducing the pain or loss of ROM associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness. PMID:16558582

  9. Post onset, oral rapamycin treatment delays development of mitochondrial encephalopathy only at supramaximal doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Buonvicino, Daniela; Muzzi, Mirko; Cavone, Leonardo; Guasti, Daniele; Lapucci, Andrea; Pratesi, Sara; De Cesaris, Francesco; Luceri, Francesca; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathies are fatal, infantile neurodegenerative disorders caused by a deficit of mitochondrial functioning, for which there is urgent need to identify efficacious pharmacological treatments. Recent evidence shows that rapamycin administered both intraperitoneally or in the diet delays disease onset and enhances survival in the Ndufs4 null mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy. To delineate the clinical translatability of rapamycin in treatment of mitochondrial encephalopathy, we evaluated the drug's effects on disease evolution and mitochondrial parameters adopting treatment paradigms with fixed daily, oral doses starting at symptom onset in Ndufs4 knockout mice. Molecular mechanisms responsible for the pharmacodynamic effects of rapamycin were also evaluated. We found that rapamycin did not affect disease development at clinically-relevant doses (0.5 mg kg(-1)). Conversely, an oral dose previously adopted for intraperitoneal administration (8 mg kg(-1)) delayed development of neurological symptoms and increased median survival by 25%. Neurological improvement and lifespan were not further increased when the dose raised to 20 mg kg(-1). Notably, rapamycin at 8 mg kg(-1) did not affect the reduced expression of respiratory complex subunits, as well as mitochondrial number and mtDNA content. This treatment regimen however significantly ameliorated architecture of mitochondria cristae in motor cortex and cerebellum. However, reduction of mTOR activity by rapamycin was not consistently found within the brain of knockout mice. Overall, data show the ability of rapamycin to improve ultrastructure of dysfunctional mitochondria and corroborate its therapeutic potential in mitochondrial disorders. The non-clinical standard doses required, however, raise concerns about its rapid and safe clinical transferability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules in healthy volunteers

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    Xi-Qing Yan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics (PK of ordinary tablets and sustained release capsules of diltiazem hydrochloride in human clinical trials had been studied. The PK of diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules, a new dosage form, has not been reported, although it is very important to clinical use. In this paper, we investigated the PK of diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules and the food influence in Chinese healthy volunteers. The PK parameters indicated that the diltiazem hydrochloride delay-onset sustained-release pellet capsules appeared marked characteristics of delayed and controlled release. An opened-label, randomized and parallel clinical trial was conducted in 36 Chinese healthy volunteers with single oral dose (90 mg, 180 mg or 270 mg and a multiple oral dose (90 mg d-1×6 d administration. The effect of food on the PK of one single oral dose (360 mg was investigated in 24 healthy Chinese volunteers. Plasma diltiazem concentration was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed by PKSolver (Ver 2.0. All clinical studies were conducted in the Clinical Pharmacological Center (No. JDX1999064 of Xiangya Hospital Affiliated Central South University, China. The PK parameters suggested that the new formulation had marked characteristics of delayed and controlled release of diltiazem, and food intake did not alter significantly diltiazem pharmacokinetic parameters.Embora a farmacocinética (PK do cloridrato de diltiazem nas formas de comprimidos de liberação imediata e cápsulas de liberação modificada em ensaios clínicos já tenha sido relatada, a pesquisa da PK do cloridrato de diltiazem na forma de cápsulas com peletes de liberação retardada e sustentada ainda é muito importante. Neste trabalho, propusemos avaliar a farmacocinética do cloridrato de diltiazem administrado através desta nova forma

  11. Delayed onset of tricuspid valve flow in repaired tetralogy of Fallot: an additional mechanism of diastolic dysfunction and interventricular dyssynchrony

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    Benson Lee N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diastolic dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV is common after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. While restrictive physiology in late diastole has been well known, dysfunction in early diastole has not been described. The present study sought to assess the prevalence and mechanism of early diastolic dysfunction of the RV defined as delayed onset of the tricuspid valve (TV flow after TOF repair. Methods The study population consisted of 31 children with repaired TOF (mean age ± SD, 12.3 ± 4.1 years who underwent postoperative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. The CMR protocol included simultaneous phase-contrast velocity mapping of the atrioventricular valves, which enabled direct comparison of the timing and patterns of tricuspid (TV and mitral (MV valve flow. The TV flow was defined to have delayed onset when its onset was > 20 ms later than the onset of the MV flow. The TV and MV flow from 14 normal children was used for comparison. The CMR results were correlated with the findings on echocardiography and electrocardiography. Result Delayed onset of the TV flow was observed in 16/31 patients and in none of the controls. The mean delay time was 64.81 ± 27.07 ms (8.7 ± 3.2% of R-R interval. The delay time correlated with the differences in duration of the TV and MV flow (55.94 ± 32.88 ms (r = 0.90, p Conclusions Early diastolic dysfunction with delayed onset of TV flow is common after TOF repair, and is associated with reduced RV ejection fraction. It is a further manifestation of interventricular dyssynchrony and represent an additional mechanism of ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  12. Eye tracking, cortisol, and a sleep vs. wake consolidation delay: combining methods to uncover an interactive effect of sleep and cortisol on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Kelly A; Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Payne, Jessica D

    2014-06-18

    Although rises in cortisol can benefit memory consolidation, as can sleep soon after encoding, there is currently a paucity of literature as to how these two factors may interact to influence consolidation. Here we present a protocol to examine the interactive influence of cortisol and sleep on memory consolidation, by combining three methods: eye tracking, salivary cortisol analysis, and behavioral memory testing across sleep and wake delays. To assess resting cortisol levels, participants gave a saliva sample before viewing negative and neutral objects within scenes. To measure overt attention, participants' eye gaze was tracked during encoding. To manipulate whether sleep occurred during the consolidation window, participants either encoded scenes in the evening, slept overnight, and took a recognition test the next morning, or encoded scenes in the morning and remained awake during a comparably long retention interval. Additional control groups were tested after a 20 min delay in the morning or evening, to control for time-of-day effects. Together, results showed that there is a direct relation between resting cortisol at encoding and subsequent memory, only following a period of sleep. Through eye tracking, it was further determined that for negative stimuli, this beneficial effect of cortisol on subsequent memory may be due to cortisol strengthening the relation between where participants look during encoding and what they are later able to remember. Overall, results obtained by a combination of these methods uncovered an interactive effect of sleep and cortisol on memory consolidation.

  13. Eye Tracking, Cortisol, and a Sleep vs. Wake Consolidation Delay: Combining Methods to Uncover an Interactive Effect of Sleep and Cortisol on Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Kelly A.; Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.; Payne, Jessica D.

    2014-01-01

    Although rises in cortisol can benefit memory consolidation, as can sleep soon after encoding, there is currently a paucity of literature as to how these two factors may interact to influence consolidation. Here we present a protocol to examine the interactive influence of cortisol and sleep on memory consolidation, by combining three methods: eye tracking, salivary cortisol analysis, and behavioral memory testing across sleep and wake delays. To assess resting cortisol levels, participants gave a saliva sample before viewing negative and neutral objects within scenes. To measure overt attention, participants’ eye gaze was tracked during encoding. To manipulate whether sleep occurred during the consolidation window, participants either encoded scenes in the evening, slept overnight, and took a recognition test the next morning, or encoded scenes in the morning and remained awake during a comparably long retention interval. Additional control groups were tested after a 20 min delay in the morning or evening, to control for time-of-day effects. Together, results showed that there is a direct relation between resting cortisol at encoding and subsequent memory, only following a period of sleep. Through eye tracking, it was further determined that for negative stimuli, this beneficial effect of cortisol on subsequent memory may be due to cortisol strengthening the relation between where participants look during encoding and what they are later able to remember. Overall, results obtained by a combination of these methods uncovered an interactive effect of sleep and cortisol on memory consolidation. PMID:24962611

  14. Relationship between use of labor pain medications and delayed onset of lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Jennifer N; Perrine, Cria G; Li, Ruowei

    2014-05-01

    Despite estimates that 83% of mothers in the United States receive labor pain medications, little research has been done on how use of these medications affect onset of lactation. To investigate whether use of labor pain medications is associated with delayed onset of lactation (DOL). We analyzed data from the 2005-2007 Infant Feeding Practices Study II, a longitudinal study of women from late pregnancy through the entire first year after birth (n = 2366). In multivariable logistic regression analyses, we assessed the relationship between mothers' use of labor pain medication/method and DOL (milk coming in > 3 days after delivery). Overall, 23.4% of women in our sample experienced DOL. Compared with women who delivered vaginally and received no labor pain medication, women who received labor pain medications had a higher odds of experiencing DOL: vaginal with spinal/epidural only (aOR 2.05; 95% CI, 1.43-2.95), vaginal with spinal/epidural plus another medication (aOR 1.79; 95% CI, 1.16-2.76), vaginal with other labor pain medications only ([not spinal/epidural]; aOR 1.84; 95% CI, 1.14-2.98), planned cesarean section with spinal/epidural only (aOR 2.13; 95% CI, 1.39-3.27), planned cesarean with spinal/epidural plus another medication (aOR 2.67; 95% CI, 1.35-5.29), emergency cesarean with spinal/epidural only (aOR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.34-3.51), and emergency cesarean with spinal/epidural plus another medication (aOR 3.03; 95% CI, 1.77-5.18). Mothers who received labor pain medications were more likely to report DOL, regardless of delivery method. This information could help inform clinical decisions regarding labor/delivery.

  15. Effects of Massage on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness, Swelling, and Recovery of Muscle Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zainal; Newton, Mike; Sacco, Paul; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) describes muscle pain and tenderness that typically develop several hours postexercise and consist of predominantly eccentric muscle actions, especially if the exercise is unfamiliar. Although DOMS is likely a symptom of eccentric-exercise–induced muscle damage, it does not necessarily reflect muscle damage. Some prophylactic or therapeutic modalities may be effective only for alleviating DOMS, whereas others may enhance recovery of muscle function without affecting DOMS. Objective: To test the hypothesis that massage applied after eccentric exercise would effectively alleviate DOMS without affecting muscle function. Design: We used an arm-to-arm comparison model with 2 independent variables (control and massage) and 6 dependent variables (maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness). A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t tests were used to examine differences in changes of the dependent variable over time (before, immediately and 30 minutes after exercise, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days postexercise) between control and massage conditions. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women) with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training. Intervention(s): Subjects performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic (90°·s−1) eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm on a dynamometer, separated by 2 weeks. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 3 hours after eccentric exercise; the contralateral arm received no treatment. Main Outcome Measure(s): Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic elbow flexor strength, range of motion, upper arm circumference, plasma creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness. Results: Delayed-onset muscle soreness was significantly less for the massage condition for peak

  16. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog, Liraglutide, Delays Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis in Lewis Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S.; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Landau, Anne M.; Møller, Arne; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention toward anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is, moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 μg/kg s.c.) or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n = 6, liraglutide, n = 7). Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11) or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4). Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined. Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0) by 2 days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p = 0.0003). Fourteen of 15 (93%) of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4) by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33%) of liraglutide-treated rats (p = 0.0004). Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p < 0.01) and reduced the neurodegenerative marker APP (p = 0.036) in the brain. GFAP levels were not significantly changed with drug treatment (p = 0.09). Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1

  17. TRPV1 and TRPV4 play pivotal roles in delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroki; Katanosaka, Kimiaki; Murase, Shiori; Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Mizumura, Kazue

    2013-01-01

    Unaccustomed strenuous exercise that includes lengthening contraction (LC) often causes tenderness and movement related pain after some delay (delayed-onset muscle soreness, DOMS). We previously demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are up-regulated in exercised muscle through up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and they sensitized nociceptors resulting in mechanical hyperalgesia. There is also a study showing that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are involved in DOMS. Here we examined whether and how TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 are involved in DOMS. We firstly evaluated a method to measure the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the deep tissues in wild-type (WT) mice with a modified Randall-Selitto apparatus. WT, TRPV1-/- and TRPV4-/- mice were then subjected to LC. Another group of mice received injection of murine NGF-2.5S or GDNF to the lateral gastrocnemius (LGC) muscle. Before and after these treatments the mechanical withdrawal threshold of LGC was evaluated. The change in expression of NGF, GDNF and COX-2 mRNA in the muscle was examined using real-time RT-PCR. In WT mice, mechanical hyperalgesia was observed 6-24 h after LC and 1-24 h after NGF and GDNF injection. LC induced mechanical hyperalgesia neither in TRPV1-/- nor in TRPV4-/- mice. NGF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT and TRPV4-/- mice but not in TRPV1-/- mice. GDNF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT but neither in TRPV1-/- nor in TRPV4-/- mice. Expression of NGF and COX-2 mRNA was significantly increased 3 h after LC in all genotypes. However, GDNF mRNA did not increase in TRPV4-/- mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 contributes to DOMS downstream (possibly at nociceptors) of NGF and GDNF, while TRPV4 is located downstream of GDNF and possibly also in the process of GDNF up-regulation.

  18. Delayed onset of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy due to compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutations

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    Babu Lal Kumawat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bilateral, symmetrical, noninflammatory corneal clouding (edema present at birth or shortly thereafter. This study reports on an unusual delayed presentation of CHED with compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutations. Materials and Methods: A 45-year-old female, presenting with bilateral decreased vision since childhood that deteriorated in the last 5 years, was evaluated to rule out trauma, viral illness, chemical injury, glaucoma, and corneal endothelial dystrophies. Tear sample was sent for herpes simplex viral (HSV antigen testing. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood was screened for mutations in all exons of SLC4A11 by direct sequencing. Full-thickness penetrating keratoplasty was done and corneal button was sent for histopathological examination. Results: Slit-lamp findings revealed bilateral diffuse corneal edema and left eye spheroidal degeneration with scarring. Increased corneal thickness (762 μm and 854 μm in the right and left eyes, respectively, normal intraocular pressure (12 mmHg and 16 mmHg in the right and left eyes, respectively, inconclusive confocal scan, and specular microscopy, near normal tear film parameters, were the other clinical features. HSV-polymerase chain reaction was negative. Histopathological examination revealed markedly thickened Descemet′s membrane with subepithelial spheroidal degeneration. SLC4A11 screening showed a novel variant p.Ser415Asn, reported mutation p.Cys386Arg and two polymorphisms, all in the heterozygous state and not identified in 100 controls. Conclusions: The study shows, for the first time, compound heterozygous SLC4A11 mutations impair protein function leading to delayed onset of the disease.

  19. Rad59-facilitated acquisition of Y' elements by short telomeres delays the onset of senescence.

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    Dmitri Churikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase-negative yeasts survive via one of the two Rad52-dependent recombination pathways, which have distinct genetic requirements. Although the telomere pattern of type I and type II survivors is well characterized, the mechanistic details of short telomere rearrangement into highly evolved pattern observed in survivors are still missing. Here, we analyze immediate events taking place at the abruptly shortened VII-L and native telomeres. We show that short telomeres engage in pairing with internal Rap1-bound TG1-3-like tracts present between subtelomeric X and Y' elements, which is followed by BIR-mediated non-reciprocal translocation of Y' element and terminal TG1-3 repeats from the donor end onto the shortened telomere. We found that choice of the Y' donor was not random, since both engineered telomere VII-L and native VI-R acquired Y' elements from partially overlapping sets of specific chromosome ends. Although short telomere repair was associated with transient delay in cell divisions, Y' translocation on native telomeres did not require Mec1-dependent checkpoint. Furthermore, the homeologous pairing between the terminal TG1-3 repeats at VII-L and internal repeats on other chromosome ends was largely independent of Rad51, but instead it was facilitated by Rad59 that stimulates Rad52 strand annealing activity. Therefore, Y' translocation events taking place during presenescence are genetically separable from Rad51-dependent Y' amplification process that occurs later during type I survivor formation. We show that Rad59-facilitated Y' translocations on X-only telomeres delay the onset of senescence while preparing ground for type I survivor formation.

  20. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meamarbashi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role. Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized. Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS. Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered. PMID:28265543

  1. Optogenetic delay of status epilepticus onset in an in vivo rodent epilepsy model.

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    Inna Sukhotinsky

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a devastating disease, currently treated with medications, surgery or electrical stimulation. None of these approaches is totally effective and our ability to control seizures remains limited and complicated by frequent side effects. The emerging revolutionary technique of optogenetics enables manipulation of the activity of specific neuronal populations in vivo with exquisite spatiotemporal resolution using light. We used optogenetic approaches to test the role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in the lithium-pilocarpine model of acute elicited seizures in awake behaving rats. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons were transduced in vivo with a virus carrying an enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR, a yellow light activated chloride pump, and acute seizure progression was then monitored behaviorally and electrophysiologically in the presence and absence of illumination delivered via an optical fiber. Inhibition of those neurons with illumination prior to seizure onset significantly delayed electrographic and behavioral initiation of status epilepticus, and altered the dynamics of ictal activity development. These results reveal an essential role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in this model of ictogenesis and illustrate the power of optogenetic approaches for elucidation of seizure mechanisms. This early success in controlling seizures also suggests future therapeutic avenues.

  2. Why cold water delays the onset of vestibular vertigo-An functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhi [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: zhiwang76@gmail.com; Chen Min [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Gong Xia; Huang Weining [Department of E.N.T., Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Xu Liang [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhou Cheng [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: chengzhou2000@yahoo.com

    2008-09-15

    The mechanism of vertigo is unclear. Generally, the peak time or the latency of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect is about 6 s. However, clinically, the latency of vertigo or nystagmus induced by caloric stimulations is much longer than 6 s, commonly about 30 s induced by water of 30 deg. C or 44 deg. C. We hypothesize that there is an inhibitive power or mechanism for the occurrence of vestibular vertigo, since it is an unpleasant feeling. The caloric test was performed in healthy volunteers during the BOLD fMRI scanning. The overlaid results of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) showed that three brain regions showed neural activation during vestibular dizziness while deactivation occurred in response to cold water simulation: (1) supplementary motor area (SMA); (2) middle temporal area/medial superior temporal area (MT/MST); (3) visual association area (BA19). The time course of the regions further demonstrated that the signal decreased during the cold-water stimulation and increased during the period of vertigo. We therefore further hypothesize that there may be two forces for the production of vertigo: inhibitory power (IP) and promotive power (PP). The delayed onset of vertigo was the result of the interaction between IP and PP. All of our findings, for the first time, suggested such an original mechanism of vertigo.

  3. Herbs and natural supplements in the prevention and treatment of delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Meamarbashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  Unaccustomed and intense eccentric exercise is a common cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. There are multiple remedies for the treatment of DOMS, but its clinical and laboratory pieces of evidence are scarce. Currently, the treatments proposed for DOMS are numerous and include pharmaceuticals, herbal remedies, stretching, massage, nutritional supplements, and other alternatives. To find a holistic treatment with effective pain relief and minimum side effects, complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal therapies, plays a main role.Methods: In this review, the existing published studies investigating the efficacy of herbal and natural supplementation therapies for the prevention or treatment of side effects, symptoms, and signs of DOMS are summarized.Results: Previous studies have documented the efficacy of herbal therapies to treat pain, inflammation, as well as laboratory and clinical side effects of DOMS.Conclusion: The use of herbs in DOMS seems safer and has lower side effects than pharmacotherapy. However, the potential for side effects and drug interactions should be considered.

  4. Pulsed Ultrasound Does Not Affect Recovery From Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

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    Gauri Shankar

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effects of pulsed Ultrasound (US in recovery from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS. Methods: Twelve healthy male athletes (mean age 23.83±1.697 year performed an eccentric exercise protocol of non-dominant elbow flexors to induce muscle soreness on 2 occasions separated by 3 weeks. Subjects in experimental group received pulsed US (1 MHz, intensity 0.8 W/cm2, mark space ratio 1:10, whereas control group received sham US after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. Perception of muscle soreness, active ROM and muscle strength were the parameters measured at 0 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h with the help of VAS, manual goniometer and JONEX muscles master instrument respectively. Results: Post hoc t test analysis revealed significant differences (p <0.05 between 0 h and 72 h in the parameter of ROM (t = 6.18 and muscle power (t = 2.54 as well as between 24 h and 48 h in the parameter of muscle soreness (t = 3.13 in control group. Similar differences were also observed in the experimental group. No significant inter-group differences at α level of 0.05 was observed in any parameter at any level. Conclusion: The pattern of recovery from DOMS was not influenced by the application of pulsed Ultrasound at the parameters discussed here.

  5. Optogenetic delay of status epilepticus onset in an in vivo rodent epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhotinsky, Inna; Chan, Alexander M; Ahmed, Omar J; Rao, Vikram R; Gradinaru, Viviana; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Majewska, Ania K; Cash, Sydney S

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a devastating disease, currently treated with medications, surgery or electrical stimulation. None of these approaches is totally effective and our ability to control seizures remains limited and complicated by frequent side effects. The emerging revolutionary technique of optogenetics enables manipulation of the activity of specific neuronal populations in vivo with exquisite spatiotemporal resolution using light. We used optogenetic approaches to test the role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in the lithium-pilocarpine model of acute elicited seizures in awake behaving rats. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons were transduced in vivo with a virus carrying an enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR), a yellow light activated chloride pump, and acute seizure progression was then monitored behaviorally and electrophysiologically in the presence and absence of illumination delivered via an optical fiber. Inhibition of those neurons with illumination prior to seizure onset significantly delayed electrographic and behavioral initiation of status epilepticus, and altered the dynamics of ictal activity development. These results reveal an essential role of hippocampal excitatory neurons in this model of ictogenesis and illustrate the power of optogenetic approaches for elucidation of seizure mechanisms. This early success in controlling seizures also suggests future therapeutic avenues.

  6. Quantifying delayed-onset muscle soreness: a comparison of unidimensional and multidimensional instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleather, Daniel J; Guthrie, Sharon R

    2007-06-01

    Unidimensional pain instrumentation, whereby participants simply rate the intensity of their pain on one evaluative level, has been the most common method of assessing delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). However, pain has been shown to be a multidimensional phenomenon including sensory, affective, and evaluative aspects. The aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to compare the DOMS pain responses derived from a multidimensional instrument (i.e. the McGill Pain Questionnaire--MPQ) with those using a unidimensional measure (i.e. a visual analogue scale), and (2) to identify the MPQ descriptors most commonly used to characterize DOMS among a sample of 14 male (mean age = 24.7 years, s = 4.4) and 9 female participants (mean age = 24.6 years, s = 3.5). Although the results demonstrated no significant differences between the pain ratings of the two instruments (mean values of the pain rating indices had a Spearman rank correlation coefficient of r = 1.00), suggesting no significant advantage to be gained in using the MPQ, a clearer description of DOMS emerged. The most frequently selected DOMS descriptors were "tight" (95% of participants chose this descriptor at least once), "sore" (86%), "tender" (86%), "annoying" (86%), and "pulling" (68%). These findings may be of use to researchers and sports medicine professionals in their deliberations about which instrumentation to use in quantifying DOMS and in distinguishing such pain from other, potentially more serious, musculoskeletal damage.

  7. Delayed-Onset Post-Keratoplasty Endophthalmitis Caused by Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium

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    Julio C. Hernandez-Camarena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE endophthalmitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP is very rare, the management is a challenge due to both the pattern of antibiotic resistance and the aggressive nature of the infectious process. We report the first delayed-onset case of VRE endophthalmitis after PKP. Materials and Methods: Case report of a 51-year-old female with a 7-week history of PKP who arrived at the emergency room with signs and symptoms of endophthalmitis. Initial visual acuity was light perception, and a posterior pole exam was not possible due to the intense vitreous reaction. Mode B ultrasound was used to assess the posterior pole. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and received intravitreous antibiotics. Results: Vitreous stains and cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium resistant to vancomycin. Donor rim cultures and viral PCR were negative. Treatment was carried out by repeated intravitreal antibiotics and systemic linezolid. Clinical improvement was seen after the second dose of intravitreous antibiotics and systemic linezolid, but visual acuity remained at light perception consistent with the ischemic changes observed in the posterior pole. Conclusion: VRE endophthalmitis might be associated with positive donor rim cultures. Prompt use of systemic linezolid in addition to intravitreous antibiotics is recommendable, but even with prompt treatment, visual prognosis is guarded.

  8. Delayed Onset Vascular Stiffening Induced by Eccentric Resistance Exercise and Downhill Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Fu; Chou, Chun-Chung; Cheng, Hao-Min; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-07-01

    Eccentric exercise induces muscle stiffening and soreness as well as unfavorable changes in macrovascular function. We tested the hypothesis that systemic eccentric exercise could evoke greater arterial stiffening than local eccentric resistance exercise. Twenty healthy young men were randomly assigned into either the downhill running (DR) and the eccentric resistance exercise (RE) group followed by a crossover design with an exercise and sham control trial. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), central hemodynamic measures, and biomarkers were obtained. Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase concentrations increased similarly after exercise in both groups. The cfPWV increased significantly at 48 hours post-exercise in both groups and remained elevated at 72 hours in DR. C-reactive protein (CRP) was elevated at 24 and 48 hours in DR, and 48 hours in RE. The increases in cfPWV were associated with the corresponding elevations in CRP in DR (r = 0.70, P < 0.05). There were no changes in arterial wave reflection measures. Both systemic and localized eccentric exercise modes induced delayed onset vascular stiffening with more prolonged changes observed in downhill running. The effect on arterial stiffening was associated, at least in part, with systemic inflammatory responses.

  9. A review of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness. Part I.

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    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung

    2014-12-01

    This review is focused on the effect of nutritional intervention on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) that occurs after exercise. In general, high force eccentric contractions and/or unaccustomed exercise result in DOMS attributed to reduction in performance such as muscle strength and range of motion (ROM) for both athletes and non-athletes. Nutritional intervention is one of the preventive or therapeutic ways to reduce DOMS. Previous research studies have suggested the following nutrition intervention: caffeine, omega-3 fatty acids, taurine, polyphenols, and so on. Nutritional intervention with these nutrients before and after exercise was reported to be effective in reducing DOMS. These nutritional interventions have also been reported to affect inflammatory responses and oxidative stress leading to DOMS reduction. However, other studies have reported that these nutritional interventions have no effect on DOMS. It is suggested that intake of proper nutrition intervention can effectively reduce DOMS after exercise and quickly help an athlete return to exercise or training program. In addition, nutritional intervention may help both athletes and non-athletes who engage in physical therapy or rehabilitative programs after surgery or any injurious events.

  10. Pilot Study on the Effect of Grounding on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

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    Brown, Dick; Hill, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether there are markers that can be used to study the effects of grounding on delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and subjects Eight (8) healthy subjects were exposed to an eccentric exercise that caused DOMS in gastrocnemius muscles of both legs. Four (4) subjects were grounded with electrode patches and patented conductive sheets connected to the earth. Four (4) control subjects were treated identically, except that the grounding systems were not connected to the earth. Outcome measures Complete blood counts, blood chemistry, enzyme chemistry, serum and saliva cortisols, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy and pain levels were taken at the same time of day before the eccentric exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours afterwards. Parameters consistently differing by 10% or more, normalized to baseline, were considered worthy of further study. Results Parameters that differed by these criteria included white blood cell counts, bilirubin, creatine kinase, phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratios, glycerolphosphorylcholine, phosphorylcholine, the visual analogue pain scale, and pressure measurements on the right gastrocnemius. Conclusions In a pilot study, grounding the body to the earth alters measures of immune system activity and pain. Since this is the first intervention that appears to speed recovery from DOMS, the pilot provides a basis for a larger study. PMID:20192911

  11. Effect of Vibration in Prevention of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: A Recent Update

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    Zubia Veqar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is muscular pain and discomfort experienced approximately 24-72 hours after exercise. DOMS is due to microscopic muscle fiber tears and is more common after unfamiliar high-force muscular work. It is seen predominantly post eccentric exercise. It is commonly seen after the intensity and volume of training are increased, the order of progression in exercise or a new training regime is performed. DOMS is not a disorder or disease; it can be considered as a painful type I muscle strain injury. DOMS can limit further exercise in the days following an initial training. It is a matter of concern for coaches, athletic trainers, physiotherapist, and other sports medicine personnel concerned with the athletes. Various pre- and post exercise interventions have been investigated with respect to preventing the subsequent symptoms and treating DOMS. Interventions like pharmacological treatments, therapeutic treatments using physical modalities, and interventions using nutritional supplements have been researched. In the aspect of prevention and treatment of DOMS vibration therapy is effective. Vibration therapy helps to synchronization of motor unit activity by preventing sarcoma disruption and also improves muscular strength, power development and kinesthetic awareness. Thus optimal muscle performance prevents the muscle damage, reducing the chances of DOMS. The purpose of this review is to find out the role of Vibration therapy in preventing DOMS.

  12. Central projection of pain arising from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS in human subjects.

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    Katharina Zimmermann

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is a subacute pain state arising 24-48 hours after a bout of unaccustomed eccentric muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to examine the patterns of cortical activation arising during DOMS-related pain in the quadriceps muscle of healthy volunteers evoked by either voluntary contraction or physical stimulation. The painful movement or physical stimulation of the DOMS-affected thigh disclosed widespread activation in the primary somatosensory and motor (S1, M1 cortices, stretching far beyond the corresponding areas somatotopically related to contraction or physical stimulation of the thigh; activation also included a large area within the cingulate cortex encompassing posteroanterior regions and the cingulate motor area. Pain-related activations were also found in premotor (M2 areas, bilateral in the insular cortex and the thalamic nuclei. In contrast, movement of a DOMS-affected limb led also to activation in the ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, while DOMS-related pain evoked by physical stimulation devoid of limb movement did not.

  13. Central Projection of Pain Arising from Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) in Human Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Katharina; Leidl, Caroline; Kaschka, Miriam; Carr, Richard W.; Terekhin, Pavel; Handwerker, Hermann O.; Forster, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a subacute pain state arising 24–48 hours after a bout of unaccustomed eccentric muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the patterns of cortical activation arising during DOMS-related pain in the quadriceps muscle of healthy volunteers evoked by either voluntary contraction or physical stimulation. The painful movement or physical stimulation of the DOMS-affected thigh disclosed widespread activation in the primary somatosensory and motor (S1, M1) cortices, stretching far beyond the corresponding areas somatotopically related to contraction or physical stimulation of the thigh; activation also included a large area within the cingulate cortex encompassing posteroanterior regions and the cingulate motor area. Pain-related activations were also found in premotor (M2) areas, bilateral in the insular cortex and the thalamic nuclei. In contrast, movement of a DOMS-affected limb led also to activation in the ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, while DOMS-related pain evoked by physical stimulation devoid of limb movement did not. PMID:23056613

  14. Transcutaneous photodynamic therapy delays the onset of paralysis in a murine multiple sclerosis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David W. C.; Leong, Simon; Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD, Verteporfin) and whole body irradiation, can affect the course of adoptively transferred experimental allergic (autoimmune) encephalomyelitis (EAE) in PL mice. Murine EAE is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease which serves as a model for human multiple sclerosis. Using a novel disease induction protocol, we found that mice characteristically developed EAE within 3 weeks of receipt of myelin basic protein (MBP)-sensitized, in vitro-cultured spleen or lymph node cells. However, if animals were treated with PDT (1 mg BPD/kg bodyweight and exposed to whole body 15 Joules cm2 of LED light) 24 hours after receiving these cells, disease onset time was significantly delayed. PDT-treated mice developed disease symptoms 45 +/- 3 days following cell administration whereas untreated controls were affected within 23 +/- 2 days. In contrast, application of PDT 48 or 120 hours following injection of the pathogenic cells had no significant effect upon the development of EAE. Experiments are in progress to account for the protective effect of PDT in this animal model. These studies should provide evidence on the feasibility of PDT as a treatment for human autoimmune disease.

  15. Delayed-Onset Post-Keratoplasty Endophthalmitis Caused by Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Camarena, Julio C.; Bautista-de Lucio, Victor M.; Navas, Alejandro; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo; Graue-Hernandez, Enrique O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) endophthalmitis after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) is very rare, the management is a challenge due to both the pattern of antibiotic resistance and the aggressive nature of the infectious process. We report the first delayed-onset case of VRE endophthalmitis after PKP. Materials and Methods Case report of a 51-year-old female with a 7-week history of PKP who arrived at the emergency room with signs and symptoms of endophthalmitis. Initial visual acuity was light perception, and a posterior pole exam was not possible due to the intense vitreous reaction. Mode B ultrasound was used to assess the posterior pole. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and received intravitreous antibiotics. Results Vitreous stains and cultures were positive for Enterococcus faecium resistant to vancomycin. Donor rim cultures and viral PCR were negative. Treatment was carried out by repeated intravitreal antibiotics and systemic linezolid. Clinical improvement was seen after the second dose of intravitreous antibiotics and systemic linezolid, but visual acuity remained at light perception consistent with the ischemic changes observed in the posterior pole. Conclusion VRE endophthalmitis might be associated with positive donor rim cultures. Prompt use of systemic linezolid in addition to intravitreous antibiotics is recommendable, but even with prompt treatment, visual prognosis is guarded. PMID:23185179

  16. Administration of pioglitazone alone or with alogliptin delays diabetes onset in UCD-T2DM rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Bethany P; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Graham, James L; Stanhope, Kimber; Haj, Fawaz G; Havel, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    There is a need to identify strategies for type 2 diabetes prevention. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of pioglitazone and alogliptin alone and in combination to prevent type 2 diabetes onset in UCD-T2DM rats, a model of polygenic obese type 2 diabetes. At 2 months of age, rats were divided into four groups: control, alogliptin (20 mg/kg per day), pioglitazone (2.5 mg/kg per day), and alogliptin+pioglitazone. Non-fasting blood glucose was measured weekly to determine diabetes onset. Pioglitazone alone and in combination with alogliptin lead to a 5-month delay in diabetes onset despite promoting increased food intake and body weight (BW). Alogliptin alone did not delay diabetes onset or affect food intake or BW relative to controls. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and lipid concentrations were lower and adiponectin concentrations were threefold higher in groups treated with pioglitazone. All treatment groups demonstrated improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test with an additive improvement observed with alogliptin+pioglitazone. Islet histology revealed an improvement of islet morphology in all treatment groups compared with control. Pioglitazone treatment also resulted in increased expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue, with mild elevations observed in animals treated with alogliptin alone. Pioglitazone markedly delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats through improvements of glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, islet function, and markers of adipose mitochondrial biogenesis; however, addition of alogliptin at a dose of 20 mg/kg per day to pioglitazone treatment does not enhance the prevention/delay of diabetes onset.

  17. Mobile Healthcare for Automatic Driving Sleep-Onset Detection Using Wavelet-Based EEG and Respiration Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon-Giin Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Driving drowsiness is a major cause of traffic accidents worldwide and has drawn the attention of researchers in recent decades. This paper presents an application for in-vehicle non-intrusive mobile-device-based automatic detection of driver sleep-onset in real time. The proposed application classifies the driving mental fatigue condition by analyzing the electroencephalogram (EEG and respiration signals of a driver in the time and frequency domains. Our concept is heavily reliant on mobile technology, particularly remote physiological monitoring using Bluetooth. Respiratory events are gathered, and eight-channel EEG readings are captured from the frontal, central, and parietal (Fpz-Cz, Pz-Oz regions. EEGs are preprocessed with a Butterworth bandpass filter, and features are subsequently extracted from the filtered EEG signals by employing the wavelet-packet-transform (WPT method to categorize the signals into four frequency bands: α, β, θ, and δ. A mutual information (MI technique selects the most descriptive features for further classification. The reduction in the number of prominent features improves the sleep-onset classification speed in the support vector machine (SVM and results in a high sleep-onset recognition rate. Test results reveal that the combined use of the EEG and respiration signals results in 98.6% recognition accuracy. Our proposed application explores the possibility of processing long-term multi-channel signals.

  18. TRPV1 and TRPV4 play pivotal roles in delayed onset muscle soreness.

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    Hiroki Ota

    Full Text Available Unaccustomed strenuous exercise that includes lengthening contraction (LC often causes tenderness and movement related pain after some delay (delayed-onset muscle soreness, DOMS. We previously demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF are up-regulated in exercised muscle through up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX-2, and they sensitized nociceptors resulting in mechanical hyperalgesia. There is also a study showing that transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels are involved in DOMS. Here we examined whether and how TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 are involved in DOMS. We firstly evaluated a method to measure the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the deep tissues in wild-type (WT mice with a modified Randall-Selitto apparatus. WT, TRPV1-/- and TRPV4-/- mice were then subjected to LC. Another group of mice received injection of murine NGF-2.5S or GDNF to the lateral gastrocnemius (LGC muscle. Before and after these treatments the mechanical withdrawal threshold of LGC was evaluated. The change in expression of NGF, GDNF and COX-2 mRNA in the muscle was examined using real-time RT-PCR. In WT mice, mechanical hyperalgesia was observed 6-24 h after LC and 1-24 h after NGF and GDNF injection. LC induced mechanical hyperalgesia neither in TRPV1-/- nor in TRPV4-/- mice. NGF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT and TRPV4-/- mice but not in TRPV1-/- mice. GDNF injection induced mechanical hyperalgesia in WT but neither in TRPV1-/- nor in TRPV4-/- mice. Expression of NGF and COX-2 mRNA was significantly increased 3 h after LC in all genotypes. However, GDNF mRNA did not increase in TRPV4-/- mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 contributes to DOMS downstream (possibly at nociceptors of NGF and GDNF, while TRPV4 is located downstream of GDNF and possibly also in the process of GDNF up-regulation.

  19. Dietary phosphate supplementation delays the onset of iron deficiency anemia and affects iron status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Mari; Yamamoto, Hironori; Nakahashi, Otoki; Ikeda, Shoko; Abe, Kotaro; Masuda, Masashi; Ishiguro, Mariko; Iwano, Masayuki; Takeda, Eiji; Taketani, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) plays critical roles in bone metabolism and is an essential component of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). It has been reported that animals fed a low-iron diet modulate Pi metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary Pi on iron metabolism, particularly in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), is not fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized the presence of a link between Pi and iron metabolism and tested the hypothesis by investigating the effects of dietary Pi on iron status and IDA. Wistar rats aged 4 weeks were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental dietary groups: normal iron content (Con Fe)+0.5% Pi, low-iron (Low Fe)+0.5% Pi, Con Fe+1.5% Pi, and Low Fe+1.5% Pi. Rats fed the 1.5% Pi diet for 14 days, but not for 28 days, maintained their anemia state and plasma erythropoietin concentrations within the reference range, even under conditions of low iron. In addition, plasma concentrations of 2,3-DPG were significantly increased by the 1.5% Pi diets and were positively correlated with plasma Pi concentration (r=0.779; Piron-regulated genes, including divalent metal transporter 1, duodenal cytochrome B, and hepcidin. Furthermore, iron concentration in liver tissues was increased by the 1.5% Pi in Con Fe diet. These results suggest that dietary Pi supplementation delays the onset of IDA and increases plasma 2,3-DPG concentration, followed by modulation of the expression of iron-regulated genes.

  20. The Effect of Curcumin Supplementation on Selected Markers of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS

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    Babak Nakhostin-Roohi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and pain induced by delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS can be induced by eccentric exercise or an unaccustomed activity. The condition can causes problems in exercising and for athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of 150mg curcumin supplementation immediately after intensive eccentric exercise. Evaluations were made for total antioxidant Capacity (TAC, muscle damage markers, and DOMS induced pain. Ten healthy young males (age, 25.0 ± 1.6 years; height, 178.9 ± 4.1 cm; body mass, 81.1 ± 6.8 kg; fat%, 14.2 ± 2.1 completed a double blind randomized-controlled crossover trial to estimate the effects of oral curcumin supplementation (150mg and a placebo on squat performance and DOMS following unaccustomed heavy eccentric exercise. Curcumin (CU or placebo (P was taken at the prescribed dose immediately after eccentric squat exercises; administrations were separated by a 14-day washout period. Measurements were made at the baseline, immediately, 24, 48, and 72h after exercise comprising: (a limb pain (1–10 cm visual analogue scale; VAS, (b total antioxidant capacity (TAC (c serum markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Measurements taken after exercise showed significantly reduced levels of pain, creatine kinase (CK, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST in C group compared with group P group (P<0.05. TAC remained significantly high in group C after exercise compared with levels in group P (P<0.05. The findings of this study suggest that a 150mg dose of curcumin may have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects on DOMS.

  1. Whole-Body Vibration While Squatting and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Women.

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    Dabbs, Nicole C; Black, Christopher D; Garner, John

    2015-12-01

    Research into alleviating muscle pain and symptoms in individuals after delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) has been inconsistent and unsuccessful in demonstrating a useful recovery modality. To investigate the effects of short-term whole-body vibration (WBV) on DOMS over a 72-hour period after a high-intensity exercise protocol. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University laboratory. Thirty women volunteered to participate in 4 testing sessions and were assigned randomly to a WBV group (n = 16; age = 21.0 ± 1.9 years, height = 164.86 ± 6.73 cm, mass = 58.58 ± 9.32 kg) or a control group (n = 14; age = 22.00 ± 1.97 years, height = 166.65 ± 8.04 cm, mass = 58.69 ± 12.92 kg). Participants performed 4 sets to failure of single-legged split squats with 40% of their body weight to induce muscle soreness in the quadriceps. The WBV or control treatment was administered each day after DOMS. Unilateral pressure-pain threshold (PPT), range of motion (ROM), thigh circumference, and muscle-pain ratings of the quadriceps were collected before and for 3 days after high-intensity exercise. Each day, we collected 3 sets of measures, consisting of 1 measure before the WBV or control treatment protocol (pretreatment) and 2 sets of posttreatment measures. We observed no interactions for PPT, thigh circumference, and muscle pain (P > .05). An interaction was found for active ROM (P = .01), with the baseline pretreatment measure greater than the measures at baseline posttreatment 1 through 48 hours posttreatment 2 in the WBV group. For PPT, a main effect for time was revealed (P .05). The WBV treatment approach studied did not aid in alleviating DOMS after high-intensity exercise. Further research is needed in various populations.

  2. [Are antioxidant supplements effective in reducing delayed onset muscle soreness? A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candia-Luján, Ramón; De Paz Fernández, José Antonio; Costa Moreira, Osvaldo

    2014-10-05

    Introducción: En los últimos años los suplementos antioxidantes han cobrado popularidad para contrarrestar los efectos de los radicales libres y los síntomas del daño muscular, entre los que se encuentra el dolor muscular tardío (DMT). Objetivo: realizar una revisión sistemática en diferentes bases de datos para conocer los efectos de los suplementos antioxidantes sobre el DMT. Método: Se llevó a cabo una búsqueda en las bases de datos; Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Scopus y SportDiscus y la Web Of Science (WOS). Las palabras y acrónimos usados fueron; Delayed onset muscle soreness, exercise induced muscle damage, DOMS, EIMD, antioxidant y oxidative stress. Resultados: Se identificaron 54 artículos de los cuales se recuperaron 48, todos ellos en inglés, 17 relacionados con la vitamina C y E, catorce corresponden a suplementos polifenòlicos, once a otros suplementos antioxidantes y seis a suplementos comerciales todos ellos usados para combatir, entre otras variables, el DMT. Conclusiones: Tanto las vitaminas como los suplementos comerciales presentan baja efectividad en la disminución del DMT, mientras que los polifenoles y otros suplementos antioxidantes muestran entre moderada y buena efectividad en el combate al DMT. Sin embargo, gran parte de los estudios presentan efectividad en la disminución de otros síntomas del daño muscular además de ayudar en la recuperación postejercicio.

  3. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats.

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    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-02-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2-4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration.

  4. The Effects of High-Volt Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

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    Butterfield, David Lynn; Draper, David O.; Ricard, Mark D.; Myrer, J. William; Schulthies, Shane S.; Durrant, Earlene

    1997-01-01

    Objective: We investigated three 30-minute high-volt pulsed current electrical stimulation (HVPC) treatments of 125 pps to reduce pain, restore range of motion (ROM), and recover strength loss associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: Randomized, masked comparison of three 30-minute treatment and sham HVPC regimens over a 48-hour period. Subjects: Twenty-eight college students. Measurements: Subjects performed concentric and eccentric knee extensions with the right leg to induce muscle soreness. Assessments were made before and after the exercise bout and each treatment at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Results: Three separate 2 × 3 × 2 ANOVAs were used to determine significant differences (p < .05) between days, treatments, and pre-post treatment effects and significant interaction among these variables. Scheffe post hoc tests showed no significant reduction in pain perception or improvement in loss of function at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Mean pain perception assessments (0 = no pain, 10 = severe pain) for the HVPC group were 2.9, 4.5, and 3.5 and for the sham group 3.8, 4.8, and 3.5). Mean ROM losses for the HVPC group were 9.0°, 22.3°, and 26.2°, and for the sham group were 9.5°, 23.1°, and 23.0°. Mean strength losses (1RM) for the HVPC group were 25.9, 25.7, and 20.8 lbs and for the sham group were 22.3, 22.3, and 13.8 lbs. Conclusions: HVPC as we studied it was ineffective in providing lasting pain reduction and at reducing ROM and strength losses associated with DOMS. PMID:16558426

  5. Delayed-onset muscle soreness: a pilot study to assess analgesic study design features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Neil; Desjardins, Paul J; Cosca, Evelyn B; Parulan, Cherri; Arriaga, Anne; Poole, Kelly C; Batz, Dan M; Chang, Phoebe D

    2015-06-01

    Based on a thorough review of the available literature in the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) model, we identified multiple study design characteristics that are considered to be normative in acute pain research but have not been followed in a majority of published DOMS experiments. We designed an analgesic investigation using the DOMS model that both complied with current scientifically accepted standards for the conduct of analgesic studies and demonstrated reasonable assay sensitivity. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled within-subject study compared the efficacy of topical diclofenac sodium 1% with a matching placebo in reducing pain associated with DOMS. After exercise, subjects reporting DOMS received topical diclofenac sodium gel 1% (DSG 1%) applied to one leg and placebo to the other every 6 hours for 48 hours. Pain intensity was assessed at rest, upon standing, and when walking in the 48 hours after initial drug application (T0). The primary end point was the reduction in pain intensity (SPID 24) on walking. Subjects receiving DSG 1% had less pain while walking compared with those receiving placebo at 24 hours (SPID 24 = 34.9 [22.9] and 23.6 [19.4], respectively; P = 0.032). This investigation used experimental techniques that have been vetted in the field of exercise physiology and superimposed techniques that are considered to be best practice in the field of analgesic research. Over time and with the help of colleagues in both fields of study, similar investigations will validate design features that impact the assay sensitivity of analgesic end points in DOMS models. In addition, the study confirmed the analgesic efficacy of topical DSG 1% over placebo in subjects experiencing DOMS.

  6. Temporal Pattern of the Repeated Bout Effect of Eccentric Exercise on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle A.; Kimura, Iris F.; Sitler, Michael R.; Kendrick, Zebulon V.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the repeated bout effect of eccentric exercise on perceived pain and muscular tenderness associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: Subjects completed 2 identical eccentric exercise bouts separated by 6, 7, 8, or 9 weeks. The experiment was conducted in a biokinetics research laboratory. Subjects: Sixteen male and 15 female untrained subjects (age = 24.59 ± 4.42 years, height = 171.71 ± 7.81 cm, weight = 73.00 ± 11.20 kg). Measurements: Two physiologic characteristics of DOMS were measured immediately before and 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after each eccentric exercise bout. Perceived pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and muscular tenderness was measured using a punctate tenderness gauge (PTG). Results: Two 4 × 2 × 5 (group × bout × time) analyses of variance with repeated measures on the bout and time factors were performed on the VAS and PTG data. Significant (P < .05) main effects were found for group, bout, and time for the VAS and the PTG data. No significant interactions were detected. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly less perceived pain for the 9-week group than the 8-week group. The 7-week group had significantly less and the 8-week group had significantly more muscular tenderness than any other group. Perceived pain and muscular tenderness were significantly less after exercise bout 2 than after exercise bout 1. All subjects had significantly less perceived pain and muscular tenderness pre-exercise than 0 and 24 hours after the eccentric exercise bouts. Conclusions: An effective prophylaxis for perceived pain and muscular tenderness associated with DOMS is the performance of an eccentric exercise bout 6 to 9 weeks before a similar exercise bout. PMID:12937441

  7. Delayed onset muscle soreness and perceived exertion following blood flow restriction exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Christopher R; Warmington, Stuart A

    2017-01-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptual responses to resistance exercise with either heavy-loads (80% 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]), light-loads (20% 1-RM), or light-loads in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR). Despite the use of light-loads, it has been suggested that the adoption of BFR resistance exercise may be limited due to increases in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and perceived exertion. Seventeen healthy untrained males participated in this balanced, randomized cross-over study. Following four sets of elbow-flexion exercise, participants reported ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), with DOMS also recorded for seven days following each trial. DOMS was significantly greater for low-pressure continuous BFR (until 48 h post-exercise) and high-pressure intermittent BFR (until 72 h post-exercise) compared with traditional heavy-load and light-load resistance exercise. In addition, RPE was higher for heavy-load resistance exercise and high-pressure intermittent BFR compared with low-pressure continuous BFR, with all trials greater than light-load resistance exercise. For practitioners working with untrained participants, this study provides evidence to suggest that in order to minimize the perception of effort and post-exercise muscle soreness associated with BFR resistance exercise, continuous low-pressure application may be more preferential compared with intermittent high-pressure application. Importantly, these perceptual responses are relatively short-lived (∼2 days) and have previously been shown to subside after a few exercise sessions. Combined with smaller initial training volumes (set x repetitions) this may limit RPE and DOMS to strengthen uptake and adherence, and assist in program progression for muscle hypertrophy and gains in strength.

  8. Influence of vibration on delayed onset of muscle soreness following eccentric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiary, Amir H; Safavi‐Farokhi, Ziaeddin; Aminian‐Far, Atefeh

    2007-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which may occur after eccentric exercise, may cause some reduction in ability in sport activities. For this reason, several studies have been designed on preventing and controlling DOMS. As vibration training (VT) may improve muscle performance, we designed this study to investigate the effect of VT on controlling and preventing DOMS after eccentric exercise. Methods Fifty healthy non‐athletic volunteers were assigned randomly into two experimental, VT (n = 25) and non‐VT (n = 25) groups. A vibrator was used to apply 50 Hz vibration on the left and right quadriceps, hamstring and calf muscles for 1 min in the VT group, while no vibration was applied in the non‐VT group. Then, both groups walked downhill on a 10° declined treadmill at a speed of 4 km/hour. The measurements included the isometric maximum voluntary contraction force (IMVC) of left and right quadriceps muscles, pressure pain threshold (PPT) 5, 10 and 15 cm above the patella and mid‐line of the calf muscles of both lower limbs before and the day after treadmill walking. After 24 hours, the serum levels of creatine‐kinase (CK), and DOMS level by visual analogue scale were measured. Results The results showed decreased IMVC force (P = 0.006), reduced PPT (P = 0.0001) and significantly increased mean of DOMS and CK levels in the non‐VT group, compared to the VT group (P = 0.001). Conclusion A comparison by experimental groups indicates that VT before eccentric exercise may prevent and control DOMS. Further studies should be undertaken to ascertain the stability and effectiveness of VT in athletics. PMID:17138635

  9. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Ginger Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Melissa D; Zavorsky, Gerald S; Smoliga, James M

    2015-06-01

    Ginger possesses analgesic and pharmacological properties mimicking non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We aimed to determine if ginger supplementation is efficacious for attenuating muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) following high-intensity resistance exercise. Following a 5-day supplementation period of placebo or 4 g ginger (randomized groups), 20 non-weight trained participants performed a high-intensity elbow flexor eccentric exercise protocol to induce muscle damage. Markers associated with muscle damage and DOMS were repeatedly measured before supplementation and for 4 days following the exercise protocol. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed one repetition maximum lift decreased significantly 24 h post-exercise in both groups (p < 0.005), improved 48 h post-exercise only in the ginger group (p = 0.002), and improved at 72 (p = 0.021) and 96 h (p = 0.044) only in the placebo group. Blood creatine kinase significantly increased for both groups (p = 0.015) but continued to increase only in the ginger group 72 (p = 0.006) and 96 h (p = 0.027) post-exercise. Visual analog scale of pain was significantly elevated following eccentric exercise (p < 0.001) and was not influenced by ginger. In conclusion, 4 g of ginger supplementation may be used to accelerate recovery of muscle strength following intense exercise but does not influence indicators of muscle damage or DOMS.

  10. Effects of Zingiber cassumunar(Plai cream) in the treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nuttaset Manimmanakorn; Apiwan Manimmanakorn; Disaphon Boobphachart; Worrawut Thuwakum; Wiroon Laupattarakasem; Michael J Hamlin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the effects ofZingiber cassumunar (Plai cream) in either 7% or 14%concentration on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). METHODS: Seventy-ifve untrained healthy volunteers (28 males and 47 females), performed 4 sets of 25 eccentric repetitions of the dominant quadriceps muscle on an isokinetic dynamometry machine. Participants were then randomized into 3 groups: 14% Plai cream, 7% Plai cream and placebo cream. Two grams of the cream (strips of 5-cm long) were gently rubbed into the quadriceps muscles for 5 min immediately folowing the exercise and every 8 h thereafter for 7 d in al groups. Muscle soreness, muscle strength, jump height, thigh circumference and creatine kinase were measured before and after eccentric exercise. RESULTS:Compared to the placebo cream the 14% Plai cream substantialy reduced muscle soreness over the 7 d by –82% (95% CI = –155% to –6%,P = 0.03), but had similar muscle soreness effects to 7% Plai cream (–34%, –96% to 27%,P = 0.2). Compared to the placebo cream the 7% Plai cream resulted in a smal non-signiifcant reduction in muscle soreness levels over the folowing 7 d (–40%,–116% to 36%,P = 0.3). Compared to placebo cream there was little effect of Plai cream (7% or 14%) on muscle strength, jump height, thigh circumference or creatine kinase concentration. CONCLUSION:Using 14% Plai cream over a 7-day period substantialy reduced muscle soreness symptoms compared to 7% Plai cream or a placebo cream. The authors suggest that the administration of 14% Plai cream is a useful alternative in the management of DOMS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Thai Clinical Trial Registry TCTR20140215001.

  11. Effects of Zingiber cassumunar (Plai cream) in the treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimmanakorn, Nuttaset; Manimmanakorn, Apiwan; Boobphachart, Disaphon; Thuwakum, Worrawut; Laupattarakasem, Wiroon; Hamlin, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of Zingiber cassumunar (Plai cream) in either 7% or 14% concentration on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Seventy-five untrained healthy volunteers (28 males and 47 females), performed 4 sets of 25 eccentric repetitions of the dominant quadriceps muscle on an isokinetic dynamometry machine. Participants were then randomized into 3 groups: 14% Plai cream, 7% Plai cream and placebo cream. Two grams of the cream (strips of 5-cm long) were gently rubbed into the quadriceps muscles for 5 min immediately following the exercise and every 8 h thereafter for 7 d in all groups. Muscle soreness, muscle strength, jump height, thigh circumference and creatine kinase were measured before and after eccentric exercise. Compared to the placebo cream the 14% Plai cream substantially reduced muscle soreness over the 7 d by -82% (95% CI = -155% to -6%, P = 0.03), but had similar muscle soreness effects to 7% Plai cream (-34%, -96% to 27%, P = 0.2). Compared to the placebo cream the 7% Plai cream resulted in a small non-significant reduction in muscle soreness levels over the following 7 d (-40%, -116% to 36%, P = 0.3). Compared to placebo cream there was little effect of Plai cream (7% or 14%) on muscle strength, jump height, thigh circumference or creatine kinase concentration. Using 14% Plai cream over a 7-day period substantially reduced muscle soreness symptoms compared to 7% Plai cream or a placebo cream. The authors suggest that the administration of 14% Plai cream is a useful alternative in the management of DOMS. Thai Clinical Trial Registry TCTR20140215001.

  12. Massage Alleviates Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness after Strenuous Exercise: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of massage on alleviating delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS and muscle performance after strenuous exercise.Method: Seven databases consisting of PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang were searched up to December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were eligible and the outcomes of muscle soreness, performance (including muscle maximal isometric force (MIF and peak torque and creatine kinase (CK were used to assess the effectiveness of massage intervention on DOMS.Results: Eleven articles with a total of 23 data points (involving 504 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria and were pooled in the meta-analysis. The findings demonstrated that muscle soreness rating decreased significantly when the participants received massage intervention compared with no intervention at 24 h (SMD: –0.61, 95% CI: –1.17 to –0.05, P = 0.03, 48 h (SMD: –1.51, 95% CI: –2.24 to –0.77, P < 0.001, 72 h (SMD: –1.46, 95% CI: –2.59 to –0.33, P = 0.01 and in total (SMD: –1.16, 95% CI: –1.60 to –0.72, P < 0.001 after intense exercise. Additionally, massage therapy improved MIF (SMD: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.21–0.90, P = 0.002 and peak torque (SMD: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.04–0.71, P = 0.03 as total effects. Furthermore, the serum CK level was reduced when participants received massage intervention (SMD: –0.64, 95% CI: –1.04 to –0.25, P = 0.001.Conclusion: The current evidence suggests that massage therapy after strenuous exercise could be effective for alleviating DOMS and improving muscle performance.

  13. Acute onset sleep apnea with severe transient hyperglycemia in young adult: the diagnostic dilemma and management controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajesh Mishra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disordered breathing and obstructive sleep apnea are frequently associated with hyperglycemic disorders. The common pathophysiological factors that link these disorders have been a matter of debate and current research. Abdominal adiposity and high body mass index are considered to predispose individuals to early onset of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. A young adult presenting with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea often poses a diagnostic challenge for clinicians especially when multiple risk factors coexist. It is essential to establish the exact diagnosis so that specific treatment can be initiated. The role of a non-aggressive approach in management of severe hyperglycemic conditions has been doubted. We report a case of a 33 year old man presenting to the respiratory outdoor clinic for recent onset loud snoring and increased daytime sleepiness. Routine biochemistry reports revealed hyperlipidemia and severe hyperglycemia. The patient was ambulatory and stable throughout. The subsequent investigations identified multiple stressors and the possibility of a single cause was analysed. A rapid glycemic control and amelioration of symptoms were observed based on consistent monitoring and a conservative clinical approach. The key findings and relevant review of literature are discussed in this article. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(2.000: 168-172

  14. Reduced Sleep Spindle Activity in Early-Onset and Elevated Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jorge; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sleep disturbances are common in major depressive disorder (MDD), although polysomnographic (PSG) abnormalities are more prevalent in adults than in children and adolescents with MDD. Sleep spindle activity (SPA) is associated with neuroplasticity mechanisms during brain maturation and is more abundant in childhood and adolescence than…

  15. Skin temperature and sleep-onset latency: changes with age and insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J. van

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the 24-hour day, the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness is closely related to changes in body temperatures. Changes in skin temperature may causally affect the ability to initiate and maintain sleep. First, we briefly summarize a previously proposed neurobiological mechanism that couples

  16. Skin temperature and sleep-onset latency: Changes with age and insomnia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the 24-hour day, the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness is closely related to changes in body temperatures. Changes in skin temperature may causally affect the ability to initiate and maintain sleep. First, we briefly summarize a previously proposed neurobiological mechanism that couples

  17. Skin temperature and sleep-onset latency: Changes with age and insomnia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the 24-hour day, the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness is closely related to changes in body temperatures. Changes in skin temperature may causally affect the ability to initiate and maintain sleep. First, we briefly summarize a previously proposed neurobiological mechanism that couples

  18. Skin temperature and sleep-onset latency: changes with age and insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Swaab, D.F.; Someren, E.J. van

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the 24-hour day, the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness is closely related to changes in body temperatures. Changes in skin temperature may causally affect the ability to initiate and maintain sleep. First, we briefly summarize a previously proposed neurobiological mechanism that couples

  19. Effects of light exposure and sleep displacement on dim light melatonin onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, MCM; Beersma, DGM; Korte, HJ; Van den Hoofdakker, RH

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to induce in two different ways, a phase-angle difference between the circadian pacemaker and the imposed sleep-wake cycle in humans, we intended to: (i) shift the circadian pacemaker by exposure to bright light and keep the timing of the sleep-wake cycle fixed; and (ii)

  20. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Warin Krityakiarana; Jariya Budworn; Chatchawan Khajohnanan; Nutchanad Suramas; Watcharaporn Puritasang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated) on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years) were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated) (CG), n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14). Method: Before inducing D...

  1. The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    McGRATH, RYAN P.; James R. Whitehead; CAINE, DENNIS J.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, the scientific community believed that post-exercise stretching could reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but recent reviews of studies on the topic have concluded that pre- or post-exercise static stretching has no effect on mitigating DOMS. However, the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) post-exercise stretching on preventing DOMS has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of post-exercise PNF stretc...

  2. When does this cortical area drop off? Principal component structuring of the EEG spectrum yields yes-or-no criteria of local sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putilov, Arcady A

    2014-06-22

    The traditional sleep scoring approach has been invented long before the recognition of strictly local nature of the sleep process. It considers sleep as a whole-organism behavior state, and, thus, it cannot be used for identification of sleep onset in a separate brain region. Therefore, this paper was aimed on testing whether the practically useful, simple and reliable yes-or-no criterion of sleep onset in a particular cortical region might be developed through applying principal component analysis to the electroencephalographic (EEG) spectra. The resting EEG was recorded with 2-hour intervals throughout 43-61-hour prolongation of wakefulness, and during 12 20-minute attempts to nap in the course of 24-hour wakefulness (15 and 18 adults, respectively). The EEG power spectra were averaged on 1-min intervals of each resting EEG record and on 1-min intervals of each napping attempt, respectively. Since we earlier demonstrated that scores on the first and second principal components of the EEG spectrum exhibit dramatic changes during the sleep onset period, a zero-crossing buildup of the first score and a zero-crossing decline of the second score were examined as possible yes-or-no markers of regional sleep onsets. The results suggest that, irrespective of electrode location, sleep onset criterion and duration of preceding wakefulness, a highly significant zero-crossing decline of the second principal component score always occurred within 1-minute interval of transition from wakefulness to sleep. Therefore, it was concluded that such zero-crossing decline can serve as a reliable, simple, and practically useful yes-or-no marker of drop off event in a given cortical area.

  3. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Sleep: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is sleep? Sleep is a period of unconsciousness during which ...

  4. Resveratrol exerts no effect on inflammatory response and delayed onset muscle soreness after a marathon in male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laupheimer, M W; Perry, M; Benton, S; Malliaras, P; Maffulli, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether the inflammatory response and delayed onset of muscle soreness after a marathon are altered by resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid antioxidant. Design: Double blind placebo-controlled randomised pilot study. Setting: London Marathon. Participants: Marathon race participants Interventions: 7 healthy male athletes were randomised to receive Resveratrol (600 mg Resveratrol daily for 7 days immediately before the marathon) or a placebo. Main Outcome Measurements: Blood samples taken 48 hours before and 18–32 hours after the marathon were analysed for white blood cell count (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A VAS score was taken at the same times as the blood samples to assess delayed onset muscle soreness. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of changes occurring between pre- and post- tests for WBC, CRP or VAS. Conclusions: There were no differences in immune response or delayed onset muscle soreness between resveratrol and placebo after a marathon. Further investigations are needed with longer treatment time and higher doses, analysing additional parameters such interleukins for a possible effect of resveratrol on the inflammatory response due to extensive exercise. To avoid a type II error, 17 subjects in each group would be required. PMID:25147765

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for delayed onset muscle soreness and closed soft tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M; Best, T M; Babul, S; Taunton, J; Lepawsky, M

    2005-10-19

    Soft tissue injuries (including muscle damage after unaccustomed exercise) are common and are often associated with athletic activity. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the therapeutic administration of 100% oxygen at environmental pressures greater than one atmosphere. To assess the benefits and harms of HBOT for treating soft tissue injury, including delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). We searched the following in July 2004: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, DORCTIHM and reference lists from relevant articles. Relevant journals were handsearched and researchers in the field contacted. Randomised trials comparing the effect on closed soft tissue injury (including DOMS) of therapeutic regimens which include HBOT with those that exclude HBOT (with or without sham therapy). Four reviewers independently evaluated study quality and extracted data. Most of the data presented in the review were extracted from graphs in the trial reports. Nine small trials involving 219 participants were included. Two trials compared HBOT versus sham therapy on acute closed soft tissue injuries (ankle sprain and medial collateral knee ligament injury respectively). The other seven trials examined the effect of HBOT on DOMS following eccentric exercise in unconditioned volunteers. All 32 participants of the ankle sprain trial returned to their normal activities. There were no significant differences between the two groups in time to recovery, functional outcomes, pain, or swelling. There was no difference between the two groups in knee function scores in the second acute injury trial; however, intention-to-treat analysis was not possible for this trial. Pooling of data from the seven DOMS trials showed significantly and consistently higher pain at 48 and 72 hours in the HBOT group (mean difference in pain score at 48 hours [0 to 10 worst pain] 0.88, 95% CI 0.09 to 1.67, P = 0.03) in trials where HBOT was started immediately. There were no differences between the two groups in longer

  6. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  7. Whole-Body Vibration and the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian-Far, Atefeh; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian, Saeed; Bakhtiary, Amir Hoshang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Numerous recovery strategies have been used in an attempt to minimize the symptoms of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whole-body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as a viable warm-up for athletes. However, scientific evidence to support the protective effects of WBV training (WBVT) on muscle damage is lacking. Objective: To investigate the acute effect of WBVT applied before eccentric exercise in the prevention of DOMS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 32 healthy, untrained volunteers were randomly assigned to either the WBVT (n  =  15) or control (n  =  17) group. Intervention(s): Volunteers performed 6 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic (60°/s) eccentric contractions of the dominant-limb knee extensors on a dynamometer. In the WBVT group, the training was applied using a vibratory platform (35 Hz, 5 mm peak to peak) with 100° of knee flexion for 60 seconds before eccentric exercise. No vibration was applied in the control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and pressure pain threshold were recorded at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Maximal voluntary isometric and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days postexercise. Serum creatine kinase was measured at baseline and at 1, 2, and 7 days postexercise. Results: The WBVT group showed a reduction in DOMS symptoms in the form of less maximal isometric and isokinetic voluntary strength loss, lower creatine kinase levels, and less pressure pain threshold and muscle soreness (P < .05) compared with the control group. However, no effect on thigh circumference was evident (P < .05). Conclusions: Administered before eccentric exercise, WBVT may reduce DOMS via muscle function improvement. Further investigation should be undertaken to ascertain the effectiveness of WBVT in

  8. Marine oil dietary supplementation reduces delayed onset muscle soreness after a 30 km run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baum K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Klaus Baum,1 Richard D Telford,2 Ross B Cunningham,3 1Trainingsinstitut Prof Baum, Köln, Germany; 2College of Medicine, Biology, and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3The Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia Objective: Runners are prone to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS during long distance training. This especially holds for unaccustomed training volumes at moderate to high intensities. We investigated the effects of a marine oil complex, PCSO-524®, derived from the New Zealand green-lipped mussel (formulated as Lyprinol® and Omega XL® on DOMS after a 30 km training run. Methods: Initially, peak oxygen uptake of 32 distance runners (4 female, 28 male; median age 45 years, range 28–53 was measured on a treadmill with a 1.5 km hour-1 increase every 4 minutes starting from 8.5 km hour-1. At least 1-week after this initial test, they participated in a 30 km road run at a speed corresponding to about 70% of their individual peak oxygen uptake on a flat terrain. Before and after (0, 24, and 48 hours the run, blood concentration of creatine kinase (CK were measured and pain sensation was determined (pain scale from 0 = no pain to 10 = extremely painful. Runners were then matched in pairs based on maximal CK and peak oxygen uptake, and allocated randomly into two different groups. One group was supplemented with 400 mg per day of PCSO-524® for 11 weeks, the other group with an olive oil placebo. After that period, CK and pain sensations were remeasured following a second 30 km run at the same speed and on the same terrain. Results: The general pattern of soreness in the PCSO-524® supplemented group was reduced by 1.1 units (standard error 0.41 compared to the placebo (P < 0.05, the effects being greater in lesser trained runners (P < 0.05. CK levels were positively associated with pain sensation (P < 0.05, but trends toward lower CK in the

  9. Dehydration and Symptoms of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Hyperthermic Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle A; Sweeney, Lori A; Kendrick, Zebulon V; Sitler, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    Context: Exercise in the heat produces cellular conditions that may leave skeletal muscle susceptible to exercise-induced microdamage. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a clinical model of contraction-induced skeletal muscle injury. Objective: To determine whether thermoregulation during exercise heat stress adversely affects muscle injury and the accompanying DOMS. Design: Randomized group test-retest design. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to either the euhydration/hyperthermic or dehydration/hyperthermic group. Intervention(s): Participants were randomly assigned to treadmill walking in a hot, humid environmental chamber (40°C and 75% relative humidity) with either oral rehydration (euhydration/hyperthermic) or fluid restriction (dehydration/hyperthermic). Immediately after heat exposure and while hyperthermic, participants performed an eccentrically biased downhill run to induce DOMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured DOMS characteristics pre-exercise and at 0.5, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours postexercise. Results: Treadmill exercise and exposure to the hot ambient environment elicited a 0.9% body mass loss for the euhydrated/ hyperthermic (mean rectal temperature after 60 minutes of heat-stress trial = 38.2 ± 0.4°C) and 3.3% body mass loss for the dehydrated/hyperthermic participants (mean rectal temperature after 60 minutes of heat-stress trial = 38.1 ± 0.4°C). Quadriceps perceived pain was significantly higher (F5,40 = 18.717, P ≤ .001) than baseline at 24 and 48 hours postexercise, following the classic pattern of DOMS. Overall lower extremity perceived pain was significantly higher for the dehydration/hyperthermia group than the euhydration/hyperthermia group (F1,8 = 6.713, P = .032). Punctate tenderness of the vastus lateralis for the dehydration/hyperthermic group was 6.9% higher (F5,40 = 4.462, P = .003) than for the euhydration/ hyperthermic group. No clinically

  10. Dehydration and Symptoms of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness in Normothermic Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle A; Sitler, Michael R; Kendrick, Zebulon V

    2006-01-01

    Context: A dehydrated individual who performs eccentric exercise may exacerbate skeletal muscle damage, leading to structural, contractile, and enzymatic protein denaturation, in addition to the myofiber and connective damage resulting from the eccentric muscle tension. Objective: To identify the effects of dehydration on 5 physiologic characteristics of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in normothermic men after an eccentric exercise perturbation. Design: Randomized group test-retest design. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy male volunteers randomly assigned to either a euhydration (age = 26.2 ± 4.9 years, height = 174.1 ± 6.0 cm, mass = 86.5 ± 15.3 kg) or dehydration (age = 25.8 ± 2.2 years, height = 177.2 ± 3.1 cm, mass = 84.4 ± 3.8 kg) group. Intervention(s): Subjects performed treadmill walking for 45 minutes in either a thermoneutral (euhydration) or a hot, humid (dehydration) environment. After a rest period to allow for return to the normothermic condition, DOMS was induced with a 45-minute downhill run. Main Outcome Measures: We assessed 5 physiologic characteristics of DOMS before and at intervals after the eccentric exercise. The characteristics were perceived pain of the bilateral quadriceps and overall body, bilateral punctate tenderness of the superficial quadriceps muscles, bilateral knee-flexion passive range of motion, bilateral thigh circumference, and bilateral isometric quadriceps muscle strength. Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular measures were obtained to monitor participants' heat load during exercise. Results: The experimental protocol produced a 0.9% increase in body mass of the euhydration group and a significant 2.7% decrease in body mass of the dehydration group. The downhill-running exercise perturbation induced DOMS in both the euhydrated and dehydrated participants, based on increased bilateral quadriceps and overall body perceived pain and punctate tenderness of the bilateral vastus medialis

  11. The Use of Thermal Infra-Red Imaging to Detect Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nakhli, Hani H.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Laymon, Michael S.; Berk, Lee S.

    2012-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), also known as exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD), is commonly experienced in individuals who have been physically inactive for prolonged periods of time, and begin with an unexpected bout of exercise1-4, but can also occur in athletes who exercise beyond their normal limits of training5. The symptoms associated with this painful phenomenon can range from slight muscle tenderness, to severe debilitating pain1,3,5. The intensity of these symptoms and the related discomfort increases within the first 24 hours following the termination of the exercise, and peaks between 24 to 72 hours post exercise1,3. For this reason, DOMS is one of the most common recurrent forms of sports injury that can affect an individual’s performance, and become intimidating for many1,4. For the last 3 decades, the DOMS phenomenon has gained a considerable amount of interest amongst researchers and specialists in exercise physiology, sports, and rehabilitation fields6. There has been a variety of published studies investigating this painful occurrence in regards to its underlying mechanisms, treatment interventions, and preventive strategies1-5,7-12. However, it is evident from the literature that DOMS is not an easy pathology to quantify, as there is a wide amount of variability between the measurement tools and methods used to quantify this condition6. It is obvious that no agreement has been made on one best evaluation measure for DOMS, which makes it difficult to verify whether a specific intervention really helps in decreasing the symptoms associated with this type of soreness or not. Thus, DOMS can be seen as somewhat ambiguous, because many studies depend on measuring soreness using a visual analog scale (VAS)10,13-15, which is a subjective rather than an objective measure. Even though needle biopsies of the muscle, and blood levels of myofibre proteins might be considered a gold standard to some6, large variations in some of these blood

  12. Various Treatment Techniques on Signs and Symptoms of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Dawn T.; Kimura, Iris F.; Sitler, Michael; Paolone, Albert; Kelly, John D.

    1996-01-01

    Eccentric activities are an important component of physical conditioning and everyday activities. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can result from strenuous eccentric tasks and can be a limiting factor in motor performance for several days after exercise. An efficacious method of treatment for DOMS would enhance athletic performance and hasten the return to activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to identify a treatment method which could assist in the recovery of DOMS. In the selection of treatment methods, emphasis was directed toward treatments that could be rendered independently by an individual, therefore making the treatment valuable to an athletic trainer in team setting. DOMS was induced in 70 untrained volunteers via 15 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the forearm extensor muscles on a Lido isokinetic dynamometer. All subjects performed a pilot exercise bout for a minimum of 9 weeks before data collection to assure that DOMS would be produced. Data were collected on 15 dependent variables: active and passive wrist flexion and extension, forearm girth, limb volume, visual analogue pain scale, muscle soreness index, isometric strength, concentric and eccentric wrist total work, concentric and eccentric angle of peak torque. Data were collected on six occasions: pre- and post-induced DOMS, 20 minutes after treatment, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 groups (6 treatment and 1 control). Treatments included a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, high velocity concentric muscle contractions on an upper extremity ergometer, ice massage, 10-minute static stretching, topical Amica montana ointment, and sublingual A. montana pellets. A 7 × 6 ANOVA with repeated measures on time was performed on the delta values of each of the 15 dependent variables. Significant main effects (p < .05) were found for all of the dependent variables on time only. There were no significant differences between

  13. Sleep/wake scheduling scheme for minimizing end-to-end delay in multi-hop wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madani Sajjad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a sleep/wake schedule protocol for minimizing end-to-end delay for event driven multi-hop wireless sensor networks. In contrast to generic sleep/wake scheduling schemes, our proposed algorithm performs scheduling that is dependent on traffic loads. Nodes adapt their sleep/wake schedule based on traffic loads in response to three important factors, (a the distance of the node from the sink node, (b the importance of the node's location from connectivity's perspective, and (c if the node is in the proximity where an event occurs. Using these heuristics, the proposed scheme reduces end-to-end delay and maximizes the throughput by minimizing the congestion at nodes having heavy traffic load. Simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed protocol, by comparing its performance with S-MAC and Anycast protocols. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed protocol has significantly reduced the end-to-end delay, as well as has improved the other QoS parameters, like average energy per packet, average delay, packet loss ratio, throughput, and coverage lifetime.

  14. Disturbed sleep as risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder--Data from a 10-year prospective-longitudinal study among adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Philipp S; Höfler, Michael; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Bauer, Michael; Pfennig, Andrea; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-09-01

    There is ample data suggesting that individuals with bipolar disorder more frequently suffer from disturbed sleep even when euthymic. Since sleep is a process that is crucial for affective homeostasis, disturbed sleep in healthy individuals may be a risk factor for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Utilizing data from a large cohort of adolescents and young adults, this study tests the hypothesis that disturbed sleep constitutes a risk factor for the later onset of bipolar disorder. A representative community sample of N = 3021 adolescents and young adults (baseline age 14-24) was assessed using the standardized Composite International Diagnostic Interview and followed-up prospectively up to 3 times over up to 10 years. Disturbed sleep at baseline was quantified utilizing the corresponding items from the self-report inventory SCL-90-R. The compound value (insomnia-score) as an ordinal parameter for the severity of sleep disturbances was used to assess associations with the incidence of bipolar disorder among participants free of major mental disorder at baseline (N = 1943) using odds ratios (OR) from logistic regressions. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, parental mood disorder and lifetime alcohol or cannabis dependence. Poor sleep quality significantly increased the risk for the subsequent development of bipolar disorder (OR = 1.75; p = 0.001). Regarding individual sleep items, trouble falling asleep and early morning awakening were predictive for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Disturbed sleep in persons otherwise free of major mental disorders appears to confer an increased risk for the subsequent onset of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Parent-Based Sleep Education for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth A.; Adkins, Karen W.; Reynolds, Ann; Weiss, Shelly K.; Loh, Alvin; Fawkes, Diane; Katz, Terry; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Madduri, Niru; Hundley, Rachel; Clemons, Traci

    2014-01-01

    This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent…

  16. Individuals with chronic low back pain demonstrate delayed onset of the back muscle activity during prone hip extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Osaka, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-08-01

    Prone hip extension (PHE) is commonly used in the evaluation of the stability of the lumbopelvic region. There is little evidence of difference in muscle activity onset timing between healthy individuals and individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) during PHE. The purpose of this study was to determine if individuals with and without CLBP differ in the onset time of the trunk and hip extensor muscles activity during PHE. The participants were 20 patients with CLBP and 20 healthy individuals. Electromyography data of the erector spinae, multifidus, gluteus maximus, and semitendinosus were collected during PHE using a surface electromyograph. Relative differences in the onset times between each muscle and the prime mover (i.e., the semitendinosus) were calculated. The onsets of the bilateral multifidus and contralateral erector spinae were significantly delayed in the CLBP group compared with the healthy group (pleg movement not being significantly different between the groups. The onset times of the gluteus maximus and ipsilateral erector spinae showed no significant differences between the groups. These results suggest that individuals with CLBP use an altered, and possibly inadequate, trunk muscle recruitment pattern.

  17. Interventions for preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael G; Béland, François; Julien, Dominic; Gauvin, Lise; Guindon, G Emmanuel; Roy, Denis; Campbell, Kaitryn; Comeau, Donna G; Davidson, Heather; Raina, Parminder; Sattler, Deborah; Vrkljan, Brenda

    2015-09-25

    Many systematic reviews have evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to prevent, delay, or decrease frailty symptoms, but no effort has been made to identify, map, and synthesize the findings from reviews across the full spectrum of interventions. Our objectives are to (1) synthesize findings from all existing systematic reviews evaluating interventions for preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty symptoms; (2) examine different conceptualizations of frailty that have been used in the development and implementation of interventions; and (3) inform policy by convening a stakeholder dialogue with Canadian health-system leaders. We will conduct an overview of systematic reviews to identify and synthesize all of the systematic reviews addressing interventions to preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty symptoms. To identify relevant systematic reviews, we will conduct database searches for published and grey literature as well as contact key experts and search reference lists of included reviews. Two reviewers will independently review all search results for inclusion and then conceptually map, extract key findings (including the conceptualization/definition of frailty used) and assess the methodological quality of all included reviews. We will then synthesize the findings by producing a 'gap map' (i.e. mapping reviews in a matrix according to the interventions and outcomes assessed), and narratively synthesize the key messages across reviews related to type of interventions. Following the completion of the synthesis, we will use the findings to develop an evidence brief that mobilizes the best available evidence about the problem related to preventing, delaying the onset, or decreasing the burden of frailty symptoms in older adults, policy and programmatic options to address the problem and implementation considerations. The evidence brief will then be used as the input into a stakeholder dialogue, which will

  18. Sleep and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Jessica L; Reynolds, Amy C; Ferguson, Sally A; Dawson, Drew

    2013-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic mental illness that can have a debilitating effect on daily functioning. A body of research reveals altered sleep behaviour in OCD sufferers; however, findings are inconsistent and there is no consensus on the nature of this relationship. Understanding sleep disturbance in OCD is of critical importance given the known negative consequences of disturbed sleep for mood and emotional wellbeing. A systematic literature search was conducted of five databases for studies assessing sleep in adults diagnosed with OCD. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria and qualitative data analysis methods were used to identify common themes. There was some evidence of reduced total sleep time and sleep efficiency in OCD patients. Many of the sleep disturbances noted were characteristic of depression. However, some OCD sufferers displayed delayed sleep onset and offset and an increased prevalence of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Severe OCD symptoms were consistently associated with greater sleep disturbance. While the sleep of OCD patients has not been a major focus to date, the existing literature suggests that addressing sleep disturbance in OCD patients may ensure a holistic approach to treatment, enhance treatment efficacy, mitigate relapse and protect against the onset of co-morbid psychiatric illnesses.

  19. Relationship of Morning Cortisol to Circadian Phase and Rising Time in Young Adults with Delayed Sleep Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Rea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at further elucidating the relationship between circadian phase, rising time, and the morning cortisol awakening response (CAR. The results presented here are a secondary analysis of experimental data obtained from a study of advanced sleep-wake schedules and light exposures on circadian phase advances measured by dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO. The present results demonstrate that morning CAR is strongly related to rising time and more weakly related to DLMO phase.

  20. Relationship between physical exercise, muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical exercise involving muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS. A literature review of national and international periodicals was carried out. Muscle structures (membranes, Z-line, sarcomeres, T tubules and myofi brils can become damaged as a result of an imposed mechanical overload. Of greatest note are exercises requiring strength, particularly when muscular action is eccentric. Damage to skeletal musculature can be analyzed by direct methods (muscle biopsy or magnetic resonance or by indirect methods (maximum voluntary movement, subjective pain perception scales, analysis of enzyme and protein concentrations in blood. Creatine kinase (CK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, myosin heavy chain fragments, troponin-I and myoglobin can be used as indirect markers of muscle damage. Both DOMS and muscle damage can be infl uenced by the type of activity, with emphasis on eccentric muscle movements, type of exercise, velocity of the movement, interval period between series, the level of individual fi tness, this last primarily affecting beginners. When myotrauma occurs, muscle damage repair is initiated by leukocytes migrating to the injured area, although, the histamines, prostaglandins, kinins and K+ produced by neutrophils and macrophages stimulate free nerve endings in the muscle, causing the DOMS. Despite this apparent relationship between muscle damage and DOMS, it is not possible toestablish a linear relationship between these two variables, since published data are divergent. RESUMO O objetivo desse estudo foi investigar as relações do exercício físico com o dano muscular e dor muscular de início tardio (DMIT. Para tanto, foi realizada uma revisão de literatura de periódicos nacionais e internacionais. O dano muscular pode ocorrer em estruturas musculares (membranas, linha Z, sarcolema, túbulos T e miofi brilas em função da sobrecarga mec

  1. Why the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) should be measured before treatment of patients with circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzer, Henry; Smits, Marcel G; Duffy, Jeanne F; Curfs, Leopold M G

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) may include light therapy, chronotherapy and melatonin. Exogenous melatonin is increasingly being used in patients with insomnia or CRSD. Although pharmacopoeias and the European food safety authority (EFSA) recommend administering melatonin 1-2 h before desired bedtime, several studies have shown that melatonin is not always effective if administered according to that recommendation. Crucial for optimal treatment of CRSD, melatonin and other treatments should be administered at a time related to individual circadian timing (typically assessed using the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO)). If not administered according to the individual patient's circadian timing, melatonin and other treatments may not only be ineffective, they may even result in contrary effects. Endogenous melatonin levels can be measured reliably in saliva collected at the patient's home. A clinically reliably DLMO can be calculated using a fixed threshold. Diary and polysomnographic sleep-onset time do not reliably predict DLMO or circadian timing in patients with CRSD. Knowing the patient's individual circadian timing by assessing DLMO can improve diagnosis and treatment of CRSD with melatonin as well as other therapies such as light or chronotherapy, and optimizing treatment timing will shorten the time required to achieve results.

  2. Sleep Habits and Sleep Problems in Healthy Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, C L Srinivasa; Bharti, Bhavneet; Malhi, Prahbhjot; Khadwal, Alka

    2015-07-01

    To describe the sleep patterns and problems in children aged between 12 and 36 mo of age. This cross sectional survey was collected over a span of 1 y in Advanced Pediatric Centre, PGIMER, Chandigarh and crèches of Chandigarh. Children in the age group of 12 to 36 mo were included in study. Children with chronic illness, developmental delay, seizure disorder and lack of consent were excluded. A total of 368 children were enrolled. Main outcome measures were sleep duration over 1 to 3 y of life; sleep behavior at onset, during and waking of sleep and parent reported sleep problems and their predictors. The average duration of sleep was 12.5 h (S.D = 1.9). The mean total sleep duration and mean day time sleep duration decreased, while mean night time sleep increased as the age advanced from 12 to 36 mo. Following were the frequency of sleep habits seen in the index study; bed time routine was seen only in 68(18.5 %), a regular bed time ritual was seen in 281(76.4 %), 329(89.4 %) children frequently required 0-20 min time to fall asleep, 11(3 %) parents used sleep inducing drugs. Night waking (1 to 3 times a night) was seen in 297(80.7 %) and its frequency declined with age. Parent reported sleep problems were seen in 12.8 % (47/368). Lack of co-sleeping and night waking were considered as strongest predictors of parent reported sleep problems. Toddlers' sleep duration, night waking behavior, and day time naps decrease as the age progress while night time sleep duration increases with age. Lack of co-sleeping and night waking are considered as strongest predictors of parent reported sleep problems.

  3. Predominance of distal skin temperature changes at sleep onset across menstrual and circadian phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari; Boudreau, Philippe; Varin, France; Boivin, Diane B

    2011-06-01

    Menstrual cycle-associated changes in reproductive hormones affect body temperature in women. We aimed to characterize the interaction between the menstrual, circadian, and scheduled sleep-wake cycles on body temperature regulation. Eight females entered the laboratory during the midfollicular (MF) and midluteal (ML) phases of their menstrual cycle for an ultradian sleep-wake cycle procedure, consisting of 36 cycles of 60-minute wake episodes alternating with 60-minute nap opportunities, in constant bed-rest conditions. Core body temperature (CBT) and distal skin temperature (DT) were recorded and used to calculate a distal-core gradient (DCG). Melatonin, sleep, and subjective sleepiness were also recorded. The circadian variation of DT and DCG was not affected by menstrual phase. DT and DCG showed rapid, large nap episode-dependent increases, whereas CBT showed slower, smaller nap episode-dependent decreases. DCG values were significantly reduced for most of the wake episode in an overall 60-minute wake/60-minute nap cycle during ML compared to MF, but these differences were eliminated at the wake-to-nap lights-out transition. Nap episode-dependent decreases in CBT were further modulated as a function of both circadian and menstrual factors, with nap episode-dependent deceases occurring more prominently during the late afternoon/evening in ML, whereas nap episode-dependent DT and DCG increases were not significantly affected by menstrual phase but only circadian phase. Circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion, DT, and DCG were significantly phase-advanced relative to CBT and sleep propensity rhythms. This study explored how the thermoregulatory system is influenced by an interaction between circadian phase and vigilance state and how this is further modulated by the menstrual cycle. Current results agree with the thermophysiological cascade model of sleep and indicate that despite increased CBT during ML, heat loss mechanisms are maintained at a similar level

  4. EFFECT OF STATIC STRETCHING AND LPG SYSTEM TECHNIQUE ON TREATMENT AND PREVENT OF DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Vahideh Kianmarz; Afshar Jafari

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was done in order to determining effect of static stretching and LPG systemtechnique on treatment and prevent of delayed onset muscle soreness.Methods: In order to thirtynon-athletic females [aged 21.8±1.15 years; fat percent 23.69±1.43 kg; BMI 21.79±1.52 kg/m2]were voluntarily selected and randomly assigned to equal three groups. The stretching groupexecuted a static stretch of hamstrings muscle for 20 min pre exercise and 12 hours postexercise. Hold each stretch 30 secon...

  5. Delaying the onset of Alzheimer disease: bilingualism as a form of cognitive reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen; Freedman, Morris

    2010-11-09

    There is strong epidemiologic evidence to suggest that older adults who maintain an active lifestyle in terms of social, mental, and physical engagement are protected to some degree against the onset of dementia. Such factors are said to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the accumulation of amyloid and other brain pathologies. We present evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a further factor contributing to cognitive reserve. Data were collected from 211 consecutive patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer disease (AD). Patients' age at onset of cognitive impairment was recorded, as was information on occupational history, education, and language history, including fluency in English and any other languages. Following this procedure, 102 patients were classified as bilingual and 109 as monolingual. We found that the bilingual patients had been diagnosed 4.3 years later and had reported the onset of symptoms 5.1 years later than the monolingual patients. The groups were equivalent on measures of cognitive and occupational level, there was no apparent effect of immigration status, and the monolingual patients had received more formal education. There were no gender differences. The present data confirm results from an earlier study, and thus we conclude that lifelong bilingualism confers protection against the onset of AD. The effect does not appear to be attributable to such possible confounding factors as education, occupational status, or immigration. Bilingualism thus appears to contribute to cognitive reserve, which acts to compensate for the effects of accumulated neuropathology.

  6. A Longitudinal Analysis of PTSD Symptom Course: Delayed-Onset PTSD in Somalia Peacekeepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Matt J.; Bolton, Elisa E.; Litz, Brett T.

    2004-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) typically follows an acute to chronic course. However, some trauma victims do not report significant symptoms until a period of time has elapsed after the event. Although originally dismissed as an artifact of retrospective methodologies, recent prospective studies document apparent instances of delayed-onset…

  7. Progress Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness%延迟性肌肉酸痛研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志锋

    2015-01-01

    机体大强度或不习惯的运动,尤其是离心运动,常常会引起肌肉的延迟性酸痛,并在运动后的2-3天达到高峰,伴有一系列的肌肉结构、组织学及生物化学的改变,严重时会影响到人们健身及训练的效果。延迟性肌肉酸痛是体育运动中一种常见的现象。有关其研究已有百年的历史,但其产生的机制至今仍不清楚,也没有找到真正有效地清除延迟性肌肉酸痛的方法。文章运用文献资料法对国内有关延迟性肌肉酸痛的发生机制及治疗方法进行综述,并提出一些研究的不足和展望,为延迟性肌肉酸痛的进一步研究提供参考。%Intensive body strength exercise and unaccustomed exercise especially centrifugal movement will inevitably lead to delayed muscle soreness which will go at peak after 2 to 3 days. The symptom also appears as the muscle structure and biochemistry changes happens. It will leave harmful consequences in people’s training. Delayed onset muscle soreness is a common sports phenomenon. As for the research, it has lasts for centuries but the mechanism is still unclear as to what produces the harmful body reaction and how to find a truly effective way to remove DOMS . In this paper, by appliance of literature reviews on the mechanisms and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness related to the occurrence of domestic reviewed, hatefully it will make up a number of shortcomings and deliver outlook studies providing a reference for further study of delayed onset muscle soreness.

  8. Long-term history and immediate preceding state affect EEG slow wave characteristics at NREM sleep onset in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, N; Mckillop, L E; Fisher, S P; Oliver, P L; Vyazovskiy, V V

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of cortical activity across the 24-h day and at vigilance state transitions is regulated by an interaction between global subcortical neuromodulatory influences and local shifts in network synchrony and excitability. To address the role of long-term and immediate preceding history in local and global cortical dynamics, we investigated cortical EEG recorded from both frontal and occipital regions during an undisturbed 24-h recording in mice. As expected, at the beginning of the light period, under physiologically increased sleep pressure, EEG slow waves were more frequent and had higher amplitude and slopes, compared to the rest of the light period. Within discrete NREM sleep episodes, the incidence, amplitude and slopes of individual slow waves increased progressively after episode onset in both derivations by approximately 10-30%. Interestingly, at the beginning of NREM sleep episodes slow waves in the frontal and occipital derivations frequently occurred in isolation, as quantified by longer latencies between consecutive slow waves in the two regions. Notably, slow waves during the initial period of NREM sleep following REM sleep episodes were significantly less frequent, lower in amplitude and exhibited shallower slopes, compared to those that occurred in NREM episodes after prolonged waking. Moreover, the latencies between consecutive frontal and occipital NREM slow waves were substantially longer when they occurred directly after REM sleep compared to following consolidated wakefulness. Overall these data reveal a complex picture, where both time of day and preceding state contribute to the characteristics and dynamics of slow waves within NREM sleep. These findings suggest that NREM sleep initiates in a more "local" fashion when it occurs following REM sleep episodes as opposed to sustained waking bouts. While the mechanisms and functional significance of such a re-setting of brain state after individual REM sleep episodes remains to be

  9. Delayed onset renal failure in a patient on tenofovir based antiretroviral regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Murali Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenofovir is recommended as one of the first line agents in combination with other antiretroviral drugs for management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. It is known to cause renal failure after exposure for a median duration of 5 months. We report tenofovir induced adverse drug reaction in a 56-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have HIV 1 infection since 10 years. The combination antiretroviral treatment included tenofovir, emtricitabine and ritonavir/lopinavir regimen since the last 6 years. She presented with recent onset renal failure and renal biopsy showed interstitial nephritis which could probably attributable to tenofovir.

  10. Sleep deprivation worsens inflammation and delays recovery in a mouse model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yueming; Preuss, Fabian; Turek, Fred W; Jakate, Shriram; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2009-06-01

    We recently showed that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) report significantly more sleep disturbances. To determine whether disrupted sleep can affect the severity of inflammation and the course of IBD, we used an animal model of colonic inflammation to determine the effects of acute and chronic intermittent sleep deprivation on the severity of colonic inflammation and tissue damage in colitis and recovery from this damage. Acute sleep deprivation (ASD) consisted of 24h of forced locomotor activity in a mechanical wheel rotating at a constant speed. Chronic intermittent sleep deprivation (CISD) consisted of an acute sleep deprivation episode, followed by additional sleep deprivation periods in the wheel for 6h every other day throughout the 10day study period. To induce colitis, mice were given 2% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their daily drinking water for 7days. The development and severity of colitis were monitored by measuring weight loss and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity daily and colon histology scores 10days after initiation of colitis. ASD or CISD did not cause colonic inflammation in vehicle-treated mice. Changes in daily body weight, tissue MPO levels and colon histopathology score were similar between mice that were sleep deprived and controls. Daily DSS ingestion caused colitis in mice. ASD worsened colonic inflammation: tissue MPO levels in ASD/DSS-treated mice were significantly higher than in DSS-treated mice that were not sleep deprived. However, the worsening of colonic inflammation by ASD was not enough to exacerbate clinical manifestations of colitis such as weight loss. In contrast, the deleterious effects of CISD were severe enough to cause worsening of histological and clinical manifestations of colitis. The deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on severity of colitis appeared to be due to both increased colonic inflammation and a decrease in the ability of mice to recover from DSS-induced colonic injury. Both acute

  11. Onset of Coagulation Function Recovery Is Delayed in Severely Injured Trauma Patients with Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Belinda H; Connelly, Christopher R; Fair, Kelly A; Holcomb, John B; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Bulger, Eileen M; Schreiber, Martin A

    2017-07-01

    Altered coagulation function after trauma can contribute to development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Severe trauma impairs coagulation function, but the trajectory for recovery is not known. We hypothesized that enhanced, early recovery of coagulation function increases VTE risk in severely injured trauma patients. Secondary analysis was performed on data from the Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratio (PROPPR) trial, excluding patients who died within 24 hours or were on pre-injury anticoagulants. Patient characteristics, adverse outcomes, and parameters of platelet function and coagulation (thromboelastography) were compared from admission to 72 hours between VTE (n = 83) and non-VTE (n = 475) patients. A p value < 0.05 indicates significance. Despite similar patient demographics, VTE patients exhibited hypercoagulable thromboelastography parameters and enhanced platelet function at admission (p < 0.05). Both groups exhibited hypocoagulable thromboelastography parameters, platelet dysfunction, and suppressed clot lysis (low clot lysis at 30 minutes) 2 hours after admission (p < 0.05). The VTE patients exhibited delayed coagulation recovery (a significant change compared with 2 hours) of K-value (48 vs 24 hours), α-angle (no recovery), maximum amplitude (24 vs 12 hours), and clot lysis at 30 minutes (48 vs 12 hours). Platelet function recovery mediated by arachidonic acid (72 vs 4 hours), ADP (72 vs 12 hours), and collagen (48 vs 12 hours) was delayed in VTE patients. The VTE patients had lower mortality (4% vs 13%; p < 0.05), but fewer hospital-free days (0 days [interquartile range 0 to 8 days] vs 10 days [interquartile range 0 to 20 days]; p < 0.05) and higher complication rates (p < 0.05). Recovery from platelet dysfunction and coagulopathy after severe trauma were delayed in VTE patients. Suppressed clot lysis and compensatory mechanisms associated with altered coagulation that can potentiate VTE formation require additional

  12. Sleep Habits of Elementary and Middle School Children in South Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Surani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sleep difficulties, including insufficient sleep and inadequate sleep hygiene, have been prevalent among children. Sleep deprivation can lead to poor grades, sleepiness, and moodiness. We undertook this study to assess the prevalence of sleep abnormalities among elementary and middle school students in South Texas and how the groups compare with one another. Method. After approval from the appropriate school district for a sleep education program, a baseline survey was taken of elementary and middle school students, using the Children’s Sleep Habit Questionnaire-Sleep Self-Report Form, which assessed the domains of bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, sleep duration, night awakening, and daytime sleepiness. Results. The survey was completed by 499 elementary and 1008 middle school children. Trouble sleeping was reported by 43% in elementary school, compared with 29% of middle school children. Fifty percent of middle school children did not like sleeping, compared with 26% in elementary school. Bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, and nighttime awakening were more common among elementary school students. Daytime sleepiness was more common among the middle school children when compared to elementary school children. Conclusions. Sleep abnormalities are present in elementary school children with changes in sleep habits into middle school.

  13. The effect of passive stretching on delayed onset muscle soreness, and other detrimental effects following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Kanstrup, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure if passive stretching would influence delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), dynamic muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase concentration (CK) and the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr/P(i)) following eccentric exercise. Seven healthy......, CK and muscle pain were measured before the eccentric exercise (day 0) and the following 7 d. In the second experiment daily passive stretching (3 times of 30 s duration, with a pause of 30 s in between) of m. quadriceps was included in the protocol. The stretching was performed before...... subjects reported pain in the right m. quadriceps with a peak 48 h after exercise. There was no difference in the reported variables between experiments one and two. It is concluded that passive stretching did not have any significant influence on increased plasma-CK, muscle pain, muscle strength...

  14. A COMPARISON OF TOPICAL MENTHOL TO ICE ON PAIN, EVOKED TETANIC AND VOLUNTARY FORCE DURING DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Pramod; Grover, Varun; Topp, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Pain can adversely affect muscle functioning by inhibiting muscle contractions. Delayed onset muscle soreness was used as a tool to ascertain whether a topical menthol-based analgesic or ice was more effective at reducing pain and permitting greater muscular voluntary and evoked force. Methods: Sixteen subjects were randomized to receive either a topical gel containing 3.5% menthol or topical application of ice to the non-dominant elbow flexors two days following the performance of an exercise designed to induce muscle soreness. Two days later, DOMS discomfort was treated with a menthol based analgesic or ice. Maximum voluntary contractions and evoked tetanic contractions of the non-dominant elbow flexors were measured at baseline prior to inducing muscle soreness (T1), two days following inducing DOMS after 20 (T2), 25 (T3) and 35 (T4) minutes of either menthol gel or ice therapy. Pain perception using a 10-point visual analog scale was also measured at these four data collection points. Treatment analysis included a 2 way repeated measures ANOVA (2 × 4). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness decreased (p = 0.04) voluntary force 17.1% at T2 with no treatment effect. Tetanic force was 116.9% higher (p<0.05) with the topical analgesic than ice. Pain perception at T2 was significantly (p=0.02) less with the topical analgesic versus ice. Conclusions: Compared to ice, the topical menthol-based analgesic decreased perceived discomfort to a greater extent and permitted greater tetanic forces to be produced. Level of Evidence: Level 2b PMID:22666646

  15. Study of the Effectiveness of Vibration in Reduction of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Resulting after Therapeutic Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayam-Bashi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS is a common strain resulting during therapeutic exercise with eccentric contractions. This pain can result in loss of interest by the patient and eventually in cancellation of the routine. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether vibration could have an affect on delayed onset muscle soreness. We hypothesized that the vibration training would decrease DOMS. Methods: Subjects comprised of 30 male athletes aged 18-26 years. The athletes were involved in regular sports activities since at least three years. Subjects were assigned randomly into two VT (n=15 and Non-VT (n=15 groups. The measurements included the flexed knee angle (FANG, pressure pain threshold (PPT, muscle soreness (SOR of right quadriceps muscle and maximal isometric force (MIF of both quadriceps muscles together (Base-line. A vibrator was used to apply 50 Hz vibration on the left and right quadriceps muscles for 1 min in the VT group. Then both groups trained eccentric exercise. All parameters were determined again 24 hours post-exercise (After- activity. Results: All subjects showed a loss in MIF, decrease in PPT, FANG and increase in SOR 24h after eccentric exercise (p=0/000. But the parameters were statistically significantly different in the VT and Non-VT groups [MIF (p=0/000, PPT (p=0/001, FANG (p=0/02, SOR (p=0/003]. Conclusion: Therapeutic exercise with eccentric contractions results in DOMS, but vibration training before exercise is effective and beneficial in decreasing DOMS.

  16. Sleep patterns in children with and without autism spectrum disorders: developmental comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Danelle; Carollo, Tanner M; Lewin, Michael; Hoffman, Charles D; Sweeney, Dwight P

    2014-07-01

    The present study examined age-related changes in the sleep of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) compared to age-related changes in the sleep of typically developing (TD) children. Participants were 108 mothers of children with ASD and 108 mothers of TD children. Participants completed a questionnaire on children's overall sleep quality that also tapped specific sleep-domains (i.e., bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, sleep duration, sleep anxiety, night wakings, parasomnias, disordered breathing, daytime sleepiness). Results confirm significantly poorer sleep quantity and quality in children with ASD, particularly children age 6-9 years. Unlike TD children, the sleep problems of children with ASD were unlikely to diminish with age. Our findings suggest that it is important to exam specific domains of sleep as well as overall sleep patterns. Finding of significant age-related interactions suggests that the practice of combining children from wide age-ranges into a single category obfuscates potentially important developmental differences.

  17. Flexion Relaxation Ratio Not Responsive to Acutely Induced Low Back Pain from a Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Maggie E.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) has been suggested as a measure of muscular performance in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the FRR was responsive to acute LBP produced from a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol. Methods. Fifty-one pain-free volunteers performed DOMS to induce LBP. Current pain intensity, trunk flexion range of motion (ROM), and passive straight leg raise (SLR) were measured at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS. Participants were categorized into pain groups based on reported current pain intensity. Changes in FRR, trunk flexion ROM, and SLR ROM were examined using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. Pain group was not found to have a significant effect on FRR (F1,29 = 0.054, P = 0.818), nor were there any two-way interactions for changes in FRR. The pain group had decreased trunk flexion ROM compared to the minimal pain group (F1,38 = 7.21, P = 0.011), but no decreases in SLR ROM (F1,38 = 3.51, P = 0.057) over time. Interpretation. There were no differences in FRR based on reported pain intensity of LBP from a DOMS protocol. The responsiveness of FRR might be limited in patients with acute onset LBP of muscular origin. PMID:27335879

  18. Sleep wake pattern analysis: Study of 131 medical students

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    Nita Ninama

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Sleep is part of the rhythm of life. Without a good sleep the mind is less adapts, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep wake cycle of the students is quite different and characterized by delayed onset, partial sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, insufficient sleep duration and occurrence of napping episodes during the day The aim of the present study is to know sleep wake pattern in medical student, role of residence and individual characterization on sleep wake cycle.Design:Cross sectional Study. Participants:There are 131 first year medical students of the Smt. NHL Municipal Medical College.Measurements and Results:All the students answered the Portuguese version of the Horne & Östberg Morningness and Eveningness questionnaire, the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI and kept a sleep diary for two weeks.We analyzed 131 students, 51 residing at hostel and 80 residing at home, with mean PSQI 6.55 and 7.48 respectively (PSQI >5 = poor sleep quality. Sleep diary analysis of morning and evening type group shows delayed sleep onset in later group (23.45 ± 1.14 vs. 1.15 ± 0.50 hrs. We also found reduced sleep duration during weekdays and extended sleep duration during weekends in evening type students and vice-a-versa in morning type of students.Conclusion:We found poor sleep quality in medical student irrespective of residence. Poor sleep quality and sleep deprivation is more pronounced in evening type of the students and partial compensation found on weekends. Morning type students adjust their life better than evening type and manage their academic schedule.

  19. Delayed onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Olig1 deficient mice.

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    Xiaoli Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Olig1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that is essential for oligodendrogenesis and efficient remyelination. However, its role in neurodegenerative disorders has not been well-elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of Olig1 deficiency on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. We show that the mean disease onset of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in Olig1(-/- mice is significantly slower than wide-type (WT mice (19.8 ± 2.2 in Olig1(-/- mice and 9.5 ± 0.3 days in WT mice. In addition, 10% of Olig1(-/- mice did not develop EAE by the end of the observation periods (60 days. The severity of EAE, the extent of demyelination, and the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes in spinal cords, were significantly milder in Olig1(-/- mice compared with WT mice in the early stage. Moreover, the visual function, as assessed by the second-kernel of multifocal electroretinograms, was better preserved, and the number of degenerating axons in the optic nerve was significantly reduced in Olig1(-/- mice. Interestingly, Olig1 deficiency had no effect on T cell response capability, however, it reduced the expression of myelin proteins such as MOG, myelin basic protein (MBP and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG. The expression of Olig2 remained unchanged in the optic nerve and brain, and it was reduced in the spinal cord of Olig1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the Olig1 signaling pathways may be involved in the incidence rate and the severity of neurological symptoms in MS.

  20. "ATP1A3" Mutations in Infants: A New Rapid-Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism Phenotype Characterized by Motor Delay and Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashear, Allison; Mink, Jonathan W.; Hill, Deborah F.; Boggs, Niki; McCall, W. Vaughn; Stacy, Mark A.; Snively, Beverly; Light, Laney S.; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Morrison, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    We report new clinical features of delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia in two young children with mutations (R756H and D923N) in the "ATP1A3" gene. In adults, mutations in "ATP1A3" cause rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP, DYT12) with abrupt onset of fixed dystonia. The parents and children were examined and videotaped, and…

  1. "ATP1A3" Mutations in Infants: A New Rapid-Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism Phenotype Characterized by Motor Delay and Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashear, Allison; Mink, Jonathan W.; Hill, Deborah F.; Boggs, Niki; McCall, W. Vaughn; Stacy, Mark A.; Snively, Beverly; Light, Laney S.; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Morrison, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    We report new clinical features of delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia in two young children with mutations (R756H and D923N) in the "ATP1A3" gene. In adults, mutations in "ATP1A3" cause rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP, DYT12) with abrupt onset of fixed dystonia. The parents and children were examined and videotaped, and…

  2. Electrical Resistance as A Measure of Soft Tissue Injuryfrom Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy Hui; Jerrold Petrofsky; Iman Akef Khowailed

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of muscle damage relies commonly on subjective sensation of pain. The purpose of this research was to test thevalidity of microcurrent conductance on skin over injured tissue to quantify soft tissue injury and recovery following heavy exercisecompared to other indexes of muscle soreness. A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, 1-week trial on 60 subjects.Setting-University Interventions: Subjects did 3 sets of squats for 5 min each. There were 3 groups of 20 subjects. One did nothing andone had heat applied for 8 h post exercise. The final group had heat 24 h after exercise. Tissue resistance and muscle strength force tomove the knee, analog visual pain scale. In the control group, microcurrent continually decreased, eventually decreasing 32% by thethird day post exercise. When heat was given immediately following exercise, microcurrent was 26% greater (P 〈 0.001). The painscale rose to 3.1/10 as opposed to 5.4/10 for controls. Strength and muscle elasticity stayed mostly constant after heat as opposed to a28% decrease in strength and increase in stiffness in the control subjects. For 24 h delayed heat, microcurrent was 14% greater(P 〈 0.02), and was unchanged for the first 24 h when no therapy was given. Pain scale rose to 4.8/10. Stiffness was unchanged whilemuscle strength decreased the same as controls. Microcurrent shows agreement with loss of strength, and stiffness from DOMS but notthe subjective pain measure. It appears that microcurrent is a good measure of muscle damage.

  3. Buying time: A rationale for examining the use of circadian rhythm and sleep interventions to delay progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's disease

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    Glenn J Landry

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As of 2010, the worldwide economic impact of dementia was estimated at $604 billion USD; and without discovery of a cure or effective interventions to delay disease progression, dementia’s annual global economic impact is expected to surpass $1 trillion USD as early as 2030. Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the leading cause of dementia accounting for over 75% of all cases. Toxic accumulation of amyloid beta (AB, either by overproduction or some clearance failure, is thought to be an underlying mechanism of the neuronal cell death characteristic of AD – though this amyloid hypothesis has been increasingly challenged in recent years. A compelling alternative hypothesis points to chronic neuroinflammation as a common root in late-life degenerative diseases including AD. Apolipoprotein-E (APOE genotype is the strongest genetic risk factor for AD: Individuals with APOE-e4 genotype accumulate more AB, are at high risk of developing AD, and almost half of all AD patients have at least one e4 allele. Recent studies suggest a bidirectional relationship exists between sleep and AD pathology. Sleep may play an important role in AB clearance and getting good quality sleep versus poor quality sleep might reduce the AD risk associated with the e4 allele. Taken together, these findings are particularly important given the sleep disruptions commonly associated with AD and the increased burden disrupted sleep poses for AD caregivers. The current review aims to: 1 Identify individuals at high risk for dementia who may benefit most from sleep interventions; 2 Explore the role poor sleep quality plays in exacerbating AD type dementia; 3 Examine the science of sleep interventions to date; and 4 Provide a road map in pursuit of comprehensive sleep interventions, specifically targeted to promote cognitive function and delay progression of dementia.

  4. Aging related erectile dysfunction—potential mechanism to halt or delay its onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F.; Rajfer, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) will visit every man at some time in his life. The age at when that knock on the door is heard is totally dependent on one’s genetics as well as other extrinsic factors. Unlike guests who come for a visit and then leave, once ED shows up it tends to hang around forever. To add insult to injury, the longer ED hangs around, the worse it will get. It is estimated that by the time a man is in his 40’s, he has about a 40% chance of having some form of ED and this prevalence increases about 10% per decade thereafter. This suggests that the aging related process that leads to ED begins early in life. It turns out that the most common cause of ED, regardless of the patient’s age, is due to a problem with the vascular system of the penis. However, this specific aging related vascular problem is not caused by arterial disease but due to a dysfunction and/or loss of the corporal smooth muscle cells (SMC), the main constituent of the corporal sinusoids. As one gets older, these SMC continue to degrade and disappear. When approximately 15% of these cells have been impacted, it results in an inability of the corporal tissue to retain and/or prevent the blood from “leaking” out of the corporal sinusoids into the systemic veins. However, the corporal SMC themselves begin to combat this aging process by expressing the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme to make nitric oxide (NO) in an attempt to quench the high intracellular oxidative stress responsible for the SMC apoptosis. When this iNOS pathway is then pharmacologically upregulated, reversal of these aging related changes in the corpora with correction of the venous leakage is observed. Since we believe that aging related ED is pathologically the same disorder as essential hypertension, the development of a therapeutic regimen that can halt, delay or possibly reverse the cellular processes that lead to aging related ED should also be applicable to those patients diagnosed with

  5. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families & Friendships Military Sexual Trauma Depression mild Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & Wellness Anger Stigma Suicide Prevention ... Post-Traumatic Stress Sleep Alcohol & Drugs mild Traumatic Brain Injury Resilience Families with Kids Depression Families & Friendships Tobacco ...

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, delays onset and reduces severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in Lewis rats

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    Brian DellaValle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention towards anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE.Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 µg/kg s.c. or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n=6, liraglutide, n=7. Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11 or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4. Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, amyloid precursor protein (APP, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP were determined.Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0 by two days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p=0.0003. Fourteen of 15 (93% of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4 by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33% of liraglutide-treated rats (p=0.0004. Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p<0.01 and reduced the neurodegenerative marker APP (p=0.036 in the brain. GFAP levels were not significantly changed with drug treatment (p=0.09Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1 receptor

  7. Comparison between hearing screening-detected cases and sporadic cases of delayed-onset hearing loss in preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jingrong; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Yan; Li, Yun; Mei, Ling; Yao, Guoyin; Wang, Yu; Shen, Xiaoming; Wu, Hao

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnosis and ages of intervention for cases of delayed-onset hearing loss identified sporadically or via a preschool hearing screening program. Retrospective study with the comparative analysis of two groups of children. Cases identified from screening were selected from 34 321 preschool children who underwent screening for delayed-onset hearing loss between October 2009 and May 2011. Sporadic cases of delayed-onset hearing loss were selected from pediatric clinical records. Cases from the first group were excluded from the latter to avoid duplication. Two groups were given the same questionnaire to record risk indicators, diagnosis, and age at intervention. The average age of 26 children at the time of diagnosis in the screening group (52.81 ± 13.23 months) was significantly earlier than in the 33 cases identified in the sporadic group (62.03 ± 12.86 months; p hearing loss in the screening group (50.40 ± 10.76 months) was also earlier than in the sporadic group (62.73 ± 13.77 months; p hearing screening for preschool children with no significant symptoms of delayed-onset hearing loss.

  8. The effect of earplugs during the night on the onset of delirium and sleep perception: a randomized controlled trial in intensive care patients

    OpenAIRE

    Van Rompaey, Bart; Elseviers, Monique M; Van Drom, Wim; Fromont, Veronique; Philippe G Jorens

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study hypothesised that a reduction of sound during the night using earplugs could be beneficial in the prevention of intensive care delirium. Two research questions were formulated. First, does the use of earplugs during the night reduce the onset of delirium or confusion in the ICU? Second, does the use of earplugs during the night improve the quality of sleep in the ICU? Methods A randomized clinical trial included adult intensive care patients in an intervention group of...

  9. Predeployment Sleep Duration and Insomnia Symptoms as Risk Factors for New-Onset Mental Health Disorders Following Military Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SLEEP, Vol. 36, No. 7, 2013 1011 Effects of Predeployment Sleep on Mental Health—Gehrman et al ployed, and the physical abuse item has the most...1998;155: 929 -33. 49. Chen MC, Burley HW, Gotlib IH. Reduced sleep quality in healthy girls at risk for depression. J Sleep Res 2012;21:68-72. 50. Gangwisch...Insomnia with ob- jective short sleep duration and incident hypertension: The Penn State Cohort. Hypertension 2012;60: 929 -35. 53. Vgontzas AN, Liao D

  10. Kinesiology Tape does not Affect Serum Creatine Kinase Level and Quadriceps Activity during Recovery from Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

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    Naoko Aminaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS causes muscle damage and edema that can hinder performance and increase risks for secondary injuries. Kinesiology Tape (KT may be an effective modality for aiding in recovery, however, no study has investigated the effects of KT on the physiological biomarkers such as serum creatine kinase (CK level, concurrently with measures of performance and function, during recovery from DOMS. Objective: Investigate the effects of KT on serum CK level, electromyographic (EMG activity of the quadriceps muscles, and performances of countermovement jump (CMJ and triple single-leg hop for distance (HopD during recovery from DOMS. Method: Fifty-eight healthy college-age participants were randomly assigned to KT (n=15, placebo (n=19, and control (n=24 groups. Serum CK level and quadriceps EMG activity and performance during CMJ and HopD were collected at baseline, immediately after repetitive eccentric quadriceps exercise, 48 hours, and 72 hours post-exercise. The EMG recording of rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and vastus lateralis during the CMJ and HopD were normalized to the baseline maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Results: A significant main effect of time on the serum CK level, EMG activity, and performance (p0.05. Conclusion: Taping interventions did not improve the serum CK level or muscle activity and performance during recovery from DOMS. Kinesiology tape may not be the first choice of method for enhancing recovery from DOMS in otherwise healthy individuals.

  11. Transplantation of Aire-overexpressing bone marrow-derived dendritic cells delays the onset of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbei; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Yadong; Limbara, Steven; Zhao, Bingjie; Zou, Xueyang; Yang, Wei; Li, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) plays an indispensable role in maintaining central immune tolerance by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) and dendritic cells (DCs), which lead to the deletion of autoreactive T cells or the induction of Tregs and consequently prevent autoimmune disease development. Curing autoimmune diseases has always been a challenge. DC-based immunotherapy represents a new and effective method to establish tolerance. We attempted to transplant Aire-overexpressing bone marrow-derived DCs (Aire-BMDCs) to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to explore a new strategy for autoimmune disease treatment. We observed that the onset of T1D in recipient mice was delayed; insulin autoantibody (IAA) production was significantly decreased; the structure of islets was protected; and the degree of inflammatory infiltration was lower. Furthermore, we found that Aire-BMDCs can promote apoptosis and induce autoreactive CD4(+) T cell clonal anergy, inhibit Th1 and Th17 production, and induce Treg production. These results suggest that transplantation of Aire-BMDCs will be a manipulation and effective method for preventing or treating T1D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preventive Effects of a Chinese Herbal Formula, Shengjiang Xiexin Decoction, on Irinotecan-Induced Delayed-Onset Diarrhea in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Liu, Sida; Pan, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Irinotecan is a well-known chemotherapy drug for the treatment of various cancers. However, delayed-onset diarrhea is a common adverse reaction, limiting the application of the drug. The study presented was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of Shengjiang Xiexin decoction (SXD) on irinotecan-induced diarrhea and to explore the possible mechanisms of this action. We established a diarrhea rat model. The condition of the rats was observed. The proliferation and apoptosis of intestinal cells were measured using immunohistochemical assays and a caspase-3 activity assay, respectively. The expression of Lgr5 and CD44 staining were used to observe intestinal stem cells (ISCs). In addition, the activity of β-glucuronidase in the rats' feces was measured. Our results showed that the number of proliferating intestinal cells in the SXD groups was obviously higher, while the activity of caspase-3 was lower. The expression of Lgr5 and the integrated option density (IOD) of CD44 stain were increased significantly by SXD. Additionally, SXD decreased the activity of β-glucuronidase after irinotecan administration. In conclusion, SXD exhibited preventive effects on irinotecan-induced diarrhea, and this action was associated with an inhibitory effect on intestinal apoptosis and β-glucuronidase and a promotive effect on intestinal cell proliferation due to increased maintenance of ISCs. PMID:28167974

  13. Role of TNF-α/TNFR1 in intense acute swimming-induced delayed onset muscle soreness in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Sergio M; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Cardoso, Renato D R; Martins-Pinge, Marli C; Tatakihara, Roberto I; Cunha, Thiago M; Ferreira, Sergio H; Cunha, Fernando Q; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2014-04-10

    The injection of cytokines such as TNF-α induces muscle pain. Herein, it was addressed the role of endogenous TNF-α/TNFR1 signaling in intense acute swimming-induced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Mice were exposed to water during 30 s (sham) or to a single session of 30-120 min of swimming. Intense acute swimming induced a dose-dependent (time of exercise-dependent) muscle mechanical hyperalgesia, which peaked after 24 h presenting characteristics of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The intense acute swimming (120 min)-induced muscle mechanical hyperalgesia was reduced in etanercept (soluble TNF receptor) treated and TNFR1 deficient ((-/-)) mice. TNF-α levels increased 2 and 4 h after intense acute swimming in soleus muscle (but not in gastrocnemius), and spinal cord, respectively. Exercise induced an increase of myeloperoxidase activity and decrease in reduced glutathione levels in an etanercept-sensitive and TNFR1-dependent manners in the soleus muscle, but not in the gastrocnemius muscle. Concluding, TNF-α/TNFR1 signaling mediates intense acute swimming-induced DOMS by an initial role in the soleus muscle followed by spinal cord, inducing muscle inflammatory hyperalgesia and oxidative stress. The knowledge of these mechanisms might contribute to improve the training of athletes, individuals with physical impairment and intense training such as military settings.

  14. A Comparison between Chocolate Milk and a Raw Milk Honey Solution’s Influence on Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hatchett

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation sought to examine the effect that a chocolate milk solution (CMS and a raw milk solution (RMS had on lower extremity induced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS. Twenty trained male participants completed a set of questionnaires, prior to completing a lower extremity DOMS protocol, to determine the level of discomfort and functional limitations. Once the DOMS protocol was completed, participants were randomly assigned to either the CM or RM group. Once assigned, participants ingested 240 mL of the respective solution and completed the same set of questionnaires immediately post, 24-, 48- and 72-h post DOMS protocol. Additionally, for 10 days post-ingestion participants were contacted to learn if any negative effects were experienced as a result of ingesting either solution. Both groups reported an increase in lower extremity discomfort at each data collection interval post-DOMS protocol (post, 24-, 48- and 72-h. Participants assigned to the RM group reported high discomfort post and a relative decline in discomfort from immediately post-DOMS protocol to 72-h post. The RMS group reported substantially less discomfort at 72-h when compared to the CMS group. Ingestion of a raw milk solution immediately post strength exercise can substantially reduce the level of self-reported discomfort associated with DOMS.

  15. EFFECT OF ICE BAG, DYNAMIC STRETCHING AND COMBINED TREATMENTS ON THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF DELAY ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warin Krityakiarana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of ice bag, dynamic stretching, combined ice and dynamic stretching, and control (non-treated on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS in biceps muscle. Subjects: Fifty-five participants (aged 18 to 25 years were engaged in this study and randomly assigned into four groups (control group (non-treated (CG, n = 13; ice bag, n = 14; dynamic stretching, n = 14; and combined treatment, n = 14. Method: Before inducing DOMS, the range of motion (ROM and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC were measured. The dynamic stretching was performed before inducing DOMS. Subjects performed biceps eccentric exercise at 110% of the predicted one-repetition maximum (1-RM, for each subject, to induce muscle soreness. Pain, ROM and MVC were assessed at 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after induction of DOMS. Results: These non-significant results for mode of treatment and time interaction showed that combined treatment, ice bag, or dynamic stretching alone is not effective at significantly reducing the symptoms of DOMS. Conclusion: These results are non-significant, the pattern of the data showed that the combined treatment may be contraindicated in the prevention of DOMS and ice bag or dynamic stretching might be the best choice of treatment. Further investigation is strongly recommended.

  16. Effects of dietary carbohydrate on delayed onset muscle soreness and reactive oxygen species after contraction induced muscle damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, G; Ashton, T; Cable, T; Doran, D; Noyes, C; McArdle, F; MacLaren, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs after unaccustomed exercise and has been suggested to be attributable to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies have shown increased ROS after lengthening contractions, attributable to invading phagocytes. Plasma glucose is a vital fuel for phagocytes, therefore carbohydrate (CHO) status before exercise may influence ROS production and DOMS Objective: To examine the effect of pre-exercise CHO status on DOMS, ROS production, and muscle function after contraction induced muscle damage. Method: Twelve subjects performed two downhill runs, one after a high CHO diet and one after a low CHO diet. Blood samples were drawn for analysis of malondialdehyde, total glutathione, creatine kinase, non-esterified fatty acids, lactate, glucose, and leucocytes. DOMS and muscle function were assessed daily. Results: The high CHO diet resulted in higher respiratory exchange ratio and lactate concentrations than the low CHO diet before exercise. The low CHO diet resulted in higher non-esterified fatty acid concentrations before exercise. DOMS developed after exercise and remained for up to 96 hours, after both diets. A biphasic response in creatine kinase occurred after both diets at 24 and 96 hours after exercise. Malondialdehyde had increased 72 hours after exercise after both diets, and muscle function was attenuated up to this time. Conclusions: Downhill running resulted in increased ROS production and ratings of DOMS and secondary increases in muscle damage. CHO status before exercise had no effect. PMID:16306505

  17. The effects of kinesio taping on architecture, strength and pain of muscles in delayed onset muscle soreness of biceps brachii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sin; Bae, Sea Hyun; Hwang, Jin Ah; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to confirm the effects of kinesio taping (KT) on muscle function and pain due to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the biceps brachii. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven subjects with induced DOMS were randomized into either Group I (control, n=19) or Group II (KT, n=18). Outcome measures were recorded before the intervention (application of KT) and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the intervention. DOMS was induced, and muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonic radiography. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was measured via electromyography (EMG). Subjective pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). [Results] Group I exhibited a positive correlation between muscle thickness and elapsed time from intervention (24, 48, and 72 hours post induction of DOMS); they also showed a significant decrease in MVIC(%). Group II showed significant increases in muscle thickness up to the 48-hour interval post induction of DOMS, along with a significant decrease in MVIC (%). However, in contrast to Group I, Group II did not show a significant difference in muscle thickness or MVIC (%) at the 72-hour interval in comparison with the values prior to DOMS induction. [Conclusion] In adults with DOMS, activation of muscles by applying KT was found to be an effective and faster method of recovering muscle strength than rest alone.

  18. Complete clinical recovery of a central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis delayed onset in a child with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, D; Karapinar, B; Balkan, C; Ay, Y; Kavakli, K

    2011-02-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with the demyelination of extrapontine areas of the central nervous system. It typically occurs 0.5-7 days after a rapid increment in serum Na level in hyponatremic patients and may lead to death. A 2.5-year-old child with a diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia developed febril neutropenia, diarrhea, gastrointestinal hemorrhage followed by pulmonary aspergillosis. He could not tolerate enteral nutrition. He was given broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal treatment. Laboratory tests showed electrolyte abnormalities including hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia in a chronic course. Twenty three days after a rapid correction of hyponatremia (16 mEq/L/24 h) he revealed flask quadriparesis, disphagia, mutism, irregular respiratory pattern and loss of cough and gag reflex. Cranial magnetic resonance showed central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. He required mechanical ventilation and then he regained his neurologic functions. He completed chemotherapy protocol and underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. After 2.5 years of the occurrence of CPM he is in completely normal physical and neurological status. CPM is a very severe but rare disorder in children with underlying disease. In the presence of multiple etiologic factors it may reveal a delayed onset and optimum outcome can be seen even in the severe clinical presentation with adequate intensive support.

  19. Preventive Effects of a Chinese Herbal Formula, Shengjiang Xiexin Decoction, on Irinotecan-Induced Delayed-Onset Diarrhea in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Irinotecan is a well-known chemotherapy drug for the treatment of various cancers. However, delayed-onset diarrhea is a common adverse reaction, limiting the application of the drug. The study presented was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of Shengjiang Xiexin decoction (SXD on irinotecan-induced diarrhea and to explore the possible mechanisms of this action. We established a diarrhea rat model. The condition of the rats was observed. The proliferation and apoptosis of intestinal cells were measured using immunohistochemical assays and a caspase-3 activity assay, respectively. The expression of Lgr5 and CD44 staining were used to observe intestinal stem cells (ISCs. In addition, the activity of β-glucuronidase in the rats’ feces was measured. Our results showed that the number of proliferating intestinal cells in the SXD groups was obviously higher, while the activity of caspase-3 was lower. The expression of Lgr5 and the integrated option density (IOD of CD44 stain were increased significantly by SXD. Additionally, SXD decreased the activity of β-glucuronidase after irinotecan administration. In conclusion, SXD exhibited preventive effects on irinotecan-induced diarrhea, and this action was associated with an inhibitory effect on intestinal apoptosis and β-glucuronidase and a promotive effect on intestinal cell proliferation due to increased maintenance of ISCs.

  20. Nortriptyline推迟Huntington病小鼠的发病%NORTRIPTYLINE DELAYS DISEASE ONSET IN HUNTINGTON'S DISEASE MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管英俊; 于丽; 高海玲; 岳炳德; 马丽; 陈燕春; 赵春艳; 王红雁; Robert M.Friedlander

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. A cardinal histopathologic feature of HD is the progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. As there is no effective treatment for this fatal disease so far, we explore the therapeutic potential of nortriptyline to identify drugs that might be effective treatments for HD. N548mu [ 1955-128] huntingtin stable ST14A cell line was cultured and incubated in the presence or absence of serial concentrations of nortriptyline. Then R6/2 transgenic HD mice were treated with nortriptyline from five to twenty-one weeks of age. Nortriptyline protected striatal cells expressing mutant huntingtin when shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. Nortriptyline delay the disease onset to 127 d in R6/2 mice as compared with 102 d in saline-treated controls, but nortriptyline did not significantly delay mortality. As a gross marker of lack of systemic toxicity, there was no significant difference in the weight of the treated and control R6/2 mice. The results demonstrate that clinically reasonable doses of one of the identified drugs, nortriptyline, delays disease onset in a mouse model of the disease more than any previously identified compound. The most desirable features of a drug for HD are minimal toxicity and the ability to extend symptom-free living. Nortriptyline appears to be one such good candidate.%Huntington病(HD)是一种常染色体显性遗传性神经退行性疾病,主要组织病理学特征是纹状体运动神经元进行性死亡,目前尚无有效治疗方法,本实验探讨了nortriptyline(去甲替林)的潜在疗效.采用N548mu[1955-128]huntingtin ST14A细胞系进行体外培养,观察不同浓度nortriptyline对细胞存活的影响.选用R6/2转基因鼠,从第5周开始每天腹腔注射nortriptyline,直至21周,对照组腹腔注射与nortriptyline组等剂量的生理盐水.结果发现,nortriptyline对移入不同温度环境的ST14A细胞

  1. 5-HT antagonists suppress sleep and delay its restoration after 5-HTP in p-chlorophenylalanine-pretreated cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallanon, M; Buda, C; Janin, M; Jouvet, M

    1982-08-13

    When injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into normal cats, methiothepin (1-7.5 mg/kg) or metergoline (0.5-8 mg/kg) induced total insomnia. The duration of suppression of deep slow-wave sleep (SWS2) and paradoxical sleep (PS) was dose-related for methiothepin (10-30 h), but was shorter and not dose-related for metergoline (3-5 h). When injected into the fourth ventricle, methiothepin (20 microgram) induced a selective suppression of PS for 6-7 h). In rho-chlorophenyl-alanine (PCPA)-pretreated, insomniac cats, i.p. injection of 5 mg/kg of DL-5-hydroxytryptophan(5-HTP) was followed by SWS and PS after latencies of 25 and 62 min. When methiothepin (2.5 mg/kg) or metergoline (4 mg/kg) were given before 5-HTP, the latency for the first PS episode increased dramatically to 7 h. Thereafter PS occurred periodically for 10 h but no SWS appeared. These results suggest that a 'PS factor' induced by 5-HTP and different from indolamines is preserved during the antagonistic effect of methiothepin or metergoline until it can act upon the executive mechanisms of PS. Our data also suggest that metergoline and methiothepin suppress but do not delay the mechanism responsible for SWS2 in the PCPA-5-HTP paradigm.

  2. Circadian period and the timing of melatonin onset in men and women: predictors of sleep during the weekend and in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alpar S; Santhi, Nayantara; Hasan, Sibah; Lo, June C-Y; Johnston, Jonathan D; Von Schantz, Malcolm; Archer, Simon N; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-04-01

    Sleep complaints and irregular sleep patterns, such as curtailed sleep during workdays and longer and later sleep during weekends, are common. It is often implied that differences in circadian period and in entrained phase contribute to these patterns, but few data are available. We assessed parameters of the circadian rhythm of melatonin at baseline and in a forced desynchrony protocol in 35 participants (18 women) with no sleep disorders. Circadian period varied between 23 h 50 min and 24 h 31 min, and correlated positively (n = 31, rs  = 0.43, P = 0.017) with the timing of the melatonin rhythm relative to habitual bedtime. The phase of the melatonin rhythm correlated with the Insomnia Severity Index (n = 35, rs  = 0.47, P = 0.004). Self-reported time in bed during free days also correlated with the timing of the melatonin rhythm (n = 35, rs  = 0.43, P = 0.01) as well as with the circadian period (n = 31, rs  = 0.47, P = 0.007), such that individuals with a more delayed melatonin rhythm or a longer circadian period reported longer sleep during the weekend. The increase in time in bed during the free days correlated positively with circadian period (n = 31, rs  = 0.54, P = 0.002). Polysomnographically assessed latency to persistent sleep (n = 34, rs  = 0.48, P = 0.004) correlated with the timing of the melatonin rhythm when participants were sleeping at their habitual bedtimes in the laboratory. This correlation was significantly stronger in women than in men (Z = 2.38, P = 0.017). The findings show that individual differences in circadian period and phase of the melatonin rhythm associate with differences in sleep, and suggest that individuals with a long circadian period may be at risk of developing sleep problems.

  3. "Smart Girls" versus "Sleeping Beauties" in the Sciences: The Identification of Instant and Delayed Recognition by Using the Citation Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Fred Y

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have introduced methods for identifying papers with delayed recognition (so called "sleeping beauties", SBs) or have presented single publications as cases of SBs. Most recently, Ke et al. (2015) proposed the so called "beauty coefficient" (denoted as B) to quantify how much a given paper can be considered as a paper with delayed recognition. In this study, the new term "smart girl" (SG) is suggested to differentiate instant credit or "flashes in the pan" from SBs. While SG and SB are qualitatively defined, the dynamic citation angle \\b{eta} is introduced in this study as a simple way for identifying SGs and SBs quantitatively - complementing the beauty coefficient B. The citation angles for all articles from 1980 (n=166870) in natural sciences are calculated for identifying SGs and SBs and their extent. We reveal that about 3% of the articles are typical SGs and about 0.1% typical SBs. The potential advantages of the citation angle approach are explained.

  4. Epoxy fatty acids and inhibition of the soluble epoxide hydrolase selectively modulate GABA mediated neurotransmission to delay onset of seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Inceoglu

    Full Text Available In the brain, seizures lead to release of large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids including arachidonic acid (ARA. ARA is a substrate for three major enzymatic routes of metabolism by cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 enzymes. These enzymes convert ARA to potent lipid mediators including prostanoids, leukotrienes and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs. The prostanoids and leukotrienes are largely pro-inflammatory molecules that sensitize neurons whereas EETs are anti-inflammatory and reduce the excitability of neurons. Recent evidence suggests a GABA-related mode of action potentially mediated by neurosteroids. Here we tested this hypothesis using models of chemically induced seizures. The level of EETs in the brain was modulated by inhibiting the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, the major enzyme that metabolizes EETs to inactive molecules, by genetic deletion of sEH and by direct administration of EETs into the brain. All three approaches delayed onset of seizures instigated by GABA antagonists but not seizures through other mechanisms. Inhibition of neurosteroid synthesis by finasteride partially blocked the anticonvulsant effects of sEH inhibitors while the efficacy of an inactive dose of neurosteroid allopregnanolone was enhanced by sEH inhibition. Consistent with earlier findings, levels of prostanoids in the brain were elevated. In contrast, levels of bioactive EpFAs were decreased following seizures. Overall these results demonstrate that EETs are natural molecules which suppress the tonic component of seizure related excitability through modulating the GABA activity and that exploration of the EET mediated signaling in the brain could yield alternative approaches to treat convulsive disorders.

  5. The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGRATH, Ryan P; Whitehead, James R; Caine, Dennis J

    Until recently, the scientific community believed that post-exercise stretching could reduce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but recent reviews of studies on the topic have concluded that pre- or post-exercise static stretching has no effect on mitigating DOMS. However, the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) post-exercise stretching on preventing DOMS has not been adequately studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of post-exercise PNF stretching on DOMS. Young adult participants (N=57) were randomly assigned to a PNF stretching group (n=19), a static stretching group (n=20), and to a no-stretching control group (n=18). All participants completed exercise designed to induce DOMS prior to post-exercise experimental stretching protocols. Participants rated their soreness level on a pain scale 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. A 3 × 2 mixed ANOVA showed there was an effect for time (p<.01). Post hoc testing revealed that DOMS pain significantly decreased (p<.05) from 24 to 48 hours post-exercise for the PNF and control groups, but not for the static stretching group. Other analyses revealed a significant correlation (r=.61, p<.01) between the pre- and post-exercise stretch scores and the 48 hour post-exercise pain score for the PNF group. Consistent with the results of previous research on post-exercise static stretching, these results indicate that post-exercise PNF stretching also does not prevent DOMS. However, the correlation analysis suggests it is possible the pre-stretch muscle contractions of the post-exercise PNF protocol may have placed a load on an already damaged muscle causing more DOMS for some participants.

  6. Evaluation of sleep, puberty and mental health in children with long-term melatonin treatment for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.; Mol, R.H.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Smits, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish whether long-term use of melatonin influences pubertal development, sleep quality and mental health development in children as compared with the normal Dutch population of the same age. METHODS: This follow-up research study was conducted in children included in a previous melatonin dose-finding trial. Outcomes were measured using questionnaires (Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and Tanner Stages) adopted for ...

  7. Sleep in children with autism with and without autistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Flavia; Cortesi, Flavia; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Vagnoni, Cristina; Valente, Donatella

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to characterize and compare traditional sleep architecture and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep microstructure in a well-defined cohort of children with regressive and non-regressive autism, and in typically developing children (TD). We hypothesized that children with regressive autism would demonstrate a greater degree of sleep disruption either at a macrostructural or microstructural level and a more problematic sleep as reported by parents. Twenty-two children with non-regressive autism, 18 with regressive autism without comorbid pathologies and 12 with TD, aged 5-10years, underwent standard overnight multi-channel polysomnographic evaluation. Parents completed a structured questionnaire (Childrens' Sleep Habits Questionnaire-CSHQ). The initial hypothesis, that regressed children have more disrupted sleep, was supported by our findings that they scored significantly higher on CSHQ, particularly on bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, sleep duration and night wakings CSHQ subdomains than non-regressed peers, and both scored more than typically developing controls. Regressive subjects had significantly less efficient sleep, less total sleep time, prolonged sleep latency, prolonged REM latency and more time awake after sleep onset than non-regressive children and the TD group. Regressive children showed lower cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) rates and A1 index in light sleep than non-regressive and TD children. Our findings suggest that, even though no particular differences in sleep architecture were found between the two groups of children with autism, those who experienced regression showed more sleep disorders and a disruption of sleep either from a macro- or from a microstructural viewpoint. © 2010 European Sleep Research Society.

  8. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Cold, and a Combination Treatment on Pain, Decreased Range of Motion, and Strength Loss Associated with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    OpenAIRE

    Denegar, Craig R.; Perrin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either tran...

  9. Piroxicam fails to reduce myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-L. Croisier

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, ten healthy male subjects were studied. Using a double-blind randomized crossover design, each subject performed two isokinetic tests separated by a period of at least 6 weeks: once with placebo, and once with piroxicam (Feldene®. They were given one capsule containing either placebo or piroxicam (20 mg per day for 6 days with initial doses given starting 3 days prior to isokinetic testing. Exercise consisted of eight stages of five maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases, on a Kin Trex device at 60°/s angular velocity. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS were evaluated using a visual analogue scale immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after each test. The mean plasma concentration of PGE2 measured at rest and after exercise was significantly lower in the group treated with piroxicam (p < 0.05. However, statistical analysis (two-way ANOVA test revealed that exercise did not cause any significant change of mean plasma PGE2 over time in either of the two groups. Eccentric work was followed by severe muscle pain in extensor and flexor muscle groups. Maximal soreness was noted 48 h postexercise. Serum creatine kinase activity and the serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly, and reached peak values 48 h after exercise in both experimental conditions (p < 0.001. By paired t-test, it appeared that there were no significant differences in the serum levels of these two markers of muscle damage between the two groups at any time point. We conclude that: (1 oral administration of piroxicam fails to reduce muscle damage and DOMS caused by strenuous eccentric exercise; and (2 the hypothetical role of increased PGE2 production in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, DOMS, and reduced

  10. Can a standard dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA supplementation reduce the symptoms of delayed onset of muscle soreness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houghton David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unaccustomed exercise can result in delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS which can affect athletic performance. Although DOMS is a useful tool to identify muscle damage and remodelling, prolonged symptoms of DOMS may be associated with the over-training syndrome. In order to reduce the symptoms of DOMS numerous management strategies have been attempted with no significant effect on DOMS-associated cytokines surge. The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of a 2 × 180 mg per day dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA on interleukin-6 (IL-6 mediated inflammatory response and symptoms associated with DOMS. Methods Seventeen healthy non-smoking females (age 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height 161.2 ± 8.3 cm and mass 61.48 ± 7.4 kg were randomly assigned to either placebo (N = 10 or EPA (N = 7. Serum IL-6, isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric strength, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were recorded on four occasions: i-prior to supplementation, ii-immediately after three weeks of supplementation (basal effects, iii-48 hours following a single bout of resistance exercise (acute training response effects, and iv-48 hours following the last of a series of three bouts of resistance exercise (chronic training response effects. Results There was only a group difference in the degree of change in circulating IL-6 levels. In fact, relative to the first baseline, by the third bout of eccentric workout, the EPA group had 103 ± 60% increment in IL-6 levels whereas the placebo group only had 80 ± 26% incremented IL-6 levels (P = 0.020. We also describe a stable multiple linear regression model which included measures of strength and not IL-6 as predictors of RPE scale. Conclusion The present study suggests that in doubling the standard recommended dose of EPA, whilst this may still not be beneficial at ameliorating the symptoms of DOMS, it counter intuitively appears to enhance the cytokine response to

  11. Can a standard dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation reduce the symptoms of delayed onset of muscle soreness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Unaccustomed exercise can result in delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) which can affect athletic performance. Although DOMS is a useful tool to identify muscle damage and remodelling, prolonged symptoms of DOMS may be associated with the over-training syndrome. In order to reduce the symptoms of DOMS numerous management strategies have been attempted with no significant effect on DOMS-associated cytokines surge. The present study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of a 2 × 180 mg per day dose of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated inflammatory response and symptoms associated with DOMS. Methods Seventeen healthy non-smoking females (age 20.4 ± 2.1 years, height 161.2 ± 8.3 cm and mass 61.48 ± 7.4 kg) were randomly assigned to either placebo (N = 10) or EPA (N = 7). Serum IL-6, isometric and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) strength, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded on four occasions: i-prior to supplementation, ii-immediately after three weeks of supplementation (basal effects), iii-48 hours following a single bout of resistance exercise (acute training response effects), and iv-48 hours following the last of a series of three bouts of resistance exercise (chronic training response effects). Results There was only a group difference in the degree of change in circulating IL-6 levels. In fact, relative to the first baseline, by the third bout of eccentric workout, the EPA group had 103 ± 60% increment in IL-6 levels whereas the placebo group only had 80 ± 26% incremented IL-6 levels (P = 0.020). We also describe a stable multiple linear regression model which included measures of strength and not IL-6 as predictors of RPE scale. Conclusion The present study suggests that in doubling the standard recommended dose of EPA, whilst this may still not be beneficial at ameliorating the symptoms of DOMS, it counter intuitively appears to enhance the cytokine response to exercise. In a

  12. Piroxicam fails to reduce myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, J-L.; Monfils, T.; Deby-Dupon, G.; Fafchamps, M.; Venneman, I.; Crielaard, J-M.; Juchmès-Ferir, A.; Lhermerout, C.; Lamy, M.; Deby, C.

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), ten healthy male subjects were studied. Using a double-blind randomized crossover design, each subject performed two isokinetic tests separated by a period of at least 6 weeks: once with placebo, and once with piroxicam (Feldene®). They were given one capsule containing either placebo or piroxicam (20 mg) per day for 6 days with initial doses given starting 3 days prior to isokinetic testing. Exercise consisted of eight stages of five maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases, on a Kin Trex device at 60°/s angular velocity. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS were evaluated using a visual analogue scale immediately after, and 24 and 48 h after each test. The mean plasma concentration of PGE2 measured at rest and after exercise was significantly lower in the group treated with piroxicam (p < 0.05). However, statistical analysis (two-way ANOVA test) revealed that exercise did not cause any significant change of mean plasma PGE2 over time in either of the two groups. Eccentric work was followed by severe muscle pain in extensor and flexor muscle groups. Maximal soreness was noted 48 h postexercise. Serum creatine kinase activity and the serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly, and reached peak values 48 h after exercise in both experimental conditions (p < 0.001). By paired t-test, it appeared that there were no significant differences in the serum levels of these two markers of muscle damage between the two groups at any time point. We conclude that: (1) oral administration of piroxicam fails to reduce muscle damage and DOMS caused by strenuous eccentric exercise; and (2) the hypothetical role of increased PGE2 production in eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, DOMS, and reduced isokinetic

  13. Sleep, arousal, and circadian rhythms in adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Jacob A; Sharkey, Katherine M; Coles, Meredith E

    2015-04-01

    Findings of this meta-analysis show that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is related to disruptions in both the duration and timing of sleep. PsycINFO and Google Scholar database searches identified 12 relevant studies that compared measures of sleep in individuals with OCD to those of either a healthy control group or published norms. Sleep measures included sleep onset latency, sleep duration, awakening after sleep onset, percentage of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, percentage of slow wave sleep, and prevalence of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Individual effect sizes were pooled using a random effects model. Sleep duration was found to be shorter, and the prevalence of DSPD higher, in individuals with OCD compared to controls. Further, excluding samples with comorbid depression did not meaningfully reduce the magnitude of these effects (although the results were no longer statistically significant) and medication use by participants is unlikely to have systematically altered sleep timing. Overall, available data suggest that sleep disruption is associated with OCD but further research on both sleep duration and sleep timing in individuals with OCD is needed.

  14. Relations Between Toddler Sleep Characteristics, Sleep Problems, and Temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Molfese, Victoria J.; Rudasill, Kathleen M.; Prokasky, Amanda; Champagne, Carly; Holmes, Molly; Molfese, Dennis; Bates, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Two sources of information (parent reported sleep diaries and actigraph records) were used to investigate how toddler sleep characteristics (bed time/sleep onset, wake time/sleep offset, total nighttime sleep and total sleep time) are related to sleep problems and temperament. There were 64 toddler participants in the study. Consistent with studies of older children, parent reports differed from actigraph based records. The findings that parent reported and actigraph recorded sleep characteri...

  15. Evaluation of sleep, puberty and mental health in children with long-term melatonin treatment for chronic idiopathic childhood sleep onset insomnia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geijlswijk, I.M.; Mol, R.H.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Smits, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish whether long-term use of melatonin influences pubertal development, sleep quality and mental health development in children as compared with the normal Dutch population of the same age. METHODS: This follow-up research study was conducted in children included in a previous m

  16. Proportional-integral and proportional-integral-derivative-based cyclic sleep controllers with anti-windup technique for energy-efficient and delay-aware passive optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kubo, Ryogo

    2016-08-01

    In energy-efficient passive optical network (PON) systems, the increase in the queuing delays caused by the power-saving mechanism of optical network units (ONUs) is an important issue. Some researchers have proposed quality-of-service (QoS)-aware ONU cyclic sleep controllers in PON systems. We have proposed proportional (P) and proportional-derivative (PD)-based controllers to maintain the average queuing delay at a constant level regardless of the amount of downstream traffic. However, sufficient performance has not been obtained because of the sleep period limitation. In this paper, proportional-integral (PI) and proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-based controllers considering the sleep period limitation, i.e., using an anti-windup (AW) technique, are proposed to improve both the QoS and power-saving performance. Simulations confirm that the proposed controllers provide better performance than conventional controllers in terms of the average downstream queuing delay and the time occupancy of ONU active periods.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  18. Delay between Onset of Symptoms and Seeking Physician Intervention Increases Risk of Diabetic Foot Complications: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norina A. Gavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a post hoc analysis of 17,530 questionnaires collected as part of the 2012 screening for neuropathy using Norfolk Quality of Life tool in patients with diabetes in Romania, to assess the impact on foot complications of time between the onset of symptoms of diabetes/its complications and the physician visit. Odds ratios (ORs for self-reporting neuropathy increased from 1.16 (95% CI: 1.07–1.25 in those who sought medical care in 1–6 months from symptoms of diabetes/its complications onset to 2.27 in those who sought medical care >2 years after symptoms onset. The ORs for having a history of foot ulcers were 1.43 (95% CI: 1.26–1.63 in those who sought medical care in 1–6 months and increased to 3.08 (95% CI: 2.59–3.66 in those who sought medical care after >2 years from symptoms of diabetes/its complications onset. The highest ORs for a history of gangrene (2.49 [95% CI: 1.90–3.26] and amputations (2.18 [95% CI: 1.60–2.97] were observed in those who sought medical care after >2 years following symptoms onset. In conclusion, we showed that waiting for >1 month after symptoms onset dramatically increases the risk of diabetic foot complications. These results show the need for accessible educational programs on diabetes and its chronic complications and the need to avoid delays in reporting.

  19. [How to characterize and treat sleep complaints in bipolar disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, P A; Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Lopez, R; Poirot, I; Brion, A; Royant-Parola, S; Etain, B

    2017-08-01

    Sleep complaints are very common in bipolar disorders (BD) both during acute phases (manic and depressive episodes) and remission (about 80 % of patients with remitted BD have poor sleep quality). Sleep complaints during remission are of particular importance since they are associated with more mood relapses and worse outcomes. In this context, this review discusses the characterization and treatment of sleep complaints in BD. We examined the international scientific literature in June 2016 and performed a literature search with PubMed electronic database using the following headings: "bipolar disorder" and ("sleep" or "insomnia" or "hypersomnia" or "circadian" or "apnoea" or "apnea" or "restless legs"). Patients with BD suffer from sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during major depressive episodes (insomnia or hypersomnia, nightmares, nocturnal and/or early awakenings, non-restorative sleep) and manic episodes (insomnia, decreased need for sleep without fatigue), but also some of these abnormalities may persist during remission. These remission phases are characterized by a reduced quality and quantity of sleep, with a longer sleep duration, increased sleep latency, a lengthening of the wake time after sleep onset (WASO), a decrease of sleep efficiency, and greater variability in sleep/wake rhythms. Patients also present frequent sleep comorbidities: chronic insomnia, sleepiness, sleep phase delay syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), and restless legs syndrome (RLS). These disorders are insufficiently diagnosed and treated whereas they are associated with mood relapses, treatment resistance, affect cognitive global functioning, reduce the quality of life, and contribute to weight gain or metabolic syndrome. Sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities have been also associated with suicidal behaviors. Therefore, a clinical exploration with characterization of these abnormalities and disorders is essential. This exploration should be

  20. Delayed diagnosis of late-onset Pompe disease in patients with myopathies of unknown origin and/or hyperCKemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-López, Jordi; Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Grau-Junyent, Josep M; Gallego-Galindo, Luis; Coll, M Josep; García-Morillo, Salvador; Torralba-Cabeza, Miguel A; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel

    2015-04-01

    Pompe disease is a rare metabolic myopathy whose diagnosis is sometimes delayed despite being essential for improving clinical outcomes. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of late-onset Pompe disease among patients with a myopathy of unknown etiology, including polymyositis, or with idiopathic rise of creatine kinase (CK) levels, in a department of internal medicine. A cohort study was conducted in 241 subjects: 140 patients with myopathies of unknown origin or increased CK levels, 30 with polymyositis and 71 who constituted the control group of other myopathies. Acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity was tested in dried blood spots. If a positive result was obtained, GAA activity in isolated lymphocytes and/or genetic testing was performed as a confirmatory diagnosis. Out of the 140 investigated patients, 2 patients with myopathies of unknown origin were confirmed to be positive for Pompe disease. Thus, late-onset Pompe disease should be considered among adult patients with myopathy of unknown origin.

  1. Pathogenic Variant in ACTB, p.Arg183Trp, Causes Juvenile-Onset Dystonia, Hearing Loss, and Developmental Delay without Midline Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Conboy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ACTB encodes the β-actin, and pathogenic variations in this gene have typically been associated with Baraitser-Winter cerebrofrontofacial syndrome, a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by short stature, craniofacial anomalies, and cerebral anomalies. Here, we describe the third case with the p.Arg183Trp variant in ACTB causing juvenile-onset dystonia. Our patient has severe, intractable dystonia, developmental delay, and sensorineural hearing loss, besides hyperintensities in the caudate nuclei and putamen on the brain MRI, which is a distinct but overlapping phenotype with the previously reported case of identical twins with the same alteration in ACTB.

  2. Pre-hospital and In-hospital Delays After Onset of Acute Ischemic Stroke—A Hospital-based Study in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Chen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The biggest hurdle for early hospital presentation is the narrow therapeutic window after stroke. The aims of our study were to investigate the time lags and the factors causing pre-hospital and emergency department (ED delay during acute ischemic stroke attack. Between June 2004 and October 2005, we prospectively studied 129 acute ischemic stroke patients who presented to the ED of the study hospital within 4 hours after symptom onset. Chi-square testing for trend, uni-variate and multiple logistic regression analyses was performed to evaluate the factors influencing delays in the ED presentation of acute ischemic stroke patients. The median time from symptom onset to ED arrival was 71 (mean ± SD, 82.7 ± 57.7 minutes. The median times from ED arrival to neurologic consultation, computed tomography scan, electrocardiogram, and laboratory data completion were 10 (11.3±9.9 minutes, 17 (9.6±11.3 minutes, 14 (23.3±55 minutes, and 39 (44.4±24.5 minutes, respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models revealed that age < 65 years, illiteracy and awakening with symptoms were the most significant factors related to a delay in ED presentation. This study indicates that 2 hours of pre-hospital delay is the cutoff point for thrombolytic therapy. Organization of a stroke team and standardized stroke pathways may help to shorten in-hospital time consumption. Educational efforts should not only focus on the public, but also on the training of ED physicians and other medical personnel.

  3. Family Disorganization, Sleep Hygiene, and Adolescent Sleep Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billows, Michael; Gradisar, Michael; Dohnt, Hayley; Johnston, Anna; McCappin, Stephanie; Hudson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The link between sleep hygiene and adolescent sleep is well documented, though evidence suggests contributions from other factors, particularly the family environment. The present study examined whether sleep hygiene mediated the relationship between family disorganization and self-reported sleep onset latency, total sleep time, and daytime…

  4. Altered aiming movements in Parkinson's disease patients and elderly adults as a function of delays in movement onset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, D.H.; Gemmert, A.W.A. van; Adler, C.H.; Bekkering, H.; Stelmach, G.E.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of lengthening the time the hand remains immobilized on an aiming movement performed by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and elderly adults, and whether visual information could compensate for the effects of delay. In Experiment One, PD patients and elderly adults

  5. A longitudinal assessment of sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across human adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Van Reen, Eliza; LeBourgeois, Monique K; Acebo, Christine; Tarokh, Leila; Seifer, Ronald; Barker, David H; Carskadon, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive analysis was to examine sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across adolescence in a longitudinal study design. Ninety-four adolescents participated; 38 (21 boys) were 9-10 years ("younger cohort") and 56 (30 boys) were 15-16 years ("older cohort") at the baseline assessment. Participants completed a baseline and then follow-up assessments approximately every six months for 2.5 years. At each assessment, participants wore a wrist actigraph for at least one week at home to measure self-selected sleep timing before salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase - a marker of the circadian timing system - was measured in the laboratory. Weekday and weekend sleep onset and offset and weekend-weekday differences were derived from actigraphy. Phase angles were the time durations from DLMO to weekday sleep onset and offset times. Each cohort showed later sleep onset (weekend and weekday), later weekend sleep offset, and later DLMO with age. Weekday sleep offset shifted earlier with age in the younger cohort and later in the older cohort after age 17. Weekend-weekday sleep offset differences increased with age in the younger cohort and decreased in the older cohort after age 17. DLMO to sleep offset phase angle narrowed with age in the younger cohort and became broader in the older cohort. The older cohort had a wider sleep onset phase angle compared to the younger cohort; however, an age-related phase angle increase was seen in the younger cohort only. Individual differences were seen in these developmental trajectories. This descriptive study indicated that circadian phase and self-selected sleep delayed across adolescence, though school-day sleep offset advanced until no longer in high school, whereupon offset was later. Phase angle changes are described as an interaction of developmental changes in sleep regulation interacting with psychosocial factors (e.g., bedtime autonomy).

  6. A longitudinal assessment of sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across human adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Crowley

    Full Text Available The aim of this descriptive analysis was to examine sleep timing, circadian phase, and phase angle of entrainment across adolescence in a longitudinal study design. Ninety-four adolescents participated; 38 (21 boys were 9-10 years ("younger cohort" and 56 (30 boys were 15-16 years ("older cohort" at the baseline assessment. Participants completed a baseline and then follow-up assessments approximately every six months for 2.5 years. At each assessment, participants wore a wrist actigraph for at least one week at home to measure self-selected sleep timing before salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO phase - a marker of the circadian timing system - was measured in the laboratory. Weekday and weekend sleep onset and offset and weekend-weekday differences were derived from actigraphy. Phase angles were the time durations from DLMO to weekday sleep onset and offset times. Each cohort showed later sleep onset (weekend and weekday, later weekend sleep offset, and later DLMO with age. Weekday sleep offset shifted earlier with age in the younger cohort and later in the older cohort after age 17. Weekend-weekday sleep offset differences increased with age in the younger cohort and decreased in the older cohort after age 17. DLMO to sleep offset phase angle narrowed with age in the younger cohort and became broader in the older cohort. The older cohort had a wider sleep onset phase angle compared to the younger cohort; however, an age-related phase angle increase was seen in the younger cohort only. Individual differences were seen in these developmental trajectories. This descriptive study indicated that circadian phase and self-selected sleep delayed across adolescence, though school-day sleep offset advanced until no longer in high school, whereupon offset was later. Phase angle changes are described as an interaction of developmental changes in sleep regulation interacting with psychosocial factors (e.g., bedtime autonomy.

  7. Syphacia muris infection delays the onset of hyperglycemia in WBN/Kob-Leprfa rats, a new type 2 diabetes mellitus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taira K.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders and its continuous global increase is due to factors as population growth, urbanization, aging, and increasing prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity. The effect of pinworm infection on the development of hyperglycemia was examined in WBN/K-Lepf (fa/fa rats, a new model of the obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with pancreatitis. The rats were orally administered Syphacia muris eggs (infected group and distilled water (control group. Hyperglycemia onset in the infected group was significantly delayed compared to the control group. Neither body weight nor intake of food and water were affected by S. muris infection. This study demonstrated that S. muris infection delayed the onset of T2DM in fa/fa rats and suggested that elucidation of the underlying mechanism and relevant pathways in the helminth-mediated protection may lead to the development of a new strategy to prevent diabetes mellitus.

  8. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as an Adjunct Treatment to Light Therapy for Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder in Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Katarina; Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Broman, Jan-Erik; Markström, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) is common among young people, but there is still no evidence-based treatment available. In the present study, the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was evaluated as an additive treatment to light therapy (LT) in DSPD. A randomized controlled trial with participants aged 16 to 26 years received LT for two weeks followed by either four weeks of CBT or no treatment (NT). LT advanced sleep-wake rhythm in both groups. Comparing LT+CBT with LT+NT, no significant group differences were observed in the primary endpoints. Although anxiety and depression scores were low at pretreatment, they decreased significantly more in LT+CBT compared to LT+NT. The results are discussed and some suggestions are given for further studies.

  10. A "Sleep 101" Program for College Students Improves Sleep Hygiene Knowledge and Reduces Maladaptive Beliefs about Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Nash, Christina O; Walsh, Colleen M; Culnan, Elizabeth; Horsey, Sarah; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Sensitizing young adults about sleep hygiene knowledge and helpful sleep attitudes may have the potential to instill long-lasting healthy sleep practices. Towards these ends, evaluation of psychoeducational program "Sleep 101" tailored to college students was undertaken. Following two weeks of sleep-log recordings, participants were randomly assigned to a Sleep 101 (experimental) condition or a sleep monitoring (control) condition. The Sleep 101 condition was comprised of two 90-minute workshops aimed to educate students about healthy sleep practices, helpful thoughts about sleep, and ways to improve sleep. The sleep monitoring group received a sleep hygiene handout and completed sleep logs for the study duration. Sleep 101 participants endorsed fewer maladaptive beliefs and attitudes about sleep, increased sleep hygiene knowledge, and reduced sleep onset latency compared to the sleep monitoring participants. Brief psychoeducational courses may be a cost-effective way to alleviate current, and/or prevent future, sleep problems in young adults.

  11. Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spires Tara L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the cerebral cortex and striatum. Transgenic mice (R6/1 line, expressing a CAG repeat encoding an expanded polyglutamine tract in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein, closely model HD. We have previously shown that environmental enrichment of these HD mice delays the onset of motor deficits. Furthermore, wheel running initiated in adulthood ameliorates the rear-paw clasping motor sign, but not an accelerating rotarod deficit. Results We have now examined the effects of enhanced physical activity via wheel running, commenced at a juvenile age (4 weeks, with respect to the onset of various behavioral deficits and their neuropathological correlates in R6/1 HD mice. HD mice housed post-weaning with running wheels only, to enhance voluntary physical exercise, have delayed onset of a motor co-ordination deficit on the static horizontal rod, as well as rear-paw clasping, although the accelerating rotarod deficit remains unaffected. Both wheel running and environmental enrichment rescued HD-induced abnormal habituation of locomotor activity and exploratory behavior in the open field. We have found that neither environment enrichment nor wheel running ameliorates the shrinkage of the striatum and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in HD mice, nor the overall decrease in brain weight, measured at 9 months of age. At this age, the density of ubiquitinated protein aggregates in the striatum and ACC is also not significantly ameliorated by environmental enrichment or wheel running. Conclusion These results indicate that enhanced voluntary physical activity, commenced at an early presymptomatic stage, contributes to the positive effects of environmental enrichment. However, sensory and cognitive stimulation, as well as motor stimulation not associated with running, may constitute major components of the therapeutic benefits associated with enrichment

  12. Are there distinctive sleep problems in Angelman syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Karine; Cheron, Guy; Boyd, Stewart G; Dan, Bernard

    2008-05-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition characterized by developmental delay, absence of speech, motor impairment, epilepsy and a peculiar behavioral phenotype that includes sleep problems. It is caused by lack of expression of the UBE3A gene on the maternal chromosome 15q11-q13. Although part of the diagnostic description, 'sleep problems' are not well characterized. A pattern emerges from the available reports. It includes reduced total sleep time, increased sleep onset latency, disrupted sleep architecture with frequent nocturnal awakenings, reduced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and periodic leg movements. Poor sleep does not significantly interfere with daytime alertness and sleep problems commonly diminish by late childhood, with continuing improvement through adolescence and adulthood. Sleep problems in Angelman syndrome reflect abnormal neurodevelopmental functioning presumably involving dysregulation of GABA-mediated inhibitory influences in thalamocortical interactions. Management may be difficult, particularly in young children; it primarily involves behavioral approaches, though pharmacological treatment may be required. The relationship between sleep and seizure disorder, and between sleep and learning raises critical questions, but more studies are needed to address these relationships adequately.

  13. Repeated exposure to conditioned fear stress increases anxiety and delays sleep recovery following exposure to an acute traumatic stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Greenwood

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep-wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by humans, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to either no, mild (10, or severe (100 acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced REM and NREM sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep / wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep / wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders.

  14. Delayed-onset enzootic bovine leukosis possibly caused by superinfection with bovine leukemia virus mutated in the pol gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tadaaki; Inoue, Emi; Mori, Hiroshi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2015-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL), to which animals are most susceptible at 4-8 years of age. In this study, we examined tumor cells associated with EBL in an 18-year-old cow to reveal that the cells carried at least two different copies of the virus, one of which was predicted to encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) lacking ribonuclease H activity and no integrase. Such a deficient enzyme may exhibit a dominant negative effect on the wild-type RT and cause insufficient viral replication, resulting in delayed tumor development in this cow.

  15. Sleep board review questions: the late riser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaq T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 22-year-old male presents to Sleep Clinic for sleep onset insomnia and difficulty waking up in the morning. He plans to begin a new job in a few weeks, which would require him to wake up at 6 AM. He usually goes to sleep at 2 AM and wakes up at 10 AM. He remembers having this problem through high school and college. He admits to being unable to sleep even if he goes to bed at an earlier time. He reports sleeping through alarms in the morning. His sleep log and actigraphy (non-invasive method of monitoring activity are consistent with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD. In order to maximally advance the sleep-wake phase in this patient, when should the administration of bright light take place?Between 5 AM to 6 AM.Between 8 AM to 9 AM.Between 2 AM to 3 AM.Between 10 …

  16. Dare to Delay?: The Impacts of Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Use Onset on Cognition, Brain Struture and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista M. Lisdahl

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, drug and alcohol use has a clear adolescent onset (Degenhardt et al., 2008. Alcohol continues to be the most popular drug among teens and emerging adults, with almost a third of 12th graders and 40% of college students reporting recent binge drinking (Johnston et al., 2010; Johnston et al., 2009, and marijuana (MJ is the second most popular drug in teens (Johnston et al., 2010. The initiation of drug use is consistent with an overall increase in risk-taking behaviors during adolescence that coincides with significant neurodevelopmental changes in both gray and white matter (Barnea-Goraly et al., 2005; Giedd, Snell et al., 1996; Gogtay et al., 2004; Lenroot & Giedd, 2006; Paus et al., 1999; Sowell et al., 2004; Sowell, Thompson, Holmes, Jernigan, & Toga, 1999; Sowell, Trauner, Gamst, & Jernigan, 2002. Animal studies have suggested that compared to adults, adolescents may be particularly vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of drugs, especially alcohol and MJ (see Barron et al., 2005; Cha, White, Kuhn, Wilson, & Swartzwelder, 2006; Monti et al., 2005; Rubino et al., 2009; Schneider & Koch, 2003; Spear, 2010. In this review, we will provide a detailed overview of studies that examined the impact of early adolescent onset of alcohol and MJ use on neurocognition (e.g., Ehrenreich et al., 1999; Fried et al., 2005; Gruber et al., 2011; Gruber et al., 2012; Hanson et al., 2011; Hartley et al., 2004; Lisdahl et al., 2012; McQueeny et al., 2009; Medina et al., 2007; Tapert et al., 2002; Townshend & Duka, 2005; Wilson et al., 2000, with a special emphasis on recent prospective longitudinal studies (e.g., Hicks et al., 2012; Meier et al., 2012; White et al., 2011. Finally, we will explore potential clinical and public health implications of these findings.

  17. Delayed onset neuropathy along with recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy due to organophosphate poisoning and the role of physiotherapy rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimala Vijay Shetye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus poisoning is a major global cause of health problems and the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. In this, the inhibition of acetyl-choline esterase and neurotoxic esterase along with nicotinic receptor involvement produces three well-identified and documented clinical phases: The initial cholinergic phase, which is a medical emergency often requiring management in an intensive care unit; the intermediate syndrome, during which prolonged ventilator care is necessary; and finally delayed neurotoxicity. Vocal cord paralysis is rare and leads to aphonia. Role of physiotherapy rehabilitation is substantial in all three stages and aims at early weaning off from mechanical ventilator until the functional independence and community integration of the patient.

  18. Progressive CAG expansion in the brain of a novel R6/1-89Q mouse model of Huntington's disease with delayed phenotypic onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsavayai, Sarat C; Dallérac, Glenn M; Milnerwood, Austen J; Cummings, Damian M; Rezaie, Payam; Murphy, Kerry P S J; Hirst, Mark C

    2007-04-30

    Transgenic models representing Huntington's disease (HD) have proved useful for understanding the cascade of molecular events leading to the disease. We report an initial characterisation of a novel transgenic mouse model derived from a spontaneous truncation event within the R6/1 transgene. The transgene is widely expressed, carries 89 CAG repeats and the animals exhibit a significantly milder neurological phenotype with delayed onset compared to R6/1. Moreover, we report evidence of progressive somatic CAG expansions in the brain starting at an early age before an overt phenotype has developed. This novel line shares a common genetic ancestry with R6/1, differing only in CAG repeat number, and therefore, provides an additional tool with which to examine early molecular and neurophysiological changes in HD.

  19. The Research Process of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness%延迟性肌肉酸痛症的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋全睿; 艾坤; 刘小卫; 李江山; 李武

    2016-01-01

    通过查阅中国知网、PubMed等数据库,总结延迟性肌肉酸痛症(DOMS)的机制假说、常用治疗方法等;通过比较分析,总结相关机制研究和治疗方案,为延迟性肌肉酸痛症的研究提供参考。%By referring to databases such as CNKI and PubMed, to summarize the mechanism hypothesis and treatment methods of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS);Through comparative analysis, summarizes the related mechanism researches and therapeutic regimens, to provide refer-ences for researches of DOMS.

  20. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Janna eMantua; Keenan M Mahan; Owen S Henry; Rebecca M. C. Spencer

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations). Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of wor...

  1. Adipocyte-Specific Deficiency of NADPH Oxidase 4 Delays the Onset of Insulin Resistance and Attenuates Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartigh, Laura J; Omer, Mohamed; Goodspeed, Leela; Wang, Shari; Wietecha, Tomasz; O'Brien, Kevin D; Han, Chang Yeop

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase in adipose tissue during the development of obesity. We previously showed that in response to excess nutrients like glucose and palmitate, adipocytes generated ROS via NADPH oxidase (NOX) 4, the major adipocyte isoform, instead of using mitochondrial oxidation. However, the role of NOX4-derived ROS in the development of whole body insulin resistance, adipocyte inflammation, and recruitment of macrophages to adipose tissue during the development of obesity is unknown. In this study, control C57BL/6 mice and mice in which NOX4 has been deleted specifically in adipocytes were fed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet. During the development of obesity in control mice, adipocyte NOX4 and pentose phosphate pathway activity were transiently increased. Primary adipocytes differentiated from mice with adipocytes deficient in NOX4 showed resistance against high glucose or palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation. Mice with adipocytes deficient in NOX4 showed a delayed onset of insulin resistance during the development of obesity, with an initial reduction in adipose tissue inflammation that normalized with prolonged high-fat, high-sucrose feeding. These findings imply that NOX4-derived ROS may play a role in the onset of insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. As such, therapeutics targeting NOX4-mediated ROS production could be effective in preventing obesity-associated conditions, such as insulin resistance. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Preventing the Androgen Receptor N/C Interaction Delays Disease Onset in a Mouse Model of SBMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Zboray

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR and is associated with misfolding and aggregation of the mutant AR. We investigated the role of an interdomain interaction between the amino (N-terminal FxxLF motif and carboxyl (C-terminal AF-2 domain in a mouse model of SBMA. Male transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded AR with a mutation in the FxxLF motif (F23A to prevent the N/C interaction displayed substantially improved motor function compared with N/C-intact AR-expressing mice and showed reduced pathological features of SBMA. Serine 16 phosphorylation was substantially enhanced by the F23A mutation; moreover, the protective effect of AR F23A was dependent on this phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for the N/C interaction on disease onset in mice and suggest that targeting AR conformation could be a therapeutic strategy for patients with SBMA.

  3. Preventing the Androgen Receptor N/C Interaction Delays Disease Onset in a Mouse Model of SBMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zboray, Lori; Pluciennik, Anna; Curtis, Dana; Liu, Yuhong; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Orr, Christopher; Kesler, Cristina T; Berger, Tamar; Gioeli, Daniel; Paschal, Bryce M; Merry, Diane E

    2015-12-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) and is associated with misfolding and aggregation of the mutant AR. We investigated the role of an interdomain interaction between the amino (N)-terminal FxxLF motif and carboxyl (C)-terminal AF-2 domain in a mouse model of SBMA. Male transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded AR with a mutation in the FxxLF motif (F23A) to prevent the N/C interaction displayed substantially improved motor function compared with N/C-intact AR-expressing mice and showed reduced pathological features of SBMA. Serine 16 phosphorylation was substantially enhanced by the F23A mutation; moreover, the protective effect of AR F23A was dependent on this phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for the N/C interaction on disease onset in mice and suggest that targeting AR conformation could be a therapeutic strategy for patients with SBMA.

  4. Thrombospondin-1 deficiency causes a shift from fibroproliferative to inflammatory kidney disease and delays onset of renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisberg, Michael; Tampe, Björn; LeBleu, Valerie; Tampe, Desiree; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-10-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is a multifunctional matricellular protein known to promote progression of chronic kidney disease. To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms through which TSP1 accelerates chronic kidney disease, we compared disease progression in Col4a3 knockout (KO) mice, which develop spontaneous kidney failure, with that of Col4a3;Tsp1 double-knockout (DKO) mice. Decline of excretory renal function was significantly delayed in the absence of TSP1. Although Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice did progress toward end-stage renal failure, their kidneys exhibited distinct histopathological lesions, compared with creatinine level-matched Col4a3 KO mice. Although kidneys of both Col4a3 KO and Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice exhibited a widened tubulointerstitium, predominant lesions in Col4a3 KO kidneys were collagen deposition and fibroblast accumulation, whereas in Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO kidney inflammation was predominant, with less collagen deposition. Altered disease progression correlated with impaired activation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in vivo and in vitro in the absence of TSP1. In summary, our findings suggest that TSP1 contributes to progression of chronic kidney disease by catalyzing activation of latent TGF-β1, resulting in promotion of a fibroproliferative response over an inflammatory response. Furthermore, the findings suggest that fibroproliferative and inflammatory lesions are independent entities, both of which contribute to decline of renal function.

  5. Association between New-onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Sleep Behaviors in Male Patients%新发男性2型糖尿病与睡眠行为的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴东妮; 李志强; 孙晓晶; 卢智泉

    2012-01-01

    目的 采用国际匹兹堡睡眠质量量表(PSQI)和自行设计的一般状况调查表对首次确诊的男性2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者进行调查,探讨男性T2DM与睡眠相关行为的关系.方法 采用1:1匹配的病例对照研究,病例组为>40岁的男性T2DM患者,对照组为>40岁非T2DM的男性患者,共156对.采用t检验及多元条件Logistic回归模型对睡眠质量及相关睡眠行为(午睡情况、晚睡情况、打鼾情况、入睡困难情况、夜间睡眠充足与否及睡眠质量)与男性T2DM间关系进行分析.结果 病例组与对照组主观睡眠质量、睡眠潜伏期、睡眠持续时间、习惯性睡眠效率、睡眠紊乱、白天功能紊乱6个因子分值及PSQI总分与对照组比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01).最终进入多元条件Logistic回归模型的睡眠相关行为因子为午睡情况、晚睡情况、打鼾情况、入睡困难情况、夜间睡眠充足与否及总体睡眠质量(PSQI测评总分)等,与男性T2DM发病存在关联.结论 晚睡、打鼾、入睡困难、夜间睡眠不足、睡眠质量差等因素可能为男性T2DM发病的危险因素,适当午睡可能是男性T2DM发病的保护性因素.%Objective To explore the association between sleep behaviors and new - onset type 2 diabetes mellitus ( T2DM ) in male patients. Methods In this case - control study, 156 pairs of T2DM patients and controls ( without T2DM ) aged > 40 years were enrolled. The sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index ( PSQI ) and self - designed general condition questionnaire. Correlations of sleep quality and relevant sleep behaviors ( nap, late bedtime, snoring, sleeping difficulty, lack of sleep at night, and poor sleep quality ) with T2DM were analyzed by t test and multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis. Results The subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disorder, 6 items concerning daytime

  6. Homeostatic regulation of sleep in arrhythmic Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Jennie E; Yokogawa, Tohei; Heller, H Craig; Franken, Paul; Ruby, Norman F

    2004-07-01

    Sleep is regulated by independent yet interacting circadian and homeostatic processes. The present study used a novel approach to study sleep homeostasis in the absence of circadian influences by exposing Siberian hamsters to a simple phase delay of the photocycle to make them arrhythmic. Because these hamsters lacked any circadian organization, their sleep homeostasis could be studied in the absence of circadian interactions. Control animals retained circadian rhythmicity after the phase shift and re-entrained to the phase-shifted photocycle. These animals displayed robust daily sleep-wake rhythms with consolidated sleep during the light phase beginning about 1 h after light onset. This marked sleep-wake pattern was circadian in that it persisted in constant darkness. The distribution of sleep in the arrhythmic hamsters over 24 h was similar to that in the light phase of rhythmic animals. Therefore, daily sleep amounts were higher in arrhythmic animals compared with rhythmic ones. During 2- and 6-h sleep deprivations (SD), it was more difficult to keep arrhythmic hamsters awake than it was for rhythmic hamsters. Because the arrhythmic animals obtained more non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) during the SD, they showed a diminished compensatory response in NREMS EEG slow-wave activity during recovery sleep. When amounts of sleep during the SD were taken into account, there were no differences in sleep homeostasis between experimental and control hamsters. Thus loss of circadian control did not alter the homeostatic response to SD. This supports the view that circadian and homeostatic influences on sleep regulation are independent processes.

  7. Sleep Sleeping Patch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Sleep Sleeping Patch is a new kind of external patch based on modern sleep medicine research achievements, which uses the internationally advanced transdermal therapeutic system (TTS). The Sleep Sleeping Patch transmits natural sleep inducers such as peppermint and liquorice extracts and melatonin through the skin to induce sleep. Clinical research proves that the Sleep Sleeping Patch can effectively improve insomnia and the quality of sleep. Highly effective: With the modern TTS therapy,

  8. Deletion of the BDNF truncated receptor TrkB.T1 delays disease onset in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhirkumar U Yanpallewar

    Full Text Available Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF exerts strong pro-survival effects on developing and injured motoneurons. However, in clinical trials, BDNF has failed to benefit patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. To date, the cause of this failure remains unclear. Motoneurons express the TrkB kinase receptor but also high levels of the truncated TrkB.T1 receptor isoform. Thus, we investigated whether the presence of this receptor may affect the response of diseased motoneurons to endogenous BDNF. We deleted TrkB.T1 in the hSOD1(G93A ALS mouse model and evaluated the impact of this mutation on motoneuron death, muscle weakness and disease progression. We found that TrkB.T1 deletion significantly slowed the onset of motor neuron degeneration. Moreover, it delayed the development of muscle weakness by 33 days. Although the life span of the animals was not affected we observed an overall improvement in the neurological score at the late stage of the disease. To investigate the effectiveness of strategies aimed at bypassing the TrkB.T1 limit to BDNF signaling we treated SOD1 mutant mice with the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS21680, which can activate motoneuron TrkB receptor signaling independent of neurotrophins. We found that CGS21680 treatment slowed the onset of motor neuron degeneration and muscle weakness similarly to TrkB.T1 removal. Together, our data provide evidence that endogenous TrkB.T1 limits motoneuron responsiveness to BDNF in vivo and suggest that new strategies such as Trk receptor transactivation may be used for therapeutic intervention in ALS or other neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Behavioral sleep problems and internalizing and externalizing comorbidities in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycett, Kate; Sciberras, Emma; Mensah, Fiona K; Hiscock, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral sleep problems are common in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as are internalizing and externalizing comorbidities. The prevalence of these difficulties and the extent to which they co-exist in children with ADHD could inform clinical practice, but remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the association between sleep problems and internalizing and externalizing comorbidities in children with ADHD. Children aged 5-13 years were recruited from 21 pediatric practices across Victoria, Australia (N = 392). Internalizing and externalizing comorbidities (none, internalizing, externalizing, co-occurring) were assessed by the telephone-administered Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children IV/Parent version. Sleep problem severity was assessed by primary caregiver report (no, mild, moderate or severe problem). Moderate/severe sleep problems were confirmed using International Classification of Sleep Disorders. Seven specific sleep problem domains (bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, sleep onset delay, sleep duration, night waking, parasomnias and daytime sleepiness) were assessed using the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using adjusted logistic and linear regression models. Compared to children without comorbidities, children with co-occurring internalizing and externalizing comorbidities were more likely to have moderate/severe sleep problems (adjusted OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.2; 4.5, p = 0.009) and problematic sleep across six of seven sleep domains. Children with either comorbidity alone were not at risk of moderate/severe sleep problems, but at the sleep domain level, children with internalizing alone had more sleep anxiety, and those with externalizing alone had less night waking. In conclusion, children with ADHD experiencing co-occurring internalizing and externalizing comorbidities are at an increased risk of sleep problems.

  10. Delayed diagnosis of narcolepsy: characterization and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael J; Krieger, Ana C

    2014-05-01

    Narcolepsy, a chronic neurologic condition resulting from dysregulation of the sleep-wake cycle, usually has an onset at an early age. However, a long delay until diagnosis has been consistently reported in the literature across countries and several publications have focused on characterizing this delay. Most studies report a mean delay to diagnosis of up to 15 years, with individual cases of >60 years, although a trend over time toward a shorter diagnostic delay has been suggested. While variables associated with this delay have been identified, a lack of symptom recognition resulting in misdiagnosis prior to reaching the narcolepsy diagnosis is the likely underlying reason. This lack of symptom recognition is especially relevant considering the high comorbidity burden that has been shown in patients with narcolepsy as some disorders manifest with symptoms that overlap with narcolepsy. A consequence of delayed diagnosis is delayed treatment, which affects the burden of disease. Substantial detrimental effects on health-care resource utilization, employment, and quality of life have been described after narcolepsy onset and prior to the diagnosis of narcolepsy. This review highlights the importance of closing the diagnostic gap by expanding awareness of narcolepsy and its symptoms.

  11. A greater reduction of anterior cruciate ligament elasticity in women compared to men as a result of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haneul; Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael; Yim, JongEun

    2013-01-01

    Women have a higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries compared to men. ACL elasticity and muscle flexibility are major risk factors for knee injuries. The presence of estrogen receptors in connective tissue allows estrogen to change the mechanical properties of muscles and ligaments. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) happened when begin unaccustomed levels of exercise. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine ACL elasticity after exercise meant to produce DOMS. As a measure of DOMS, visual analog pain scale and quadriceps strength were measured. One hundred forty healthy students (age: 25.2 ± 2.4 years, height: 165.9 ± 8.0 cm, weight: 62.5 ± 10.5 kg, BMI: 22.6 ± 3.1) participated in this investigation and were divided into two groups: men (n = 70) and women (n = 70). Visual analog pain scale, ACL elasticity, and quadriceps strength were measured before and after the intervention. Subjects participated in the same exercise to induce DOMS. To provoke DOMS, subjects accomplished squats for 5 minutes for 3 rounds. Greater ACL elasticity, greater pain on the subjective pain scale and less muscle strength were found (p damage to the ACL and recover slower compared to men after exercise. Thus, we suggest that women should have more time for musculoskeletal recovery after heavy exercise.

  12. Additional effects of taurine on the benefits of BCAA intake for the delayed-onset muscle soreness and muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Song-Gyu; Miyazaki, Teruo; Ishikura, Keisuke; Nagayama, Hisashi; Suzuki, Takafumi; Maeda, Seiji; Ito, Masaharu; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ohmori, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (TAU) has a lot of the biological, physiological, and pharmocological functions including anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress. Although previous studies have appreciated the effectiveness of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on the delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), consistent finding has not still convinced. The aim of this study was to examine the additional effect of TAU with BCAA on the DOMS and muscle damages after eccentric exercise. Thirty-six untrained male volunteers were equally divided into four groups, and ingested a combination with 2.0 g TAU (or placebo) and 3.2 g BCAA (or placebo), thrice a day, 2 weeks prior to and 4 days after elbow flexion eccentric exercise. Following the period after eccentric exercise, the physiological and blood biochemical markers for DOMS and muscle damage showed improvement in the combination of TAU and BCAA supplementation rather than in the single or placebo supplementations. In conclusion, additional supplement of TAU with BCAA would be a useful way to attenuate DOMS and muscle damages induced by high-intensity exercise.

  13. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Plus Glucose Supplement Reduces Exercise-Induced Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in College-Age Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Danielle T.; Pintauro, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) has been used to stimulate muscle protein synthesis following exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if supplementation with BCAAs in combination with glucose would reduce exercise-induced delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Using a double-blind crossover design, 20 subjects (11 females, 9 males) were randomly assigned to either BCAA (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10) groups. Subjects performed a squatting exercise to elicit DOMS and rated their muscle soreness every 24 hours for four days following exercise while continuing to consume the BCAA or placebo. Following a three-week recovery period, subjects returned and received the alternate BCAA or placebo treatment, repeating the same exercise and DOMS rating protocol for the next four days. BCAA supplementation in female subjects resulted in a significant decrease in DOMS versus placebo at 24 hours following exercise (P = 0.018). No significant effect of BCAA supplementation versus placebo was noted in male subjects nor when male and female results were analyzed together. This gender difference may be related to dose per body weight differences between male and female subjects. PMID:24967261

  14. Linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel mechanomyographic recordings reveal heterogeneous activation of wrist extensors in presence of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst A; Samani, Afshin

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we applied multi-channel mechanomyographic (MMG) recordings in combination with linear and nonlinear analyses to investigate muscular and musculotendinous effects of high intensity eccentric exercise. Twelve accelerometers arranged in a 3 × 4 matrix over the dominant elbow muscles were used to detect MMG activity in 12 healthy participants. Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced by repetitive high intensity eccentric contractions of the wrist extensor muscles. Average rectified values (ARV) as well as percentage of recurrence (%REC) and percentage of determinism (%DET) extracted from recurrence quantification analysis were computed from data obtained during static-dynamic contractions performed before exercise, immediately after exercise, and in presence of muscle soreness. A linear mixed model was used for the statistical analysis. The ARV, %REC, and %DET maps revealed heterogeneous MMG activity over the wrist extensor muscles before, immediately after, and in presence of muscle soreness (P<0.01). The ARVs were higher while the %REC and %DET were lower in presence of muscle soreness compared with before exercise (P<0.05). The study provides new key information on linear and nonlinear analyses of multi-channel MMG recordings of the wrist extensor muscles following eccentric exercise that results in muscle soreness. Recurrence quantification analysis can be suggested as a tool for detection of MMG changes in presence of muscle soreness.

  15. Effects of the hold and relax-agonist contraction technique on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness after exercise in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to verify the effects of the hold relax-agonist contraction and passive straight leg raising techniques on muscle activity, fatigue, and range of motion of the hip joint after the induction of delayed onset muscle soreness in the hamstring muscle. [Subjects] Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to a hold relax-agonist contraction group and a passive straight leg raising group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group underwent hold relax-agonist contraction at the hamstring muscle, while subjects in the control group underwent passive straight leg raising at the hamstring muscle. [Results] Subjects in the hold relax-agonist contraction group showed a significant increase in hamstring muscle activity and hip joint angle and a significant decrease in muscle fatigue. In the passive straight leg raising group, the hip joint angle increased significantly after the intervention. In the hold relax-agonist contraction group, hamstring muscle activity increased significantly and muscle fatigue decreased significantly. [Conclusion] We conclude that the hold relax-agonist contraction technique may be beneficial for improving muscle activation and decreasing muscle fatigue.

  16. Two cases of delayed-onset suicidal ideation, dysphoria and anxiety after ketamine infusion in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and a history of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niciu, Mark J; Grunschel, Beth D G; Corlett, Philip R; Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H

    2013-07-01

    Ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist that is Food and Drug Administration-approved in the United States for anesthesia due to its sedative effects with low risk of severe respiratory depression. Subanesthetic dose intravenous ketamine has rapidly acting antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant unipolar and bipolar depression. We recently reported an open-label trial of ketamine in 10 subjects with treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, seven of whom had active comorbid depression. Although ketamine had no sustained anti-obsessive effect, four of the seven subjects with comorbid depression experienced an acute antidepressant effect. However, we unexpectedly observed delayed-onset dysphoria, worsening anxiety and suicidal thinking in two of the three subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder and extensive psychiatric comorbidity but minimal depressive symptoms at the start of infusion. The implications of these adverse neuropsychiatric effects in two patients with similar psychiatric comorbidity are discussed. We conclude that there remains insufficient data on therapeutic ketamine in the presence of comorbid psychiatric disorders to promote its off-label use in a non-research milieu.

  17. Long-lasting effects of feline amygdala kindling on monoamines, seizures and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, M N; Staba, R J; Saquib, S F; Farber, P R

    2001-02-16

    This report describes the relationship between monoamines, sleep and seizures before and 1-month after amygdala kindling in young cats (kindling (n=2); 5-min recording epochs were temporally adjusted to correspond to dialysate samples and differentiated according to dominant sleep or waking state (lasting > or =80% of 5-min epoch) and degree of spontaneous seizure activity (number and duration of focal versus generalized spikes and spike trains and behavioral seizure correlates). Post-kindling records in each cat were divided into two groups (n=1 record each) based on higher or lower spontaneous EEG and behavioral seizure activity and compared to pre-kindling records. We found: (1) before and after kindling, NE and 5-HT but not DA concentrations were significantly lower in sleep than waking at both sites; (2) after kindling, each cat showed cyclic patterns, as follows: (a) higher NE, 5-HT and DA concentrations accompanied increased seizure activity with delayed sleep onset latency and increased sleep fragmentation (reduced sleep state percentages, number of epochs and/or epoch duration) in one recording versus (b) lower monoaminergic concentrations accompanied reduced seizure activity, rapid sleep onset and reduced sleep disruption in the other recording. The alternating, post-kindling pattern suggested "rebound" effects which could explain some controversies in the literature about chronic effects of kindling on monoamines and sleep-waking state patterns.

  18. Defining the roles of actigraphy and parent logs for assessing sleep variables in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Janet C; Mahone, E Mark; Mason, Thornton B A; Scharf, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Actigraphy provides a non-invasive objective means to assess sleep-wake cycles. In young children, parent logs can also be useful for obtaining sleep-wake information. The authors hypothesized that actigraphy and parent logs were both equally valid instruments in healthy preschool-aged children. The authors studied 59 children aged 3 to 5 years in full-time day care. Each child was screened for medical problems and developmental delays before being fitted with an actigraphy watch, which was worn for 1 week. Parents maintained logs of sleep and wakefulness during the same period, with input from day care workers. In general, parents overestimated the amount of nighttime sleep measured by actigraphy by 13% to 22% (all significant). Although there was no difference in sleep onset times, parents reported later rise times on the weekend and fewer nighttime awakenings. There was no significant difference between parent logs and actigraphy with regard to daytime napping. The authors conclude that parent logs are best utilized in assessing daytime sleep and sleep onset, whereas actigraphy should be used to assess nighttime sleep and sleep offset time.

  19. Headache and sleep in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Benedetta; Panunzi, Sara; Bruni, Oliviero; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    Several scientific studies report a close relationship between sleep and headache: sleep changes may reflect the onset and increase of both duration and frequency of headache attacks. Variations in sleep architecture, together with a poor sleep hygiene in children, may indeed be responsible for the onset of headache and its development into a chronic disease. For a correct clinical management of children with headache, it is therefore fundamental to investigate their sleep habits, architecture and potential disturbances, in order to develop adequate therapeutic plans for both sleep and headache.

  20. Middle school start times: the importance of a good night's sleep for young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R; Spaulding, Noah L; Dandrow, Craig; Baroni, Elizabeth M

    2007-01-01

    With the onset of adolescence, teenagers require 9.2 hr of sleep and experience a delay in the timing of sleep. In the "real world" with early school start times, however, they report less sleep, striking differences between their school-weekend sleep schedules, and significant daytime sleepiness. Prior studies demonstrated that high schoolers with later school starts do not further delay bedtime but obtain more sleep due to later wake times. This study examined sleep-wake patterns of young adolescents attending urban, public middle schools with early (7:15 a.m.) versus late (8:37 a.m.) start times. Students (N = 205) were assessed at 2 time periods. Students at the late-starting school reported waking up over 1 hr later on school mornings and obtaining 50 min more sleep each night, less sleepiness, and fewer tardies than students at the early school. All students reported similar school-night bedtime, sleep hygiene practices, and weekend sleep schedules.

  1. Relationship of chronotype to sleep pattern in a cohort of college students during work days and vacation days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Arjita; Singh, Sudhi

    2014-05-01

    To study whether the chronotype is linked with the sleep characteristics among college going students assessed during college days and vacation days, adult female students at undergraduate level were asked to answer the Hindi/English version of the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ), fill a sleep log, and drinking and feeding logs for three weeks covering college and vacation days. Based on chronotype categorization as morning type, intermediate type and evening type, sleep onset and offset times, sleep duration and mid-sleep times for each group were compared, separately for college and vacation days. Results indicate that the sleep duration of the morning types was significantly longer than the evening types, both, during college and vacation days. Similarly, the sleep onset and sleep offset times were significantly earlier in the morning types than the evening type students. During the vacation days, the individuals exhibited longer sleep duration with delayed mid-sleep times. Further there was no significant difference among the chronotypes regarding their feeding and drinking frequency per cent during the college and the vacation days. It is suggested that the students should be made aware of their chronotype, so that they can utilize their time optimally, and develop a schedule more suitable to their natural needs.

  2. 延迟性肌肉酸痛实验模型及年龄特征分析%Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Experimental Models and Age Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽; 韩鹏; 张国强; 张翔

    2016-01-01

    研究目的:延迟性肌肉酸痛实验模型设计是其研究的重要组成部分而实验对象年龄也是延迟性肌肉酸痛的影响因素之一,探讨延迟性肌肉酸痛实验模型设计及实验对象的年龄特征,建立更便捷有效的延迟性肌肉酸痛实验模型。研究方法:文献资料法。结果与结论:1)成年人作为研究对象,能承受相对强度较大的运动,实验数据相对稳定,更有利于实验的进行;延迟性肌肉酸痛对老年人骨骼肌是否具有重塑的作用,还有待进一步研究。2)建议以人体的非惯用肢体大强度离心运动为主诱导延迟性肌肉酸痛的实验模型。3)延迟性肌肉酸痛的模型基本基于肢体进行不同负荷、形式的改变进行研究。建议选取可行性较高,操作简单且人为干预较少,诱导酸痛明显的方法,如:纵跳、斜面提踵、负重肘屈伸。4)疼痛识别可采用直观的视觉模拟量表。%Objective: Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness experimental model design is an important part of their research subjects and the age is one of the influence factors DOMS. To explore the experimental model of DOMS and the age characteristics of the experimental subjects, and to establish a more convenient and effective experimental model of DOMS. Methods: To retrieve in February 1984 to December 2015 Pub Med database related literature, the Chinese retrieval words:延迟性肌肉酸痛; The key words in English:Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness; Into the 138 paper, all the data of the related to this research and analysis. Results and conclusion: 1) As the research object, adults can bear larger relative intensity of sports, the experimental data is relatively stable, more conducive to the experiment;DOMS for the elderly skeletal muscle is reshaping the role, and it remains to be further research. 2) A proposal to the body of the non-dominant limb strength of large centrifugal movement induced experimental model

  3. Circadian regulation of human sleep and age-related changes in its timing, consolidation and EEG characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, D. J.; Duffy, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    The light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates the timing and consolidation of sleep by generating a paradoxical rhythm of sleep propensity; the circadian drive for wakefulness peaks at the end of the day spent awake, ie close to the onset of melatonin secretion at 21.00-22.00 h and the circadian drive for sleep crests shortly before habitual waking-up time. With advancing age, ie after early adulthood, sleep consolidation declines, and time of awakening and the rhythms of body temperature, plasma melatonin and cortisol shift to an earlier clock hour. The variability of the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms increases, and in old age sleep is more susceptible to internal arousing stimuli associated with circadian misalignment. The propensity to awaken from sleep advances relative to the body temperature nadir in older people, a change that is opposite to the phase delay of awakening relative to internal circadian rhythms associated with morningness in young people. Age-related changes do not appear to be associated with a shortening of the circadian period or a reduction of the circadian drive for wake maintenance. These changes may be related to changes in the sleep process itself, such as reductions in slow-wave sleep and sleep spindles as well as a reduced strength of the circadian signal promoting sleep in the early morning hours. Putative mediators and modulators of circadian sleep regulation are discussed.

  4. The anti-inflammatory peptide stearyl-norleucine-VIP delays disease onset and extends survival in a rat model of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goursaud, Stéphanie; Schäfer, Sabrina; Dumont, Amélie O; Vergouts, Maxime; Gallo, Alessandro; Desmet, Nathalie; Deumens, Ronald; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has potent immune modulatory actions that may influence the course of neurodegenerative disorders associated with chronic inflammation. Here, we show the therapeutic benefits of a modified peptide agonist stearyl-norleucine-VIP (SNV) in a transgenic rat model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (mutated superoxide dismutase 1, hSOD1(G93A)). When administered by systemic every-other-day intraperitoneal injections during a period of 80 days before disease, SNV delayed the onset of motor dysfunction by no less than three weeks, while survival was extended by nearly two months. SNV-treated rats showed reduced astro- and microgliosis in the lumbar ventral spinal cord and a significant degree of motor neuron preservation. Throughout the treatment, SNV promoted the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 as well as neurotrophic factors commonly considered as beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis management (glial derived neuroptrophic factor, insulin like growth factor, brain derived neurotrophic factor). The peptide nearly totally suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and repressed the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin-1β, nitric oxide and of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α likely accounted for the observed down-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B that modulates the transcription of genes specifically involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sod1 and the glutamate transporter slc1a2). In line with this, levels of human superoxide dismutase 1 mRNA and protein were decreased by SNV treatment, while the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter-1 was promoted. Considering the large diversity of influences of this peptide on both clinical features of the disease and associated biochemical markers, we propose that SNV or related peptides may constitute promising candidates for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  5. Eccentric exercise and delayed onset muscle soreness of the quadriceps induce adjustments in agonist-antagonist activity, which are dependent on the motor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Chã, C; Hassanlouei, H; Farina, D; Falla, D

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of eccentric exercise and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the quadriceps on agonist-antagonist activity during a range of motor tasks. Ten healthy volunteers (age, mean ± SD, 24.9 ± 3.2 years) performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) and explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors followed by isometric contractions at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% MVC at baseline, immediately after and 24 h after eccentric exercise of the quadriceps. During each task, force of the knee extensors and surface EMG of the vasti and hamstrings muscles were recorded concurrently. Rate of force development (RFD) was computed from the explosive isometric contraction, and the coefficient of variation of the force (CoV) signal was estimated from the submaximal contractions. Twenty-four hours after exercise, the subjects rated their perceived pain intensity as 4.1 ± 1.2 (score out of 10). The maximum RFD and MVC of the knee extensors was reduced immediately post- and 24 h after eccentric exercise compared to baseline (average across both time points: 19.1 ± 17.1% and 11.9 ± 9.8% lower, respectively, P eccentric exercise (up to 66% higher than baseline, P exercise during the presence of DOMS (P exercise and was accompanied by increased antagonist EMG for the explosive contraction only. On the contrary, reduced force steadiness was accompanied by a general increase in EMG amplitude of the vasti muscles and was accompanied by increased antagonist activity, but only at higher force levels (>15% MVC). This study shows that eccentric exercise and subsequent DOMS of the quadriceps reduce the maximal force, rate of force development and force steadiness of the knee extensors, and is accompanied by different adjustments of agonist and antagonist muscle activities.

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Early and Delayed-onset Ocular Injuries Due to Mustard Gas Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Sepehr; Moghadam, Mohammadreza Sedighi; Jadidi, Khosrow; Babaei, Mahmoud; Shirvani, Armin; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Mohammad-Rabei, Hossein; Ziaei, Hossein; Ghassemi-Broumand, Mohammad; Baher, Siamak Delfaza; Naderi, Mostafa; Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoodreza; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Hanjani, Shahriar; Ghasemi, Hassan; Salouti, Ramin; Pakbin, Mojgan; Kheiri, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of ocular injuries caused by exposure to mustard gas. Methods: The clinical questions were designed by the guideline team. Websites and databases including National Guidelines Clearinghouse, National Institute for Clinical Excellence, Cochrane, and PubMed were searched to find related CPGs and explore possible answers to the clinical questions. Since there were no relevant CPGs in the literature, related articles in Persian and English languages were extracted. Each article along with its level of evidence was summarized. Additionally, hand search was performed by looking the reference list of each article. Consequently, recommendations were developed considering the clinical benefits and side effects of each therapeutic modality. The recommendations were re-evaluated in terms of customization criteria. All recommendations along with the related evidence were scored from 1 to 9 by experts from all medical universities of Iran. The level of agreement among the experts was evaluated by analyzing the given scores. Results: The agreement was achieved for all recommendations. The experts suggested a number of minor modifications which were applied to the recommendations. Finally, CPGs were developed with 98 recommendations under three major domains including prevention of injury, diagnosis and management of the acute and delayed-onset mustard gas ocular injuries. Conclusion: Considering the lack of CPGs for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of mustard gas-induced keratitis, these recommendations would be useful to prevent the serious ocular complications of mustard gas and standardize eye care services to the affected individuals.

  7. An MMP13-selective inhibitor delays primary tumor growth and the onset of tumor-associated osteolytic lesions in experimental models of breast cancer.

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    Manisha Shah

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy-5-(2-methoxyethyl pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H-trione (Cmpd-1, on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis.

  8. The Effect of Warm-Up and Cool-Down Exercise on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in the Quadriceps Muscle: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Olav; Sjøhaug, Mona; van Beekvelt, Mireille; Mork, Paul Jarle

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of warm-up and cool-down exercise on delayed onset of muscle soreness at the distal and central parts of rectus femoris following leg resistance exercise. Thirty-six volunteers (21 women, 15 men) were randomly assigned to the warm-up (20 min ergometer cycling prior to the resistance exercise), cool-down (20 min cycling after the resistance exercise), or control group performing resistance exercise only. The resistance exercise consisted of front lunges (10×5 repetitions/sets) with external loading of 40% (women) and 50% (men) of body mass. Primary outcomes were pressure pain threshold along rectus femoris and maximal isometric knee extension force. Data were recorded before the resistance exercise and on the two consecutive days. Pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced for the control group on both day 2 and 3 (p≤0.003) but not for the warm-up group (p≥0.21). For the cool-down group, pressure pain threshold at the central muscle belly was significantly reduced on day 2 (p≤0.005) and was also lower compared to the warm-up group (p=0.025). Force was significantly reduced on day 2 and 3 for all groups (p<0.001). This study indicates that aerobic warm-up exercise performed prior to resistance exercise may prevent muscle soreness at the central but not distal muscle regions, but it does not prevent loss of muscle force. PMID:23486850

  9. Biopsychosocial Influence on Exercise-induced Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness at the Shoulder: Pain Catastrophizing and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Diplotype Predict Pain Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven Z.; Dover, Geoffrey C.; Wallace, Margaret R.; Sack, Brandon K.; Herbstman, Deborah M.; Aydog, Ece; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The experience of pain is believed to be influenced by psychologic and genetic factors. A previous study suggested pain catastrophizing and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype influenced clinical pain ratings for patients seeking operative treatment of shoulder pain. This study investigated whether these same psychologic and genetic factors predicted responses to induced shoulder pain. Methods Participants (n=63) completed self-report questionnaires and had COMT genotype determined before performing a standardized fatigue protocol to induce delayed onset muscle soreness. Then, shoulder pain ratings, self-report of upper-extremity disability ratings, and muscle torque production were reassessed 24, 48, and 72 hours later. Results This cohort consisted of 35 women and 28 men, with a mean age of 20.9 years (SD=1.7). The frequency of COMT diplotypes was 42 with “high COMT enzyme activity” (low pain sensitivity group) and 21 with “low COMT enzyme activity” (average pain sensitivity/high pain sensitivity group). A hierarchical regression model indicated that an interaction between pain catastrophizing and COMT diplotype was the strongest unique predictor of 72-hour pain ratings. The same interaction was not predictive of self-report of disability or muscle torque production at 72 hours. The pain catastrophizing × COMT diplotype interaction indicated that participants with high pain catastrophizing and low COMT enzyme activity (average pain sensitivity/high pain sensitivity group) were more likely (relative risk=3.5, P=0.025) to have elevated pain intensity ratings (40/100 or higher). Discussion These findings from an experimental model converge with those from a surgical cohort and provide additional evidence that the presence of elevated pain catastrophizing and COMT diplotype indicative of low COMT enzyme activity have the potential to increase the risk of developing chronic pain syndromes. PMID:18936597

  10. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, Cold, and a Combination Treatment on Pain, Decreased Range of Motion, and Strength Loss Associated with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Perrin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Athletic trainers have a variety of therapeutic agents at their disposal to treat musculoskeletal pain, but little objective evidence exists of the efficacy of the modalities they use. In this study, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) served as a model for musculoskeletal injury in order to: (1) compare the changes in perceived pain, elbow extension range of motion, and strength loss in subjects experiencing DOMS in the elbow flexor muscle group following a single treatment with either transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), cold, a combination of TENS and cold, sham TENS, or 20 minutes of rest; (2) compare the effects of combining static stretching with these treatments; and (3) determine if decreased pain is accompanied by a restoration of strength. DOMS was induced in the non-dominant elbow flexor muscle group in 40 females (age = 22.0 ± 4.3 yr) with repeated eccentric contractions. Forty-eight hours following exercise, all subjects presented with pain, decreased elbow extension range of motion, and decreased strength consistent with DOMS. Subjects were randomly assigned to 20-minute treatments followed by static stretching. Cold, TENS, and the combined treatment resulted in significant decreases in perceived pain. Treatments with cold resulted in a significant increase in elbow extension range of motion. Static stretching also significantly reduced perceived pain. Only small, nonsignificant changes in muscle strength were observed following treatment or stretching, regardless of the treatment group. These results suggest that the muscle weakness associated with DOMS is not the result of inhibition caused by pain. The results suggest that these modalities are effective in treating the pain and muscle spasm associated with DOMS, and that decreased pain may not be an accurate indicator of the recovery of muscle strength. PMID:16558162

  11. Effect of a Single Administration of Focused Extracorporeal Shock Wave in the Relief of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: Results of a Partially Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Friton, Mara; Himmelreich, Heiko; Banzer, Winfried

    2017-05-01

    To examine the effects of a single administration of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy on eccentric exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Three-arm randomized controlled study. University research center. Participants (N=46; 23 women) had a mean age of 29.0±3.0 years and a mean body mass index of 23.8±2.8kg/m(2). Participants were randomly allocated to verum- (energy flux density, .06-.09mJ/mm(2); pulse ratio per point, 200) or sham-focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (no energy) at 7 equidistant points along the biceps muscle or no intervention. The primary outcome was the difference in pain intensity. Secondary outcomes included maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and impairment in daily life. Despite descriptive clinically meaningful differences, mixed-effects analysis (group × time) of changes to baseline did not reveal significant differences in the reduction of pain intensity between groups (F2,42=2.5, P=.094). MIVF was not significantly different between groups (F2,43=1.9, P=.159). PTT (F2,43=0.2, P=.854) and daily life impairment (F2,42=1.4, P=.248) were not significantly decreased over time, and there were no differences between groups in the post hoc analysis. DOMS is a common symptom in people participating in exercise, sports, or recreational physical activities. A single treatment with focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy causes clinically relevant effects in the relief of pain, increase in force, and improvement of pain-associated impairments of daily living. Still, results need to be cautiously interpreted because of the pilot character of this study. Focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy might present an option in the midterm recovery from DOMS (72h) and be an approach to enhance the return to play in athletes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Sleep during an Antarctic summer expedition: new light on "polar insomnia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Nathalie; Mairesse, Olivier; Cortoos, Aisha; Marcoen, Nele; Neyt, Xavier; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-04-01

    Sleep complaints are consistently cited as the most prominent health and well-being problem in Arctic and Antarctic expeditions, without clear evidence to identify the causal mechanisms. The present investigation aimed at studying sleep and determining circadian regulation and mood during a 4-mo Antarctic summer expedition. All data collection was performed during the continuous illumination of the Antarctic summer. After an habituation night and acclimatization to the environment (3 wk), ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) was performed in 21 healthy male subjects, free of medication. An 18-h profile (saliva sampling every 2 h) of cortisol and melatonin was assessed. Mood, sleepiness, and subjective sleep quality were assessed, and the psychomotor vigilance task was administered. PSG showed, in addition to high sleep fragmentation, a major decrease in slow-wave sleep (SWS) and an increase in stage R sleep. Furthermore, the ultradian rhythmicity of sleep was altered, with SWS occurring mainly at the end of the night and stage R sleep at the beginning. Cortisol secretion profiles were normal; melatonin secretion, however, showed a severe phase delay. There were no mood alterations according to the Profile of Mood States scores, but the psychomotor vigilance test showed an impaired vigilance performance. These results confirm previous reports on "polar insomnia", the decrease in SWS, and present novel insight, the disturbed ultradian sleep structure. A hypothesis is formulated linking the prolonged SWS latency to the phase delay in melatonin.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present paper presents a rare body of work on sleep and sleep wake regulation in the extreme environment of an Antarctic expedition, documenting the effects of constant illumination on sleep, mood, and chronobiology. For applied research, these results suggest the potential efficiency of melatonin supplementation in similar deployments. For fundamental research, these results warrant further investigation of the

  13. Predictors of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students: association between evening typology, lifestyle behaviors, and sleep habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabrita CS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colette S Kabrita,1 Theresa A Hajjar-Muça,2 Jeanne F Duffy31Department of Sciences, 2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Notre Dame University – Louaize, Zouk Mosbeh, Lebanon; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Adequate, good night sleep is fundamental to well-being and is known to be influenced by myriad biological and environmental factors. Given the unavailability of sleep data about Lebanon, the cultural shifts and socioeconomic pressures that have affected many aspects of society, particularly for students and working adults, as well as our understanding of sleep in university students in other countries, we conducted a national study to assess sleep quality and factors contributing to sleep and general health in a culture-specific context. A self-filled questionnaire, inquiring about sociodemographics, health-risk behaviors, personal health, and evaluating sleep quality and chronotype using standard scales was completed by 540 students at private and public universities in Lebanon. Overall, they reported sleeping 7.95±1.34 hours per night, although 12.3% reported sleeping <6.5 hours and more than half scored in the poor-sleeper category on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Sleep timing differed markedly between weekdays and weekends, with bedtimes and wake-up times delayed by 1.51 and 2.43 hours, respectively, on weekends. While most scored in the "neither type" category on the Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ, 24.5% were evening types and 7.3% were morning types. MEQ score was significantly correlated with smoking behavior and daily study onset, as well as with PSQI score, with eveningness associated with greater number of cigarettes, later study times, and poor sleep. We conclude that the prevalence of poor sleep quality among Lebanese university students is associated

  14. Onset dominance in lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, R L; Zurek, P M; Balakrishnan, U; Chiang, Y C

    1997-03-01

    Saberi and Perrott [Acustica 81, 272-275 (1995)] found that the in-head lateralization of a relatively long-duration pulse train could be controlled by the interaural delay of the single pulse pair that occurs at onset. The present study examined this further, using an acoustic pointer measure of lateralization, with stimulus manipulations designed to determine conditions under which lateralization was consistent with the interaural onset delay. The present stimuli were wideband pulse trains, noise-burst trains, and inharmonic complexes, 250 ms in duration, chosen for the ease with which interaural delays and correlations of select temporal segments of the stimulus could be manipulated. The stimulus factors studied were the periodicity of the ongoing part of the signal as well as the multiplicity and ambiguity of interaural delays. The results, in general, showed that the interaural onset delay controlled lateralization when the steady state binaural cues were relatively weak, either because the spectral components were only sparsely distributed across frequency or because the interaural time delays were ambiguous. Onset dominance can be disrupted by sudden stimulus changes within the train, and several examples of such changes are described. Individual subjects showed strong left-right asymmetries in onset effectiveness. The results have implications for understanding how onset and ongoing interaural delay cues contribute to the location estimates formed by the binaural auditory system.

  15. Sleep in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeta, Sônia Maria Garcia; Hachul, Helena; Tufik, Sergio; de Oliveira, Eleonora Menicucci

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that most influence the perception of sleep quality in postmenopausal women. We used the methodological strategy of the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD), which is based on a theoretical framework of social representations theory. We obtained the data by interviewing 22 postmenopausal Brazilian women who were experiencing insomnia. The women gave accounts of their difficulties with sleep; a variety of dimensions were identified within the data. The onset of sleep disorders might have occurred during childhood or in situations considered to be stressful, and were not necessarily associated with menopause. We found that hormonal alterations occurring during menopause, psychosocial factors, and sleep-breathing disorders triggered occasional sleep disturbances during this time of life. Participants were aware of the consequences of sleep deprivation. In addition, inadequate sleep hygiene habits figured prominently as determinants in the persistence of sleep disturbances.

  16. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed.

  17. Energy-Delay Tradeoff and Dynamic Sleep Switching for Bluetooth-Like Body-Area Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rebeiz, Eric; Molisch, Andreas F

    2012-01-01

    Wireless technology enables novel approaches to healthcare, in particular the remote monitoring of vital signs and other parameters indicative of people's health. This paper considers a system scenario relevant to such applications, where a smart-phone acts as a data-collecting hub, gathering data from a number of wireless-capable body sensors, and relaying them to a healthcare provider host through standard existing cellular networks. Delay of critical data and sensors' energy efficiency are both relevant and conflicting issues. Therefore, it is important to operate the wireless body-area sensor network at some desired point close to the optimal energy-delay tradeoff curve. This tradeoff curve is a function of the employed physical-layer protocol: in particular, it depends on the multiple-access scheme and on the coding and modulation schemes available. In this work, we consider a protocol closely inspired by the widely-used Bluetooth standard. First, we consider the calculation of the minimum energy functio...

  18. Sleep-wake cycle in young and older persons with a lifetime history of mood disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rébecca Robillard

    Full Text Available Considering the marked changes in sleep and circadian rhythms across the lifespan, age may contribute to the heterogeneity in sleep-wake profiles linked to mood disorders. This study aimed to investigate the contributions of age and depression severity to sleep-wake disturbances. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS was administered to assess current symptoms severity in 238 persons with a history of a mood disorder between 12 and 90 years of age (y.o.. Actigraphy was recorded over five to 22 days. Regression analyses and analyses of variance [age (12-19 y.o., 20-39 y.o., 40-59 y.o., and ≥ 60 y.o. by depression severity (HDRS< and ≥ 8] were conducted. The 12-19 y.o. and 20-39 y.o. groups had a delayed sleep schedule and acrophase compared to all other groups. The ≥ 60 y.o. group had a lower rhythmicity and amplitude (p ≤ .006 than the 12-19 y.o. group (p ≤ .046. Participants with a HDRS ≥ 8 spent longer time in bed, had later sleep offset times and had lower circadian rhythmicity than those with a HDRS<8 (p ≤ .036. Younger age and higher HDRS score correlated with later sleep onset and offset times, longer time in bed, higher WASO, lower sleep efficiency and later acrophase (p ≤ .023. Age was a significant predictor of delayed sleep and activity schedules (p ≤ .001. The profile of sleep-wake cycle disturbances associated with mood disorders changes with age, with prominent sleep phase delay during youth and reduced circadian strength in older persons. Conversely, disruptions in sleep consolidation seem more stable across age.

  19. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  20. Adolescent sleep misalignment: a chronic jet lag and a matter of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    Sleep is a key element, both physiologically and psychologically, in adolescent development. The prevalence of sleep disorders in western countries is important, as with age the sleep-wake cycle of adolescents becomes irregular and delayed in relation with later sleep onset and waking time resulting in rhythm desynchronization. A large number of adolescents sleep for 7-8h instead of 9-10h per night, which can lead to a cumulative sleep debt with fatigue, behavioral problems and poor academic achievement. The effect of electronic media use (such as television, mobile phone, computer, and electronic gaming) on sleep has been the object of several international studies, though pubertal changes may also impact adolescent sleep. Adolescents and their parents should be educated by professionals, including physicians and nurses, on the key role of sleep in adolescent well being and quality of life. A number of basic rules are proposed to improve sleep in adolescents. The permanent social jet lag experienced by a number of adolescents should be considered as a matter of public health.

  1. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  2. A single dose of histamine-receptor antagonists before downhill running alters markers of muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Matthew R; Romero, Steven A; Sieck, Dylan C; Mangum, Joshua E; Luttrell, Meredith J; Halliwill, John R

    2017-03-01

    Histamine contributes to elevations in skeletal muscle blood flow following exercise, which raises the possibility that histamine is an important mediator of the inflammatory response to exercise. We examined the influence of antihistamines on postexercise blood flow, inflammation, muscle damage, and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in a model of moderate exercise-induced muscle damage. Subjects consumed either a combination of fexofenadine and ranitidine (blockade, n = 12) or nothing (control, n = 12) before 45 min of downhill running (-10% grade). Blood flow to the leg was measured before and throughout 120 min of exercise recovery. Markers of inflammation, muscle damage, and DOMS were obtained before and at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postexercise. At 60 min postexercise, blood flow was reduced ~29% with blockade compared with control (P < 0.05). Markers of inflammation were elevated after exercise (TNF-ɑ, IL-6), but did not differ between control and blockade. Creatine kinase concentrations peaked 12 h after exercise, and the overall response was greater with blockade (18.3 ± 3.2 kU·l(-1)·h(-1)) compared with control (11.6 ± 2.0 kU·l(-1)·h(-1); P < 0.05). Reductions in muscle strength in control (-19.3 ± 4.3% at 24 h) were greater than blockade (-7.8 ± 4.8%; P < 0.05) and corresponded with greater perceptions of pain/discomfort in control compared with blockade. In conclusion, histamine-receptor blockade reduced postexercise blood flow, had no effect on the pattern of inflammatory markers, increased serum creatine kinase concentrations, attenuated muscle strength loss, and reduced pain perception following muscle-damaging exercise.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Histamine appears to be intimately involved with skeletal muscle during and following exercise. Blocking histamine's actions during muscle-damaging exercise, via common over-the-counter antihistamines, resulted in increased serum creatine kinase, an indirect marker of muscle damage. Paradoxically, blocking

  3. Timing of sleep and its relationship with the endogenous melatonin rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey L Sletten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available While much research has investigated the effects of exogenous melatonin on sleep, less is known about the relationship between the timing of the endogenous melatonin rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle. Significant inter-individual variability in the phase relationship between sleep and melatonin rhythms has been reported although the extent to which the variability reflects intrinsic and/or environmental differences is unknown. We examined the effects of different sleeping schedules on the time of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO in 28 young, healthy adults. Participants chose to maintain either an early (22:30 – 06:30 h or a late (00:30 – 08:30 h sleep schedule for at least three weeks prior to an overnight laboratory visit. Saliva samples were collected under dim light (<2 lux and controlled posture conditions to determine salivary DLMO. The 2 hour difference between groups in the enforced sleep-wake schedule was associated with a concomitant 1.75 hour delay in DLMO. The mean phase relationship between sleep onset and DLMO remained constant (~2 hours. The variance in DLMO time, however, was greater in the late group (range 4.5 hours compared to the early group (range 2.4 hours perhaps due to greater effect of environmental influences in delayed sleep types or greater intrinsic instability in their circadian system. The findings contribute to our understanding of individual differences in the human circadian clock and have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, in particular if a greater normative range for phase angle of entrainment occurs in individuals with later sleep-wake schedules.

  4. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  5. Daytime Ayahuasca administration modulates REM and slow-wave sleep in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi; Clos, S; Giménez, S; Grasa, E; Romero, S

    2008-02-01

    Ayahuasca is a traditional South American psychoactive beverage and the central sacrament of Brazilian-based religious groups, with followers in Europe and the United States. The tea contains the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and beta-carboline alkaloids with monoamine oxidase-inhibiting properties that render DMT orally active. DMT interacts with serotonergic neurotransmission acting as a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor sites. Given the role played by serotonin in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle, we investigated the effects of daytime ayahuasca consumption in sleep parameters. Subjective sleep quality, polysomnography (PSG), and spectral analysis were assessed in a group of 22 healthy male volunteers after the administration of a placebo, an ayahuasca dose equivalent to 1 mg DMT kg(-1) body weight, and 20 mg d-amphetamine, a proaminergic drug, as a positive control. Results show that ayahuasca did not induce any subjectively perceived deterioration of sleep quality or PSG-measured disruptions of sleep initiation or maintenance, in contrast with d-amphetamine, which delayed sleep initiation, disrupted sleep maintenance, induced a predominance of 'light' vs 'deep' sleep and significantly impaired subjective sleep quality. PSG analysis also showed that similarly to d-amphetamine, ayahuasca inhibits rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, decreasing its duration, both in absolute values and as a percentage of total sleep time, and shows a trend increase in its onset latency. Spectral analysis showed that d-amphetamine and ayahuasca increased power in the high frequency range, mainly during stage 2. Remarkably, whereas slow-wave sleep (SWS) power in the first night cycle, an indicator of sleep pressure, was decreased by d-amphetamine, ayahuasca enhanced power in this frequency band. Results show that daytime serotonergic psychedelic drug administration leads to measurable changes in PSG and sleep power spectrum and suggest an

  6. Environmental Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields Exposure at Home, Mobile and Cordless Phone Use, and Sleep Problems in 7-Year-Old Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Huss

    Full Text Available We evaluated if exposure to RF-EMF was associated with reported quality of sleep in 2,361 children, aged 7 years.This study was embedded in the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD birth cohort study. When children were about five years old, school and residential exposure to RF-EMF from base stations was assessed with a geospatial model (NISMap and from indoor sources (cordless phone/WiFi using parental self-reports. Parents also reported their children's use of mobile or cordless phones. When children were seven years old, we evaluated sleep quality as measured with the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ filled in by parents. Of eight CSHQ subscales, we evaluated sleep onset delay, sleep duration, night wakenings, parasomnias and daytime sleepiness with logistic or negative binomial regression models, adjusting for child's age and sex and indicators of socio-economic position of the parents. We evaluated the remaining three subscales (bedtime resistance, sleep anxiety, sleep disordered breathing as unrelated outcomes (negative control because these were a priori hypothesised not to be associated with RF-EMF.Sleep onset delay, night wakenings, parasomnias and daytime sleepiness were not associated with residential exposure to RF-EMF from base stations. Sleep duration scores were associated with RF-EMF levels from base stations. Higher use mobile phones was associated with less favourable sleep duration, night wakenings and parasomnias, and also with bedtime resistance. Cordless phone use was not related to any of the sleeping scores.Given the different results across the evaluated RF-EMF exposure sources and the observed association between mobile phone use and the negative control sleep scale, our study does not support the hypothesis that it is the exposure to RF-EMF that is detrimental to sleep quality in 7-year old children, but potentially other factors that are related to mobile phone usage.

  7. Delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle satellite cells:repair of skeletal muscle injury%延迟性肌肉酸痛与骨骼肌卫星细胞:骨骼肌损伤的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翔; 柴志铭; 赵丽

    2015-01-01

    背景:长时间或高强度运动出现的骨骼肌纤维损伤是导致骨骼肌损伤直接原因。  目的:文章从修复骨骼肌损伤的客观实际出发,提出骨骼肌损伤后产生的延迟性肌肉酸痛与骨骼肌卫星细胞之间存在某种关系。  方法:检索1961年2月至2015年2月中国知网和PubMed 数据库中相关文献资料,中文检索词:延迟性肌肉酸痛;骨骼肌损伤;骨骼肌卫星细胞;调节因子;英文检索词:Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness;Satel ite Cel s, Skeletal Muscle;Myogenic Regulatory Factors。纳入59篇国内外文献,对骨骼肌损伤伴随的延迟性肌肉疼痛的发生机制做一探讨。  结果与结论:骨骼肌微损伤主要涉及肌细胞生物膜、细胞骨架、肌小节、线粒体等超微结构的破坏和细胞代谢功能紊乱,进而导致骨骼肌收缩功能下降,期间常伴有延迟性肌肉酸痛,其中以离心运动对骨骼肌纤维的微细损伤最为显著;延迟性酸痛的骨骼肌特殊微环境一定程度上刺激骨骼肌卫星细胞生长因子的分泌,持续大强度离心运动引发的延迟性肌肉酸痛的发生时序与骨骼肌卫星细胞增殖时序存在一定的相关性。%BACKGROUND:Skeletal muscle fiber damage that is induced by prolonged or high-intensity exercise directly cause muscle injury. OBJECTIVE:To propose the existence of a relationship between delayed onset muscle soreness and muscle satel ite cel s after skeletal muscle injury from the objective reality. METHODS:A retrieval of CNKI and PubMed databases was done for relevant literature published from February 1961 to February 2015 using the keywords of“delayed onset muscle soreness;skeletal muscle injury;satel ite cel s, skeletal muscle;myogenic regulatory factors”in Chinese and English, respectively. Final y, 59 articles were included to explore the mechanism of skeletal muscle injury accompanied by delayed onset muscle pain

  8. A two-night comparison in the sleep laboratory as a tool to challenge the relationship between sleep initiation, cardiophysiological and thermoregulatory changes in women with difficulties initiating sleep and thermal discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, D; Gompper, B; Kräuchi, K

    2013-04-10

    Cardiovascular and thermophysiological changes accompany the decision to fall asleep. A relationship between core body temperature and heart rate variability (HRV) especially during the sleep onset episode is suggested, but only few data are available, investigating a relationship between skin temperature and HRV at this time span. This study was aimed to elucidate the pattern of body temperature (i.e. distal and proximal skin temperature), heart rate and its variability in a specific population of ten healthy women having both, thermal discomfort from cold extremities and difficulties initiating sleep for two subsequent nights in the laboratory. Furthermore, changes in sleep, temperature or cardiac regulation were examined after 16-h of constant posture conditions. Due to a faster decline of arousals, the build-up of sleep stage 2, slow wave sleep and hence delta power is promoted in the second night compared to the first. Both, proximal and distal skin temperatures show an increase after lights out. Distal skin temperature around lights out is already higher during the second night. Proximal skin temperature starts at the same temperature level for both nights but was significantly reduced in the second hour after lights out during the second night. The distal-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG), as a measure for distal dilatation of the skin vasculature, starts with a lower level after lights out in the first night, compared to the second. Different dynamics and differences between the two nights in skin temperature or sleep variables, but not in heart rate and HRV variables were found during the sleep initiation episode. Thus, a direct causality between these functions seems rather unlikely in the present study sample. The described differences between both nights might occur from delayed relaxation, reflected in a slower decrease of arousals, prolonged sleep onset latency and a lower DPG at the first night. Especially the latter finding confirms nicely

  9. Sleep Quality Changes during Overwintering at the German Antarctic Stations Neumayer II and III: The Gender Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Steinach

    Full Text Available Antarctic residence holds many challenges to human physiology, like increased psycho-social tension and altered circadian rhythm, known to influence sleep. We assessed changes in sleep patterns during 13 months of overwintering at the German Stations Neumayer II and III from 2008 to 2014, with focus on gender, as many previous investigations were inconclusive regarding gender-based differences or had only included men.Time in bed, sleep time, sleep efficiency, number of arousals, sleep latency, sleep onset, sleep offset, and physical activity level were determined twice per month during seven overwintering campaigns of n = 54 participants (37 male, 17 female using actimetry. Data were analyzed using polynomial regression and analysis of covariance for change over time with the covariates gender, inhabited station, overwintering season and influence of physical activity and local sunshine radiation.We found overall longer times in bed (p = 0.004 and sleep time (p = 0.014 for women. The covariate gender had a significant influence on time in bed (p<0.001, sleep time (p<0.001, number of arousals (p = 0.04, sleep latency (p = 0.04, and sleep onset (p<0.001. Women separately (p = 0.02, but not men (p = 0.165, showed a linear increase in number of arousals. Physical activity decreased over overwintering time for men (p = 0.003, but not for women (p = 0.174. The decline in local sunshine radiation led to a 48 minutes longer time in bed (p<0.001, 3.8% lower sleep efficiency (p<0.001, a delay of 32 minutes in sleep onset (p<0.001, a delay of 54 minutes in sleep offset (p<0.001, and 11% less daily energy expenditure (p<0.001, for all participants in reaction to the Antarctic winter's darkness-phase.Overwinterings at the Stations Neumayer II and III are associated with significant changes in sleep patterns, with dependences from overwintering time and local sunshine radiation. Gender appears to be an influence, as women showed a declining sleep quality

  10. Sleep in Children with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, E. Juulia; Vehkalahti; Kimmo; Vanhala, Raija; von Wendt, Lennart; Nieminen-von Wendt, Taina; Aronen, Eeva T.

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of sleep disturbances in 52 children with Asperger syndrome (AS) as compared with 61 healthy controls (all subjects aged 5-17 years) was investigated. Problems with sleep onset and maintenance, sleep-related fears, negative attitudes toward sleeping, and daytime somnolence were more frequent among children with AS than among…

  11. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to melatonin and reduction of sleep onset latency (ID 1698, 1780, 4080) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is melatonin. The Panel considers...... that melatonin is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effects are “sleep-wake cycle regulation”, “relaxation” and “sleep patterns”. The target population is assumed to be the general population. In the context of the proposed wordings and the clarifications from Member States and the references provided......, the Panel assumes that the claimed effects refer to the reduction of sleep onset latency (time taken to fall asleep). The Panel considers that reduction of sleep onset latency might be a beneficial physiological effect. In weighing the evidence, the Panel took into account that a meta-analysis of controlled...

  12. The Timing of the Circadian Clock and Sleep Differ between Napping and Non-Napping Toddlers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lameese D Akacem

    Full Text Available The timing of the internal circadian clock shows large inter-individual variability across the lifespan. Although the sleep-wakefulness pattern of most toddlers includes an afternoon nap, the association between napping and circadian phase in early childhood remains unexplored. This study examined differences in circadian phase and sleep between napping and non-napping toddlers. Data were collected on 20 toddlers (34.2±2.0 months; 12 females; 15 nappers. Children followed their habitual napping and non-napping sleep schedules (monitored with actigraphy for 5 days before an in-home salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO assessment. On average, napping children fell asleep during their nap opportunities on 3.6±1.2 of the 5 days before the DLMO assessment. For these napping children, melatonin onset time was 38 min later (p = 0.044; d = 0.93, actigraphically-estimated bedtime was 43 min later (p = 0.014; d = 1.24, sleep onset time was 59 min later (p = 0.006; d = 1.46, and sleep onset latency was 16 min longer (p = 0.030; d = 1.03 than those not napping. Midsleep and wake time did not differ by napping status. No difference was observed in the bedtime, sleep onset, or midsleep phase relationships with DLMO; however, the wake time phase difference was 47 min smaller for napping toddlers (p = 0.029; d = 1.23. On average, nappers had 69 min shorter nighttime sleep durations (p = 0.006; d = 1.47 and spent 49 min less time in bed (p = 0.019; d = 1.16 than non-nappers. Number of days napping was correlated with melatonin onset time (r = 0.49; p = 0.014. Our findings indicate that napping influences individual variability in melatonin onset time in early childhood. The delayed bedtimes of napping toddlers likely permits light exposure later in the evening, thereby delaying the timing of the clock and sleep. Whether the early developmental trajectory of circadian phase involves an advance associated with the decline in napping is a question

  13. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascetti GG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gian Gastone Mascetti Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Abstract: Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes' closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use

  14. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linden M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael Linden,1,2 Marie Dietz,1 Christian Veauthier,3 Ingo Fietze3 1Research Group Psychosomatic Rehabilitation, Charité University Medicine Berlin, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Rehabilitation Centre Seehof, Teltow, 3Interdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany Objective: To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients.Method: A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80 and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19. They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night’s sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP].Results: In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes, evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often, and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective

  15. Disrupted Nighttime Sleep in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. Methods: A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. Results: The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Conclusions: Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment. Citation: Roth T; Dauvilliers Y; Mignot E; Montplaisir J; Paul J

  16. Changes in sleep habits in adolescents during intensive interdisciplinary pediatric pain rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Deirdre E; Sieberg, Christine B; Conroy, Caitlin; Smith, Kelly; Odell, Shannon; Sethna, Navil

    2015-02-01

    Sleep behaviors play an important role in the experience of chronic pain in adolescence; less well known is the effect of improved sleep in the context of pain rehabilitation. This study examined changes in sleep habits and their association with pain and functioning following day-hospital interdisciplinary pediatric pain rehabilitation. Participants (84% female) were a cohort of 274 youth (ages 10-18, mean age 14.6 years) with neuropathic or musculoskeletal pain and associated disability who completed measures at admission, discharge, and short term (1-3 month) follow-up. Parents reported on the child's sleep habits; participants reported on pain, functional disability, and school functioning. Results show that sleep habits improved over the course of intensive pain rehabilitation treatment, with continued improvements at follow-up. Sleep habits at discharge correlated with concurrent measures of functional disability and mood symptoms, with healthier sleep habits being associated with less disability and fewer mood symptoms. Furthermore, greater sleep duration, less sleep onset delay, and fewer night wakings correlated with lower pain intensity ratings at discharge. Controlling for change in pain with treatment, baseline sleep habits, age, and concurrent depressive symptoms, sleep habits at discharge predicted global functioning and school functioning measured at follow-up. There was modest support for changes in sleep habits over the course of treatment predicting pain reduction at follow-up, with decreased night wakings significantly predicting reduced pain intensity at follow-up. Improvements in sleep habits may be one mechanism of efficacy for intensive pediatric pain rehabilitation.

  17. 睡眠中发作症状的脑电图特征及其与睡眠分期的关系%Study on the characteristics of EEG features in onset of symptoms during sleep and its relationship with sleep staging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃君德; 龚彩芬

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨睡眠中发作症状的脑电图特征及其与睡眠分期的关系。方法统计分析2012年9月至2014年9月收治的86例睡眠中发作症状患者的临床资料。结果夜发性额叶癫痫患者的痫样波检出率57.1%(12/21)显著高于睡眠肌阵挛、夜惊症、梦游症、梦魇患者9.7%(3/31)、18.8%(3/16)、0、0( P ﹤0.05);86例患者中,NREMⅠ期、NREMⅡ期是睡眠肌阵挛集中发生的时期,NREMⅢ期、NREMⅣ期是夜惊症、梦游症集中发生的时期,REM期是梦魇集中发生的时期,NREMⅠ期、NREMⅡ期是夜发性额叶癫痫主要发生的时期,其次为NREMⅢ期、NREMⅣ期,最后为REM期。结论不同睡眠中发作症状的脑电图特征差异显著,和睡眠分期关系密切,临床可以依据脑电图特征对睡眠中发作症状患者的疾病类型进行诊断,从而为及时准确地治疗和改善患者预后提供良好的前提条件。%Objective To explore the characteristics of electroencephalographic features in onset of symptoms during sleep and sleep stag-ing. Methods The clinical data of 86 patients with onset of symptoms during sleep admitted and treated in the department of internal medicine in this hospital during September 2012 to September 2014 were reviewed and analyzed. Results The detection rate of epileptiform wave in patients with nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy was 57. 1%(12/21),it was significantly higher than that of patients with sleep myoclonus 9. 7%(3/31), night terrors,18. 8%(3/16),sleepwalking(0)and nightmare(0)( P ﹤0. 05). Among these 86 patients,NREM I and NREM II were set in the period of sleep myoclonus,NREM III and NREM IV were night terror,set in sleepwalking concentrated period,the REM period was nightmare concentrated period,NREM I and NREM II were periods for occurring sleep myoclonus,NREM III and NREM IV were the periods for occurring night terror and sleepwalking,REM was the period for occurring nightmare

  18. Individual differences in the sleep/wake cycle of Arctic flexitime workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Daniela; Garefelt, Johanna; Fischer, Frida M; Moreno, Claudia R; Lowden, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Daytime workers tend to have shorter sleep duration and earlier sleep onset during work days than on days off. Large individual differences in sleep onset and sleep duration may be observed on work days, but work usually synchronizes sleep offset to a similar time. The present study describes individual differences in sleep behaviour of 48 daytime workers (25 men, aged 20-58 years) from an iron ore mine in Northern Sweden. The aim of the study was to determine whether differences in sleep patterns during work days were associated with the outcomes of sleepiness and sleep complaints. Cluster analysis was used to group workers into two categories of sleep onset and sleep duration. The "Late Sleep Onset" cluster comprised workers who slept 1.30 h later than the "Early Sleep Onset" cluster (p work nights). The "Late Sleep Onset" cluster reported less refreshing sleep (p Work schedule and commuting time modulate both sleep phase and sleep duration independently. Workers, classified as having an intermediate sleep phase preference, can organize their sleep time in order to minimize sleep debt and sleepiness symptoms. Individual differences in sleep phase and duration should be considered when promoting well-being at work even among groups with similar sleep needs. In order to minimize sleep debt and sleepiness symptoms, successful sleep behaviour could be promoted involving extend use of flexitime arrangement (i.e. later starting times) and reduce use of alarm clocks.

  19. Daytime nap controls toddlers’ nighttime sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Machiko; Ohta, Hidenobu; Nagaoki, Yuko; Shimabukuro, Rinshu; Asaka, Yoko; Takahashi, Noriko; Nakazawa, Takayo; Kaneshi, Yousuke; Morioka, Keita; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Azami, Yuriko; Ikeuchi, Mari; Takahashi, Mari; Hirata, Michio; Ozawa, Miwa; Cho, Kazutoshi; Kusakawa, Isao; Yoda, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that afternoon naps can have a negative effect on subsequent nighttime sleep in children. These studies have mainly been based on sleep questionnaires completed by parents. To investigate the effect of napping on such aspects of sleep quality, we performed a study in which child activity and sleep levels were recorded using actigraphy. The parents were asked to attach actigraphy units to their child’s waist by an adjustable elastic belt and complete a sleep diary for 7 consecutive days. 50 healthy young toddlers of approximately 1.5 years of age were recruited. There was a significant negative correlation between nap duration and both nighttime sleep duration and sleep onset time, suggesting that long nap sleep induces short nighttime sleep duration and late sleep onset time. We also found a significant negative correlation between nap timing and nighttime sleep duration and also a significant positive correlation between nap timing and sleep onset time, suggesting that naps in the late afternoon also lead to short nighttime sleep duration and late sleep onset. Our findings suggest that duration-controlled naps starting early in the afternoon can induce a longer nighttime sleep in full-term infants of approximately 1.5 years of age. PMID:27277329

  20. Efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of transcranial electrical stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials and spontaneous electromyography activity to identify acute-versus delayed-onset C-5 nerve root palsy during cervical spine surgery: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalodia, Vidya M; Schwartz, Daniel M; Sestokas, Anthony K; Bloomgarden, Gary; Arkins, Thomas; Tomak, Patrick; Gorelick, Judith; Wijesekera, Shirvinda; Beiner, John; Goodrich, Isaac

    2013-10-01

    Deltoid muscle weakness due to C-5 nerve root injury following cervical spine surgery is an uncommon but potentially debilitating complication. Symptoms can manifest upon emergence from anesthesia or days to weeks following surgery. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of spontaneous electromyography (spEMG) monitoring in detecting evolving C-5 nerve root compromise. By contrast, transcranial electrical stimulation-induced motor evoked potential (tceMEP) monitoring has been shown to be highly sensitive and specific in identifying impending C-5 injury. In this study the authors sought to 1) determine the frequency of immediate versus delayed-onset C-5 nerve root injury following cervical spine surgery, 2) identify risk factors associated with the development of C-5 palsies, and 3) determine whether tceMEP and spEMG neuromonitoring can help to identify acutely evolving C-5 injury as well as predict delayed-onset deltoid muscle paresis. The authors retrospectively reviewed the neuromonitoring and surgical records of all patients who had undergone cervical spine surgery involving the C-4 and/or C-5 level in the period from 2006 to 2008. Real-time tceMEP and spEMG monitoring from the deltoid muscle was performed as part of a multimodal neuromonitoring protocol during all surgeries. Charts were reviewed to identify patients who had experienced significant changes in tceMEPs and/or episodes of neurotonic spEMG activity during surgery, as well as those who had shown new-onset deltoid weakness either immediately upon emergence from the anesthesia or in a delayed fashion. Two hundred twenty-nine patients undergoing 235 cervical spine surgeries involving the C4-5 level served as the study cohort. The overall incidence of perioperative C-5 nerve root injury was 5.1%. The incidence was greatest (50%) in cases with dual corpectomies at the C-4 and C-5 spinal levels. All patients who emerged from anesthesia with deltoid weakness had significant and unresolved

  1. Unihemispheric sleep and asymmetrical sleep: behavioral, neurophysiological, and functional perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascetti, Gian Gastone

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a behavior characterized by a typical body posture, both eyes’ closure, raised sensory threshold, distinctive electrographic signs, and a marked decrease of motor activity. In addition, sleep is a periodically necessary behavior and therefore, in the majority of animals, it involves the whole brain and body. However, certain marine mammals and species of birds show a different sleep behavior, in which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other is awake. In dolphins, eared seals, and manatees, unihemispheric sleep allows them to have the benefits of sleep, breathing, thermoregulation, and vigilance. In birds, antipredation vigilance is the main function of unihemispheric sleep, but in domestic chicks, it is also associated with brain lateralization or dominance in the control of behavior. Compared to bihemispheric sleep, unihemispheric sleep would mean a reduction of the time spent sleeping and of the associated recovery processes. However, the behavior and health of aquatic mammals and birds does not seem at all impaired by the reduction of sleep. The neural mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep are unknown, but assuming that the neural structures involved in sleep in cetaceans, seals, and birds are similar to those of terrestrial mammals, it is suggested that they involve the interaction of structures of the hypothalamus, basal forebrain, and brain stem. The neural mechanisms promoting wakefulness dominate one side of the brain, while those promoting sleep predominates the other side. For cetaceans, unihemispheric sleep is the only way to sleep, while in seals and birds, unihemispheric sleep events are intermingled with bihemispheric and rapid eye movement sleep events. Electroencephalogram hemispheric asymmetries are also reported during bihemispheric sleep, at awakening, and at sleep onset, as well as being associated with a use-dependent process (local sleep). PMID:27471418

  2. 肌肉延迟性酸痛的神经生物学机制研究进展%Reearch progresses of the neurobiology mechanism of delayed onset muscle soreness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 赵晏

    2008-01-01

    肌肉延迟性酸痛(delayed onset muscle soreness, DOMS)是生活中经常遇到的一种现象,由于其发生机制尚不十分清楚,并缺乏可靠的防治措施,一直成为运动医学界的重要话题.本文总结了近年来有关DOMS发生机制方面的研究成果,着重从神经生物学角度来探讨和分析DOMS的产生原因.

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion) are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Kiraly, Michael A.; Kiraly, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzh...

  4. Effects on sleep stages and microarchitecture of caffeine and its combination with zolpidem or trazodone in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, L M; Nutt, D J; Ivarsson, M; Hutson, P H; Wilson, S J

    2009-07-01

    Caffeine is the world's most popular stimulant and is known to disrupt sleep. Administration of caffeine can therefore be used in healthy volunteers to mimic the effects of insomnia and thus to test the hypnotic effects of medication. This study assessed the effects of caffeine on sleep architecture and electroencephalography (EEG) spectrum alone and in combination with two different sleep-promoting medications. Home polysomnography was performed in 12 healthy male volunteers in a double-blind study whereby subjects received placebo, caffeine (150 mg), caffeine plus zolpidem (10 mg) and caffeine plus trazodone (100 mg) at bedtime in a randomised crossover design. In addition to delaying sleep onset, caffeine decreased total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE) and stage 2 sleep without significantly altering wake after sleep onset or the number of awakenings. Zolpidem attenuated the caffeine-induced decrease in SE and increased spindle density in the caffeine plus zolpidem combination compared with placebo. Trazodone attenuated the decrease in SE and TST, and it also increased stage 3 sleep, decreased the number of awakenings and decreased the spindle density. No significant changes in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were observed, neither was any significant alteration in slow wave activity nor other EEG spectral measures, although the direction of change was similar to that previously reported for caffeine and appeared to 'normalise' after trazodone. These data suggest that caffeine mimics some, but not all of the sleep disruption seen in insomnia and that its disruptive effects are differentially attenuated by the actions of sleep-promoting compounds with distinct mechanisms of action.

  5. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvolby, A.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals...... with ADHD with typically developing controls is most concordant for associations of ADHD with: hypopnea/apnea and peripheral limb movements in sleep or nocturnal motricity in polysomnographic studies; increased sleep onset latency and shorter sleep time in actigraphic studies; and bedtime resistance......, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian...

  6. High incidence of sleep problems in children with developmental disorders: results of a questionnaire survey in a Japanese elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Michiko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Iwasaki, Mizue; Iemura, Akiko; Yamashita, Yushiro; Maeda, Masaharu; Kitani, Shingo; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uchimura, Naohisa; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present school-based questionnaire was to analyze the sleep problems of children with developmental disorders, such as pervasive developmental disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The sleep problems of 43 children with developmental disorders were compared with those of 372 healthy children (control group). All children attended one public elementary school in Kurume, Japan; thus, the study avoided the potential bias associated with hospital-based surveys (i.e. a high prevalence of sleep disturbance) and provided a more complete picture of the children's academic performance and family situation compared with a control group under identical conditions. Children's sleep problems were measured with the Japanese version of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Children with developmental disorders had significantly higher total CSHQ scores, as well as mean scores on the parasomnias and sleep breathing subscales, than children in the control group. The total CSHQ score, bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, and daytime sleepiness worsened with increasing age in children with developmental disorders; in contrast, these parameters were unchanged or became better with age in the control group. In children with developmental disorders, there was a significant association between a higher total CSHQ score and lower academic performance, but no such association was found in the control group. For both groups, children's sleep problems affected their parents' quality of sleep. There were no significant differences in physical, lifestyle, and sleep environmental factors, or in sleep/wake patterns, between the two groups. Children with developmental disorders have poor sleep quality, which may affect academic performance. It is important for physicians to be aware of age-related differences in sleep problems in children with developmental disorders. Further studies are needed to identify the association between sleep quality and

  7. Sleep problems and daytime somnolence in a German population-based sample of snoring school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Steffen; Urschitz, Michael S; Guenther, Anke; Urschitz-Duprat, Pilar M; Bohnhorst, Bettina; Schlaud, Martin; Poets, Christian F

    2007-03-01

    Habitual snoring is associated with daytime symptoms like tiredness and behavioral problems. Its association with sleep problems is unclear. We aimed to assess associations between habitual snoring and sleep problems in primary school children. The design was a population-based cross-sectional study with a nested cohort study. The setting was twenty-seven primary schools in the city of Hannover, Germany. Habitual snoring and sleep problems were assessed in primary school children using an extended version of Gozal's sleep-disordered breathing questionnaire (n = 1144). Approximately 1 year later, parents of children reported to snore habitually (n = 114) and an equal number of children who snored never or occasionally were given the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children, a validated questionnaire for the assessment of pediatric sleep problems. Snoring status was re-assessed using the initial questionnaire and children were then classified as long-term habitual snorers or ex-habitual snorers. An increasing prevalence of sleep problems was found with increasing snoring frequency for sleep-onset delay, night awakenings, and nightmares. Long-term habitual snorers were at significantly increased risk for sleep-wake transition disorders (e.g. rhythmic movements, hypnic jerks, sleeptalking, bruxism; odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 12.0, 3.8-37.3), sleep hyperhidrosis (3.6, 1.2-10.8), disorders of arousal/nightmares (e.g. sleepwalking, sleep terrors, nightmares; 4.6, 1.3-15.6), and excessive somnolence (i.e. difficulty waking up, morning tiredness, daytime somnolence; 6.3, 2.2-17.8). Ex-habitual snorers were at increased risk for sleep-wake transition disorders (4.4, 1.4-14.2). Habitual snoring was associated with several sleep problems in our study. Long-term habitual snorers were more likely to have sleep problems than children who had stopped snoring spontaneously.

  8. Modelling the effect of exposing algae to pulses of S-metolachlor: How to include a delay to the onset of the effect and in the recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Perronet, Léa; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2016-01-15

    In agriculture, herbicides are applied to improve crop productivity. During and after rain event, herbicides can be transported by surface runoff in streams and rivers. As a result, the exposure pattern in creeks is time-varying, i.e., a repeated pollution of aquatic system. In previous studies, we developed a model to assess the effects of pulse exposure patterns on algae. This model was validated for triazines and phenylureas, which are substances that induce effects directly after exposure with no delay in recovery. However, other herbicides display a mode of action characterized by a time-dependency effect and a delay in recovery. In this study, we therefore investigate whether this previous model could be used to assess the effects of pulse exposure by herbicides with time delay in effect and recovery. The current study focuses on the herbicide S-metolachlor. We showed that the effect of the herbicide begins only after 20 h of exposure for the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus based on both the optical density and algal cells size measurements. Furthermore, the duration of delay of the recovery for algae previously exposed to S-metolachlor was 20 h and did not depend on the pulse exposure duration or the height of the peak concentration. By accounting for these specific effects, the measured and predicted effects were similar when pulse exposure of S-metolachlor is tested on the alga S. vacuolatus. However, the sensitivity of the alga is greatly modified after being previously exposed to a pulse of S-metolachlor. In the case of scenarios composed of several pulses, this sensitivity should be considered in the modelling. Therefore, modelling the effects of any pulse scenario of S-metolachlor on an alga is feasible but requires the determination of the effect trigger, the delay in recovery and the possible change in the sensitivity of the alga to the substance.

  9. Ambulatory sleep-wake patterns and variability in young people with emerging mental disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Rébecca; Hermens, Daniel F.; Naismith, Sharon L.; White, Django; Rogers, Naomi L.; Ip, Tony K.C.; Mullin, Sharon J.; Alvares, Gail A.; Guastella, Adam J.; Smith, Kristie Leigh; Rong, Ye; Whitwell, Bradley; Southan, James; Glozier, Nick; Scott, Elizabeth M.; Hickie, Ian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The nature of sleep-wake abnormalities in individuals with mental disorders remains unclear. The present study aimed to examine the differences in objective ambulatory measures of the sleep-wake and activity cycles across young people with anxiety, mood or psychotic disorders. Methods Participants underwent several days of actigraphy monitoring. We divided participants into 5 groups (control, anxiety disorder, unipolar depression, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorder) according to primary diagnosis. Results We enrolled 342 participants aged 12–35 years in our study: 41 healthy controls, 56 with anxiety disorder, 135 with unipolar depression, 80 with bipolar disorder and 30 with psychotic disorders. Compared with the control group, sleep onset tended to occur later in the anxiety, depression and bipolar groups; sleep offset occurred later in all primary diagnosis groups; the sleep period was longer in the anxiety, bipolar and psychosis groups; total sleep time was longer in the psychosis group; and sleep efficiency was lower in the depression group, with a similar tendency for the anxiety and bipolar groups. Sleep parameters were significantly more variable in patient subgroups than in controls. Cosinor analysis revealed delayed circadian activity profiles in the anxiety and bipolar groups and abnormal circadian curve in the psychosis group. Limitations Although statistical analyses controlled for age, the sample included individuals from preadolescence to adulthood. Most participants from the primary diagnosis subgroups were taking psychotropic medications, and a large proportion had other comorbid mental disorders. Conclusion Our findings suggest that delayed and disorganized sleep offset times are common in young patients with various mental disorders. However, other sleep-wake cycle disturbances appear to be more prominent in broad diagnostic categories. PMID:25203899

  10. Validating the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire against polysomnography and actigraphy in school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adria Nora Markovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a vital physiological behaviour in children’s development, and as such it is important to be able to efficiently and accurately assess whether children display difficulties with sleep quality and quantity. The Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ; (1 is one of the most commonly used assessment tools for pediatric sleep. However, this instrument has never been validated against the gold standard of sleep measurement (i.e., polysomnography; PSG, and studies comparing it to actigraphy are limited. Therefore, the current study assessed the validity of four subscales of the CSHQ via direct comparison with PSG and actigraphy for 30 typically developing school-aged children (ages 6 to 12. No significant correlations between relevant CSHQ subscales and PSG variables were found. In terms of the actigraphy variables, only the CSHQ Night Wakings subscale achieved significance. In addition, sensitivity and specificity analyses revealed consistently low sensitivity and high specificity. Overall, the CSHQ Sleep Onset Delay, Sleep Duration, Night Wakings, and Sleep Disordered Breathing subscales showed low construct validity and diagnostic validity. These results underscore that caution should be taken when using the CSHQ as the sole screening tool for sleep problems in children.

  11. Delayed onset of vastii muscle activity in response to rapid postural perturbations following eccentric exercise: a mechanism that underpins knee pain after eccentric exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Falla, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Appropriate timing of activity of the vastus medialis obliqus (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles is a key factor for proper tracking of the patella in the trochlear groove during knee extension. This study investigates the relative timing of activation of the VMO and VL muscles during unexpected perturbations performed before and after eccentric exercise. Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the VMO and VL muscles of the right leg in 11 healthy men during rapid postural perturbations performed at baseline, immediately after eccentric exercise of the quadriceps, and at 24 and 48 h after exercise. Participants stood on a moveable platform during which eight randomised postural perturbations were performed (4 repetitions of 2 perturbation types: 8 cm forward slides, 8 cm backward slides). Before the eccentric exercise, the onset of VMO activity was significantly earlier than the VL muscle (average for both forward and backward perturbations: VMO 39.0±7.1 ms; VL 43.7±7.9 ms). However, the onset of VMO activity was significantly later compared with VL muscle immediately after eccentric exercise and this remained 24 and 48 h after eccentric exercise (average across all postexercise sessions and perturbation directions: VMO 72.3±11.1 ms; VL 56.0±8.2 ms; peccentric exercise and during eccentric exercise-induced muscle soreness up to 48 h later. These observations may help explain the high prevalence of knee disorders after high intensity eccentric exercise.

  12. 晚发性抑郁患者睡眠障碍的多导睡眠图研究%Study on the physiological changes of the late-onset depression during sleep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢秀颖; 许晶; 王俊平; 周密

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨晚发性抑郁患者睡眠障碍的多导睡眠图特点.方法 15例晚发性抑郁患者与10例健康老年人分别进行汉密尔顿抑郁量表(Hamilton Depression Scale,HAMD)的评分、多导睡眠记录仪的监测,次日行日间功能评定.结果 与对照组比较,晚发性抑郁患者睡眠进程明显紊乱,其中睡眠效率[(59.20±2.90)%,(77.09±1.55)%]、睡眠潜伏期[(54.00±4.97)min,(24.00±2.91)min]、异相睡眠(rapid eye movement,REM)次数[(4.50±0.40),(2.63±0.26)]和REM睡眠潜伏期(REM latency,REML)[(51.40±2.97)min,(79.00±3.56)min]差异有显著性(P<0.01);与对照组比较,晚发性抑郁组的醒觉时间及百分比[(31.84±3.47)%,(18.17±1.95)%]增加,S2睡眠时相的时间[(116.40±11.16)min,(199.25±11.84)min]及百分比[(31.00±2.60)%,(48.67±1.46)%]明显增加,慢波睡眠时间减少,REM睡眠活动度、密度[(58.61±3.76),(40.64±1.88)]及强度增加(P<0.05).结论 晚发性抑郁患者存在客观睡眠生理指标的紊乱;S2睡眠时间及百分比的增加、REM睡眠去抑制的表现有可能成为晚发性抑郁患者特异性的诊断指标.%Objective To explore ihe physiological changes of the late-onset depressive(LOD) persons during sleep.Methods 15 cases of LOD patients formed a group and 10 healthy aging persons formed a control group.Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) was used to score the severity of depression and polysomnographic recorders were used to monitor the whole night long.The subjective feelings of the sleep and the daytime mental status were assessed in the morning.Results Compared with the controlde group, the LOD patients obviously possessed a disordered sleeping process: sleep efficiency was lower( ( 59.20 ± 2.90 ) %, ( 77.09 ± 1.55 ) %, P <0.01 ); their sleep latency was longer( (54.00 ± 4.97 ), ( 24.00 ± 2.91 ), P < 0.01 ); the numbers of rapid eye movement(REM) sleep phase and rapid eye movement latency(REML) were strikingly different(P<0.01 ).Compad with

  13. Endothelial function and sleep: associations of flow-mediated dilation with perceived sleep quality and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Denise C; Ziegler, Michael G; Milic, Milos S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Mills, Paul J; Loredo, José S; Von Känel, Roland; Dimsdale, Joel E

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial function typically precedes clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease and provides a potential mechanism for the associations observed between cardiovascular disease and sleep quality. This study examined how subjective and objective indicators of sleep quality relate to endothelial function, as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In a clinical research centre, 100 non-shift working adults (mean age: 36 years) completed FMD testing and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, along with a polysomnography assessment to obtain the following measures: slow wave sleep, percentage rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep latency, total arousal index, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency and apnea-hypopnea index. Bivariate correlations and follow-up multiple regressions examined how FMD related to subjective (i.e., Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores) and objective (i.e., polysomnography-derived) indicators of sleep quality. After FMD showed bivariate correlations with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores, percentage REM sleep and REM latency, further examination with separate regression models indicated that these associations remained significant after adjustments for sex, age, race, hypertension, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, smoking and income (Ps Quality Index increased (indicating decreased subjective sleep quality) and percentage REM sleep decreased, while REM sleep latency increased (Ps quality and adverse changes in REM sleep were associated with diminished vasodilation, which could link sleep disturbances to cardiovascular disease.

  14. Interventions for Sleep Disturbance in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G; Kaplan, Katherine A; Soehner, Adriane M

    2015-03-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic disorder, ranked in the top 10 leading causes of disability worldwide. Sleep disturbances are strongly coupled with interepisode dysfunction and symptom worsening in bipolar disorder. Experimental studies suggest that sleep deprivation can trigger manic relapse. There is evidence that sleep deprivation can have an adverse impact on emotion regulation the following day. The clinical management of the sleep disturbances experienced by bipolar patients, including insomnia, hypersomnia delayed sleep phase, and irregular sleep-wake schedule, may include medication approaches, psychological interventions, light therapies and sleep deprivation.

  15. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  16. Sleep Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... PDF 474KB) En Español Medicines to Help You Sleep Tips for Better Sleep Basic Facts about Sleep ...

  17. The beneficial endophyte Trichoderma hamatum isolate DIS 219b promotes growth and delays the onset of the drought response in Theobroma cacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hanhong; Sicher, Richard C; Kim, Moon S; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Strem, Mary D; Melnick, Rachel L; Bailey, Bryan A

    2009-01-01

    Theobroma cacao (cacao) is cultivated in tropical climates and is exposed to drought stress. The impact of the endophytic fungus Trichoderma hamatum isolate DIS 219b on cacao's response to drought was studied. Colonization by DIS 219b delayed drought-induced changes in stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis, and green fluorescence emissions. The altered expression of 19 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (seven in leaves and 17 in roots with some overlap) by drought was detected using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Roots tended to respond earlier to drought than leaves, with the drought-induced changes in expression of seven ESTs being observed after 7 d of withholding water. Changes in gene expression in leaves were not observed until after 10 d of withholding water. DIS 219b colonization delayed the drought-altered expression of all seven ESTs responsive to drought in leaves by > or = 3 d, but had less influence on the expression pattern of the drought-responsive ESTs in roots. DIS 219b colonization had minimal direct influence on the expression of drought-responsive ESTs in 32-d-old seedlings. By contrast, DIS 219b colonization of 9-d-old seedlings altered expression of drought-responsive ESTs, sometimes in patterns opposite of that observed in response to drought. Drought induced an increase in the concentration of many amino acids in cacao leaves, while DIS 219b colonization caused a decrease in aspartic acid and glutamic acid concentrations and an increase in alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations. With or without exposure to drought conditions, colonization by DIS 219b promoted seedling growth, the most consistent effects being an increase in root fresh weight, root dry weight, and root water content. Colonized seedlings were slower to wilt in response to drought as measured by a decrease in the leaf angle drop. The primary direct effect of DIS 219b colonization was promotion of root growth, regardless of water status, and an

  18. An experimental study of adolescent sleep restriction during a simulated school week: changes in phase, sleep staging, performance and sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Alex; Carskadon, Mary A; Dorrian, Jillian; Coussens, Scott; Short, Michelle A

    2017-04-01

    This laboratory study investigated the impact of restricted sleep during a simulated school week on circadian phase, sleep stages and daytime functioning. Changes were examined across and within days and during a simulated weekend recovery. Participants were 12 healthy secondary school students (six male) aged 15-17 years [mean = 16.1 years, standard deviation (SD) = 0.9]. After 2 nights with 10 h (21:30-07:30 hours), time in bed was restricted to 5 h for 5 nights (02:30-07:30 hours), then returned to 10 h time in bed for 2 nights (21:30-07:30 hours). Saliva was collected in dim light on the first and last sleep restriction nights to measure melatonin onset phase. Sleep was recorded polysomnographically, and the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) and Karolinska Sleepiness Scale were undertaken 3-hourly while awake. Average phase delay measured by melatonin was 3 h (SD = 50 min). Compared to baseline, sleep during the restriction period contained a smaller percentage of Stages 1 and 2 and rapid eye movement (REM) and a greater percentage of Stage 4. PVT lapses increased significantly during sleep restriction and did not return to baseline levels during recovery. Subjective sleepiness showed a similar pattern during restriction, but returned to baseline levels during recovery. Results suggest that sustained attention in adolescents is affected negatively by sleep restriction, particularly in the early morning, and that a weekend of recovery sleep is insufficient to restore performance. The discrepancy between sleepiness ratings and performance may indicate a lack of perception of this residual impairment.

  19. Adolescent sleep patterns and night-time technology use: results of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Big Sleep Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Amanda L; D'Rozario, Angela L; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Williams, Shaun; Bin, Yu Sun; Grunstein, Ronald R; Marshall, Nathaniel S

    2014-01-01

    Electronic devices in the bedroom are broadly linked with poor sleep in adolescents. This study investigated whether there is a dose-response relationship between use of electronic devices (computers, cellphones, televisions and radios) in bed prior to sleep and adolescent sleep patterns. Adolescents aged 11-17 yrs (n = 1,184; 67.6% female) completed an Australia-wide internet survey that examined sleep patterns, sleepiness, sleep disorders, the presence of electronic devices in the bedroom and frequency of use in bed at night. Over 70% of adolescents reported 2 or more electronic devices in their bedroom at night. Use of devices in bed a few nights per week or more was 46.8% cellphone, 38.5% computer, 23.2% TV, and 15.8% radio. Device use had dose-dependent associations with later sleep onset on weekdays (highest-dose computer adjOR  = 3.75: 99% CI  = 2.17-6.46; cellphone 2.29: 1.22-4.30) and weekends (computer 3.68: 2.14-6.32; cellphone 3.24: 1.70-6.19; TV 2.32: 1.30-4.14), and later waking on weekdays (computer 2.08: 1.25-3.44; TV 2.31: 1.33-4.02) and weekends (computer 1.99: 1.21-3.26; cellphone 2.33: 1.33-4.08; TV 2.04: 1.18-3.55). Only 'almost every night' computer use (: 2.43: 1.45-4.08) was associated with short weekday sleep duration, and only 'almost every night' cellphone use (2.23: 1.26-3.94) was associated with wake lag (waking later on weekends). Use of computers, cell-phones and televisions at higher doses was associated with delayed sleep/wake schedules and wake lag, potentially impairing health and educational outcomes.

  20. Study on Jiawei Lianli Decoction Preventing Irinotecan-Induced Delayed-Onset Diarrhea%加味连理汤预防伊立替康致大肠癌患者迟发性腹泻临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖军; 田静; 闫磊

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the preventive effect of Jiawei Lianli decoction on delayed-onset diarrhea caused by irinotecan. Methods:There were 62 patients with advanced colorectal cancer randomly divided into two group,30 in treatment group and 32 in control group. All the patients were given FOLFIRI chemothera-py. Patients in the treatment group were given Jiawei Lianli decoction for 10 days. After the treatment,the following changes in two groups were measured such as the incidence and severity of diarrhea ,tumor remis-sion rate,healthy state(Karnofsky score) and the immune function. Results:The treatment group showed sig-nificantly lower incidence rates of delayed-onset diarrhea and less severity of diarrhea than the control group (P0.05). After the treatment,the CD3+,CD4+,CD4+/CD8+,natural killer cells and the Karnofsky score were increased in both groups,and they also showed differences between the 2 groups(P0.05);治疗组KPS评分改善情况优于对照组(P<0.05);治疗后两组组内CD3+、CD4+、CD4+/CD8+、NK细胞数量相比较均有显著性改善(P<0.05),两组间CD3+、CD4+、CD4+/CD8+、NK细胞数量相比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:加味连理汤有预防CPT-11所致迟发性腹泻、改善患者生活质量、提高免疫功能的作用。

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea alters sleep stage transition dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt T Bianchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Enhanced characterization of sleep architecture, compared with routine polysomnographic metrics such as stage percentages and sleep efficiency, may improve the predictive phenotyping of fragmented sleep. One approach involves using stage transition analysis to characterize sleep continuity. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed hypnograms from Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS participants using the following stage designations: wake after sleep onset (WASO, non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, and REM sleep. We show that individual patient hypnograms contain insufficient number of bouts to adequately describe the transition kinetics, necessitating pooling of data. We compared a control group of individuals free of medications, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, medical co-morbidities, or sleepiness (n = 374 with mild (n = 496 or severe OSA (n = 338. WASO, REM sleep, and NREM sleep bout durations exhibited multi-exponential temporal dynamics. The presence of OSA accelerated the "decay" rate of NREM and REM sleep bouts, resulting in instability manifesting as shorter bouts and increased number of stage transitions. For WASO bouts, previously attributed to a power law process, a multi-exponential decay described the data well. Simulations demonstrated that a multi-exponential process can mimic a power law distribution. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: OSA alters sleep architecture dynamics by decreasing the temporal stability of NREM and REM sleep bouts. Multi-exponential fitting is superior to routine mono-exponential fitting, and may thus provide improved predictive metrics of sleep continuity. However, because a single night of sleep contains insufficient transitions to characterize these dynamics, extended monitoring of sleep, probably at home, would be necessary for individualized clinical application.

  2. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    effects of sleep could be objectively differentiated from the effects of rest and recumbency. Furthermore, the specific effects of sleep onset and termination, and the effects of different sleep stages, could be assessed. Technological advances, with consequently enhanced and relatively non-invasive approaches to cardiovascular regulation, have greatly broadened our understanding of the effects of sleep stage on cardiovascular function. Continuous monitoring of simultaneous measures of polysomnographic and cardiovascular variables enables characterization of the effects of dynamic changes and rapid transitions in sleep stage, such as arousals. The capacity for measuring acute and immediate changes in autonomic, EEG and hemodynamic responses to sleep and arousal on a continuous basis has played an important role in enabling us to understand the interplay between changes in EEG and changes in the more peripheral measurements of neural and circulatory variables, such as sympathetic nerve traffic, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) (8-10), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (11-16), and intraneural measurement of sympathetic nerve traffic to muscle (MSNA) (17-22) and skin (SSNA) (23-24) have further advanced our understanding of mechanisms linking sleep and cardiovascular physiology.

  3. Nursing experience of infants with delayed-onset of vitamin K deficiency induced intracranial hemorrhage%晚发性维生素K缺乏症引起颅内出血患儿的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侍海棠

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore intensive care in improving delayed - onset of vitamin K caused by lack of children of the treatment of the role of intracere-bral hemorrhage effect. Methods :22 cases were analyzed retrospectively late onset vitamin K caused by lack of intracranial hemorrhage the children nursing effect. Results:22 cases cure in 18 cases,2 cases died, automatic discharge in 2 cases. Conclusion:Strengthening basic nursing is the key to improve the curative effect;At the same time,strengthen nutrition guidance, the nurse with a formula milk as the reasonable feeding artificially bred son knowledge education of the key is prevention.%目的:探讨晚发性维生素K缺乏致患儿颅内出血的护理措施.方法:回顾性分析22例晚发性维生素K缺乏所致颅内出血患儿全程护理效果.结果:治愈18例,死亡2例,自动出院2例.结论:加强基础护理是提高治愈率的关键;同时加强乳母的营养指导、以配方奶为主的人工喂养儿的合理喂养知识宣教是预防的关键.

  4. Potential Linkage of Satellite Cells and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness%肌卫星细胞与延迟性肌肉酸痛的潜在联系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵新娟; 杜海平; 王植元; 张翔

    2015-01-01

    By reviewing related literatures retrieved through the CNKI and Pubmed database. the continuous intensive eccentric exercise may have certain regulation to skeletal muscle satellite cell growth factor which is closely related to repair skeletal muscle damage ; delayed onset muscle soreness sequential timing has certain correlation with skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation; delayed ache of skeletal muscle special micro environment certain extent to stimulate the secretion of skeletal muscle satellite cell growth factor and promote skeletal muscle sarcomere remodeling.%检索中国知网和Pubmed数据库中相关文献并对其进行综述。持续大强度离心运动可能对与骨骼肌损伤修复密切相关的骨骼肌卫星细胞生长因子具有一定的调节作用;持续大强度离心运动引发的延迟性肌肉酸痛的发生时序与骨骼肌卫星细胞增殖时序存在一定的相关性;延迟性酸痛的骨骼肌特殊微环境一定程度上刺激骨骼肌卫星细胞生长因子的分泌,促进骨骼肌肌节重塑。

  5. The role of sleep in migraine attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Inamorato

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine attacks may be precipitated by sleep deprivation or excessive sleep and sleep is also associated with relief of migraine attacks. In view of this variable relationship we studied the records of 159 consecutive outpatients of our Headache Unit. In 121 records there was reference to sleep involvement, in 55% by a single form and in 45% by more than one form. When only one form was related, relief was most common (70%. 30% of that group of patients had the migraine attack precipitated by sleep, 24% by deprivation and 6% by sleep excess. When the effects of sleep were multiple, these effects were as expected logically in 65%: «in accordance» group (e.g attack precipitated by sleep deprivation and relieved by sleep onset. In a second group, («conflicting» where the involvement was not logical, there were three different combinations of sleep involvement, possibly due to more than one pathophysiological mechanism.

  6. Targeted silencing of DNA-specific B cells combined with partial plasma cell depletion displays additive effects on delaying disease onset in lupus-prone mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova-Ganeva, K A; Gesheva, V V; Todorov, T A; Voll, R E; Vassilev, T L

    2013-11-01

    Targeting autoreactive B lymphocytes at any stage of their differentiation could yield viable therapeutic strategies for treating autoimmunity. All currently used drugs, including the most recently introduced biological agents, lack target specificity. Selective silencing of double-stranded DNA-specific B cells in animals with spontaneous lupus has been achieved previously by the administration of a chimeric antibody molecule that cross-links their DNA-reactive B cell immunoglobulin receptors with inhibitory FcγIIb (CD32) receptors. However, long-lived plasmacytes are resistant to this chimeric antibody as well as to all conventional treatments. Bortezomib (a proteasome inhibitor) depletes most plasma cells and has been shown recently to suppress disease activity in lupus mice. We hypothesized that the co-administration of non-toxic doses of bortezomib, that partially purge long-lived plasma cells, together with an agent that selectively silences DNA-specific B cells, should have additive effects in an autoantibody-mediated disease. Indeed, our data show that the simultaneous treatment of lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice with suboptimal doses of bortezomib plus the chimeric antibody resulted in the prevention or the delayed appearance of the disease manifestations as well as in a prolonged survival. The effect of the combination therapy was significantly stronger than that of the respective monotherapies and was comparable to that observed after cyclophosphamide administration.

  7. CD44-deficiency attenuates the immunologic responses to LPS and delays the onset of endotoxic shock-induced renal inflammation and dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rampanelli

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, a potentially deadly clinical condition characterized by whole-body inflammatory state and organ dysfunction. CD44 is a ubiquitously expressed cell-surface transmembrane receptor with multiple functions in inflammatory processes, including sterile renal inflammation. The present study aimed to assess the role of CD44 in endotoxic shock-induced kidney inflammation and dysfunction by using CD44 KO and WT mice exposed intraperitoneally to LPS for 2, 4, and 24 hours . Upon LPS administration, CD44 expression in WT kidneys was augmented at all time-points. At 2 and 4 hours, CD44 KO animals showed a preserved renal function in comparison to WT mice. In absence of CD44, the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in plasma and kidneys were lower, while renal expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was higher. The cytokine levels were associated with decreased leukocyte influx and endothelial activation in CD44 KO kidneys. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated a role of CD44 in enhancing macrophage cytokine responses to LPS and leukocyte migration. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that lack of CD44 impairs the early pro-inflammatory cytokine response to LPS, diminishes leukocyte migration/chemotaxis and endothelial activation, hence, delays endotoxic shock-induced AKI.

  8. Low-temperature thermochronology of northern Baja California, Mexico: Decoupled slip-exhumation gradients and delayed onset of oblique rifting across the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christian; Fletcher, John M.; Kohn, Barry P.; Gleadow, Andrew J. W.; Raza, Asaf

    2011-06-01

    The northern Gulf Extensional Province displays key structural relationships that characterize the magnitude, direction, and timing of Neogene rift-related transtension during the opening of the Gulf of California. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He thermochronology from the Sierra San Felipe document moderate cooling (4°C/Myr-7°C/Myr) during the early Paleogene associated with progressive unroofing caused by erosional downwearing of the ancestral Peninsular Ranges. Beginning at ˜45-35 Ma, a period of tectonic quiescence with low cooling rates (≤1°C/Myr) marks the development of a regional Oligocene-Miocene peneplain. Rift-related exhumation began at ˜9-7 Ma and attains ˜2.5 km in the hinges of two antiformal megamullions. Decoupling between exhumation and finite displacement in certain fault segments is explained by vertical deflections associated with extension-perpendicular folding of the fault surfaces. The main faults of the detachment system were active contemporaneously, thus forming a mechanically linked array of large-displacement normal faults in the hanging wall of the Main Gulf Escarpment. The Late Miocene onset of transtension in the Sierra San Felipe suggests that widespread deformation may only have localized in the Gulf Extensional Province between ˜9 and 7 Ma, some ˜3-5 Ma after a major plate reorganization associated with cessation of subduction in the trench to the west. Between ˜12 Ma and ˜9-7 Ma, plate boundary shearing was likely distributed between the continental borderland west of Baja California and the southern Basin and Range province in Mexico.

  9. CHIP−/−-Mouse Liver: Adiponectin-AMPK-FOXO-Activation Overrides CYP2E1-Elicited JNK1-Activation, Delaying Onset of NASH: Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Mi; Grenert, James P.; Patterson, Cam; Correia, Maria Almira

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) E3 ubiquitin-ligase impairs hepatic cytochrome P450 CYP2E1 degradation. Consequent CYP2E1 gain of function accelerates reactive O2 species (ROS) production, triggering oxidative/proteotoxic stress associated with sustained activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-signaling cascades, pro-inflammatory effectors/cytokines, insulin resistance, progressive hepatocellular ballooning and microvesicular steatosis. Despite this, little evidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was found in CHIP−/−-mice over the first 8–9-months of life. We herein document that this lack of tissue injury is largely due to the concurrent up-regulation and/or activation of the adiponectin-5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-forkhead box O (FOXO)-signaling axis stemming from at the least three synergistic features: Up-regulated expression of adipose tissue adiponectin and its hepatic adipoR1/adipoR2 receptors, stabilization of hepatic AMPKα1-isoform, identified herein for the first time as a CHIP-ubiquitination substrate (unlike its AMPKα2-isoform), as well as nuclear stabilization of FOXOs, well-known CHIP-ubiquitination targets. Such beneficial predominance of the adiponectin-AMPK-FOXO-signaling axis over the sustained JNK-elevation and injurious insulin resistance in CHIP−/−-livers apparently counteracts/delays rapid progression of the hepatic microvesicular steatosis to the characteristic macrovesicular steatosis observed in clinical NASH and/or rodent NASH-models. PMID:27406999

  10. Relationships Between Questionnaire Ratings of Sleep Quality and Polysomnography in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Anna; Lagerros, Ylva Trolle; Kecklund, Göran; Axelsson, John; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between polysomnographic sleep and subjective habitual sleep quality and restoration from sleep. Thirty-one normal sleepers completed the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire and multiple home polysomnography recordings (n = 2-5). Using linear regression, sleep quality and restoration were separately analyzed as functions of standard polysomnography parameters: sleep efficiency, total sleep time, sleep latency, stage 1 and 2 sleep, slow-wave sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, wake time after sleep onset, and awakenings (n), averaged across recordings. Stage 2 and slow-wave sleep predicted worse and better sleep quality, respectively. Also, slow-wave sleep predicted less subjective restoration, although adjustment for age attenuated this relation. Our findings lend some physiological validity to ratings of habitual sleep quality in normal sleepers. Data were less supportive of a physiological correlate of ratings of restoration from sleep.

  11. Effect of Shenlingbaizhu San on Delayed-onset Diarrhea Caused by Irinotecan in Rats%参苓白术散对伊立替康化疗后大鼠迟发性腹泻的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁军利; 许隽颖; 刘超英

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究参苓白术散对模型大鼠伊立替康(Irinotecun,CPT-11)所致迟发性腹泻的预防作用.方法:健康雄性SD大鼠40只,随机分为正常对照组,腹泻模型组,中药低剂量组+腹泻模型组,中药中剂量组+腹泻模型组,中药高剂量组+腹泻模型组.尾静脉注射CPT-11 150mg/kg·d,连续两天,复制迟发性腹泻模型;中药十腹泻模型组于注射CPT-11前3天开始,每天一次用参苓白术散灌胃,共用10天;对各组大鼠腹泻情况进行评分;光镜下对大鼠肠黏膜损伤程度进行分级;ELISA法检测大鼠血清中IL-6,TNF-a,IL-10的水平.结果:中药各剂量组+腹泻模型组大鼠迟发性腹泻发生率均低于腹泻模型组(P<0.05);光镜下中药各剂量组+腹泻模型组大鼠肠黏膜损伤分级亦较模型组轻微(P<0.05);中药各剂量组+腹泻模型组大鼠的IL-6,TNF-a水平均比模型组低(P<0.05),而IL-10水平比模型组高(P<0.05).结论:参苓白术散可调节大鼠免疫功能,抑制炎症反应,预防迟发性腹泻的发生.%Objective:To study the effect of Shenlingbaizhu San on delayed-onset diarrhea caused by Irinotecan in rats models. Methods:40 healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group,diarrhea model group,low dose + diarrhea model group,middle dose group + diarrhea model group,high dose group + diarrhea model group.A model of delayed-onset diarrhea was established through injection with 150mg/kg body weigh/day CPT-11 for consecutive days into the tail vein. Herb groups were treated with Shenlingbaizhu San three days before CPT-11 injected and kept for 9 days.Scoring of delayed-onset diarrhea,histological studies of intestinal tissues under high power microscope,Elisa measuring the serum levels of IL-6,TNF-α and IL-10.Results:Scores of diarrhea in each herb dose + diarrhea model group were significantly lower than those of diarrhea model group (P<0.05);the severity of intestinal injury in each herb dose + diarrhea model group

  12. Sleep Paralysis: phenomenology, neurophysiology and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Solomonova, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    Sleep paralysis is an experience of being temporarily unable to move or talk during the transitional periods between sleep and wakefulness: at sleep onset or upon awakening. Feeling of paralysis may be accompanied by a variety of vivid and intense sensory experiences, including mentation in visual, auditory, and tactile modalities, as well as a distinct feeling of presence. This chapter discusses a variety of sleep paralysis experiences from the perspective of enactive cognition and cultural ...

  13. BDNF in sleep, insomnia, and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Karen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Eckert, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors involved in plasticity of neurons in several brain regions. There are numerous evidence that BDNF expression is decreased by experiencing psychological stress and that, accordingly, a lack of neurotrophic support causes major depression. Furthermore, disruption in sleep homeostatic processes results in higher stress vulnerability and is often associated with stress-related mental disorders. Recently, we reported, for the first time, a relationship between BDNF and insomnia and sleep deprivation (SD). Using a biphasic stress model as explanation approach, we discuss here the hypothesis that chronic stress might induce a deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system. In the long-term it leads to sleep disturbance and depression as well as decreased BDNF levels, whereas acute stress like SD can be used as therapeutic intervention in some insomniac or depressed patients as compensatory process to normalize BDNF levels. Indeed, partial SD (PSD) induced a fast increase in BDNF serum levels within hours after PSD which is similar to effects seen after ketamine infusion, another fast-acting antidepressant intervention, while traditional antidepressants are characterized by a major delay until treatment response as well as delayed BDNF level increase. Key messages Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the pathophysiology of stress-related mood disorders. The interplay of stress and sleep impacts on BDNF level. Partial sleep deprivation (PSD) shows a fast action on BDNF level increase.

  14. Pulsing blue light through closed eyelids: effects on acute melatonin suppression and phase shifting of dim light melatonin onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro, Barbara Plitnick, Mark S Rea Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythm disturbances parallel the increased prevalence of sleep disorders in older adults. Light therapies that specifically target regulation of the circadian system in principle could be used to treat sleep disorders in this population. Current recommendations for light treatment require the patients to sit in front of a bright light box for at least 1 hour daily, perhaps limiting their willingness to comply. Light applied through closed eyelids during sleep might not only be efficacious for changing circadian phase but also lead to better compliance because patients would receive light treatment while sleeping. Reported here are the results of two studies investigating the impact of a train of 480 nm (blue light pulses presented to the retina through closed eyelids on melatonin suppression (laboratory study and on delaying circadian phase (field study. Both studies employed a sleep mask that provided narrowband blue light pulses of 2-second duration every 30 seconds from arrays of light-emitting diodes. The results of the laboratory study demonstrated that the blue light pulses significantly suppressed melatonin by an amount similar to that previously shown in the same protocol at half the frequency (ie, one 2-second pulse every minute for 1 hour. The results of the field study demonstrated that blue light pulses given early in the sleep episode significantly delayed circadian phase in older adults; these results are the first to demonstrate the efficacy and practicality of light treatment by a sleep mask aimed at adjusting circadian phase in a home setting. Keywords: circadian phase, dim light melatonin onset, light through closed eyelids, blue light, sleep

  15. A 797 kb de novo deletion of 18q21.31 in a patient with speech delay, mental retardation, sleeping problems, facial dysmorphism, and feet anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Mireille M L; Gijsbers, Antoinet C J; Bosch, Cathy A J; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Bijlsma, Emilia K

    2011-01-01

    We report a 797 kb de novo interstitial deletion of 18q21.31 in a 6-year-old boy with speech delay, mental retardation, sleeping problems, facial dysmorphism, and feet anomalies. Examination of the region showed two genes, TXNL1 and WDR7, to be involved in the deletion. Haploinsufficiency of these genes could potentially contribute to the phenotype. Our patient has some clinical features that overlap with earlier described patients with a larger deletion of the distal part of chromosome 18q. The small deletion in region 18q21.31 may be responsible for some of the common features found in patients with larger 18q deletions.

  16. Diagnostic delay is associated with psychosocial impairment in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Sonja; Streetz-van der Werf, Christine; Schott, Jennifer S; Nolte, Kay; Karges, Wolfram; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically assess health care utilisation, diagnostic delay and psychosocial impairment in patients with acromegaly in rural versus urban health care environments. 41 patients with acromegaly were questioned to time lapse of symptom onset, first seeking medical advice and time of acromegaly diagnosis. Quality of life (QoL), and psychosocial impairment (depression, daytime sleepiness, sleep disturbances, disturbances of body image) were measured by self-assessment questionnaires. Patients were grouped into living in rural health care environments (RHCE, n = 22 patients) or urban health care environments (UHCE, n = 19 patients) using data on population density from the German Federal Statistical Office. RHCE patients waited significantly longer (2.5 vs. 0.89 years; p = .025) after symptom onset before seeking medical advice, but diagnosis of acromegaly was established at least as quickly as in UHCE (1.45 vs. 2.74 years; n.s.). There was a consistent trend toward more psychosocial impairment in UHCE which reached significance for sleep disturbances (p = .004). For all patients significant correlations between time delay of diagnostic process (defined as first visit to the doctor because of acromegaly-related symptoms and establishment of acromegaly diagnosis) and psychological QoL, depression, daytime sleepiness, sleep disorders and body image emerged. Patients with acromegaly in UHCE experienced more psychosocial impairment than patients in RHCE. The correlation of significantly increased psychosocial impairment and delay of diagnosis by the physician may reflect long-lasting embitterment in patients with acromegaly and should be considered during psychosocial counselling.

  17. Effect of dopamine D4 receptor agonists on sleep architecture in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Shunsuke; Nakamichi, Keiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ichihara, Junji

    2015-12-03

    Dopamine plays a key role in the regulation of sleep-wake states, as revealed by the observation that dopamine-releasing agents such as methylphenidate have wake-promoting effects. However, the precise mechanisms for the wake-promoting effect produced by the enhancement of dopamine transmission are not fully understood. Although dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors are known to have differential effects on sleep architecture, the role of D4 receptors (D4Rs), and particularly the influence of D4R activation on the sleep-wake state, has not been studied so far. In this study, we investigated for the first time the effects of two structurally different D4R agonists, Ro 10-5824 and A-412997, on the sleep-wake states in rats. We found that both D4R agonists generally increased waking duration, and conversely, reduced non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep duration in rats. The onset of NREM sleep was also generally delayed. However, only the A-412997 agonist (but not the Ro 10-5824) influenced rapid eye movement sleep onset and duration. Furthermore, these effects were accompanied with an enhancement of EEG spectral power in the theta and the gamma bands. Our results suggest the involvement of dopamine D4R in the regulation of sleep-wake states. The activation of the D4R could enhance the arousal states as revealed by the behavioral and electrophysiological patterns in this study. Dopamine D4R may contribute to the arousal effects of dopamine-releasing agents such as methylphenidate.

  18. Time to diagnosis in young-onset dementia as compared with late-onset dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, D. van; Vugt, M.E. de; Bakker, C.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Verhey, F.R.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which specific factors influence diagnostic delays in dementia is unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare duration from symptom onset to diagnosis for young-onset dementia (YOD) and late-onset dementia (LOD) and to assess the effect of age at onset,

  19. Analysis of sleep parameters in patients with obstructive sleep apnea studied in a hospital vs. a hotel-based sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Kimberly N; Song, Yanna; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A

    2008-04-15

    Polysomnography is associated with changes in sleep architecture called the first-night effect. This effect is believed to result from sleeping in an unusual environment and the technical equipment used to study sleep. Sleep experts hope to decrease this variable by providing a more familiar, comfortable atmosphere for sleep testing through hotel-based sleep centers. In this study, we compared the sleep parameters of patients studied in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories. We retrospectively reviewed polysomnograms completed in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories from August 2003 to July 2005. All patients were undergoing evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea. Hospital-based patients were matched for age and apnea-hypopnea index with hotel-based patients. We compared the sleep architecture changes associated with the first-night effect in the two groups. The associated conditions and symptoms listed on the polysomnography referral forms are also compared. No significant differences were detected between the two groups in sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, REM sleep latency, total amount of slow wave sleep (NREM stages 3 and 4), arousal index, and total stage 1 sleep. This pilot study failed to show a difference in sleep parameters associated with the first-night effect in patients undergoing sleep studies in our hotel and hospital-based sleep laboratories. Future studies need to compare the first-night effect in different sleep disorders, preferably in multi-night recordings.

  20. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Michael; Dietz, Marie; Veauthier, Christian; Fietze, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients. A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80) and good sleepers (PSQI subjective feeling of current well-being in the morning and subjective TST and negatively with subjective restfulness, subjective sleep onset latency, subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency, and evaluation of time awake after sleep onset. The data suggest that, in general, patients selected from the extremes of reported very poor sleepers and good sleepers have different amounts of sleep when measured in the laboratory, and that in general, the amount and timing of sleep in the laboratory are quite well perceived and reported by these groups. The data came from psychosomatic patients and suggest that even in this patient group, respective sleep complaints are more than just the expression of general somatization or lamenting.

  1. Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PD / Coping with Symptoms & Side Effects / Sleep Disturbances Sleep Disturbances Many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have ... stay awake during the day. Tips for Better Sleep People with PD — and their care partners too — ...

  2. Sleep Variability Among Older Adults With Insomnia: Associations With Sleep Quality and Cardiometabolic Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J; Malkani, Roneil G; Kang, Joseph; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-01-01

    Sleep variability has been linked to poor subjective sleep quality, but few studies have investigated effects on physical health. In this study, we evaluated cross sectional associations and change over time in objective sleep variability of adults with insomnia and short sleep duration who were participating in a non-pharmacologic intervention study. Results indicated greater variability in objective sleep measures were associated with poorer subjective sleep quality (p < 0.05). Higher sleep duration variability was associated with higher HbA1c (p < 0.01) and sleep onset time variability was associated with higher BMI (p < 0.05). Sleep efficiency and WASO variability decreased with intervention (p < 0.05). These results indicate that objective sleep variability may be an important feature for the assessment of insomnia outcomes.

  3. Sleep architecture when sleeping at an unusual circadian time and associations with insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne K J Gonnissen

    Full Text Available Circadian misalignment affects total sleep time, but it may also affect sleep architecture. The objectives of this study were to examine intra-individual effects of circadian misalignment on sleep architecture and inter-individual relationships between sleep stages, cortisol levels and insulin sensitivity. Thirteen subjects (7 men, 6 women, age: 24.3±2.5 y; BMI: 23.6±1.7 kg/m² stayed in a time blinded respiration chamber during three light-entrained circadian cycles (3x21h and 3x27h resulting in a phase advance and a phase delay. Sleep was polysomnographically recorded. Blood and salivary samples were collected to determine glucose, insulin and cortisol concentrations. Intra-individually, a phase advance decreased rapid eye movement (REM sleep and slow-wave sleep (SWS, increased time awake, decreased sleep and REM sleep latency compared to the 24h cycle. A phase delay increased REM sleep, decreased stage 2 sleep, increased time awake, decreased sleep and REM sleep latency compared to the 24h cycle. Moreover, circadian misalignment changed REM sleep distribution with a relatively shorter REM sleep during the second part of the night. Inter-individually, REM sleep was inversely associated with cortisol levels and HOMA-IR index. Circadian misalignment, both a phase advance and a phase delay, significantly changed sleep architecture and resulted in a shift in rem sleep. Inter-individually, shorter REM sleep during the second part of the night was associated with dysregulation of the HPA-axis and reduced insulin sensitivity.International Clinical Trials Registry Platform NTR2926 http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/

  4. Sleep, vigilance, and thermosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeijn, Nico; Raymann, Roy J E M; Møst, Els; Te Lindert, Bart; Van Der Meijden, Wisse P; Fronczek, Rolf; Gomez-Herrero, German; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of sleep and wakefulness is well modeled with two underlying processes: a circadian and a homeostatic one. So far, the parameters and mechanisms of additional sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions have been largely overlooked. The present overview focuses on one of these conditions: the effect of skin temperature on the onset and maintenance of sleep, and alertness. Skin temperature is quite well suited to provide the brain with information on sleep-permissive and wake-promoting conditions because it changes with most if not all of them. Skin temperature changes with environmental heat and cold, but also with posture, environmental light, danger, nutritional status, pain, and stress. Its effect on the brain may thus moderate the efficacy by which the clock and homeostat manage to initiate or maintain sleep or wakefulness. The review provides a brief overview of the neuroanatomical pathways and physiological mechanisms by which skin temperature can affect the regulation of sleep and vigilance. In addition, current pitfalls and possibilities of practical applications for sleep enhancement are discussed, including the recent finding of impaired thermal comfort perception in insomniacs.

  5. Perception of sleep in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ståle Pallesen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background:  Method:  Results:  Conclusion:  Key Words:  insomnia; older adults; diagnosis; perception of sleepThe results cast doubts about the usefulness of the common criteria (30 minutes sleeponset latency and wake after sleep onset used in clinical contexts to diagnose insomnia. Unrealisticpositive expectations about sleep changes with age can lower the threshold for complaining and thuscontribute to dissatisfaction and worry about sleep. Sedative-hypnotic drugs did seem to have limitedbenefit for the participants in this study.For those generally satisfied with their sleep, mean sleep onset latency was 37 minutes andmean wake after sleep onset was 38 minutes. It was further demonstrated that 59.2% of the sample hadunrealistic positive expectations (did not expect worsening of sleep with age regarding sleep in oldage. Those using sedative-hypnotic medication (23.3% were less satisfied with their sleep and felt lessrefreshed during the day than non-users. Contrary to most studies, no general gender differences inperception of sleep was revealed. The only exception was total sleep time where men reported moresleep than women (6.78 vs. 6.15 hours per day.A questionnaire focusing on the subjective experience of sleep was administered to 116 older(60 years and above visitors at 4 senior centres in Bergen, Norway.Discrepancies between objectively and subjectively measured sleep variables make diagnosinginsomnia in the elderly difficult. Also relevant to diagnosing insomnia in the elderly are expectationsabout sleep, gender and use of sedative-hypnotic medication. The present study focuses on howthese variables relate to insomnia and sleep satisfaction.ABSTRACT

  6. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    Primary pathophysiology of circadian rhythm sleep disorders(CRSDs) is a misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm phase and the desired or socially required sleep-wake schedule, or dysfunction of the circadian pacemaker and its afferent/efferent pathways. CRSDs consist of delayed sleep phase type, advanced sleep phase type, free-running type, irregular sleep-wake type, shift work type and jet lag type. Chronotherapy using strong zeitgebers (time cues), such as bright light and melatonin/ melatonin type 2 receptor agonist, is effective when administered with proper timing. Bright light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms. Bright light therapy (appropriately-timed exposure to bright light) for CRSDs is an effective treatment option, and can shift the sleep-wake cycle to earlier or later times, in order to correct for misalignment between the circadian system and the desired sleep-wake schedule. Timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has also been shown to be useful in the treatment of CRSDs.

  7. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed...... lymph node is also reduced following a single dose of anti-C5aR, suggesting that modulation of the C5a/C5aR axis results in effects on the T cell compartment in inflammatory arthritis. In summary, these data demonstrate that blockade of C5aR leads to rapid and significant effects on arthritic disease......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...

  8. 体针加中药对延迟性肌肉酸痛的治疗%The Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine on Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健隆; 翟鹏飞

    2006-01-01

      延迟性肌肉酸痛(Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness,DOMS)是运动员在运动训练过程中经常发生的现象.特别在突然加大运动量、非习惯性运动及力量训练后24h发生,主要表现为肌肉疼痛和(或)伴有肿胀、僵硬等症状.48h达到峰值随后逐渐减轻[1].该症状的发生对运动员的训练和比赛成绩的提高是一个巨大的障碍.常用的按摩、理疗、淋浴等疗法,效果欠佳.本研究应用体针和中药内调相结合的方法进行治疗,效果较为理想,对今后延迟性肌肉酸痛治疗具有一定的参考价值.……

  9. Treatment of GABA from Fermented Rice Germ Ameliorates Caffeine-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Kim, Hee Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2015-05-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is involved in sleep physiology. Caffeine is widely used psychoactive substance known to induce wakefulness and insomnia to its consumers. This study was performed to examine whether GABA extracts from fermented rice germ ameliorates caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice, without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination. Indeed, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration of mice. Conversely, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA treatment (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), especially at 100 mg/kg, normalized the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine. In locomotor tests, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA slightly but not significantly reduced the caffeine-induced increase in locomotor activity without affecting motor coordination. Additionally, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA per se did not affect the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination of mice. In conclusion, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA supplementation can counter the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine, without affecting the general locomotor activities of mice.

  10. Incorporation of caffeine into a quantitative model of fatigue and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckeridge, M; Fulcher, B D; Phillips, A J K; Robinson, P A

    2011-03-21

    A recent physiologically based model of human sleep is extended to incorporate the effects of caffeine on sleep-wake timing and fatigue. The model includes the sleep-active neurons of the hypothalamic ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), the wake-active monoaminergic brainstem populations (MA), their interactions with cholinergic/orexinergic (ACh/Orx) input to MA, and circadian and homeostatic drives. We model two effects of caffeine on the brain due to competitive antagonism of adenosine (Ad): (i) a reduction in the homeostatic drive and (ii) an increase in cholinergic activity. By comparing the model output to experimental data, constraints are determined on the parameters that describe the action of caffeine on the brain. In accord with experiment, the ranges of these parameters imply significant variability in caffeine sensitivity between individuals, with caffeine's effectiveness in reducing fatigue being highly dependent on an individual's tolerance, and past caffeine and sleep history. Although there are wide individual differences in caffeine sensitivity and thus in parameter values, once the model is calibrated for an individual it can be used to make quantitative predictions for that individual. A number of applications of the model are examined, using exemplar parameter values, including: (i) quantitative estimation of the sleep loss and the delay to sleep onset after taking caffeine for various doses and times; (ii) an analysis of the system's stable states showing that the wake state during sleep deprivation is stabilized after taking caffeine; and (iii) comparing model output successfully to experimental values of subjective fatigue reported in a total sleep deprivation study examining the reduction of fatigue with caffeine. This model provides a framework for quantitatively assessing optimal strategies for using caffeine, on an individual basis, to maintain performance during sleep deprivation.

  11. Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Quality of Third-Trimester Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shao-Yu; Lee, Chien-Nan; Wu, Wei-Wen; Landis, Carol A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the associations of sleep hygiene and actigraphy measures of sleep with self-reported sleep quality in 197 pregnant women in northern Taiwan. Third-trimester pregnant women completed the Sleep Hygiene Practice Scale (SHPS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as well as the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), and wore an actigraph for 7 consecutive days. Student's t-test was used to compare the SHPS scores and means as well as variability of actigraphy sleep variables between poor sleepers (i.e., PSQI global score >5) and good sleepers (i.e., PSQI global score ≤5). Compared to good sleepers, poor sleepers reported significantly worse sleep hygiene, with higher SHPS scores and higher sleep schedule, arousal-related behavior, and sleep environment subscale scores. Poor sleepers had significantly greater intra-individual variability of sleep onset latency, total nighttime sleep, and wake after sleep onset than good sleepers. In stepwise linear regression, older maternal age (p = .01), fewer employment hours per week (p = .01), higher CES-D total score (p sleep quality. Findings support avoiding physically, physiologically, emotionally, or cognitively arousing activities before bedtime as a target for sleep-hygiene intervention in women during pregnancy.

  12. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...... mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas...

  13. Related factors of stroke onset in patients with sleep apnea syndrome%睡眠呼吸暂停综合征合并卒中的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李友梅

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expressions of serum inflammatory markers and markers for endothelial function in patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) complicated with stroke, and explore the risk factors related to stroke onset in SAS patients. Methods:This study included 35 patients with simple SAS and 38 SAS patients complicated with stroke. The expression levels of serum endothelial nitric oxide synthase, malondialdehyde (MDA) and tumor necrosis factorα (TNFα) were detected and compared between the simple SAS patients and the SAS patients complicated with stroke. The related factors of stroke onset in patients with SAS were examined. Results:The expression levels of serum endothelial nitric oxide synthase, MDA and TNFαin SAS patients complicated with stroke were significantly higher than those in simple SAS patients (allP = 0.000). Univariate analysis showed that gender (P = 0.012), age (P = 0.009), the course of SAS (P = 0.000) and the history of hypertension (P = 0.000) were associated with stroke onset in SAS patients. Multivariate analysis showed that the course of SAS [hazard ratio: 9.12 (95% confidence interval: 2.15-13.88);P = 0.000] and the history of hypertension [hazard ratio: 5.05 (95% confidence interval: 2.74-10.52);P = 0.000] were the independent factors for stroke onset in SAS patients. Conclusion:The expression levels of serum inflammatory markers and markers for endothelial function in SAS patients complicated with stroke are increased, indicating the further dysfunction of endothelial cells. The course of SAS more than one year and the history of hypertension are independent risk factors involved in the onset of stroke in SAS patients.%目的:分析睡眠呼吸暂停综合征(sleep apnea syndrome,SAS)合并卒中患者的血清炎性标志物和血管内皮功能指标的表达水平,并探讨与SAS发生卒中相关的危险因素。方法:研究对象包括35例单纯SAS患者以及38例SAS合并卒

  14. Low-cost EEG-based sleep detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hal, Bryan; Rhodes, Samhita; Dunne, Bruce; Bossemeyer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A real-time stage 1 sleep detection system using a low-cost single dry-sensor EEG headset is described. This device issues an auditory warning at the onset of stage 1 sleep using the "NeuroSky Mindset," an inexpensive commercial entertainment-based headset. The EEG signal is filtered into low/high alpha and low/high beta frequency bands which are analyzed to indicate the onset of sleep. Preliminary results indicate an 81% effective rate of detecting sleep with all failures being false positives of sleep onset. This device was able to predict and respond to the onset of drowsiness preceding stage 1 sleep allowing for earlier warnings with the result of fewer sleep-related accidents.

  15. The consensus sleep diary: quantitative criteria for primary insomnia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Vincenzo; Léger, Damien; Bayon, Virginie; Erbacci, Alex; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Fabbri, Marco; Martoni, Monica

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to put forward quantitative criteria for the Consensus Sleep Diary, to differentiate people with insomnia from normal sleepers. In this retrospective study, we analyzed 295 sleep diaries of patients with primary insomnia (43% were male, ages ranging between 17 and 76 years) collected in two clinical centers for insomnia and 536 sleep diaries of normal sleepers (47% were male, ages ranging between 15 and 82 years). We considered the following sleep parameters: time in bed, sleep onset latency, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings, terminal wakefulness, and subjective feeling of rest. Using the Youden index, we calculated the quantitative criteria that performed best for each sleep parameter. Finally, we created receiver operating characteristic curves to test the accuracy of each identified criterion. Individuals with insomnia significantly differed from controls on all sleep indices (p optimal for terminal wakefulness (>15 minutes, area under the curve [AUC] = 0.83), wake after sleep onset (cutoff >20 minutes, AUC = 0.81), total sleep time (sleep efficiency (sleep diary in this study agree with the few available data in the literature. This confirms that the sleep diary could be a useful screening tool for assessing patients with primary insomnia.

  16. Cold panniculitis: delayed onset in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Michelle M; Cutlan, Jonathan E; Smith, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    The panniculitides are a complex dermatologic entity for both dermatologists and dermatopathologists. Panniculitis is an inflammation of the subcutaneous adipose tissue and can be associated with systemic diseases. We present a case of cold panniculitis, a form of traumatic panniculitis, in a 37-year-old woman that was caused by a cold therapy unit. Our patient did not develop lesions until 10 days following initiation of therapy, which is a unique presentation of cold panniculitis, as lesions usually develop 1 to 3 days after cold exposure.

  17. Sleep quality in professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietze, Ingo; Strauch, Jutta; Holzhausen, Martin; Glos, Martin; Theobald, Christiane; Lehnkering, Hanna; Penzel, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    Ballet dancers are competitive athletes who undergo extreme physical and mental stress and work according to an irregular schedule, with long days of training, rehearsal, and performance. Their most significant potential risks entail physical injury and altered sleep. The elaborate training requirements for ballet dancers do not allow regular chronobiological patterns or a normal sleep-wake rhythm. Our aim was to investigate the sleep-wake rhythm and sleep quality during rehearsal phases prior to a ballet premiere. We used wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries for a period of 67 days before the ballet premiere performance to study 24 classical ballet dancers. We likewise applied the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), SF-12 Quality of life Assessment, and d2 Test of Attention to assess quality of sleep, aspects of cognitive performance, and health status. We found significant reduction in sleep duration, from 418+/-43 min to 391+/-42 min, and sleep efficiency, from 81+/-4% to 79+/-5%, over the 67-day course of the rehearsal. We also found a decline in time in bed and an increase in wakefulness after sleep onset. Sleep onset latency did not change. However, the changes in sleep as documented by actigraphy were not reflected by the subjective data of the sleep diaries and sleep scores. As a result of the facts that total sleep efficiency and sleep duration values were already lower than usual for the dancers' age group at the beginning of the study and that mental acuity, concentration, and speed were likewise impaired, we observed exacerbated health deterioration in terms of sleep deprivation in ballet dancers during preparation for a premier. We conclude that individual activity-rest schedules, including daytime naps, may be helpful, especially during the stressful training and rehearsal experienced prior to ballet premieres.

  18. Sleep laboratory studies on the single-dose effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors paroxetine and fluoxetine on human sleep and awakening qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Frey, R; Krupka, M; Anderer, P; Grünberger, J; See, W R

    1991-10-01

    Paroxetine is a novel antidepressant drug with selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitory properties. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover sleep laboratory study the single-dose effects on objective and subjective sleep and awakening qualities were investigated after paroxetine 20, 30 and 40 mg morning doses (PX 20, 30, 40), paroxetine 30 mg evening dose, fluoxetine 40 mg morning dose (FX 40) and placebo in 18 healthy young volunteers. The drugs were orally administered in 2-wk intervals. In addition to each drug night, the adaptation night and washout night were recorded. Polysomnographic investigations (10:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.) showed a delayed sleep onset only after the morning intake of paroxetine, PX 40 being statistically different from placebo. Total sleep time and sleep efficiency deteriorated under morning PX 30, PX 40 and evening PX 30 as compared to placebo. The nocturnal wake time and sleep stage 1 increased under the paroxetine. Rapid eye movement (REM) reduction (min and %) occurred dose dependently after all paroxetine doses, but the REM latency was lengthened only after the morning intake. The suppressant effect on REM sleep is characteristic for antidepressants and was still significant in the washout nights following PX 40 and evening PX 30. The only statistically relevant finding under 40 mg fluoxetine referred to the increase of REM latency in both drug and washout nights. In contrast to objective results, subjective sleep quality remained generally unchanged. Attention, concentration and reaction performance improved under paroxetine as compared to baseline. The deterioration of well-being under PX 40 might be related to the appearance of drowsiness and nausea. Blood pressure and pulse rate were unaffected.

  19. Diagnostic delay in narcolepsy type 1: combining the patients' and the doctors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Raquel N; Werth, Esther; Poryazova, Rositsa; Baumann, Christian R; Valko, Philipp O

    2016-12-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is a neurological disorder characterized by a unique syndrome, including the pathognomonic symptom of cataplexy. The diagnosis can be confirmed by objective measures, such as typical findings in the multiple sleep latency test, reduced or undetectable levels of orexin (hypocretin) in the cerebrospinal fluid, and linkage to a specific HLA haplotype. Nevertheless, the mean time that elapses from symptom onset to the correct diagnosis ranges between 10 and 20 years, and the causes and correlates of this delay are poorly understood. Diagnostic delay was assessed on 52 well-defined patients with narcolepsy type 1, evaluating clinical, electrophysiological and neurochemical parameters and the results of a 41-item questionnaire developed to obtain the patients' perspective on various aspects of the diagnostic process. The mean time gap between disease onset and first medical consultation was 3.2 ± 5.1 years; the mean diagnostic delay was 8.9 ± 11.0 years. Prior to correct diagnosis, patients received a wide variety of misdiagnoses. The self-ratings of the patients revealed that the undiagnosed symptoms caused high levels of anxiety and unjustified criticism by family, friends and employers. Multiple regression analysis identified higher cerebrospinal fluid orexin levels (β = 0.311, P = 0.01), and a longer interval between the onset of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy (β = 0.368, P = 0.002) as independent associates of longer diagnostic delay. The diagnostic delay decreased over the last decades (β = -0.672, P narcolepsy type 1 is very common, associated with many adverse consequences, and requires educational efforts to improve awareness on narcolepsy among healthcare providers and the general population. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Assessment of sleep quality in powernapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooravand Takht Sabzy, Bashaer; Thomsen, Carsten E

    2011-01-01

    days each, including EEG and ECG were recorded. The SD and sleep events were analyzed by applying spectral analysis. The SO time was detected by a combination of signal spectral analysis, Slow Rolling Eye Movement (SREM) detection, Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis and EEG segmentation using both......The purpose of this study is to assess the Sleep Quality (SQ) in powernapping. The contributed factors for SQ assessment are time of Sleep Onset (SO), Sleep Length (SL), Sleep Depth (SD), and detection of sleep events (K-complex (KC) and Sleep Spindle (SS)). Data from daytime nap for 10 subjects, 2...... Autocorrelation Function (ACF), and Crosscorrelation Function (CCF) methods. The EEG derivation FP1-FP2 filtered in a narrow band and used as an alternative to EOG for SREM detection. The ACF and CCF segmentation methods were also applied for detection of sleep events. The ACF method detects segment boundaries...

  1. REM sleep deprivation during 5 hours leads to an immediate REM sleep rebound and to suppression of non-REM sleep intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, D.G.M.; Dijk, D.J.; Blok, Guus; Everhardus, I.

    Nine healthy male subjects were deprived of REM sleep during the first 5 h after sleep onset. Afterwards recovery sleep was undisturbed. During the deprivation period the non-REM EEG power spectrum was reduced when compared to baseline for the frequencies up to 7 Hz, despite the fact that non-REM

  2. REM sleep deprivation during 5 hours leads to an immediate REM sleep rebound and to suppression of non-REM sleep intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, D.G.M.; Dijk, D.J.; Blok, Guus; Everhardus, I.

    1990-01-01

    Nine healthy male subjects were deprived of REM sleep during the first 5 h after sleep onset. Afterwards recovery sleep was undisturbed. During the deprivation period the non-REM EEG power spectrum was reduced when compared to baseline for the frequencies up to 7 Hz, despite the fact that non-REM sl

  3. Sleep Paralysis and Hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Stores

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty features prominently in the folklore of various countries.

  4. The effects of exercise on self-rated sleep among adults with chronic sleep complaints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carmen Erlacher; Daniel Erlacher; Michael Schredl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose:The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether and to what extent the observed effects on self-rated sleep in a previous study using a combined treatment program with physical exercise and sleep education can be attributed by the physical activity (PA) component. Methods:The present study reports supplementary analysis of an already described and published study. Data were provided by a nonclinical sample of 98 normal-active adults with chronic initiating and the maintaining of sleep complaints. The additional analysis included sleep log, exercise log, and daily pedometer data which were collected during a baseline week and 6-week of a combined intervention. Results:The results indicate that the number of steps ( p=0.02) and the duration of PA ( p=0.01) is significantly related to the improvement in subjective sleep measures and therefore reveal an independent effect within this combined sleep program. Sleep diary data (recuperation of sleep, number of awakenings after sleep onset, and wake time after sleep onset time) improved significant (all p<0.01) over the intervention program. About 50%of the participants stated that the PA had an effect on their improvement. Conclusion:Improvements on subjective sleep quality after a combined intervention cannot be attributed to the cognitive component alone, but PA has an independent effect. Adults with chronic sleep complaints benefit from exercise. Therefore structured PA should be implemented in any sleep management programs.

  5. Impaired sleep affects quality of life in children during maintenance treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspers Gertjan JL

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increase of pediatric cancer survival rates, late effects and quality of life (QoL have received more attention. Disturbed sleep in pediatric cancer is a common clinical observation, but research on this subject is sparse. In general, sleep problems can lead to significant morbidity and are associated with impaired QoL. Information on sleep is essential to develop interventions to improve QoL. Methods Children (2-18 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL were eligible for this multi-center study. The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ, Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 3.0™ Acute Cancer Version (PedsQL were used to assess sleep and QoL halfway through maintenance therapy. Sleep and QoL were measured during and after dexamethasone treatment (on-dex and off-dex. Results Seventeen children participated (age 6.7 ± 3.3 years, 44% boys. Children with ALL had more sleep problems and a lower QoL compared to the norm. There were no differences on-dex and off-dex. Pain (r = -0.6; p = 0.029 and worry (r = -0.5; p = 0.034 showed a moderate negative association with sleep. Reduced overall QoL was moderately associated with impaired overall sleep (r = -0.6; p = 0.014 and more problems with sleep anxiety (r = -0.8; p = 0.003, sleep onset delay (r = -0.5; p = 0.037, daytime sleepiness (r = -0.5; p = 0.044 and night wakenings (r = -0.6; p = 0.017. Conclusion QoL is impaired in children during cancer treatment. The results of this study suggest that impaired sleep may be a contributing determinant. Consequently, enhanced counseling and treatment of sleep problems might improve QoL. It is important to conduct more extensive studies to confirm these findings and provide more detailed information on the relationship between sleep and QoL, and on factors affecting sleep in pediatric ALL and in children with cancer in general.

  6. Effects of Light-Emitting Diode Therapy on Muscle Hypertrophy, Gene Expression, Performance, Damage, and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness: Case-control Study with a Pair of Identical Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Bertucci, Danilo; Schiavinato, Josiane; Reiff, Rodrigo; Araújo, Amélia; Panepucci, Rodrigo; Matheucci, Euclides; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Arakelian, Vivian Maria; Hamblin, Michael R; Parizotto, Nivaldo; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify how a pair of monozygotic twins would respond to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) or placebo combined with a strength-training program during 12 weeks. This case-control study enrolled a pair of male monozygotic twins, allocated randomly to LEDT or placebo therapies. Light-emitting diode therapy or placebo was applied from a flexible light-emitting diode array (λ = 850 nm, total energy = 75 J, t = 15 seconds) to both quadriceps femoris muscles of each twin immediately after each strength training session (3 times/wk for 12 weeks) consisting of leg press and leg extension exercises with load of 80% and 50% of the 1-repetition maximum test, respectively. Muscle biopsies, magnetic resonance imaging, maximal load, and fatigue resistance tests were conducted before and after the training program to assess gene expression, muscle hypertrophy and performance, respectively. Creatine kinase levels in blood and visual analog scale assessed muscle damage and delayed-onset muscle soreness, respectively, during the training program. Compared with placebo, LEDT increased the maximal load in exercise and reduced fatigue, creatine kinase, and visual analog scale. Gene expression analyses showed decreases in markers of inflammation (interleukin 1β) and muscle atrophy (myostatin) with LEDT. Protein synthesis (mammalian target of rapamycin) and oxidative stress defense (SOD2 [mitochondrial superoxide dismutase]) were up-regulated with LEDT, together with increases in thigh muscle hypertrophy. Light-emitting diode therapy can be useful to reduce muscle damage, pain, and atrophy, as well as to increase muscle mass, recovery, and athletic performance in rehabilitation programs and sports medicine.

  7. Sleep and Mental Health in Undergraduate Students with Generally Healthy Sleep Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevich, Helen M; Lukowski, Angela F

    2016-01-01

    Whereas previous research has indicated that sleep problems tend to co-occur with increased mental health issues in university students, relatively little is known about relations between sleep quality and mental health in university students with generally healthy sleep habits. Understanding relations between sleep and mental health in individuals with generally healthy sleep habits is important because (a) student sleep habits tend to worsen over time and (b) even time-limited experience of sleep problems may have significant implications for the onset of mental health problems. In the present research, 69 university students with generally healthy sleep habits completed questionnaires about sleep quality and mental health. Although participants did not report clinically concerning mental health issues as a group, global sleep quality was associated with mental health. Regression analyses revealed that nighttime sleep duration and the frequency of nighttime sleep disruptions were differentially related to total problems and clinically-relevant symptoms of psychological distress. These results indicate that understanding relations between sleep and mental health in university students with generally healthy sleep habits is important not only due to the large number of undergraduates who experience sleep problems and mental health issues over time but also due to the potential to intervene and improve mental health outcomes before they become clinically concerning.

  8. Uso do alongamento estático como fator interveniente na dor muscular de início tardio Use of static stretching as an intervenient factor in delayed onset muscle soreness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Evans de Oliveira Bonfim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A dor muscular de início tardio consiste em uma sensação de desconforto muscular consequente da prática de exercício físico intenso, que perdura durante alguns dias. O alongamento estático pode ser usado para tentar amenizar esse efeito pós-exercício, mantendo-o durante cerca de 10-30 segundos e repetindo o procedimento por três a cinco vezes. OBJETIVO: Verificar, em indivíduos sedentários, o efeito do alongamento estático para o alívio da dor muscular de início tardio. MÉTODOS: Este estudo foi um ensaio clínico randomizado, prospectivo, cego por parte do avaliador, composto por 20 estudantes que foram divididos em dois grupos: GAL (exercício + alongamento e GC (exercício. O exercício foi constituído de cinco séries com 20 repetições de planti/dorsiflexão, exercitando o grupo tríceps sural. Ambos os grupos foram avaliados antes do exercício e reavaliados após 24, 48 e 72 horas, quanto ao seu grau de dor utilizando-se a escala visual analógica (VAS e um dolorímetro de pressão. RESULTADOS: A VAS mostrou que no grupo controle (GC houve diferença significativa na sensação de dor no pré-exercício comparado a 24, 48 e 72 horas, entre 24 e 72 horas e entre 48 e 72 horas após o exercício. No grupo alongamento (GAL, a VAS mostrou diferenças significativas no período pré-exercício comparado com 24, 48 e 72 horas e entre 48 e 72 horas após o exercício. O dolorímetro mostrou que no grupo controle (GC, houve diferença significativa na sensação de dor no pré-exercício comparado a 24 e 48 horas e entre 24 e 72 horas após o exercício. No grupo alongamento (GAL, as diferenças significativas se mostraram no período pré-exercício comparado com 24 e 48 horas após o mesmo. CONCLUSÃO: O alongamento estático não foi eficaz para o alívio da dor muscular de início tardio no grupo avaliado.INTRODUCTION: The Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness consists in a sensation of muscle discomfort resulting from

  9. Parasomnias and movement disorders of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alon Y

    2009-09-01

    Neurologists are often enlisted to help diagnose, evaluate, and manage a spectrum of abnormal spells during the night ranging from parasomnias to motor disturbance that span the sleep-wake cycle. Parasomnias are undesirable emotional or physical events that accompany sleep. These events typically occur during entry into sleep from wakefulness, or during arousals from sleep, and are often augmented by the sleep state. Some parasomnias, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder may be extremely undesirable, while others such as somniloquy are often of little concern. The parasomnias include a spectrum of abnormal emotions, movements, behaviors, sensory perceptions, dream mentation, and autonomic activity. Basic physiologic drives, such as sex, hunger, and aggression, may manifest as sleep-related eating, sleep-related sexual behaviors, and sleep-related violence. Parasomnias have a very bizarre nature, but are readily explainable, diagnosable, and treatable. They are hypothesized to be due to changes in brain organization across multiple states of being, and are particularly apt to occur during the incomplete transition or oscillation from one sleep state to another. Parasomnias are often explained on the basis that wakefulness and sleep are not mutually exclusive states, and abnormal intrusion of wakefulness into non-REM (NREM) sleep produces arousal disorders, and intrusion of wakefulness into REM sleep produces REM sleep parasomnias and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), two closely related conditions that often result in disturbed sleep onset and sleep maintenance, are also reviewed in this article. Although the mechanisms that underlie idiopathic RLS or PLMD are not fully understood, there is currently substantial evidence that dopaminergic dysfunction is likely involved in both conditions. The discussion will conclude with the "other parasomnias" and sleep

  10. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantua, Janna; Mahan, Keenan M; Henry, Owen S; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations). Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of word pairs in the morning or evening, and recall was assessed 12-h later, following an interval awake or with overnight sleep. Young adult participants (18-22 years) were assigned to one of four experimental groups: TBI Sleep (n = 14), TBI Wake (n = 12), non-TBI Sleep (n = 15), non-TBI Wake (n = 15). Each TBI participant was >1 year post-injury. Sleep physiology was measured with polysomnography. Memory consolidation was assessed by comparing change in word-pair recall over 12-h intersession intervals. The TBI group spent a significantly greater proportion of the night in SWS than the non-TBI group at the expense of NREM1. The TBI group also had marginally lower EEG delta power during SWS in the central region. Intersession changes in recall were greater for intervals with sleep than without sleep in both groups. However, despite abnormal sleep stage proportions for individuals with a TBI history, there was no difference in the intersession change in recall following sleep for the TBI and non-TBI groups. In both Sleep groups combined, there was a positive correlation between Intersession Change and the proportion of the night in NREM2 + SWS. Overall, sleep composition is altered following TBI but such deficits do not yield insufficiencies in sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

  11. Altered sleep composition after traumatic brain injury does not affect declarative sleep-dependent memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna eMantua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI often report sleep disturbances, which may be caused by changes in sleep architecture or reduced sleep quality (greater time awake after sleep onset, poorer sleep efficiency, and sleep stage proportion alterations. Sleep is beneficial for memory formation, and herein we examine whether altered sleep physiology following TBI has deleterious effects on sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Participants learned a list of word pairs in the morning or evening, and recall was assessed 12-hrs later, following an interval awake or with overnight sleep. Young adult participants (18-22 yrs were assigned to one of four experimental groups: TBI Sleep (n=14, TBI Wake (n=12, non-TBI Sleep (n=15, non-TBI Wake (n=15. Each TBI participant was >1 yr post-injury. Sleep physiology was measured with polysomnography. Memory consolidation was assessed by comparing change in word-pair recall over 12-hr intersession intervals. The TBI group spent a significantly greater proportion of the night in SWS than the non-TBI group at the expense of NREM1. The TBI group also had marginally lower EEG delta power during SWS in the central region. Intersession changes in recall were greater for intervals with sleep than without sleep in both groups. However, despite abnormal sleep stage proportions for individuals with a TBI history, there was no difference in the intersession change in recall following sleep for the TBI and non-TBI groups. In both Sleep groups combined, there was a positive correlation between Intersession Change and the proportion of the night in NREM2 + SWS. Overall, sleep composition is altered following TBI but such deficits do not yield insufficiencies in sleep-dependent memory consolidation.

  12. Characterization of the autonomic system during the cyclic alternating pattern of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Salazar, J S; Alba, A; Mendez, M O; Luna-Rivera, J M; Parrino, L; Grassi, A; Terzano, M; Milioli, G

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the RR variability was carried out during the Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP) in sleep. CAP is a central phenomenon formed by short events called A-phases that break basal electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillations of the sleep stages. A-phases are classified in three types (A1, A2 and A3) based on the EEG desynchronization during A-phase. However, the relation of A-phases with other systems, such as cardiovascular system, is unclear and a deep analysis is required. For the study, six patients with Nocturnal Front Lobe Epilepsy (NFLE) and other six healthy controls patients underwent whole night polysomnographic recordings with CAP and hypnogram annotations. Amplitude reduction and time delay of the RR intervals minimum with respect to A-phases onset were computed. In addition, the same process was computed over randomly chosen RR interval segments during the NREM sleep for further comparison. The results suggest that the onset of the A-phases is correlated with a significative increase of the heart rate that peaks at around 4s after the Aphase onset, independently of the A-phase subtype.

  13. Sleep board review question: epilepsy or parasomnia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhiraja R

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. Which of the following is the most helpful in differentiating nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE from non-rapid eye movement (NREM arousal parasomnias? 1. Onset during rapid eye movement (REM sleep. 2. Arousal preceding the event. 3. Stereotypy. 4. Concomitant presence of sleep apnea.

  14. Sleep board review question: epilepsy or parasomnia?

    OpenAIRE

    Budhiraja R

    2013-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. Which of the following is the most helpful in differentiating nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) from non-rapid eye movement (NREM) arousal parasomnias? 1. Onset during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. 2. Arousal preceding the event. 3. Stereotypy. 4. Concomitant presence of sleep apnea.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ...

  16. Healthy Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea Testing CPAP Healthy Sleep Habits Healthy Sleep Habits Your behaviors during the day, and especially ... team at an AASM accredited sleep center . Quick Sleep Tips Follow these tips to establish healthy sleep ...

  17. [The use of social media modifies teenagers' sleep-related behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royant-Parola, S; Londe, V; Tréhout, S; Hartley, S

    2017-06-08

    Modification of sleep behaviors in teenagers has been observed over the past 30years with a reduction in overall sleep time and an increasing number of teenagers suffering from sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation is linked to physical problems such as obesity but also to change in performance at school and mood disorders. Changes have been associated with the use of screens, cell phones, Internet and social media. Use of screens has been shown to delay sleep onset and melatonin secretion and stimulation of wake systems by interaction with social media may exacerbate these effects. The links between the use of social media and sleep patterns have not been fully explored. Our study aimed to evaluate the effects of social media on teenagers' sleep and the impact of sleep deprivation. As part of a sleep education program conducted in middle schools, teenagers from 6th to 9th grade were invited to complete an online questionnaire on sleep habits with teacher supervision and after parental consent. Outcome measures were sleep and wake times with estimated sleep duration in school (SP) and rest periods (RP), use of screens (computers, tablets, smartphones and video game consoles), the use of social media and impact on visual analogue scales of sleep quality, mood and daytime functioning. Students were divided into those with clear sleep deprivation (sleep timeSocial media was used by 64.6 %. After dinner, 52.6 % spent more than an hour and 14.7 % spent more than 2hours in front of a screen. After bedtime, 51.7 % regularly used electronic devices of which 25.6 % had a screen-based activity (e.g. texts, social media, video games or television). During the night, some teens woke up to continue screen-based activities: 6.1 % in order to play online video games, 15.3 % to send texts and 11 % to use social media. Bedtimes were later in PR compared with PS (22h06±132 vs. 23h54±02; Psocial media: sleep deprived teens were at more risk of nocturnal disruption with a

  18. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF IMOVANE AND ESTAZOLAM TREATMENT ON SLEEP DISTURBANCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李舜伟; 王长华

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with sleep disturbances who had completed therapy with hypnotics were observed under single-blind and self-comparable method for 7 days each. We found that patients treated with imovane or estazolam had no statistical differences with respect to sleep time onset, total sleep time, noc-turnal awakening, feeling after awakening, dream, drug side effects and sleep quality. Imovave performed better than estazolam in sleep time onset and total sleep time, From this study, imovane can be recom-mended as a new hypuotic to treat patients with sleep disturbanees.

  19. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time and to get into the deep restful stages of sleep decreases with age. Older people have more fragile sleep and are more easily disturbed by light, noise, and pain. They also may have medical ...

  20. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  1. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... air or choking that awakens you from sleep Intermittent pauses in your breathing during sleep Excessive daytime ... disease, these multiple episodes of low blood oxygen (hypoxia or hypoxemia) can lead to sudden death from ...

  2. Poor sleep maintenance and subjective sleep quality are associated with postpartum maternal depression symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eliza M; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Stickgold, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Women are at increased risk of developing mood disorders during the postpartum period, and poor postpartum sleep may be a modifiable risk factor for the development of depression. This longitudinal study investigated the relationship between sleep variables and postpartum depression symptoms using wrist actigraphy and self-report surveys. Twenty-five healthy primiparous women were recruited from their outpatient obstetricians' offices from July 2009 through March 2010. Subjects wore wrist actigraphs for 1 week during the third trimester of pregnancy and again during the 2nd, 6th, 10th, and 14th weeks postpartum while completing sleep logs and sleep surveys. Subjective assessments of mood were collected at the end of each actigraph week. Subjective sleep assessments were strongly predictive of depression severity scores as measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) across all weeks (p measures of sleep maintenance, such as sleep fragmentation, sleep efficiency, and wake time after sleep onset, were also significantly correlated with EPDS scores postpartum. However, there was no relationship between nocturnal sleep duration and EPDS scores. This study provides additional evidence that poor sleep maintenance as measured by wrist actigraphy, rather than lesser amounts of sleep, is associated with EPDS scores during the postpartum period and that subjective assessments of sleep may be more accurate predictors of postpartum depression symptoms than wrist actigraphy. It also supports the hypothesis that disrupted sleep may contribute to the development and extent of postpartum depression symptoms.

  3. Efficacy of Adjunct Sleep Interventions for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    dorsed symptoms of restless legs syndrome , periodic leg move- ment disorder, or delayed sleep phase syndrome on most nights associated with difficulty...cycle are offered. & 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.O 57 59 61UN C Introduction Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a clinical syndrome ...sleep consolidation is proportional to lesion size.43 The medial prefrontal cortex, and especially the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), influence sleep, and

  4. Selective REM sleep deprivation in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Manh Hoang; Hurni, Christoph; Mathis, Johannes; Roth, Corinne; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2011-03-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities, including cataplexy. The aim of this study was to assess REM sleep pressure and homeostasis in narcolepsy. Six patients with narcolepsy and six healthy controls underwent a REM sleep deprivation protocol, including one habituation, one baseline, two deprivation nights (D1, D2) and one recovery night. Multiple sleep latency tests (MSLTs) were performed during the day after baseline and after D2. During D1 and D2 REM sleep was prevented by awakening the subjects at the first polysomnographic signs of REM sleep for 2 min. Mean sleep latency and number of sleep-onset REM periods (SOREMs) were determined on all MSLT. More interventions were required to prevent REM sleep in narcoleptics compared with control subjects during D1 (57 ± 16 versus 24 ± 10) and D2 (87 ± 22 versus 35 ± 8, P = 0.004). Interventions increased from D1 to D2 by 46% in controls and by 53% in narcoleptics (P REM sleep deprivation was successful in both controls (mean reduction of REM to 6% of baseline) and narcoleptics (11%). Both groups had a reduction of total sleep time during the deprivation nights (P = 0.03). Neither group had REM sleep rebound in the recovery night. Narcoleptics had, however, an increase in the number of SOREMs on MSLT (P = 0.005). There was no increase in the number of cataplexies after selective REM sleep deprivation. We conclude that: (i) REM sleep pressure is higher in narcoleptics; (ii) REM sleep homeostasis is similar in narcoleptics and controls; (iii) in narcoleptics selective REM sleep deprivation may have an effect on sleep propensity but not on cataplexy.

  5. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized...... by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however...... with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic...

  6. Establishing an animal model of delayed onset muscle soreness and its histomorphologic observation%延迟性肌肉酸痛动物模型的建立及组织形态学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏源; 方春露; 李良鸣; 邢文华; 杨则宜

    2015-01-01

    背景:延迟性肌肉酸痛和骨骼肌微损伤有密切关系,但对于骨骼肌微损伤的确切机制还不太清楚。目的:通过离心运动建立骨骼肌微损伤模型,通过其组织形态学和超微结构变化。方法:将40只雄性 SD大鼠随机等分为安静对照组、运动后即刻组、运动后24 h组、运动后48 h组和运动后72 h组。后4组大鼠进行一次间歇性下坡跑运动,速度为16 m/min,坡度为-16°,5 min运动,2 min休息,共120 min。运动后即刻组、运动后24 h组、运动后48 h组和运动后72 h组大鼠分别于运动后即刻、24,48,72 h进行观察。结果与结论:离心运动后,大鼠骨骼肌组织形态结构和超微结构都发生了程度不同的变化,骨骼肌组织中结蛋白和波形蛋白出现不同程度的抗结蛋白抗体染色脱染。表明一次性离心运动能引起延迟性骨骼肌微损伤。%BACKGROUND:Delayed onset muscle soreness is closely related to skeletal muscle micro-injury, but the exact mechanism of skeletal muscle micro-injury is not yet clear. OBJECTIVE:To observe the histomorphological and ultrastructure changes of skeletal muscle micro-injury models induced by eccentric exercise. METHODS: Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into quiet control group, immediately after exercise group, post-exercise 24 hours group, post-exercise 48 hours group and post-exercise 72 hours group. In the latter four groups, the rats were subjected to intermittent running on the-16° slope at a speed of 16 m/min: 5 minutes movement, 2 minutes rest and totaly 120 minutes. Rats in the latter four groups were observed immediately, at 24, 48, 72 hours after exercise. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:After eccentric exercise, the morphology and ultrastructure of rat’s skeletal muscle were both changed to different extents, and Desmin and Vimentin were dyed off for anti-desmin antibody staining at varying degrees. It indicates that one

  7. [Sleep related eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Komada, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Nighttime eating is categorized as either sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) or night eating syndrome (NES). Critical reviews of the literature on both disorders have suggested that they are situated at opposite poles of a disordered eating spectrum. The feeding behavior in SRED is characterized by recurrent episodes of eating after an arousal from nighttime sleep with amnesia. Conversely, NES could be considered as an abnormality in the circadian rhythm of meal timing with a normal circadian timing of sleep onset. Both conditions clearly concentrate to occur during young adulthood, and are often relentless and chronic. Misunderstanding and low awareness of SRED and NES have limited our ability to determine the exact prevalence of the two disorders. SRED is frequently associated with other sleep disorders, in particular parasomnias such as sleep walking. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is ineffective, but pharmacotherapy is very effective in controlling SRED. Especially, studies have shown that the anti-seizure medication topiramate may be an effective treatment for SRED.

  8. "Sleep is not tangible" or what the Hebrew tradition has to say about sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancoli-Israel, S

    2001-01-01

    Much of what is known about sleep disorders has been uncovered in the last forty years. As scientists, we consider these discoveries to be landmarks. Yet there is a tremendous amount of information written about sleep in the Bible and its commentaries. Sleep, and even sleep disorders, are referred to in many instances and can be directly interpreted by what we know today. Our forefathers and foremothers generally viewed sleep as both pleasant and necessary and were aware that sleep was not one continuous stage. They referred to the function of sleep as being restorative. They deplored sleep deprivation, believing that it impaired life. They felt that excessive sleepiness was harmful. They understood that insomnia could be caused by stress and anxiety and by excessive alcohol, and that physical activity (exercise) and drinking milk could improve sleep. They suggested cures for insomnia, including some of the ideas included in today's sleep hygiene rules. They understood that there was a rhythm or timing to sleep. They even understood that it is easier to delay the circadian rhythm that to advance it. Although naps are not recommended, they sometimes took naps in the afternoon, but suggested just how long that nap should last-about one-half hour. And they knew that with age, although sleep is advanced, healthy elderly do not have difficulty sleeping. Although we think we have discovered many new features about sleep disorders, much of what we know today was suggested thou