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Sample records for delayed coking unit

  1. Closed-cycle process of coke-cooling water in delayed coking unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, P.; Bai, Z.S.; Yang, Q.; Ma, J.; Wang, H.L.

    2008-01-01

    Synthesized processes are commonly used to treat coke-cooling wastewater. These include cold coke-cut water, diluting coke-cooling water, adding chemical deodorization into oily water, high-speed centrifugal separation, de-oiling and deodorization by coke adsorption, and open nature cooling. However, because of water and volatile evaporation loss, it is not suitable to process high-sulphur heavy oil using open treatments. This paper proposed a closed-cycling process in order to solve the wastewater treatment problem. The process is based on the characteristics of coke-cooling water, such as rapid parametric variation, oil-water-coke emulsification and steam-water mixing. The paper discussed the material characteristics and general idea of the study. The process of closed-cycle separation and utilization process of coke-cooling water was presented along with a process flow diagram. Several applications were presented, including a picture of hydrocyclones for pollution separation and a picture of equipments of pollution separation and components regeneration. The results showed good effect had been achieved since the coke-cooling water system was put into production in 2004. The recycling ratios for the components of the coke-cooling water were 100 per cent, and air quality in the operating area reached the requirements of the national operating site circumstance and the health standards. Calibration results of the demonstration unit were presented. It was concluded that since the devices went into operation, the function of production has been normal and stable. The operation was simple, flexible, adjustable and reliable, with significant economic efficiency and environmental benefits. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  2. Test Report Emission Test Program EPA Information Collection Request for Delayed Coking Units 736 Coker Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARI Environmental, Inc. (ARI) was retained by Houston Refining LP (HRO) to conduct an emission test program at their refinery located in Houston, Texas. The testing was conducted on on the 736 Delayed Coking Unit (DCU) in response to EPA's ICR.

  3. Delayed coking unit preheat train optimization; Otimizacao do preaquecimento das Unidades de Coque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, Edson R.; Geraldelli, Washington O.; Barros, Francisco C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    The oil industry has been investing in research and development of new techniques and process improvements with the objective to increase the residual fraction profitability and to fulfill the market demands. The adequacy of the refining scheme has led to the development of bottom of the barrel processes that has the objective to convert heavy fractions into products of higher aggregate value. In this context, the process of Delayed Coking presents a great importance in the production of distillates in the diesel range as well as the processing of heavy residues, mostly in the markets where the fuel oil consumption is being reduced. With the approach to help PETROBRAS decide which route to follow during new designs of Delayed Coking units, this work presents a comparative study of the preheat train performance among the energy recovery to preheat the feed, in contrast with preheating the feed and generating steam, simultaneously. In this study the Pinch Technology methodology was used as a procedure for heat integration with the objective of getting the maximum energy recovery from the process, finding the best trade-off between operational cost and investment cost. The alternative of steam generation aims to provide an appropriate flexibility in Delayed Coking units design and operation. (author)

  4. Source Test Report for the 205 Delayed Coking Unit Drum 205-1201 and Drum 205-1202 Depressurization Vents (Marathon Petroleum Company LLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2010 Source Test was performed during the atmospheric depressurization step of the delayed coking process prior to the removal of petroleum coke from the coke drum. The 205 DCU was operated under a variety of conditions during the 2010 Source Test.

  5. Development of reduced crude processing technology in delayed coking units; Desenvolvimento da tecnologia de processamento de residuo atmosferico em unidade de coqueamento retardado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gloria Maria Gomes; Bartros, Francisco Carlos da Costa; Goncalves, Natalie Jorge; Pala, Danielle Marins; Nadolni, Aline Voigt [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Delayed Coking Technology can be described as thermal cracking of low value refinery residual streams into high-value products. This process has been applied in petroleum refining schemes in order to upgrade heavy and ultra-heavy crude oils. The typical feedstock is vacuum residue (VR). When we have an increasing medium distillates demand and refining schemes which have gas oil and VR excess, the simultaneous conversion of these streams becomes economically attractive, due mainly to the increase of diesel production. Thus, the processing of atmospheric residue (AR) in Delayed Coking Units (DCU) has fueled great interest for PETROBRAS. This work presents the results of industrial and pilot plant tests with AR and VR showing the increasing of diesel yields and decreasing of coke yields processing AR as feedstock. When we process all the AR in the DCU with high recycle rate we observe an increasing of 25% on refinery diesel production related to conventional schemes. The refining scheme of the new PETROBRAS refinery at Northeast of Brazil is based on this technology. This refinery will process heavy oils maximizing diesel production with minimum investment. (author)

  6. The importance of new delayed coking units in he fuel market; A importancia das novas unidade de coqueamento retardado no mercado de combustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Fabricia S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos 13; Seidl, Peter R.; Guimaraes, Maria Jose O.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The increase in production of heavier oils and the recent changes in the demand for petroleum derivatives requires modifications in refining schemes of Brazilian refineries, which were originally projected for processing light oils and production of mainly gasoline by fluid catalytic cracking units. This is necessary because forecasts indicate a larger increase in demand for diesel oil instead of gasoline. These same forecasts reveal an expressive reduction in the demand for fuel oil, which still is produced in large amounts in Brazilian refineries due to the quality of the oils from local fields that are processed. The current challenge for the local oil industry is to adapt the present refineries to produce more valuable derivatives from heavy oils. For this purpose, PETROBRAS is investing in the construction of conversion units with technology for processing heavier feeds, especially in the Delayed Coking process. This work has as an objective to identify the importance of the delayed coke units in the current scenario of the oil industry, highlighting the main investments in construction of new units and evaluating the impact of the existing units on the market for petroleum derivatives. (author)

  7. Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volk Jr., Michael; Wisecarver, Keith D.; Sheppard, Charles M.

    2003-02-07

    The coking test facilities include three reactors (or cokers) and ten utilities. Experiments were conducted using the micro-coker, pilot-coker, and stirred-batch coker. Gas products were analyzed using an on-line gas chromatograph. Liquid properties were analyzed in-house using simulated distillation (HP 5880a), high temperature gas chromatography (6890a), detailed hydrocarbon analysis, and ASTM fractionation. Coke analyses as well as feedstock analyses and some additional liquid analyses (including elemental analyses) were done off-site.

  8. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units. (iii) The owner or operator shall install, operate... for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU). 60.105a Section 60.105a... and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU). (a) FCCU and...

  9. Estimation of quality and yields of products from the process of future national oils indelayed coking units; Estimativa da qualidade e dos rendimentos de produtos de coqueamento a partir do processamento de petroleos nacionais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipakis, Sofia D.; Silva, Maria do Socorro A.J. da; Guimaraes, Regina C.L. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    As the importance of the delayed coking process increases in the Brazilian refinery scenario, it is necessary to perform a more detailed evaluation of vacuum residues potential on this kind of process. This work compares the performance of future produced and exported oils residues with those which are references nowadays as delayed coking feeding. This information is essential for the prediction of the future quality and yield of the products generated by this process, and for the determination of the oils value for exportation. For this purpose, a process simulator was used considering the operational conditions of a real delayed coking unit. The carbon residue and asphaltenes ratio from the residues were also evaluated. This simulation demonstrated that most of the future oils will produce a high quality coke from the point of view of crystallinity and metals content, and it will present high contents of both volatile matter and sulphur. The exported oils residues are likely to show good crystallinity. (author)

  10. Vernier Delay Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    This module will accept differential ECL pulses from the auxiliary rear panel or NIM level pulses from the front panel. The pulses are produced at the output with a fixed delay that is software programmable in steps of 0.1 ns over the range of 0.1 to 10.5 ns. Multiple outputs are available at the front panel. Minimum delay through the module is 9 ns.

  11. Characterization of coke, or carbonaceous matter, formed on CoMo catalysts used in hydrodesulfurization unit in oil refinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Nobuharu; Iwanami, Yoshimu; Koide, Ryutaro; Kudo, Reiko

    2017-06-01

    When a mixture of light gas oil (LGO) and light cycle oil is fed into an oil refinery’s hydrodesulfurization (HDS) unit to produce diesel fuel, the catalyst in the HDS unit is rapidly deactivated. By contrast, when the feed is LGO mixed with residue desulfurization gas oil, the catalyst is deactivated slowly. Hoping to understand why, the authors focused on the coke formed on the catalysts during the HDS reaction. The result of a comprehensive analysis of the coke suggested that the ways coke formed and grew on the catalysts may differ depending on the feeds used, which in turn could affect the deactivation behaviors of the catalysts.

  12. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya

    2015-06-11

    Fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units in refineries process heavy feedstock obtained from crude oil distillation. While cracking feed, catalysts get deactivated due to coke deposition. During catalyst regeneration by burning coke in air, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed. The increase in nitrogen content in feed over time has resulted in increased NOx emissions. To predict NOx concentration in flue gas, a reliable model for FCC regenerators is needed that requires comprehensive understanding and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics for the proposed pathways are evaluated using transition state theory. It is observed that the addition of O2 on coke is favored only when the free radical is present on the carbon atom instead of nitrogen atom. Thus, NOx formation during coke oxidation does not result from the direct attack by O2 on N atoms of coke, but from the transfer of an O atom to N from a neighboring site. The low activation energies required for NO formation indicate that it is more likely to form than NO2 during coke oxidation. The favorable pathways for NOx formation that can be used in FCC models are identified. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  13. Effects of operating conditions on compositional characteristics and reaction kinetics of liquid derived by delayed coking of nigerian petroleum residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Bello

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal upgrading of Nigerian petroleum residue was studied at relatively low pressure in a delayed coking reactor system. In this work, the intent was to investigate the effects of process variables such as reaction temperature (200(0C to 600(0C, reaction time (0 to 120min, additive concentration loading and additive-to-residue ratio on the amounts and quality of organic liquid product (OLP. The liquid products derived from the delayed coking process were characterized by means of instrumental analysis of gas-liquid chromatography. Results obtained from the analyses of the OLP revealed an upward trend of the conversion process and the selectivity of the aromatic compounds with additive-to-residue ratio (ARR and increase in temperature. This led to maximum yield of 37.2% achieved with ARR of 5 compared to 31% achieved with ordinary thermal conversion. The selectivity for aromatic hydrocarbons was maximum at 83.1wt% the selectivity towards aromatics and aliphatic hydrocarbons were highest for methanol-potassium hydroxide and methanol respectively. In all additive system cases, maximum OLP was produced at an optimum reaction temperature of 370(0C in the delayed coking reactor and at higher residence time. The gaseous product consisted of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide and C1 - C6 hydrocarbons, which amounted to about 20 to 30 wt% of liquid distillate. The information obtained in this study show that the organic liquid products are amenable to characterization procedure and provided the basis for the identification of processes for upgrading Nigerian petroleum residue and such other starting materials such as bitumen or fossil fuel coal liquids.

  14. World coking coal markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCloskey, G.

    2010-01-01

    This article discussed conditions in world coking coal markets. There is increased demand from Asia for metallurgical coal imports. World iron production was up 22 percent in first 7 months of 2010. Supply is up in Australia, the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Russia, and Mongolia, but the unexpected surge in supply caused prices to drop following a robust start to the year. Coking coal exports are up for the United States and Australia, but a delay in expanded production is expected until 2014. There is increased demand from Brazil, India, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan as well as new plants in Thailand, Indonesia, and Brazil. Unexpectedly, Australia is backing out of the Chinese market but increasing exports to Japan and South Korea. India is seeing flat performance in iron production and imports, and the United States has surged back into Asia. A considerable increase is expected in the seaborne import requirement by 2020. Prices are expected to fall and then rise. This presentation also discussed whether coking coal index pricing is impossible or inevitable. 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  15. Physico-chemical characterization of products from vacuum oil under delayed coking process by infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, L. V.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.; Guzmán, A.

    2016-02-01

    Eight vacuum residues and their delayed coking liquids products from Colombian crude were study by infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and principal component analysis (PCA). For the samples the structural parameters of aromaticity factor (fa), alifaticity (A2500-3100cm-1), aromatic condensation degree (GCA), length of aliphatic chains (LCA) and aliphatic chain length associated with aromatic (LACAR) were determined through the development of a methodology, which includes the previous processing of spectroscopy data, identifying the regions in the IR spectra of greatest variance using PCA and molecules patterns. The parameters were compared with the results obtained from proton magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and 13C-NMR. The results showed the influence and correlation of structural parameters with some physicochemical properties such as API gravity, weight percent sulphur (% S) and Conradson carbon content (% CCR)

  16. Physico-chemical characterization of products from vacuum oil under delayed coking process by infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meléndez, L V; Cabanzo, R; Mejía-Ospino, E; Guzmán, A

    2016-01-01

    Eight vacuum residues and their delayed coking liquids products from Colombian crude were study by infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and principal component analysis (PCA). For the samples the structural parameters of aromaticity factor (fa), alifaticity (A2500-3100cm -1 ), aromatic condensation degree (GCA), length of aliphatic chains (LCA) and aliphatic chain length associated with aromatic (LACAR) were determined through the development of a methodology, which includes the previous processing of spectroscopy data, identifying the regions in the IR spectra of greatest variance using PCA and molecules patterns. The parameters were compared with the results obtained from proton magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) and 13 C-NMR. The results showed the influence and correlation of structural parameters with some physicochemical properties such as API gravity, weight percent sulphur (% S) and Conradson carbon content (% CCR) (paper)

  17. Possibilities of electrode coke production from carbochemical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Janik, M.; Rojak, A.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory delayed coking results using Czechoslovak coal tar are explained. Laboratory equipment and coking procedures are described. Volatiles were condensed at the top of the reactor and recycled for coking at 500 C. Coal tar throughput was 1.1 kg/h. Yield of reaction products was 30 to 35% coke and 60% condensates. Properties of the produced coke are listed and compared to various types of pitch and petroleum coke. Technological advantages of the delayed coking process are outlined. The process is favored over traditional chamber furnace coking of coal pitches. 5 references.

  18. Coking coal outlook from a coal producer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrasher, E.

    2008-01-01

    Australian mine production is recovering from massive flooding while Canadian coal shipments are limited by mine and rail capacity. Polish, Czech, and Russian coking coal shipments have been reduced and United States coking coal shipments are reaching their maximum capacity. On the demand side, the Chinese government has increased export taxes on metallurgical coal, coking coal, and thermal coal. Customers seem to be purchasing in waves and steel prices are declining. This presentation addressed the global outlook for coal as well as the challenges ahead in terms of supply and demand. Supply challenges include regulatory uncertainty; environmental permitting; labor; and geology of remaining reserves. Demand challenges include global economic uncertainty; foreign exchange values; the effect of customers making direct investments in mining operations; and freight rates. Consolidation of the coal industry continued and several examples were provided. The presentation also discussed other topics such as coking coal production issues; delayed mining permits and environmental issues; coking coal contract negotiations; and stock values of coking coal producers in the United States. It was concluded that consolidation will continue throughout the natural resource sector. tabs., figs

  19. Clean Production of Coke from Carbonaceous Fines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig N. Eatough

    2004-11-16

    In order to produce steel (a necessary commodity in developed nations) using conventional technologies, you must have metallurgical coke. Current coke-making technology pyrolyzes high-quality coking coals in a slot oven, but prime coking coals are becoming more expensive and slot ovens are being shut-down because of age and environmental problems. The United States typically imports about 4 million tons of coke per year, but because of a world-wide coke scarcity, metallurgical coke costs have risen from about $77 per tonne to more than $225. This coke shortage is a long-term challenge driving up the price of steel and is forcing steel makers to search for alternatives. Combustion Resources (CR) has developed a technology to produce metallurgical coke from alternative feedstocks in an environmentally clean manner. The purpose of the current project was to refine material and process requirements in order to achieve improved economic benefits and to expand upon prior work on the proposed technology through successful prototype testing of coke products. The ultimate objective of this project is commercialization of the proposed technology. During this project period, CR developed coke from over thirty different formulations that meet the strength and reactivity requirements for use as metallurgical coke. The technology has been termed CR Clean Coke because it utilizes waste materials as feedstocks and is produced in a continuous process where pollutant emissions can be significantly reduced compared to current practice. The proposed feed material and operating costs for a CR Clean Coke plant are significantly less than conventional coke plants. Even the capital costs for the proposed coke plant are about half that of current plants. The remaining barrier for CR Clean Coke to overcome prior to commercialization is full-scale testing in a blast furnace. These tests will require a significant quantity of product (tens of thousands of tons) necessitating the construction

  20. Continuous coking of heavy feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Douglas W. [Lidcon, Inc (United States)

    2011-07-01

    A new process for continuous coking and decoking has been developed by Lidcon Inc. This process uses bitumen, vacuum tower residues, or a heavy CCR stock. The Lidcon process produces a higher liquid yield and lowers solid coke production. It also reduces the effects on the environment by lowering the amount of utilities that are needed to power the unit, while improving fire and worker safety. The reactor also produces coke continuously. The theoretical advantage of such a reactor configuration is that it has a short high temperature residence time for volatiles while improving the mass transfer of volatiles through the residue. The dimensions of the reactor are approximately 28' long with a 7' diameter. The weight of the unit is 20,000lbs. The Lidcon process can deliver a higher level of efficiency while reducing the amount of coke that is produced.

  1. Sun Coke Company responds to coke demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkdoll, M. [Sun Coke Company, Knoxville, TN (US)

    2004-07-01

    A set of 28 slides/overheads outline in words and photographs recent developments with which Sun Coke is involved. These include a update on the Jewell Coke Plant in Vansant, VA, USA and on the Indiana Habor Coke Company plant in East Chicago, IN, USA, news on the construction of a coking plant at Haverhill, OH, USA and of Sun Coke Tubarao in Vitoria, Brazil, and of proposed projects at Haverhill and at Port Talbot, Wales, UK. Technology updates by Sun Coke are described. These include flue gas sharing, automatic door latches, charging emission control, a high performance quench tower baffle system and a flat push hot car.

  2. Recursive Delay Calculation Unit for Parametric Beamformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recursive approach for parametric delay calculations for a beamformer. The suggested calculation procedure is capable of calculating the delays for any image line defined by an origin and arbitrary direction. It involves only add and shift operations making it suitable...

  3. Virtual unit delay for digital frequency adaptive T/4 delay phase-locked loop system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Zhou, Keliang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    /processor with a fixed sampling rate considering the cost and complexity, where the number of unit delays that have been adopted should be an integer. For instance, in conventional digital control systems, a single-phase T/4 Delay Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) system takes 50 unit delays (i.e., in a 50-Hz system...... Delay PLL system should be done in its implementation. This process will result in performance degradation in the digital control system, as the exactly required number of delays is not realized. Hence, in this paper, a Virtual Unit Delay (VUD) has been proposed to address such challenges to the digital......Digital micro-controllers/processors enable the cost-effective control of grid-connected power converter systems in terms of system monitoring, signal processing (e.g., grid synchronization), control (e.g., grid current and voltage control), etc. Normally, the control is implemented in a micro-controller...

  4. Fine art of coking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, S.

    1984-01-01

    The art and science of coking are discussed. Coke is the solid carbon made from the heavy, viscous residue left after the more useful products such as gasoline and diesel fuel have been refined out of the crude oil. Fuel grade coke can be a substitute for steam coal in many applications. Low-sulfur fuel coke is used in blast furnaces for steelmaking. The operations of Conoco's refineries for producing coke is described.

  5. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  6. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  7. Design of coke ovens. Types of coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroka, E.; Haratyk, J.

    1983-07-01

    Basic types of coke ovens used in Poland and in foreign countries are described. Four coke oven types are compared: the Otto coke oven, the PTU coke oven, the Still coke oven and the Didier coke oven. Design of each coke oven is shown in a scheme. The following problems are discussed: use of loose coking mixtures and packed mixtures, distribution of flue channels in heating walls, design of burners for combustion of gases used for heating. Effects of design on heat distribution and fluctuations of heat distribution in heating walls are analyzed. Effects of heat fluctuation on fluctuations of coke properties and coke quality are described.

  8. Programmable delay unit incorporating a semi-custom integrated circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linstadt, E.

    1985-04-01

    The synchronization of SLC accelerator control and monitoring functions is realized by a CAMAC module, the PDU II (Programmable Delay Unit II, SLAC 253-002), which includes a semi-custom gate array integrated circuit. The PDU II distributes 16 channels of independently programmable delayed pulses to other modules within the same CAMAC crate. The delays are programmable in increments of 8.4 ns. Functional descriptions of both the module and the semi-custom integrated circuit used to generate the output pulses are given

  9. Upgrading oil sands bitumen with FLUID COKING and FLEXICOKING technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamienski, P.; Phillips, G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Fairfax, VA (United States); McKnight, C.; Rumball, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described EMRE's Fluid Coking and Flexicoking technologies that are well suited for upgrading Alberta's heavy crudes and oil sands bitumen into pipelineable crudes or synthetic crudes, which can be further processed into transportation fuels. The Fluid Coking technology uses a fluidized bed reactor that thermally converts the heavy oils into light gases, liquids and coke. The metals and much of the sulphur are concentrated in the coke. Combustion of the coke provides process heat and the remaining coke is sold or stored on site for later recovery. Syncrude Canada currently operates 3 Fluid Coking units in northern Alberta. Flexicoking extends fluid coking by integrating air gasification to produce a carbon monoxide/hydrogen rich fuel gas that helps meet fuel and energy requirements of bitumen recovery and upgrading. The yields of light gas and liquids are similar to those of the Fluid Coking process. The partial combustion of coke provides the process heat for the thermal conversion and gasification steps. The remaining coke is gasified and desulphurized using Flexsorb technology. At present, there are 5 Flexicoking units in operation around the world. Interest in the technology is growing, particularly in locations with large demand for clean fuel or electricity. It is also suitable for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations in Alberta. This presentation outlined the operating principles of the Flexicoking integrated gasification system and compared it with more expensive oxygen gasification processes. tabs., figs.

  10. Delayed discharge from intellectual disability in-patient units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devapriam, John; Gangadharan, Satheesh; Pither, Judith; Critchfield, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method We undertook a cross-sectional service evaluation of the reasons and extent of delay in the discharge process in an intellectual disability hospital over a 12-month period. Delays at each stage of the discharge process are also quantified in this study. Results We found that discharge was delayed for 29% of patients during the study period. The majority (78.5%) was due to awaiting completion of assessment of future care needs and waiting for public funding. Clinical implications Commissioners (health and social), provider trusts, regulators and community providers should consider the reasons for delay in the discharge process and adopt a whole systems approach to discharge planning. This is highly relevant in light of recommendations by the Department of Health following the Winterbourne View scandal, which has raised concern about patients staying in intellectual disability in-patient units too long and for the wrong reasons. PMID:25285218

  11. Production of electrode coke from carbochemical raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Rojak, A.; Janik, M.

    1981-09-01

    This paper discusses the results of delayed coking of coal tar on a laboratory scale to produce high quality electrode coke. Design of the laboratory equipment used for coal tar carbonization is shown in a scheme. Properties of coal tar used as raw material for coking are shown in a table (moisture content, sulfur content, density, amount of matter insoluble in benzene, etc.). Reactor for coal tar coking is heated to 500/sup 0/C using water vapor (temperature in reactor head is lower and amounts to 350/sup 0/C). Coal tar preheated to 150/sup 0/C is injected into the reactor. Working pressure in the reactor amounts to 0.8 MPa. Coal tar is mixed with water before it enters the heating system (proportion of water to coal tar is 5 to 95). Gaseous and liquid carbonization products are collected and cooled separately. Properties of electrode coke produced by the described methods are shown in 2 tables. Coke properties produced from coal tar are compared to properties of petroleum coke produced in the USA and Romania (structure, moisture, ash, sulfur content). Comparative evaluations show that properties of coke from coal tar are satisfactory, and the proposed technology is more economical and less complicated than pitch coking. (5 refs.)

  12. Refinaria do Nordeste: petroleum coke handling system; Refinaria do Nordeste: desafios do sistema de movimentacao de coque verde de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Luiz G. de; Cabral, Jose Mauro B. [PETROBRAS S.A., Ipojuca, PE (Brazil). Refinaria do Nordeste (RNEST); Lucredi, Hedewandro A. [PETROBRAS S.A., Paulinia, SP (Brazil). Refinaria de Paulinia (REPLAN); Barros, Francisco Carlos da C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    The Delayed Coking Units - DCU - are adequate to the scheme for processing heavy oils where the market of fuel oil or asphalt is low or not profitable. The DCU's are conversion units that produce, in addition to the gas and liquid distilled products, the petcoke. The petcoke, depending on the characteristics, is used in various applications like as in the aluminum, iron, thermoelectric and cement industries. The petcoke is solid and its logistics is quite different from most of the products handled by PETROBRAS; therefore, this product has been a constant challenge in relation to the market requirements. Due to the importance of the DCU at Refinaria do Nordeste, and the petcoke production capacity, the coke handling system was projected in order to ensure the refinery operational continuity. The project permits the expedition and loading of 10,000 tons of petcoke within a period of 12 hours of work for cargo vessel. In the development of the processing project of Refinaria do Nordeste efforts were made to optimize the Delayed Coking Unit for the production of distilled products and the quality of the coke. The DCU operating conditions were projected so as to produce petcoke with quality adequate to the iron and aluminum industry. (author)

  13. Microstructural analysis and the mechanism if the coke formation in a refractory castable used in a fluidized catalytic cracking unit; Analise microestructural e mecanismo de formacao do coque em um concreto refratario utilizado em unidades de craqueamento catalitico fludizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrelon, M.D.; Rodrigues, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (GEMM/UFSCAR), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Grupo de Engenharia de Microestrutura de Materiais], Email: marcelodezena@gmail.com; Medeiros, J. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Toledo Filho, R.D. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Estruturas e Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The cokes formation in the refractory castables for FCC's unit is cited as one the most relevant problem in the internal face of the petrochemical Riser, but its mechanism is still unknown. In this sense, was made a microstructural study with a anti-erosive refractory castable class C, exposed to a cokemaker atmosphere, aiming to identify a mechanism to explain the coke's formation. For this reason, test samples were molded and subjected to a cokemaker process in the reactor pilot from CENPES-PETROBRAS-RJ, under an atmosphere of propene, as one temperature of 540 deg C and soaking time ranging between 10 and 480h. These samples had their internal and surface microstructures analyzed by Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results showed that the aggregates had deterioration and your internal pores were filled with coke. In this point, starts the growth of microspheres of coke on the external face, coalescing and forming 'columns' in which become denser when increasing the exposure time to a saturated atmosphere with hydrocarbon. (author)

  14. Centralized coke gasification study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    du Plessis, Duke [Alberta Innovates (Canada); Pietrusik, Debbie [Alberta Finance and Enterprise (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    By the year 2020 Alberta will produce 3 million barrels of bitumen per day. Refining bitumen yields several by-products such as petroleum coke and off-gasses. These products can be further utilized as a low cost feedstock for additional applications to increase revenue. Alberta currently has the largest amount of coke stockpiled in the world. The presentation explores what is the most profitable way to use this coke and what future technologies would improve the economic and environmental impact of the process. The development of methane and hydrogen becomes competitive at intermediate gas and oil prices. The next generation of gasification technologies is going to be cheaper, efficient and much smaller. Pilot projects have shown positive results. Economies of scale can be reached simply by only 20-30% of annual coke production. The high cost of the current technology is creating the biggest challenge but new technologies and process innovations have the potential to drive down cost.

  15. Design of coke ovens. Part II. Types of coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroka, E.; Haratyk, J.

    1983-08-01

    Design of 4 coke oven types is discussed: H. Koppers ovens, PWR ovens (developed by Giprokoks in the USSR), Koppers-Becker ovens and Nittetsu ovens. Design of each coke oven type is shown in a scheme. Distribution of heat and heat control in the heating walls of coke ovens are analyzed: burners, distribution of flue channels in heating walls, systems for temperature control of gases in flue channels. Gas flow in flue channels of 4 coke oven types is evaluated. Effects of coke oven design on its performance and on coke quality are also discussed.

  16. Pace studying worldwide coke production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Pace Consultants Inc., Houston, has started a multiclient study of world-wide petroleum coke production, examining environmental initiatives and eventually forecasting prices of fuel grade coke. Pace expects coker expansions, increased operating severity, and reduced cycle times to boost coke supply to more than 50 million metric tons/year in 2000, compared with 39.7 million metric tons in 1992. Increased supply and tightened environmental rules in countries consuming large amounts of petroleum coke will be the main factors affecting coke markets. The paper discusses coke quality and the Japanese market

  17. Sun Coke heat recovery coke technology at Indiana Harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.N. [Sun Coke Company (USA). Operations

    1999-12-01

    Sun Coke heat recovery coke technology was fully established for the first time at Indiana Harbor Coke Company, East Chicago, Indiana (USA). The plant supplies continuous heat to waste heat boilers which provide steam for a 94 MW turbine generator whilst producing 1,350,00 NT per year of metallurgical coke. The paper briefly describes the development of the technology and discusses specific design aspects of the Indiana Harbor plant. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Desulfurization of coke by recycling coke oven gas during coking process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Tang, H.; Guo, Z. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Process Engineering

    2004-06-01

    The experiments were carried out to try to remove the inorganic sulfur and organic sulfur in the semi-coke at different gaseous mixtures and temperatures. The influence of recycling coke oven gas on the coke oven temperature was analysed and the distribution of recycling coke oven gas in the carbonization chamber was simulated. The result shows that increasing the hydrogen content favours the removal of both inorganic sulfur and organic sulfur. However, raising the temperature does not always benefit the desulfurization. It would have little influence on the coke oven temperature if the coke oven gas were preheated before the recycling. The optimal time to recycle the coke oven gas is when the pore distribution in the coke is becoming homogenous. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. High coking value pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  20. Coking technology using packed coal mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznichenko, V.M.; Shteinberg, Eh.A.; Tolstoi, A.P. (Khar' kovskii Nauchno-Issledovatel' skii Uglekhimicheskii Institut, Kharkov (Ukrainian SSR))

    1991-08-01

    Discusses coking of packed coal charges in the FRG, USSR, France, India, Poland and Czechoslovakia. The following aspects are evaluated: types of weakly caking coals that are used as components of packed mixtures, energy consumption of packing, effects of coal mixture packing on coke oven design, number of coke ovens in a battery, heating temperature, coking time, coke properties, investment and operating cost. Statistical data that characterize the Saarberg packing process used in the FRG are analyzed. Packing coal mixtures for coking improves coke quality and reduces environmental pollution. 4 refs.

  1. Health Effects of Petroleum Coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant quantities of fugitive dust from pet coke storage and handling operations present a health risk. EPA’s research suggests that petcoke does not pose a different health risk than similar-sized particulate matter (PM10).

  2. PROSPECTS FOR COKE BREEZE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Mihnovets

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches give grounds to believe in the possibility of receiving briquettes from coke waste mixed with peat dry coal and their use for smelting iron in the cupola or as a household fuel.

  3. Transient thermal stresses analysis and thermal fatigue damage evaluation for skirt attachment of coke drum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.; Siahaan, A. S.; Kawai, H.; Daimaruya, M.

    2018-02-01

    In the last decade, the demand for delayed coking capacity has been steadily increasing. The trend in the past 15 to 20 years has been for operators to try to maximize the output of their units by reducing cycle times. This mode of operation can result in very large temperature gradients within the drums during preheating stage and even more so during the quench cycle. This research provide the optimization estimation of fatigue life due to each for the absence of preheating stage and cutting stage. In the absence of preheating stage the decreasing of fatigue life is around 19% and the increasing of maximum stress in point 5 of shell-to-skirt junction is around 97 MPa. However for the absence of cutting stage it was found that is more severe compare to normal cycle. In this adjustment fatigue life reduce around 39% and maximum stress is increased around 154 MPa. It can concluded that for cycle optimization, eliminating preheating stage possibly can become an option due to the increasing demand of delayed coking process.

  4. Coking pressure and fissure formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.; Patrick, J.W.; Steel, K.M.; Snape, C.E. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre SChEME

    2003-07-01

    Some coals, when carbonised for coke-making, lead to a build-up of pressure in the coke oven that results in damage to the oven walls. Coals that appear similar according to all commonly used assessment criteria for selecting coking coals can vary significantly in the amount of pressure they generate during carbonization. During the coking process fissures form in the coke, most characteristically in the direction of the thermal gradient extending from the oven wall to the centre of the charge. It has been shown that the extent of fissure formation varies significantly between different coals and blends. The pattern ranges form a few straight, unconnected fissures to an extensive network of fissures. Multi-directional, interconnected fissures would be much more efficient at releasing gases from the charge. But, as the fissure formation is associated with semicoke, whereas the gas release takes place as the coal devolatilises, there is doubt as to whether the two occurrences coincide in the oven. To make any case for a relation between fissuring and coking pressure, it needs to be shown that fissures are readily formed at an early stage of the carbonization and extend to the areas in the charge where gas continues to be evolved. The argument brought forward in this paper is that coals form characteristic fissure patterns on carbonization, and that this pattern can contribute to the prevention of coking pressure. The nature of the fissure formation can, in part, explain why some coals with high volatile contents do not build up internal gas pressure, whereas others, which release much less volatiles, do. 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Analytical and experimental study of two delay-coupled excitable units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weicker, Lionel; Erneux, Thomas; Keuninckx, Lars; Danckaert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of time-periodic oscillations for a system of two identical delay-coupled excitable (nonoscillatory) units. We first analyze these solutions by using asymptotic methods. The oscillations are described as relaxation oscillations exhibiting successive slow and fast changes. The analysis highlights the determinant role of the delay during the fast transition layers. We then study experimentally a system of two coupled electronic circuits that is modeled mathematically by the same delay differential equations. We obtain quantitative agreements between analytical and experimental bifurcation diagrams.

  6. 46 CFR 148.04-15 - Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and calcined (mixture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and calcined (mixture). 148.04-15 Section 148.04-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-15 Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and...

  7. Consistent coke quality from Sun Coke Company s heat recovery cokemaking technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkdoll, M. [Sun Coke Company, Knoxville, TN (USA)

    2001-07-01

    Presents the Sun Coke heat recovery coke making technology which has been developed over the last 41 years. Aspects covered include: development history; ongoing technological development; relationship between coal blend and coke quality; long-term production coke quality; environmental performance; plant economics; and labour requirements. 14 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Possibilities for producing and using activated coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Roubicek, V.; Rojak, A.; Kmostak, V.

    1986-02-01

    Feasibility of replacing activated carbon by activated coke in sewage treatment plants is analyzed. The following procedure for production of activated coke was used: black coal from the Ostrava-Karvina basin in Czechoslovakia was crushed to below 1.0 mm and heated to 900 C at a rate of 3 C/min, steam was used for coke activation. Design of laboratory equipment used for production of activated coke is shown. Properties of 2 types of activated coke are compared to those of FU activated carbon produced in Czechoslovakia and Degussa activated carbon imported from the FRG. The activated coke and activated carbon were used for treatment of waste water in a sewage treatment plant in Prague. Efficiency of waste water treatment using activated coke was similar to that achieved using activated carbon. Efficiency of three-stage waste water treatment is analyzed. Recommendations for use of activated coke for waste water treatment are made.

  9. Results of tuyere coke sampling with regard to application of appropriate coke strength after reaction (CSR) for a blast furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Shiau J-S.; Ko Y-C.; Ho C-K.; Hung M-T.

    2017-01-01

    Raising pulverized coal injection (PCI) will decrease coke rate, but increase the residence time of coke and abrasion in the blast furnace (BF). Thus, insufficient coke strength will generate more coke fines in the lower BF and result in lower permeability and production of hot metal (HM). For understanding the behavior of coke at various HM productivities, a tuyere coke sampler was used to collect the coke samples for measuring the coke strength. Firstly, ...

  10. An Evaluation of the Delayed-Coking Product Yield of Heavy Feedstocks Using Asphaltene Content and Carbon Residue Évaluation du rendement en produit de cokéfaction différée de pétrole lourd à l'aide de la teneur an asphaltènes et du résidu de coke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schabron J. F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Six residua from different crude oils were evaluated for composition and carbon residue forming tendencies. The whole residua were evaluated for elemental composition, trace metals content, carbon residue, and specific gravity. Each residuum was deasphaltened in heptane, and the heptane-soluble materials were separated into saturate, aromatic, and polar fractions on activated silica gel. The asphaltenes were evaluated for elemental composition, trace metals content, molecular weight, and carbon residue. The relationship between carbon residues and features of the asphaltenes was studied, and a correlation of contributing features was developed. The asphaltenes were further separated into four fractions according to apparent molecular size by preparative size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The preparative size exclusion chromatographic fractions from the asphaltenes were evaluated for sulfur content, molecular weight, and trace metals content. Material balances showed that the data obtained on the fractions account for the data obtained on the original material. This indicates that the contributions of the properties of the fractions can be studied and related to properties of the whole material. La composition et le résidu de coke de six résidus de raffinage de différents pétroles lourds ont été évalués afin de déterminer des tendances. La composition élémentaire, la teneur en métaux-traces, le résidu de coke et la densité spécifique ont été déterminés sur le résidu complet. Chaque résidu a été désasphalténé dans l'heptane et les produits solubles dans l'heptane ont été séparés en fractions saturée, aromatique et polaire sur du gel de silice activée. La composition élémentaire, la teneur en métaux-traces, la masse moléculaire et le résidu de coke ont été déterminés sur les asphaltènes. La relation entre les résidus de coke et les caractéristiques des asphaltènes a été étudiée, ce qui a permis d

  11. 77 FR 32998 - Foundry Coke From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... COMMISSION Foundry Coke From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on foundry coke from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4326 (May 2012), entitled Foundry Coke from China...

  12. Effect of petroleum coke addition into coal charge on coke qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koichi Fukuda; Kenji Kato [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment & Process Technology Center

    2005-07-01

    The effect of petroleum coke addition to coal charge on the resultant coke qualities was investigated using a coke test oven. Addition of the petroleum cokes into coal charge, in the range from 1 to 5 mass%, deteriorated coke qualities, especially coke strength evaluated by the drum index regulated in K2151 in JIS, DI{sup 150}{sub 15}, and the coke strength after the reaction with carbon dioxide, CSR. However, further crushing of the petroleum cokes was found to lead to suppression of the drop in DI{sup 150}{sub 15} and CSR. On the other hand, the petroleum coke addition had benefit to increase the coke yield due to the low volatile matter content of the petroleum cokes. The sulfur content of the petroleum cokes was found to remain mainly in the resultant cokes after carbonization. Therefore, the increase in sulfur content of the resultant cokes must be taken into consideration when the coke is used in a blast furnace. 7 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Sun Coke Company's heat recovery coke making technology. High coke quality and low environmental impact; Technologie ''Sun Coke''. Qualite du coke et impact environnemental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.N.; Barkdoll, M.P. [Sun Coke Company (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Sun Coke Company's heat recovery coke-making technology has been developed over the past 40 years, and is now poised to become the dominant technology to meet future global coke-making needs. An extensive data base regarding coal blends tested and resultant coke quality will be presented. On the environmental front, extensive air emission data has been collected and will be compared to by-product coke plant air emission data. (authors)

  14. Bio-coke as an alternative to petroleum coke and metallurgical coke; Bio-cokes als alternatief voor petroleumcokes en metallurgische cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H.J.; Van Lieshout, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Sevenster, M.N. [Sevenster Environmental Consultancy, Australian Capital Territory ACT (Australia)

    2012-11-15

    In the framework of elaborating the Dutch Roadmap Chemistry 2030), CE Delft has conducted an exploratory study for the Association of the Dutch Chemical Industry (VNCI) on the options of replacing (petroleum) coke in the chemical sector by biocokes. Coke is used as a reducing agent and/or raw material in four companies in the Dutch chemical industry (Tronox, ESD-SIC, Thermphos, Aluchemie). Replacing coke at these four companies can potentially yield a direct CO2 reduction of expectedly several hundreds of kilotons per year. For a first exploration of the options of bio-coke, CE Delft first conducted a desk study to get information on the quality and production costs for bio-coke. Subsequently, CE Delft had contact with the four chemical companies and a made a number of company visits. Moreover, the technical, economic and organizational capabilities, constraints and requirements with regard to a possible (partial) switch to biocokes have been explored. Based on the information available so far it can be concluded that biocokes seems to be a technically and economically interesting innovation. For implementation to finally take place, it is necessary to gain better insight in the technical and economic potential [Dutch] In verband met de uitwerking van de Routekaart Chemie 2030 heeft CE Delft voor VNCI een verkenning uitgevoerd naar de mogelijkheden voor vervanging van (petroleum)cokes in de chemische sector door biocokes. Cokes wordt gebruikt als reductiemiddel en/of grondstof bij een viertal bedrijven in de Nederlandse chemie (Tronox, ESD-SIC, Thermphos, Aluchemie). Het vervangen van cokes bij deze vier bedrijven kan in potentie een directe CO2-reductie van naar verwachting enkele honderden kilotonnen/jaar opleveren. Voor een eerste verkenning van de mogelijkheden van bio-cokes heeft CE Delft eerst een bureaustudie uitgevoerd naar informatie over kwaliteit van en productiekosten voor bio-cokes. Vervolgens heeft CE Delft contact gehad met de vier chemische

  15. Coke from small-diameter tubes analyzed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism for coke deposit formation and the nature of the coke itself can vary with the design of the ethylene furnace tube bank. In this article, coke deposits from furnaces with small-diameter pyrolysis tubes are examined. The samples were taken from four furnaces of identical design (Plant B). As in both the first and second installments of the series, the coke deposits were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX). The deposits from the small-diameter tubes are compared with the coke deposits from the furnace discussed in earlier articles. Analysis of the coke in both sets of samples are then used to offer recommendations for improved decoking procedures, operating procedures, better feed selection, and better selection of the metallurgy used in furnace tubes, to extend the operating time of the furnace tubes by reducing the amount and type of coke build up

  16. Oil sands cokes affect microbial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip M. Fedorak; Debora L. Coy [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Department of Biological Sciences

    2006-09-15

    The upgrading of bitumen extracted from oil sands in Alberta, Canada is producing vast quantities of coke that must be stored in a manner that will not harm the environment. It has been assumed that these cokes are inert, and therefore should not affect any biological processes. Coke samples were incubated in two microbiological tests to determine if they are inert. One was a methanogenic bioassay, which showed that higher coke dosages led to lower methanogenic activity. In the second test, coke was incubated with heterotrophic, aerobic bacteria that are known to extract organic sulfur from coal yielding sulfate in the medium. Sulfate production was observed with one of the coke samples. Thus, the cokes are not inert. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Delayed coker fractionator advanced control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaisinghani, R.; Minter, B. (ABB SIMCON Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Tica, A.; Puglesi, A.; Ojeda, R. (Yacimentos Petroliferos Fiscales, Mendoza (Argentina))

    1993-08-01

    In a delayed coking process, as coke drum switches are made, rapid changes occur in both the fractionator feed rate and composition. With conventional control, it is not unusual to see long transient behavior of large swings in both quality and flowrates of coker gas oils. This can extract a heavy economic toll, not only in coker operation, but in the operation of downstream units as the upset is propagated. An advanced process control application (APC) was recently implemented on the coker fractionator at the Yacimentos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), Lujan de Cuyo Refinery, in Mendoza, Argentina. This coker fractionator control design was unique as it handled two different operating objectives: control of product qualities via tower temperature profile during normal operation and control of gas oil product flow ratio during drum switch. This combination of control objectives in one multivariable predictive control program was achieved by including special logic to decouple the individual tuning requirements. Also, additional logic was included to unambiguously detect and identify drum switch and drum steam out as discrete events within 30 seconds of their actual occurrence. These discrete events were then used as disturbance variables to minimize fractionator transient behavior. As a performance measure, the overhead temperature was controlled within 2 C to 2.5 C of its target, gas oil flows were stabilized during drum switches and steam generation via pump around was maximized. Overall, implementing advanced control for the delayed coker fractionator resulted in substantial benefits from product quality control, product flow control and minimized energy consumption.

  18. Carbonization heat of coking coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Ueda; V. Zymla; F. Honnart [Nippon Steel (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The heat of carbonization is an important element of the coke oven heat balance. It is therefore important to know its absolute value or, at least, its relative variation when coal properties and process parameters change, in order for it to be taken into account by automatic heating control systems. An experimental procedure was thus developed, enabling the heat flow over the whole carbonization temperature range (25-1100{sup o}C) to be measured by DTA. Five coals of different ranks (from 18 to 34% volatile matter) were tested. Results show that all of them exhibit similar behaviour: an endothermic effect below 500{sup o}C and an exothermic effect at higher temperatures. It was established that the heat of carbonization varies with coal rank. The highest exothermic peak was measured for medium volatile hard coking coal. Having ascertained the right measurement procedure, the influence of coal weathering and plastic addition to coal blends on carbonisation heat were studied as well. It was found that the weight loss of oxidized coals during a heating in nitrogen was reduced (coke yield increased) and the heat of carbonization dramatically decreased, especially for medium and high volatile coals. The copyrolysis of coals and plastics (PE, PP, PS, PET) showed also a notable decrease of exothermic heat of carbonization, even for relatively low percentage plastic addition (less then 2%). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-01

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  20. Development of an X-ray delay unit for correlation spectroscopy and pump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseker, Wojciech

    2008-07-15

    Probing condensed matter on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be one of the key topics for future X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources. The accessible time windows are, however, compromised by the intrinsic time structure of the sources. One way to overcome this limitation is the usage of a time delay unit. A prototype device capable of splitting an X-ray pulse into two adjustable fractions, delaying one of them with the aim to perform X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and pump-probe type studies was designed and manufactured. The device utilizes eight perfect crystals in vertical 90 scattering geometry. Its performance has been verified with 8.39 keV and 12.4 keV Xrays at various synchrotron sources. The measured throughput of the device with a Si(333) monochromator at 8.39 keV under ambient conditions is 0.6%. The stability was verified at 12.4 keV and operation without realignment and feedback was possible for more than 30 minutes. Time delays up to 2.95 ns have been achieved. The highest resolution achieved in an experiment was 15.4 ps, a value entirely determined by the diagnostics system. The influence of the delay unit optics on the coherence properties of the beam was investigated by means of Fraunhofer diffraction and static speckle analysis. The obtained high fringe visibility and contrast values larger than 23% indicate the feasibility of performing coherence based experiments with the delay line. (orig.)

  1. The cause of the uneven carbonization process in wet coal charging in coke oven chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Takashi Arima [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment and Process Technology Center

    2008-11-15

    In the case of the wet coal charging process in coke oven chamber, it is known that the coking process is uneven and a local carbonization delay occurs. The reason was investigated through a laboratory-scale experiment and a quantitative estimation. A partial carbonization test in a test coke oven replicated the uneven plastic layer and local carbonization delay. It was revealed that most of the gas generated in the uncarbonized coal layer results from the evaporation of condensed water and that steam can break through the plastic layer in a test coke oven. Moreover, the order estimation implied that steam that generates in the uncarbonized coal layer and breaks through the plastic layer has sufficient heat capacity to cool the heating wall and delay the carbonization. It was also shown that the steam pressure peak measured in a commercial coke oven is much lower than the estimated steam pressure in this study assuming steam not breaking through the plastic layer. The above-mentioned results and quantitative investigation strongly support the 'steam breaking through the plastic layer' theory proposed by Dr. Rohde that an uneven carbonization process is caused by vaporized coal moisture breaking through the plastic layer at definite, unforeseeable points, which results in cooling of the wall by the steam flow. 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Comparison of metallurgical coke and lignite coke for power generation in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanakuakangwan, Sudlop; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents and compares two alternatives of cokes in power generation which are the metallurgical coke with coke oven gas and the coke from lignite under the consideration of the energy and the environment. These alternatives not only consume less fuel due to their higher heat content than conventional coal but also has less SO2 emission. The metallurgical coke and its by-product which is coke oven gas can be obtained from the carbonization process of coking coal. According to high grade coking coal, the result in the energy attitude is not profitable but its sulfur content that directly affects the emission of SO2 is considered to be very low. On the other hand, the coke produced from lignite is known as it is the lowest grade from coal and it causes the high pollution. Regarding to energy profitability, the lignite coke is considered to be much more beneficial than the metallurgical coke in contrast to the environmental concerns. However, the metallurgical coke has the highest heating value. Therefore, a decision making between those choices must be referred to the surrounding circumstances based on energy and environment as well as economic consideration in the further research.

  3. Briquetting of Coke-Brown Coal Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ïurove Juraj

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the research of briquetting a coke-brown coal composite The operation consists of the feeding crushed coal and coke to moulds and pressing into briquettes which have been made in the Laboratories at the Mining Faculty of Technical University of Košice (Slovakia. In this research, all demands will be analyzed including the different aspects of the mechanical quality of briquettes, the proportion of fine pulverulent coal and coke in bricks, the requirements for briquetting the coke-brown coal materials.

  4. The new coke oven battery heating control system at Rautaruukki Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmu, P.; Swanljung, J. [Rautaruukki Steel, Raahe (Finland)

    1998-07-01

    The heating control system of the coke oven batteries has been developed strongly during the existence of the coke oven plant. The first step of the heating control was a statistical model which had a good monitoring system. This was enough in those days due to bigger problems elsewhere. The second generation heating control system is designed for irregular coke oven battery operation. Coke production in Rautaruukki Steel is based on one coke-oven plant consisting of two batteries and a by-product plant. The whole coke production is cooled by three dry quenching units. The first coke-oven battery was taken into operation in October 1987 and the second in November 1992. Originally the plant was mainly designed and equipped by Ukrainian Giprokoks except Finnish CDQ-boilers, German ammonia recovery process and electric and automation designed by Rautaruukki. Before building of the second coke oven battery, there was a huge amount of development and modification work to do, to ensure the proper function of the coke production. For example all electronic and hydraulic systems of the Russian supplier were replaced by systems designed by Rautaruukki's own personnel. When the coke production capacity was doubled, the only design by Gibrokoks related to the battery and one additional dry quenching chamber. The expansion project itself was managed and executed by Rautaruukki. The expansion project consisted of: the second battery, third CDQ-unit, Desulphurization and Benzol plants for the by-product plant and upgrading of automation system. Battery and CDQ chamber refractory materials were Russian origin and all other main equipment were purchased by Rautaruukki from western and domestic manufacturers based on the operation difficulties and experience of coke oven battery No. 1. These modification practices made a good basis for later development in the field of coke oven battery automation. The hierarchy of the coke oven battery automation at Rautaruukki Steel consist

  5. Analysis of gas-phase mercury sorption with coke and lignite dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marczak Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the problem of mercury emission became a widely discussed topic. Its high impact is caused by its toxicity and ability to accumulate in living organisms, properties that justified the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA to classify mercury as hazardous pollutant. The problem of mercury emission is crucial for countries like Poland, where the most of the emission is caused by coaldepended energy sector. Current technology of mercury removal utilizes adsorption of mercury on the surface of activated carbon. Due to high price of activated carbon, this technological approach seems to be uneconomical and calls for cheaper alternative. One possible solution can be usage of other sorptive materials obtained from thermal processes like coke production. Example of such material is coke dust obtained from dry quenching of coke. The aim of this work was to analyse the sorption potential of lignite and coke dust and determine parameters influencing mercury behaviour during combustion.

  6. Procedure for ash-poor cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissler

    1945-04-01

    This article was composed of four sections which dealt with de-ashing processes or uses of ash-poor coke. The general procedure for de-ashing started with 1 mm coal grains mixed with dilute HCl and then decanted from a concentrator. The thick paste was crushed finely and pasted with tar from the Low Temperature Carbonization (LTC). The paste was kneaded, washed, and then formed. The resulting briquettes were dried, crushed, and reformed. The LTC then took place at 550/sup 0/C followed by coking at 900/sup 0/C. The oven dimensions were given as 3.25 m tall, 0.65 wide, and 4 m deep for the LTC sections, and 3.25 m x 0.60 m x 4 m for the coking section. These dimensions were designed for 100 kg coke per hour. Methods were discussed for decreasing costs of coke production by substitution of a cheaper binding tar than that of the LTC recycle. CS/sub 2/ production was proposed using coke processed by the above de-ashing procedure. This process which substituted coke for the usual charcoal was shown to work, but was very sensitive to ash and solids content in the coke. Coke substitution for reducing charcoal in the production of light metals was tested. It was found that the iron content of the coke product has to be less than 0.05%, so that the coal used must have only slight traces of iron. Experiments were carried out to use de-ashed cokes as fuel to power automibiles, where a major difficulty was found in the tendency of the coke briquettes to flake and crumble. Different methods and binders were tried for briquetting, thus eliminating many difficulties. For the production of electrode cokes, flotation, separation, and lye treatment preceeded the de-ashing procedure outlined above. It was concluded that the properties of the cokes were greatly influenced by the quality of the briquette binder. It was intended to research and classify the types of binders.

  7. Understanding the mechanisms behind coking pressure: Relationship to pore structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; M. Castro Diaz; Colin E. Snape; Karen M. Steel; Merrick R. Mahoney [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-09-15

    Three low volatile coals A, B and C with oven wall pressures of 100 kPa, 60 kPa and 20 kPa respectively were investigated using high-temperature rheometry, {sup 1}H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM, with the primary aim to better understand the mechanisms behind the coking pressure phenomenon. Rheometer plate displacement measurements ({Delta}L) have shown differences in the expansion and contraction behaviour of the three coals, which seem to correlate with changes in rheological properties; while SEM images have shown that the expansion process coincides with development of pore structure. It is considered that the point of maximum plate height ({Delta}L{sub max}) prior to contraction may be indicative of a cell opening or pore network forming process, based on analogies with other foam systems. Such a process may be considered important for coking pressure since it provides a potential mechanism for volatile escape, relieving internal gas pressure and inducing charge contraction. For coal C, which has the highest fluidity {delta}L{sub max} occurs quite early in the softening process and consequently a large degree of contraction is observed; while for the lower fluidity coal B, the process is delayed since pore development and consequently wall thinning progress at a slower rate. When {Delta}L{sub max} is attained, a lower degree of contraction is observed because the event occurs closer to resolidification where the increasing viscosity/elasticity can stabilise the expanded pore structure. For coal A which is relatively high fluidity, but also high coking pressure, a greater degree of swelling is observed prior to cell rupture, which may be due to greater fluid elasticity during the expansion process. This excessive expansion is considered to be a potential reason for its high coking pressure. 58 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A soft x-ray split-and-delay unit for FLASH II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roling, Sebastian; Rollnik, Matthias; Kuhlmann, Marion; Plönjes, Elke; Wahlert, Frank; Zacharias, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    For the soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH II at DESY in Hamburg a new split-and-delay unit (SDU) is built for photon energies in the range of 30 eV reflectance (shallow angles) and a large possible maximum delay (steeper angles) has been chosen. The maximum possible delay is -6 ps total transmission between T = 57 % at hν = 30 eV and still T > 30 % at hν = 800 eV. For photon energies up to hν = 1800 eV a different beam path with platinum coated mirrors is used enabling a total transmission in the fixed beam path of T > 29 % at hν = 800 eV and T = 24 % at hν = 1800 eV, respectively. In the variable beam path the total transmission in this photon energy range is considerably lower but still sufficient with T = 13 % at hν = 800 eV and T > 6 % at hν = 1800 eV.

  9. Genesis of natural cokes: Some Indian examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashok K.; Sharma, Mamta [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Dhanbad, PIN-828108 (India); Singh, Mahendra P. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, PIN-221005 (India)

    2008-06-13

    In Indian coalfields huge amounts of natural coke have been produced due to magmatic intrusions. Jharia Coalfield in eastern part of India alone contains approximately 2000 Mt of baked coking coal as a consequence of these intrusions in the form of discordant and concordant bodies. This paper is an effort to investigate the effect of carbonization in two intrusion affected coal seams of Ena (seam XIII) and Alkusa (seam XIV) collieries of Jharia Coalfield. Natural coke is derived from coking coal under in-situ conditions due to intense magmatic induced heat and overburden pressure. Natural coke is characterized by the presence of low volatile matter and high ash contents and organic constituents showing isotropy and anisotropy. Through physical, petrographic and chemical properties of natural coke or 'jhama' as determined by various methods it has been established that the reactives in the unaltered coals (vitrinite, liptinite, pseudovitrinite, reactive semifusinite, etc.) are < 25.0 vol.%, moisture < 2.5%, volatile matter < 15.0% and hydrogen < 4.0%. The temperatures attained in the coal seams have been deciphered using some standard models, which indicate that a temperature {proportional_to} 1000 C was attained. This produced huge amount of anisotropic and deposited carbons. An attempt has been made to understand the factors that influence the genesis of natural coke and heat altered maceral products in coals in Indian coalfields. (author)

  10. Atmospheric pollution control in coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, N.K.; Parthasarthy, L.

    2002-07-01

    Production of iron through the blast furnaces route is still a dominant route and coke is a major raw material and energy source for the blast furnaces. The process of coal carbonization in slot ovens is one of the major sources of atmospheric pollution in an integrated steel plant. Coke making process involves coal preparation, carbonization and coke handling operations. To meet the demand of blast furnaces of SAIL plants, about 12 million tones of coal are carbonized every year in 26 operating coke oven batteries in the different plants. SAIL is well aware of the problems of pollution in coke oven batteries and a number of measures have been introduced to meet the challenges of emission control from coke ovens viz. smokeless charging, water-jet cleaning of doors, introduction of selective crushing/groupwise crushing of coals, new door design, water sealing of A.P. caps, introduction of tall ovens etc. The paper discusses some of these measures adopted in coke ovens for the control of pollution. 5 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Acute toxicity and chemical evaluation of coking wastewater under biological and advanced physicochemical treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehua, Ma; Cong, Liu; Xiaobiao, Zhu; Rui, Liu; Lujun, Chen

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the changes of toxic compounds in coking wastewater with biological treatment (anaerobic reactor, anoxic reactor and aerobic-membrane bioreactor, A1/A2/O-MBR) and advanced physicochemical treatment (Fenton oxidation and activated carbon adsorption) stages. As the biological treatment stages preceding, the inhibition effect of coking wastewater on the luminescence of Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov. Q67 decreased. Toxic units (TU) of coking wastewater were removed by A1/A2/O-MBR treatment process, however approximately 30 % TU remained in the biologically treated effluent. There is a tendency that fewer and fewer residual organic compounds could exert equal acute toxicity during the biological treatment stages. Activated carbon adsorption further removed toxic pollutants of biologically treated effluent but the Fenton effluent increased acute toxicity. The composition of coking wastewater during the treatment was evaluated using the three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic compounds with high polarity were the main cause of acute toxicity in the coking wastewater. Aromatic protein-like matters in the coking wastewater with low biodegradability and high toxicity contributed mostly to the remaining acute toxicity of the biologically treated effluents. Chlorine generated from the oxidation process was responsible for the acute toxicity increase after Fenton oxidation. Therefore, the incorporation of appropriate advanced physicochemical treatment process, e.g., activated carbon adsorption, should be implemented following biological treatment processes to meet the stricter discharge standards and be safer to the environment.

  12. A hydraulic device for unloading coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretinin, M.V.; Abizgildin, U.M.; Kirillov, T.S.; Makarov, M.I.; Prokopov, O.I.; Solov' ev, A.M.

    1979-07-15

    A hydraulic device for unloading petroleum coke from slow carbonization chambers is characterized by an arrangement whereby in order to increase the output of large size coke by controlling the increment of the cutting line of the coke, the mechanism used to move the rod in the hydraulic cutter is built in the form of a rod rotation rotor; a gear wheel is mounted on the immobile section of this rotor, and on the mobile section a multi-stage regulator is installed. The drive gear of the regulator is engaged with the gear wheel, while the driven gear is connected to the rack, which is fastened to the rod.

  13. Blast furnace coke substitutes from Victorian brown coal

    OpenAIRE

    Mollah, Mamun

    2017-01-01

    Iron is usually produced from its ores using coke in a blast furnace (BF). Coke, a hard and macroporous carbon material, is produced from special coals (coking coals) and acts as fuel, smelting agent, and the permeable support for the charge to the BF. No material can completely replace coke in a BF. Coking coals are becoming harder (and more expensive) to obtain. Victorian brown coal (VBC) is accessible, cheap, with low mineral concentrations, which is favourable for iron production in a BF....

  14. An experimental evaluation of coke production from bituminous coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Janik, M.; Rojak, A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of studies of laboratory coking of bituminous coal tar are presented, which verify the technical feasibility and suitability of this engineering process for coke production. Thanks to the closed-system character of the process, it is suitable for technological and hygienic reasons. The yield of pitch coke is higher by comparison with that from chamber coking; also the properties of this coke are better; it is suitable for more varied applications, including the production of large-diameter graphite electrodes.

  15. The effect of volume change of coal during carbonization in the direction of coke oven width on the internal gas pressure in the plastic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Arima, T. [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Ironmaking Research Laboratory, Steel Research Laboratories

    2001-07-06

    The coking pressure in a coke oven, which is caused by the internal gas pressure in the coal plastic layer, is determined by the gas permeability of the layer. The gas permeability of the plastic layer depends on its density as well as the physical property of the plastic coal itself. The plastic layer is sandwiched between the coke and the resolidifying layers and the coal layer and the effect of the volume change of these outer layers in the direction of coke oven width, i.e. contraction and compression, on the density of the plastic layer and the internal gas pressure was studied. A sandwich carbonization test, where different kinds of coals were charged in the test coke oven, showed that the internal gas pressure depends not only on the kind of coal in the plastic phase but also open the kind of coal in the resolidifying and the coke phases near the oven walls. The relative volume of coke transformed from the unit volume of coal was measured using an X-ray CT scanner and it varied greatly across the coke oven width depending on the kinds of coals. The volume change of coal, during carbonization in the direction of coke oven width affects the density of the plastic layer and the internal gas pressure. the relative volume of semicoke and coke transformed from the unit volume of coal near the oven walls is higher for a high coking pressure coal than that for a low coking pressure coal. This causes the plastic layer to have a high density and the generation of dangerously high internal gas pressure in the oven center. 17 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Prehospital and hospital delays after stroke onset--United States, 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-18

    Each year approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have a new or recurrent stroke; of these persons, 15%-30% become permanently disabled, and 20% require institutionalization during the first 3 months after the stroke. The severity of stroke-related disability can be reduced if timely and appropriate treatment is received. Patients with ischemic stroke may be eligible for treatment with intravenous thrombolytic (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) therapy within 3 hours of symptom onset. Receipt of this treatment usually requires patients to recognize stroke symptoms and receive prompt transport to a hospital emergency department (ED), where timely evaluation and brain imaging (i.e., computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) can take place. For patients eligible for t-PA, evidence suggests that the earlier patients are treated after the onset of symptoms the greater the likelihood of a more favorable outcome. In 2001, Congress established the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to measure and track the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients. To assess prehospital delays from onset of stroke symptoms to ED arrival and hospital delays from ED arrival to receipt of brain imaging, CDC analyzed data from the four states participating in the national stroke registry. The results of that analysis indicated that fewer than half (48.0%) of stroke patients for whom onset data were available arrived at the ED within 2 hours of symptom onset, and prehospital delays were shorter for persons transported to the ED by ambulance (i.e., emergency medical services) than for persons who did not receive ambulance transport. The interval between ED arrival and brain imaging also was significantly reduced for those arriving by ambulance. More extensive public education is needed regarding early recognition of stroke and the urgency of telephoning 9-1-1 to receive ambulance transport. Shortening prehospital and hospital delays will increase

  17. Modelling of a coke oven heating wall

    OpenAIRE

    Landreau, M.; Isler, D.; Gasser, A.; Blond, E.; Daniel, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This work deals with thermomechanical modelling of a coke oven heating wall. The objective is to define the safe limits of coke oven battery operating conditions compatible with a long service life in terms of thermal and mechanical stresses. For this purpose a 3D thermomechanical model of a heating wall taking into account the assembly of bricks and joints was developed with PRISME Laboratory. To build an efficient and complete model, different parameters must be take...

  18. Advanced coking process control at Rautaruukki Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritamaki, O.; Luhtaniemi, H. [Rautaruukki Engineering (Finland)

    1999-12-01

    The paper presents the latest development of the Coking Process Management System (CPMS) at Raahe Steel. The latest third generation system is based on the previous system with the addition of fuzzy logic controllers. (The previous second generation system was based simultaneous feed forward and feedback control.) The system development has resulted in balanced coke oven battery heating, decreased variation in process regulation between shifts and increase of process information for operators. The economic results are very satisfactory. 7 figs.

  19. Special analyses reveal coke-deposit structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX) have been used to obtain information that clarifies the three mechanisms of coke formation in ethylene furnaces, and to analyze the metal condition at the exit of furnace. The results can be used to examine furnace operations and develop improved ethylene plant practices. In this first of four articles on the analyses of coke and metal samples, the coking mechanisms and coke deposits in a section of tube from an actual ethylene furnace (Furnace A) from a plant on the Texas Gulf Coast are discussed. The second articles in the series will analyze the condition of the tube metal in the same furnace. To show how coke deposition and metal condition dependent on the operating parameters of an ethylene furnace, the third article in the series will show the coke deposition in a Texas Gulf Coast furnace tube (Furnace B) that operated at shorter residence time. The fourth article discusses the metal condition in that furnace. Some recommendations, based on the analyses and findings, are offered in the fourth article that could help extend the life of ethylene furnace tubes, and also improve overall ethylene plant operations

  20. Physico-chemical treatment of coke plant effluents for control of water pollution in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, M.K. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India). Center of Mining Environmental

    2002-01-01

    Coal carbonizing industries in India are important and are growing every year. Large quantities of liquid effluents produced in this industry contain a large amount of suspended solids, high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), phenols, ammonia and other toxic substances, which are causing serious surface water pollution in the area. There is a large number of coke plants in the vicinity of Jharia Coal Field (JCF). The working principle of a coke plant and the effluents produced is described. One large coke plant was chosen to evaluate characteristics of the effluent and to suggest a proper treatment method. Present effluent treatment system was found to be inadequate and a large quantity of a very good quality coke breeze is being lost, which is also causing siltation on the riverbed in addition to surface water pollution. Physico-chemical treatment has been considered as a suitable option for the treatment of coke plant effluents. A scheme has been proposed for the treatment, which can be suitably adopted for the recycling, reuse or safe disposal of the treated effluent. Various unit process and unit operations are discussed. The process may be useful on industrial scale for various sites so as to maintain a clean environment.

  1. Results of tuyere coke sampling with regard to application of appropriate coke strength after reaction (CSR for a blast furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiau J-S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raising pulverized coal injection (PCI will decrease coke rate, but increase the residence time of coke and abrasion in the blast furnace (BF. Thus, insufficient coke strength will generate more coke fines in the lower BF and result in lower permeability and production of hot metal (HM. For understanding the behavior of coke at various HM productivities, a tuyere coke sampler was used to collect the coke samples for measuring the coke strength. Firstly, the difference of sampled coke under the conditions of various HM productivities was explored. Secondly, the BF operating conditions and causes of generating more coke fines was correlated by testing the coke reaction rate after reaction. Finally, according to the above analysis results, the relative regression equations had been obtained for sampling coke properties, BF operation conditions and BF permeability. Furthermore, the coke strength after reaction (CSR quantitative target and its online system at various blast conditions were set to provide some reference for coke and HM production.

  2. Numerical simulation for a process analysis of a coke oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhancheng Guo; Huiqing Tang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Process Engineering

    2005-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model is established for a coking process analysis of a coke oven using PHOENICS CFD package. The model simultaneously calculates the transient composition, temperatures of the gas and the solid phases, velocity of the gas phase and porosity and density of the semi-coke phase. Numerical simulation is illustrated in predicting the evolution of volatile gases, gas flow paths, profiles of density, porosity of the coke oven charge, profiles of temperatures of the coke oven gas and the semi-coke bed. On the basis of above modeling, the flow of coke oven gas (COG) blown from the bottom of the coke oven into the porous semi-coke bed is simulated to reveal whether or not and when the blown COG can uniformly flow through the porous semi-coke bed for the purpose of desulfurizing the semi-coke by recycling the COG. The simulation results show that the blown COG can uniformly flow through the semi-coke bed only after the temperature at the center of the semi-coke bed has risen to above 900{sup o}C.

  3. Coke fouling monitoring by electrical resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombardelli, Clovis; Mari, Livia Assis; Kalinowski, Hypolito Jose [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial (CPGEI)

    2008-07-01

    An experimental method to simulate the growth of the coke fouling that occurs in the oil processing is proposed relating the thickness of the encrusted coke to its electrical resistivity. The authors suggest the use of the fouling electrical resistivity as a transducer element for determining its thickness. The sensor is basically two electrodes in an electrically isolated device where the inlay can happen in order to compose a purely resistive transducer. Such devices can be easily constructed in a simple and robust form with features capable to face the high temperatures and pressures found in relevant industrial processes. For validation, however, it is needed a relationship between the electrical resistivity and the fouling thickness, information not yet found in the literature. The present work experimentally simulates the growth of a layer of coke on an electrically insulating surface, equipped with electrodes at two extremities to measure the electrical resistivity during thermal cracking essays. The method is realized with a series of consecutive runs. The results correlate the mass of coke deposited and its electrical resistivity, and it can be used to validate the coke depositions monitoring employing the resistivity as a control parameter. (author)

  4. BCDP: Budget Constrained and Delay-Bounded Placement for Hybrid Roadside Units in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In vehicular ad hoc networks, roadside units (RSUs placement has been proposed to improve the the overall network performance in many ITS applications. This paper addresses the budget constrained and delay-bounded placement problem (BCDP for roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks. There are two types of RSUs: cable connected RSU (c-RSU and wireless RSU (w-RSU. c-RSUs are interconnected through wired lines, and they form the backbone of VANETs, while w-RSUs connect to other RSUs through wireless communication and serve as an economical extension of the coverage of c-RSUs. The delay-bounded coverage range and deployment cost of these two cases are totally different. We are given a budget constraint and a delay bound, the problem is how to find the optimal candidate sites with the maximal delay-bounded coverage to place RSUs such that a message from any c-RSU in the region can be disseminated to the more vehicles within the given budget constraint and delay bound. We first prove that the BCDP problem is NP-hard. Then we propose several algorithms to solve the BCDP problem. Simulation results show the heuristic algorithms can significantly improve the coverage range and reduce the total deployment cost, compared with other heuristic methods.

  5. BCDP: Budget constrained and delay-bounded placement for hybrid roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Huang, Chuanhe; Liu, Qin

    2014-11-27

    In vehicular ad hoc networks, roadside units (RSUs) placement has been proposed to improve the the overall network performance in many ITS applications. This paper addresses the budget constrained and delay-bounded placement problem (BCDP) for roadside units in vehicular ad hoc networks. There are two types of RSUs: cable connected RSU (c-RSU) and wireless RSU (w-RSU). c-RSUs are interconnected through wired lines, and they form the backbone of VANETs, while w-RSUs connect to other RSUs through wireless communication and serve as an economical extension of the coverage of c-RSUs. The delay-bounded coverage range and deployment cost of these two cases are totally different. We are given a budget constraint and a delay bound, the problem is how to find the optimal candidate sites with the maximal delay-bounded coverage to place RSUs such that a message from any c-RSU in the region can be disseminated to the more vehicles within the given budget constraint and delay bound. We first prove that the BCDP problem is NP-hard. Then we propose several algorithms to solve the BCDP problem. Simulation results show the heuristic algorithms can significantly improve the coverage range and reduce the total deployment cost, compared with other heuristic methods.

  6. Fissure formation in coke. 3: Coke size distribution and statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Jenkins; D.E. Shaw; M.R. Mahoney [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Mathematical and Information Sciences

    2010-07-15

    A model of coke stabilization, based on a fundamental model of fissuring during carbonisation is used to demonstrate the applicability of the fissuring model to actual coke size distributions. The results indicate that the degree of stabilization is important in determining the size distribution. A modified form of the Weibull distribution is shown to provide a better representation of the whole coke size distribution compared to the Rosin-Rammler distribution, which is generally only fitted to the lump coke. A statistical analysis of a large number of experiments in a pilot scale coke oven shows reasonably good prediction of the coke mean size, based on parameters related to blend rank, amount of low rank coal, fluidity and ash. However, the prediction of measures of the spread of the size distribution is more problematic. The fissuring model, the size distribution representation and the statistical analysis together provide a comprehensive capability for understanding and predicting the mean size and distribution of coke lumps produced during carbonisation. 12 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Coke fouling process on the oil refining; Processo de incrustacao por coque no refino do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombardelli, Clovis; Fiorentin, Leila D.; Negrao, Cezar O.R.; Franco, Admilson T. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Parana (CEFET-PR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais (PPGEM)

    2004-07-01

    The heavy crude fraction processing is performed under very high vacuum to minimize thermal cracking which cause coke deposition and damage the equipment. The current tendency is to process heavier oil leading to higher process temperatures and consequently to greater fouling. This situation demands better knowledge fouling process by carbonization. This problem is pronounced in the residual gasoil region of a vacuum distillation unit because it obstructs the recirculation circuits and the spray system with serious environmental and economics implications. This paper review the main correlated published work related to coke generation and fouling and presents a discussion about the works. (author)

  8. The year-book of the Coke Oven Managers' Association 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The 88th volume of the Year Book outlines activities of the Coke Oven Managers' Association throughout 2007 and reproduces transactions presented to the industry through its various sections. It includes lists of Council and committee members and representation on committees and past presidents, and a full list of members. Reports of Council 2005-6 and of the annual general meeting 2005 are included. The Presidential address by R.G.W. Sargent looks at the situation faced by coke oven managers through the decades with some predictions for the future. Carbonisation and briquetting works in the United Kingdom, Koppers carbon materials and chemical works in the UK and Europe, European coking plants, their addresses and managers are listed. Nine transactions are abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database.

  9. The year-book of the Coke Oven Managers' Association 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The 87th volume of the Year Book outlines activities of the Coke Oven Managers' Association throughout 2006 and reproduces transactions presented to the industry through its various sections. It includes lists of Council and Committee members and representation on committees and past presidents, and a full list of members. Reports of Council 2004-5 and of the annual general meeting 2005 are included. The Presidential address by M. Gore is on the last five years of Monckton Coke and Chemical Company. Carbonisation and briquetting works in the United Kingdom, Koppers carbon materials and chemical works in the UK and Europe, European coking plants, their addresses and managers are listed. Seven transactions are abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database.

  10. The year-book of the Coke Oven Managers' Association 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The 89th volume of the Year Book outlines activities of the Coke Oven Managers' Association throughout 2008 and reproduces transactions presented to the industry through its various sections. It includes lists of Council and Committee members and representation on committees and past presidents, and a full list of members. Reports of Council 2006-7 and of the annual general meeting 2007 are included. The Presidential address by A. Moore is about his experiences at Redcar Coke Ovens. Carbonisation and briquetting works in the United Kingdom, Koppers carbon materials and chemical works in the UK and Europe, European coking plants, their addresses and managers are listed. Six transactions are abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database.

  11. Study and modelling of deactivation by coke in catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons on Pt-Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst; La microbalance inertielle: etude et modelisation cinetique de la desactivation par le coke en reformage catalytique des hydrocarbures sur catalyseur Pt-Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu-Deghais, S.

    2004-07-01

    Catalytic reforming is the refining process that produces gasoline with a high octane number. During a reforming operation, undesired side reactions promote the formation of carbon deposits (coke) on the surface of the catalyst. As the reactions proceed, the coke accumulation leads to a progressive decrease of the catalyst activity and to a change in its selectivity. Getting this phenomenon under control is interesting to optimize the industrial plants. This work aims to improve the comprehension and the modeling of coke formation and its deactivating effect on reforming reactions, while working under conditions chosen within a range as close as possible to the industrial conditions of the regenerative process. The experimental study is carried out with a micro unit that is designed to observe simultaneously the coke formation and its influence on the catalyst activity. A vibrational microbalance reactor (TEOM - Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance) is used to provide continuous monitoring of coke. On-line gas chromatography is used to observe the catalyst activity and selectivity as a function of the coke content. The coking experiments are performed on a fresh Pt-Sn/alumina catalyst, with mixtures of hydrocarbon molecules of 7 carbon atoms as hydrocarbon feeds. The coking tests permitted to highlight the operating parameters that may affect the amount of coke, and to identify the hydrocarbon molecules that behave as coke intermediate. A kinetic model for coke formation could be developed through the compilation of these results. The catalytic activity analysis permitted to point out the coke effect on both of the active phases of the catalyst, to construct a simplified reforming kinetic model that simulates the catalyst activity under the reforming conditions, and to quantify deactivation via deactivation functions. (author)

  12. Multispecies acute toxicity evaluation of wastewaters from different treatment stages in a coking wastewater-treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Liang; Jiang, Yu-Xia; Yan, Bo; Wei, Chaohai; Zhang, Li-Juan; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2014-09-01

    Coking wastewater contributes approximately 5% of the total discharge volume of industrial wastewaters every year in China. The toxicity of coking wastewater to aquatic organisms is still unknown. The authors evaluated the toxicity of wastewater from different treatment stages in a coking wastewater treatment plant, South China, using 5 test species belonging to different trophic levels: luminous bacteria, green alga, a crustacean, duckweed, and zebrafish embryos. The raw influent displayed the highest toxicity to the test species, with toxic units ranging from 16.2 to 1176. The toxicity in the wastewater was then gradually removed by sequential primary treatment, biological fluidized-bed treatment, and secondary clarifier treatment. The toxic unit of the final effluent was reduced to 2.26 for the green alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and to 0 for the other 4 organisms. Quantitative analysis of metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and qualitative scanning by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed the presence of a variety of pollutants in the coking wastewaters. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the toxicity in the coking wastewater was correlated to the chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, volatile phenols, sulfide, metals (Cr, As, Sb, Hg, Pb, and Ni), and ΣPAHs. Based on the results, it is required to set a safety emission limit value for the discharge of coking wastewater to protect aquatic organisms in the receiving water bodies. © 2014 SETAC.

  13. The effect of plastic size on coke quality and coking pressure in the co-carbonization of coal/plastic in coke oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Kenji Kato [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment and Process Technology Center

    2006-01-01

    In the recycling process of waste plastics using coke ovens, coals and added plastics are carbonized and changed into coke, tar, oil and coke oven gas in a coke oven chamber. In this study, the effect of added plastic size on coke quality and the effect of plastic addition on coking pressure was investigated. In the case of a plastic addition rate of 2%, the coke strength (DI{sub 15}{sup 150}) reached a minimum at the particle size of 10 mm for polyethylene (PE) and 3 mm for polystyrene (PS). The mechanism was attributed to the weak coke structure formed on the interface between plastic and coal. The result indicates that large or small plastic particles are favorable in order to add waste plastics to blended coals for coke making without affecting coke strength (DI{sub 15}{sup 150}). Furthermore, it was also shown that a 1% addition of large size agglomerated waste plastics to blended coals did not increase coking pressure. Based on this fundamental study, and considering the ease of handling plastics, we have determined that the size of waste plastic used in a commercial-scale recycling process of waste plastics using coke ovens is about 25 mm. Nippon Steel Corporation started to operate a waste plastic recycling process using coke ovens at Nagoya and Kimitsu works in 2000 and at Yawata and Muroran works in 2002. Now the total capacity is 120,000 tons per year as of 2003 and this process is operating smoothly. 13 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Emission and source characterization of monoaromatic hydrocarbons from coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Q.S.; Wang, X.M.; Sheng, G.Y.; Fu, J.M. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry

    2005-09-15

    Monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) from indigenous and industrial coking processes are studied in Shanxi province. They are sampled on the top of coke ovens and in the chimneys using stainless steel canister and determined by GC/MSD after preconcentration with liquid nitrogen. Benzene, toluene and xylene are the main components among MAHs emitted from coking processes. Benzene and the total MAHs concentrations were as high as 3421.0 microg/m3 and 4 865.9 microg/m3 in the air from indigenous coking, 548.7 microg/m3 and 1 054.8 microg/m3 in the oventop air from industrial coking, and 1 376.4 microg/m3 and 1 819.4 microg/m3 in stack gas from industrial coking, respectively. The MAHs concentrations vary greatly during the indigenous coking process, which in the prophase (from firing to 10 days) is obviously higher than in the anaphase (10 days to quenching the coke). In industrial coking the MAHs in the oventop air are highest when charging the coal and next when transferring the hot coke, but in stack gas they are highest when charging coal and lowest when transferring the coke. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in industrial coking samples show good linearity, indicating that MAHs in industrial coking might come predominantly from coal pyrolysis; but BTEX distribute dispersedly in indigenous coking samples, indicating that its emission might be affected by many factors. In all samples BTEX ratios especially high B/E ratio, is unique among MAHs sources, and might be helpful to characterize pollution from coking.

  15. [Emission and source characterization of monoaromatic hydrocarbons from coke production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Xin-Ming; Sheng, Guo-Ying; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2005-09-01

    Monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) from indigenous and industrial coking processes are studied in Shanxi province. They are sampled on the top of coke ovens and in the chimneys using stainless steel canister and determined by GC/MSD after preconcentration with liquid nitrogen. Benzene, toluene and xylene are the main components among MAHs emitted from coking processes. Benzene and the total MAHs concentrations were as high as 3421.0 microg/m3 and 4 865.9 microg/m3 in the air from indigenous coking, 548.7 microg/m3 and 1 054.8 microg/m3 in the oventop air from industrial coking, and 1 376.4 microg/m3 and 1 819.4 microg/m3 in stack gas from industrial coking, respectively. The MAHs concentrations vary greatly during the indigenous coking process, which in the prophase (from firing to 10 days) is obviously higher than in the anaphase (10 days to quenching the coke). In industrial coking the MAHs in the oventop air are highest when charging the coal and next when transferring the hot coke, but in stack gas they are highest when charging coal and lowest when transferring the coke. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in industrial coking samples show good linearity, indicating that MAHs in industrial coking might come predominantly from coal pyrolysis; but BTEX distribute dispersedly in indigenous coking samples, indicating that its emission might be affected by many factors. In all samples BTEX ratios especially high B/E ratio, is unique among MAHs sources, and might be helpful to characterize pollution from coking.

  16. Effects of delayed microbial analysis of dental unit water line specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Charles John; Burgess, Kenneth H; Miller, Chris H

    2005-04-01

    Monitoring microbial concentrations in water emitted from dental unit water lines (DUWL) is an important safety procedure. Improper handling of test water specimens could give incorrect results. Thus, the objective of this study was to measure the effects delayed culturing might have on DUWL specimens. First, 100 mL water specimens were obtained from 10 different handpiece service lines within the School. All units had independent water systems, used DI (deionized water) water and were routinely cleaned using an alkaline peroxide based product. Two specimens of 10 mL were removed from the bottles and placed into individual sterile conical tubes. One set of tubes was processed immediately. 0.05 mL of sterile 1.0% (w/v) sodium thiosulfate solution was added to undiluted and diluted (1:10 and 1:100 with sterile DI water) specimens. After mixing, specimens were spiral plated onto duplicate R2A plates and incubated at 21degrees C for 7 days. Colonies were then counted and the cfu/mL of each original specimen determined. Another set of tubes was placed into a shipping envelope and mailed out to the School. Upon receipt, the tubes were processed as described above. The remaining 80 mL of water in the collection bottles were divided equally into new sterile tubes. One tube was left at 21 degrees C, while the other was placed into a 37 degrees C incubator. Aliquots were processed immediately and then after 1, 3 and 7 days. Next, 30 mL water specimens were obtained from 15 handpiece service lines in three outside clinics. All units had independent water systems, used DI water and were routinely cleaned with an alkaline peroxide-based product. Specimens were then divided equally into three sterile conical tubes. One of the tubes was transported (at 4 degrees C) to the laboratory and immediately processed as described. At the collection site, the second tube was placed into a padded envelope and mailed back to the School. The third tube was returned by overnight delivery using

  17. Water protection in coke-plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

  18. Top ten reasons why coke batteries fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohle, H.; Schulte, H.; Ramani, R.V. [ThyssenKrupp EnCoke GmbH, Bochum (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The reasons for the failure of coke batteries are varied and interrelated. Identifying them and taking precautionary measures against them will help with the possible extension of the service life of the batteries. Most of the contributory factors are interrelated and in combination they encourage faster deterioration of the battery. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Variations in toxicity of semi-coking wastewater treatment processes and their toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaochang; Liu, Yongjun; Gao, Jian; Wang, Yongkun

    2017-04-01

    Chemical analyses and bioassays using Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna were conducted to evaluate comprehensively the variation of biotoxicity caused by contaminants in wastewater from a semi-coking wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Pretreatment units (including an oil-water separator, a phenols extraction tower, an ammonia stripping tower, and a regulation tank) followed by treatment units (including anaerobic-oxic treatment units, coagulation-sedimentation treatment units, and an active carbon adsorption column) were employed in the semi-coking WWTP. Five benzenes, 11 phenols, and five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated as the dominant contaminants in semi-coking wastewater. Because of residual extractant, the phenols extraction process increased acute toxicity to V. fischeri and immobilization and lethal toxicity to D. magna. The acute toxicity of pretreated wastewater to V. fischeri was still higher than that of raw semi-coking wastewater, even though 90.0% of benzenes, 94.8% of phenols, and 81.0% of PAHs were removed. After wastewater pretreatment, phenols and PAHs were mainly removed by anaerobic-oxic and coagulation-sedimentation treatment processes respectively, and a subsequent active carbon adsorption process further reduced the concentrations of all target chemicals to below detection limits. An effective biotoxicity reduction was found during the coagulation-sedimentation and active carbon adsorption treatment processes. The concentration addition model can be applied for toxicity prediction of wastewater from the semi-coking WWTP. The deviation between the measured and predicted toxicity results may result from the effects of compounds not detectable by instrumental analyses, the synergistic effect of detected contaminants, or possible transformation products. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Two years of heat recovery coke production at Sun Coke Company's Indiana Harbor facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, R.W.; Schuett, K.J. [Sun Coke Company, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2000-07-01

    In March of 1998, the first battery of Sun Coke Company's newest facility, the Indiana Harbor Coke Company, was brought on line in East Chicago, Indiana. By June of 1998, the last of four batteries began pushing coke and producing power. The plant provides Ispat-Inland with coke for their No. 7 blast furnace and waste heat to Cokenergy for steam production, 94 megawatts of power generation, and flue gas cleaning. Annual production will be more than 1.2 million tons of high quality furnace coke. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    1999-09-01

    Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and

  2. Deactivation and coking kinetic relations between activity, concentration of coke and time-on-stream for different mechanisms of formation and growth of the coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Monzon, A.

    1988-08-01

    The kinetic equations activity-coke concentration, and coke concentration-time-on-stream are deduced for four different mechanisms of coke formation and growth. In this development a basic parameter is the number (h) of active sites covered by molecule of coke in the controlling step of the mechanism of formation of the coke. The four mechanisms studied have been: (1) coke formation in a monolayer; (2) coke formation in multilayers with h constant with the time, which gives rise to coke in filaments; (3) coke formation in multilayers, in an arbitrary manner, with h variable (steric hindrance) with the time-on-stream; and (4) formation of multilayers with adjacent site coverage (steric hindrance) and/or pore blockage. The 115 different kinetic equations here deduced for these mechanisms include all the empirical and mechanistic kinetic equations of the a-C/sub c/ or C/sub c/-t type used up to now. 56 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Comments on Effect of Gabapentin on Delayed Discharge From the Postanesthesia Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Aakanksha; Agarwal, Anil; Khuba, Sandeep

    2018-04-10

    The audit aims to study the effect of gabapentin induced sedation on the length of PACU stay and its effect on delayed discharge of patients from PACU. However, in the present study authors excluded the patients with a PACU stay of less than 2 hours. We are of the opinion that it is not prudent to draw conclusions that the use of preoperative gabapentin resulted in a significantly increased the number of patients whose PACU perioperative discharge was delayed when only patients with prolonged PACU stay were included. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  5. Some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Hidetoshi Terashima; Eiji Sato; Masaaki Naito [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment and Process Technology Center

    2007-07-01

    It is important to develop the production and utilization technology of highly reactive coke in order to improve the efficiency of blast furnace reactions. In this study, some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke produced in a coke oven chamber were investigated. First, the effects of catalytic Fe powder addition to coal before carbonization on coke strength were investigated. The addition of Fe powder decreased the coal caking property and hence the resultant coke drum index (DI150 15). On the other hand it increased coke reactivity (JIS coke reactivity index and CRI) to a great extent. This means that the caking property of blended coals needs to be adjusted higher to produce iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity. Secondly, it was shown that the iron ore reacts with silica brick at 1200{sup o}C in a condition similar to that in a coke oven chamber. The iron ore and silica reacted to produce fayalite (2FeO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}) and the brick was damaged. On the other hand, it was proven that the iron ore does not react with silica brick at 1100{sup o}C in the above condition. Based on this fundamental study, iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity was successfully produced in a coke oven chamber on a commercial scale by adjusting the coal blend composition and the coke oven temperature. Furthermore it was revealed that about 70% of iron in iron ore powder added to coal was reduced to metallic iron during carbonization in coke ovens.

  6. Some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Terashima, H.; Sato, E.; Naito, M. [Nippon Steel Corp. Ltd., Futtsu (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    The development of production and utilization technology of highly reactive coke is significant in order to improve blast furnace reaction efficiency. In this report, some fundamental aspects of highly reactive iron coke produced in a coke oven chamber were investigated. First, the effects of catalytic Fe powder addition to coal before carbonization on coke strength were investigated. The addition of Fe powder decreased coal caking property and hence resultant coke drum index (DI{sup 150}{sub 15}). On the other hand it increased coke reactivity (JIS coke reactivity index and CRI) to a great extent. This means that caking property of blended coals needs to be adjusted higher to produce the iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity. Secondly, it was shown that the iron ore reacts with silica brick at 1200{sup o}C in a condition similar to that in a coke oven chamber. The iron ore and silica reacted to produce fayalite (2FeO {center_dot}SiO{sub 2}) and the brick was damaged. On the other hand, it was proved that the iron ore does not react with silica brick at 1100{sup o}C in the above condition. Based on this fundamental study, the iron coke with proper strength and high reactivity was successfully produced in coke ovens on a commercial scale by adjusting the coal blend composition and the coke oven temperature. Furthermore it was revealed that about 70% of iron in iron ore powder added to coal was reduced to metallic iron during carbonization in coke ovens.

  7. Contraction behaviour of coals and binary blends during coking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. MacPhee; L. Giroux; J.F. Gransden; J.T. Price [CANMET Energy Technology Centre - Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Contraction of coals during coking is of major practical interest since the longevity of industrial coke ovens depends on facilitating smooth coke pushes. Consequently, the prediction of the contraction behaviour of blends from single coal properties is of great importance to cokemakers. The situation is often complicated by the non-additivity of component coal properties. Our approach to simplify this problem involves the examination of the expansion/contraction behaviour of a number of binary coal blends and single coals (Appalachian coals mainly) for which a suite of coal and coke properties has been measured. These properties include coal and coke chemistry; coal petrography; coke optical textures; apparent and true specific gravities; CSR and CRI, etc. Coke yields from the sole-heated oven (D 2014-97) have also been carefully measured and almost all cases indicate that the yield of coke from the binary blends is greater than is predicted from the yields of the component coals. The coke yield data presented provides evidence supporting synergistic interaction between macerals in different coals during pyrolysis. Blends of high- and low-volatile coal coked in a sole-heated oven often produce a larger coke yield than expected from coking the single coals alone. Coke microscopy confirms interaction between the coals in the blend. Flow type textures are increased at the expense of either mosaic or domain textures or both. The sole-heated contraction of the blend may be less than that expected from the single coals. Based on limited observations it is tentatively concluded high-volatile coals with high contractions are the cause of the non-additivity of blend contraction values. They tend to have high thermal rheological properties and be of moderately low rank. Their high contraction values must be discounted in calculations of a blend contraction from the contraction or expansion of the coals in the blend. 8 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Predication of coke strength from textural analysis of stamp charged coke supported by coal petrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Dash, P.S.; Chakraborty, D.; Banerjee, P.K.; Kumar, D. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    Materials science tells us that defects or flaws in a solid material control the mechanical behaviour of that material. Similarly, in a coke, its strength is associated with the microstructure and texture. Optical microscopy is the most appropriate method for measuring these features. Attempts were made to correlate different types of textures with the strength of stamp charged coke at Tata Steel. The studies revealed that anisotropic carbon is less reactive to carbon dioxide compared to isotropic carbon. There may be two reasons for this: a lower surface area of the carbon available for reaction; the intrinsic reactivity may be lower for molecules which constitute anisotropic carbon. The strength after reaction depends on its anisotropic texture - the smaller size mosaic texture contributes to higher post strength. There are very few reports about use of micro textural analysis to predict cold strength of coke. Test results show that there exists an influence of isotropic carbon on M{sub 10} index. With an increase in isotropic texture, the M{sub 10} index deteriorates. The performance of coke in blast furnaces may be improved by improving room temperature and high temperature strength of coke by selecting coal with higher vitrinite distribution in the present blend through the stamp charging route. 18 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Coking coal of Checua Lenguazaque area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arboleda Otalora, Carlos Ariel

    1987-06-01

    In this report a summary of the main characteristics of the coal of the area of Checua-Samaca is presented. Using the main works carried out on this area, the most important geologic, physical-chemical, technological and petrographic aspects are compiled that are considered essential to carry out a technical evaluation of these coal and all the analyses they take to conclude that in this area, bituminous coal are presented with very good coking properties, on the other hand, it is demonstrated by the use that is given to the coal extracted by the small existent mining. However, keeping in mind the demands of the international market of the coking coal, it becomes necessary to improve the existent geologic information to be able to make reliable stratigraphic correlations

  10. Reduction in toxicity of coking wastewater to aquatic organisms by vertical tubular biological reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Siyun; Watanabe, Haruna; Wei, Chang; Wang, Dongzhou; Zhou, Jiti; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Masunaga, Shigeki; Zhang, Ying

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a battery of toxicity tests using photo bacterium, algae, crustacean and fish to evaluate acute toxicity profile of coking wastewater, and to evaluate the performance of a novel wastewater treatment process, vertical tubular biological reactor (VTBR), in the removal of toxicity and certain chemical pollutants. A laboratory scale VTBR system was set up to treat industrial coking wastewater, and investigated both chemicals removal efficiency and acute bio-toxicity to aquatic organisms. The results showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol reductions by VTBR were approximately 93% and 100%, respectively. VTBR also reduced the acute toxicity of coking wastewater significantly: Toxicity Unit (TU) decreased from 21.2 to 0.4 for Photobacterium phosphoreum, from 9.5 to 0.6 for Isochrysis galbana, from 31.9 to 1.3 for Daphnia magna, and from 30.0 to nearly 0 for Danio rerio. VTBR is an efficient treatment method for the removal of chemical pollutants and acute bio-toxicity from coking wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coke drums inspection and evaluation using stress and strain analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Marcio Issamu [Tricom Tecnologia e Servicos de Manutencao Industrial Ltda., Piquete, SP (Brazil); Samman, Mahmod [Houston Engineering Solutions, Houston, TX (United States); Tinoco, Ediberto Bastos; Marangone, Fabio de Castro; Silva, Hezio Rosa da; Barcelos, Gustavo de Carvalho [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Coke drums deform due to a complex combination of mechanical and thermal cyclic stresses. Bulges have progressive behavior and represent the main maintenance problem related to these drums. Bulge failure typically result in through-wall cracks, leaks, and sometimes fires. Such failures generally do not represent a great risk to personnel. Repairs needed to maintain reliability of these vessels might require extensive interruption to operation which in turn considerably impacts the profitability of the unit. Therefore the condition, progression and severity of these bulges should be closely monitored. Coke drums can be inspected during turnaround with 3D Laser Scanning and Remote Visual Inspection (RVI) tools, resulting in a detailed dimensional and visual evaluation of the internal surface. A typical project has some goals: inspect the equipment to generate maintenance or inspection recommendations, comparison with previous results and baseline data. Until recently, coke drum structural analysis has been traditionally performed analyzing Stress Concentration Factors (SCF) thought Finite Element Analysis methods; however this technique has some serious technical and practical limitations. To avoid these shortcomings, the new strain analysis technique PSI (Plastic Strain Index) was developed. This method which is based on API 579/ ASME FFS standard failure limit represents the state of the art of coke drum bulging severity assessment has an excellent correlation with failure history. (author)

  12. Full scale treatment of phenolic coke coking waste water under unsteady conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suschka, Jan [Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland); Morel, Jacek; Mierzwinski, Stanislaw; Januszek, Ryszard [Coke Plant Przyjazn, Dabrowa Gornicza (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Phenolic waste water from the largest coke coking plant in Poland is treated at a full technical scale. From the very beginning it became evident that very high qualitative variations in short and long periods were to be expected. For this purpose, the biological treatment plant based on activated sludge is protected through preliminary physical-chemical treatment and the results are secured by a final chemical stage of treatment. Nevertheless, improvements in the performance of the treatment plant have been found necessary to introduce. In this work, the experience gained over the last five years is described and developed improvements were presented. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A hard x-ray split-and-delay unit for the HED instrument at the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roling, Sebastian; Kärcher, Victor; Samoylova, Liubov; Appel, Karen; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Siewert, Frank; Zastrau, Ulf; Rollnik, Matthias; Wahlert, Frank; Zacharias, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    For the High Energy Density Instrument (HED) at the European XFEL a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit (SDU) is built covering photon energies in the range between 5 keV and 24 keV. This SDU enables time-resolved x-ray pump / x-ray probe experiments as well as sequential diffractive imaging on a femtosecond to picosecond time scale. The set-up is based on wavefront splitting that has successfully been implemented at an autocorrelator at FLASH. The x-ray FEL pulses will be split by a sharp edge of a silicon mirror coated with Mo/B4C and W/B4C multilayers. Both partial beams then pass variable delay lines. For different photon energies the angle of incidence onto the multilayer mirrors is adjusted in order to match the Bragg condition. Hence, maximum delays between +/- 1 ps at 24 keV and up to +/- 23 ps at 5 keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations are performed with Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) software. The XFEL radiation is simulated using the output of the time-dependent SASE code FAST. For the simulations diffraction on the edge of the beam-splitter as well as height and slope errors of all eight mirror surfaces are taken into account. The impact of these effects on the ability to focus the beam by means of compound refractive lenses (CRL) is analyzed.

  14. Reducing power production costs by utilizing petroleum coke. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbreath, K.C.

    1998-07-01

    A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

  15. Competitive reactions of organophosphorus radicals on coke surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catak, Saron; Hemelsoet, Karen; Hermosilla, Laura; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2011-10-17

    The efficacy of organophosphorus radicals as anticoking agents was subjected to a computational study in which a representative set of radicals derived from industrially relevant organophosphorus additives was used to explore competitive reaction pathways on the graphene-like coke surface formed during thermal cracking. The aim was to investigate the nature of the competing reactions of different organophosphorus radicals on coke surfaces, and elucidate their mode of attack and inhibiting effect on the forming coke layer by use of contemporary computational methods. Density functional calculations on benzene and a larger polyaromatic hydrocarbon, namely, ovalene, showed that organophosphorus radicals have a high propensity to add to the periphery of the coke surface, inhibiting methyl radical induced hydrogen abstraction, which is known to be a key step in coke growth. Low addition barriers reported for a phosphatidyl radical suggest competitive aptitude against coke formation. Moreover, organophosphorus additives bearing aromatic substituents, which were shown to interact with the coke surface through dispersive π-π stacking interactions, are suggested to play a nontrivial role in hindering further stacking among coke surfaces. This may be the underlying rationale behind experimental observation of softer coke in the presence of organophosphorus radicals. The ultimate goal is to provide information that will be useful in building single-event microkinetic models. This study presents pertinent information on potential reactions that could be taken up in these models. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Development of waste plastics recycling process using coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K.; Nomura, S.; Uematsu, H. [Nippon Steel Corp., Chiba (Japan). Steel Research Laboratories

    2002-07-01

    Laboratory tests are reported to evaluate the feasibility of adding waste plastics to coal for carbonization in coke ovens. It was found that the process was feasible. Coke, tar and light oil and gas were collected without affecting coke strength. The yield of coke, tar and light oil and gas were about 20%, 40% and 40% respectively. Waste plastics recycling equipment with a total capacity of 80,000 tons per year started operation in 2000 at Nagoya and Kimitsu works in Japan. Equipment is operating well. 7 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. EPA Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) with ERP Compliant Coke, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Administrative Order on Consent with ERP Compliant Coke was effective August 2016. The Walter Coke facility located in North Birmingham was purchased by ERP Compliant Coke, LLC in February 2016 out of bankruptcy proceedings.

  18. High temperature coke characteristics in the blast furnace:evaluation of coke properties in the raceway area

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Maria; Sundqvist Ökvist, Lena; Hyllander, Gunilla; Jansson, Björn; Björkman, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Core-drilling into the coke bed of raceway and hearth has been performed in the LKAB Experimental Blast Furnace (EBF®) during short stoppages aiming to characterize raceway conditions corresponding to different operational conditions. All coke operation, injection of pulverized coal and injection of a mixture of coal and blast furnace flue dust (BFD) were evaluated and compared. The samples have been studied regarding particle size and distribution, coke have been evaluated with chemical comp...

  19. Driver licensing and reasons for delaying licensure among young adults ages 18-20, United States, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefft, Brian C; Williams, Allan F; Grabowski, Jurek G

    2014-12-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens and young adults in the United States. Graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems were designed to protect young novice drivers by limiting their exposure to specific risks while they gain experience driving. In the United States, most states' GDL systems only apply to new drivers younger than 18. Some experts suggest that GDL might encourage young people to wait until age 18 to obtain a license, to avoid GDL requirements, resulting in older teenagers having less driving experience and higher crash risk than they might have had without GDL. This study examined the prevalence and timing of licensure among young adults, and explored factors associated with delaying licensure among those not licensed before age 18. An online questionnaire was completed by 1,039 persons aged 18-20 years, recruited from a representative panel of United States households. Main outcome measures were acquisition of driver's license (a) within 12 months of the state minimum age for licensure, (b) before age 18. Associations of timing of licensure with demographic characteristics were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Respondents not licensed before age 18 were asked to rate the importance of various possible reasons for delaying licensure. 54% of respondents were licensed before age 18. Blacks (37%; adjusted Prevalence Ratio 0.67, 95% Confidence Interval 0.48-0.93) and Hispanics (29%; adjusted Prevalence Ratio 0.60, 95% Confidence Interval 0.45-0.81) were less likely than non-Hispanic whites (67%) to be licensed before age 18. Lower household income was independently associated with delayed licensure (P licensed sooner were not having a car, being able to get around without driving, and costs associated with driving. There was little evidence that GDL is a major contributor to delayed licensure; however, a substantial minority of young people do not obtain a driver's license until age 18 or older and thus begin

  20. Influence of thermoplastic properties on coking pressure generation: Part 1 - A study of single coals of various rank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; Merrick R. Mahoney; Karen M. Steel [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2010-07-15

    In this study a number of high coking pressure coals with different fluidities were evaluated alongside a number of low pressure coals also with differing fluidities. This was to establish rheological parameters within which a coal may be considered potentially dangerous with regards to coking pressure. The results have confirmed and elaborated on previous findings which show that parallel plate displacement ({Delta}L) and axial force profiles can be used to distinguish between high and low pressure coals, with peak values indicating cell rupture and subsequent pore network formation. This is thought to correspond with plastic layer compaction in the coke oven. For low pressure coals pore coalescence occurs quite early in the softening process when viscosity/elasticity are decreasing and consequently a large degree of contraction/collapse is observed. For higher pressure coals the process is delayed since pore development and consequently wall thinning progress at a slower rate. If or when a pore network is established, a lower degree of contraction/collapse is observed because the event occurs closer to resolidification, where viscosity and elasticity are increasing. For the higher fluidity, high coking pressure coals, a greater degree of swelling is observed prior to cell rupture, and this is considered to be the primary reason for the high coking pressure observed with these coals. An additional consequence of these events is that high pressure coals are likely to contain a higher proportion of closed cells both at and during resolidification, reducing permeability in both the semi-coke and high temperature plastic layers, respectively. Using a rheological mapping approach to follow viscoelastic changes during carbonisation it has been possible to identify specific regions associated with dangerous coals. 76 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Presentation on management of delayed Cernavoda unit 2 NPP nuclear projects. Regulatory body assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, L.

    2003-01-01

    In 2003 the owner SNN signed the contract with AECL/ANSALDO to finalize together (management team) unit 2. The CNCAN requirements for Cernavoda unit 2 fully construction licence are: preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR); system classification list; item classification list; compliance report on safety Canadian regulation regarding the special safety systems (SDS 1, SDS 2, ECCS, Containment). The well-known CANDU design, easy to compare PSAR from unit 1 with unit 2 FSAR and improvement in accident analysis are the advantages of actual base for construction licence. Missing of design manuals to submit to CNCAN in this phase, special and expensive evaluation of safety implication for the equipment procured in the early time of project that compliance with obsolete codes are the main disadvantages of actual base for construction licence. The following additional document for the licence are required: training program for main control room operators; information about the availability of technical staff for commissioning; list of unit 2 procedures required to be approved by CNCAN; commissioning schedule for main control room ect

  2. Statistical assessment of coal charge effect on metallurgical coke quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Pustějovská

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies coke quality. Blast furnace technique has been interested in iron ore charge; meanwhile coke was not studied because, in previous conditions, it seemed to be good enough. Nowadays, requirements for blast furnace coke has risen, especially, requirements for coke reactivity. The level of reactivity parameter is determined primarily by the composition and properties of coal mixtures for coking. The paper deals with a statistical analysis of the tightness and characteristics of the relationship between selected properties of coal mixture and coke reactivity. Software Statgraphic using both simple linear regression and multiple linear regressions was used for the calculations. Obtained regression equations provide a statistically significant prediction of the reactivity of coke, or its strength after reduction of CO2, and, thus, their subsequent management by change in composition and properties of coal mixture. There were determined indexes CSR/CRI for coke. Fifty – four results were acquired in the experimental parts where correlation between index CRI and coal components were studied. For linear regression the determinant was 55.0204%, between parameters CRI – Inertinit 21.5873%. For regression between CRI and coal components it was 31.03%. For multiple linear regression between CRI and 3 feedstock components determinant was 34.0691%. The final correlation has shown the decrease in final coke reactivity for higher ash, higher content of volatile combustible in coal increases the total coke reactivity and higher amount of inertinit in coal increases the reactivity. Generally, coke quality is significantly affected by coal processing, carbonization and maceral content of coal mixture.

  3. Effect of coke structure on an increase in CSR range during the production period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkkonen, O.; Arendt, P.; Kuehl, H. [Rautaruukki Oyj, Raahe (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The paper reports investigations of changes in BET surface area, porosity and normal property data measured for Deutsche Montan Technologies (DMT) test cokes and Rautaruukki's wharf cokes in relation to Coke Strength after Reaction (CSR). Correlations of coke structural and chemical data with Coke Reactivity Index (CRI) confirmed an assumption that there can be noteworthy differences in coke properties from the daily sampling system at the Rautaruukki coking plant in Finland. It was found that the NSC procedure used was sensitive to changes in physical properties of the coke sample to be tested. 8 refs., 16 figs.

  4. Influence of surface modification by sulfuric acid on coking coal's adsorption of coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lihui; Wen, Hong; Tian, Quanzhi; Wang, Yongtian; Li, Guosheng

    2017-07-01

    Coking coal, the raw material of a coke plant, was applied to the adsorption of coking wastewater. In this study, coking coal was directly treated with sulfuric acid to improve its surface properties and adsorption ability. Acid treatment was carried out at various concentrations, by varying from 0.001 to 1 mol/L. The samples were characterized by ash content analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), N 2 adsorption-desorption analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), wettability analysis, and zeta potential analysis. These results demonstrated that H + could react with inorganic minerals, which resulted in a significant variation of the chemical composition and the structure of coal surface. Furthermore, both the ash content and the surface content of O = C-O, C = O and C-O groups declined gradually as the concentration of sulfuric acid increased, while the surface area and pore volume of micropore, the lipophilic and hydrophobic properties, and zeta potential magnitude increased, resulting in enhanced hydrophobic and Van der Waals' forces between the fine coal and organic pollutants. Characterization modification showed a better performance in adsorption, the removal rate enhanced from 23% to 42% after treated by 1 mol/L sulfuric acid. It was concluded that the acid activation modified the lipophilic and hydrophobic properties, the surface charge properties, surface area and pore volume, the content of oxygen functional groups, all of which could be potentially useful in wastewater adsorption.

  5. Tuberculosis Diagnosis Delaying Treatment of Cancer: Experience From a New Oncology Unit in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamba, Leo Peter Lockie; Jere, Yankho; Brown, Ewan Russell Stewart; Gorman, Dermot Robert

    2016-02-01

    Malawi is a low-income country in sub-Saharan Africa with limited health care infrastructure and high prevalance of HIV and tuberculosis. This study aims to determine the characteristics of patients presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital Oncology Unit, Blantyre, Malawi, who had been treated for tuberculosis before they were diagnosed with cancer. Clinical data on all patients presenting to the oncology unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital from 2010 to 2014 after a prior diagnosis of tuberculosis were prospectively recorded, and a descriptive analysis was undertaken. Thirty-four patients who had been treated for tuberculosis before being diagnosed with cancer were identified between 2010 and 2014, which represents approximately 1% of new referrals to the oncology unit. Forty-one percent of patients were HIV positive. Mean duration of tuberculosis treatment before presentation to the oncology unit was 3.6 months. The most common clinical presentation was a neck mass or generalized lymphadenopathy. Lymphoma was the most common malignancy that was subsequently diagnosed in 23 patients. Misdiagnosis of cancer as tuberculosis is a significant clinical problem in Malawi. This study underlines the importance of closely monitoring the response to tuberculosis treatment, being aware of the possibility of a cancer diagnosis, and seeking a biopsy early if cancer is suspected.

  6. Carbon Tubular Morphologies in Blast Furnace Coke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav S. Gornostayev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on the first occurrence of microscale carbon tubular morphologies (CMTs in a blast furnace (BF coke. The CMTs were probably formed as a result of the conversion of solid disordered carbon via liquid phase metal particles involving a gas phase containing a substantial amount of N2 and O2. The presence of CMTs may lie behind the generation of the smallest fraction of fines in BF exhaust dust. If the amount of CMTs present in the BF exhausts gases at any particular metallurgical site proves to be substantial, it could become a subject of environmental concern.

  7. Study on the Inference Factors of Huangling Coking Coal Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meili; Yang, Zongyi; Fan, Jinwen

    2018-01-01

    In order to reasonably and efficiently utilize Huangling coking coal resource, coal particle, heating rate, holding time, pyrolysis temperature and others factors were dicussed for the influence of those factor on Huangling coking coal pyrolysis products. Several kinds of coal blending for coking experiments were carried out with different kinds of coal such as Huangling coking coal, Xida coal with high ash low sufur, Xinghuo fat coal with hign sulfur, Zhongxingyi coking coal with high sulfur, Hucun lean coal, mixed meager and lean coal. The results shown that the optimal coal particle size distribution was 0.5~1.5mm, the optimal heating rate was 8°C/min, the optimal holding time was 15min, the optimal pyrolysis temperature was 800°C for Huangling coking coal pyrolysis, the tar yield increased from 4.7% to 11.2%. The maximum tar yield of coal blending for coking under the best single factor experiment condition was 10.65% when the proportio of Huangling coking coal was 52%.

  8. Optimization of cord blood unit sterility testing: impact of dilution, analysis delay, and inhibitory substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Mélissa; Laforce-Lavoie, Audrey; de Grandmont, Marie Joëlle; Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Fournier, Diane; Delage, Gilles; Thibault, Louis

    2017-08-01

    Different methods are used by cord blood banks to prepare samples for sterility testing. Suboptimal methods can result in the release of contaminated products. In our organization, samples are prepared by diluting the final product in RPMI-1640 medium. In this work, we have compared our method with different approaches to verify whether optimization should be sought. Cord blood units (n = 6 units per bacterial strain) characterized to contain inhibitory substances or not were inoculated (10 colony-forming units/mL) with Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, or Bacteroides fragilis. After plasma and red blood cell removal, stem cell concentrates were diluted in RPMI-1640, thioglycollate, or the unit's plasma. These products, as well as final product, plasma, and red blood cell fractions, were held from 0 to 72 hours at 20 to 24°C before inoculation in culture bottles and detection using the BacT/ALERT 3D system. Dilution of cell concentrates in RPMI-1640 allowed bacterial detection in 93.3% of noninhibitory cord blood samples after a 24-hour storage period. Thioglycollate medium better promoted bacterial growth in inhibitory cord blood samples that were held for 72 hours before testing (66.7%) compared with RPMI-1640 (45.0%). Less than 33% of all spiked plasma samples were detected by the BacT/ALERT 3D system. Diluting cord blood samples in culture medium containing bacterial growth promoting substances is a suitable option for sterility testing, whereas the use of plasma should be proscribed, because it might lead to false-negative results. Because inhibitory substances affect bacterial growth, inoculation of culture bottles should be done rapidly after sample preparation. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Coke deactivation of catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Harwell's principal contribution to the study of the role of coke in the deactivation of catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum feedstocks has been the development and application of nuclear microprobe methods to measure the distributions of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and other elements in coked catalyst pellets. Nuclear microprobe methods have been developed that allow the measurement of the distribution of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and heavier elements in coked catalyst pellets. At present analysis by both deuteron and helium-4 ion beams is necessary to cover the complete range of elements. The potential of using helium-3 irradiation alone to measure all elements is as yet unrealised. Applications have included studies of the variability of profiles in batches of used pellets, investigation of interrelationships between coke components and limited kinetic studies. Many of these applications have proved to be successful and nuclear microprobe methods should continue to be exploited studies of catalyst coking. (au)

  10. Structural features of coke obtained from mixtures of various compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromova, O.B.; Syskov, K.I.; Mikhailets, S.N.; Gromov, V.E.; Sukhov, Yu.K.

    1985-11-01

    Fundamental aspects are examined for sorptional theory of coking by exposing structural features of coke obtained from charges of varying quantitative proportions of leaning (fillers) and caking (binding) components. Test samples of binding coke (fat coal) and its mixtures with fillers were studied. The samples were boiled with a mixture of xylene and colophony and then freshly spalled so that bonding coke surfaces could be prepared. Microscopic nonuniformity of substances under investigation was taken into consideration during analysis of the results. All varieties of the substance were studied in order to obtain statistically averaged characteristics. It was found that the addition of fillers to the mixture increases the size of structural globular constituents of coke. 6 references.

  11. Predictive Factors for Delayed Extubation in the Intensive Care Unit after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting; A Southern Iranian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Shahbazi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early extubation is implemented in cardiothoracic units worldwide for its advantages such as decreased mortality, morbidity, and hospitalization costs. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate potential factors which may affect extubation time. Methods: The records of 334 eligible patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG in 2008 in Kowsar Hospital in Shiraz, southern Iran were evaluated to find the factors that can affect the extubation time. The patients were divided to early (equal or less than 6 hours and late extubation groups. The patients’ demographic data and operative variables were extracted from the records. We excluded patients with difficult intubation, severe acid base disturbance, neurological problems, and cardiovascular instability; and those who used intra-aortic balloon pump, had underwent emergency operation, or had another concomitant surgery. Results: Multiple logistic regressions comparing age, sex, number of grafts, ejection fraction, pump time, hematocrit, number of risk factors, and number of inotropic drugs, identified only age as a predictor of delayed extubation (odds ratio=1.07, CI 95%=1.04-1.10, P<0.001. Also, in both studied groups the men to women ratio was higher (P<0.05.Conclusion: Although in our study age was the only predictive factor for delayed extubation, a comprehensive study including preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative factors is recommended in our area.

  12. The year-book of the Coke Oven Managers' Association 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The 86th volume of the Year Book outlines activities of the Coke Oven Managers' Association throughout 2005 and reproduces transactions presented to the industry through its various sections. It includes lists of Council and Committee members and representation on committees and past presidents, and a full list of members. Reports of Council 2003-4 and of the annual general meeting 2004 are included. The Presidential address by A.W. Murray is on the changing world of steel. Carbonisation and briquetting works in the United Kingdom, Koppers carbon materials and chemical works in the UK and Europe, Euro continental carbonisation works 2004 and working coke plants in Europe 2005 are listed. Six of the eight transactions are abstracted separately on the Coal Abstracts database.

  13. Design of coke ovens. Part I: basic heating systems of coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroka, E.; Haratyk, J.

    1983-06-01

    Presented is a comparative evaluation of heating systems of coke ovens. The following systems are evaluated: Becker, Koppers-Becker, PK, Collin, DHK, Still, Koppers, Wilpute, Didier, Otto, Koksoprojekt, PTU-57, Giprokoks PWR, Nittetsu, Simon-Carves and the Didier I system. The following aspects of heating systems are analyzed: design of coke ovens, design of heating walls, materials used for construction of heating walls, position of flue channels, supply systems of gas to heating channels, combustion systems, calorific value of gas used for heating (natural gas, blast-furnace gas, producer gas etc.), effects of flue gas recirculation on heating efficiency, optimizing dimensions of heating walls and heating channels. Design of heating channels is shown in 7 schemes. (5 refs.) (In Polish)

  14. Effect of nut coke on the performance of the ironmaking blast furnace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Q.

    2013-01-01

    The blast furnace consumes a large amount of high quality metallurgy coke (size 35-80 mm) in addition to ore in the form of pellets and sinter. This coke is the coarse fraction, derived from the coke plant. The fine fraction (8 -35 mm), arise after sieving, named nut coke, can’t be directly used in

  15. Petroleum coke and plants : impact on growth and physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, C.; Renault, S.

    2006-01-01

    Petroleum coke, a by-product of the oil sand processing industry in Alberta, contains fairly significant concentrations of arsenic, boron, iron, nickel, sulphur, titanium, and vanadium embedded in a carbon matrix. Through weathering and biological degradation, these components may be released from coke and absorbed by plant tissues where they may restrict growth and interfere with physiological activities. In order to study the effects of petroleum coke on plants, several greenhouse experiments were conducted by growing Agropyron trachycaulum, Deschampsia caespitosa, Calamagrostis canadensis, Oryzopsis hymenoides, Triticum aestivum, Cornus sericea and Fragaria virginiana for 3 months in control soil, Syncrude Canada Ltd. coke; and Suncor Energy Inc.coke. It was found that in all coke treated plants, shoot biomass was lower than controls. Root biomass followed this same trend, with the exception of Triticum aestivum. Several results were presented in this study abstract. It was concluded that the short term effects of coke on plants are most likely due to water stress and nutrient deficiency and that further research is needed

  16. Bromination of petroleum coke for elemental mercury capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi; Pudasainee, Deepak; Gupta, Rajender; Xu, Zhenghe; Diao, Yongfa

    2017-08-15

    Activated carbon injection has been proven to be an effective control technology of mercury emission from coal-fired power plants. Petroleum coke is a waste by-product of petroleum refining with large quantities readily available around the world. Due to its high inherent sulfur content, petroleum coke is an attractive raw material for developing mercury capture sorbent, converting a waste material to a value-added product of important environmental applications. In this study, petroleum coke was brominated by chemical-mechanical bromination. The brominated petroleum coke was characterized for thermal stability, mercury capture capacity, and potential mercury and bromine leaching hazards. Bromine loaded on the petroleum coke was found to be stable up to 200°C. Even after treating the brominated petroleum coke for 30min at 600°C, 1/3 bromine remained on the solid. The sorbent from bromination of sulfur-containing petroleum coke was shown to be a promising alternative to commercial brominated activated carbon for capture of elemental mercury from coal combustion flue gases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Production and utilization of highly reactive calcium rich coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Nomura; H. Kitaguchi; H. Ayukawa [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment & Process Technology Center

    2005-07-01

    A method to produce coke in 'lump' form with high strength and reactivity through the addition of a catalyst was investigated in order to improve blast furnace reaction efficiency. The addition of Ca compounds to coal before carbonization was found to considerably increase the reactivity of the coke at a low temperature range in the thermal reserve zone of a blast furnace. Furthermore it was proved that strong, highly reactive 'lump' form coke could be produced by adding a Ca-rich non-caking coal and adjusting the coal blend composition. Based on this fundamental study, the Ca-rich coke was successfully produced in coke ovens on a commercial scale. The use of the Ca-rich coke in a commercial scale blast furnace was found to cause a decrease in the reducing agent rate by 10 kg/t-p. This technology, producing coke of high reactivity and strength through catalyst addition, is promising as a means of improving the reaction efficiency of a blast furnace. 8 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Coke deposition mechanism on the pores of a commercial Pt-Re/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} naphtha reforming catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghalha, Morteza; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Ghorbanpour, Arian [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi St., Tehran, 11365-9465 (Iran)

    2010-07-15

    Coke deposition mechanism on a commercial Pt-Re/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} naphtha reforming catalyst was studied. A used catalyst that was in industrial reforming operation for 28 months, as well as the fresh catalyst of the unit were characterized using XRD, XRF, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses. Carbon and sulfur contents of the fresh and the used catalysts were determined using Leco combustion analyzer. The pore size distributions (PSD) of the fresh and the used reforming catalysts were determined using BJH and Comparison Plot methods. The Comparison Plot method produced the most reasonable PSDs for the catalysts. Through comparison of the PSDs of the fresh and the used catalysts, it was revealed that coke deposited on both micropores and mesopores of the catalyst at a constant thickness of 1.0 nm. The constant coke thickness on the catalyst pore walls in the naphtha reforming process (temp. {proportional_to} 500 C) implies that coke deposition reaction is the slow controlling step in comparison to the fast mass transfer rate of coke ingredients into the pores. The bulk density of the deposited coke on the used catalyst was calculated as 0.966 g/cm{sup 3}. (author)

  19. Methanol gasoline blend from petroleum coke sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzer, David [Consulting Chemical Engineer (United States); Wallsgrove, Chris [Process Engineering Manager (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In Alberta, a large amount of petroleum coke is produced as a byproduct from processes relating to bitumen upgrading and refining. Unfortunately, there is little to no market for this product in the province. This presentation addresses concerns relating to the concept of converting the otherwise wasted petcoke into methanol and using it as a blending component in gasoline. The presentation tackles issues relating to environmental impact, economics, renewability, toxicity, safety, and vehicle design by analyzing and comparing the proposed methanol/gasoline (M-10) to that of an ethanol/gasoline (E-10). The presentation covers analysis of the CO2 emissions, an analysis of the finances, and a number of scenarios involving the improper use or accidental spillage of M-10. Through the comparison of methanol/gasoline and ethanol/gasoline, the presentation demonstrated that converting the petcoke byproduct into methanol for use as a gasoline blend is a viable option.

  20. Differential thermal analysis of coking coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruhisa Ueda; Frederic Honnart; Victor Zymla [Nippon Steel Corporation, Nagoya (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    An experimental procedure was developed enabling the heat flow at all range of the pyrolysis and carbonisation process temperature (25-1100 {sup o}C) to be measured by differential thermal analysis. The endothermic effect at temperatures below 500{sup o}C as well as exothermic effect at higher temperatures were determined. It was established that the heat of carbonisation varies with coal rank and that it is dramatically influenced by coal oxidation and by even relatively small addition of waste plastics to the coal blend. These findings could be taken into consideration in thermal balance of the carbonisation process and the automatic heating control of coke oven batteries. 5 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Lithium intercalation in heat-treated petroleum cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T. D.; Spellman, L. M.; Goldberger, W. M.; Song, X.; Kinoshita, K.

    Petroleum needle cokes were processed by air-milling and heat treatment at three temperatures 1800, 2100 and 2350 °C, to produce a final average particle size of 10 p.m. The effects of air-milling (before and after heat treatment) on the physical and microstructural properties of the petroleum coke particles were examined. The results obtained for electrochemical lithium intercalation/de-intercalation in 0.5 M LiN(CF 3SO 2) 2/EC:DMC electrolyte using these petroleum cokes after the different processing conditions are reported.

  2. A view of merchant coke in Shanxi Province of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Naiyi [Xin Yuan Law Firm, Beijing (China)

    2003-07-01

    The paper describes the production of merchant coke in Shanxi province both before and after 1999. Production by beehive ovens reached a peak in 1995. Despite being banned in 1996 this technology was used until the end of 2000. Since 2000, advanced machinery recovery ovens with carbonization chambers of over 3 or 4 metres have been built, along with non-recovery 'clean beehive ovens'. The supply and demand of merchant coke, from Shanxi is discussed. Recently 75% of China's merchant coke has been produced in Shanxi.

  3. Experimental Study of Advanced Treatment of Coking Wastewater Using MBR-RO Combined Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Hwang, Jiannyang; Leng, Ting; Xue, Gaifeng; Chang, Hongbing

    A membrane bioreactor-reverse osmosis (MBR-RO) combined process was used for advanced treatment of coking wastewater from secondary biological treatment. MBR and RO units' treatment efficiency for the pollution removal were conducted, and effects of raw water conductivity and trans-membrane pressure on water yield and desalination rate in RO unit were investigated in detail. The experimental results proved that MBR-RO combined process ran steadily with good treatment effect, which could obtain stable effluent water quality and met the requirement of "Design Criterion of the Industrial Circulating Cooling Water Treatment" (GB 50050-2007).

  4. Effects of heat treatments of coal on coke destruction under blast furnace conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkoller, M.B.; Dinel' t, V.M.; Korchuganova, G.S.; Petrov, V.B.

    1983-09-01

    This paper discusses results of investigations on effects of chemical reactions in a blast furnace on coke disintegration and destruction. The investigations were carried out by the VUKhIN Institute branch in Kuznetsk. Effects of silicates and carbonates of sodium, potassium and zinc on mechanical coke properties were investigated under laboratory conditions. Coke samples were placed in a reactor and were treated by vapors of metal compounds. Coke produced from a coal mixture with conventional moisture content and from preheated coal mixture was used. Coal properties are given in a table. Design of laboratory equipment used for tests is shown in 2 schemes. Heat treatments influenced coke porosity and its structural strength. Proportion of large pores accessible to sodium and potassium in coke from preheated coal was 4.5 times lower than in coke from a conventional mixture. Adsorption of sodium and potassium on coke from preheated charge was lower (from 0.22% to 0.24%) than on coke from a conventional mixture (from 2.5% to 2.9%). Adsorption of alkali metals on coke reduced its structural strength and increased coke oxidation rate by carbon dioxide. Use of heat treatments of coal for coking reduced adsorption of alkali metals on coke in a blast furnace, increased coke structural strength and reduced coke oxidation rate by carbon dioxide. (16 refs.) (In Russian)

  5. Scientific research in the area of coking and coking by-products (based on material from the All-Union Coordinating Conference)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydkevich, M.I.; Tselik, M.P.; Belkina, T.V.

    1985-06-01

    Subjects covered in the all-union coordinating conference on coking and chemical by-products of coking, which took place on 13-15 July 1984, are discussed. One hundred forty eight on-going and new research themes accepted as research projects for 1985-86 were discussed. Areas of research include coals from the eastern deposits and Pechora basin as raw materials for coking; coals from the southern deposits as coking raw materials; technology of coal preparation for coking; technology for producing blast furnace coke and methods of assessing its quality; technology for producing other kinds of coke and carbon graphite materials; methods for extraction processing and producing chemical products from coking.

  6. Crystallinity and shape of crushed calcined coke particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fecioru, M.; Petrescu, M.; Georgeoni, P.

    1993-01-01

    The particle eccentricity is a very important property of the petroleum coke in determining the anisotropy of the properties of the final graphite and it affects the manner in which its properties change in the specific applications. (orig.)

  7. Crystallinity and shape of crushed calcined coke particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecioru, M. (DACIA Synthetic Diamonds Factory, Bucharest (Romania)); Petrescu, M. (DACIA Synthetic Diamonds Factory, Bucharest (Romania) Polytechnic Inst., Bucharest (Romania)); Georgeoni, P. (DACIA Synthetic Diamonds Factory, Bucharest (Romania))

    1993-11-01

    The particle eccentricity is a very important property of the petroleum coke in determining the anisotropy of the properties of the final graphite and it affects the manner in which its properties change in the specific applications. (orig.).

  8. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: WRI COKING INDEXES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Francis P. Miknis; Thomas F. Turner

    2003-06-01

    Pyrolysis experiments were conducted with three residua at 400 C (752 F) at various residence times. The wt % coke and gaseous products were measured for the product oils. The Western Research Institute (WRI) Coking Indexes were determined for the product oils. Measurements were made using techniques that might correlate with the Coking Indexes. These included spin-echo proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, heat capacity measurements at 280 C (536 F), and ultrasonic attenuation. The two immiscible liquid phases that form once coke formation begins were isolated and characterized for a Boscan residuum pyrolyzed at 400 C (752 F) for 55 minutes. These materials were analyzed for elemental composition (CHNS), porphyrins, and metals (Ni,V) content.

  9. Prediction of coking dynamics for wet coal charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kardaś Dariusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional transient mathematical model describing thermal and flow phenomena during coal coking in an oven chamber was studied in the paper. It also accounts for heat conduction in the ceramic oven wall when assuming a constant temperature at the heating channel side. The model was solved numerically using partly implicit methods for gas flow and heat transfer problems. The histories of temperature, gas evolution and internal pressure were presented and analysed. The theoretical predictions of temperature change in the centre plane of the coke oven were compared with industrialscale measurements. Both, the experimental data and obtained numerical results show that moisture content determines the coking process dynamics, lagging the temperature increase above the water steam evaporation temperature and in consequence the total coking time. The phenomenon of internal pressure generation in the context of overlapping effects of simultaneously occurring coal transitions - devolatilisation and coal permeability decrease under plastic stage - was also discussed.

  10. Actual application of hot repairing technology to operating coke oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, Susumu; Ito, Hidekuni; Numazawa, Makoto; Yamazaki, Takao; Narita, Yuji; Kondo, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    In Wakayama Steel Works, the coke ovens have been operating for 23 [approximately] 25 years, and many over-aged parts can be seen. However the investment for the construction of a new coke oven is so huge that the maximum prolongation of the existing coke ovens life becomes very important. In the Wakayama Steel Works, it is thought that the coking chamber repairing technology can be the key to that prolongation. While, repairing the coking chamber, the area near the wall head can be observed by the naked eye and repaired using conventional methods, such a welding repairment by metal oxidation heat, partial chamber wall brick re-laying in the hot stage. However, these repairing methods are limited to the area near the wall head, and successful repair methods for the central portion of chamber wall have not, heretofore, been found. In the Wakayama Steel Works, the development of a new welding repairing machine for the central portion of the chamber wall was started and the actual repairing machine has been completed with practical use tests on operating coke ovens. This repairing machine has the following characteristic; (1) Repair of the central portion of ovens under high temperature (over 1,000 C); (2) Capability to seal narrow cracks or open brick joints and to smooth out brick roughness into a flat surface; (3) High working efficiency (max. welding capacity [equals] 30K g/h); (4) Compact and fully automatic operation with a high level of man/machine control interface; and (5) No disturbance of coke oven operation and no cooling of the chamber wall. In this paper, the outline of the actual hot repairing machine and its application results in the Wakayama operating coke ovens are reported.

  11. Experimental research on quality features of metallurgical coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, V.; Constantin, N.

    2015-06-01

    From all the solid fuels, the metallurgical coke is the most used in obtaining iron in the blast furnace. Together with the iron ore, manganese ore and fluxes, it constitutes the basis of raw materials and materials for elaborating pig iron. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations by the authors to determine the most important quality characteristics of some types of coke used in the blast furnace charge.

  12. Vanadium Geochemistry of Oil Sands Fluid Petroleum Coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jake A; Lindsay, Matthew B J

    2017-03-07

    Vanadium has previously been linked to elevated toxicity of leachates derived from oil sands petroleum coke. However, geochemical controls on V mobility within coke deposits remain poorly constrained. Detailed examinations of porewater and solid-phase V geochemistry were therefore performed on oil sands fluid petroleum coke deposits in Alberta, Canada. Sample collection focused on both active and reclaimed deposits, which contained more than 3 × 10 7 m 3 of fluid petroleum coke. Dissolved V concentrations were highest (up to 3.0 mg L -1 ) immediately below the water table but decreased rapidly with increasing depth. This trend corresponded to a transition from mildly acidic (pH 6-7) and oxic conditions to mildly alkaline (pH 7-8.5) and anoxic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping revealed coke particles exhibited an internal structure characterized by successive concentric layers. The outer margins of these layers were characterized by elevated V, Fe, Si, and Al concentrations, indicating the presence of inorganic phases. Micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy revealed that V speciation was dominated by V(IV) porphyrins except at outer margins of layers, where octahedrally coordinated V(III) was a major component. Minor to trace V(V) was also detected within fluid petroleum coke particles.

  13. Need for reclassification on coking coals for Indian steel plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, R.K.; Wazir, S.N.; Laha, P.C.

    Current coal classification systems in use are: ASTM D-388-66, ISO classification (International), NCB classification of UK and IS: 770-1977 in India. The prevailing systems of classification are reviewed and the problems faced by the Indian steel plants, with particular reference to the coking coal usage, vis-a-vis application of classification system in accordance with IS:770, are analysed. A separate system of classification for coking and non-coking coals has been proposed. Four basic parameters, namely volatile matter, Gray-King (LT) coke type, maximum thickness of plastic layer, ash content (in place of calorific value as included in IS:770) followed by moisture content (60 per cent relative humidity and 40 C) as the supplementary parameter should be the criteria for classification of coking coals keeping in view the Indian conditions. All these aspects emphasize the need for fresh thinking on the entire issue to arrive at a more realistic and pragmatic system for classifying coking coals in India. 5 refs.

  14. Fissure formation in coke. 1: The mechanism of fissuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Jenkins; M.R. Mahoney; J.C. Keating [CSIRO Mathematical and Information Sciences, North Ryde, NSW (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    Pilot scale coke oven experiments, in which carbonisation has been arrested after 2 and 4 h, have been used to identify key aspects of the initial formation and propagation of fissuring in coke. The experiments show that the primary fissure network is formed within the first few hours of coking and the fissures propagate towards the centre of the oven as coking progresses. They also show that some of the initially formed fissures stop propagating, thus increasing the effective fissure spacing as coking continues. A model for the propagation of regular crack arrays has been used to identify the cause of the initial formation of the fissure network, evaluate the fissure spacing and explain the fissure coarsening effect. The coarsening is shown to be due to an instability, in the form of every second fissure stopping. The formation of lateral fissures is shown to be due to tensile stress formation near the tips of stopped fissures and also to increased shrinkage due to a maximum in the coke contraction coefficient at around 700{sup o}C. 45 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Investigating combined influence of petrology and technological parameters on strength of porous coke body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinel' t, V.M.; Shkoller, M.B.; Stankevich, A.S.; Korchuganova, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The VUKhIN branch in Kuznetsk investigated effects of coal petrology and coking conditions on structural strength of coke in blast furnaces. Structural strength of coke produced from black coal from the Kuzbass as well as structural strength of coke partially gasified by carbon dioxide under conditions similar to those in blast furnaces was investigated. Fourteen samples of coal mixtures from the Kuzbass were used. Regression analysis was applied. Equations for forecasting coke properties on the basis of coal petrology and selected parameters characterizing coking were derived. Analyses showed that coke structural strength was decisively influenced by coefficients which characterized the average reflectivity of vitrinite in a coal mixture and its average density. After partial coke gasification by carbon dioxide effects of coefficients which characterized coal mixture nonhomogeneity (fluctuations of vitrinite reflectivity) and coal mixture density increased. Increasing coal density partially compensated negative effects of fluctuations of vitrinite reflectivity on coke structural strength. (10 refs.) (In Russian)

  16. The effect of soaking time on properties of blast furnace coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Dash, P.S.; Krishnan, S.H.; Kumar, D. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2004-07-01

    Attempts were made to study the effect of soaking time on properties of blast furnace coke at Tata Steel. Plant trial indicated that when soaking time was increased the +50 mm size coke, mean size, and M{sub 40} indices improved. The CSR value exhibited no significant improvement after a certain limit. This may be due to stability of coke structure improvement in coke quality by increasing soaking time. To achieve the maximum improvement in coke cost, loss of output and heat consumption may be compensated by decreasing coke rate and improving productivity in the blast furnace. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, Celine S; Oostdijk, Evelien A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale; Bonten, Marc J M; van den Bergh, Walter M

    2016-02-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and poor outcome. We thus postulated that preventive antibiotics might be associated with a reduced risk of DCI and subsequent poor outcome in aSAH patients. We performed a retrospective cohort-study in intensive care units (ICU) of three university hospitals in The Netherlands. We included consecutive aSAH patients with minimal ICU stay of 72 h who received either preventive antibiotics (SDD: selective digestive tract decontamination including systemic cefotaxime or SOD: selective oropharyngeal decontamination) or no preventive antibiotics. DCI was defined as a new hypodensity on CT with no other explanation than DCI. Hazard ratio's (HR) for DCI and risk ratio's (RR) for 28-day case-fatality and poor outcome at 3 months were calculated, with adjustment (aHR/aRR) for clinical condition on admission, recurrent bleeding, aneurysm treatment modality and treatment site. Of 459 included patients, 274 received preventive antibiotics (SOD or SDD) and 185 did not. With preventive antibiotics, the aHR for DCI was 1.0 (95% CI 0.6-1.8), the aRR for 28-day case-fatality was 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.9) and the aRR for poor functional outcome 1.2 (95% CI 1.0-1.4). Preventive antibiotics were not associated with reduced risk of DCI or poor outcome in aSAH patients in the ICU.

  18. Pyrolisator Coal to be Cokes (Coal Cokes Casting Metal Industry Standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukamto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolisis of coal is partial combustion to reduce total moisture, volatile matter and sulfur contens and increase the calorific value of coal. The results of pyrolysis of coal is coke. At the laboratory level studies, pyrolisis done in batch using different calorie, namely 5800, 6000, 6300 kcal/kg and a time of 15-60 minutes and the temperature 400-800°C. Maximum results obtained total moisture (0.44%, fixed carbon (89%, volatile matter (2.4%, sulfur content (undetected and ash (7.2%. Then applied to the scale miniplant with continuous processes using multitube pyrolisator which are designed to operate in the temperature range 400-800°C and a flow rate of 240-730 kg/h, obtained coal cokes that meets industry quality standards, namely TM (0.42%, FC (90.40%, VM (2.16%, S (not detected, Ash (6.8% incalori 6300 kcal/h, a flow rate of 240 kg / h and temperatures between 600-700°C

  19. The year-book of the Coke Oven Managers' Association 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The 85th volume of the Year Book outlines activities of the Coke Oven Managers' Association throughout 2004 and reproduces transactions presented to the industry through its various sections. It includes lists of Council and Committee members and past presidents, and a full list of members. Carbonisation and briquetting works in the United Kingdom, carbon materials and chemical works in the UK and Europe, and Continental European carbonisation works are listed. A short history is presented of Koppers Totton Works. 11 papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  20. Chlorine behavior of waste plastics recycling process using coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K.; Nomura, S. [Nippon Steel Corp. Ltd., Futtsu (Japan). Environmental & Protection Technological Center

    2004-10-01

    At the advent of the 21st century, mankind is facing a global environmental problem, and the industrial sector is required to take initiatives in the establishment of recycling society for efficient utilization of natural resources. To establish the waste plastics recycling method by using iron-making process, waste plastics recycling process using coke ovens was developed by Nippon Steel in 2000. In this process, waste plastics are charged into coke ovens with coal, and carbonized at about 1200{degree}C under the reducing atmosphere. Waste plastics are converted to chemical products, such as coke, tar and light oil, and coke oven gas. However, waste plastics involves chlorine-contained plastics, such as polyvinyl chloride and polyvinylidene chloride, etc. It is generally known that such chlorine-contained plastics cause corrosion problem at the incinerator or gasification equipment. Therefore, the behavior of chlorine content of waste plastics was investigated. As a result, it was found that the chlorine content of waste plastics is mostly pyrolysed during carbonization with coal in a coke oven and effectively captured by ammonia liquor.

  1. Integrated process for synthetic natural gas production from coal and coke-oven gas with high energy efficiency and low emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Yi; Yang, Siyu; Qian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel coal and coke-oven gas to SNG (CGtSNG) process is proposed. • Energy efficiency of CGtSNG increases 8% compared to coal-to-SNG process. • CGtSNG reduces 60% CO 2 emission and 72% effluent discharge. • CGtSNG proposes an idea of using redundant coke-oven gas for producing SNG production. - Abstract: There was a rapid development of coal to synthetic natural gas (SNG) projects in the last few years in China. The research from our previous work and some other researchers have found coal based SNG production process has the problems of environmental pollution and emission transfer, including CO 2 emission, effluent discharge, and high energy consumption. This paper proposes a novel co-feed process of coal and coke-oven gas to SNG process by using a dry methane reforming unit to reduce CO 2 emissions, more hydrogen elements are introduced to improve resource efficiency. It is shown that the energy efficiency of the co-feed process increases by 4%, CO 2 emission and effluent discharge is reduced by 60% and 72%, whereas the production cost decreases by 16.7%, in comparison to the conventional coal to SNG process. As coke-oven gas is a waste gas in most of the coking plant, this process also allows to optimize the allocation of resources.

  2. Microstructures and microtextures of natural cokes: A case study of heat-affected coking coals from the Jharia coalfield, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashok K. [Central Fuel Research Institute, CSIR, Dhanbad-828108 (India); Singh, Mahendra P. [Department of Geology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Sharma, Mamta; Srivastava, Sunil K.

    2007-07-02

    In Jharia coalfield, nearly 1250 Mt of coking coal has been devolatilized due to igneous intrusives and {proportional_to} 1900 Mt due to mine fires. This paper is an effort to investigate the effect of carbonization in two intrusive affected coal seams of Ena (seam XIII) and Alkusa (seam XIV) collieries of this coalfield. Through petrographic studies by microscopy, characterization of normal and heat-affected coals was carried out. The microstructures and microtextures produced due to extraneous heat have been related to nature and extent of heat, location of heating source, and quality and quantity of natural coke produced. Based on the results of this study and earlier studies, an effort has been made to study the classification scheme for microtextures of natural cokes generated through in-situ carbonization of the coal seams. It has been observed that in case of such heat effects under overburden pressure, the anisotropy is much more pronounced as compared to laboratory-carbonized cokes. In the mildly carbonized coals (pre-plastic phase, < 300 C) the vitrinite attained higher reflectance than normal vitrinite, liptinite started disappearing, and inertinite remained unaffected. In the moderately affected coals (plastic phase, 300-500 C), mesophase spheres and fused natural cokes were generated from the reactives (vitrinite and liptinite maceral groups), the liptinites disappeared, and structurally, the inertinites remained almost unchanged with slight increase in the reflectance value. In the severely heat-affected coals (post plastic phase, > 500 C) the identified microtextures were mesophase spheres, different shapes and sizes of natural cokes, graphitic sphaeroliths, pyrolytic carbons, inerts with morpho-structural changes and slightly higher reflectance values, and altered and unaltered mineral matters. A gradual change in the heat-affected coals with increasing temperature was observed with respect to location of intrusive body. It has been concluded that

  3. Microporous Cokes Formed in Zeolite Catalysts Enable Efficient Solar Evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianjian

    2017-03-13

    Cokes are inevitably generated during zeolite-catalyzed reactions as deleterious side products that deactivate the catalyst. In this study, we in-situ converted cokes into carbons within the confined microporous zeolite structures and evaluated their performances as absorbing materials for solar-driven water evaporation. With a properly chosen zeolite, the cokederived carbons possessed ordered interconnected pores and tunable compositions. We found that the porous structure and the oxygen content in as-prepared carbons had important influences on their energy conversion efficiencies. Among various investigated carbon materials, the carbon derived from the methanol-to-olefins reaction over zeolite Beta gave the highest conversion efficiency of 72% under simulated sunlight with equivalent solar intensity of 2 suns. This study not only demonstrates the great potential of traditionally useless cokes for solar thermal applications but also provides new insights into the design of carbon-based absorbing materials for efficient solar evaporation.

  4. Influence of thermal charge preparation on coke comminution under blast-furnace operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkoller, M.B.; Dinel' t, V.M.; Korchuganova, G.S.; Petrov, V.B.

    1983-09-01

    Reactions of coke in the blast furnace are determined mainly by the nature of the coke itself which depends on the coal properties, its preparation and the coking conditions. In the blast furnace the coke reacts with alkali and alkaline earth metals in the burden. Preheated coal charges were found to absorb far less sodium and potassium carbonates than a conventional moist charge over an equivalent period, due to the smaller pore volume available.

  5. China's coke industry: Recent policies, technology shift, and implication for energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Hong; Lei, Yu; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Lijian; He, Kebin

    2012-01-01

    China is the largest coke producer in the world, accounting for over 60% of the world coke production, which makes the coke industry in China a significant coal consumer and air pollutant emitter. Recently, China has taken a series of measures to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions from the coke industry, including eliminating old and low energy-efficiency coking technologies, promoting advanced technologies, and strengthening energy and environmental requirements on coking processes. As a consequence, China's coke industry is experiencing an unprecedented technology shift, which was characterized by the elimination of old, inefficient, and polluting indigenous ovens and small machinery ones within 10 years. This study examines the policies and the prompt technology shift in China's coke industry, as well as the associated energy and environmental effects, and discusses the implications with respect to the development of the coke industry in China towards a more efficient and clean future. As China sets stricter requirements on energy efficiency and the ambient environment, a more significant change focusing on technologies of energy saving and emission reduction is urgently needed at present. Those mature technologies, including coke dry quenching, coke oven gas recycle, fine particle removal, etc., should be enforced in the near future. - Highlights: ► With 60% of world coke output, China's coke making has big energy/pollution issues. ► Actions were taken to improve energy and environmental performance of coke plants. ► China's coke industry is experiencing an unprecedented technology shift. ► Another shift, focusing on technologies of energy and emission saving, is needed. ► More measurement studies on coking emissions are needed given the importance.

  6. Dust emission from wet, low-emission coke quenching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosiński, Bogusław; Bobik, Bartłomiej; Konieczny, Tomasz; Cieślik, Ewelina

    2018-01-01

    Coke plants, which produce various types of coke (metallurgical, foundry or heating), at temperatures between 600 and 1200°C, with limited access to oxygen, are major emitters of particulates and gaseous pollutants to air, water and soils. Primarily, the process of wet quenching should be mentioned, as one of the most cumbersome. Atmospheric pollutants include particulates, tar substances, organic pollutants including B(a)P and many others. Pollutants are also formed from the decomposition of water used to quench coke (CO, phenol, HCN, H2S, NH3, cresol) and decomposition of hot coke in the first phase of quenching (CO, H2S, SO2) [1]. The development of the coke oven technology has resulted in the changes made to different types of technological installations, such as the use of baffles in quench towers, the removal of nitrogen oxides by selective NOx reduction, and the introduction of fabric filters for particulates removal. The BAT conclusions for coke plants [2] provide a methodology for the measurement of particulate emission from a wet, low-emission technology using Mohrhauer probes. The conclusions define the emission level for wet quenching process as 25 g/Mgcoke. The conducted research was aimed at verification of the presented method. For two of three quench towers (A and C) the requirements included in the BAT conclusions are not met and emissions amount to 87.34 and 61.35 g/Mgcoke respectively. The lowest particulates emission was recorded on the quench tower B and amounted to 22.5 g/Mgcoke, therefore not exceeding the requirements.

  7. Dust emission from wet, low-emission coke quenching process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komosiński Bogusław

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Coke plants, which produce various types of coke (metallurgical, foundry or heating, at temperatures between 600 and 1200°C, with limited access to oxygen, are major emitters of particulates and gaseous pollutants to air, water and soils. Primarily, the process of wet quenching should be mentioned, as one of the most cumbersome. Atmospheric pollutants include particulates, tar substances, organic pollutants including B(aP and many others. Pollutants are also formed from the decomposition of water used to quench coke (CO, phenol, HCN, H2S, NH3, cresol and decomposition of hot coke in the first phase of quenching (CO, H2S, SO2 [1]. The development of the coke oven technology has resulted in the changes made to different types of technological installations, such as the use of baffles in quench towers, the removal of nitrogen oxides by selective NOx reduction, and the introduction of fabric filters for particulates removal. The BAT conclusions for coke plants [2] provide a methodology for the measurement of particulate emission from a wet, low-emission technology using Mohrhauer probes. The conclusions define the emission level for wet quenching process as 25 g/Mgcoke. The conducted research was aimed at verification of the presented method. For two of three quench towers (A and C the requirements included in the BAT conclusions are not met and emissions amount to 87.34 and 61.35 g/Mgcoke respectively. The lowest particulates emission was recorded on the quench tower B and amounted to 22.5 g/Mgcoke, therefore not exceeding the requirements.

  8. Optimization of the coke-oven activated sludge plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raizer Neto, Ernesto [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Colin, Francois [Institut de Recherches Hydrologiques, 54 - Nancy (France); Prost, Christian [Laboratoire de Sciences de Genie Chimique, Nancy (France)

    1993-12-31

    In the coke-oven activated sludge plants one of the greatest problems of malfunction is due to inffluent variability. The composition and, or, concentration variations of the inffluent substrate, which can cause an unstable system, are function of the pollutant load. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the kinetic biodegradation of the coke-oven effluent represents the limiting factor to develop an effective biological treatment. This work describes a computational model of the biological treatment which was elaborated and validated from continuous pilot scale experiments and calibrated by comparing its predictions to the pilot experiment`s results. 12 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Selected problems of cooling water in coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Roubicek, V.; Benatsky, M.; Rojak, A.; Dockal, P.; Trytko, O.

    1985-02-01

    Chemical compositions of water used for cooling coal gas in coking plants in Czechoslovakia are discussed. Composition of cooling water in the NHKG coking plant was determined once a month for one year. The following water properties were determined: pH value, electrolytic conductivity, content of insoluble compounds, residue left after evaporation of cooling water, content of carbonic acid ions, chloride ions, sulfate ions, calcium ions, magnesium ions, and content of oxygen. Evaluation methods are described. Investigation results are shown in 2 tables. Buildup in cooling systems was influenced by water leaks. Addition of corrosion inhibitors would be economic only after eliminating water leaks. 4 references.

  10. Coke detection in furnaces tubes by radiographic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, I.S. dos

    1987-01-01

    The coke detection technique by radiographic examinations allows to quantify the coke in furnace coils of Petroleum refineries and petrochemical industries. The paper describes how was determined the radiographic parameters, the wall apparent thickness calculation, the distance source-film, the position of the source and films, the chosen of films and the calculation of exposure time, aiming to obtain high producticity and good quality image. This technique is being used and improved for more than two years with good results. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Renewable synthesis-gas-production. Do hydrocarbons in the reactant flow of the reverse water-gas shift reaction cause coke formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In a two-step synthetic fuel production process based on carbon dioxide and renewable hydrogen, the best possible selectivity towards liquid hydrocarbons (Hc) shall be implemented. The process consists of a combination of the Reverse Water-Gas Shift reaction and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. To achieve this goal, gaseous short-chained Hc from the FTS reactor are recycled in the RWGS unit. In this paper, challenges coming up with the implementation of a recycle loop are discussed. First of all, it has to be examined whether Hc are converted under conditions present in the RWGS reactor. The coking caused by the recycle of Hc is regarded, including thermal coking in the heating zone of the reactor and catalytic coking in the catalyst bed. Coking of course is unwanted, as it deactivates the catalyst. The scope of this work is to find out to which extent and under which conditions gaseous Hc can be recycled. Therefore, experiments were carried out in both, a quartz glass reactor using a commercial Ni-catalyst at ambient pressure and in a pressurized steel reactor (without catalyst) to examine coking during the thermal decomposition of Hc. The catalytic experiments at atmospheric pressure showed that a recycle of CH{sub 4} did not cause coking up to a ratio of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} below one. For these conditions, long term stability was proved. The reaction rates of the CH{sub 4} conversion were below those of the RWGS reaction. However, replacing CH{sub 4} by C{sub 3}H{sub 8} leads to thermal and catalytic coking. Catalytic coking hits the maximum level at about 700 C and decreases for higher temperatures and, thus is not regarded as a problem for the RWGS reactor. In contrast to that, thermal coking raises with higher temperatures, but it can be supressed efficiently with additional injection of H{sub 2}O, which of course shifts the equilibrium towards the undesired reactant side. (orig.)

  12. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S; Oostdijk, Evelien A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale; Bonten, Marc J M; van den Bergh, Walter M

    INTRODUCTION: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and

  13. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S.; Oostdijk, Evelien A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; de Smet, Anne Marie G. A.; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale; Bonten, Marc J. M.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and poor outcome. We

  14. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345480392; Oostdijk, Evelien A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818828; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/320630544; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07483472X; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; van den Bergh, Walter M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272886157

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and

  15. The effect of blast furnace coke quality on the possibility of its use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Konstanciak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper behavior of the blast-furnace coke in the high temperature was presented. Comparative analysis of the chemical composition of the blast-furnace coke and the heat treatment of it were done. Coefficients M10 and M40 with the thermo-abrasiveness for chosen cokes were compared. The influence of ash content of the coke on the blast-furnace bed permeability was defined. Usefulness of the coke to blast-furnace process was also defined.

  16. Compacting of coal for heat recovery ovens, Illawarra Coke Company Pty Ltd., Coalcliffe, NSW, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.; Schuecker, F.; Kim, R. [Illawara Coke Company, NSW (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    This paper described a simple method of compacting coal for heat-recovery coke making. Coal carbonization tests in commercial non-recovery coke ovens have shown that coal densities greater than 1100 kg/m{sup 3} were obtained in a simple manner by means of hydraulically actuated compression plates. The tests and the results have significantly increased the level of knowledge regarding compacting technology. The coke produced from the compacted cakes is comparable to well-known qualities from non-recovery coke ovens using top charging technology. The quality of stamp charged heat recovery coke will provide a positive impact on blast furnace performance. 2 refs., 5 figs., 11 photos.

  17. Oil sand process-affected water treatment using coke adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamal El-Din, M.; Pourrezaei, P.; Chelme-Ayala, P.; Zubot, W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Oil sands operations generate an array of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) that will eventually be released to the environment. This water must be evaluated within conventional and advanced water treatment technologies. Water management strategies propose options for increased reuse and recycling of water from settling ponds, as well as safe discharge. This presentation outlined the typical composition of OSPW. Constituents of concern in OSPW include suspended solids, hydrocarbons, salts, ammonia, trace metals, and dissolved organics such as naphthenic acids (NAs). Petroleum coke is one of the by-products generated from bitumen extraction in the oil sands industry and can be used as one of the possible treatment processes for the removal of organic compounds found in OSPW. Activated carbon adsorption is an effective process, able to adsorb organic substances such as oils, radioactive compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, poly aromatic hydrocarbons and various halogenated compounds. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the production of activated carbon from petroleum coke using steam as the activation media; to determine the factors affecting the absorption of NAs; and to evaluate the activated coke adsorption capacity for the reduction of NAs and dissolved organic carbons present in OSPW. It was concluded that petroleum non-activated coke has the ability to decrease COD, alkalinity, and NA concentration. tabs., figs.

  18. Petrographic studies and coking properties of Lamza, Chikila and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petrographic studies and coking properties of Lamza, Chikila and Lafia-Ori coals of the Benue trough. A Jauro, MO Agho, OJ Abayeh, NG Obaje, MB Abubakar. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology Vol. 44 (1) 2008: pp. 37-42. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1029 - Coke oven emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... part; (iv) Footwear providing insulation from hot surfaces for footwear; (v) Safety shoes which comply... include face shield or vented goggles, protective helmets and safety shoes, insulated from hot surfaces..., coking time, operating procedures and maintenance practices; (b) Engineering plans and other studies used...

  20. 77 FR 20788 - Foundry Coke Products From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Expedited Second...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... International Trade Administration Foundry Coke Products From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of... coke products (``foundry coke'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') pursuant to section 751... Than Fair Value and Antidumping Duty Order: Foundry Coke Products from The People's Republic of China...

  1. Microwaves effectively examine the extent and type of coking over acid zeolite catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Slocombe, D R; Wang, J; Aldawsari, A; Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Arden, J; Kuznetsov, V L; AlMegren, H; AlKinany, M; Xiao, T; Edwards, P P

    2017-09-11

    Coking leads to the deactivation of solid acid catalyst. This phenomenon is a ubiquitous problem in the modern petrochemical and energy transformation industries. Here, we show a method based on microwave cavity perturbation analysis for an effective examination of both the amount and the chemical composition of cokes formed over acid zeolite catalysts. The employed microwave cavity can rapidly and non-intrusively measure the catalytically coked zeolites with sample full body penetration. The overall coke amount is reflected by the obtained dielectric loss (ε″) value, where different coke compositions lead to dramatically different absorption efficiencies (ε″/cokes' wt%). The deeper-dehydrogenated coke compounds (e.g., polyaromatics) lead to an apparently higher ε″/wt% value thus can be effectively separated from lightly coked compounds. The measurement is based on the nature of coke formation during catalytic reactions, from saturated status (e.g., aliphatic) to graphitized status (e.g., polyaromatics), with more delocalized electrons obtained for enhanced Maxwell-Wagner polarization.Catalyst deactivation by coke deposition is a major drawback in industrial processes. Here, the authors show a non-intrusive microwave cavity perturbation technique as a powerful tool to determine the nature and extent of coke accumulation in industrially-relevant zeolite catalysts.

  2. On-line determination of moisture in coke on conveyor belts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millen, M.J.; Rafter, P.T.; Sowerby, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    A fast neutron and γ-ray transmission technique is being developed for the on-line determination of moisture in coke on conveyor belts. Calculations show that the technique is capable of determining coke moisture to within 0.3 wt% for coke thicknesses down to 50 mm provided that count rates are measured to within 0.1% relative. Laboratory measurements on static and moving coke samples showed that coke moisture can be determined to within 0.25 and 0.45 wt% for crushed and lump coke, respectively. It is planned to carry out a long-term plant trial of the technique on lump coke feed to the No. 3 blast furnace at BHP, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. (author)

  3. Chlorine behavior of waste plastics recycling process using coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenji Kato; Seiji Nomura [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment & Process Technology Center

    2005-07-01

    At the advent of the 21st century, mankind is facing a global environmental problem, and the industrial sector is required to take initiatives in the establishment of recycling society for efficient utilization of natural resources. The Japan Iron and Steel Federation (JISF), as its voluntary energy-saving action plan, proposed a 10% energy reduction by 2010 with 1990 as the basis. Further it has suggested an additional 1.5% energy saving by the use of waste plastics as a metallurgical raw material. The amount of processing of waste plastics which corresponds to this amount of energy conversion is about 1 million ton scale during 1 year. To establish the waste plastics recycling method by using iron-making process, waste plastics recycling process using coke ovens was developed by Nippon Steel in 2000. In this process, waste plastics are charged into coke ovens with coal, and carbonized at about 1200{sup o}C under the reducing atmosphere. Waste plastics are converted to chemical products, such as coke, tar and light oil, and coke oven gas. However, waste plastics involves chlorine-contained plastics, such as polyvinyl chloride and polyvinylidene chloride, etc. It is generally known that such chlorine-contained plastics cause corrosion problem at the incinerator or gasification equipment. Therefore, the behavior of chlorine content of waste plastics was investigated. As a result, it was found that the chlorine content of waste plastics is mostly pyrolysed during carbonization with coal in a coke oven and effectively captured by ammonia liquor. 19 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Study of variation grain size in desulfurization process of calcined petroleum coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintowantoro, Sungging; Setiawan, Muhammad Arif; Abdul, Fakhreza

    2018-04-01

    Indonesia is a country with abundant natural resources, such as mineral mining and petroleum. In petroleum processing, crude oil can be processed into a source of fuel energy such as gasoline, diesel, oil, petroleum coke, and others. One of crude oil potentials in Indonesia is petroleum coke. Petroleum coke is a product from oil refining process. Sulfur reducing process in calcined petroleum cokes can be done by desulfurization process. The industries which have potential to become petroleum coke processing consumers are industries of aluminum smelting (anode, graphite block, carbon mortar), iron riser, calcined coke, foundry coke, etc. Sulfur reducing process in calcined petroleum coke can be done by thermal desulfurization process with alkaline substance NaOH. Desulfurization of petroleum coke process can be done in two ways, which are thermal desulfurization and hydrodesulphurization. This study aims to determine the effect of various grain size on sulfur, carbon, and chemical bond which contained by calcined petroleum coke. The raw material use calcined petroleum coke with 0.653% sulfur content. The grain size that used in this research is 50 mesh, then varied to 20 mesh and 100 mesh for each desulfurization process. Desulfurization are tested by ICP, UV-VIS, and FTIR to determine levels of sulfur, carbon, chemical bonding and sulfur dissolved water which contained in the residual washing of calcined petroleum coke. From various grain size that mentioned before, the optimal value is on 100 mesh grain size, where the sulfur content in petroleum coke is 0.24% and carbon content reaches the highest level of 97.8%. Meanwhile for grain size 100 mesh in the desulfurization process is enough to break the chemical bonds of organic sulfur in petroleum coke.

  5. The chemical and biological characteristics of coke-oven wastewater by ozonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, E.-E.; Hsing, H.-J.; Chiang, P.-C.; Chen, M.-Y.; Shyng, J.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    A bench-scale bubble column reactor was used to investigate the biological and chemical characteristics of coke-oven wastewater after ozonation treatment through the examination of selected parameters. Color and thiocyanate could be removed almost entirely; however, organic matter and cyanide could not, due to the inadequate oxidation ability of ozone to remove ozonated byproducts under given experimental conditions. The removal of cyanide and total organic carbon were pH-dependent and were found to be efficient under neutral to alkaline conditions. The removal rate for thiocyanate was about five times that of cyanide. The ozone consumption ratio approached to about 1 at the early stage of ozonation (time TOC ) increased to 30%, indicating that easily degraded pollutants were degraded almost entirely. The effect of ozonation on the subsequent biological treatment unit (i.e., activated sludge process) was determined by observing the ratio of 5-day biological oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand (BOD 5 /COD) and the specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR). The results indicated that the contribution of ozonation to inhibition reduction was very significant but limited to the enhancement of biodegradation. The operation for ozonation of coke-oven wastewater was feasible under neutral condition and short ozone contact time in order to achieve better performance and cost savings

  6. Synthesis of activated carbon materials from petroleum coke; Sintese de materiais carbonosos ativados a partir de coque de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, Manoel Orlando Alvarez; Coutinho, Aparecido dos Reis [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Energia e Meio Ambiente; Lisboa, Antonio Carlos Luz [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-04-15

    Activated carbon materials (MCA) present a high specific superficial areas and in increased volume of pores in its carbon matrix, being capable of adsorbing molecules both in the liquid and gas phase. The main MCA production processes use as raw material precursors with high carbon content. Petroleum coke (PC), residue with high fixed carbon content and low ash content, with a practically amorphous structure, has little commercial value, being considered as a troublesome residue in environmental and commercial terms, what makes its use attractive for the production of MCAs. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the production of MCAs from CP originated from the coke unit at Paulinia Refinery (REPLAN/PETROBRAS), assessing the influences of the process parameters in the quality of the CAs such as: concentration of activating agent, activation time, activation temperature and grain size distribution of the petroleum coke. The results indicated that the changes in these process parameters cause structural changes in the porous net of the MCA obtained, allowing to obtain superficial areas of up to 2,500 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1} with narrow distributions to the size of pores and features of molecular sieves. (author)

  7. Lack of utility of a decision support system to mitigate delays in admission from the operating room to the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Dexter, Franklin; Rothman, Brian S; Minton, Betty Sue; Johnson, Diane; Sandberg, Warren S; Epstein, Richard H

    2013-12-01

    When the phase I postanesthesia care unit (PACU) is at capacity, completed cases need to be held in the operating room (OR), causing a "PACU delay." Statistical methods based on historical data can optimize PACU staffing to achieve the least possible labor cost at a given service level. A decision support process to alert PACU charge nurses that the PACU is at or near maximum census might be effective in lessening the incidence of delays and reducing over-utilized OR time, but only if alerts are timely (i.e., neither too late nor too early to act upon) and the PACU slot can be cleared quickly. We evaluated the maximum potential benefit of such a system, using assumptions deliberately biased toward showing utility. We extracted 3 years of electronic PACU data from a tertiary care medical center. At this hospital, PACU admissions were limited by neither inadequate PACU staffing nor insufficient PACU beds. We developed a model decision support system that simulated alerts to the PACU charge nurse. PACU census levels were reconstructed from the data at a 1-minute level of resolution and used to evaluate if subsequent delays would have been prevented by such alerts. The model assumed there was always a patient ready for discharge and an available hospital bed. The time from each alert until the maximum census was exceeded ("alert lead time") was determined. Alerts were judged to have utility if the alert lead time fell between various intervals from 15 or 30 minutes to 60, 75, or 90 minutes after triggering. In addition, utility for reducing over-utilized OR time was assessed using the model by determining if 2 patients arrived from 5 to 15 minutes of each other when the PACU census was at 1 patient less than the maximum census. At most, 23% of alerts arrived 30 to 60 minutes prior to the admission that resulted in the PACU exceeding the specified maximum capacity. When the notification window was extended to 15 to 90 minutes, the maximum utility was system to mitigate

  8. Modelling of Coke Layer Collapse during Ore Charging in Ironmaking Blast Furnace by DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Yoichi; Mio, Hiroshi; Orimoto, Takashi; Nomura, Seiji

    2017-06-01

    A technical issue in an ironmaking blast furnace operation is to realize the optimum layer thickness and the radial distribution of burden (ore and coke) to enhance its efficiency and productivity. When ore particles are charged onto the already-embedded coke layer, the coke layer-collapse phenomenon occurs. The coke layer-collapse phenomenon has a significant effect on the distribution of ore and coke layer thickness in the radial direction. In this paper, the mechanical properties of coke packed bed under ore charging were investigated by the impact-loading test and the large-scale direct shear test. Experimental results show that the coke particle is broken by the impact force of ore charging, and the particle breakage leads to weaken of coke-layer strength. The expression of contact force for coke in Discrete Element Method (DEM) was modified based on the measured data, and it followed by the 1/3-scaled experiment on coke's collapse phenomena. Comparing a simulation by modified model to the 1/3-scaled experiment, they agreed well in the burden distribution.

  9. Granulation of coke breeze fine for using in the sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coke breeze is the main fuel used in the sintering process. The value of -3+1 mm. represents the most favorable particle size for coke breeze in the sintering process. About 20% of total coke fines (-0.5 mm are produced during different steps of preparation. Introducing these fines during the sintering process proves to be very harmful for different operating parameters. Thus ,this study aims at investigating the production of granules resulting from these fines using molasses as organic binder and its application in sintering of an iron ore. The results showed that the granules having the highest mechanical properties were obtained with 14.5 wt % molasses addition. The sintering experiments were performed by using coke breeze in different shapes (-3+1 mm in size, coke breeze without sieving and coke breeze granules -3+1 mm. The reduction experiments, microscopic structure and X-ray analysis for the produced sinter were carried out. The results revealed that, all sinter properties (such as shatter test, productivity of sinter machine and blast furnace, reduction time and chemical composition for produced sinter by using coke breeze with size -3+1 mm and coke breeze granules were almost the same. The iron ore sinter which was produced by using coke breeze without sieving yielded low productivity for both sinter machine and blast furnace. Furthermore, using coke breeze without sieving in sintering of an iron ore decreases the vertical velocity of sinter machine and increases the reduction time.

  10. Methods for analysis and testing of coal and coke. Part 108. Tests special to coke. Section 108.4 Determination of bulk density (large container)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of the bulk density of coke in a large container such as a wagon or skip. A weighed container of known volume is filled with coke and the increase in mass is determined. 2 refs.

  11. Methods for analysis and testing of coal and coke. Part 108. Tests special to coke. Section 108.3 Determination of bulk density (small container)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of the bulk density of coke in a cubical container of capacity 0.2 m{sup 3}. It is applicable to coke with a nominal top size not greater than 125 mm.

  12. Heat input control in coke ovens battery using artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.; Kannan, C.; Sistla, S.; Kumar, D. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    Controlled heating is very essential for producing coke with certain desired properties. Controlled heating involves controlling the heat input into the battery dynamically depending on the various process parameters like current battery temperature, the set point of battery temperature, moisture in coal, ambient temperature, coal fineness, cake breakage etc. An artificial intelligence (AI) based heat input control has been developed in which currently some of the above mentioned process parameters are considered and used for calculating the pause time which is applied between reversal during the heating process. The AI based model currently considers 3 input variables, temperature deviation history, current deviation of the battery temperature from the target temperature and the actual heat input into the battery. Work is in progress to control the standard deviation of coke end temperature using this model. The new system which has been developed in-house has replaced Hoogovens supplied model. 7 figs.

  13. Microbeam analysis of hydrogen in coked catalyst pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofield, C.J.; Bridwell, L.B.; Wright, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen content of catalyst pellets has recently been shown to be important in predicting the maximum temperature rise of the catalyst during regeneration in industrial plant. This is because carbonaceous coke deposits (CHsub(0.4) to CHsub(2.0)) accumulate in the pellet during use, which then have to be removed by exothermic oxidation. It is important, in this well established industrial process, to limit the maximum temperature that the catalyst reaches to level s sufficiently low to prevent permanent deactivation by sintering. In view of the importance of the H content as a function of the distance from the surface of the catalyst pellets in predicting maximum temperature rises during de-coking, we have adopted the technique of elastic recoil analysis for use with the Harwell microbeam to obtain measurements of the hydrogen concentration at varying positions along a pellet diameter. The method of analysis is described and illustrated with typical data. (orig.)

  14. Microbeam analysis of hydrogen in coked catalyst pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofield, C. J.; Bridwell, L. B.; Wright, C. J.

    1981-12-01

    The hydrogen content of catalyst pellets has recently been shown to be important in predicting the maximum temperature rise of the catalyst during regeneration in industrial plant. This is because carbonaceous coke deposits (CH 0.4 to CH 2.0) accumulate in the pellet during use, which then have to be removed by exothermic oxidation. It is important, in this well established industrial process, to limit the maximum temperature that the catalyst reaches to level s sufficiently low to prevent permanent deactivation by sintering. In view of the importance of the H content as a function of the distance from the surface of the catalyst pellets in predicting maximum temperature rises during de-coking, we have adopted the technique of elastic recoil analysis for use with the Harwell microbeam to obtain measurements of the hydrogen concentration at varying positions along a pellet diameter. The method of analysis is described and illustrated with typical data.

  15. Treatment of coking wastewater by using manganese and magnesium ores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianhu; Huang, Xiaoming; Pan, Min; Jin, Song; Peng, Suchuan; Fallgren, Paul H

    2009-09-15

    This study investigated a wastewater treatment technique based on natural minerals. A two-step process using manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg) containing ores were tested to remove typical contaminants from coking wastewater. Under acidic conditions, a reactor packed with Mn ore demonstrated strong oxidizing capability and destroyed volatile phenols, chemical oxygen demand (COD)(,) and sulfide from the coking wastewater. The effluent was further treated by using Mg ore to remove ammonium-nitrogen and phosphate in the form of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) precipitates. When pH of the wastewater was adjusted to 1.2, the removal efficiencies for COD, volatile phenol and sulfide reached 70%, 99% and 100%, respectively. During the second step of precipitation, up to 94% of ammonium was removed from the aqueous phase, and precipitated in the form of struvite with phosphorus. The struvite crystals showed a needle-like structure. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the crystallized products.

  16. Development of low NOx combustion structure in coke oven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, S.; Takase, S.; Uchida, M.; Saji, T.; Koyama, H.; Yamamoto, M. [Sumitomo Metal Industry Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    One of the targets of the SCOPE21 process was to improve the productivity. To achieve high productivity, the process was applied the following items: (1) ultra super dense brick, (2) thin wall (70 mm), (3) hot coal charging, (4) medium temperature carbonization. As the heat flux for carbonization was needed about 2 times as much as a conventional coke oven, the combustion technologies to achieve high productivity were investigated by using the actual scale combustion test oven. The combustion conditions to achieve low NOx in the waste gas and uniform heating for carbonization were clarified. The coke oven of the pilot plant was designed based on these results. The combustion targets of the low NOx and uniform heating were achieved in the test operation.

  17. The influence of coke source on anode performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonville, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Dreyer, C.

    1995-08-01

    The role of anode raw material has long been debated in the aluminum smelting industry. By examining data accumulated from two similar smelting operations of Aluminium Pechiney, this article focuses on the differences in performance of anodes that can be attributed to the raw materials. The results suggest that good anode performance can be obtained for a range of cokes, provided that the operation is well designed and carefully operated.

  18. The properties of coke breeze briquettes produced by ram briquetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, Yu. N.; Babailov, N. A.; Polyansky, L. I.

    2017-12-01

    The paper reports on the results of briquetting coke breeze with a binder in a closed cylindrical press-die. Liquid glass is used as a binder. Approximating curves for the "compaction ratio vs. compaction pressure" dependences are plotted from experimental data. The mechanical properties of the briquettes are determined, namely, drop damage resistance and breaking stress. The results are presented as approximating dependences in the form of a power function.

  19. Denitrification of coking wastewater with micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanli; Wang, Yanqiu; Shan, Mingjun; Shen, Xue; Su, Ying

    2011-06-01

    The denitrification for the coking wastewater was conducted by means of original battery principle with Fe-C micro-electrolysis. Fe-C serves as positive and negative electrodes, by which N02(-)-N and TN were reduced to nitrogen, and then the purpose of denitrifieation for coking wastewater was realized. The influences of pH value, carbon particle size, Fe/C ratio (mass ratio), reaction time and coagulation pH value on removal rate of N02(-)-N and TN were investigated. Coking wastewater originated from Jiamusi Coal Chemistry Engineering Company. The optimum conditions of treatment were as follows: the initial pH was 3.0, the dosage of Fe 73.5 g/L, reaction time 70 min, mass ratio of Fe/C ratio 1.0:1.3, coagulation pH 9.0 and sedimentation time 40 min. Under those conditions, nitrogen removal efficiencies of N02(-)-N and TN were beyond 50% and 45%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of causes of oil sands coke leachate toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttaswamy, N.; Liber, K.

    2010-01-01

    The potential causes of oil sands coke leachate toxicity were investigated. Chronic 7-day toxicity tests were conducted to demonstrate that oil sands coke leachates (CL) are acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia). CLs were generated in a laboratory to perform toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) tests in order to investigate the causes of the CL toxicity. The coke was subjected to a 15-day batch leaching process at 5.5 and 9.5 pH values. The leachates were then filtered and used for chemical and toxicological characterization. The 7-day estimates for the C. dubia survival were 6.3 for a pH of 5.5 and 28.7 per cent for the 9.5 CLs. The addition of EDTA significantly improved survival and reproduction in a pH of 5.5 CL, but not in a pH of 9.5 CL. The toxicity of the pH 5.5 CL was removed with a cationic resin treatment. The toxicity of the 9.5 pH LC was removed using an anion resin treatment. Toxicity re-appeared when nickel (Ni) and vanadium (V) were added back to the resin-treated CLs. Results of the study suggested that Ni and V were acting as primary toxicants in the pH 5.5 CL, while V was the primary cause of toxicity in the pH 9.5 CL.

  1. Reduction of electrical arc furnace oxidizing slag by coke under microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sung Beom; Shin, Minsoo; Sim, Ki Joo; Lee, Joonho

    2014-03-01

    The reduction of iron from electrical arc furnace oxidizing slag by coke was investigated under microwave irradiation (1.7 kW, 2.45 GHz). The heating behavior of cokes of different sizes were examined and a maximum heating rate of 550 K/min and a maximum temperature of 1783 K were obtained with coke particles smaller than 75 m. In the reduction of the oxidizing slag (15 g) by coke (1.45˜1.65 g) under microwave irradiation for 25 min, the maximum recovery ratio of iron was 0.87, obtained when the amount of coke addition was 1.55 g. In addition, the reduced slag composition was modified by adding 5.9 g of CaO. With the addition of 1.55 g coke or more, free CaO in the slag was effectively reduced.

  2. Consumption of fuels and energy in the coking industry and ways of reducing consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasil' ev, Yu.S.; Tsel' ik, M.P.; Belkina, T.V. (Khar' kovskii Nauchno-Issledovatel' skii Uglekhimicheski Institut (USSR))

    1989-08-01

    Coking plants in the USSR consume 4,000 million kWh electric energy, 100 million GJ heat energy and 35,000 million m{sup 3} gaseous fuels per year. Structure of energy consumption is the following: 68% gaseous fuels, 24% steam and 8% electric energy. Processes of coal preparation, crushing, mixing, coking and quenching are analyzed from the point of view of energy consumption. The following methods for reducing energy consumption are discussed: using the FM-25 flotation machines for flotation of coking coal slurries, briquetting the whole coal charge for coking, optimization of air supply rates for combustion of gases used for coke oven heating, use of control systems for coke oven heating considering coal charge density, waste heat utilization from quenching. 4 refs.

  3. Application of various techniques for predicting coke CSR from coal blend properties through laboratory scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, P.S.; Guha, M.; Chakraborty, D.; Krishnan, S.H.; Banerjee, P.K. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    The study is aimed to fulfill the need of a model that will predict the coke properties from coal blend characteristics so that optimisation of coal blends for producing desired quality of stamp charged coke could be done easily, quickly and with lesser number of carbonisation tests in a 7-kg test oven. To achieve the above goal, different coal blends were formulated to realise sufficient change in each of the blend variables and tests were conducted in the laboratory. The input variables, data and output variables coke strength after reaction (CSR) and coke reactivity index (CSRI) data were generated. Regression analyses and artificial neural network models with different number of hidden number of hidden layers and nodes were used to predict the coke CSR from various combinations of 8 input variables. From the results obtained through all these analyses, it can be concluded that coke CSR can be predicted with reasonable accuracy from coal blend characteristics. 7 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Discerning the Location and Nature of Coke Deposition from Surface to Bulk of Spent Zeolite Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Devaraj, Arun; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Bao, Jie; Guo, Mond F.; Derewinski, Miroslaw A.; Xu, Zhijie; Gray, Michel J.; Prodinger, Sebastian; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of carbonaceous deposits (coke) in zeolite pores during catalysis leads to temporary deactivation of catalyst, necessitating regeneration steps, affecting throughput, and resulting in partial permanent loss of catalytic efficiency. Yet, even to date, the coke molecule distribution is quite challenging to study with high spatial resolution from surface to bulk of the catalyst particles at a single particle level. To address this challenge we investigated the coke molecules in HZS...

  5. 46 CFR 148.04-17 - Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. 148.04-17...-17 Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. (a) The requirements of this part do not apply to bulk shipments of petroleum coke, calcined, on any vessel when the material is less than 130 °F. (b...

  6. Combined effects of petrographic and technological parameters on strength of porous coke substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinel' t, V.M.; Shkoller, M.B.; Stankevich, A.S.; Korchuganova, G.S.

    1983-09-01

    The proportion of coke in modern blast furnaces has been reduced and at the same time ore burdens have increased. The coke itself now derives from a much wider range of coals. Laboratory tests related to the structural strength of cokes were carried out with charges composed of 14 representative coals. Results showed that vitrinite reflectance and bulk density were the critical parameters, followed by petrographic composition. Increasing bulk density of the charge from 0.6 to 0.9 g/cm/sup 3/ produces coke with a structural strength which counteracts the effects of increasing diversity in both petrography and reflectance in any one charge.

  7. Modelling of Coke Layer Collapse during Ore Charging in Ironmaking Blast Furnace by DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narita Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A technical issue in an ironmaking blast furnace operation is to realize the optimum layer thickness and the radial distribution of burden (ore and coke to enhance its efficiency and productivity. When ore particles are charged onto the already-embedded coke layer, the coke layer-collapse phenomenon occurs. The coke layer-collapse phenomenon has a significant effect on the distribution of ore and coke layer thickness in the radial direction. In this paper, the mechanical properties of coke packed bed under ore charging were investigated by the impact-loading test and the large-scale direct shear test. Experimental results show that the coke particle is broken by the impact force of ore charging, and the particle breakage leads to weaken of coke-layer strength. The expression of contact force for coke in Discrete Element Method (DEM was modified based on the measured data, and it followed by the 1/3-scaled experiment on coke’s collapse phenomena. Comparing a simulation by modified model to the 1/3-scaled experiment, they agreed well in the burden distribution.

  8. Effect of microwave irradiation on reactivity of metallurgical coke in CO2 atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of microwave irradiation on gasification behavior and crystallite parameters of coke samples was studied in this research. The results indicated that microwave irradiation have significant influence on the carbon structure and the reactivity of coke in CO2 atmosphere. The thermogravimetric results showed that the temperature of coke at different conversion rates of 10 %, 20 % and 30 % were reduced by 20 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C respectively. Simultaneously, microwave irradiation may lead to variation in lateral size and stacking height of crystallite and subsequently reduce the gasification reaction rate of coke in CO2 atmosphere.

  9. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  10. Modélisation thermomécanique d'un piédroit de four à coke

    OpenAIRE

    Landreau, Matthieu

    2009-01-01

    This study lies within the framework of European project called Coke Oven Operating Limits. This thesis deals with the thermomechanical modelling of a coke oven heating wall. The heating wall is an alveolar masonry, heated thanks to gas at high temperature (superior to 1200°C). During coking time in coke ovens, there is a pyrolysis of coal to coke which implies a coke swelling pressure on chamber wall. The aim of this project is to determine the maximal lateral pressure allowed by these struc...

  11. Development of the super coke oven for productivity and environment enhancement toward the 21st century (SCOPE 21); Sekitan kodo tenkan cokes seizo gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, T. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Nakashima, Y.; Nishioka, K.; Otsuka, J. [The Japan Iron and Steel Federation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    Serious shortage is predicted on cokes for blast furnaces in the first half of the 21st century. In order to deal flexibly with the fluid world market in the future, it is necessary to have a technology developed, by which coals from coking coal to non-coking dust coal can be used. The Japan Iron and Steel Federation and the Center for Coal Utilization, Japan are working on research and development of a new process with enhanced environmentality and economy (SCOPE 21) as a coke manufacturing process to respond to the requirements arisen from the above situation. The process is assessed basing on basic technological seeds such as rapid coal heating and high-speed carbonization and reformation of middle to low temperature cokes. The organizations are moving forward an eight-year development program which has started in fiscal 1994. This paper reports the summary of the development, and results of investigations and researches performed during fiscals 1994 and 1995. Rapid heating tests, middle to low temperature coke reformation tests, and tests for plug transportation of high-temperature coal have been performed. It has been verified, for example, that rapid coal heating can improve coke strength. The development work is being promoted toward grain size distribution and upscaling problems. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Optimisation of coal blend and bulk density for coke ovens by vibrocompacting technique non-recovery ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P.P.; Vinoo, D.S.; Yadav, U.S.; Ghosh, S.; Lal, J.P.N. [J.S.W. Steel Ltd, Bellary (India)

    2007-09-15

    The quality of coke produced in a coke oven depends on the coal blend characteristics and carbonisation conditions. Scarcity of good quality coking coal made it necessary to look for techniques capable of producing superior coke from inferior coals. Precarbonisation techniques improve the bulk density of the coal charge and produce good quality coke from inferior coals. The stamp charging technique, the most effective among them requires finer crushing of coal and higher moisture as binder, both requiring additional energy. JSW Steel has adopted vibrocompaction along with non-recovery ovens for its 1.2 Mtpa coke production. This is a highly ecofriendly coke making process producing excellent quality coke from inferior coals. It increases the bulk density of cake, similar to stamp charging, using compaction in place of stamping. A cake density of 1.10 t m{sup -3} has been achieved using the vibrocompacting technique with optimum moisture and crushing fineness. Coal blend containing up to 35% soft coal and coking coal, having 32% volatile matter have been successfully used to produce a coke with coke strength after reaction >65%, coke reactivity index <25% and M10 <6%. The paper discusses the experience of operating vibrocompaction non-recovery coke ovens.

  13. Heterocyclic Aromatics in Petroleum Coke, Snow, Lake Sediments, and Air Samples from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Carlos A; Marvin, Chris; Muir, Derek; Harner, Tom; Martin, Jonathan; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-05-16

    The aromatic fractions of snow, lake sediment, and air samples collected during 2011-2014 in the Athabasca oil sands region were analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography following a nontargeted approach. Commonly monitored aromatics (parent and alkylated-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dibenzothiophenes) were excluded from the analysis, focusing mainly on other heterocyclic aromatics. The unknowns detected were classified into isomeric groups and tentatively identified using mass spectral libraries. Relative concentrations of heterocyclic aromatics were estimated and were found to decrease with distance from a reference site near the center of the developments and with increasing depth of sediments. The same heterocyclic aromatics identified in snow, lake sediments, and air were observed in extracts of delayed petroleum coke, with similar distributions. This suggests that petroleum coke particles are a potential source of heterocyclic aromatics to the local environment, but other oil sands sources must also be considered. Although the signals of these heterocyclic aromatics diminished with distance, some were detected at large distances (>100 km) in snow and surface lake sediments, suggesting that the impact of industry can extend >50 km. The list of heterocyclic aromatics and the mass spectral library generated in this study can be used for future source apportionment studies.

  14. A discussion of the extraction criteria for evaluating coking properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Rojak, A.; Roubicek, V.

    1981-01-01

    The article contains a discussion of the extractive criterion for evaluating the coking properties of Czechoslovakian coal. The work is based on a literature review which attests to the fact that the extraction criterion has an additive nature in coal mixtures. The entire extraction technique was tested with mixtures obtained in a laboratory and in industry. A filtering, anthracene oil was used for the extractions. All types of coals and mixtures were subjected to a detailed characterization. The obtained results did not confirm the additive nature of the extraction criterion.

  15. Application of fine-grained coke breeze fractions in the process of iron ore sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Niesler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The testing cycle, described in the paper, included fine-grained coke breeze granulation tests and iron concentrate sintering tests with the use of selected granulate samples. The use of granulated coke breeze in the sintering process results in a higher process efficiency, shorter sintering duration and fuel saving.

  16. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition ...... mineral density) and psychological (e.g., low self-esteem) and underline the importance of careful clinical assessment of the patients....

  17. Environmental protection in Polish coking plants in the light of comprehensive control and own investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarzebski, L.; Kubala, I.; Wolany, B. (Panstwowa Inspekcja Ochrony Srodowiska, Katowice (Poland))

    1989-09-01

    Environmental pollution from 11 leading coking plants was investigated in 1987. The plants provide 75% of the coke produced in Poland. The mean gas pollution rate is 1.2 kg/t, the mean dust pollution rate is 5.77 kg/t. Minimum and maximum pollution rates for all investigated plants are discussed. Air control systems used by the plants and coke production technologies are comparatively evaluated: use of loose or packed coal, smokeless charging systems, heating systems, coke pushing and quenching, coal gas desulfurization. Water consumption, water treatment and waste water utilization are discussed. Waste storage and utilization are evaluated. Methods for pollution monitoring, control and measuring pollution level are analyzed. Health hazards from coking plant pollution in Poland are evaluated. 16 refs.

  18. Influence of operating parameters on coke end temperature in stamp charged batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, U.S.; Sarkar, P.; Deshpande, D.P. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2004-07-01

    Coke end temperature (CET) indicates the final temperature of coke mass after pushing it out from the oven and before quenching and thus is an indicator of the preparedness of the coke. Analysis of plant data from stamp charged batteries at Tata Steel show that it depends on coal blend characteristics and battery conditions. Increased input coal ash, its crushing fineness and volatile matters increases but the moisture decreases it. The heating rate, battery and regenerator temperatures all increase the coke end temperature. The present paper documents that observations on parameters influencing coke end temperature under stamp charged conditions and attempts to hypothesise the possible explanation for the results obtained. 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Rapid production of metallurgical coke by use of a simulated moving bed reactor. Mogi idoso wo mochiita kyusoku shoon ni yoru cokes no jinsoku seizo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, K.; Hayashi, J.; Sano, N. (Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Research Laboratory of CArbonaceous Resources Conversion); Hashimoto, K. (Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Iwakiri, H. (Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan))

    1992-12-20

    An experiment to manufacture coke with rapid temperature raising was carried out using an equipment simulating a vertical moving bed coke oven. Two kinds of trial manufacturing patterns were tested: Pattern A to raise coal temperature rapidly to about 450[degree]C, which is held for about 20 minutes, and then raised again to 800[degree]C at a rate of about 5[degree]C/min, and pattern B to raise the temperature from about 300[degree]C to 800[degree]C at a rate of about 5[degree]C/min. An experiment on test samples from heavy caking coal (PDH coal) and light caking coal (OP coal) revealed the following results: The PDH coal applied with the pattern A produced in about two hours a coke with quality equivalent to or better than practically used coke; the temperature raising pattern B resulted in no full lump formation even with the PDH coal; according to the temperature raising pattern A, manufacturing coke from the OP coal is impossible; however, if the PDH coal or pitch is mixed with the OP coal, coke may be manufactured. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Effect of the exposure time in coke making atmosphere on the microstructure and properties of a refractory castable used in the petrochemical industry; Efeito do tempo de exposicao a uma atmosfera coqueificante na microestrutura e nas propriedades de um concreto refratario usado na industria petroquimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrelon, M.D.; Pereira, A.H.A.; Rodrigues, J.A., E-mail: marcelodezena@gmail.com [Grupo de Engenharia de Microestrutura de Materiais - GEMM, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais - DEMa, Universidade Federal de S. Carlos - UFSCar, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Medeiros, J. [CENPES, Petroleo Brasileiro S/A - PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Toledo-Filho, R.D. [Laboratorio de Estruturas e Materiais - LABEST, COPPE, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Refractory castables used in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units (FCCU) are said to deteriorate due coke formation during the production of light hydrocarbons, causing a shortening in the operating time of the reactor. Consequently, a significant financial loss for the petrochemical will occur. Several studies have been carried out, but none of them showed clearly how much is the contribution of the coke for the concrete final deterioration. It still remains the doubt if the coke is the responsible for the damage observed macroscopically in a FCCU's riser. In this way, this work aimed to study the effect of the time in a coke making atmosphere on an anti-erosive class-C refractory castable, seeking for microstructural changes or on physical properties that indicate degradation mechanisms and give support to the understanding of the phenomenon. Samples of an industrial refractory castable used in petrochemical units were prepared and subjected to a forced coke making process in a simulation reactor. The temperature and the heating rate were kept constant at 540 deg C and 50 deg C/h, respectively. The values of 10, 60, 120, 240 and 480 h were used for the time of exposition to the propene gas. The microstructure of the samples was characterized through optical and scanning electron microscopy and its mineralogical phases through X-ray diffraction. Complementary analyses were necessary to a better understanding of the phenomenon. The results show that the surface and the microstructure are gradually impregnated by coke, which fills up pores, microcracks and cracks. Evidences of microcracking around the coke filled pores were not found. However, many aggregates present some type of deterioration related to the time of exposition to propene. Those damages are not necessarily caused by coke directly (author)

  1. Design of a new PID controller using predictive functional control optimization for chamber pressure in a coke furnace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianming

    2017-03-01

    An improved proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller based on predictive functional control (PFC) is proposed and tested on the chamber pressure in an industrial coke furnace. The proposed design is motivated by the fact that PID controllers for industrial processes with time delay may not achieve the desired control performance because of the unavoidable model/plant mismatches, while model predictive control (MPC) is suitable for such situations. In this paper, PID control and PFC algorithm are combined to form a new PID controller that has the basic characteristic of PFC algorithm and at the same time, the simple structure of traditional PID controller. The proposed controller was tested in terms of set-point tracking and disturbance rejection, where the obtained results showed that the proposed controller had the better ensemble performance compared with traditional PID controllers. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conceptual design of coke-oven gas assisted coal to olefins process for high energy efficiency and low CO2 emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Yi; Yang, Siyu; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel coke-oven gas assisted coal to olefins (GaCTO) process is proposed. • GaCTO has higher energy efficiency and emits less CO 2 compared to coal-to-olefins process. • GaCTO proposes an idea of using redundant coke-oven gas for producing value added products. - Abstract: Olefins are one of the most important platform chemicals. Developing coal-to-olefins (CTO) processes is regarded as one of promising alternatives to oil-to-olefins process. However, CTO suffers from high CO 2 emission due to the high carbon contents of coal. In China, there is 7 × 10 10 m 3 coke-oven gas (COG) produced in coke plants annually. However, most of the hydrogen-rich COG is utilized as fuel or discharged directly into the air. Such situation is a waste of precious hydrogen resource and serious economic loss, which causes serious environmental pollution either. This paper proposes a novel co-feed process of COG assist CTO in which CH 4 of COG reacts with CO 2 in a Dry Methane Reforming unit to reduce emissions, while the Steam Methane Reforming unit produces H 2 -rich syngas. H 2 of COG can adjust the H/C ratio of syngas. The analysis shows that the energy efficiency of the co-feed process increases about 10%, while at the same time, life cycle carbon footprint is reduced by around 85% in comparison to the conventional CTO process. The economic sustainability of the co-feed process will be reached when the carbon tax would be higher than 150 CNY/t CO 2

  3. Improvement in blast furnace reaction efficiency through the use of highly reactive calcium rich coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Ayukawa, H.; Kitaguchi, H.; Tahara, T.; Matsuzaki, S.; Naito, M.; Koizumi, S.; Ogata, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Abe, T. [Nippon Steel Corp. Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    A method to produce coke in 'lump' form with high strength and reactivity through the addition of a catalyst was investigated in order to improve blast furnace reaction efficiency. The addition of Ca compounds to coal before carbonization was found to considerably increase the reactivity of the coke at a low temperature range in the thermal reserve zone of a blast furnace. Furthermore it was proved that strong, highly reactive 'lump' form coke could be produced by adding a Ca-rich non-caking coal and adjusting the coal blend composition. Based on this fundamental study, the Ca-rich coke was successfully produced in coke ovens on a commercial scale, both at Kimitsu and Muroran works. The use of the Ca-rich coke in the Muroran No. 2 blast furnace was found to cause a decrease in the reducing agent rate by 10kg/t-p. This technology, producing coke of high reactivity and strength through catalyst addition, is promising as a means of improving the reaction efficiency of a blast furnace.

  4. Improvement in blast furnace reaction efficiency through the use of highly reactive calcium rich coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, S.; Ayukawa, H.; Kitaguchi, H.; Tahara, T.; Matsuzaki, S.; Naito, M.; Koizumi, S.; Ogata, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Abe, T. [Nippon Steel Corporation Ltd, Futtsu (Japan). Environmental & Processing Technology Centre

    2006-03-15

    A method to produce coke in 'lump' form with high strength and reactivity through the addition of a catalyst was investigated in order to improve blast furnace reaction efficiency. The addition of Ca compounds to coal before carbonization was found to considerably increase the reactivity of the coke at a low temperature range equivalent to the thermal reserve zone temperature of a blast furnace. Furthermore it was proved that strong, highly reactive 'lump' form coke could be produced by adding a Ca-rich non-caking coal and adjusting the coal blend composition. Based on this fundamental study, the Ca-rich coke was successfully produced in coke ovens on a commercial scale, both at Kimitsu and Muroran works. The use of the Ca-rich coke in the Muroran No. 2 blast furnace was found to cause a decrease in the reducing agent rate by 10 kg/t-p. This technology, producing coke of high reactivity and strength through catalyst addition, is promising as a means of improving the reaction efficiency of a blast furnace.

  5. The effects of the coke addition and the heating time on the efficiency of chlorination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masduki, B.; Indrati, Y. T.; Wahyuadi, J.; Triswanto, I. H.

    1998-01-01

    The preparation of mixed pellet, ZrO 2 , coke and sucrose, for chlorinating process of ZrO 2 pellet has been performed. In this experiments the studied parameters were coke addition and the heating time. The addition of coke was 9.72 grams, 10.5 grams and 11 for the mixture of the 87 grams ZrO 2 and 3.5 grams sucrose. The purpose of the coke addition is to from ZrC, which is corresponding to Kroll process with carbon-chlor methos. The weight of cokes had been calculated beyond the stoichiometry. The heating times was held in 10 minutes, 15 minutes, and 20 minutes at the temperature of 100 o C that was below the evaporation coke temperature of 315 o C. The result show that the efficiency of chlorinating of ZrO 2 pellet could be reached of 82.16% with the addition of coke mass of 11 grams at the heating temperature of 100 o C with the heating time of 20 minutes

  6. The Release of Trace Elements in the Process of Coal Coking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Konieczyński

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the penetration of individual trace elements into the air through their release in the coal coking process, it is necessary to determine the loss of these elements by comparing their contents in the charge coal and in coke obtained. The present research covered four coke oven batteries differing in age, technology, and technical equipment. By using mercury analyzer MA-2 and the method of ICP MS As, Be, Cd, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Se, Sr, Tl, V, and Zn were determined in samples of charge coal and yielded coke. Basing on the analyses results, the release coefficients of selected elements were determined. Their values ranged from 0.5 to 94%. High volatility of cadmium, mercury, and thallium was confirmed. The tests have shown that although the results refer to the selected case studies, it may be concluded that the air purity is affected by controlled emission occurring when coke oven batteries are fired by crude coke oven gas. Fugitive emission of the trace elements investigated, occurring due to coke oven leaks and openings, is small and, is not a real threat to the environment except mercury.

  7. PROBLEMS WITH DETERMINATION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS FROM COKE OVEN BATTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Bigda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coke oven battery is complex and multifaceted facility in terms of air pollutant emissions. As far as stack or quenching tower does not cause major difficulties of emission measurement, the fugitive emission measurement from sources such as battery top elements (charging holes, ascension pipes or oven doors is still complicated and not fully solved problem. This article presents the discussion concerning main problems and errors likely to be made in particular stages of procedure of fugitive emissions characterization from coke oven battery (selection of sampling points, sampling itself, measurement of air velocity over battery top and laboratory analyses. In addition, results of concentrations measurements of selected substances characteristic for the coking process (naphthalene, anthracene, 4 PAHs and TSP originating from fugitive sources of coke oven battery and subjected to reporting under the E-PRTR are presented. The measurements were carried out on coke oven battery top in points selected on the basis of the preceding detailed air convection velocity measurements over battery top. Results of the velocity measurements were compared with results of numerical modelling using CFD software. The presented material is an attempt to cross-sectional presentation of issues related to the quantitative evaluation of fugitive emission from coke oven battery, discussed on the example of PAHs emission as a group of substances characteristic for coking of coal.

  8. Partners assume risks, lower finance costs of delayed coker-cogeneration project in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alveal, E.D. [Petrox SA Refineria de Petroleo, Concepcion (Chile); Karpenski, M.J. [Foster Wheeler Power Systems Inc., Clinton, NJ (United States)

    1997-03-31

    Foster Wheeler Power Systems Inc., and its partners--Petrox SA Refineria de Petroleo and Empresa Nacional de Petroleo (ENAP), the Chilean national oil company--closed on the financing of Petropower Energia Limitada, a $237 million financed combination delayed coker-cogeneration facility. The facility is now under construction adjacent to Petrox`s 84,000 b/d Talcahuano refinery, near Concepcion. In addition to the low interest rate of 7.36%--only 170 basis points over the 10 year US Treasury yield--the project was rated investment-grade by Standard and Poor`s. The Petropower project also has the distinction of having the longest term--18 years--for any project financing in Latin America. The project is unique in other ways: it is the Republic of Chile`s first public/private partnership and also the first project to combine petroleum coking technology with cogeneration technology in a single project financing. The paper discusses risk assumption, the Petropower project, organization, delayed coker facility, hydrotreater unit, cogeneration facility, environmental assessment, Chile`s changing market, and project benefit.

  9. Coke and product profiles formed along the catalyst bed during n-heptane reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querini, C.A.; Fung, S.C. (Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Deactivation of Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Pt-Re/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] during n-heptane reforming was studied using a multi-outlet reactor, which allows determination of gas-phase composition profiles and coke profiles along the catalyst bed. Coke profiles strongly depend on catalyst type and pressure. At low pressure, 105 kPa, the coke content on the Pt catalyst increases along the bed and at 1225 kPa decreases. Between these pressure values, a maximum in the coke profile is observed. Similar changes in C[sub 5] ring naphthene concentration profile with pressure are observed and a general correlation has been established between coke and C[sub 5] naphthenes covering variations in time on-oil, pressure, and location of catalysts. Therefore, C[sub 5] naphthenes appear as the dominant factor in the deactivation of these catalysts. The addition of Re to a Pt catalyst has a similar effect on the coke profile and on the C[sub 5] naphthene profile of the Pt catalyst as increasing its operation pressure, i.e., shifting the maximum of coke C[sub 5] naphthene profile from bed outlet to inlet. Additionally, pressure at which coke is deposited affects TPO spectra. An increase in the total pressure of a Pt catalyst produces a TPO spectrum similar to that of Pt-Re. These results suggest that Re increases the hydrogen surface concentration on Pt-Re, and therefore, Re decreases the dehydrogenating capacity of this catalyst and increases its hydrogenating activity. The lower dehydrogenation activity of Pt-Re catalysts as compared with Pt catalysts result in forming less C[sub 5] ring diolefins and, thus, Pt-Re catalysts exhibit lower coke make and better stability. 46 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stress Delayed ejaculation Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  11. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the penis Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include: Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication or other concerns Anxiety about performance Poor body image Cultural or religious taboos Differences between the reality ...

  12. On-line determination of moisture in coal and coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutmore, N.G.; Sowerby, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The CSIRO Division of Mineral Engineering is developing various techniques for the on-line determination of moisture in coal and coke, and some instruments are now commercially available. These techniques permit accurate and rapid determination of moisture in materials directly on conveyor belts or in bins. The most promising techniques for direct on-belt measurement of moisture in coal are capacitance and microwave transmission. A non-contacting under-belt capacitance and gamma-ray backscatter technique has determined moisture in coal to better than 0.5 wt% in field tests. CSIRO is developing a fast neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique, which is proving very accurate in laboratory tests. This technique overcomes many of the limitations of thermal neutrons moisture gauges

  13. Structural variations and physical properties of lignin coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.

    1986-01-01

    The studied lignin is a by-product of the process of ethanol production from eucaliptus. It was heat-treated under inert atmosphere conditions at increasing temperatures from 300 0 C up to 2600 0 C. This material has about 35 weight % of carbon yield and low ash content (0.70 w %). The structural variations were studied by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and infra-red spectroscopy. The bulk and the ''real'' density of the samples have also been determined as a function of the heat treatment temperatures. These experimental results enabled us to establish a mechanism of structure variation based on the formation of a graphite-like and porous structure within the initially amorphous lignin matrix. It has been possible to specify the adequate heat treatment temperature based upon the lignin coke applications. (author) [pt

  14. The effect of calcination conditions on the graphitizability of novel synthetic and coal-derived cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Barbara Ellen

    The effects of calcination heating rate and ultimate calcination temperature upon calcined coke and subsequent graphitic material microstructures were studied for materials prepared from three different precursors. The pitch precursors used were Mitsubishi AR pitch (a synthetic, 100% mesophase pitch), the NMP-extracted portion of a raw coal, and the NMP-extracted fraction of a coal liquefaction residue obtained from an HTI pilot plant. These materials were all green-coked under identical conditions. Optical microscopy confirmed that the Mitsubishi coke was very anisotropic and the HTI coke was nearly as anisotropic. The coke produced from the direct coal extract was very isotropic. Crystalline development during calcination heating was verified by high-temperature x-ray diffraction. Experiments were performed to ascertain the effects of varying calcination heating rate and ultimate temperature. It was determined that calcined coke crystallite size increased with increasing temperature for all three materials but was found to be independent of heating rate. The graphene interplanar spacing decreased with increasing temperature for the isotropic NMP-extract material but increased with increasing temperature for the anisotropic materials---Mitsubishi and HTI cokes. Graphene interplanar spacing was also found to be independent of heating rate. Calcined coke real densities were, likewise, found to be independent of heating rate. The anisotropic cokes (Mitsubishi and HTI) exhibited increasing real density with increasing calcination temperature. The NMP-extract coke increased in density up to 1050°C and then suffered a dramatic reduction in real density when heated to 1250°C. This is indicative of puffing. Since there was no corresponding disruption in the crystalline structure, the puffing phenomena was determined to be intercrystalline rather than intracrystalline. After the calcined cokes were graphitized (under identical conditions), the microstructures were re

  15. Digital neutron moisture meter for moisture determination in the cokes and building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibovski, R.; Igel'ski, A.; Kiyanya, K.; Kiyanya, S.; Mnikh, Eh.; Sledzevski, R.; Verba, V.

    1979-01-01

    Description is given of the digital neutron moisture gage for measuring water content in coke or in dry building materials. The device can work independently with indication of the results to personnel carrying out control operation and adjustment of the process or as a part of an automated control system with supplying the results of measurements in a form of analogous signals or electric pulses in the preselected code. The moisture gage described consists of two units: measuring probes with containers and the desk with power supply and the system for digital processing of a radiometric signal. The measuring probe consists of the asotopic fast neutrons source; helium proportional counter of slow neutrons and a pulse amplifier. The probe is mounted in the bunker with the material measured and is located inside the protective tube made of the weare-resistant material. To obtain high accuracy of measurements and to obtain the measuring instrument's reading immediately in the units of moisture measurement, the digizal converter circuit for radiometric signals processing is used. The The digital converter circuit cited, can be applied to any calibration dependence of linear type with initial value. The block diagram of the device is given. The device described permits to measure the moisture content in the metallurgy coks and in the building materials in one minute and with the error not more than 0.5% [ru

  16. Characterization of coke by MAS 13C-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, J.B.; Tuel, A.; Munck, M.; Derouane, E.G.

    1991-01-01

    The molecular architecture of coke is difficult to determine. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows one to understand the chemical environment or types of hydrogen and carbon in the sample. It is also possible to estimate the proportion of atoms in the various environments. Here, liquid-state and solid-state NMR have been used to characterize different series of feedstocks and coke samples. Liquid phase 13 C NMR was used to analyse feeds and products separated by HPLC (PEW) in fractions called aliphatics, mono-, di-, tri-, and polyaromatics. An internal lock with deuterated chloroform was used due to the small amount of material present in each fraction. The NMR analysis gives the aromaticity and gives a nice correlation with the results obtained by GC/MS (average no of C-atoms in each fraction, chainlength, no. of substituents etc.). Structural features were gained by comparison of different fractions, while differences were seen, when feed and product were compared. For liquid samples, a model has been proposed in which the feed is supposed to be described as a mixture of six model compounds. Results concerning three series of feedstocks and the structural paramaters deduced from 13 C and 1 H NMR spectra are discussed and compared with the experimental data obtained from elemental analysis. In the solid state, by using Cross Polarization (CP) and Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), it is possible to obtain information on different carbon structural types. Structural parameters, such as the aromaticity f a or the H/C ratio can be evaluated with a good reliability. (AB) (23 refs.)

  17. Combined effects of petrographic and technological parameters on strength of porous coke substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinel' t, V.M.; Shkoller, M.B.; Stankevich, A.S.; Korchuganova, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to study the combined effects of the basic petrographic characteristics of Kuzbas coal blends and the technological carbonization parameters on the structural strength of the porous coke. Strength tests were carried out on the original coke and the products of partial gasification with carbon dioxide under conditions simulating those inside blast furnaces. Properties of the 14 samples of Kuzbas coals and composition of the four coal blends made from them are listed. It was concluded that the structural strength of coke was most strongly influenced by the average reflectance index and bulk density of the charge. Also, charge compaction can largely offset the adverse influence of petrographic heterogeneity on the strength of the coke. 10 references, 3 tables.

  18. Guide to ASTM test methods for the analysis of coal and coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Kishore Nadkarni (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    The guide includes brief descriptions of all 56 ASTM test methods that cover the physical, chemical, and spectroscopic analytical techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively identify over 40 chemical and physical properties of coal, coke, their products, and by-products.

  19. A small-angle neutron scattering investigation of coke deposits on catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, D.R.; Hughes, R.; Allen, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to characterize a silica-alumina catalyst before and after coke deposition. The reaction used to deactivate the catalyst was the isomerization of xylenes. The results showed that, while most of the surface area in this type of catalyst resides in the ultrafine pores of diameters less than 1 nm occupying about 7% of the sample volume, there appears to be no coke deposition in these pores. The coke seems to coat the solid structures of 3.3-nm diameter which are of capillary shape. Such structures occupy about 6% of the sample volume. The coke was found to correspond to amonolayer of composition CH 0.3 with a density of 1660 kg/m 3

  20. Selective Coke Combustion by Oxygen Pulsing During Mo/ZSM-5-Catalyzed Methane Dehydroaromatization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinov, Nikolay; Coumans, Ferdy J A G; Uslamin, Evgeny; Kapteijn, F.; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective

  1. Selective Coke Combustion by Oxygen Pulsing During Mo/ZSM‐5‐Catalyzed Methane Dehydroaromatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, Ferdy J. A. G.; Uslamin, Evgeny; Kapteijn, Freek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non‐oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective oxidation of coke during methane dehydroaromatization at 700 °C. Periodic pulsing of oxygen into the methane feed results in substantially higher cumulative product yield with synthesis gas; a H2/CO ratio close to two is the main side‐product of coke combustion. Using 13C isotope labeling of methane it is demonstrated that oxygen predominantly reacts with molybdenum carbide species. The resulting molybdenum oxides catalyze coke oxidation. Less than one‐fifth of the available oxygen reacts with gaseous methane. Combined with periodic regeneration at 550 °C, this strategy is a significant step forward, towards a process for converting methane into liquid hydrocarbons. PMID:27791321

  2. Influence of carbonization conditions on micro-pore structure of foundry formed coke produced with char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Qiao; Jianjun Wu; Jingru Zu; Zhiyuan Gao; Guoli Zhou

    2009-07-01

    There are few studies on coke's micro-pore structure in recent years, however, micro-pore structure of foundry coke determines its macroscopically quality index and reactivity in cupola furnace. Effect of such factors on micro-pore structure were investigated under different carbonization conditions with certain ratio of raw materials and material forming process in this article as charging temperature (A); braised furnace time (B); heating rate of the first stage (C)and the second stage (D) and holding time of ultimate temperature (E). Research showed that charging temperature was the most influential factor on the coke porosity, pore volume, pore size and specific surface area. It is suggested that formation of plastic mass and releasing rate of volatile during carbonization period are two main factors on microstructure of foundry coke while charging temperature contributes most to the above factors. 6 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Morphological classification of coke formed from the Castilla and Jazmin crude oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picon Hernandez, Hector Julio; Centeno Hurtado, Aristobulo; Pantoja Agreda, Edgar Francisco

    2008-01-01

    A morphological classification of cokes from the Castilla and Jazmin Colombian crude oils was completed. These heavy-nature crude oils, after being fractioned during the refining stages, were physicochemical characterized and submitted to the coking process. The conclusions of this work are based on the characterization of the feedstock chemical composition according to the type of aromatic carbon. UV visible spectrophotometry and the corresponding micrographs obtained by a Scan Electron Microscope (SEM), in amplification intervals from 100X to 5000X for the samples of formed cokes, were analyzed. Results of this work allowed the determination of the morphological classification intervals in function of the polyaromatic compound concentration ratio (tetraromatic/triaromatic, and diaromatic/triaromatic) of the different coked feedstock. Furthermore, high content of calcium and sulfur in the feedstock promotes morphologies of the associated - shot type

  4. Pyrolysis kinetics of coking coal mixed with biomass under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ha Myung; Seo, Myung Won; Jeong, Sang Mun; Na, Byung Ki; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Goo; Lee, Woon Jae

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the kinetic characteristics of coking coal mixed with biomass during pyrolysis, thermogravimetric (TG) and thermo-balance reactor (TBR) analyses were conducted under non-isothermal and isothermal condition. Yellow poplar as a biomass (B) was mixed with weak coking coal (WC) and hard coking coal (HC), respectively. The calculated activation energies of WC/B blends were higher than those of HC/B blends under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions. The coal/biomass blends show increased reactivity and decreased activation energy with increasing biomass blend ratio, regardless of the coking properties of the coal. The different char structures of the WC/B and HC/B blends were analyzed by BET and SEM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activity and selectivity modifications produced by coke deposition on mono- and bimetallic reforming catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querini, C.A.; Figoli, N.S.; Parera, J.M.

    1989-08-15

    Modifications of the activity and selectivity of mono- and bimetallic catalysts induced by coke were studied. A mixture of cyclohexane and n-pentane was used as the feed in order to follow typical reforming reactions such as hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, isomerization and ring contraction. The catalysts were previously coked by means of accelerated deactivation tests. There were significant modifications to the catalyst selectivity with coke content. The ring contraction of cyclohexane into methylcyclopentane was the only reaction for which the coked catalysts were more active than the fresh catalysts. The concept of 'indirect control' of the metal function in the conversion of cyclohexane into methylcyclopentane is introduced in order to explain that the metal is not the location where the slowest step in the above conversion occurs, but that where cyclohexane is rapidly converted into benzene. 4 figs., 20 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. 76 FR 77020 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Coke Oven...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... with occupational exposure to coke oven emissions. Employers must monitor worker exposure, reduce worker exposure to within permissible exposure limits, and provide workers with medical examinations and... appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of...

  7. Effect of Hyper Coal addition to coal on coking pressure of expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanji Matsudaira; Yuko Nishibata; Masaru Nishimura; Noriyuki Okuyama; Takuo Shigehisa [Kansai Coke and Chemicals Co., Ltd., Hyogo (Japan). Research and Development Center

    2007-07-01

    Hyper Coal (hereinafter referred to as 'HPC') is an ash free coal, which can be produced by thermal extractions from various coals with organic solvent, followed by the gravity settling of the extracted material. HPC shows high total dilatation with Audibert-Arnu dilatometer test. Since high coking pressure causes many problems during carbonization, we evaluated coking pressure of the HPC blended coal. The test oven with a load cell which can measure the coking pressure against to the oven wall was used in this study. It was shown that when the blending ratio of the HPC was in the range of 0.5 to 5.0mass%, the maximum coking pressure was less than 7kPa. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Zeolite deactivation during hydrocarbon reactions: characterisation of coke precursors and acidity, product distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, B.

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of hydrocarbons over zeolites has been applied in large scale petroleum-refining processes. However, there is always formation and retention of heavy by-products, called coke, which causes catalyst deactivation. This deactivation is due to the poisoning of the acid sites and/or pore blockage. The formation of coke on hydrocarbon processing catalysts is of considerable technological and economic importance and a great deal of work has been carried out to this study. Th...

  9. Conversion of tar in hot coke oven gas by pyrolysis and steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, K.; Kawase, M.; Nakagawa, H.; Ashida, R.; Nakai, T.; Ishikawa, T. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Possibility to convert the tar vapor in the hot coke oven gas (COG) to a synthesis gas was investigated. Tar condensed from an actual COG as well as model compounds such as benzene, naphthalene, and pyrene were used as the reactants. Experiments of the pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming of the tar in a helium, a steam, and a simulated COG atmospheres were carried out. More than 80% of tar could be decomposed in several seconds by pyrolysis at temperature {>=}to 1000{sup o}C. The coke yield reached 80% and the main gas products were methane and hydrogen. Coke deposition was reduced in the presence of steam by steam gasification of the coke. When the tar was pyrolyzed in the simulated COG, coke deposition from methane in addition to the deposition from the tar was observed at high temperature. The reverse shift reaction forming carbon monoxide and steam also occurred during the tar pyrolysis in the simulated COG. The coke formation was not reduced greatly even in the presence of the reforming catalysts.

  10. Volatiles production from the coking of coal; Sekitan no netsubunkai ni okeru kihatsubun seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Saito, H.; Inaba, A. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    In order to simplify the coke manufacturing process, a coke production mechanism in coal pyrolysis was discussed. Australian bituminous coal which can produce good coke was used for the discussion. At a temperature raising rate of 50{degree}C per minute, coal weight loss increases monotonously. However, in the case of 3{degree}C, the weight loss reaches a peak at a maximum ultimate temperature of about 550{degree}C. The reaction mechanism varies with the temperature raising rates, and in the case of 50{degree}C per minute, volatiles other than CO2 and propane increased. Weight loss of coal at 3{degree}C per minute was caused mainly by methane production at 550{degree}C or lower. When the temperature is raised to 600{degree}C, tar and CO2 increased, and so did the weight loss. Anisotropy was discerned in almost of all coke particles at 450{degree}C, and the anisotropy became remarkable with increase in the maximum ultimate temperature. Coke and volatiles were produced continuously at a temperature raising rate of 50{degree}C per minute, and at 3{degree}C per minute, the production of the coke and volatiles progressed stepwise as the temperature has risen. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Precautionary measures in determining volatile matter in natural coke washability fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashok K. Singh; N.K. Shukla; S.K. Srivastava; D.D. Haldar; B.N. Roy; Mamta Sharma [Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Dhanbad (India)

    2009-01-15

    Industrial utilization of heat-altered coal, especially natural coke derived from coking coal, has become a challenge. As such approximately 3,500 million tones (Mt) reserves of baked coals are available in different coalfields of India. In the present investigation, a natural coke sample (03 tone) was collected from a huge dump of seam XIV of Burragarh colliery under leasehold of Bharat Coking Coal Ltd., a subsidiary of Coal India Ltd., situated in Dhanbad district of Jharkhand state. It was observed that the volatile matter in the washability fractions of different size ranges (50 to 0.5 mm) at specific gravity 1.40 to 1.80 showed erratic distribution with respect to ash. To check the abnormality, the subsamples were subjected to microscopic (petrographic) study and chemical analysis including CO{sub 2} determination. The high concentration of CO{sub 2} is related to high concentration of carbonate minerals generated due to igneous intrusions in coal seams. Based on above observations, it was concluded that the volatile matter can be corrected through determined CO{sub 2} content in each fraction. Since efforts are being made to use natural coke in different industries such as steel, power, cement, carbon artifacts, etc., a careful investigation of volatile matter distribution in natural coke washability fractions would be of immense help in planning its bulk use.

  12. Discerning the Location and Nature of Coke Deposition from Surface to Bulk of Spent Zeolite Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Arun; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Bao, Jie; Guo, Mond F.; Derewinski, Miroslaw A.; Xu, Zhijie; Gray, Michel J.; Prodinger, Sebastian; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of carbonaceous deposits (coke) in zeolite pores during catalysis leads to temporary deactivation of catalyst, necessitating regeneration steps, affecting throughput, and resulting in partial permanent loss of catalytic efficiency. Yet, even to date, the coke molecule distribution is quite challenging to study with high spatial resolution from surface to bulk of the catalyst particles at a single particle level. To address this challenge we investigated the coke molecules in HZSM-5 catalyst after ethanol conversion treatment by a combination of C K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), 13C Cross polarization-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CP-MAS NMR) spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography (APT). XAS and NMR highlighted the aromatic character of coke molecules. APT permitted the imaging of the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon molecules located within the pores of spent HZSM-5 catalyst from surface to bulk at a single particle level. 27Al NMR results and APT results indicated association of coke molecules with Al enriched regions within the spent HZSM-5 catalyst particles. The experimental results were additionally validated by a level-set-based APT field evaporation model. These results provide a new approach to investigate catalytic deactivation due to hydrocarbon coking or poisoning of zeolites at an unprecedented spatial resolution.

  13. Discrete Element Method Modeling of the Rheological Properties of Coke/Pitch Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Majidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of pitch and pitch/coke mixtures at temperatures around 150 °C are of great interest for the carbon anode manufacturing process in the aluminum industry. In the present work, a cohesive viscoelastic contact model based on Burger’s model is developed using the discrete element method (DEM on the YADE, the open-source DEM software. A dynamic shear rheometer (DSR is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of pitch at 150 °C. The experimental data obtained is then used to estimate the Burger’s model parameters and calibrate the DEM model. The DSR tests were then simulated by a three-dimensional model. Very good agreement was observed between the experimental data and simulation results. Coke aggregates were modeled by overlapping spheres in the DEM model. Coke/pitch mixtures were numerically created by adding 5, 10, 20, and 30 percent of coke aggregates of the size range of 0.297–0.595 mm (−30 + 50 mesh to pitch. Adding up to 30% of coke aggregates to pitch can increase its complex shear modulus at 60 Hz from 273 Pa to 1557 Pa. Results also showed that adding coke particles increases both storage and loss moduli, while it does not have a meaningful effect on the phase angle of pitch.

  14. Causes of carbon deposition on the walls of coke oven chambers - preventative and curative care against carbon deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honnart, F.

    2008-07-01

    The subject of preventing and controlling roof, wall, and oven sole carbon has plagued the coke industry ever since the introduction of the by-product recovery oven. It effects productivity of batteries and has resulted in shortened and uneconomic life. The 35 slides/overheads used in the presentation to a Coke Oven Manufacturers Association meeting held in Scunthorpe, UK on 5 April 2005 are self-explanatory and give a full indication of the content of the paper presented. By combining preventative and curative care of the coke ovens of battery 6 of the Dunkerque Coke Plant (in France) carbon deposition has been decreased. This was achieved by reducing the free space temperature; glass-coating the silica brick surface of the coking chamber wall and cleaning the silica for each coke pushing operation; and air blasting the roof and the ascension chamber.

  15. Lung function in retired coke oven plant workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, N; Bertrand, J P; Guenzi, M; Mayer, L; Téculescu, D; Mur, J M; Patris, A; Moulin, J J; Pham, Q T

    1992-01-01

    Lung function was studied in 354 coke oven plant workers in the Lorraine collieries (Houillères du Bassin de Lorraine, France) who retired between 1963 and 1982 and were still alive on 1 January 1988. A spirometric examination was performed on 68.4% of them in the occupational health service. Occupational exposure to respiratory hazards throughout their career was retraced for each subject. No adverse effect of occupational exposure on ventilatory function was found. Ventilatory function was, however negatively linked with smoking and with the presence of a respiratory symptom or discrete abnormalities visible on pulmonary x ray films. The functional values were mostly slightly lower than predicted values and the most reduced index was the mean expiratory flow, FEF25-75%. The decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was often parallel to that in forced vital capacity (FVC), but it was more pronounced for subjects who had worked underground, for smokers of more than 30 pack-years, and for subjects having a respiratory symptom. Pulmonary function indices were probably overestimated because of the exclusion of deceased subjects and the bias of the participants. PMID:1599869

  16. Mechanism for sludge acidification in aerobic treatment of coking wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.-M.; Tseng, I.-C.; Chang, J.-S.

    2006-01-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the cause of sludge acidification that led to disruption of the activated sludge process treating coking wastewater from a steel-making plant in Taiwan. An activated sludge reactor (ASR) with a working volume of 80 L was used as a model system to simulate the behavior of the real wastewater treatment process. Parameters that may cause acidification or inactivation of the sludge (NH 3 , SCN - , S 2 O 3 2- and CN - ) were studied individually to examine for their effects on the performance of the ASR. The results show that high loading of NH 3 , SCN - and CN - did not lead to pH decrease, while the ASR attained 85% COD removal and nearly 100% SCN degradation. In contrast, when the wastewater was supplemented with ca. 1000 mg/L of S 2 O 3 2- , the pH dropped to nearly 4.0 in 2 days and the COD and SCN removal yields were significantly lower (at 50 and 0-20%, respectively). Thus, overloading of S 2 O 3 2- was apparently a key factor causing sludge acidification. The results suggest that to ensure a normal functioning of the activated sludge, the influent S 2 O 3 2- concentration should be closely monitored and that the pH control of the ASR is indispensable when the S 2 O 3 2- loading is in excess

  17. ECONOMIC MODEL AND TOOLS OF THE AIR PROTECTION MANAGEMENT BASED ON THE EXAMPLE OF A COKING PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Hilse

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Legal-economic models of the air protection management at the Polish industrial plants, which take into account the regulations of the Act on “Environment protection law”, are far from being perfect. It is particularly noticeable in the coking industry where chargeable pollutions are chosen selectively, and unitary rates of emission charges are agreed at random. Tax deductions are not granted either to producers of fuel coke for reduction of pollutants emission in municipal-housing management after replacing coal with fuel coke. The proposed new economic model of the air protection management at coking plants eliminates the existing shortcomings.

  18. [Study on co-pyrolysis of coking-coal, plastic and dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rongfang; Ye, Shufeng; Xie, Yusheng; Chen, Yunfa

    2003-09-01

    The co-pyrolysis processes of different proportions of coking-coal, plastic, metallurgical dust (MD) were investigated using thermal analyzer (Setaram Labsys) under a neutral atmosphere of N2 at the sweep rate of 30 mL/min, the linear heating rate and the final pyrolysis temperature were 5 degrees C/min and 1000 degrees C respectively in this study. The experimental results indicated that both the pyrolysis process of coking-coal and that of plastic were radical mechanism. In other word, within the relatively lower temperature range, a large amount of radicals were generated during their pyrolysis processes and stabilized through the intra-radical rearrangement reactions or inter-radical combination reactions. This means that sulfur containing in coal and plastic tends to formed gaseous sulfides, such as H2S, COS, CS2, etc. When co-existing with MD, these sulfides will react with metal oxides containing in MD to form metal sulfide with high stability and the cleaner coke oven gas (COG) were obtained. Within higher temperature interval of 500 degrees C-1000 degrees C, some of the gaseous products after pyrolysis (e.g. H2, CO and C) reinforce the reduction atmosphere that the coking reaction system needs and accelerate the reduction of metal oxides in MD and gasification of metal, which were conductive to the effective removal of sulfur in coke. Therefore, it is definitely feasible to adding waste plastic and MD into coking-coal to remove the sulfur in COG and coke simultaneously.

  19. The effect of recycled plastics and cooking oil on coke quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Liséte Celina; Ferreira, Alison Frederico Medeiros

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the effects of adding plastics and waste vegetable oil on the quality of coke in the coking process, on a pilot scale. A typical composition of the main plastics found in municipal solid waste was prepared using 33% HDPE, 5% LDPE, 10% PP, 21% PET, 24.8% PS, 5.2% PVC, 1% cellulose and also a 0.5% waste vegetable oil was added. The wastes were added to the coal blends in the proportions of 1%, 2% and 3% for plastics and 0.5% for vegetable oil. Two types of experiments were performed. The first was carried out in a hearth heating furnace (HHF) at temperatures of up to 900°C for a 7 h period. The second was a box test, which consists of heating coal blends in 18L cans using a pilot coking oven, for approximately 20 h at temperatures between 1050 and 1100°C. The quality parameters used for the assessment were the CSR (coke strength after reaction), CRI (coke reactivity index), ash, volatile matter and sulfur in order to identify the effect of plastic and vegetable oil on coke quality. Results for CSR in the HHF averaged 52.3%, and 56.63% in box test trials. The CRI results ranged from 26.6% to 35.7%. Among the different percentages of plastics used, 3% plastic blends provided the most stable CSR results. The industrial furnaces work at temperatures between 1100 and 1350°C and time coking 21-24h, compared to the test conditions achieved in the HHF and pilot furnace with box test. It was concluded that the results of CSR and CRI are consistent with the tests confirming the feasibility of using plastic in the steelmaking process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experiment Study on Corrosion Control Using Coking Wastewater as Circulating Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanzhen; Dong, Changqing; Bian, Lei; Zhao, Qian

    The coking wastewater drainage will bring severe water environmental pollution, so it is necessary to change the coking wastewater into resource. The reuse of pre-treated coking wastewater as make-up water for circulating cooling system is an important way. To prevent the circulating cooling system corrosion, the characteristic and the corrosion control technology and the effect of the classic corrosion inhibitors in the circulating cooling water system were studied by static experiment and dynamic experiment based on water quality stabilization theory. The results indicate that the corrosion in circulating cooling system is mainly spot corrosion caused by pollutants in coking wastewater, and the corrosion inhibition technology on the model of precipitated membrane based on phosphor series should be preferred. The mixed corrosion inhibitors HEDP and Zn 2+ optimally selected by experiment can form a firm corrosion inhibition membrane on heat transfer surface, and the corrosion inhibition rate could reach 85.6%. The corrosion rate of common carbon steel is 0.105 mm/a, which could satisfy the criterion of > Design criterion of the industrial circulating cooling water treatment > (GB 50050-95). The practical application to the circulating cooling system shows that the mixed corrosion inhibitors HEDP and Zn 2+ can control the corrosion in the system economically when the concentration multiple is 2-2.2, which opens up a feasible way for changing the coking wastewater into resource.

  1. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Advanced treatment of biologically pretreated coking wastewater by a bipolar three-dimensional electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Lin, Hui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Wenwen

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation is a promising technology for the treatment ofbio-refractory wastewater. In this research, advanced treatment of coking wastewater which had previously undergone A/O (anaerobic-aerobic biological) treatment was investigated over Ti/RuO2 x IrO2 anode, stainless steel cathode and coke powder particle electrodes which were packed into the electrodes in a bipolar three-dimensional electrode reactor (BTDR). The results showed that the removal efficiency of COD and ammonia nitrogen increased with applied current density. The main influencing factors of BTDR were evaluated by an orthogonal test, including reaction time, plate distance, current density, plate amounts and aeration flow rate. With reaction time of 60 min, plate distance of 1.0 cm, current density of 20 mA/cm2 and plate amounts of four pairs, most of the contaminants in coking wastewater can be remediated by BTDR, which can then meet the discharge limit for coking wastewater in China. For organic pollutants, 12 kinds of organic pollutants can be completely removed, and the removal efficiencies of 11 kinds of organic pollutants are between 13.3 and 70.3% by advanced treatment with BTDR. We conclude that there is great potential for BTDR in engineering applications as a final treatment for coking wastewater.

  3. Post oxygen treatment characteristics of coke as an anode material for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Park, Min-Sik; Jo, Yong Nam; Yu, Ji-Sang; Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Young-Jun

    2013-05-01

    The effect of a oxygen treatment on the electrochemical characteristics of a soft carbon anode material for Li-ion batteries was investigated. After a coke carbonization process at 1000 degrees C in an argon atmosphere, the samples were treated under a flow of oxygen gas to obtain a mild oxidation effect. After this oxygen treatment, the coke samples exhibited an improved initial coulombic efficiency and cycle performance as compared to the carbonized sample. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the carbonized cokes consisted of disordered and nanosized graphene layers and the surface of the modified carbon was significantly changed after the treatment. The chemical state of the cokes was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The enhanced electrochemical properties of the surface modified cokes could be attributed to the mild oxidation effect induced by the oxygen treatment. The mild oxidation process could have led to the elimination of surface imperfections and the reinforcement of a solid electrolyte interphase film, which resulted in the improved electrochemical characteristics.

  4. Mathematical modelling of volatile matter evolution during carbonisation in metallurgical coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K.; Godiwalla, K.M.; Mehrotra, S.P.; Chatterjee, A.; Krishnan, S.H.; Choudhary, P.C. [National Meteorological Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    In this study, a mathematical model to simulate volatile matter evolution during the carbonisation process for Indian coals has been developed. This model is a part of the endeavour to develop a rigorous mathematical model to simulate the main physical, chemical changes and transient heat transfer phenomena occurring during thermal decomposition of coals in coke oven carbonisation. To have sufficient generality for the applications to coke oven practices, the mathematical model describes the kinetics of release of main volatile matter constituents, thereby permitting the changes in the mass and composition of solid residue to be estimated by element balances. The prediction of volatile matter evolution has been made from coal ultimate analysis and heating profile based on the principles of kinetics and rate phenomena. The aim of this mathematical model is to predict the yield and composition of volatile matter as a function of charge temperature and to relate these to the changes in the semi-coke composition for some typical Indian coals used for coke making in the coke ovens of Tata Steel. The quantity of volatile matter loss from coal during carbonisation was also determined experimentally using a standard thermogravimetric analyser (TGA), in which the weight of the sample undergoing test is monitored continuously while the sample is heated at a constant rate. The computer based mathematical model predictions for volatile matter yield are verified with the experimental results and found to be in good agreement.

  5. Comparison of the quality of the coke produced at different scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Diaz-Faes; J.L.G. Cimadevilla; C. Barriocanal; M.A. Diez; R. Alvarez [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    A series of coking coals covering a wide range of coalification, thermoplastic properties and geographical origin were carbonized at two different scales. All the coals used are available in the international market and they are used by the cokemaking industry in blend preparation. The cokes were produced in two movable wall ovens of 15 and 300 kg capacity available at INCAR-CSIC facilities. The quality of the cokes was assessed by means of reactivity towards carbon dioxide and mechanical strength before and after the reaction with CO{sub 2}. The results obtained are very promising and a good correlation between the quality parameters of the cokes produced in the two ovens was found. The use of a semi-pilot oven against big-capacity ovens in the optimization of complex coking blends allows to obtain valuable results by using small amount of coal (15 kg vs. 300-400 kg) with the advantages that it is quicker, more flexible and of lower cost. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Pyrolysis and steam reforming of heavy oils from ethylene plants and coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Imai; M. Kawase; T. Ihara; F. Morozumi; K. Miura

    2005-07-01

    To examine the possibility of utilizing a cracking heavy oil from ethylene plant and a coal tar from coke oven, pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming of these two heavy oils were carried out in helium and steam/helium atmosphere. More than 80% of the both heavy oils were decomposed in several seconds and the coke yield reached around 70% by pyrolysis at temperature above 1000{sup o}C. The cracking heavy produced more gases, particularly hydrocarbons such as ethylene, benzene, and toluene, than the coal tar. It was attributed to the difference in chemical composition and structure between these two heavy oils. Steam addition, without any catalysts, did not contribute to reforming of heavy oils at 1000{sup o}C and only slightly reduced coke deposition by steam gasification of coke. The coke yield was greatly reduced and considerable amount of H{sub 2} and CO were formed in the catalytic steam reforming over a nickel catalyst. 18 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Treatment of coke-oven wastewater with the powdered activated carbon-contact stabilization activated sludge process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suidan, M.T.; Deady, M.A.; Gee, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine optimum parameters for the operation of an innovative process train used in the treatment of coke-over wastewater. The treatment process train consisted of a contact-stabilization activated sludge system with powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition, followed by activated sludge nitrification, followed by denitrification in an anoxic filter. The control and operating parameters evaluated during the study were: (a) the average mixed-liquor PAC concentration maintained in the contact-stabilization system, (b) the solids retention time practiced in the contact-stabilization system, and (c) the hydraulic detention time maintained in the contact aeration tank. Three identical treatement process trains were constructed and employed in this study. The coke-oven wastewater used for this investigation was fed to the treatment units at 30% strength. The first part of the study was devoted to determining the interactions between the mixed liquor PAC concentration and the solids retention time in the contact-stabilization tanks. Results showed that optimum overall system performance is attainable when the highest sludge age (30 day) and highest mixed liquor PAC concentration were practiced. During the second phase of the study, all three systems were operated at a 30 day solids retention time while different detention times of 1, 2/3 and 1/3 day were evaluated in the contact tank. PAC addition rates were maintained at the former levels and, consequently, reduced contact times entailed higher mixed liquor carbon concentrations. Once again, the system receiving the highest PAC addition rate of PAC exhibited the best overall performance. This system exhibited no deterioration in process performance as a result of decreased contact detention time. 72 references, 41 figures, 24 tables.

  8. Influence of thermal charge preparation on coke comminution under blast-furnace operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkoller, M.B.; Dinel' t, V.M.; Korchuganova, G.S.; Petrov, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is described for the study of structural breakdown of coke by thermochemical action of alkali and alkaline-earth metal vapors under blast furnace operating conditions. Bench-scale test facilities are described in which a pair of coke samples are exposed to the metal vapors then subjected to gasification. Structural strength tests were performed before and after each experiment. Coke samples were obtained in either moist or thermally prepared condition. The value of thermal charge preparation (heat treatment of the coal at 150/sup 0/C in a fluidized bed) was established, since it shifts the pore size distribution to the smaller size, thereby retarding adsorption of the metal vapors. 16 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Incorporation of petroleum coke into red ceramic; Incorporacao de coque de petroleo em ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, L.A. de; Monteiro, S.N.; Sanchez, R.; Vieira, C.M.F. [Laboratorio de Materiais Avancados - LAMAV, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro - UENF, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: sanchez@uenf.br, vieira@uenf.br

    2011-04-15

    This work has as its objective the evaluation of the effect of incorporation of petroleum coke in the physical and mechanical properties of red ceramic. Compositions were prepared with 0%, 1%, 2% and 4 wt.% of petroleum coke incorporated into a kaolinitic clayey body. Rectangular specimens were formed by extrusion to fire at 850 deg C and 1050 deg C. The determined physical and mechanical properties were flexural rupture strength and water absorption. The microstructure of the fired ceramics was evaluated by optical microscopy. The results show that the petroleum coke waste can significantly contribute to reduce the energy consumption during the firing stage. However, incorporations must be done in amounts around 1 wt.% to avoid deleterious effect on the water absorption of the ceramic. (author)

  10. Effect of moisture on the accuracy of coke-ash determination by X-ray backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, H.D.; Prasad, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Effect of moisture on the rapid non-destructive estimation of ash content in coal specimens using the X-ray backscattering technique has been studied extensively by various workers. In the present work, an attempt has been made to estimate its influence when the technique is extended to coke-ash determinations. From the study of the variation of backscattered intensity with change in the moisture content of a coke specimen, it is observed that the ash content varies significantly at moisture levels higher than 5%. The variation, however, remains within allowable limits if the moisture level is kept below 5%. This observation is confirmed by the actual measurement of ash percentages in thirteen coke specimens containing three different states of moisture levels viz. (i) in the dry state, (ii) with 5% moisture and (iii) with 10% moisture. (author)

  11. ANALISA PEMANFAATAN EXCESS COKE OVEN GAS SEBAGAI BAHAN BAKAR GAS HEATER DI IRON MAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Suderajat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Analisa pemanfaatan excess Coke Oven Gas Sebagai Bakar Bakar Gas Heater dilakukan untuk Memanfaatkan excess COG dari coke oven plant yang berjumlah 11.722 NCMH untuk dipakai sebagai bahan bakar di gas heater dan juga untuk meningkatkan ketersediaan gas bakar akibat makin menurunnya pasokan dan semakin mahalnya gas alam. Dari hasil perhitungan Coke oven gas (COG memiliki nilai kalor yang relatif tinggi, yaitu sekitar 4,373.56 kCal/Nm3 atau kira-kira setengah nilai kalor gas alam yang mencapai 8600 kCal/Nm3. Apabila digunakan sebagai bahan bakar di gas heater akan berdampak Heat Duty kecil, Namun hal ini bisa diantisipasi dengan menambah flow dari COG yang akan masuk ke gas heater, apabila COG digunakan sebagai bahan bakar maka dapat menggantikan hampir separuh dari kebutuhan gas alam untuk volume yang sama

  12. Modified sequential extraction for biochar and petroleum coke: Metal release potential and its environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gunten, Konstantin; Alam, Md Samrat; Hubmann, Magdalena; Ok, Yong Sik; Konhauser, Kurt O; Alessi, Daniel S

    2017-07-01

    A modified Community Bureau of Reference (CBR) sequential extraction method was tested to assess the composition of untreated pyrogenic carbon (biochar) and oil sands petroleum coke. Wood biochar samples were found to contain lower concentrations of metals, but had higher fractions of easily mobilized alkaline earth and transition metals. Sewage sludge biochar was determined to be less recalcitrant and had higher total metal concentrations, with most of the metals found in the more resilient extraction fractions (oxidizable, residual). Petroleum coke was the most stable material, with a similar metal distribution pattern as the sewage sludge biochar. The applied sequential extraction method represents a suitable technique to recover metals from these materials, and is a valuable tool in understanding the metal retaining and leaching capability of various biochar types and carbonaceous petroleum coke samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 77 FR 34012 - Foundry Coke Products From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... International Trade Administration Foundry Coke Products From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of... antidumping duty order on foundry coke products from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') would likely... Products from China Determination, 77 FR 32998 (June 4, 2012), and USITC Publication 4326 (May 29, 2012...

  14. 41 CFR 101-26.4904-416 - DD Form 416: Purchase Request for Coal, Coke, or Briquettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true DD Form 416: Purchase Request for Coal, Coke, or Briquettes. 101-26.4904-416 Section 101-26.4904-416 Public Contracts and... DD Form 416: Purchase Request for Coal, Coke, or Briquettes. Note: The form illustrated in § 101-26...

  15. Non-competitive market behaviour in the international coking coal market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, P.; Thorpe, S.; Hogan, L.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a primal dual programming model of international coking coal trade is constructed to test for non-competitive market behaviour. World trade in 1996 is simulated under perfect competition and various non-competitive market structures. Statistical tests are used to compare simulated trade flows with actual data. Assuming Cournot-Nash behaviour, an all consumer oligopsony market structure is preferred to alternative models. Under an all consumer oligopsony world coking coal prices and trade are lower than under perfect competition. Under an oligopsonistic structure welfare gains from productivity increases in Australian coal mines might largely accrue to coal buyers

  16. Effects of mechanical activation on the carbothermal reduction of chromite with metallurgical coke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Yıldız

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbothermal reduction of mechanically activated chromite with metallurgical coke under an argon atmosphere was investigated at temperatures between 1100 and 1400°C and the effects of the mechanical activation on chromite structure were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. An increase in specific surface area resulted in more contact points. The activation procedure led to amorphization and structural disordering in chromite and accelerated the degree of reduction and metalization in the mixture of chromite and metallurgical coke. Carbothermal reduction products were analzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS.

  17. Research on Reasonable Particle Size of Coal Blends for Blast Furnace Injection: Semi Coke and Bituminous Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyang; Xu, Runsheng; Song, Tengfei; Zhang, Pengcheng

    Semi coke, a byproduct in the chemical industry, is a new fuel for blast furnace injection in China. In this study, semi coke and bitumite were milled into different size, ranged from 0.147mm to under 0.074mm. The content of volatile matter and ash, which affect the combustibility of semi coke, were measured using muffle furnace. The mixture, in which the proportion of coal in different sizes changed, was blend by semi coke and bitumite with different size. Activation energy calculation and the comprehensive combustion characteristic index of all kinds of blends was also discussed. The result obtained by Thermogravimetry -Derivative Thermogravimetry curves indicates that the smaller the size of mixture is, the lower for the characteristic temperature, and the better for its combustibility, Semi coke can be a substitute for anthracite in blast furnace injection.

  18. Reference materials for ratio of moisture content and bulk density of blast furnace coke for neutron moisture and density meters: development and use experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Savelov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with reference materials for moisture and bulk density of blast furnace coke for graduation of neutron moisture and density meters. Reference materials are produced from substances and materials which element content is identical to coke elemental content coke.

  19. The US merchant blast furnace coke market: current state of play

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloe, A. [Shenango Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    2004-07-01

    A five page text is accompanied by a set of 11 slides/overheads. The talk discussed the reasons why the presenter believes that coke prices will stay above their historical levels for the foreseeable future. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Coke formation in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene by TEOM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, C.; Vijfhuizen, P.; Zarubina, V.; Melian-Cabrera, I.; Kapteijn, F.; Makkee, M.

    2014-01-01

    A packed bed microbalance reactor setup (TEOM-GC) is used to investigate the formation of coke as a function of time-on-stream on gamma-Al2O3 and 3P/SiO2 catalyst samples under different conditions for the ODH reaction of ethylbenzene to styrene. All samples show a linear correlation of the styrene

  1. Selective Coke Combustion by Oxygen Pulsing During Mo/ZSM-5-Catalyzed Methane Dehydroaromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinov, Nikolay; Coumans, Ferdy J A G; Uslamin, Evgeny; Kapteijn, Freek; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-11-21

    Non-oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective oxidation of coke during methane dehydroaromatization at 700 °C. Periodic pulsing of oxygen into the methane feed results in substantially higher cumulative product yield with synthesis gas; a H 2 /CO ratio close to two is the main side-product of coke combustion. Using 13 C isotope labeling of methane it is demonstrated that oxygen predominantly reacts with molybdenum carbide species. The resulting molybdenum oxides catalyze coke oxidation. Less than one-fifth of the available oxygen reacts with gaseous methane. Combined with periodic regeneration at 550 °C, this strategy is a significant step forward, towards a process for converting methane into liquid hydrocarbons. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  2. The effect of K2CO3 on thermal oxidation of cokes and carbonaceous materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vallová, S.; Plevová, Eva; Šugárková, Věra; Hummel, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2013), s. 100-104 ISSN 1804-2058 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : coke * K2CO3 * thermal oxidation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://paliva.vscht.cz/cz/archiv-clanku/detail/20

  3. Sensory evaluation and electronic tongue analysis for sweetener recognition in coke drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Kovács, Zoltán; Gere, Attila; Sípos, László; Kókai, Zoltán; Fekete, András

    2011-09-01

    Consumption of beverages with low energy has an increasing role. Furthermore hydrolyzed starch products such as inverted syrup show a wide application in the beverage industry. Therefore the importance of methods which can monitor the usage of natural and artificial sweeteners is increasing. The task was to describe the relevant sensory attributes and to determine the applicability of the electronic tongue to discriminate the coke drink samples with different sweeteners. Furthermore the aim was to find relationship between the taste attributes and measurement results provided by electronic tongue. An Alpha Astree Electronic Tongue and a trained sensory panel were used to evaluate the coke samples. Panelists found significant differences between the samples in 15 cases from the 18 sensory attributes defined previously by the consensus group. Coke drinks containing different kind of sweeteners can be characterized according to these sensory attributes. The samples were definitely distinguished by the electronic tongue. The main difference was found between the samples made with natural and artificial sweeteners. However electronic tongue was able to distinguish samples containing different kind of artificial and different kind of natural sweeteners, as well. Taste attributes of coke drinks determined by sensory panel were predicted by partial least squares regression method based on the results of electronic tongue with close correlation and low prediction error.

  4. THE ACCELERATED SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF XINYU COKING COAL AND ITS EXTRACTION MECHANISM

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lu; Qi, Shi-Chao; Norinaga, Koyo

    2015-01-01

    Coking coal from Xinyu of Shanxi Province is extracted under elevated temperature and pressure via Accelerated Solvent and Soxhlet Extraction. Analyzing their GC/MS results, we explore the two extraction methods’ impact on the dissolution behavior of small molecules in coal and investigate the mechanism of the extraction.

  5. Water plasmas for the revalorisation of heavy oils and cokes from petroleum refining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, José L; Rico, Víctor J; Cotrino, José; Jiménez-Mateos, J M; González-Elipe, Agustín R

    2009-04-01

    This work investigates the possibility of using plasmas to treat high boiling point and viscous liquids (HBPVL) and cokes resulting as secondary streams from the refining of oil. For their revalorisation, the use of microwave (MW) induced plasmas of water is proposed, as an alternative to more conventional processes (i.e., catalysis, pyrolysis, combustion, etc.). As a main result, this type of energetic cold plasma facilitates the conversion at room temperature of the heavy aromatic oils and cokes into linear hydrocarbons and synthesis gas, commonly defined as syngas (CO + H2 gas mixture). The exposure of the coke to this plasma also facilitates the removal of the sulfur present in the samples and leads to the formation on their surface of a sort of carbon fibers and rods network and new porous structures. Besides, optical emission measurements have provided direct evidence of the intermediates resulting from the fragmentation of the heavy oils and cokes during their exposure to the water plasma. Furthermore, the analysis of the mass spectra patterns suggests a major easiness to break the aromatic bonds mainly contained in the heavy oils. Therefore, an innovative method for the conversion of low value residues from oil-refining processes is addressed.

  6. Carbon deposition in a coke oven chamber at high productivity operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uebo, K.; Kunimasa, H.; Suyama, S. [Sumitomo Metal Industry Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    SCOPE21 process uses thin oven wall of high thermal conductivity dense brick and pre-heated coal charging to achieve high coking rate. This suggests critical trouble by the increase of carbon deposits. Carbon deposition in a coke oven at high coking rate of SCOPE21 process was investigated in this study. The influences of temperature, fine coal and water existence on carbon deposition were studied in laboratory tests. Carbon deposition in coal charging and after charging was investigated in the pilot plant oven using test brick pieces. Carbon deposition rate in top space after charging was mainly affected by temperature and was little affected by fine coal briquetting. This is supported by the laboratory test. However, considering no moisture content, the rate was smaller than the one expected by the laboratory test. The amount of carbon deposits in top space in one carbonization period was small by means of the shorter coking time and the lower top space temperature. The amount of carbon deposits in coal charging was larger than the one after charging at ordinal operation of the pilot plant oven. The deposits in the top space derived from coal had been reduced by about one-half due to the fine coal briqetting. By applying the relationship between the carbon deposition rate in the top space and the temperature it was estimated that carbon deposits on chamber wall are not so large. From these results, it was concluded that the carbon deposition of SCOPE21 process is not such a serious problem.

  7. Utilizing the phenol byproducts of coke production: 3. Phenols as coinhibitors of thermopolymerization during styrene production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.I. Batura; A.F. Gogotov; V.I. Cherepanov; O.I. Baranov; A.A. Levchuk; M.V. Parilova [Irkutsk State Technical University, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-15

    A new oligomerization procedure for phenol byproducts from coke production is experimentally studied. This method, oxidative combination, is intended to produce an effective coinhibitor of styrene thermopolymerization. When combined with a Mannich base, the new oligomer exhibits excellent inhibiting properties in the heat treatment of styrene and matches the effectiveness of imported inhibitors based on nitroxyl radicals. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Adsorption performance and mechanism in binding of Reactive Red 4 by coke waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Sung Wook; Wu Guiping; Ma Hui; Liu Qiong; Yan Yao; Cui Longzhe; Liu Chengfu; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2006-01-01

    The protonated coke waste was used as a new type of adsorbent for the removal of Reactive Red 4. To identify the binding sites in the protonated coke waste, the waste was potentiometrically titrated. As a result, four types of functional groups were present in the waste, which was confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Among functional groups, primary amine groups (-NH 2 ) were likely the binding sites for anionic Reactive Red 4. It was also found that sulfonate, carboxyl and phosphonate groups played a role in electrostatic interference with the binding of dye molecules. The maximum adsorption capacities of the coke waste were 70.3 ± 11.1 and 24.9 ± 1.8 mg/g at pH 1 and 2, respectively. Kinetic study showed a pseudo-first-order rate of adsorption with respect to the solution. The uptake of Reactive Red 4 was not significantly affected by the high concentration of salts. These results of adsorption performance indicate the coke waste as a potentially economical adsorbent for dye removal

  9. Delaying cognitive and physical decline through multidomain interventions for residents with mild-to-moderate dementia in dementia care units in Taiwan: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Chen, Liang-Yu; Wang, Kuei-Yu; Lin, Shih-Yi; Chen, Liang-Kung; Lin, Yu-Te; Liu, Tsung-Yun; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2017-04-01

    To develop experimental multi-domain interventions for older people with mild-to-moderate dementia, and to evaluate the effect of delaying cognitive and physical decline, and improvement or prevention of geriatric syndromes during 1-year follow up. Participants aged 65 years and older with mild-to-moderate dementia (clinical dementia rating [CDR] 1 or 2) were grouped as intervention in Jia-Li Veterans Home and usual care model in the community (Memory clinic). All residents in Jia-Li Veterans Home received comprehensive intervention, including Multi-disciplinary team consultation and intervention, Multi-component non-pharmacological management, geriatric syndromes survey and intervention by CGA, and a dementia friendly medical Green channel Approach (2MCGA). The decline of cognitive and physical function are determined by the change of Mini-Mental State Examination score, CDR and the sum of CDR box, as well as activities of daily living based on the Barthel Index. We also screened geriatric syndromes at baseline and 1 year later. Participants in the intervention group were older and had a lower educational level, lower body mass index, poor baseline activities of daily living function, lower visual impairment, and higher rates of hearing impairment, polypharmacy and risk of malnutrition. The residents receiving 2MCGA had lower baseline Mini-Mental State Examination scores, and higher CDR. For residents in Jia-Li Veterans Home, all cognitive measurements except Mini-Mental State Examination were significantly associated with delaying the decline of cognition after analyzing by multiple linear regression, and multivariate logistic regression also showed that patients living in the community was independently associated with a higher odds ratio for activities of daily living decline (3.180, 95% CI 1.384-7.308, P = 0.006). There are also more improvement in their baseline geriatric syndromes and suffered less from new geriatric syndromes, including falls, urinary

  10. Coke, char and organic waste behaviour in the blast furnace with high injection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudenau, H. W.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Blast furnace operation with low coke rate, high amount of auxiliary hydrocarbons and use of nut coke causes a change in coke quality requirements. In particular, not burned in the raceway residues of injected substances (char and ash can influence the coke behaviour. Therefore combustion efficiency of various organic wastes with and without pulverized coal injection (PCI and coal char has been investigated under the raceway simulation conditions. Mixing of various substances improves their combustion efficiency. Study on coke gasification by carbon dioxide in the presence of char showed that with the increase of char concentration, coke strength reduction becomes smaller. The reactivity of char with CO2 is higher than that of coke. Therefore char is consumed preferentially. In presence of injected char, total pore volume in coke and its wear resistance were increased. Coke reactivity and microstructure in the presence of various kinds of ash has been studied. Many ash spheres were observed on the surface of coke matrix and its size was dependent on ash properties.

    La operación del horno alto con una tasa baja de coque, una cantidad elevada de hidrocarburos auxiliares y el empleo de coque calibrado, origina un cambio en las necesidades de calidad del coque. En particular, pueden influir en el comportamiento del coque los residuos inquemados en el raceway (cavidad enfrente a las toberas del horno de las sustancias que se inyectan (char y cenizas. El char es el residuo de carbón que se origina después que el carbón libera sus sustancias volátiles. Por tanto, se ha investigado la eficiencia de la combustión de varios residuos orgánicos con y sin inyección de carbón pulverizado (ICP y char, bajo las condiciones de simulación del raceway. La mezcla de varias sustancias mejora la eficiencia a la combustión. El estudio de la gasificación del coque por el dióxido de carbono en la

  11. Emission characteristics and size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coke production in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ling; Peng, Lin; Liu, Xiaofeng; He, Qiusheng; Bai, Huiling; Yan, Yulong; Li, Yinghui

    2017-11-01

    Coking is regarded as a major source of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but few researches have been conducted on the emission characteristics of PAHs from coke production. In this study, emissions of size-segregated particulate matter (PM) and particle-bound PAHs emitted from charging of coal (CC) and pushing of coke (PC) in four typical coke plants were determined. The emission factors on average, sums of CC and PC, were 4.65 mg/kg, 5.96 mg/kg, 19.18 μg/kg and 20.69 μg/kg of coal charged for PM2.1 (≤ 2.1 μm), PM, PAHs in PM2.1 and total-PAHs, respectively. PM and PAHs emission from plants using stamp charging were significantly more than those using top charging. The profile of PAHs in PM with size ≤ 1.4 μm (PM1.4) emitted from CC process were similar with that from PC, however, it revealed obviously different tendency for PAHs in PM with size > 1.4 μm, indicating the different formation mechanism for coarse particles emitted from CC and PC. Size distributions of PM and PAHs indicated that they were primarily connected with PM1.4, and the contributions of PM1.4 to PM and PAHs emitted from the plants using stamp charging were higher than those using top charging. Some improved technology in air-pollution control devices should be considered in coke production in future based on the considerable impacts of PM1.4 and PAHs on human health and ambient air quality.

  12. modelling and modelling and simulation of coking in the riser

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    operations into high octane gasoline, light fuel oils and gases [2]. FCC unit comprises mainly of the riser, the regenerator and the main fractionators. However, the reactor section of FCC units has been the most active area of research in the industry and academia alike as evidenced by the works of previous researchers ...

  13. Transfer delay audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraqi, S; Coughlan, R

    2007-05-01

    The purpose was to determine the average transfer time taken for acute patients to arrive to the medical unit from the time of referral by an A/E officer. We included the first 200 consecutive patients with completed records. 86 were men and 114 women, aged between 14 and 96 years. Transfer time was calculated as the difference from the time of referral by the A/E officer in UCHG to the time of arrival to the medical unit in MPH. The average transfer time for all patients was 91.5 minutes. The longest was in the second (17:00-24:00) interval with a mean of 105 minutes. 26.5% of patients arrived later than 2 hours after referral. Our findings confirm the existence of unacceptably long transfer time for a significant number of patients. Causes for this delay should be searched for to help find and implement solutions.

  14. Evaluation of risk strategy and market efficiency in the International coal market: A case study of the Japanese coking coal market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.

    1992-01-01

    Market efficiency and buyers' risk strategy in the Japanese coking import market are examined. The Japanese coal market is found to be inefficient. Japanese buyers traditionally have purchased coals from the United States at a high price and, since the second half of the 1980's, have paid the highest average price to Canadian producers. Given the abundant low cost Australian coals, this purchasing pattern does not meet the cost minimization criteria for efficiency. This is explained mainly by the buyers' risk management strategy. To more accurately examine price differentiation, the complexity of coal quality is considered first. A statistical method is used to estimate comparison of supply regions and a detailed investigation on market conduct is based on quality-adjusted prices, which are assumed to represent the prices of homogeneous coals. Although various reasons are used by researchers to explain Japanese buyers power, this study finds vertical integration of the Japanese companies to be the most important factor creating that power. A detailed survey of vertical integration is made. Finally, a monetary value of the risk premium is estimated by using the partial elasticity of substitution. Total payments by Japanese coking coal buyers for risk premiums are estimated. These represent the extra dollars paid by the Japanese to US and Canadian coal producers for purchasing their coals instead of Australian coals

  15. Combustion Simulation and Quick-freeze Observation of a Cupola-furnace Process Using a Bio-coke Fuel Based on Tea Scum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Murata, Hirotoshi; Kuwana, Kazunori; Mizuno, Satoru; Morita, Akihiro; Ida, Tamio

    Global environment problems have become more and more serious in recent years, and reduction of greenhouse gas emission based on Kyoto Protocol adopted at the 3rd conference of the parties of the United nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3); securement of primary energy source and development of clean and renewable energy sources have been pressingly needed in consideration of the predicted depletion of fossil fuel in the future. In this study, we explore the use of a solidified biomass-derived fuel, having the maximum compressive strength of 100MPa and calorific value of 21MJ/kg, in iron-casting or iron-making processes as an alternative fuel to be mixed with coal coke. This study, carried out for internal observation using a quick-freeze technique, observed an actual working cupola furnace under the 20% alternative coal coke operation condition. After quick freeze of the cupola furnace, the solidified biomass fuel was found to inhabit near the iron-melting zone. Especially, this solidified biomass fuel smoothly changes carbonized fuel through high-density state during the operating process. On the other hand, this study tried to simulate gasification combustion under a high temperature environment instead of actual internal combustion of solidified biomass fuel. These combustion mechanisms were confirmed to be similar to diffusion-flame phenomena in general.

  16. Hydrogen and energy recovery by gasification of petroleum coke from heavy crude refining; Recuperacion de hidrogeno y energia mediante gasificacion de coques de petroleo provenientes de refinacion de crudos pesados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua-Rodriguez, J.C [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Jimenez-Garcia, G. [Instituto Tecnologico del Valle de Morelia, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Maya-Yescas, R. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: rmayay@umich.mx

    2013-03-15

    Heavy oils exhibit high yields to bottom-of barrel products (low commercial value); depending on the metals content and on carbon residue the upgrading of bottoms could follow either hydroprocessing or carbon rejection. In particular the Mexican Maya, which is the most refined crude in Mexico, is upgraded by carbon rejection via delayed coking of vacuum residue. In order to obtain acceptable economic profit, it is necessary to transform that carbon (mainly petroleum coke) into useful higher added value products. Coke gasification could be used to obtain hydrogen and/or energy (preferable electrical), via the reaction of coke molecules with oxygen, carbon dioxide and water. Departing from the empiric formulas of five petroleum cokes, a kinetic scheme that consists of three linearly independent stoichiometric equations was recently developed; by including the enthalpy of each reaction and considering the gasification reactor as adiabatic, it is possible to predict product stream composition and high pressure steam that could be generated by the process. [Spanish] Los crudos pesados exhiben rendimientos altos a productos de-fondo-de-barril (de bajo valor comercial); dependiendo del contenido de metales y del residuo carbonoso, la mejora de fondos puede llevarse a cabo por hidrotratamiento o rechazo de carbon. En particular el crudo Maya, que es el mas refinado en Mexico, se mejora via rechazo de carbon por coquizacion retardada del residuo de vacio. A fin de obtener ganancias aceptables, es necesario transformar ese carbon (coque de petroleo, principalmente) en producto util de alto valor agregado. La gasificacion de coque puede usarse para obtener hidrogeno y/o energia (electrica de preferencia), via la reaccion de moleculas de coque con oxigeno, dioxido de carbono y agua. Recientemente se desarrollo un esquema cinetico que consiste de tres reacciones linealmente independientes, partiendo de las formulas empiricas de cinco coques de petroleo; incluyendo la entalpia

  17. Methods to Remove Coke from Endothermic Heat Exchangers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Currently the United States space program is recognized as the world leader in providing access to space. However, in order to maintain this position, it will be...

  18. Torrefaction reduction of coke formation on catalysts used in esterification and cracking of biofuels from pyrolysed lignocellulosic feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, James R; Mani, Sudhagar; Hilten, Roger; Das, Keshav C

    2015-11-04

    A bio-oil production process involving torrefaction pretreatment, catalytic esterification, pyrolysis, and secondary catalytic processing significantly reduces yields of reactor char, catalyst coke, and catalyst tar relative to the best-case conditions using non-torrefied feedstock. The reduction in coke as a result of torrefaction was 28.5% relative to the respective control for slow pyrolysis bio-oil upgrading. In fast pyrolysis bio-oil processing, the greatest reduction in coke was 34.9%. Torrefaction at 275.degree. C. reduced levels of acid products including acetic acid and formic acid in the bio-oil, which reduced catalyst coking and increased catalyst effectiveness and aromatic hydrocarbon yields in the upgraded oils. The process of bio-oil generation further comprises a catalytic esterification of acids and aldehydes to generate such as ethyl levulinate from lignified biomass feedstock.

  19. Investigating erosion of building materials used in an installation for pneumatic transport of coke breeze and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandrowski, J.; Kot-Borkowska, Z.; Misztal, M.; Raczek, J.; Kaczmarzyk, G.

    1980-09-01

    This article investigates the influence of the following factors on erosion of building material used in pneumatic transport of coal and coke breeze: intensity of coal or coke breeze flow within the range of 47 to 120 kg/h for coke and 99 to 165 kg/h for coal; speed of solid material particles within the range 3.71 to 7.97 m/s for coke, and 3.30 to 7.58 m/s for coal; duration of the experiments 0.5 to 1.5 h for coke and 2.0 to 5.0 for coal; angle of inclination of the sample of building material 30 to 60 degrees for both coal and coke breeze. Three types of construction material used in pneumatic transport were tested: steel, concrete and chamotte bricks. Investigations show that concrete is characterized by the highest erosion, chamotte bricks by medium erosion and steel by the lowest erosion. As a result of mathematical processing of experimental data, empirical models of erosion of the three materials are constructed. (7 refs.)

  20. Multinuclear MAS NMR studies on coked zeolites H-ZSM-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, H.; Freude, D.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H.

    1991-01-01

    During the cracking process carbonaceous materials are deposited on the outer or inner surface of the catalyst. These deposits are in many cases the main cause of catalyst deactivation. Magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR investigations and catalytic n-hexane cracking were carried out on H-ZSM-5 zeolites after a mild hydrothermal de-alumination. By 13 C CP MAS NMR it could be shown that the enhanced catalytic activity does not enhance the coke formation and that the chemical nature of these deposits is essentially aromatic. From 1 H MAS NMR studies performed on shallow-bed activated sealed samples and 27 Al and 29 Si MAS NMR on rehydrated samples it follows that for high coke concentrations the catalyst deactivation is caused mainly by blocking of Broensted acid sites. (author). 27 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Study on CO2 gasification reactivity and physical characteristics of biomass, petroleum coke and coal chars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Wei; Zhou, Zhijie; Chen, Xueli; Dai, Zhenghua; Yu, Guangsuo

    2014-05-01

    Gasification reactivities of six different carbonaceous material chars with CO2 were determined by a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). Gasification reactivities of biomass chars are higher than those of coke and coal chars. In addition, physical structures and chemical components of these chars were systematically tested. It is found that the crystalline structure is an important factor to evaluate gasification reactivities of different chars and the crystalline structures of biomass chars are less order than those of coke and coal chars. Moreover, initial gasification rates of these chars were measured at high temperatures and with relatively large particle sizes. The method of calculating the effectiveness factor η was used to quantify the effect of pore diffusion on gasification. The results show that differences in pore diffusion effects among gasification with various chars are prominent and can be attributed to different intrinsic gasification reactivities and physical characteristics of different chars. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental Study of Advanced Treatment of Coking Wastewater Using PFS Coagulation-Photocatalytic Oxidation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Lina; Liu, Pu; Fu, Benquan; Hwang, Jiannyang; Chen, Shining

    A PFS(polymeric ferric sulfate) coagulation-photocatalytic oxidation technology was used for advanced treatment of coking wastewater from secondary biological treatment. Effects of some key factors on TOC removal rate were investigated, and the results were compared with those of the common photocatalytic oxidation technology under the operating parameters of the photocatalytic oxidation defined. Single factor experimental results showed that TOC removal rate could reach 81%, when optimal operating conditions were as follows: TiO2 loading: 4.0g/L, irradiation time: 4h, initial pH is 5.1and PFS dosage:700mg/L. PFS coagulation and photocatalytic oxidation have synergistic effect, which is meaningful for highly efficient treatment of coking wastewater.

  3. Reducibility mill scale industrial waste via coke breeze at 850-950ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaballah N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mill scale is a very attractive industrial waste due to its elevated iron content (about = 69.33% Fe besides being suiTab. for direct recycling to the blast furnace via sintering plant. In this paper the characteristics of raw materials and the briquettes produced from this mill scale were studied by different methods of analyses. The produced briquettes were reduced with different amounts of coke breeze at varying temperatures, and the reduction kinetics was determined. The activation energy of this reaction ≈ 61.5 kJ/mole for reduction of mill scale with coke breeze in the form of briquettes with 2% molasses where the chemical reaction interface model is applicable.

  4. Coking- and sintering-resistant palladium catalysts achieved through atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Fu, Baosong; Kung, Mayfair C; Xiao, Guomin; Elam, Jeffrey W; Kung, Harold H; Stair, Peter C

    2012-03-09

    We showed that alumina (Al(2)O(3)) overcoating of supported metal nanoparticles (NPs) effectively reduced deactivation by coking and sintering in high-temperature applications of heterogeneous catalysts. We overcoated palladium NPs with 45 layers of alumina through an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process that alternated exposures of the catalysts to trimethylaluminum and water at 200°C. When these catalysts were used for 1 hour in oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene at 650°C, they were found by thermogravimetric analysis to contain less than 6% of the coke formed on the uncoated catalysts. Scanning transmission electron microscopy showed no visible morphology changes after reaction at 675°C for 28 hours. The yield of ethylene was improved on all ALD Al(2)O(3) overcoated Pd catalysts.

  5. Computational and experimental research on humidity measurements of coke and/or cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywicka-Jakiel, T.; Loskiewicz, J.; Tracz, G.

    1998-01-01

    During first year of the CRP realisation the computer modelling of geometry configuration for the Fast Neutron and Gamma-ray Transmission technique (FNGT) in falling material geometry for coke industry were performed. Results of modelling calculations of the FNGT geometrical and material arrangements, choice of proper materials for source shielding and collimators as well as results of geometry optimisation are presented in this report

  6. Modelling and Simulation of Coking in the Riser of an Industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yields of LCO, gasoline, gas and coke that were predicted by the model for industrial risers were 15.54wt%, 49.70wt%, 18.01wt% and 4.90wt% respectively. A feed stock (VGO) conversion of 79.28% was predicted by the model. An optimal operating temperature range of 786K

  7. Comparative investigations of zeolite catalyst deactivation by coking in the conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Evensen, Kjetil Gurholt

    2014-01-01

    With large countries as India and China in tremendous development accompanied by a growing worldwide population, questions arise in how energy demands can be met in the post-oil society. The methanol-to-hydrocarbon process, catalysed by Brønsted acidic zeolites, constitutes an alternative route for the production of gasoline and other valuable hydrocarbons from feedstocks such as natural gas and coal. Catalyst deactivation by coke formation is nevertheless a big concern, and a better understa...

  8. Tried and True: Using Diet Coke and Mentos to Teach Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Adding mint Mentos candy to a two-liter bottle of Diet Coke produces a fountain of soda foam that can reach 3 m high. A demonstration such as this can get a "Wow" out of most audiences, usually followed by a "Do it again!"--but can it be used to teach anything? The answer is a definite "Yes," and what follows is a guided inquiry activity that…

  9. The aquatic toxicity and chemical forms of coke plant effluent cyanide -- Implications for discharge limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay, R.; Rupnow, M.; Godwin-Saad, E.; Hall, S.

    1995-01-01

    Cyanide is present in treated cokemaking process waters at concentrations as high as 8.0 mg/L. In assessing options for managing the discharge of a treated effluent, the development and implementation of discharge limits for cyanide became a critical issue. A study was initiated to evaluate possible alternatives to cyanide permit limits at the US Steel Gary Works Facility. The objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluation the forms of cyanide present in coke plant effluent; (2) determine whether these forms of cyanide are toxic to selected aquatic organisms; (3) compare the aquatic toxicity of various chemical forms of cyanide; (4) identify if the receiving water modifies cyanide bioavailability; and (5) confirm, with respect to water quality-based effluent limits, an appropriate analytical method for monitoring cyanide in a coke plant effluent. The results of aquatic toxicity tests and corresponding analytical data are presented. Toxicity tests were conducted with various pure chemical forms of cyanide as well as whole coke plant effluent (generated from a pilot-scale treatment system). Test species included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) and Daphnia magna (D. magna). Analytical measurements for cyanide included total, weak acid dissociable, diffusible cyanide and selected metal species of cyanide. The findings presented by the paper are relevant with respect to the application of cyanide water quality criteria for a coke plant effluent discharge, the translation of these water quality-based effluent limits to permit limits, and methods for compliance monitoring for cyanide

  10. Raw materials inventory management for a Coke plant / by Christoffel van Dijk

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dijk, Christoffel

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of inventory management and logistics for a metallurgical coke plant at Mittal Steel, Vanderbijlpark Works , Gauteng, South Africa. Inventory management and logistics is a concept, which has shown considerable development in the post-World War II era. The concept of applying inventory and logistics as a business function initially emerged during the price wars era and evolved during the quest for quality era. Thereafter, business inventory and logistics had a promotion/marketing focu...

  11. Effect of oxygen potential on sulphur dioxide activation of oil sands fluid coke and characteristics of activated coke in mercury adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.A.; Jia, C.Q.; Tong, S.

    2007-01-01

    A sulphur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC) technology was modified for use in copper smelters in order to mitigate mercury and sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions. Elemental sulphur was captured as a co-product. The study examined the feasibility of reducing levels of SO 2 using fluid coke in the copper smelter flue. SIAC properties were optimized in order to capture vapour phase mercury. Raw fluid coke samples were used to measure SO 2 flow rates. Gas composition was varied to mimic concentrations found during normal operation of copper converters. Gas chromatography was used to analyze reactions products and to prove the hypothesis that mercury capacity is influenced by the oxygen potential of the activation gas due to changes in surface sulphur types developed from reduced sulphur species. Results of the study showed that oxygen levels at 5 per cent did not play a significant role in pore development. It was concluded that increased residence times contributed to reductions in SO 2 and elemental S yields. 13 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  12. The effect of treatment stages on the coking wastewater hazardous compounds and their toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-xue; Zhang, Zi-yang; Fan, Qing-lan; Yuan, Xiao-ying; Guo, Dong-sheng

    2012-11-15

    This study investigated the change of hazardous materials in coking wastewater at different treatment stages (anaerobic, anaerobic/aerobic, anaerobic/aerobic/photo degradation, anaerobic/aerobic/ozone oxidation treatment) and the effects of them on the development of maize embryos and the activity of amylase and protease in maize seeds. Moreover the interaction of refractory organic matters in the wastewater at different treatment stages with amylase and protease also were determined in vitro. The results show that the biodegradable and the refractory organic compounds in the wastewater both can affect maize embryo development (germination inhibition rate is 19.3% for biodegradable organic compounds). As the treatment stage preceding, the inhibition effect of coking wastewater on the development of the maize embryo (for germination inhibition rates change from 49.3% to 24.6%) and on enzymatic activity (inhibition rates change from 63.9% to 22.4% for amylase) decreases gradually, but the photo-degradation treatment to anaerobic/aerobic effluent can increase its toxicity. The changes in the ability of the refractory organic compounds to bind with enzyme proteins, combined with the analysis of the organic components by GC/MS, show that in the process of coking wastewater treatment no new toxic chemicals were produced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorption of organic pollutants from coking and papermaking wastewaters by bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-ling; Qu, Yan-zhi; Yu, Qing; Ni, Jin-ren

    2008-06-15

    Bottom ash, a power plant waste, was used to remove the organic pollutants in coking wastewater and papermaking wastewater. Particular attention was paid on the effect of bottom ash particle size and dosage on the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD). UV-vis spectra, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (FEEM) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) photographs were investigated to characterize the wastewaters and bottom ash. The results show that the COD removal efficiencies increase with decreasing particle sizes of bottom ash, and the COD removal efficiency for coking wastewater is much higher than that for papermaking wastewater due to its high percentage of particle organic carbon (POC). Different trends of COD removal efficiency with bottom ash dosage are also observed for coking and papermaking wastewaters because of their various POC concentrations. Significant variations are observed in the FEEM spectra of wastewaters after treatment by bottom ash. New excitation-emission peaks are found in FEEM spectra, and the fluorescence intensities of the peaks decrease. A new transmittance band in the region of 1400-1420 cm(-1) is observed in FTIR spectra of bottom ash after adsorption. The SEM photographs reveal that the surface of bottom ash particles varies evidently after adsorption.

  14. Adsorption of organic pollutants from coking and papermaking wastewaters by bottom ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Weiling; Qu Yanzhi; Yu Qing; Ni Jinren

    2008-01-01

    Bottom ash, a power plant waste, was used to remove the organic pollutants in coking wastewater and papermaking wastewater. Particular attention was paid on the effect of bottom ash particle size and dosage on the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD). UV-vis spectra, fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (FEEM) spectra, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) photographs were investigated to characterize the wastewaters and bottom ash. The results show that the COD removal efficiencies increase with decreasing particle sizes of bottom ash, and the COD removal efficiency for coking wastewater is much higher than that for papermaking wastewater due to its high percentage of particle organic carbon (POC). Different trends of COD removal efficiency with bottom ash dosage are also observed for coking and papermaking wastewaters because of their various POC concentrations. Significant variations are observed in the FEEM spectra of wastewaters after treatment by bottom ash. New excitation-emission peaks are found in FEEM spectra, and the fluorescence intensities of the peaks decrease. A new transmittance band in the region of 1400-1420 cm -1 is observed in FTIR spectra of bottom ash after adsorption. The SEM photographs reveal that the surface of bottom ash particles varies evidently after adsorption

  15. Oxygen-containing coke species in zeolite-catalyzed conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-06

    Zeolites are the most commonly used catalysts for methanol-to-hydrocarbon (MTH) conversion. Here, we identified two oxygen-containing compounds as coke species in zeolite catalysts after MTH reactions. We investigated the possible influences of the oxygen-containing compounds on coke formation, catalyst deactivation, product selectivity, and the induction period of the MTH reaction through a series of controlled experiments in which one of the identified compounds (2,3-dimethyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one) was co-fed with methanol over a zeolite H-ZSM-5 catalyst. Our results allow us to infer that once produced, the oxygen-containing compounds block the Brønsted acid sites by strong chemisorption and their rapid conversion to aromatics expedites the formation of coke and thus the deactivation of the catalyst. A minor effect of the production of such compounds during the MTH reaction is that the aromatic-based catalytic cycle can be slightly promoted to give higher selectivity to ethylene.

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA-88-377-2120, Armco Coke Oven, Ashland Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnes, G.M.; Fleeger, A.K.; Baron, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    In response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union, a study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ARMCO Coke Oven (SIC-3312), Ashland, Kentucky. The facility produces about 1,000,000 tons of coke annually. Of the approximately 400 total employees at the coke oven site, 55 work in the by products area. Air quality sampling results indicated overexposure to both benzene (71432) and coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs). Airborne levels of benzene ranged as high as 117 parts per million (ppm) with three of 17 samples being above the OSHA limit of 1ppm. Airborne concentrations of CTPVs ranged as high as 0.38mg/cu m with two of six readings being above OSHA limit of 0.2mg/cu m. Several polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were also detected. The authors conclude that by products area workers are potentially overexposed to carcinogens, including benzene, CTPVs, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. An epidemiologic study is considered unlikely to yield meaningful information at this time, due to the small number of workers and the short follow up period. The authors recommend specific measures for reducing potential employee exposures, including an environmental sampling program, a preventive maintenance program, improved housekeeping procedures, and reducing exposure in operators' booths

  17. Control of pollutants emissions and heat consumption of the CST coke ovens; Controle des emissions de polluants et de la consommation thermique a la cokerie de CST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, J.M.; Sampaio d' Andrea, C.H.; Da Silva, O.J.; Brandenberger Valente, O.; Lievana, M.; Rabelo de Faria, M. [Arcelor-CST, 92 - Puteaux (France)

    2005-07-15

    To precede the energy and environmental demands, a follow-up of the coke oven batteries was made, to identify the probable causes of pollutants generation and thermal losses. The results of the follow-up of the in/out gases of the coke ovens led to a change of the traditional operational practices, aiming at reducing the air emissions and the energy consumption of the coke ovens. (authors)

  18. Mechanical strength of extrusion briquettes (BREX) for blast-furnace and ferroalloy production: II. Effect of the method of grinding coke breeze on the strength of extrusion briquettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizhanov, A. M.; Kurunov, I. F.; Dashevskii, V. Ya.

    2015-05-01

    The influence of the method of grinding coke breeze on the strength and the behavior of extrusion briquette (BREX) during static loading is studied. It is found that the size, the shape, and the surface relief of coke breeze particles affect the character of BREX fracture. The application of a shearing extruder for preliminary refinement of coke breeze can result in viscoelastic fracture of BREX due to an increase in its impact toughness.

  19. Nitrogen conversion during rapid pyrolysis of coal and petroleum coke in a high-frequency furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Zhou, Zhi-jie; Li, Jun; Wang, Fu-chen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Use a high-frequency furnace to study N-conversion during rapid pyrolysis of coal. ► Scarcely reported N-conversion during rapid pyrolysis of petroleum coke was studied. ► Both of NH 3 and HCN can be formed directly from coal during rapid pyrolysis. ► NH 3 –N yields are higher than HCN–N yields in most conditions. ► NH 3 –N yields of petroleum coke increase with temperature and no HCN detected. -- Abstract: Rapid pyrolysis of three typical Chinese coals, lignite from Inner Mongolia, bituminous from Shenfu coalfield, and anthracite from Guizhou, as well as a petroleum coke were carried out in a drop-style high-frequency furnace. The reactor was induction coil heated and had a very small high-temperature zone, which could restrain secondary conversions of nitrogen products. The effects of temperature and coal rank on conversions of fuel-N to primary nitrogen products (char-N, HCN–N, NH 3 –N and (tar + N 2 )–N) have been investigated. The results showed that, the increasing temperature reduced the yields of char-N and promoted the conversion of fuel-N to N 2 . Char-N yields increased, while volatile-N yields decreased as the coal rank increased. In most of the conditions, NH 3 –N yields were higher than HCN–N yields during rapid pyrolysis of coal. In the case of petroleum coke, NH 3 –N yields increased gradually with the increasing temperature, but no HCN was detected. We argue that NH 3 –N can be formed directly through the primary pyrolysis without secondary reactions. Although volatile-N yields of lignite were higher than those of bituminous, yields of (HCN + NH 3 )–N in volatile-N of lignite were lower than those of bituminous. While the (HCN + NH 3 )–N yields of anthracite were the lowest of the three coals. Both of the (HCN + NH 3 )–N yields and (HCN + NH 3 )–N proportions in volatile-N of petroleum coke were lower than the three coals.

  20. Natureza do coque formado sobre a mordenita durante a transalquilação de benzeno Nature of the coke formed on mordenite during benzene transalkylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Rangel

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Zeolite catalysts have been extensively used in petroleum refining and the chemical industry although they are deactivated by coke deposition. In order to find the best condition to avoid deactivation, the coke formation on H-mordenite was studied in this work. The coke was produced during benzene transalkylation with C9+ aromatics, under several reaction conditions. It was found that hydrogenated coke was produced in all samples without affecting the selectivity of toluene and xylene formation. This is explained in terms of the mordenite structure and the presence of hydrogen.

  1. A novel approach to mitigating sulphur dioxide emissions and producing a mercury sorbent material using oil-sands fluid coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.; Jia, C.Q.; Tong, S.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical smelting operations are a major source of sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) which is a precursor to acid rain and increased levels of UV-B penetration in boreal lakes. Mercury is also released in copper smelter off-gas, which can bioaccumulate and cause neurological disorders and death in humans. Fluid coke is produced in massive quantities as a by-product of bitumen upgrading at Syncrude Canada's facility in Fort McMurray, Alberta. Oilsands fluid coke can be used to reduce SO 2 and produce elemental sulphur as a co-product. This process was dubbed SOactive. The reaction physically activates the fluid coke to produce a sulphur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC) which is known as ECOcarbon. Some studies have indicated that SIAC is well suited for the removal of vapour phase mercury, mainly due to the formation of stable mercuric sulphide species. This paper discussed the findings made to date in relation to the SOactive process and the characterization of ECOcarbons. The paper discussed the use of fluid coke for reducing SO 2 emissions while producing elemental sulphur as well as coke-SO 2 -oxygen (O 2 ) and coke-SO 2 -water (H 2 O) systems. The paper also examined the production of SIAC products for use in capturing vapour phase mercury. The paper presented the materials and methodology, including an illustration of the apparatus used in reduction of SO 2 and activation of fluid coke. It was concluded that more work is still needed to analyse the effect of O 2 and SO 2 reduction and SIAC properties under smelter flue gas conditions. 10 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  2. Effect of Extracted Compositions of Liquefaction Residue on the Structure and Properties of the Formed-coke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yong-hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of extracted compositions of the de-ash liquefaction residue (D-DCLR on pyrolysis products yields, compressive strength and composition of the formed-coke, which was prepared by co-pyrolysis of the low metamorphic pulverized coal and D-DCLR. The scanning electron microscope (SEM and the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR were used to characterize the morphology and functional group of the formed-coke, respectively. The results showed that the extracted compositions of D-DCLR were heavy oil (HS, asphaltene (A, pre-asphaltene (PA and tetrahydrofuran isolusion (THFIS, whose contents were 5.10%, 40.90%, 14.4%, 39.60%, respectively. During the pyrolysis process, HS was the main source of tar, and HS, A as well as PA were conducive to improve gas yields. The THFIS helped to improve the yield of the formed-coke up to 89.5%, corresponding to the compressive strength was only 147.7N/ball for the coke. A and PA were the key factors affecting the compressive strength and surface structure of the formed-coke. The compressive strength of coke could be up to 728.0N/ball with adding D-DCLR, which reduced by 50% after the removal of A and PA. The FT-IR analysis showed that the types of surface functional groups of the formed-coke were remained the same after co-pyrolysis, but the absorption peak intensity of each functional group was changed.

  3. Time-dependent wave front propagation simulation of a hard x-ray split-and-delay unit: Towards a measurement of the temporal coherence properties of x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL a split-and-delay unit based on geometrical wavefront beam splitting and multilayer mirrors is built which covers the range of photon energies from 5 keV up to 20 keV. Maximum delays between Δτ=±2.5  ps at hν=20  keV and up to Δτ=±23  ps at hν=5  keV will be possible. Time-dependent wave-optics simulations have been performed by means of Synchrotron Radiation Workshop software for XFEL pulses at hν=5  keV. The XFEL radiation was simulated using results of time-dependent simulations applying the self-amplified spontaneous emission code FAST. Main features of the optical layout, including diffraction on the beam splitter edge and optics imperfections measured with a nanometer optic component measuring machine slope measuring profiler, were taken into account. The impact of these effects on the characterization of the temporal properties of XFEL pulses is analyzed. An approach based on fast Fourier transformation allows for the evaluation of the temporal coherence despite large wavefront distortions caused by the optics imperfections. In this way, the fringes resulting from time-dependent two-beam interference can be filtered and evaluated yielding a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.187  fs (HWHM for real, nonperfect mirrors, while for ideal mirrors a coherence time of τ_{c}=0.191  fs (HWHM is expected.

  4. Long-Term Retrospective Clinical and Radiographic Follow-up of 205 Brånemark System Mk III TiUnite Implants Submitted to Either Immediate or Delayed Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imburgia, Mario; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Studies are needed to evaluate long-term performance of immediately loaded implants with moderately rough surface. This retrospective study evaluated long-term survival and periimplant soft and hard tissue conditions in patients treated with TiUnite implants. Forty-one consecutive patients (mean age, 52.6 years) received 205 Brånemark System Mk III TiUnite implants (145 maxillary, 60 mandibular). The indication was single tooth (n = 7 implants), partial (n = 94), or full arches (n = 104). One hundred thirteen implants were immediately loaded. Cumulative survival rate (CSR) of implants was assessed. Long-term marginal bone remodeling, probing pocket depth (PPD), and periimplant mucosa conditions were assessed. Follow-up averaged 8.8 years (range, 6.6-10.6 years). Eight implants in 5 patients failed. CSR was 96.1% (implant basis) and 87.8% (patient basis) up to 10 years. At the longest follow-up, bone loss averaged 0.43 ± 1.15 mm (n = 173), PPD averaged 3.64 ± 0.74 mm, and periimplant mucosa was healthy in 74.6% of cases. Furthermore, 50.3% and 35.5% of implants scored negative for plaque and bleeding, respectively. No significant difference in CSR and hard and soft tissue conditions was found in the long term between immediately and delayed loaded implants. Implants with TiUnite surface demonstrated excellent long-term survival, marginal bone response, and soft tissue conditions, despite a nonoptimal level of oral hygiene.

  5. Reconfigurable Reduced Delay Universal Adder

    OpenAIRE

    Mohit Tyagi,; Samender Singh,; Kavita Khare

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel architecture for least latency universal adder using pipeline and parallel computing technique. The proposed architecture implemented in reconfigurable technology as arun time reconfigurable unit. The proposed 32-bit Universal adder design and compared with previously proposed adder designs in terms of area and delay after synthesis targeting on 4vfx60ff672-12 Xilinxvirtex-4 FPGA and have high hardware resource sharing up to 42% for the binary and BCD arithmetic ...

  6. A Feasibility Study of Ammonia Recovery from Coking Wastewater by Coupled Operation of a Membrane Contactor and Membrane Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hsun Lin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 80% of ammonia (NH3 in the steel manufacturing process wastewater is contributed from the coking wastewater, which is usually treated by biological processes. However, the NH3 in the coking wastewater is typically too high for biological treatment due to its inhibitory concentration. Therefore, a two-stage process including a hollow fiber membrane contactor (HFMC and a modified membrane distillation (MD system was developed and applied to reduce and recover NH3 from coking wastewater. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate different membrane materials, receiving solutions, and operation parameters for the system, remove NH3 from the coking wastewater to less than 300 mg N/L, which is amenable to the biological process, and recover ammonia solution for reuse. As a result, the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE HFMC using sulfuric acid as a receiving solution can achieve a maximum NH3-N transmembrane flux of 1.67 g N/m2·h at pH of 11.5 and reduce NH3 in the coking wastewater to less than 300 mg N/L. The NH3 in the converted ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4 was then recovered by the modified MD using ice water as the receiving solution to produce ≥3% of ammonia solution for reuse.

  7. A Feasibility Study of Ammonia Recovery from Coking Wastewater by Coupled Operation of a Membrane Contactor and Membrane Distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Hsun; Horng, Ren-Yang; Hsu, Shu-Fang; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ho, Chia-Hua

    2018-03-03

    More than 80% of ammonia (NH₃) in the steel manufacturing process wastewater is contributed from the coking wastewater, which is usually treated by biological processes. However, the NH₃ in the coking wastewater is typically too high for biological treatment due to its inhibitory concentration. Therefore, a two-stage process including a hollow fiber membrane contactor (HFMC) and a modified membrane distillation (MD) system was developed and applied to reduce and recover NH₃ from coking wastewater. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate different membrane materials, receiving solutions, and operation parameters for the system, remove NH₃ from the coking wastewater to less than 300 mg N/L, which is amenable to the biological process, and recover ammonia solution for reuse. As a result, the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) HFMC using sulfuric acid as a receiving solution can achieve a maximum NH₃-N transmembrane flux of 1.67 g N/m²·h at pH of 11.5 and reduce NH₃ in the coking wastewater to less than 300 mg N/L. The NH₃ in the converted ammonium sulfate ((NH₄)₂SO₄) was then recovered by the modified MD using ice water as the receiving solution to produce ≥3% of ammonia solution for reuse.

  8. 78 FR 76753 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... determine whether your facility would be regulated by this direct final rule, you should examine the... and petroleum coke is produced in a series of closed, batch system reactors. A delayed coking unit includes, but is not limited to, all of the coke drums associated with a single fractionator; the...

  9. Determination of the coke bed voidage in the blast furnace hearth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havelange, O.; Danloy, G.; Venturini, M.J. [and others] [CRM, Liege (Belgium)

    2004-07-01

    The objectives of the research were to develop and apply techniques and model tools allowing an online evaluation of the blast furnace hearth conditions and its permeability, in order to guarantee a stable furnace operation and to control the refractory wear through early corrective actions. CRM determined the coke bed voidage in the hearth of BFB of Cockerill-Sambre by two techniques: one based on pressure measurement inside the taphole and the other based on electromotive force measurement. A mathematicalmodel was developed taking into account the movements of the deadman. ln order to continuously determine the hot metal flow rate, BFI measured the filling level in the runner at BF 2 of TKS. A statistical wear model evaluated the cross-sectional runner geometry. The data have been fed into a model to calculate the coke bed voidage on multiple taphole blast furnaces. To control the wear caused by preferential liquid flow, Corus IJmuiden developed a monitoring of temperature and heat flux information from purpose-installed duplex thermocouples. This information has been correlated over time to identify any persistent trends and used to evaluate control measures such as blocked tuyeres and process shutdowns. Industrial trials at Fos BF1 enabled IRSID to propose a picture to describe the effects of the central coke charging practice. IRSID used the Fluent code to describe the liquid flow in the hearth with regard to the deadman conditions and to simulate tracer experiments. From studies of the behaviour of the hearth skull, Corus UK proposed a method for its monitoring. The iron flow rate was measured by using strain gauges attached to the torpedo ladles, and the slag flow rate was estimated from the slag pelletiser current. Data from tuyere core drilling samples were examined to estimate the voidage in the hearth. 38 refs., 127 figs.

  10. Combustion of coked sand in a two-stage fluidized bed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coronella, C.J.; Seader, J.D. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-02-01

    An advanced multiple-stage fluidized bed reactor system has been devised for the energy-efficient extraction and conversion, from tar sand, of bitumen into synthetic crude oil. The reactor consists of four fluidized beds arranged as stages in series with respect to flow of sand. In the first stage, tar sands are heated, causing the bitumen to pyrolyse into coke, which is deposited on the sand, and gas, which is mostly condensed into oil. The coke is partially combusted with air or enriched oxygen in the second stage, which is thermally coupled to the first stage by multiple vertical heat pipes. Combustion is completed adiabatically in the third stage and heat recovery from the sand is carried out in the fourth stage. By conducting the coke combustion in two stages in this manner, the overall reactor residence time to produce clean sand is greatly reduced from that for a single combustion stage. Laboratory experimental studies have confirmed the ability to operate and control the two thermally coupled stages. The two-phase bubbling bed model of Grace, amended to account for bubble growth in the axial direction, has been adopted to model the mass transfer and fluid mechanics of the fluidized beds. The model for the first and second combustion stages is complete. Predictions for exit reactor conditions at various operating conditions are in reasonable agreement with experimental observations. The operating parameters have been found to exert a much greater influence on the predictions of the model than do the values of the physical parameters, indicating a desirable degree of reactor stability. Extension of the model to the pyrolysis and heat recovery stages will permit the optimization of the reactor configuration and operating conditions. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Effluent characteristics of advanced treatment for biotreated coking wastewater by electrochemical technology using BDD anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunrong; Zhang, Mengru; Liu, Wei; Ye, Min; Su, Fujin

    2015-05-01

    Effluent of biotreated coking wastewater comprises hundreds of organic and inorganic pollutants and has the characteristics of high toxicity and difficult biodegradation; thus, its chemical oxygen demand cannot meet drainage standards in China. A boron-doped diamond anode was selected for advanced treatment of biotreated coking wastewater, and considering the efficiency of the removal of total organic carbon and energy consumption, optimal conditions were obtained as current density of 75 mA cm(-2), electrolysis time of 1.5 h, and an electrode gap of 1.0 cm in an orthogonal test. Effluent characteristics were investigated at different electrolysis times. The ratio of the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to the chemical oxygen demand increased from an initial value of 0.05 to 0.65 at 90 min. Fluorescence spectra were used to evaluate the evolution of refractory organics. Two fluorescence peaks for raw wastewater, corresponding to an aromatic protein-like substance II and humic acid-like substance, weakened at 30 and at 90 min, only the former was detected. The specific oxygen uptake rate was used to assess effluent toxicity, and an obvious inhibition effect was found at 15 min; then, it was significantly faded at 30 and 45 min. The BOD5/NO3 (-)-N ratio increased from an initial value of 0.48 to 1.25 at 45 min and then gradually dropped to 0.69 at 90 min. According to the above effluent characteristics, it is strongly suggested that electrochemical technology using boron-doped diamond anodes is combined with biological denitrification technology for the advanced treatment of biotreated coking wastewater.

  12. Is A/A/O process effective in toxicity removal? Case study with coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liu; Wang, Dong; Cao, Di; Na, Chunhong; Quan, Xie; Zhang, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A/A/O) process is the commonly used biological wastewater treatment process, especially for the coking wastewater. However, limit is known about its ability in bio-toxicity removal from wastewater. In this study, we evaluated the performance of A/A/O process in bio-toxicity removal from the coking wastewater, using two test species (i.e. crustacean (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio rerio)) in respect of acute toxicity, oxidative damage and genotoxicity. Our results showed that the acute toxicity of raw influent was reduced gradually along with A/A/O process and the effluent presented no acute toxicity to Daphnia magna (D. magna) and zebra fish. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in D. magna and zebra fish was promoted by the effluent from each tank of A/A/O process, showing that coking wastewater induced oxidative damage. Herein, the oxidative damage to D. magna was mitigated in the oxic tank, while the toxicity to zebra fish was reduced in the anoxic tank. The comet assays showed that genotoxicity to zebra fish was removed stepwise by A/A/O process, although the final effluent still presented genotoxicity to zebra fish. Our results indicated that the A/A/O process was efficient in acute toxicity removal, but not so effective in the removal of other toxicity (e.g. oxidative damage and genotoxicity). Considering the potential risks of wastewater discharge, further advanced toxicity mitigation technology should be applied in the conventional biological treatment process, and the toxicity index should be introduced in the regulation system of wastewater discharge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of operating parameters on tar yield in coke oven batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, U.S.; Kumar, D.; Sarkar, P.; Kumar, A. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2002-07-01

    The requirements on coke quality and cost consciousness have changed the cokemaking practical at Tata Steel significantly. The changes are on two fronts - firstly, the very technology itself and secondly, the coal blend for cokemaking. On the technological front, various pre-carbonization techniques with their specific pros and cons are available. Likewise, there is an increase in the variety of coals used for cokemaking - coals ranging from non-coking to semi-hard coking characteristics and with a range of volatile matter have been used in the recent years. This may be looked at as the outcome of advancement in cokemaking technology - the pre-carbonization techniques. However, the influence of such changes in cokemaking recovery of by-product is not very well established, particularly the most valuable one, coal tar. The coal tar yield is governed by the content of volatile matter, its characteristics, the extent of cracking during carbonization inside the oven and transport of the gas from the oven to the tar collector. The cracking of volatiles is guided by the thermal regime inside the oven, the free-space and the gas carrying main as well as the space between the coal cake and the oven wall. Stamp charging technology, in which coal is charged in the form of a cake into the ovens at higher bulk density, provides greater opportunity for cracking of the volatiles resulting in lower tar yield. This paper outlines the theoretical considerations for increasing the tar yield and validates it with some significant parameters under operating conditions in an industrial plant having both stamp charged as well as conventional top charged ovens. 12 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Association of urinary metals levels with type 2 diabetes risk in coke oven workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Bing; Feng, Wei; Wang, Jing; Li, Yaru; Han, Xu; Hu, Hua; Guo, Huan; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies indicated that occupationally exposed to metals could result in oxidative damage and inflammation and increase cardiovascular diseases risk. However, epidemiological studies about the associations of metals exposure with diabetes risk among coke oven workers were limited. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the potential associations of 23 metals levels with the risk of diabetes among coke oven workers. Methods: The analysis was conducted in a cross-sectional study including 1493 participants. Urinary metals and urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) metabolites levels were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer respectively. Multivariate logistic regression was used to investigate the associations of urinary metal levels with diabetes risk with adjustment for potential confounding factors including gender, age, BMI, education, smoking, drinking, physical activity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and urinary PAHs metabolites levels. Results: Compared with the normoglycemia group, the levels of urinary copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and cadmium were significantly higher in the diabetes group (all p < 0.05). Participants with the highest tertile of urinary copper and zinc had 2.12 (95%CI: 1.12–4.01) and 5.43 (95%CI: 2.61–11.30) fold risk of diabetes. Similar results were found for hyperglycemia risk. Besides, participants with the highest tertile of manganese, barium, and lead had 1.65(1.22–2.23), 1.60(1.19–2.16) and 1.45(1.05–1.99) fold risk of hyperglycemia when compared with the lowest tertlie. Conclusion: The results indicated that the urinary copper and zinc levels were positively associated with the risk of diabetes and hyperglycemia among coke oven workers. Urinary manganese, barium and lead levels were also associated with increased risk of hyperglycemia independently of other traditional risk factors. These findings need further validation

  15. Purification of coke oven wastewater; Depuracion de aguas residuales de coqueria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rancano, A.; Gutierrez, A.; Diaz, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    Coke oven wastewater are one of the most problematic that are produced by the iron and steel industry. They must be purified to minimise their impact on the environment. In this work a general vision about the different treatments that the wastewater must subject before being poured is showed. The options and efficiencies of every step were studied, taking special attention to the organic removal, studying the different ways to carry out this removal, centring on the biological treatment, the most used in this kind of wastewaters. (Author) 35 refs.

  16. Investigation on the fates of vanadium and nickel during co-gasification of petroleum coke with biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhou; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Bing; Zhao, Jiantao; Fang, Yitian

    2018-02-16

    This study investigates the volatilization behaviors and mineral transformation of vanadium and nickel during co-gasification of petroleum coke with biomass. Moreover, the evolution of occurrence modes of vanadium and nickel was also determined by the method of sequential chemical extraction. The results show that the volatilities of vanadium and nickel in petroleum coke have a certain level of growth with an increase in the temperature. With the addition of biomass, their volatilities both show an obvious decrease. Organic matter and stable forms are the dominant chemical forms of vanadium and nickel. After gasification, organic-bound vanadium and nickel decompose completely and convert into other chemical forms. The crystalline phases of vanadium trioxide, coulsonite, nickel sulfide, and elemental nickel are clearly present in petroleum coke and biomass gasification ashes. When the addition of biomass reaches 60 wt%, the diffraction peaks of orthovanadate are found while that of vanadium trioxide disappear. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-441-1765, New Boston Coke Corporation, New Boston, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, M.A.

    1986-12-01

    In response to a request from the Industrial Commission of Ohio, worker complaints of skin disease at the New Boston Coke Corporation, New Boston, Ohio were investigated. The request was based on seven reports of dermatitis thought to be associated with steam exposure during coke quenching. Quench water had a pH of 8.85 and contained phenol, ammonia, calcium-oxide, and suspended particulates (82% organic compounds); no irritant threshold levels were found for these compounds. Skin tests in rabbits showed a minimal irritant capacity for quench water. Medical records did not reveal the origin of dermatitis. Active skin lesions were characterized as nummular eczema or atopic dermatitis, which were not thought to be of occupational origin. The author concludes that coke-quenching steam does not pose a skin hazard, but certain work activities may aggravate existing skin conditions. Recommendations include elimination of abrasive cleansing agents, use of skin moisturizers after washing, and prompt medical evaluation of skin complaints.

  18. Fugitive coke oven gas emission profile by continuous line averaged open-path Fourier transform infrared monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chitsan; Liou, Naiwei; Chang, Pao-Erh; Yang, Jen-Chin; Sun, Endy

    2007-04-01

    Although most coke oven research is focused on the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, well-known carcinogens, little has been done on the emission of volatile organic compounds, some of which are also thought to be hazardous to workers and the environment. To profile coke oven gas (COG) emissions, we set up an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) system on top of a battery of coke ovens at a steel mill located in Southern Taiwan and monitored average emissions in a coke processing area for 16.5 hr. Nine COGs were identified, including ammonia, CO, methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, cyclohexane, and O-xylene. Time series plots indicated that the type of pollutants differed over time, suggesting that different emission sources (e.g., coke pushing, quench tower, etc.) were involved at different times over the study period. This observation was confirmed by the low cross-correlation coefficients of the COGs. It was also found that, with the help of meteorological analysis, the data collected by the OP-FTIR system could be analyzed effectively to characterize differences in the location of sources. Although the traditional single-point samplings of emissions involves sampling various sources in a coke processing area at several different times and is a credible profiling of emissions, our findings strongly suggest that they are not nearly as efficient or as cost-effective as the continuous line average method used in this study. This method would make it easier and cheaper for engineers and health risk assessors to identify and to control fugitive volatile organic compound emissions and to improve environmental health.

  19. Use of rheometry and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy for understanding the mechanisms behind the generation of coking pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen M. Steel; Miguel Castro Diaz; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2004-10-01

    The fluid phase which forms during carbonization of a range of coals was studied using rheometry and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to study the mechanisms behind the generation of excessive wall pressures during coking. It is proposed that high coking pressures are generated for low volatile matter coals when the temperature of maximum fluidity (T{sub mf}) is {gt} 465{degree}C, the minimum complex viscosity ({eta}{asterisk}) is {gt} 10{sup 5} Pa s, the percentage of mobile 1H (fluid phase) is {lt} 40%, and the {sup 1}H mobility in the fluid phase is {lt} 65 {mu}s. It is suggested for these coals that the particles fuse to form a rigid network containing pockets of fluid material which have a low fluidity and do not link up. This arrangement could present an impermeable barrier for gas flow and force the gas to the coal side where it builds up in a diminishing region to a critical level, causing pressure on the walls. The magnitude of the pressure generated may be proportional to T{sub mf} and {eta}{asterisk} and inversely proportional to the percentage and mobility of mobile {sup 1}H. It was also found that a high volatile coal which formed a highly fluid phase over a broad temperature range gave rise to a significant coking pressure. In this case, it is proposed that the sheer expansion of the coal charge as it converts to gas and liquid phases is the reason for pressure on the oven walls. These proposals agree with current thinking on the generation of coking pressure. This work is based on the testing of only nine samples and further work is planned to gain a greater fundamental understanding of fluidity development from which models for predicting coking pressure and coke quality for coal blends may be developed. 20 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Understanding the viscoelastic behaviour of coals with respect to coking pressure using rheometry, {sup 1}H NMR and visual techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.M. Steel; M. Castro Diaz; J.W. Patrick; W.L. Huang; C.E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2003-07-01

    The fluid phase which forms during pyrolysis of a range of coals was studied using rheometry, 1H NMR spectroscopy and a visual technique to study the mechanisms behind the generation of excessive gas pressures during coking. It is proposed that high coking pressures are generated for low volatile matter coals when the concentration of mobile hydrogen is below a threshold which is thought to be somewhere in the region of 35-45%, and when the fluid material itself has a low mobility. It is suggested for these coals that the particles fuse to form a rigid network containing pockets of fluid material which don't link up. This arrangement could present an impermeable barrier for gas flow. For a highly fluid coal which did not generate coking pressure, visual studies showed gas bubbles emitting from and moving freely throughout the fluid phase, generating channels for gas flow. Emission of gas bubbles was not observed for coals which generated coking pressure. It is thought that when the gas can't move through the fluid phase it is forced to the coal side of the oven charge where it builds up in a diminishing region to a critical level before forcing its way out abruptly, causing pressure on the walls. The magnitude of the pressure generated may be inversely proportional to the concentration of mobile hydrogen and its mobility, and proportional to the temperature of maximum fluidity. It was also found that a high volatile matter coal which formed a highly fluid phase over a broad temperature range gave rise to a significant coking pressure. In this case it is proposed that the sheer expansion of the coal charge as it converts into gas and liquid phases is the reason for pressure on the oven walls. These proposals agree with current thinking on the generation of coking pressure. 8 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Simulation of blast furnace operation during the substitution of coke and pulverized coal with granulated waste plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Tihomir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using the waste plastic as reducing agent in blast furnace for obtaining pig iron is in focus for the past couple year. The simulation of blast furnace process in BFC software has been performed in order to analyze the coke and coals saving, CO2 emission and determining the economic benefits. Three different batches were made for comparative analysis, depending on the batch composition and input of batch components into the blast furnace: case 1 (C1, case 2 (C2 and case 3 (C3. The base case, C1 contains sinter (bulk material which is needed for obtaining 1 tone of pig iron, quartz which provides slag alkalinity and coke as reducing and energy agent. C2 has the same components as C1, but contains pulverized coal instead one part of coke and C3 contains granulated waste plastic instead coke in an approximately the same amount as pulverized coal. The substitution of coke with pulverized coal and waste plastic is 18.6 % and 25.2 %, respectively. The economic, productivity and ecologic aspects have been analyzed. The consumption of each tone of waste plastic in blast furnace saves 360 $, which is 18 times more than its price, bearing in mind that the market price of coke is 380 $/t % and waste plastic 20 $/t. Regarding the specific productivity, it decreases from 2.13 for C1 to 1.87 for C3. From an environmental aspect there are two main benefits: reduction of CO2 emission and impossibility of dioxin formation. The CO2 emission was 20.18, 19.46 and 17.21 for C1, C2 and C3, respectively.

  2. Reducibility study of Rossetta ilmenite ore briquettes and powder with coke breeze at 800-1100°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd el Gawad Hala H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ilmenite ore fine and coke breeze as reduced material were briquetted with different amounts of organic materials such as molasses or pitch were studied in this investigation. The produced briquettes at reasonable condition were reduced in nitrogen atmosphere at temperature range 800 - 1100oC to determine the factors controlling the reduction and to determine the controlling mechanism. Also ilmenite ore fine with coke breeze were reduced at the same temperature range in nitrogen atmosphere without briquetting process, for the sake of comparison.

  3. Combined XRD and Raman studies of coke types found in SAPO-34 after methanol and propene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wragg, David S.; Grønvold, Arne; Voronov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    We have used a combination of high resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPD), Raman spectroscopy, in situ powder diffraction and nitrogen adsorption measurements to study the effect on and nature of coke in the zeotype catalyst SAPO-34 during the methanol to olefin (MTO) and propene oligomerisat......We have used a combination of high resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPD), Raman spectroscopy, in situ powder diffraction and nitrogen adsorption measurements to study the effect on and nature of coke in the zeotype catalyst SAPO-34 during the methanol to olefin (MTO) and propene...

  4. Petrological study of the formed coke of the high rank coals from Yicheng, Shanxi, P.R. China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Junying; Guo Mintai; Ma Yonghe [Shanxi Mining Inst., Taiyuan (China); Ren Deyi [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). Beijing Graduate School

    1997-12-31

    The high quality of formed coke has been produced by using anthracite and lean coal of Yicheng. The coals are mixed with the binder according to the proper ratio. The macerals of the coals, the microtextures of the formed coke, the gas pores and their distributions have been quantitatively analyzed under MPV-3 microphotometer. The results show that the base anisotropy and the flake texture are the main microtextures of the formed coke, up to 60.5% and 25.3% in volume; the mosaic texture (which is mainly the coarse grained mosaic texture) and the fiber texture are only 7.2% and 3.4% in volume; the analog fusinite and the fragment are 2.4%; and the isotropic texture is 0.3% in volume. The microtextures of the formed coke are determined by the macerals in the high rank coals and the property of the binder. The base anisotropic texture comes from the macerals of the anthracite and lean coal which vary a little in the carbonization process; the flake and fiber textures come from the binder; and the binder and the lean coal may convert into a few of the isotropic and mosaic textures. The gas pores in the formed coke have been statistically analyzed. The D < 130{micro}m gas pore is up to 81.17%, in which D < 65{micro}m and 65--130{micro}m are 54.14% and 27.03% respectively; the D > 130{micro}m gas pores are relative less, only 18.83%, in which 130--195{micro}m, 195--260{micro}m, 260--325{micro}m, and > 325{micro}m are 7.84%, 4.60%, 2.07% and 4.32% respectively. The average diameter of the gas pores in the formed coke is 115.24{micro}m, the void content is 55.09% in volume, the average sphericity of the gas pores is 1.99. The distribution of gas pores is not uniform, The anthracite and lean coal are almost not softened and flowed, they only produce a few small pores. The pores are mainly produced by the binder, but the pores are larger and the walls of the pores are very thin and disconnected. The microtextures and the distributions of the gas pores in the formed coke of

  5. Results and experiences from using BHT coke in the combined ammonia-soda and lime burning process. [Brown coal high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faenger, H.; Scheiner, R.; Wagner, U.

    1984-01-01

    Black coal coke substitution by brown coal coke is described during 2 years of experimental furnace operation at the Bernburg VSW soda production plant, GDR. The plant operates 21 lime burning furnaces producing both caustic lime and carbon dioxide, the latter used in distillation and carbonization processes of sodium carbonate. A 30% substitution of metallurgical black coal coke was possible, applying various measures to compensate the lower brown coal coke quality. A higher degree of substitution had negative effects on plant operation, i.e. decreased furnace output, higher lime discharge temperature, higher carbon monoxide content in the furnace gas and significant dust emission during brown coal coke handling. Process parameters (furnace and lime temperatures, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide gas concentrations) are listed for substitution degrees of 18, 20 and 30%. 13 references.

  6. Estrogenic activity and identification of potential xenoestrogens in a coking wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Wen; Yan, Bo; Wei, Chaohai; Jiang, Yu-Xia; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the estrogenic activities in influent and effluents of coking wastewater from different treatment stages were studied using Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) bioassays. Raw extracts were further fractioned to identify the potential xenoestrogens combined with YES bioassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Influent, primary effluent, and anaerobic effluent showed high estrogenic activities, with potencies of 1136±269, 1417±320, and 959±69 ng/L of 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalent (EEQ), respectively. The potency of estrogenic activity was gradually removed through the treatment processes. In the final effluent, the estrogenic activity was reduced to 0.87 ng EEQ/L with a total removal efficiency of more than 99%, suggesting that the estrogenic activity was almost completely removed in the coking wastewater. For the fractions of raw extracts, bioassay results showed that the estrogenic activities were mostly present in the polar fractions. Correlation analysis between estrogenic activities and responses of identified chemicals indicated that potential xenoestrogens were the derivatives of indenol, naphthalenol, indol, acridinone, fluorenone, and carbazole. The estrogenic activity in the final effluent was higher than the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) for E2, implying that the discharged effluent would probably exert estrogenic activity risk to the aquatic ecosystem in "the worst-case scenario." Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Research of Environmental and Economic Interactions of Coke And By-Product Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Vladimir; Kiseleva, Tamara; Bugrova, Svetlana; Muromtseva, Alina; Mikhailova, Yana

    2017-11-01

    The issues of showing relations between environmental and economic indicators (further - environmental and economic interactions) of coke and by-product process are considered in the article. The purpose of the study is to reveal the regularities of the functioning of the local environmental and economic system on the basis of revealed spectrum of environmental and economic interactions. A simplified scheme of the environmental and economic system "coke and by-product process - the environment" was developed. The forms of the investigated environmental-economic interactions were visualized and the selective interpretation of the tightness of the established connection was made. The main result of the work is modeling system of environmental and economic interactions that allows increasing the efficiency of local ecological and economic system management and optimizing the "interests" of an industrial enterprise - the source of negative impact on the environment. The results of the survey can be recommended to government authorities and industrial enterprises with a wide range of negative impact forms to support the adoption of effective management decisions aimed at sustainable environmental and economic development of the region or individual municipalities.

  8. Petroleum coke in the urban environment: a review of potential health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Joseph A; Zhang, Kezhong; Schroeck, Nicholas J; McCoy, Benjamin; McElmurry, Shawn P

    2015-05-29

    Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants.

  9. Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals in Soils of Past Coking Sites: Distribution and Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hanzhong; Zhao, Song; Nulaji, Gulimire; Tao, Kelin; Wang, Fu; Sharma, Virender K; Wang, Chuanyi

    2017-06-06

    This study presents the existence of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in soils of past coking sites, mainly contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Measurements of EPFRs were conducted by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique with numerous soil samples, which were collected from different distances (0-1000 m) and different depths (0-30 cm) of three contaminant sources. EPR signals with ∼3 × 10 17 radicals/g of the soil samples were obtained, which are very similar to that generated in PAHs contaminated clays, that is, g = 2.0028-2.0036. Concentrations of PAHs and soil components were determined to understand their role in producing EPFRs. PAHs, clay, and iron predominately contributed to generating EPRFs. Meanwhile, organic matter negatively influenced the production of EPRFs. The effects of environmental factors (moisture and oxic/anoxic) were also studied to probe the persistency of EPFRs under various simulated conditions. The EPFRs are stable under relatively dry and oxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions without O 2 and H 2 O, the spin densities decrease initially, followed by gradual increase before attaining constant values in two months period time. The present work implies that continuous formation of EPFRs induced by PAHs is largely responsible for the presence of relatively stable radicals in soils of coking sites.

  10. Treatment of coking wastewater by a novel electric assisted micro-electrolysis filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruosong; Wu, Miaomiao; Qu, Guangfei; Ning, Ping; Cai, Yingying; Lv, Pei

    2018-04-01

    A newly designed electric assisted micro-electrolysis filter (E-ME) was developed to investigate its degradation efficiency for coking wastewater and correlated characteristics. The performance of the E-ME system was compared with separate electrolysis (SE) and micro-electrolysis (ME) systems. The results showed a prominent synergistic effect on COD removal in E-ME systems. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis confirmed that the applied electric field enhanced the degradation of phenolic compounds. Meanwhile, more biodegradable oxygen-bearing compounds were detected. SEM images of granular activated carbon (GAC) showed that inactivation and blocking were inhibited during the E-ME process. The effects of applied voltage and initial pH in E-ME systems were also studied. The best voltage value was 1V, but synergistic effects existed even with lower applied voltage. E-ME systems exhibited some pH buffering capacity and attained the best efficiency in neutral media, which means that there is no need to adjust pH prior to or during the treatment process. Therefore, E-ME systems were confirmed as a promising technology for treatment of coking wastewater and other refractory wastewater. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Treasure Na-ion anode from trash coke by adept electrolyte selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Marta; Chyrka, Taras; Klee, Rafael; Aragón, María J.; Bai, Xue; Lavela, Pedro; Vasylchenko, Gennadiy M.; Alcántara, Ricardo; Tirado, José L.; Ortiz, Gregorio F.

    2017-04-01

    Converting 'trash' waste residua to active functional materials 'treasure' with high added value is being regarded as a promising way to achieve the sustainable energy demands. Carbonaceous materials cannot insert sodium except when graphite co-intercalates solvents such as diglyme. Here, we show that petroleum coke and shale coke annealed at different temperatures can also insert sodium by reversible intercalation phenomena in a diglyme-based electrolyte. The structural and morphological studies will reveal significant differences justifying their distinct electrochemical behavior. Galvanostatic tests exhibit a flat plateau at about 0.7 V ascribable to the reversible reaction. At the end of the discharge, a Stage-I ternary intercalation compound is detected. Two diglyme molecules are co-intercalated per alkali ion, as evidenced by 1-D Patterson diagrams, FTIR and TGA analyses. The full sodium-ion cell made with P-2500/NaPF6(diglyme)/Na3V2(PO4)3 delivered an initial reversible capacity of 75 mA h g-1 at C rate and an average potential of 2.7 V. Thus, the full cell provides an energy density of 202 W h kg-1. This sodium-ion system can be considered a promising power source that encourages the potential use of low-cost energy storage systems.

  12. Instability of biological nitrogen removal in a cokes wastewater treatment facility during summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Donghee; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Jong Moon

    2007-01-01

    Failure in nitrogen removal of cokes wastewater occurs occasionally during summer season (38 deg. C) due to the instability of nitrification process. The objective of this study was to examine why the nitrification process is unstable especially in summer. Various parameters such as pH, temperature, nutrients and pollutants were examined in batch experiments using activated sludge and wastewater obtained from a full-scale cokes wastewater treatment facility. Batch experiments showed that nitrification rate of the activated sludge was faster in summer (38 deg. C) than in spring or autumn (29 deg. C) and the toxic effects of cyanide, phenol and thiocyanate on nitrification were reduced with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, experiment using continuous reactor showed that the reduction rate in nitrification efficiency was higher at 38 deg. C than at 29 deg. C. In conclusion, the instability of full-scale nitrification process in summer might be mainly due to washing out of nitrifiers by fast growth of competitive microorganisms at higher temperature under increased concentrations of phenol and thiocyanate

  13. Fly ashes from coal and petroleum coke combustion: current and innovative potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Aixa; Navia, Rodrigo; Moreno, Natalia

    2009-12-01

    Coal fly ashes (CFA) are generated in large amounts worldwide. Current combustion technologies allow the burning of fuels with high sulfur content such as petroleum coke, generating non-CFA, such as petroleum coke fly ash (PCFA), mainly from fluidized bed combustion processes. The disposal of CFA and PCFA fly ashes can have severe impacts in the environment such as a potential groundwater contamination by the leaching of heavy metals and/or particulate matter emissions; making it necessary to treat or reuse them. At present CFA are utilized in several applications fields such as cement and concrete production, agriculture and soil stabilization. However, their reuse is restricted by the quality parameters of the end-product or requirements defined by the production process. Therefore, secondary material markets can use a limited amount of CFA, which implies the necessity of new markets for the unused CFA. Some potential future utilization options reviewed herein are zeolite synthesis and valuable metals extraction. In comparison to CFA, PCFA are characterized by a high Ca content, suggesting a possible use as neutralizers of acid wastewaters from mining operations, opening a new potential application area for PCFA that could solve contamination problems in emergent and mining countries such as Chile. However, this potential application may be limited by PCFA heavy metals leaching, mainly V and Ni, which are present in PCFA in high concentrations.

  14. Anode performance of boron-doped graphites prepared from shot and sponge cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Luo, Ruiying; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao

    The structures and anode performances of graphitized pristine and boron-doped shot and sponge cokes have been comparatively studied by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and galvanostatic measurement. The results show that high degree of graphitization can be obtained by the substituted boron atom in the carbon lattice, and boron in the resultant boron-doped graphites mainly exist in the form of boron carbide and boron substituted in the carbon lattice. Both of boron-doped graphites from shot and sponge cokes obtain discharge capacity of 350 mAh g -1 and coulombic efficiency above 90%. Apart from commonly observed discharge plateau for graphite, boron-doped samples in this study also show a small plateau at ca. 0.06 V. This phenomenon can be explained that Li ion stores in the site to be void-like spaces that are produced by "molecular bridging" between the edge sites of graphene layer stack with a release of boron atoms substituted at the edge of graphene layer. The effect of the amount of boron dopant and graphitization temperature on the anode performance of boron-doped graphite are also investigated in this paper.

  15. Processing of converter sludges on the basis of thermal-oxidative coking with coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S. N.; Shkoller, M. B.; Protopopov, E. V.; Kazimirov, S. A.; Temlyantsev, M. V.

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with the solution of an important problem related to the recycling of converter sludge. High moisture and fine fractional composition of waste causes the application of their deep dehydration and lumping. To reduce environmental emissions the non-thermal method of dehydration is considered - adsorption-contact drying. As a sorbent, the pyrolysis product of coals from the Kansko-Achinsky basin - brown coal semi-coke (BSC) obtained by the technology “Thermokoks”. Experimental data on the dehydration of high-moisture wastes with the help of BSC showed high efficiency of the selected material. The lumping of the dried converter dust was carried out by thermo-chemical coking with coals of grades GZh (gas fat coal) and Zh (fat coal). As a result, an iron-containing product was obtained - ferrocoke, which is characterized by almost complete reduction of iron oxides, as well as zinc transition into a vapor state, and is removed with gaseous process products. Based on the results of the experimental data a process basic diagram of the utilization of converter sludge to produce ferrocoke was, which can be effectively used in various metallurgical aggregates, for example, blast furnaces, converters and electric arc furnaces. In the basic technological scheme heat generated by ferrocoke cooling and the energy of the combustion products after the separation of zinc in the gas turbine plant will be used.

  16. The assessment of the coke wastewater treatment efficacy in rotating biological contractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cema, G; Żabczyński, S; Ziembińska-Buczyńska, A

    2016-01-01

    Coke wastewater is known to be relatively difficult for biological treatment. Nonetheless, biofilm-based systems seem to be promising tool for such treatment. That is why a rotating biological contactor (RBC) system focused on the Anammox process was used in this study. The experiment was divided into two parts with synthetic and then real wastewater. It was proven that it is possible to treat coke wastewater with RBC but such a procedure requires a very long start-up period for the nitritation (190 days), as well as for the Anammox process, where stable nitrogen removal over 70% was achieved after 400 days of experiment. Interestingly, it was possible at a relatively low (20.2 ± 2.2 °C) temperature. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) based monitoring of the bacterial community showed that its biodiversity decreased when the real wastewater was treated and it was composed mainly of GC-rich genotypes, probably because of the modeling influence of this wastewater and the genotypes specialization.

  17. Control of carbon deposition in the free space of coke oven chamber by injecting atomized water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, T.; Kudo, T.; Kamada, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Komaki, K. [Nippon Steel Corp. Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The method of the atomized water injection into the free space of coke oven chamber was studied to decrease the carbon deposits by controlling the atmospheric temperature. After the preliminary examinations, three injection lances were installed among four charging holes of an actual coke oven chamber. When the 1.7 kmol/h of water per lance was injected into the free space, the temperature decreased from 1210 to 1160 K and the carbon formation rate was decreased by 70 % (average in an oven length direction, respectively). A long-term (about two months) injection test showed that the remarkable decreases of the frequency of the manual decarbonization operation held on the oven top and the incidence of the blockage of the standpipe. It was estimated that the decrease of the carbon deposits was brought not only by the depression of the pyrolysis reaction, but also by the dilution of the carbonization gas and the reduction of the carry-over of fines.

  18. Simulation and optimization of a coking wastewater biological treatment process by activated sludge models (ASM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yang; Wu, Gaoming; Mao, Juan; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Applications of activated sludge models (ASM) in simulating industrial biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are still difficult due to refractory and complex components in influents as well as diversity in activated sludges. In this study, an ASM3 modeling study was conducted to simulate and optimize a practical coking wastewater treatment plant (CWTP). First, respirometric characterizations of the coking wastewater and CWTP biomasses were conducted to determine the specific kinetic and stoichiometric model parameters for the consecutive aeration-anoxic-aeration (O-A/O) biological process. All ASM3 parameters have been further estimated and calibrated, through cross validation by the model dynamic simulation procedure. Consequently, an ASM3 model was successfully established to accurately simulate the CWTP performances in removing COD and NH4-N. An optimized CWTP operation condition could be proposed reducing the operation cost from 6.2 to 5.5 €/m(3) wastewater. This study is expected to provide a useful reference for mathematic simulations of practical industrial WWTPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Petroleum Coke in the Urban Environment: A Review of Potential Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Caruso

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants.

  20. Study on treatment of coking wastewater by biofilm reactors combined with zero-valent iron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Peng; Zhao Huazhang; Zeng Ming; Ni Jinren

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the behavior of the integrated system with biofilm reactors and zero-valent iron (ZVI) process for coking wastewater treatment. Particular attention was paid to the performance of the integrated system for removal of organic and inorganic nitrogen compounds. Maximal removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) were up to 96.1, 99.2 and 92.3%, respectively. Moreover, it was found that some phenolic compounds were effectively removed. The refractory organic compounds were primarily removed in ZVI process of the integrated system. These compounds, with molecular weights either ranged 10,000-30,000 Da or 0-2000 Da, were mainly the humic acid (HA) and hydrophilic (HyI) compounds. Oxidation-reduction and coagulation were the main removal mechanisms in ZVI process, which could enhance the biodegradability of the system effluent. Furthermore, the integrated system showed a rapid recovery performance against the sudden loading shock and remained high efficiencies for pollutants removal. Overall, the integrated system was proved feasible for coking wastewater treatment in practical applications

  1. 75 FR 53963 - Notice of Baseline Filings: The Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, Minnesota Energy Resources...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Filings: The Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, Minnesota Energy Resources Corporation, Louisville Gas... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-86-000, Docket No. PR10... should submit an original and 14 copies of the protest or intervention to the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  2. Coke formation during the hydrotreatment of bio-oil using NiMo and CoMo catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadarwati, Sri; Hu, Xun; Gunawan, Richard; Westerhof, Roel; Gholizadeh, Mortaza; Hasan, M. D.Mahmudul; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the coke formation during the hydrotreatment of bio-oil at low temperature. The catalytic hydrotreatment of bio-oil produced from the pyrolysis of mallee wood was carried out using pre-sulphided NiMo and CoMo catalysts at a temperature range of 150–300 °C. Our results

  3. Pt/Cu single-atom alloys as coke-resistant catalysts for efficient C-H activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Darby, Matthew T.; Liu, Jilei; Wimble, Joshua M.; Lucci, Felicia R.; Lee, Sungsik; Michaelides, Angelos; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Stamatakis, Michail; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2018-03-01

    The recent availability of shale gas has led to a renewed interest in C-H bond activation as the first step towards the synthesis of fuels and fine chemicals. Heterogeneous catalysts based on Ni and Pt can perform this chemistry, but deactivate easily due to coke formation. Cu-based catalysts are not practical due to high C-H activation barriers, but their weaker binding to adsorbates offers resilience to coking. Using Pt/Cu single-atom alloys (SAAs), we examine C-H activation in a number of systems including methyl groups, methane and butane using a combination of simulations, surface science and catalysis studies. We find that Pt/Cu SAAs activate C-H bonds more efficiently than Cu, are stable for days under realistic operating conditions, and avoid the problem of coking typically encountered with Pt. Pt/Cu SAAs therefore offer a new approach to coke-resistant C-H activation chemistry, with the added economic benefit that the precious metal is diluted at the atomic limit.

  4. Pt/Cu single-atom alloys as coke-resistant catalysts for efficient C–H activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Darby, Matthew T.; Liu, Jilei; Wimble, Joshua M.; Lucci, Felicia R.; Lee, Sungsik; Michaelides, Angelos; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Stamatakis, Michail; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2018-01-08

    The recent availability of shale gas has led to a renewed interest in C-H bond activation as the first step towards synthesis of fuels and fine chemicals. Heterogeneous catalysts based on Ni and Pt can perform this chemistry, but deactivate easily due to coke formation. Cu- based catalysts are not practical for this chemistry due to high C-H activation barriers, but their weaker binding to adsorbates offers resilience to coking. Utilizing Pt/Cu single atom alloys (SAAs) we examine C-H activation in a number of systems including methyl groups, methane, and butane using a combination of simulations, surface science, and catalysis studies. We find that Pt/Cu SAAs activate C-H bonds more efficiently than Cu, are stable for days under realistic operating conditions, and avoid the problem of coking typically encountered with Pt. Pt/Cu SAAs therefore offer a new approach to coke resistant C-H activation chemistry with the added economic benefit that the precious metal is diluted at the atomic limit.

  5. Feasibility study of direct analysis of coal and coke inorganic components by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadares, A.F.; Salgado, J.E.; Castro, J.R.; Pretti, L.G.; Castro Rodrigues, W. de.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of an analysis process for coal and coke inorganic components by X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy is tested. The graphics and results are shown, concluding that this methodology can be used for regular attendments. (C.G.C.) [pt

  6. Hydrocarbons reforming on Pt-Re-S/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Cl coked in a commercial reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querini, C.A.; Figoli, N.S.; Parera, J.M.

    1989-08-01

    The deactivation of naphtha reforming catalyst under commercial conditions is very slow, and its study on the laboratory scale under similar operating conditions is impractical owing to the length of the experiments. For this reason, samples of coked catalyst withdrawn from a commercial reactor were catalytically tested with several model hydrocarbons (n-hexane, n-heptane and a mixture of n-pentane and cyclohexane). Changes in activity and selectivity due to the coke previously deposited and the selective poisoning of the acid function with n-butylamine were used to determine the contribution of catalytic functions. Samples takena few days after the beginning of the commercial run showed that the metal function reaches a stationary state of constant activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenattion and n-pentane hydrogenolysis. Temperature-programmed oxidation analysis showed that coke on the metal does not increase from that time. On the other hand, coke deposition on the acid function increases during the whole run. Poisoning by n-butylamine showed that the mechanism of n-heptane dehydrocyclization under commercial conditions is controlled by the acid function. 6 figs., 31 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Treatment of organic pollutants in coke plant wastewater by the method of ultrasonic irradiation, catalytic oxidation and activated sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, Ping; Bart, Hans-Jörg; Jiang, Yijiao; de Haan, A.B.; Tien, C.

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the degradation of the organic pollutants in coke plant wastewater by the combination process of ultrasonic irradiation, catalytic oxidation and activated sludge. The effect factors of ultrasonic irradiation on the degradation of the organic pollutants such as saturating gas,

  8. Emission of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins (PCDDs and Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans (PCDFs from Underfiring System of Coke Oven Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Bigda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A coke oven battery is not considered as a significant source of PCDDs/PCDFs emissions; however, due to small amounts of chlorine in coal dioxins, dibenzofurans may be formed. The paper presents the attempts to determine the level of emission of PCDDs/PCDFs from the COB underfiring system and to confront the obtained results with the calculations based on the mass balance of chlorine in the coking process and reactions of both chlorophenols formation and PCDDs and PCDFs formation from mono- and polychlorophenols. There were PCDDs/PCDFs concentrations measured in flue gases from the underfiring system of two COBs at a Polish coking plant. The measurements included both an old and a new battery. The obtained concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs were lower than reported in the literature (0.5-1.7 ng I-TEQ/tcoke, while the results for old COB were on average 3 times higher than for the new one. It was found that PCDD/F emission from COB underfiring system is insignificant and that PCDDs/PCDFs formation during coal coking should consider the mechanisms of their formation from mono- and polychlorophenols, as well as the influence of process parameters on the synthesis.

  9. Digital time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  10. Delayed Sequence Intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weingart, Scott D; Trueger, N Seth; Wong, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    assessed. RESULTS: A total of 62 patients were enrolled: 19 patients required delayed sequence intubation to allow nonrebreather mask, 39 patients required it to allow NIPPV, and 4 patients required it for nasogastric tube placement. Saturations increased from a mean of 89.9% before delayed sequence...

  11. Time-delay analyzer with continuous discretization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayatyan, G.L.; Darbinyan, K.T.; Mkrtchyan, K.K.; Stepanyan, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    A time-delay analyzer is described which when triggered by a start pulse of adjustable duration performs continuous discretization of the analyzed signal within nearly 22 ns time intervals, the recording in a memory unit with following slow read-out of the information to the computer and its processing. The time-delay analyzer consists of four CAMAC-VECTOR systems of unit width. With its help one can separate comparatively short, small-amplitude rare signals against the background of quasistationary noise processes. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  12. A study on carbothermal reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur using oilsands fluid coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, C.A.; Jia, C.Q.; Chung, K.H. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    2001-02-15

    Experiments and reaction equilibrium calculations were carried out for the SO{sub 2} gas and oilsands fluid coke system. The goal was to develop a coke-based sulfur-producing flue gas desulfurization (SP-FGD) process that removes SO{sub 2} from flue gases and converts it into elemental sulfur. The conversion of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur proceeded efficiently at temperatures higher than 600{degree}C, and the sulfur yield reached a maximum ({lt} 95%) at about 700{degree}C. An increase of temperature beyond 700{degree}C enhanced the reduction of product elemental sulfur, resulting in the formation of reduced sulfur species (COS and CS{sub 2}), which lowered the sulfur yield at 900{degree}C to 90%. Although equilibrium calculations suggest that a lower temperature favors the conversion of SO{sub 2} as well as the yield of elemental sulfur, experiments showed no formation of elemental sulfur at 600{degree}C and below, likely due to hindered kinetics. Faster reduction of SO{sub 2} was observed at a higher temperature in the range of 700-1000{degree}C. A complete conversion of SO{sub 2} was achieved in about 8 s at 700{degree}C. Prolonging the product gas-coke contact, the yield of elemental sulfur decreased due to the formation of COS and CS{sub 2} while the SO{sub 2} conversion remained complete. Equilibrium calculations suggest that the ultimate yield of elemental sulfur maximizes at the C/SO{sub 2} ratio of 1, which represents the stoichiometry of SO{sub 2} + C {yields} CO{sub 2} + S. For the C/SO{sub 2} ratio {lt} 1, equilibrium calculations predict elemental sulfur and CO{sub 2} being major products, suggesting that SO{sub 2} + C {yields} CO{sub 2} + S is the predominant reaction if SO{sub 2} is in excess. Experiments revealed that elemental sulfur and CO{sub 2} were the only major products if the conversion of SO{sub 2} was incomplete, which is in agreement with the result of the equilibrium modeling. 18 refs., 12 figs.

  13. [Advanced treatment of coking wastewater with a novel heterogeneous electro-Fenton technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Tao; Li, Yu-Ping; Zhang, An-Yang; Cao, Hong-Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    A novel electro-catalytic reactor, with oxygen-reduction cathode (PAQ/GF), dimensionally stable anode (IrO2-RuO2 -TiO2/ Ti) and heterogeneous catalysts, is developed for advanced treatment of coking wastewater after biological process, integrating cathodic and anodic simultaneous oxidation processes. A PAQ/GF electrode was synthesized by the electro-polymerization of 2-ethyl anthraquinone on graphite felt, which was characterized with cyclic voltametry measurements; the results indicated that the PAQ/GF electrode showed high reversibility for oxidation-reduction reaction of anthraquinone and catalytic activity for O2 reduction to H2O2; 13.5 mmol/L H2O2 was obtained after electrolysis for 6 h at -0.7 V (vs. SCE) and pH 6 with a current efficiency of 50% in a membrane reactor. Fe-Cu/Y350 catalysts, prepared by impregnation method, could catalyze the production of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) from H2O2, which was confirmed both by fading reaction of crystal violet and oxidation of *OH-probe compound (p-chlorobenzoic acid); Fe-Cu/Y350 also showed high catalytic-activity for the oxidation of organics by hypochlorous sodium, because COD removal of coking wastewater reached 26% in the catalytic process while only 11% of COD removal was obtained in the absence of Fe-Cu/Y350. COD removal of coking wastewater reached 49.4% (26.0% and 23.4% in cathodic system and anodic system, respectively) in the developed electrolytic-reactor, which was higher than that of conventional cathodic-anodic-oxidation process (29.8%). At optimal reaction condition of initial COD = 192 mg/L, I = 10A x m(-2) and pH 4-5, more than 50% COD were removed after electrolysis for 1 h. The mechanism might be as follows: in cathodic system, H2O2 is generated from reduction of O2 on PAQ/GF cathode, and catalyzed by Fe-Cu/Y350 for production of *OH, which causes mineralization and degradation of organic pollutants; in anodic system, Cl2 and HClO are generated from Cl- oxidation on IrO2-RuO2-TiO2/Ti anode and the

  14. American Dream Delayed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorunzhina, Natalia; Miller, Robert A.

    This paper investigates the delay in homeownership and a subsequent reduction in homeownership rate observed over the past decades. We focus on the delay in giving birth to children and increased labor market participation as contributing factors to homeownership dynamics for prime-age female hou......, fertility decisions and labor supply alternatives faced by the individuals over different stages of the life cycle. The delays in giving birth and buying first home arise endogenously.......This paper investigates the delay in homeownership and a subsequent reduction in homeownership rate observed over the past decades. We focus on the delay in giving birth to children and increased labor market participation as contributing factors to homeownership dynamics for prime-age female...

  15. The use of fractionated fly ash of thermal power plants as binder for production of briquettes of coke breeze and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnikova, E. Yu; Bogomolov, A. R.; Lapin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the slag and ash material of thermal power plants (TPP) operating on pulverized coal fuel. The elemental and chemical composition of fly ash of five Kuzbass thermal power plants differs insignificantly from the composition of the mineral part of coking coal because coke production uses a charge, whose composition defines the main task: obtaining coke with the required parameters for production of iron and steel. These indicators are as follows: CRI reactivity and strength of the coke residue after reaction with CO2 - CSR. The chemical composition of fly ash of thermal power plants and microsilica with bulk density of 0.3-0.6 t/m3 generated at production of ferroalloys was compared. Fly ash and microsilica are the valuable raw material for production of mineral binder in manufacturing coke breeze briquettes (fraction of 2-10 mm) and dust (0-200 μm), generated in large quantities during coking (up to 40wt%). It is shown that this binder is necessary for production of smokeless briquettes with low reactivity, high strength and cost, demanded for production of cupola iron and melting the silicate materials, basaltic rocks in low-shaft furnaces. It is determined that microsilica contains up to 90% of silicon oxide, and fly ash contains up to 60% of silicon oxide and aluminum oxide of up to 20%. On average, the rest of fly ash composition consists of basic oxides. According to calculation by the VUKHIN formula, the basicity index of briquette changes significantly, when fly ash is introduced into briquette raw material component as a binder. The technology of coke briquette production on the basis of the non-magnetic fraction of TPP fly ash in the ratio from 3.5:1 to 4.5:1 (coke breeze : coke dust) with the addition of the binder component to 10% is proposed. The produced briquettes meet the requirements by CRI and require further study on CSR requirements.

  16. The influence of Ni loading on coke formation in steam reforming of acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Lu; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Junjiao; He, Lei [National Engineering Laboratory of Biomass Power Generation Equipment, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Steam reforming of acetic acid on Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with different nickel loading for hydrogen production was investigated in a tubular reactor at 600 C, 1 atm, H2O/HAc = 4, and WHSV = 5.01 g-acetic acid/g-cata.h{sup -1}. The catalysts were characterized by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the amount of deposited carbidic-like carbon decreased and graphitic-like carbon increased with Ni loading increasing from 9 to 15 wt%. The Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst with 12 wt% Ni loading had higher catalytic activity and lower coke deposited rate. (author)

  17. The development of Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Xu, Xiangdong

    1999-12-01

    Carried-Heat Partial Gasification Combined cycle is a novel combined cycle which was proposed by Thermal Engineering Department of Tsinghua University in 1992. The idea of the system comes from the situation that the efficiency of the power plants in China is much lower than that of the advanced countries, but the coal consumption is much higher, which brings about the waste of primary energy resources and the pollution of the environment. With the deep study of the gasification technology, Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, as the improved system, came into birth in 1996 based on the partial gasification one. At the end of 1997, a new cycle scheme similar to IGCC was created. This paper focuses on several classes combined cycle put forward by Tsinghua University, depending on the plant configuration and carbon conversion, making the solution a viable and attractive option for efficient coal utilization.

  18. Inhibition of anaerobic degradation of phenolics and methanogenesis by coal coking wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorak, P.M.; Hrudey, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Dilutions of a wastewater containing 410 mg/l phenolics (by 4-aminoantipyrine method) from a coal coking process were tested in anaerobic batch cultures to determine whether phenol degradation and subsequent methane production would occur. Phenol was degraded in cultures which contained up to 30% (V/V) wastewater but no methane production could be attributed to the phenol degradation. Higher concentrations of the wastewater severely inhibited methane formation likely due to cyanide which was present in the wastewater at 8.3 mg/l. Exhaustive extraction at neutral pH with diethyl ether could not alleviate this inhibition, suggesting that it was not primarily due to non-polar organic compounds. Although the inclusion of 2500 mg/l activated carbon in the batch cultures improved the methanogenic fermentation, methane yields were still lower then expected for complete phenolic conversion. 17 refs.

  19. Char and coke formation as unwanted side reaction of the hydrothermal biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karayildirim, T. [Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Ege University, Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Sinag, A. [Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Ankara University, Besevler-Ankara (Turkey); Kruse, A. [Institut fuer Technische Chemie CPV, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    The hydrothermal biomass gasification is a promising technology to produce hydrogen and/or methane from wet biomass with a water content of {>=}80 % (g/g). In the process, the coke formation usually is very low, but already low amounts may cause problems like, e.g., fouling in the heat exchanger. To learn more about the product formation, the results of the hydrothermal treatment (at 400,500,600 C and 1 h) of different biomass feedstocks (artichoke stalk, pinecone, sawdust, and cellulose as model biomass) in a microreactor are compared. The gas composition and the total organic carbon content of the aqueous phase were determined after reaction. The gas formation rises with increasing temperature. The formation of carbon deposits and their characterization has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The variation of the solid morphology during the hydrothermal conversion is discussed based on chemical pathways occurring during hydrothermal biomass degradation. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Oil Coking Prevention Using Electric Water Pump for Turbo-Charge Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Ching Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbocharger has been widely implemented for internal combustion engine to increase an engine's power output and reduce fuel consumption. However, its operating temperature would rise to 340°C when engine stalls. This higher temperature may results in bearing wear, run-out, and stick, due to oil coking and insufficient lubrication. In order to overcome these problems, this paper employs Electric Water Pump (EWP to supply cool liquid to turbocharger actively when the engine stalls. The system layout, operating timing, and duration of EWP are investigated for obtaining optimal performance. The primarily experimental results show that the proposed layout and control strategy have a lower temperature of 100°C than the conventional temperature 225°C.

  1. Byproducts from lignite coking (Report on ECSC contract 7220-EB/106)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Storing and aging tests of tars extracted from coking of brown coal showed that chemical and colloid-chemical reactions, especially polymerization reactions of the resin and aliphatic materials caused changes in their penetration, density, viscosity drip and softening point. Separation into individual components using gas chromatography revealed 137 individual components, of which 34 had alkaline characteristics, and were mostly alkylated pyridines and aniline isomers, 28 had acidic characteristics (mostly alkylated phenols and naphthalenes) and 75 had neutral characteristics - in the latter, 44 aliphatic and 31 aromatic components were identified. Characteristic differences between high and low temperature tars were identified. Tests involving the ethoxylation and pyrolysis of the coal tars showed that different portions may be extracted: creosotes and resins from the ethoxylation reaction and phenols and low-boiling-point aromatics from pyrolysis. (In German)

  2. Determination of reactivity parameters of model carbons, cokes and flame-chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Gjernes, Erik; Jessen, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Reactivity profiles are defined and measured with thermogravimetry for a dense metallurgical Longyear coke, a polymer-derived porous active carbon, Carboxen 1000, and three flame-chars, Illinois #6, Pittsburgh #8 and New Mexico Blue #1. For each sample it is found that the reactivity profile can...... range of 130-133 kJ/mol. For Carboxen n=0.91 and E=146 kJ/mol. The reactivity differences between the coal chars are proposed mainly due to variations in the physical structure. Over the pressure-temperature domain examined reactivity varies considerably, but the structural profile is approximately...... invariant, i.e. each sample exhibits consistently the same structural evolution for a broad span of kinetic conditions. The structural profile is different for each carbonaceous material. In the 20-80% burn-off range, Carboxen undergoes a four-fold increase in reactivity, while for coal-derived chars...

  3. Development and Testing of the Advanced CHP System Utilizing the Off-Gas from the Innovative Green Coke Calcining Process in Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudnovsky, Yaroslav [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Kozlov, Aleksandr [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Green petroleum coke (GPC) is an oil refining byproduct that can be used directly as a solid fuel or as a feedstock for the production of calcined petroleum coke. GPC contains a high amount of volatiles and sulfur. During the calcination process, the GPC is heated to remove the volatiles and sulfur to produce purified calcined coke, which is used in the production of graphite, electrodes, metal carburizers, and other carbon products. Currently, more than 80% of calcined coke is produced in rotary kilns or rotary hearth furnaces. These technologies provide partial heat utilization of the calcined coke to increase efficiency of the calcination process, but they also share some operating disadvantages. However, coke calcination in an electrothermal fluidized bed (EFB) opens up a number of potential benefits for the production enhancement, while reducing the capital and operating costs. The increased usage of heavy crude oil in recent years has resulted in higher sulfur content in green coke produced by oil refinery process, which requires a significant increase in the calcinations temperature and in residence time. The calorific value of the process off-gas is quite substantial and can be effectively utilized as an “opportunity fuel” for combined heat and power (CHP) production to complement the energy demand. Heat recovered from the product cooling can also contribute to the overall economics of the calcination process. Preliminary estimates indicated the decrease in energy consumption by 35-50% as well as a proportional decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. As such, the efficiency improvement of the coke calcinations systems is attracting close attention of the researchers and engineers throughout the world. The developed technology is intended to accomplish the following objectives: - Reduce the energy and carbon intensity of the calcined coke production process. - Increase utilization of opportunity fuels such as industrial waste off-gas from the novel

  4. Delayed power analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, L.A.; Azarov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Time dependent core power behavior in a nuclear reactor is described with well-known neutron kinetics equations. At the same time, two portions are distinguished in energy released from uranium nuclei fission; one released directly at fission and another delayed (residual) portion produced during radioactive decay of fission products. While prompt power is definitely described with kinetics equations, the delayed power presentation still remains outstanding. Since in operation the delayed power part is relatively small (about 6%) operation, it can be neglected for small reactivity disturbances assuming that entire power obeys neutron kinetics equations. In case of a high negative reactivity rapidly inserted in core (e.g. reactor scram initiation) the prompt and delayed components can be calculated separately with practically no impact on each other, employing kinetics equations for prompt power and known approximation formulas for delayed portion, named residual in this specific case. Under substantial disturbances the prompt component in the dynamic process becomes commensurable with delayed portion, thus making necessary to take into account their cross impact. A system of differential equations to describe time-dependent behavior of delayed power is presented. Specific NPP analysis shows a way to significantly simplify the task formulation. (author)

  5. Petroleum coke adsorption as a water management option for oil sands process-affected water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubot, Warren; MacKinnon, Michael D.; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Smith, Daniel W.; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Water is integral to both operational and environmental aspects of the oil sands industry. A water treatment option based on the use of petroleum coke (PC), a by-product of bitumen upgrading, was examined as an opportunity to reduce site oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) inventories and net raw water demand. Changes in OSPW quality when treated with PC included increments in pH levels and concentrations of vanadium, molybdenum, and sulphate. Constituents that decreased in concentration after PC adsorption included total acid-extractable organics (TAO), bicarbonate, calcium, barium, magnesium, and strontium. Changes in naphthenic acids (NAs) speciation were observed after PC adsorption. A battery of bioassays was used to measure the OSPW toxicity. The results indicated that untreated OSPW was toxic towards Vibrio fischeri and rainbow trout. However, OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not acutely toxic towards these test organisms. Removal of TAO was found to be an adsorption process, fitting the Langmuir and Langmuir–Freundlich isotherm models. For TAO concentrations of 60 mg/L, adsorption capacities ranged between 0.1 and 0.46 mg/g. This study demonstrates that freshly produced PC from fluid cokers provides an effective treatment of OSPW in terms of key constituents' removal and toxicity reduction. - Highlights: ► Treatment of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) using petroleum coke (PC) adsorption was investigated. ► PC was effective at adsorbing naphthenic acids with higher cyclicity. ► OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not toxic towards Vibrio fisheri and rainbow trout. ► The adsorption of organic acids fitted the Langmuir and Langmuir–Freundlich isotherm models. ► PC has the potential to be an effective adsorbent to treat OSPW either directly or as a pretreatment step.

  6. Petroleum coke adsorption as a water management option for oil sands process-affected water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubot, Warren [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Research and Development, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6N 1H4 (Canada); MacKinnon, Michael D. [OSPM Solutions Ltd., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8H 6X2 (Canada); Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Smith, Daniel W. [University of Alberta, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2W2 (Canada); Gamal El-Din, Mohamed, E-mail: mgamalel-din@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2W2 (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Water is integral to both operational and environmental aspects of the oil sands industry. A water treatment option based on the use of petroleum coke (PC), a by-product of bitumen upgrading, was examined as an opportunity to reduce site oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) inventories and net raw water demand. Changes in OSPW quality when treated with PC included increments in pH levels and concentrations of vanadium, molybdenum, and sulphate. Constituents that decreased in concentration after PC adsorption included total acid-extractable organics (TAO), bicarbonate, calcium, barium, magnesium, and strontium. Changes in naphthenic acids (NAs) speciation were observed after PC adsorption. A battery of bioassays was used to measure the OSPW toxicity. The results indicated that untreated OSPW was toxic towards Vibrio fischeri and rainbow trout. However, OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not acutely toxic towards these test organisms. Removal of TAO was found to be an adsorption process, fitting the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models. For TAO concentrations of 60 mg/L, adsorption capacities ranged between 0.1 and 0.46 mg/g. This study demonstrates that freshly produced PC from fluid cokers provides an effective treatment of OSPW in terms of key constituents' removal and toxicity reduction. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) using petroleum coke (PC) adsorption was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PC was effective at adsorbing naphthenic acids with higher cyclicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not toxic towards Vibrio fisheri and rainbow trout. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption of organic acids fitted the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PC has the potential to be an effective adsorbent to treat OSPW either directly or as a pretreatment step.

  7. Specific long non-coding RNAs response to occupational PAHs exposure in coke oven workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chen; He, Zhini; Li, Jie; Li, Xiao; Bai, Qing; Zhang, Zhengbao; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Shan; Xiao, Xinhua; Wang, Fangping; Yan, Yan; Li, Daochuan; Chen, Liping; Zeng, Xiaowen; Xiao, Yongmei; Dong, Guanghui; Zheng, Yuxin; Wang, Qing; Chen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    To explore whether the alteration of lncRNA expression is correlated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposure and DNA damage, we examined PAHs external and internal exposure, DNA damage and lncRNAs (HOTAIR, MALAT1, TUG1 and GAS5) expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLCs) of 150 male coke oven workers and 60 non-PAHs exposure workers. We found the expression of HOTAIR, MALAT1, and TUG1 were enhanced in PBLCs of coke oven workers and positively correlated with the levels of external PAHs exposure (adjusted P trend  TUG1). However, only HOTAIR and MALAT1 were significantly associated with the level of internal PAHs exposure (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene) with adjusted β  = 0.298, P  = 0.024 for HOTAIR and β  = 0.090, P  = 0.034 for MALAT1. In addition, the degree of DNA damage was positively associated with MALAT1 and HOTAIR expression in PBLCs of all subjects (adjusted β  = 0.024, P  = 0.002 for HOTAIR and β  = 0.007, P  = 0.003 for MALAT1). Moreover, we revealed that the global histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) modification was positively associated with the degree of genetic damage ( β  = 0.061, P  < 0.001) and the increase of HOTAIR expression ( β  = 0.385, P  = 0.018). Taken together, our findings suggest that altered HOTAIR and MALAT1 expression might be involved in response to PAHs-induced DNA damage.

  8. Specific long non-coding RNAs response to occupational PAHs exposure in coke oven workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gao

    Full Text Available To explore whether the alteration of lncRNA expression is correlated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs exposure and DNA damage, we examined PAHs external and internal exposure, DNA damage and lncRNAs (HOTAIR, MALAT1, TUG1 and GAS5 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLCs of 150 male coke oven workers and 60 non-PAHs exposure workers. We found the expression of HOTAIR, MALAT1, and TUG1 were enhanced in PBLCs of coke oven workers and positively correlated with the levels of external PAHs exposure (adjusted Ptrend < 0.001 for HOTAIR and MALAT1, adjusted Ptrend = 0.006 for TUG1. However, only HOTAIR and MALAT1 were significantly associated with the level of internal PAHs exposure (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene with adjusted β = 0.298, P = 0.024 for HOTAIR and β = 0.090, P = 0.034 for MALAT1. In addition, the degree of DNA damage was positively associated with MALAT1 and HOTAIR expression in PBLCs of all subjects (adjusted β = 0.024, P = 0.002 for HOTAIR and β = 0.007, P = 0.003 for MALAT1. Moreover, we revealed that the global histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 modification was positively associated with the degree of genetic damage (β = 0.061, P < 0.001 and the increase of HOTAIR expression (β = 0.385, P = 0.018. Taken together, our findings suggest that altered HOTAIR and MALAT1 expression might be involved in response to PAHs-induced DNA damage. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Long non-coding RNA, Peripheral blood lymphocytes, DNA damage response, HOTAIR, MALAT

  9. Compensating for telecommunication delays during robotic telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoni, Leonardo J; Siqueira, Adriano A G; Krebs, Hermano I

    2017-07-01

    Rehabilitation robotic systems may afford better care and telerehabilitation may extend the use and benefits of robotic therapy to the home. Data transmissions over distance are bound by intrinsic communication delays which can be significant enough to deem the activity unfeasible. Here we describe an approach that combines unilateral robotic telerehabilitation and serious games. This approach has a modular and distributed design that permits different types of robots to interact without substantial code changes. We demonstrate the approach through an online multiplayer game. Two users can remotely interact with each other with no force exchanges, while a smoothing and prediction algorithm compensates motions for the delay in the Internet connection. We demonstrate that this approach can successfully compensate for data transmission delays, even when testing between the United States and Brazil. This paper presents the initial experimental results, which highlight the performance degradation with increasing delays as well as improvements provided by the proposed algorithm, and discusses planned future developments.

  10. Evaluation of co-cokes from bituminous coal with vacuum resid or decant oil, and evaluation of anthracites, as precursors to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyathi, Mhlwazi S.

    2011-12-01

    Graphite is utilized as a neutron moderator and structural component in some nuclear reactor designs. During the reactor operaction the structure of graphite is damaged by collision with fast neutrons. Graphite's resistance to this damage determines its lifetime in the reactor. On neutron irradiation, isotropic or near-isotropic graphite experiences less structural damage than anisotropic graphite. The degree of anisotropy in a graphite artifact is dependent on the structure of its precursor coke. Currently, there exist concerns over a short supply of traditional precursor coke, primarily due to a steadily increasing price of petroleum. The main goal of this study was to study the anisotropic and isotropic properties of graphitized co-cokes and anthracites as a way of investigating the possibility of synthesizing isotropic or near-isotropic graphite from co-cokes and anthracites. Demonstrating the ability to form isotropic or near-isotropic graphite would mean that co-cokes and anthracites have a potential use as filler material in the synthesis of nuclear graphite. The approach used to control the co-coke structure was to vary the reaction conditions. Co-cokes were produced by coking 4:1 blends of vacuum resid/coal and decant oil/coal at temperatures of 465 and 500 °C for reaction times of 12 and 18 hours under autogenous pressure. Co-cokes obtained were calcined at 1420 °C and graphitized at 3000 °C for 24 hours. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, temperature-programmed oxidation and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the products. It was found that higher reaction temperature (500 °C) or shorter reaction time (12 hours) leads to an increase in co-coke structural disorder and an increase in the amount of mosaic carbon at the expense of textural components that are necessary for the formation of anisotropic structure, namely, domains and flow domains. Characterization of graphitized co-cokes showed that the quality, as expressed by the degree of

  11. Delayed puberty in boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In most cases, delayed puberty is simply a matter of growth changes beginning later than usual, sometimes ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  12. Delayed puberty in girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with too little body fat, gaining a bit of weight may help trigger puberty. If delayed puberty is caused by a disease or an eating disorder, treating the cause may help puberty to develop normally. If puberty ...

  13. Bargaining and delay in patent licensing

    OpenAIRE

    MAULEON, Ana; VANNETELBOSCH, Vincent; VERGARI, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    We consider a model of licensing of a non-drastic innovation in which the patent holder (an outside innovator) negotiates either up-front fixed fees or per-unit royal- ties with two firms producing horizontally differentiated brands and competing à la Cournot. We investigate how licensing schemes (fixed fee or per-unit royalty) and the number of licenses sold (exclusive licensing or complete technology diffusion) affect price agreements and delays in reaching an agreement. We show that the pa...

  14. Choice and reinforcement delay

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry, G. David; Marr, M. Jackson

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies of choice between two delayed reinforcers have indicated that the relative immediacy of the reinforcer is a major determinant of the relative frequency of responding. Parallel studies of choice between two interresponse times have found exceptions to this generality. The present study looked at the choice by pigeons between two delays, one of which was always four times longer than the other, but whose absolute durations were varied across conditions. The results indicated th...

  15. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  16. Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of The Fuel Society of Japan (1991). 28th Coal Science Conference/91st Coke Meeting; (Sha) nenryo kyokai godo taikai happyo ronbunshu (1991). Dai 28 kai sekitan kagaku kaigi dai 91 kai cokes tokubetsukai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-07

    Relating to coke, studies are made on the rapid coke production method, oven investigation during carbonization, and operational management/control. As to coal science, studies are mainly on the brown coal two-stage liquefaction (BCL) method, and data on the pilot plant and PSU are reported. Concerning bituminous coal liquefaction, PSU data mostly including the NEDOL process, and characteristics of liquefaction residue and its effective utilization by thermal decomposition are reported. Regarding the liquefaction mechanism, an experimentally extensive study on catalyst, solvent and reaction conditions is made using model materials and coal itself on the bench scale and also in the pilot plant. Engineering subjects on residue, solvent deashing, scale attachment and coprocessing are also reported. Relations of decomposition process to coal chemical structure changes and reaction conditions are investigated. As to coal gasification, studies, which are not many, are conducted on material balance, heat balance, and image characteristics of char for gasification and factors controlling reactivity.

  17. COSIPA company technical development in what concerns coke during the 90`s; Desenvolvimento tecnico da COSIPA na area de carvoes nos anos 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Carlos Henrique Azevedo; Oliveira Vargas, Carlos Henrique de; Mainardi, Henrique; Silva, Jose Claudio da; Yazaki, Kiyohiko; Lia, Luiz Renato Bastos; Oliveira, Marcia de; Araujo Jorge, Roberto Carlos de; Maranha, Silvio Pereira Diniz [Companhia Siderurgica Paulista, Cubatao, SP (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    This work reports the main activities developed by COSIPA company in what concerns coke studies during the 90`s. The results obtained are presented both in terms of raw material costs and quality of the obtained coke. With the increase in the soft coals rate utilization and the optimization of the mixtures it is projected an yearly economy around ten million dollars 1 tab., 7 figs.

  18. Pilot tests of a seat belt gearshift delay on the belt use of commercial fleet drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    the seat belt was buckled. Participants, commercial drivers from the United States and Canada who did not consistently wear their seat belts, could avoid the delay by fastening their seat belts. Unbelted participants experienced a delay of either a c...

  19. Semi-coke briquettes: towards reducing emissions of primary PM2.5, particulate carbon, and carbon monoxide from household coal combustion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Li, Xinghua; Jiang, Jingkun; Duan, Lei; Ge, Su; Zhang, Qi; Deng, Jianguo; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Direct household use of unprocessed raw coals for cooking and heating without any air pollution control device has caused serious indoor and outdoor environment problems by emitting particulate matter (PM) and gaseous pollutants. This study examined household emission reduction by switching from unprocessed bituminous and anthracite coals to processed semi-coke briquettes. Two typical stoves were used to test emission characteristics when burning 20 raw coal samples commonly used in residential heating activities and 15 semi-coke briquette samples which were made from bituminous coals by industrial carbonization treatment. The carbonization treatment removes volatile compounds from raw coals which are the major precursors for PM formation and carbon emission. The average emission factors of primary PM2.5, elemental carbon, organic carbon, and carbon monoxide for the tested semi-coke briquettes are much lower than those of the tested raw coals. Based on the current coal consumption data in China, switching to semi-coke briquettes can reduce average emission factors of these species by about 92%, 98%, 91%, and 34%, respectively. Additionally, semi-coke briquette has relatively lower price and higher burnout ratio. The replacement of raw coals with semi-coke briquettes is a feasible path to reduce pollution emissions from household activities.

  20. Neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique for the on-line determination of moisture in coal and coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowerby, B.D.; Millen, M.J.; Rafter, P.T.

    1985-01-01

    A fast neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique is being developed for the on-line analysis of moisture in coal and coke. The technique utilises 252 Cf and 137 Cs sources and 3 He and NaI(Tl) detectors. Laboratory measurements on single coal samples have shown that moisture can be determined to better than 1 wt% over the range 0 to 16 wt% moisture and 5 to 17cm thickness. Reduced errors were obtained for restricted ranges of moisture and thickness. Preliminary measurements on coke of thickness 30 to 50cm have shown that moisture can be determined to within 0.26 wt% over the range 1 to 16 wt% moisture

  1. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang

    2013-01-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane...... (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema...... in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis + aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  2. Information about the new 8-group delayed neutron set preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svarny, J.

    1998-01-01

    Some comments to the present state concerning delayed neutron data preparation is given and preliminary analysis of the new 8-group delayed data (relative abundances) is presented. Comparisons of the 8-group to 6-group set is given for rod drop experiment (Unit 1, Cycle 14, NPP Dukovany).(Author)

  3. Delays in presentation and treatment of breast cancer in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the delays and define the causes of delay in presentation and treatment of breast cancer patients inEnugu,Nigeria. Across-sectional survey of breast cancer patients using a semi structured questionnaire. SurgicalOncology unit,University ofNigeriaTeachingHospitalEnugu, (UNTH-E),Nigeria. 164 consecutively ...

  4. Synergetic effects leading to coke-resistant NiCo bimetallic catalysts for dry reforming of methane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-01-08

    A new dry reforming of methane catalyst comprised of NiCo bimetallic nanoparticles and a Mgx(Al)O support that exhibits high coke resistance and long-term on-stream stability is reported. The structural characterization by XRD, TEM, temperature-programmed reduction, and BET analysis demonstrates that the excellent performance of this catalyst is ascribed to the synergy of various parameters, including metal-nanoparticle size, metal-support interaction, catalyst structure, ensemble size, and alloy effects.

  5. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Studies of complications following reconstructive surgery with implants among women with breast cancer are needed. As the, to our knowledge, first prospective long-term study we evaluated the occurrence of complications following delayed breast reconstruction separately for one- and two......-stage procedures. From the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast, which has prospectively registered data for women undergoing breast implantations since 1999, we identified 559 women without a history of radiation therapy undergoing 592 delayed breast reconstructions following breast cancer during...... of reoperation was significantly higher following the one-stage procedure. For both procedures, the majority of reoperations were due to asymmetry or displacement of the implant. In conclusion, non-radiated one- and two-stage delayed breast implant reconstructions are associated with substantial risks...

  6. Electrochemical Degradation Characteristics of Refractory Organic Pollutants in Coking Wastewater on Multiwall Carbon Nanotube-Modified Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiwall carbon nanotube-mollified electrode (MWCNT-ME was fabricated and its electrocatalytic activity of refractory organic pollutants of coking wastewater was investigated. The surface morphology, absorption properties, and the electrochemical behavior of phenol and aniline at the MWCNT-ME were analyzed. Using ultraviolet-visible adsorption spectroscopy (UV-vis, Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS, and chemical oxygen demand (COD test, the electrochemical oxidation properties of refractory organic pollutants of coking wastewater using the MWCNT-ME and the IrSnSb/Ti electrode were analyzed. Compared with the powder adsorption media, the MWCNT-ME was proved to have weaker adsorption activity, which means electrochemical degradation is the decisive factor of the removal of organic pollutants. The MWCNT-ME shows high electrochemical reactivity with oxidation peaks of 0.18 A and 0.12 A for phenol and aniline, respectively. Under the same working conditions, the MWCNT-ME COD removal rate 51% is higher than IrSnSb/Ti electrode’s rate 35%. The MWCNT-ME has application potential of electrochemical oxidation of refractory organic pollutants of coking wastewater.

  7. Impact of Zr metal and coking reactions on the fission product aerosol release during MCCI [Molten Core Concrete Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Davis, R.E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a core meltdown accident in a light water reactor, molten core materials (corium) could leave the reactor vessel and interact with concrete. In this paper, the impact of the zirconium content of the corium pool and the coking reaction on the release of fission products during Molten Core Concrete Interactions (MCCI) are quantified using CORCON/MOD2 and VANESA computer codes. Detailed calculations show that the total aerosol generation is proportional to the zirconium content of the corium pool. Among the twelve fission product groups treated by the VANESA code, CsI, CsO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 are completely released over the course of the core/concrete interaction, while an insignificant quantity of Mo, Ru and ZrO 2 are predicted to be released. The release of BaO, SrO and CeO 2 increase with increased Zr content, while the releases of Te and La 2 O 3 are relatively unaffected by the Zr content of the corium pool. The impact of the coking reaction on the radiological releases is estimated to be significant; while the impact of the coking reaction on the aerosol production is insignificant

  8. Propane dehydrogenation over Pt-Cu bimetallic catalysts: the nature of coke deposition and the role of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiping; Li, Shuirong; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Tuo; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the promotional effect of Cu on the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 catalysts for propane dehydrogenation. We have shown that Pt/Al2O3 catalysts possess higher propylene selectivity and lower deactivation rate as well as enhanced anti-coking ability upon Cu addition. The optimized loading content of Cu is 0.5 wt%, which increases the propylene selectivity to 90.8% with a propylene yield of 36.5%. The origin of the enhanced catalytic performance and anti-coking ability of the Pt-Cu/Al2O3 catalyst is ascribed to the intimate interaction between Pt and Cu, which is confirmed by the change of particle morphology and atomic electronic environment of the catalyst. The Pt-Cu interaction inhibits propylene adsorption and elevates the energy barrier of C-C bond rupture. The inhibited propylene adsorption diminishes the possibility of coke formation and suppresses the cracking reaction towards the formation of lighter hydrocarbons on Pt-Cu/Al2O3, while a higher energy barrier for C-C bond cleavage suppresses the methane formation.

  9. An experimental study on effect of coke ratio on SO2 and NOx emissions in sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Pu; Yang, Jingling

    2018-02-01

    By using the sinter cup experiment, the effects of different coke ratios of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% on the formation and total emissions of SO2 and NOx in the sintering process were studied with the Testo350 flue gas analyzer. The experimental results show that the emissions of SO2 and NOx are closely related to sintering process. With the increase of the coke proportion, the sintering temperature changes and the maximum peak time appears earlier. SO2 concentration has a bimodal distribution and NOx concentration has a triple peak. Besides, the both maximum peaks appear at the end of sintering. In addition, due to the increasing of the S and N contents in the fuel with the coke ratios from 0% to 100%, the amounts of SO2 and NOx emissions are raised respectively at 10.82 mg, 11.42 mg, 13.84 mg, 13.69 mg, 20.36 mg and 3.11 mg, 3.39 mg, 4.44 mg, 4.31 mg, 6.16 mg.

  10. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-05

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. The delayed neutron method of uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of delayed neutron analysis (DNA) is discussed. The DNA rig installed on the MOATA reactor, the assay standards and the types of samples which have been assayed are described. Of the total sample throughput of about 55,000 units since the uranium analysis service began, some 78% has been concerned with analysis of uranium ore samples derived from mining and exploration. Delayed neutron analysis provides a high sensitivity, low cost uranium analysis method for both uranium exploration and other applications. It is particularly suitable for analysis of large batch samples and for non-destructive analysis over a wide range of matrices. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. NO{sub x} reduction by coke deposited on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in an oxidizing medium; Elimination des NO{sub x} par le coke depose sur Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} en milieu oxydant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunati, S.

    1997-12-12

    NO{sub x} reduction by coke deposited on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in excess oxygen. Continuous analysis of the effluent was performed with a mass spectrometer. The coking reaction was carried out under reducing conditions with two different coking agents: cyclopentane and heptanal. In general, NO{sub x} reduction by coke deposited on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurs in a wide temperature range (200 deg Ccoke reducing ability and the temperature window depend closely on the chemical nature of the carbon deposits. Thereby, a coke made from heptanal which contains oxygenated functions (carbonyl and hydroxyl groups) within the carbon structure, is more selective and reduce NO{sub x} at lower temperature than a coke made from cyclopentane which does not contain these functional groups. Based on our results, we proposed a `dual-site` reaction for NO{sub x} reduction on coked Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Platinum allows O{sub 2} activation by dissociative adsorption, and NO{sub 2} formation by oxidation of NO. NO{sub x} reduction occurs on carbon deposits. Reaction between NO{sub x} and coke leads to the formation of N-containing species which are decomposed in CI{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O by reaction with activated O{sub 2}. (author) 205 refs.

  13. State of technology and problems of environmental protection in coking plants on the basis of inspection conducted by the National Inspectorate for Environmental Protection. Stan technologii a problemy ochrony srodowiska w zakladach koksowniczych na podstawie wynikow kontroli PIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarzebski, L.; Wolany, B.; Kubala, I. (Panstwowy Inspektorat Ochrony Srodowiska (Poland))

    1988-01-01

    Reports on the state of environmental protection at various technological operations in Polish coking plants. Overall emission of pollutants to atmospheric air is estimated to be 49.5 kg/t of dry coal charge in old coking plants, 4.4 kg/t in the Przyjazn plant, while the newest technologies permit emission to be reduced to 2.0 kg/t. Fresh water consumption, waste water dumping and clarification in coking plants are discussed. Reliability of means and methods used for emission measurements and effectiveness of the coking plant's own environmental protection service are assessed. Only two of the eleven coking plants inspected had valid legal permission for their emission levels. Most plants did not have valid permission for fresh water intake or waste water dumping. Measures are recommended to improve environmental protection in Polish coking plants. 10 refs.

  14. Delayed photon selfinterference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel', A.R.; Moiseev, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Delayed photon selfinterference on a sample containing resonant two-level atoms is considered when the difference in the lengths in two optical paths exceeds the photon 'length'. It is shown that a reading pulse of the electromagnetic field can induce photon echo

  15. Permissible Delay in Payments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fu Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper wants to investigate the optimal retailer's lot-sizing policy with two warehouses under partially permissible delay in payments within the economic order quantity (EOQ framework. In this paper, we want to extend that fully permissible delay in payments to the supplier would offer the retailer partially permissible delay in payments. That is, the retailer must make a partial payment to the supplier when the order is received. Then the retailer must pay off the remaining balance at the end of the permissible delay period. In addition, we want to add the assumption that the retailer's storage space is limited. That is, the retailer will rent the warehouse to store these exceeding items when the order quantity is larger than retailer's storage space. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a cost minimization problem to determine the retailer's optimal cycle time and optimal order quantity. Three theorems are developed to efficiently determine the optimal replenishment policy for the retailer. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate these theorems and obtained a lot of managerial insights.

  16. Estimating Delays In ASIC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gary; Nesheiwat, Jeffrey; Su, Ling

    1994-01-01

    Verification is important aspect of process of designing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). Design must not only be functionally accurate, but must also maintain correct timing. IFA, Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying timing of ASIC early in design process. This program speeds design-and-verification cycle by estimating delays before layouts completed. Written in C language.

  17. Delays of Interconnected Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorger, U.; Suchanecki, Z.

    2011-07-01

    A rigorous approach to flows of particles in networks is presented. Under the assumption of independence of the transversal flows the asymptotic distributions of inter-delay times between particles are shown to be log-normal. In the case of dependent transversal traffic the ARCH and GARCH time series models, as well as martingale approach, have been applied.

  18. Plasmas for Transition Delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotsonis, M.; Boon, P.; Veldhuis, L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigation of the properties of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) actuators aimed at transition delay techniques. A wide range of geometrical configurations are tested as well as several electrical operational conditions. For the majority of the measurements

  19. Compressive loading unloading behavior of nuclear graphite grades of different forming method and raw cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Sehwan; Hong, Seongdeok; Kim, Yongwan

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite is used for core structural components and neutron moderators in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. As graphite is a brittle material fail at relatively low strains (e.g., ∼0.5% in tension and ∼2% in compression), cracking of these components can occur throughout the life of the reactor under the influence of thermal and mechanical stresses. While a lot of studies have been performed on the fracture of graphite, most studies have been concerned on crack initiation and propagation, with little concerns on the damage processes that lead to the very first stage of crack initiation. In this study, the graphite damage processes before the main crack formation were investigated based on the microstructure change during load relaxation. For this, 4-1/3 notched flexure strength test specimens made of nuclear graphite grades IG-110, NBG-18 and PCEA of different forming methods (isotropic molding, vibrational molding and extrusion, respectively) and ingredients (coke, binder) were subjected to 10 cyclic compressive loading-unloading, and the changes in the microstructure of notch-tip areas were examined by X-ray tomography

  20. Synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity of biomass-petroleum coke blended char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Juntao; Guo, Qinghua; Gong, Yan; Ding, Lu; Yu, Guangsuo

    2017-06-01

    In this work, effects of gasification temperature (900°C-1100°C) and blended ratio (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) on reactivity of petroleum coke and biomass co-gasification were studied in TGA. Quantification analysis of active AAEM transformation and in situ investigation of morphological structure variations in gasification were conducted respectively using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and heating stage microscope to explore synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity. The results indicated that char gasification reactivity was enhanced with increasing biomass proportion and gasification temperature. Synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity was presented after complete generation of biomass ash, and gradually weakened with increasing temperature from 1000°C to 1100°C after reaching the most significant value at 1000°C. This phenomenon was well related with the appearance of molten biomass ash rich in glassy state potassium and the weakest inhibition effect on active potassium transformation during co-gasification at the temperature higher than 1000°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementation of a system of recovery of by-products for a coke oven pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Quintero, Wilder; Trivino Restrepo, Maria del Pilar

    2005-01-01

    In this work is to the design of a lab-scale system that was constructed and started up to recover primary by-products of the coke gas, which in his first stage presents displays a mechanism of cooling made up of heat exchanger of double shell to reverse flow, a tower of perforated trays and a closed circuit of water that condenses tars. The second phase contemplates the entrance of the gas in crosscurrent to a tank divided by perforated trays with a permanent water shower, where the ammoniac solutions are concentrated. In order to avoid that the gas remains catches in the pipe of conduction by its high density, it is necessary to suck it by means of an extractor type snail closed, that acts as well like centrifugal separator precipitating the heaviest compounds, and impelling the gas towards a tower where the chemical cleaning of sulfurous and hydrocyanic compounds when reacting with the Lamming mixture takes place, providing a clean and ready gas for consumption. An experimental procedure is developed to test coals samples

  2. Researching the technology of tar removal from coke-chemical plants’ wastewater by reagent flotation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Ivanchenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify process patterns of tars and oils removal from phenolic wastewater by reagent flotation with bringing those components’ content to acceptable concentrations. For the first time established is the effect of Al2(SO43, AlCl3, FeSO4, Fe2(SO43, Al2(OH5Cl and FeCl3 doses onto residual tar content in phenolic wastewater. Results obtained give the possibility to prevent air pollution resulting from the toxic substances emission at the wet quenching with water containing excessive oils and to increase the quality of wastewater biological treatment. It is shown experimentally that the most efficient are Fe2(SO43, FeCl3 and Al2(OH5Cl at optimum concentrations of 50, 30 and 30 mg/dm3 respectively. The Al2(OH5Cl can be recommended for implementation at industry on existing coking plants and municipal wastewater treatment plants to improve the environmental air and water resources condition in Ukraine.

  3. A mathematical model for prediction of physical properties of the coke oven charge during carbonisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.K.; Godiwalla, K.M.; Mehrotra, S.P. [CSIR, Jamshedpur (India)

    2007-07-01

    Mathematical models for the prediction of physical properties of the charge (e.g specific heat, density, and thermal conductivity) and heat of reaction during thermal decomposition of coal to coke have been constructed in terms of the changes in the chemical composition and structure. For realistic quantification of thermal transport processes in the oven, it is essential to predict the physical properties of the charge as they evolve during the carbonisation process. The models are based on the predictive procedure developed to address volatile matter evolution during carbonisation from knowledge of coal proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and heating profile. A first principle based formalism has been adopted to predict the physical properties of the charge and heat of carbonisation reaction as a function of the charge temperature during carbonisation supported with pertinent data. The predictions have been validated with published data, wherever possible. The models of physical properties are expected to generate critical temperature dependent property data of the oven charge' which would be vital for further development of a rigorous oven heat transfer model during carbonisation.

  4. Simultaneous removal of phenol, ammonium and thiocyanate from coke wastewater by aerobic biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, I.; Rodriguez, J.; Maranon, E.; Castrillon, L.; Fernandez, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale activated sludge plant composed of a 20 L volume aerobic reactor followed by a 12 L volume settling tank and operating at 35 deg. C was used to study the biodegradation of coke wastewater. The concentrations of ammonium nitrogen (NH 4 + -N), phenols, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and thiocyanate (SCN - ) in the wastewater ranged between 504 and 2340, 110 and 350, 807 and 3275 and 185 and 370 mg/L, respectively. The study was undertaken with and without the addition of bicarbonate. The addition of this inorganic carbon source was necessary to favour nitrification, as the alkalinity of the wastewater was very low. Maximum removal efficiencies of 75%, 98% and 90% were obtained for COD, phenols and thyocianates, respectively, without the addition of bicarbonate. The concentration of ammonia increased in the effluent due to both the formation of NH 4 + as a result of SCN - biodegradation and to organic nitrogen oxidation. A maximum nitrification efficiency of 71% was achieved when bicarbonate was added, the removals of COD and phenols being almost similar to those obtained in the absence of nitrification. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of pH and alkalinity on the biodegradation of phenols and thiocyanate

  5. Boarding is associated with higher rates of medication delays and adverse events but fewer laboratory-related delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri-On, Jiraporn; Chang, Yuchiao; Curley, David P; Camargo, Carlos A; Weissman, Joel S; Singer, Sara J; Liu, Shan W

    2014-09-01

    Hospital crowding and emergency department (ED) boarding are large and growing problems. To date, there has been a paucity of information regarding the quality of care received by patients boarding in the ED compared with the care received by patients on an inpatient unit. We compared the rate of delays and adverse events at the event level that occur while boarding in the ED vs while on an inpatient unit. This study was a secondary analysis of data from medical record review and administrative databases at 2 urban academic teaching hospitals from August 1, 2004, through January 31, 2005. We measured delayed repeat cardiac enzymes, delayed partial thromboplastin time level checks, delayed antibiotic administration, delayed administration of home medications, and adverse events. We compared the incidence of events during ED boarding vs while on an inpatient unit. Among 1431 patient medical records, we identified 1016 events. Emergency department boarding was associated with an increased risk of home medication delays (risk ratio [RR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-1.88), delayed antibiotic administration (RR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.72-3.52), and adverse events (RR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.15-4.72). On the contrary, ED boarding was associated with fewer delays in repeat cardiac enzymes (RR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.09-0.27) and delayed partial thromboplastin time checks (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27-0.96). Compared with inpatient units, ED boarding was associated with more medication-related delays and adverse events but fewer laboratory-related delays. Until we can eliminate ED boarding, it is critical to identify areas for improvement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. On stochastic differential equations with random delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krapivsky, P L; Luck, J M; Mallick, K

    2011-01-01

    We consider stochastic dynamical systems defined by differential equations with a uniform random time delay. The latter equations are shown to be equivalent to deterministic higher-order differential equations: for an nth-order equation with random delay, the corresponding deterministic equation has order n + 1. We analyze various examples of dynamical systems of this kind, and find a number of unusual behaviors. For instance, for the harmonic oscillator with random delay, the energy grows as exp((3/2) t 2/3 ) in reduced units. We then investigate the effect of introducing a discrete time step ε. At variance with the continuous situation, the discrete random recursion relations thus obtained have intrinsic fluctuations. The crossover between the fluctuating discrete problem and the deterministic continuous one as ε goes to zero is studied in detail on the example of a first-order linear differential equation

  7. [Diagnosis delay of pleural and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ladhar, A; Toujani, S; Mokadem, S; Louzir, B; Mehiri, N; Béji, M

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still being endemic in our country. Time until management determines both evolution and prognosis of this condition. The aim of this work is to evaluate the delay in diagnosis of TB in a respiratory unit from a university hospital series. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study including patients with pulmonary TBC and/or pleural. An evaluation of time management was conducted from the beginning of symptoms and various consultations with reference to the date of hospitalization and treatment set up. One hundred patients were included (pulmonary TB: 68 cases, pleural TB 23 cases, miliary pulmonary TB: 4 cases, pulmonary TB associated with other extrathoracic locations: 5 cases). The mean time of patient delay and total delay institution were respectively 43.6, 25.7 and 69.3 days. Variables responsible for long delays were: number of consultations more than 3 before hospitalization, empirical antibiotic therapy, of a regional hospital first consultation and the presence of extra-respiratory impairment. The patient delay was considered long. A reorganization of the TB control program, in particular by partial decentralization of care and health education is imperative in order to improve the quality of tuberculosis management in our country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-Delay Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tinto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Equal-arm detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers, the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called time-delay interferometry (TDI. This article provides an overview of the theory, mathematical foundations, and experimental aspects associated with the implementation of TDI. Although emphasis on the application of TDI to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA mission appears throughout this article, TDI can be incorporated into the design of any future space-based mission aiming to search for gravitational waves via interferometric measurements. We have purposely left out all theoretical aspects that data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the TDI data combinations.

  9. Characterization of Coke on a Pt-Re/γ-Al 2 O 3 Re-Forming Catalyst: Experimental and Theoretical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bare, Simon R.; Vila, F. D.; Prabhakar, Sesh; Bradley, William J.

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of coke on spent catalysts is key to understanding deactivation mechanisms in hydrocarbon transformations. Here, we report the comprehensive characterization (using laser Raman spectroscopy, 13 C MAS NMR, temperature-programmed oxidation, XPS, and carbon K-edge NEXAFS) of coke on a series of spent Pt-Re re-forming catalysts as a function of time on stream and position in the catalytic bed. Laser Raman spectroscopy is shown to be rather insensitive to the carbon species present, while 13 C MAS NMR finds that the carbon is present primarily as aromatic carbon. The TPO data are consistent with the coke being present on the alumina support and not to a large extent covering the metallic Pt-Re nanoclusters, but the data do suggest the presence of more than one type of coke present. The carbon K-edge NEXAFS data, however, clearly differentiate the types of coke species present. In the more coked samples the features ascribed to graphite become more pronounced, together with an increase in the aromaticity, as judged by the intensity of the π* peak. With increasing amounts of carbon on the catalyst there is also a concomitant decrease in the σ* C–H peak, indicating that the carbon is becoming less hydrogenated. Furthermore, by using a linear combination of C NEXAFS spectra for n-hexane, benzene, and broadened highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), we estimate the compositional change on the coke species, verifying the aliphatic to aromatic conversion. The data indicate that a good model for the deposited coke is that of highly defected, medium-sized rafts with a short-range polycyclic aromatic structure which have a variety of points of contact with the alumina surface, in particular with the O atoms. In agreement with the NMR, there is evidence for the C–O functionality from the presence of a shoulder in the C NEXAFS spectra that is ascribed, as a result of DFT calculations, to a 1s → π* transition of the carbon atoms bound to the oxygen

  10. Quinoline-degrading strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 isolated from coking activated sludge is capable of the simultaneous removal of phenol in a dual substrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Panhong; Jia, Rong; Zhang, Yuxiu; Shi, Peili; Chai, Tuanyao

    2016-11-09

    Quinoline is a refractory organic compound in the treatment of coking wastewater. The isolation of high efficiency quinoline-degrading bacteria from activated sludge and the evaluation of their degradation characteristics in the presence of phenol or in the actual coking wastewater are important for the improvement of effluent quality. The novel bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 was isolated from a quinoline enrichment culture obtained from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The optimum temperature and initial pH for quinoline degradation were 33-38°C and 8-9, respectively. KDQ4 completely degraded 400 mg/L of quinoline within 24 h and 800 mg/L of phenol within 30 h. In the dual-substrate system, the removal efficiencies of quinoline and phenol at the same initial concentration (200 mg/L) by KDQ4 were 89% and 100% within 24 h, respectively, indicating that KDQ4 could simultaneously and quickly degrade quinoline and phenol in a coexistence system. Moreover, KDQ4 was able to adapt to actual coking wastewater containing high quinoline and phenol concentrations and rapidly remove them. KDQ4 also exhibited heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification potential under aerobic conditions. These results suggested a potential bioaugmentation role for KDQ4 in the removal of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds and phenolics from coking wastewater.

  11. Development of a cost-effective CO2 adsorbent from petroleum coke via KOH activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eunji; Choi, Seung Wan; Hong, Seok-Min; Shin, Sangcheol; Lee, Ki Bong

    2018-01-01

    The capture of CO2 via adsorption is considered an effective technology for decreasing global warming issues; hence, adsorbents for CO2 capture have been actively developed. Taking into account cost-effectiveness and environmental concerns, the development of CO2 adsorbents from waste materials is attracting considerable attention. In this study, petroleum coke (PC), which is the carbon residue remaining after heavy oil upgrading, was used to produce high-value-added porous carbon for CO2 capture. Porous carbon materials were prepared by KOH activation using different weight ratios of KOH/PC (1:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1) and activation temperatures (600, 700, and 800 °C). The specific surface area and total pore volume of resulting porous carbon materials increased with KOH amount, reaching up to 2433 m2/g and 1.11 cm3/g, respectively. The sample prepared under moderate conditions with a KOH/PC weight ratio of 2:1 and activation temperature of 700 °C exhibited the highest CO2 adsorption uptake of 3.68 mmol/g at 25 °C and 1 bar. Interestingly, CO2 adsorption uptake was linearly correlated with the volume of micropores less than 0.8 nm, indicating that narrow micropore volume is crucial for CO2 adsorption. The prepared porous carbon materials also exhibited good selectivity for CO2 over N2, rapid adsorption, facile regeneration, and stable adsorption-desorption cyclic performance, demonstrating potential as a candidate for CO2 capture.

  12. Health effects of banning beehive coke ovens and implementation of the ban in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Shen, Huizhong; Yun, Xiao; Gao, Fei; Chen, Yilin; Li, Bengang; Liu, Junfeng; Ma, Jianmin; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Xueping; Tian, Chongguo; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2018-03-13

    Environmental legislation and proper implementation are critical in environmental protection. In the past, beehive coke ovens (BCOs) were popular in China, resulting in enormous emissions of benzo[ a ]pyrene (BaP), a common indicator of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. BCOs were banned by the Coal Law in 1996. Although BCO numbers have declined since the ban, they were not eliminated until 2011 due to poor implementation. Here, we present the results of a quantitative evaluation of the health effects of historical BCO operation, the health benefits of the ban, and the adverse impacts of the poor implementation of the ban. With only limited official statistics available, historical and geospatial data about BCOs were reconstructed based on satellite images. Emission inventories of BaP from BCOs were compiled and used to model atmospheric transport, nonoccupational population exposure, and induced lung cancer risk. We demonstrated that more than 20% of the BaP in ambient air was from BCOs in the peak year. The cumulative nonoccupational excess lung cancer cases associated with BaP from BCOs was 3,500 (±1,500) from 1982 to 2015. If there was no ban, the cases would be as high as 9,290 (±4,300), indicating the significant health benefits of the Coal Law. On the other hand, if the ban had been fully implemented immediately after the law was enforced in 1996, the cumulative cases would be 1,500 (±620), showing the importance of implementing the law. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  13. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis and detection of mutagenicity in ambient air of the coke oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiás, L; Kůsová, J; Gajdos, O; Vidová, P; Gajdosová, D; Havránková, J; Fried, M; Binková, B; Topinka, J

    1999-09-30

    In the present study, we summarize the results of studies on the mutagenic potential of the main fractions and subfractions of extractable organic material (EOM) in the ambient air at the workplaces of the coke oven. The objective of our experiments was to apply the Bioassay-Directed Chemical Analysis (with the use of the Ames test) for the identification of the differences in the mutagenicity of these fractions, in relationship to the complex mixture of EOM in occupational air. From the evaluation of results, it is possible to deduce the following conclusions: (1) The comparison of the mutagenicity in the main fractions (basic, acidic, neutral) demonstrates the existence of differences in mutagenic potential. Of the total mutagenicity, 20.4% is in the basic fraction, 25.4% in the acidic fraction and 54.2% in the neutral fraction. (2) In general, 90.1% of the mutagenicity found in the basic, acidic and neutral fractions together was associated with the requirement of metabolic activation in vitro (+S9). In the case of the neutral fraction, it was 51.8%. (3) These results also suggest that frameshift mutations are the major component (53.8%) of the total mutagenicity of the main fractions. (4) With regards to the mutagenicity of organic compounds in the neutral fraction it appeared that genotoxicants of its subfractions (slightly and moderately polar and aromatic) play the main role. Carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and genotoxic nitrocompounds play an important role as determinants of the mutagenic potential of complex mixtures of harmful compounds in ambient air. This is confirmed first by the results of short-term bacterial tests.

  14. 76 FR 14987 - United States v. Graftech International Ltd. and Seadrift Coke, L.P.; Public Comments and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... effectively locked in volume targets and imposed most- favored-nation (``MFN'') pricing for three years, while... annually, with price terms and volume targets memorialized in formal contracts. At the time of the proposed... access to its largest competitor's production and pricing to all other customers. By facilitating the...

  15. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Delayed Speech or Language Development KidsHealth / For Parents / Delayed Speech ... their child is right on schedule. How Are Speech and Language Different? Speech is the verbal expression ...

  16. Biotransformation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing pollutants during coking wastewater treatment: Correspondence of performance to microbial community functional structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dev Raj; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yinxin; Liu, Yuan; Yang, Min

    2017-09-15

    Although coking wastewater is generally considered to contain high concentration of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing pollutants, the biotransformation processes of these compounds have not been well understood. Herein, a high throughput functional gene array (GeoChip 5.0) in combination with Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used to identify microbial functional traits and their role in biotransformation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds in a bench-scale aerobic coking wastewater treatment system operated for 488 days. Biotransformation of nitrogen and sulfur-containing pollutants deteriorated when pH of the bioreactor was increased to >8.0, and the microbial community functional structure was significantly associated with pH (Mantels test, P nitrogen and sulfate was correlated with both the taxonomic and functional microbial community structure (P nitrogen and sulfate, aromatic dioxygenases (e.g. xylXY, nagG), nitrilases (e.g. nhh, nitrilase), dibenzothiophene oxidase (DbtAc), and thiocyanate hydrolase (scnABC) were important functional genes for biotransformation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing pollutants. Functional characterization of taxa and network analysis suggested that Burkholderiales, Actinomycetales, Rhizobiales, Pseudomonadales, and Hydrogenophiliales (Thiobacillus) were key functional taxa. Variance partitioning analysis showed that pH and influent ammonia nitrogen jointly explained 25.9% and 35.5% of variation in organic pollutant degrading genes and microbial community structure, respectively. This study revealed a linkage between microbial community functional structure and the likely biotransformation of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing pollutants, along with a suitable range of pH (7.0-7.5) for stability of the biological system treating coking wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental impact of heavy metals on the soils and plants around a coke-making factory of Jiyuan city, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun Leung, Kwun

    2010-05-01

    The combustion of coal usually leads to many different kinds of pollution around coke-making factories. Among these pollutions, the heavy metal contamination in the soil and plants is one of the major concerns by people living around. Heavy metals are highly attracted to the biological tissue, and can stay in bodies of organisms for long period of time, causing a lot of hazardous diseases to human beings, animal and plants. In the developing regions of China, developing of industries has been based on the sacrifices of environments and human health. In order to evaluate the danger of heavy metal contamination from a coke factory to citizens of close inhabitants, a survey on soil and plants was conducted in the region around a coke-making factory in Jiyuan city, which is a major electricity supplying city for the Henan Province in China. In this study, 8 surface soil samples and 11 plant samples were collected from 8 different places around the coke-making factory in Jiyuan city. The collected samples are then treated in the laboratory, and 8 types of heavy metals, which include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, nickel and zinc, are analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The concentration data of heavy metals that collected from the analysis are then used to evaluate their toxicity towards living organisms and ecology by applying several biological effect standards, such as effect-range low (ERL), effect-range median (ERM) and several maximum allowances standards of heavy metal concentrations in soils and plants that established by different countries. Moreover, the relationship between the distance from the factory and the concentration of heavy metals in soils and plants are also evaluated in order to find out the contamination ranges of those heavy metals from the source. The result shows that the concentration of these 8 types of heavy metals in the

  18. In-Class Quantification of the Mentos and Diet Coke Analogue Experiment: Effects of Wind on Volcanic Isopach Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quane, S.; Klos, Z.; Jacobsen, R.

    2009-05-01

    The Mentos and Diet Coke experiment, where instantaneous emplacement of Mentos candy in Diet Coke creates a soda/CO2 eruptive plume, is a common educational analogue for a volcanic eruption. In this paper, we quantify the effects of varying directional wind speeds on the eruptive plume as a learning tool in advanced Introductory Geology and Volcanology courses. The Mentos and Diet Coke reaction is a fun, safe and affordable analogue for explosive, single pulse, basaltic eruptions (e.g., Strombolian eruptions). Specifically, the physical and chemical reaction nucleating CO2 bubbles on the pitted surface of Mentos candy is directly analogous to the collapsing foam eruption regime described by Parfitt (2004) where inertia driven fragmentation of the liquid (Namiki and Manga, 2008) leads to basaltic pyroclastic eruptions. Often, in these systems, the pyroclasts are carried downwind, resulting lopsided (downwind side taller) cinder cones. In our experiments, we create a single pulse eruption by simultaneously dropping four Mentos candies into a 16.9 oz. bottle of Diet Coke. The experiments are run under different wind conditions created by three stacked box fans in the off (control experiment) low, medium and high settings. Wind speed is measured using a hand held anemometer. The pyroclast dispersal is recorded by degree of liquid saturation through four layers of newspaper. The liquid is allowed to soak in for thirty seconds post eruption and then the individual layers of newspaper are separated and the saturation envelope is traced with a black marker and digitally photographed. The pyroclast dispersal envelope (or saturation area) is then quantified from the photos by image analysis in Adobe Photoshop. In addition, the experiments are videotaped to quantify ejection velocity using frame by frame analysis in iMovie. The resulting isopach ("deposit thickness") maps indicate a strong tightening of dispersal envelopes with increasing wind speed as seen in natural

  19. Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy of catalysts: Adsorption and coke formation in zeolites and vibrational spectra of supported metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yek Tann

    2001-10-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to study the physicochemical and catalytic properties of zeolites and supported metal oxide catalysts using UV Raman spectroscopy. In order to reduce the thermal degradation and possible photodecomposition of adsorbates by UV radiation, we have developed a novel fluidized bed method for measuring the UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The UV Raman spectra of various organic compounds adsorbed in zeolites H-USY and H-ZSM-5 are recorded. When measurements are performed on stationary and spinning samples, the Raman spectra show the presence of coke, a typical end product of heat and photochemistry. In contrast, the Raman peaks of the unreacted adsorbates dominate the spectra measured using the fluidized bed method. These results indicate that the fluidized bed technique is a good method for measuring UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The formation of coke in the methanol-to-gasoline conversion over zeolite H-ZSM-5 causes deactivation of the catalyst. To gain insight into the formation of coke, we have studied this reaction using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectral changes suggest coke is produced from conjugated olefins via cyclopentadiene intermediates. Aromatic compounds in gasoline may also be produced from cyclopentadienes. The adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolites may alter the molecular sieving characteristics of these materials which ultimately affect their performance as catalysts and adsorbents. We have quantified the adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolite H-RHO using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of the zeolite after the adsorption of water, methanol or acetonitrile are consistent with an increase in the average T-O-T angle of the zeolite of 5-8°. The adsorption of ammonia, on the other hand, decreases the average T-O-T angle by 5°. Because of certain advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy, recently there is a strong interest in

  20. Delayed Macular Hole Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Distelmaier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The presented case raises questions regarding the favorable scheduling of planned postoperative care and the ideal observation interval to decide for reoperations in macular hole surgery. Furthermore a discussion about the use of short- and long-acting gas tamponades in macular hole surgery is encouraged. Methods: We present an interventional case report and a short review of the pertinent literature. Results: We report a case of spontaneous delayed macular hole closure after vitreoretinal surgery had been performed initially without the expected success. A 73-year-old male Caucasian patient presented at our clinic with a stage 2 macular hole in his left eye. He underwent 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling with a 20% C2F6-gas tamponade. Sixteen days after the procedure, an OCT scan revealed a persistent stage 2 macular hole, and the patient was scheduled for reoperation. Surprisingly, at the date of planned surgery, which was another 11 days later, the macular hole had resolved spontaneously without any further intervention. Conclusions: So far no common opinion exists regarding the use of short- or long-acting gas in macular hole surgery. Our case of delayed macular hole closure after complete resorption of the gas tamponade raises questions about the need and duration of strict prone positioning after surgery. Furthermore short-acting gas might be as efficient as long-acting gas. We suggest to wait with a second intervention at least 4 weeks after the initial surgery, since a delayed macular hole closure is possible.

  1. Electrochemical improvement of low-temperature petroleum cokes by chemical oxidation with H2O2 for their use as anodes in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concheso, A.; Santamaria, R.; Menendez, R.; Jimenez-Mateos, J.M.; Alcantara, R.; Lavela, P.; Tirado, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical performance of non-graphitized petroleum cokes has been improved by mild oxidation using hydrogen peroxide, a procedure used for the first time in these materials. For this purpose, various carbonisation temperatures and H 2 O 2 treatments were tested. For low sulfur content cokes, the aqueous oxidative treatment significantly increases the capacity values above 372 mAh/g during the first cycles. In contrast, cokes with a sulfur content of ca. 5%, did not shown a real improvement. The former results have been interpreted in terms of an effective oxidation of the particles surface, which removes unorganized carbon, where lithium can be irreversibly trapped. Moreover, a stable and less resistive passivating layer grows during the first discharge of lithium, as revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Therefore, chemical procedures, as mild oxidation, open an interesting field of research for the improvement of disordered carbons as anode materials in lithium ion batteries

  2. Organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asif; Ali, Rajab; Yaqoob, M Yousuf; Saleem, Omema

    2007-07-01

    Organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy (OPIDP) is a rare sensory-motor distal axonopathy, which usually occur after ingestion of large doses of certain organophosphate insecticide. The clinical picture is characterized by the distal paresis in lower limb associated with sensory symptoms. Electrodiagnostic studies show a motor axonal neuropathy. This case occurred in a 14 years old girl who developed cramping pain in both calves associated with lower limbs paresis 6 weeks after accidental organophosphate poisoning. After another week, she also developed weakness in both hands. Electrophysiological study was characterized by an axonal polyneuropathy pattern. Patient improved upon oral multivitamin therapy and physiotherapy.

  3. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast...

  4. Fractional delay waveguide modeling of acoustic tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaelimaeki, V.

    The theme of this work is computational modeling of acoustic tubes. The models are intended to be used in a sound synthesizer based on physical modeling. Such a synthesizer could be used producing realistic sounds of, e.g., woodwind instruments or the human voice. This work deals with digital waveguide modeling of acoustic tubes, such as bores of musical woodwind instruments or the human vocal tract. The acoustic tube systems considered in this work are those consisting of a straight cylindrical or conical tube or of concatenated cylindrical or conical tube sections. Also, the joint of three tube sections is studied. Of special interest for our application is a junction where a side branch is connected to a cylindrical tube as it is needed in the simulation of finger holes of wood-wind instruments. All of the cylindrical tube models are described for both pressure and volume velocity. In the case of conical bores, only pressure waves are considered as models for volume velocity waves are more complicated. The basic waveguide models are extended by employing the concept of fractional delay, which means a delay smaller than a unit delay. The fractional delays are implemented using bandlimited interpolation. Applying fractional delay filtering techniques, a spatially discretized waveguide model is turned into a spatially continuous one. This implies that the length of the digital waveguide can be adjusted as accurately as required, and a change of the impedance of a waveguide may occur at any desired point between sampling points. The authors call this kind of system a fractional delay waveguide filter (FDWF). It is a discrete-time structure but a spatially continuous model of a physical system.

  5. Logic units for complex experimental facilities with inter-unit connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borejko, V.F.; Baluev, Yu.M.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.; Rudenko, A.I.; Selikov, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    The description and technical characteristics of logic units realized in the CAMAC standard are given. For units connected with the trunck the logical functions control unit is unified. The signal shaper circuits, delay unit, coincidence unit, level matching unit, coincided signals detecting unit, pulse bursts generator for detector signal imitation are considered

  6. Concurrent Delay in Construction Disputes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleri, Sylvie Cécile

    period of delay can potentially be attributed to several events falling within both parties' spheres of responsibility, commonly termed concurrent delay, is rarely regulated in construction contracts in spite of its common occurrence. This book analyses both the theoretical foundations and the practical......Delay is one of the issues most frequently encountered in today’s construction industry; it causes significant economic damage to all parties involved. Construction contracts, standard and bespoke, almost invariably consider delay from a perspective of single liability. If the event causing...... solutions to the issue of concurrent delay in a comparative perspective between common and civil law systems, with an emphasis on Danish and English law....

  7. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  8. Patient delay in cancer studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no validated way of measuring the prevalence and duration of patient delay, and we do not know how people perceive and define the time intervals they are asked to report in patient delay studies. This lack of a validated measure hampers research in patient delay...... as symptoms related to a specific cancer diagnosis is embedded within a social and cultural context. We therefore cannot assume that respondents define delay periods in identical ways. SUMMARY: In order to improve the validity of patient delay studies, it is suggested that research be strengthened on three...

  9. Epidemiology of delayed ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Stefania; Mollaioli, Daniele; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Carosa, Eleonora; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2016-08-01

    A large body of literature on diminished ejaculatory disorders has been generated without the use of a clear diagnostic definition. Many studies have not distinguished between the orgasm and ejaculation disorders leading to doubtful results. Delayed ejaculation (DE) is one of the diminished ejaculatory disorders, which range from varying delays in ejaculatory latency to a complete inability to ejaculate. The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the definition and epidemiology of diminished ejaculatory disorders. We focus on the acquired diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and specific drug regimens that may cause an iatrogenic form of ejaculatory disorder. In addition, the impact of aging is discussed since the prevalence of DE appears to be moderately but positively related to age. Finally, we also focus on the importance of the hormonal milieu on male ejaculation. To date, evidence on the endocrine control of ejaculation is derived from small clinical trials, but the evidence suggests that hormones modulate the ejaculatory process by altering its overall latency.

  10. Developpement d'un modele thermodynamique pour les cristallites de coke: Application aux systems carbone-hydrogene et carbone-soufre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzilleau, Philippe

    Carbon materials are essential components of multiple key industrial processes. One example of such a process is the production of aluminum using the Hall-Heroult process. It is well known that important quantities of carbon materials are regularily consumed by the operation of the Hall-Heroult process. In recent years, the increased impurity content of industrial carbon materials motivated the development of a better understanding for the high temperature behavior of these specific materials. The most common forms of carbon materials used in the industry are cokes. Cokes are carbon materials which, following heat treatment, present a crystalline structure similar to that observed in graphite. However, the observed crystallite size of cokes is usually much smaller than the one observed in graphite. For this reason, the chemical and thermodynamic properties of the ordered phase of cokes (i.e. coke crystallites) are very different than those of graphite (although coke crystallites of infinite size would possess properties almost identical to graphite). Coke crystallites consist of hexagonal planes of carbon atoms stacked one above the other. This particular aspect causes strong anisotropic properties in coke crystallites. No thermodynamic model was found for the production of a reliable correlation between the effect of crystallite size and chemical composition for the predictive calculations of the thermodynamic properties (and phase equilibriums) of coke crystallites. It is also difficult to produce predictive calculations that can be compared to experimental results using such a thermodynamic model. The goal of the present work is to propose a thermodynamic model designed to solve this problem. The present model is based on the well-defined geometrical properties of coke cristallites. This geometry allows the development of mathematical equations for the calculation of the mass balances of the crystallite (using a simplified geometry) using only the commonly used

  11. Organic sulphur in coal and coke by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunstan, B.T.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified method for the determination of organic sulphur in coal or coke by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM-EDAX) has been developed. The method requires the resin encapsulation of coal crushed to less than 212 μmetres, followed by the examination of a uncoated polished surface. Twenty sampling points chosen to intercept coal grains, but free of mineral matter, have been found to provide a satisfactory regime. A petroleum coke, in which the total sulphur content is assumed to be in the organic phase and prepared under the same conditions, is used as a reference material. The method has been found to show good correlation to the indirect Standard Method and is applicable to a range of higher ranked coals but is less satisfactory for lower rank coals and lignites; particularly when there are high levels of disseminated pyrite. Detection limits of less than 0.1% organic sulphur can be achieved, but method errors become appreciable below 0.2%. 18 refs., 1 tab

  12. Impact of Zr metal and coking reactions on the ex-vessel source term predictions of CORCON/VANESA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Davis, R.E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    During a core meltdown accident in a LWR, molten core materials (corium) could leave the reactor vessel and interact with concrete. In this paper, the impact of the zirconium content of the corium pool and the coking reaction on the release of fission products are quantified using CORCON/Mod2 and VANESA computer codes. Detailed calculations show that the total aerosol generation is proportional to the zirconium content of the corium pool. Among the twelve fission product groups treated by the VANESA code, CsI, Cs 2 O and Nb 2 O 5 are completely released over the course of the core/concrete interaction, while an insignificant quantity of Mo, Ru and ZrO 2 are predicted to be released. The release of BaO, SrO and Ce 2 O increase, while the releases of Te and La 2 O 3 are relatively unaffected by the Zr content of the corium pool. The impact of the coking reaction on the radionuclide release and aerosol production was found to be insignificant

  13. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shu; Li, Xinrong; Yang, Yu; Coveney, Raymond M; Lu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Haitao; Shen, Weiran

    2006-08-01

    A USEPA, procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from approximately 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from approximately 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 +/- 2.87 ng/m3 on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m3, 41% of the entire population lives within this area.

  14. Process development of coke oven gas to methanol integrated with CO2 recycle for satisfactory techno-economic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Qun; Gong, Min-Hui; Huang, Yi; Feng, Jie; Hao, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Ji-Long; Li, Wen-Ying

    2016-01-01

    A novel process designed for producing methanol from coke oven gas (COG) integrated with CO 2 recycle is proposed. In the new system, oxygen replacing air is blown to combustor for assisting combustion of COG and unreacted syngas from methanol synthesis process. The combustion process provides to the heat required in the coking process. The rest COG reacts with the recycled CO 2 separated from the exhaust gas to produce syngas for methanol synthesis. The unreacted syngas from methanol synthesis process with low grade energy level is recycled to the combustor. In the whole methanol production process, there is no additional process with respect to supplementary carbon, and the carbon resource only comes from the internal CO 2 recycle in the plant. With the aid of techno-economic analysis, the new system presents the energy or exergy saving by 5–10%, the CO 2 emission reduction by about 70% and the internal rate of return increase by 5–8%, respectively, in comparison with the traditional COG to methanol process. - Highlights: • A process for producing methanol from COG integrated with CO 2 recycle is first proposed. • CO 2 from the exhaust gas is recycled to supply carbon for producing syngas. • New integrated plant simplifies the production process with 5–8% IRR increase. • New system presents about 5–10% energy saving, about 70% CO 2 emission reduction.

  15. Occupational coke oven emissions exposure and risk of abnormal liver function: modifications of body mass index and hepatitis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Hu; B. Chen; J. Qian; L. Jin; T. Jin; D. Lu [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). Department of Occupational and Environmental Health

    2010-03-15

    Occupational coke oven emissions (COEs) have been considered an important health issue. However, there are no conclusive data on human hepatic injury due to COE exposure. The association of COE exposure with liver function was explored and the effects of modification of potential non-occupational factors were assessed. 705 coke oven workers and 247 referents were investigated. Individual cumulative COE exposure was quantitatively estimated. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), {gamma}-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C antibody were measured. Among those with high COE exposure, the adjusted ORs of abnormal ALT and AST were 5.23 (95% CI 2.66 to 10.27) and 1.95 (95% CI 1.18 to 3.52), respectively. Overweight individuals (body mass index (BMI) {>=}25 kg/m{sup 2}) with high COE exposure had elevated risks of abnormal ALT (adjusted OR 23.93, 95% CI 8.73 to 65.62) and AST (adjusted OR 5.18, 95% CI 2.32 to 11.58). Risk of liver damage in hepatitis B virus- or hepatitis C virus-positive individuals with COE exposure was also elevated. Long-term exposure to COE increases the risk of liver dysfunction, which is more prominent among those with higher BMI and hepatitis virus infection. The risk assessment of liver damage associated with COE exposure should take BMI and hepatitis virus infection into consideration.

  16. Multimedia fate and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a coking industry city in Northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.L.; Xia, Z.H.; Liu, D.; Qiu, W.X.; Duan, X.L.; Wang, R.; Liu, W.J.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.; Tao, S.; Liu, W.X.

    2013-01-01

    A steady state Level III fate model was established and applied to quantify source–receptor relationship in a coking industry city in Northern China. The local emission inventory of PAHs, as the model input, was acquired based on energy consumption and emission factors. The model estimations were validated by measured data and indicated remarkable variations in the paired isomeric ratios. When a rectification factor, based on the receptor-to-source ratio, was calculated by the fate model, the quantitatively verified molecular diagnostic ratios provided reasonable results of local PAH emission sources. Due to the local ban and measures on small scale coking activities implemented from the beginning of 2004, the model calculations indicated that the local emission amount of PAHs in 2009 decreased considerably compared to that in 2003. -- Highlights: •A steady-state fate model could well elucidate the multimedia fate of PAHs. •A rectification factor for correcting the paired isomeric ratio was calculated. •The corrected isomeric ratios were successfully applied to source apportionment. -- Based on multimedia model correction, the specific isomeric ratios could provide reasonable apportionments for the local PAHs emission sources

  17. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyphasic bacterial community analysis of an aerobic activated sludge removing phenols and thiocyanate from coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfoldi, T.; Szekely, A.J.; Goral, R.; Barkacs, K.; Scheirich, G.; Andras, J.; Racz, A.; Marialigeti, K. [Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Microbiology

    2010-05-15

    Biological purification processes are effective tools in the treatment of hazardous wastes such as toxic compounds produced in coal coking. In this study, the microbial community of a lab-scale activated sludge system treating coking effluent was assessed by cultivation-based (strain isolation and identification, biodegradation tests) and culture-independent techniques (sequence-aided T-RFLP, taxon-specific PCR). The results of the applied polyphasic approach showed a simple microbial community dominated by easily culturable heterotrophic bacteria. Comamonas badia was identified as the key microbe of the system, since it was the predominant member of the bacterial community, and its phenol degradation capacity was also proved. Metabolism of phenol, even at elevated concentrations (up to 1500 mg/L), was also presented for many other dominant (Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter, Oligella) and minor (Alcaligenes, Castellaniella, Microbacterium) groups, while some activated sludge bacteria (Sphingomonas, Rhodopseudomonas) did not tolerate it even in lower concentrations (250 mg/L). In some cases, closely related strains showed different tolerance and degradation properties. Members of the genus Thiobacillus were detected in the activated sludge, and were supposedly responsible for the intensive thiocyanate biodegradation observed in the system. Additionally, some identified bacteria (e.g. C. badia and the Ottowia-related strains) might also have had a significant impact on the structure of the activated sludge due to their floc-forming abilities.

  19. Evaluation method of economic efficiency of industrial scale research based on an example of coking blend pre-drying technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żarczyński Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research on new and innovative solutions, technologies and products carried out on an industrial scale is the most reliable method of verifying the validity of their implementation. The results obtained in this research method give almost one hundred percent certainty although, at the same time, the research on an industrial scale requires the expenditure of the highest amount of money. Therefore, this method is not commonly applied in the industrial practices. In the case of the decision to implement new and innovative technologies, it is reasonable to carry out industrial research, both because of the cognitive values and its economic efficiency. Research on an industrial scale may prevent investment failure as well as lead to an improvement of technologies, which is the source of economic efficiency. In this paper, an evaluation model of economic efficiency of the industrial scale research has been presented. This model is based on the discount method and the decision tree model. A practical application of this proposed evaluation model has been presented based on an example of the coal charge pre-drying technology before coke making in a coke oven battery, which may be preceded by industrial scale research on a new type of coal charge dryer.

  20. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  1. Delay tolerant networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Longxiang; Luan, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents emerging and promising communication methods for network reliability via delay tolerant networks (DTNs). Different from traditional networks, DTNs possess unique features, such as long latency and unstable network topology. As a result, DTNs can be widely applied to critical applications, such as space communications, disaster rescue, and battlefield communications. The brief provides a complete investigation of DTNs and their current applications, from an overview to the latest development in the area. The core issue of data forward in DTNs is tackled, including the importance of social characteristics, which is an essential feature if the mobile devices are used for human communication. Security and privacy issues in DTNs are discussed, and future work is also discussed.

  2. Patterns of delayed marriage: how special are the Irish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, J A

    1991-02-01

    "This paper deals with delayed marriage and singlehood among the Irish as a focus for the study of the persistence of ethnic characteristics. Patterns of delayed marriage in Ireland in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are reviewed, and evidence is also presented that Irish persons in other countries (especially in the United States) continue to show significantly higher rates of singlehood and postponed marriage than persons of other nationality groups. Discussion includes how delayed marriage became common in Ireland during the past 150 years and what may be involved in the apparent persistence of this pattern today in Ireland and among the Irish in other countries." excerpt

  3. Location Estimation using Delayed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Larsen, Thomas Dall; Nørgård, Peter Magnus

    1998-01-01

    When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new techn...... technique to a sensor fusion system for estimating the location of an autonomous guided vehicle. The system fuses encoder and vision measurements in an extended Kalman filter. Results from experiments in a real environment are reported......When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new...

  4. Delayed cyanide poisoning following acetonitrile ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M.; Borland, C.

    1997-01-01

    Acetonitrile (methyl cyanide) is a common industrial organic solvent but is a rare cause of poisoning. We report the first recorded UK case. Acetonitrile is slowly converted to cyanide, resulting in delayed toxicity. We describe a case of deliberate self-poisoning by a 39-year-old woman resulting in cyanide poisoning 11 hours later which was successfully treated by repeated boluses of sodium nitrite and thiosulphate. The half-life of conversion of acetonitrile was 40 hours and harmful blood cyanide levels persisted for over 24 hours after ingestion. Departments treating or advising in cases of poisoning need to be aware of the delayed toxicity of acetonitrile. Monitoring in an intensive care unit of cases of acetonitrile poisoning should continue for 24-48 hours. PMID:9196706

  5. Control systems with network delay

    OpenAIRE

    Şabanoviç, Asif; Sabanovic, Asif; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Yashiro, Daisuke; Acer, Merve; Ş.-Behliloviç, Nadira; S.-Behlilovic, Nadira

    2009-01-01

    In this paper motion control systems with delay in measurement and control channels are discussed and a new structure of the observer-predictor is proposed. The feature of the proposed system is enforcement of the convergence in both the estimation and the prediction of the plant output in the presence of the variable, unknown delay in both measurement and in the control channels. The estimation is based on the available data – undelayed control input, the delayed measurement of position o...

  6. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-01-01

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay

  7. Modeling delay in genetic networks: from delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Bennett, Matthew R; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  8. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  9. Systematic of delayed neutron parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, S.G.; Piksaikin, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental studies of the energy dependence of the delayed neutron (DN) parameters for various fission systems has shown that the behaviour of a some combination of delayed neutron parameters has a similar features. On the basis of this findings the systematics of delayed neutron experimental data for thorium, uranium, plutonium and americium isotopes have been investigated with the purpose to find a correlation of DN parameters with characteristics of fissioning system as well as a correlation between the delayed neutron parameters themselves. It was presented the preliminary results which were obtained during study the physics interpretation of the results [ru

  10. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  11. Chaos synchronization by resonance of multiple delay times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Manuel Jimenez; D'Huys, Otti; Lauerbach, Laura; Korutcheva, Elka; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Chaos synchronization may arise in networks of nonlinear units with delayed couplings. We study complete and sublattice synchronization generated by resonance of two large time delays with a specific ratio. As it is known for single-delay networks, the number of synchronized sublattices is determined by the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the network loop lengths. We demonstrate analytically the GCD condition in networks of iterated Bernoulli maps with multiple delay times and complement our analytic results by numerical phase diagrams, providing parameter regions showing complete and sublattice synchronization by resonance for Tent and Bernoulli maps. We compare networks with the same GCD with single and multiple delays, and we investigate the sensitivity of the correlation to a detuning between the delays in a network of coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. Moreover, the GCD condition also allows detection of time-delay resonances, leading to high correlations in nonsynchronizable networks. Specifically, GCD-induced resonances are observed both in a chaotic asymmetric network and in doubly connected rings of delay-coupled noisy linear oscillators.

  12. Predictors of Delayed Healthcare Seeking Among American Muslim Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Milkie; Azmat, Alia; Radejko, Tala; Padela, Aasim I

    2016-06-01

    Delayed care seeking is associated with adverse health outcomes. For Muslim women, delayed care seeking might include religion-related motivations, such as a preference for female clinicians, concerns about preserving modesty, and fatalistic beliefs. Our study assesses associations between religion-related factors and delayed care seeking due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. Surveys were distributed to Muslim women attending mosque and community events in Chicago. Survey items included measures of religiosity, religious fatalism, discrimination, modesty, and alternative medicine utilization and worship practices. The outcome measure asked for levels of agreement to the statement "I have delayed seeking medical care when no woman doctor is available to see me." Two hundred fifty-four women completed the survey with nearly equal numbers of African Americans (26%), Arab Americans (33%), and South Asians (33%). Fifty-three percent reported delays in care seeking due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. In multivariate analysis adjusting for sociodemographic factors, higher religiosity (odds ratio [OR] = 5.2, p 20 years (OR = 0.22, p Muslim women reported delays in care seeking due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. Women with higher levels of modesty and self-rated religiosity had higher odds of delaying care. Women who had lived in the United States for longer durations had lower odds of delaying care. Our research highlights the need for gender-concordant providers and culturally sensitive care for American Muslims.

  13. Fast-neutron and gamma-ray transmission technique for the on-line determination of moisture in coal and coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowerby, B.D.; Millen, M.J.; Rafter, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    A fast neutron and γ-ray transmission technique is being developed for the on-line analysis of moisture. Calculations show that the technique is capable of determining coke moisture to better than 0.2 wt% over a wide range of coke thicknesses. The favoured technique uses a thick Li-glass detector surrounded by a neutron moderator to determine simultaneously the fast neutron and γ-ray intensities. Laboratory measurements on single coke samples showed that moisture can be determined to within 0.2 wt% over the range 3-13 wt% moisture and 300-500 mm thickness. Measurements on a range of coke samples showed that the increase in r.m.s. error due to bound H variations is less than about 0.4 wt% moisture. Applications of the technique, to moisture determination in black and brown coal are also investigated, both by calculation and experiment. Further potential applications of the technique are discussed, including the determination of C in steel. (author)

  14. A highly sensitive detection method for temperature programmed oxidation of coke deposits: Methanation of CO[sub 2] in the presence of O[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, S.C.; Querini, C.A. (Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Temperature programmed oxidation is the most widely used technique in the study of coked catalysts. This technique provides useful information about coke distribution and coke type on the catalyst surfaces. A new detection method, which gives continuous monitoring of coke oxidation rate, has been applied to this technique. The new detection method is simple and highly sensitive. It consists of a methanator and a flame ionization detector. It involves the conversion of CO[sub 2], an FID insensitive gas, to an FID sensitive gas, CH[sub 4], in the presence of an oxygen-containing carrier gas. It has been found that the conversion efficiency of the methanator strongly depends on oxygen concentration, its flow rate, and the temperature of the methanator. At temperature below 673 K and at <3% O[sub 2], the incomplete conversion of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4] is mainly due to kinetic limitations brought about by the excess water produced in the methanator from the oxygen in the carrier gas. At higher temperatures and O[sub 2] concentrations, equilibrium limits the conversion of CO[sub 2] to a low level. Complete conversion of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4] is realized when O[sub 2] < 3%, carrier gas at 20-60 cc/min, and methanator at 673 K. 24 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Preparation of activated petroleum coke for removal of naphthenic acids model compounds: Box-Behnken design optimization of KOH activation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niasar, Hojatallah Seyedy; Li, Hanning; Das, Sreejon; Kasanneni, Tirumala Venkateswara Rao; Ray, Madhumita B; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2018-04-01

    This study employed Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology to optimize activation parameters for the production of activated petroleum coke (APC) adsorbent from petroleum coke (PC) to achieve highest adsorption capacity for three model naphthenic acids. Activated petroleum coke (APC) adsorbent with a BET surface area of 1726 m 2 /g and total pore volume of 0.85 cc/g was produced at the optimum activation conditions (KOH/coke mass ratio) of 3.0, activation temperature 790 °C, and activation time 3.47 h). Effects of the activation parameters on the adsorption pefromances (adsortion capaciy and kinetics) were investigated. With the APC obtained at the optimum activation condition, the maximum adsorption capacity of 451, 362, and 320 (mg/g) was achieved for 2-naphthoic acid, diphenylacetic acid and cyclohexanepentanoic acid (CP), respectively. Although, generally APC adsorbents with a higher specific surface area and pore volume provide better adsorption capacity, the textural properties (surface areas and pore volume) are not the only parameters determining the APC adsorbents' adsorption capacity. Other parameters such as surface functionalities play effective roles on the adsorption capacity of the produced APC adsorbents for NAs. The KOH activation process, in particular the acid washing step, distinctly reduced the sulfur and metals contents in the raw PC, decreasing the leaching potential of metals from APC adsorbents during adsorption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coke industry and steel metallurgy as the source of soil contamination by technogenic magnetic particles, heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachwał, Marzena; Magiera, Tadeusz; Wawer, Małgorzata

    2015-11-01

    Application of integrated magnetic, geochemical and mineralogical methods for qualitative and quantitative assessment of forest topsoils exposed to the industrial emissions was the objective of this manuscript. Volume magnetic susceptibility (κ) in three areas of southern Poland close to the coke and metallurgical plants was measured directly in the field. Representative topsoil samples were collected for further chemical and mineralogical analyses. Topsoil magnetic susceptibility in the studied areas depended mainly on the content of technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) and decreased downwind at increasing distance from the emitters. In the vicinity of coking plants a high amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was observed, especially the most carcinogenic ones with four- and five-member rings. No significant concentration of TMPs (estimated on the base of κ values) and heavy metals (HM) was observed in area where the coke plant was the only pollution source. In areas with both coke and metallurgical industry, higher amounts of TMPs, PAHs and HM were detected. Morphological and mineralogical analyses of TMPs separated from contaminated soil samples revealed their high heterogeneity in respect of morphology, grain size, mineral and chemical constitution. Pollution load index and toxicity equivalent concentration of PAHs used for soil quality assessment indicated its high level of pollution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Etude de la desactivation des catalyseurs d'hydrotraitement par cokage. Synthèse bibliographique Study of the Deactivation of Hydrotreating Catalysts by Coking. Bibliographic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualda G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail effectue la synthèse de la littérature disponible en février 1987 sur le phénomène de cokage en hydrotraitement entraînant la désactivation des catalyseurs. Il propose trois angles d'étude apportant chacun un éclairage complémentaire sur le sujet : - un angle physico-chimique qui décrit les méthodes de caractérisation du coke et des catalyseurs usés utilisées par les auteurs, et les informations qu'elles fournissent; - un angle d'observation macroscopique du phénomène de désactivation par cokage, par la confrontation de modèles et de résultats expérimentaux; - un angle plus fondamental faisant état des mécanismes proposés pour la formation du coke dans les conditions d'hydrotraitement des fractions lourdes du pétrole en particulier. Il ressort de cette étude la très grande hétérogénéité des travaux, tant du point de vue des protocoles expérimentaux que des interprétations mécanistiques. Une étude rigoureuse et systématique s'impose donc dans ce domaine. Toutefois, il semble bien établi que l'on puisse faire la différence entre un coke fatal formé par dégradation thermique des hydrocarbures, et un coke dépendant des propriétés des catalyseurs mis en oeuvre. This article makes a synthesis of the literature available in February 1987 on the coking phenomenon in hydrotreating causing catalyst deactivation. It proposes three angles of study, each giving complementary light on the subject:(a a physicochemical angle describing methods of characterizing the coke and catalysts used by the authors, and the information they provide;(b a macroscopic observation angle of the deactivation phenomenon by coking, by comparing models and experimental results;(c a more fundamental angle bearing on the mechanisms proposed for coke formation under hydrotreatment conditions of heavy oil fractions in particular. This study shows the great heterogeneity of research, from the standpoint of both experimental

  18. High resolution digital delay timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  19. System delays in breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    we notice a discrepancy in incidence rates between various ethnic/race .... Thailand. 180. 2. 3. 5 to diagnosis NOT treatment‡. This study. South Africa 45. -. 2.5. 3. 1.25. 3. -. 10. *Total delay refers to totals for available datasets and not necessarily mean delay to treatment/surgery commencement. †Montella et al. presented ...

  20. Magnetic bearing optical delay line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dool, T.C. van den; Kamphues, F.G.; Fouss, B.; Henrioulle, K.; Hogenhuis, H.

    2004-01-01

    TNO TPD, in close cooperation with Micromega-Dynamics and Dutch Space, has developed an advanced Optical Delay Line (ODL) for use in PRIMA, GENIE and other ground based interferometers. The delay line design is modular and flexible, which makes scaling for other applications a relatively easy task.

  1. #FakeNobelDelayReasons

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday’s hour-long delay of the Nobel Prize in Physics announcement was (and still is) quite the cause for speculation. But on the Twittersphere, it was simply the catalyst for some fantastic puns, so-bad-they're-good physics jokes and other shenanigans. Here are some of our favourite #FakeNobelDelayReasons.    

  2. Picosecond resolution programmable delay line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchenek, Mariusz

    2009-01-01

    The note presents implementation of a programmable delay line for digital signals. The tested circuit has a subnanosecond delay range programmable with a resolution of picoseconds. Implementation of the circuit was based on low-cost components, easily available on the market. (technical design note)

  3. Project delay analysis of HRSG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvianita; Novega, A. S.; Rosyid, D. M.; Suntoyo

    2017-08-01

    Completion of HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) fabrication project sometimes is not sufficient with the targeted time written on the contract. The delay on fabrication process can cause some disadvantages for fabricator, including forfeit payment, delay on HRSG construction process up until HRSG trials delay. In this paper, the author is using semi quantitative on HRSG pressure part fabrication delay with configuration plant 1 GT (Gas Turbine) + 1 HRSG + 1 STG (Steam Turbine Generator) using bow-tie analysis method. Bow-tie analysis method is a combination from FTA (Fault tree analysis) and ETA (Event tree analysis) to develop the risk matrix of HRSG. The result from FTA analysis is use as a threat for preventive measure. The result from ETA analysis is use as impact from fabrication delay.

  4. Delay discounting of different commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N; Terrell, Heather K; Derenne, Adam

    2010-01-01

    When outcomes are delayed, their value is decreased. Delay discounting is a much-studied topic because it is correlated with certain disorders (e.g., pathological gambling). The present study attempts to determine how people would delay discount a number of different commodities, ranging from money to dating partners to federal education legislation. Participants completed delay discounting tasks pertaining to 5 different commodities, with a different set of 5 commodities for 2 groups. Results showed that different commodities were often discounted differently. Both data sets were also subjected to factor analysis. A 2-factor solution was found for both, suggesting that there are multiple "domains" of commodities. This finding is of interest because it suggests that measuring delay discounting for one commodity within a particular domain of commodities will be predictive of how people discount other commodities within that domain but will not be predictive of how they discount commodities within another domain.

  5. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshiko; Miyamoto, Kazuto; Beppu, Hirokuni; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author)

  6. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  7. High Coke-Resistance Pt/Mg1-xNixO Catalyst for Dry Reforming of Methane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris A J Al-Doghachi

    Full Text Available A highly active and stable nano structured Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalysts was developed by a simple co-precipitation method. The obtained Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalyst exhibited cubic structure nanocatalyst with a size of 50-80 nm and realized CH4 and CO2 conversions as high as 98% at 900°C with excellent stability in the dry reforming of methane. The characterization of catalyst was performed using various kinds of analytical techniques including XRD, BET, XRF, TPR-H2, TGA, TEM, FESEM, FT-IR, and XPS analyses. Characterization of spent catalyst further confirms that Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalyst has high coke-resistance for dry reforming. Thus, the catalyst demonstrated in this study, offers a promising catalyst for resolving the dilemma between dispersion and reducibility of supported metal, as well as activity and stability during high temperature reactions.

  8. Electro-Fenton oxidation of coking wastewater: optimization using the combination of central composite design and convex optimization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Jiwei; Wang, Qin; Fan, Niansi; Ni, Jialing; Li, Weicheng; Gao, Yingxin; Li, Yu-You; Xu, Changyou

    2017-10-01

    The electro-Fenton treatment of coking wastewater was evaluated experimentally in a batch electrochemical reactor. Based on central composite design coupled with response surface methodology, a regression quadratic equation was developed to model the total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency. This model was further proved to accurately predict the optimization of process variables by means of analysis of variance. With the aid of the convex optimization method, which is a global optimization method, the optimal parameters were determined as current density of 30.9 mA/cm 2 , Fe 2+ concentration of 0.35 mg/L, and pH of 4.05. Under the optimized conditions, the corresponding TOC removal efficiency was up to 73.8%. The maximum TOC removal efficiency achieved can be further confirmed by the results of gas chromatography-mass spectrum analysis.

  9. High Coke-Resistance Pt/Mg1-xNixO Catalyst for Dry Reforming of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Doghachi, Faris A. J.; Islam, Aminul; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Saiman, Mohd Izham; Embong, Zaidi; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2016-01-01

    A highly active and stable nano structured Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalysts was developed by a simple co-precipitation method. The obtained Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalyst exhibited cubic structure nanocatalyst with a size of 50–80 nm and realized CH4 and CO2 conversions as high as 98% at 900°C with excellent stability in the dry reforming of methane. The characterization of catalyst was performed using various kinds of analytical techniques including XRD, BET, XRF, TPR-H2, TGA, TEM, FESEM, FT-IR, and XPS analyses. Characterization of spent catalyst further confirms that Pt/Mg1-xNixO catalyst has high coke-resistance for dry reforming. Thus, the catalyst demonstrated in this study, offers a promising catalyst for resolving the dilemma between dispersion and reducibility of supported metal, as well as activity and stability during high temperature reactions. PMID:26745623

  10. Analysis of denitrifier community in a bioaugmented sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yaohui; Xing, Rui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Sun, Qinghua [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

    2011-05-15

    The denitrifier community and associated nitrate and nitrite reduction in the bioaugmented and general sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) during the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline were investigated. The efficiency and stability of nitrate and nitrite reduction in SBR was considerably improved after inoculation with four pyridine- or quinoline-degrading bacterial strains (including three denitrifying strains). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the nosZ gene revealed that the structures of the denitrifier communities in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented reactors were distinct and varied during the course of the experiment. Bioaugmentation protected indigenous denitrifiers from disruptions caused by pyridine and quinoline. Clone library analysis showed that one of the added denitrifiers comprised approximately 6% of the denitrifier population in the bioaugmented sludge. (orig.)

  11. Kinetics of the catalyst deactivation by coke in a complex reactant system with an extremely fast deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Saiz, J.; Fernandez, A.; Corella, J.; Bilbao, R.; Monzon, J.; Santamaria, J.; Vidal, J.M.; Valencia, M.

    A kinetic study of the deactivation by coke of commercial catalysts in the gas oil catalytic cracking has been performed. Owed to the very fast deactivation of the catalyst, an experimental method that yields results for small intervals of time-on-stream has been used. Data are analysed starting from a generic kinetic equation of deactivation, in which, having in mind the complexity of the reactant system, the adequate simplifications have been performed. The deactivation order of the kinetic equation decreases along the time-on-stream, taking values of 3, 2 and 1 successively. The results obtained have been interpreted with the consideration that the number of active sites blocked by each deposited molecule decreases along the time-on-stream as the catalyst surface is progressively fouled. 30 references.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of the partial oxidation of coke oven gas for indirect reduction of iron oxides in a blast furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Hsu, Chih-Liang; Du, Shan-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The partial oxidation of a COG (coke oven gas) in a blast furnace is examined in this work using thermodynamic analysis. LTIR and HTIR (Low-temperature and high-temperature indirect reduction) of iron oxides in a blast furnace are also studied. The influences of the reaction temperature, M/H (methane-to-hematite) ratio, and O/F (oxygen-to-fuel) ratio on CH 4 conversion and iron oxide reduction are examined. Within the investigated ranges of the parameters, a higher reaction temperature is conducive to CH 4 conversion, while at least 97.64% of Fe 2 O 3 is reduced. In LTIR, Fe 3 O 4 is the prime product, with a high level of solid carbon formation. The entire LTIR reaction is characterized by exothermic behavior, so that no additional heat is required to trigger COG partial oxidation and IR. In HTIR, increasing the reaction temperature facilitates CO-based IR and suppresses H 2 -based IR. A higher temperature produces more Fe, so as to enhance the iron oxide reduction reactions; meanwhile, the FeO reduction is governed by H 2 and CH 4 . When the reaction temperature is higher than 800 °C and the M/H ratio is lower than unity, a heat supply is required to drive HTIR. The O/F ratio in LTIR and HTIR should be controlled below 2 to retard carbon formation and drive iron oxide reduction. - Highlights: • Direct partial oxidation of coke oven gas in blast furnace is analyzed thermodynamically. • A higher reaction temperature is conducive to CH 4 conversion and syngas production. • At least 97.64% of Fe 2 O 3 is converted. • The low-temperature indirect reduction is characterized by exothermic behavior. • The oxygen-to-fuel molar ratio in indirect reduction should be controlled below 2

  13. Performance and microbial community composition in a long-term sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor operation treating coking wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dev Raj; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Zhe; Gao, Yingxin; Yang, Min

    2016-09-01

    The combined anaerobic-aerobic biosystem is assumed to consume less energy for the treatment of high strength industrial wastewater. In this study, pollutant removal performance and microbial diversity were assessed in a long-term (over 300 days) bench-scale sequential anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor treating coking wastewater. Anaerobic treatment removed one third of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and more than half of the phenols with hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 42 h, while the combined system with total HRT of 114 h removed 81.8, 85.6, 99.9, 98.2, and 85.4 % of COD, total organic carbon (TOC), total phenols, thiocyanate, and cyanide, respectively. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed complete removal of phenol derivatives and nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) via the combined system, with the anaerobic process alone contributing 58.4 and 58.6 % removal on average, respectively. Microbial activity in the bioreactors was examined by 454 pyrosequencing of the bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities. Proteobacteria (61.2-93.4 %), particularly Betaproteobacteria (34.4-70.1 %), was the dominant bacterial group. Ottowia (14.1-46.7 %), Soehngenia (3.0-8.2 %), and Corynebacterium (0.9-12.0 %), which are comprised of phenol-degrading and hydrolytic bacteria, were the most abundant genera in the anaerobic sludge, whereas Thiobacillus (6.6-43.6 %), Diaphorobacter (5.1-13.0 %), and Comamonas (0.2-11.1 %) were the major degraders of phenol, thiocyanate, and NHCs in the aerobic sludge. Despite the low density of fungi, phenol degrading oleaginous yeast Trichosporon was abundant in the aerobic sludge. This study demonstrated the feasibility and optimization of less energy intensive treatment and the potential association between abundant bacterial groups and biodegradation of key pollutants in coking wastewater.

  14. Fractional delayed damped Mathieu equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbahi, Afshin; Haeri, Mohammad; Nazari, Morad; Butcher, Eric A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates the dynamical behaviour of the fractional delayed damped Mathieu equation. This system includes three different phenomena (fractional order, time delay, parametric resonance). The method of harmonic balance is employed to achieve approximate expressions for the transition curves in the parameter plane. The n = 0 and n = 1 transition curves (both lower and higher order approximations) are obtained. The dependencies of these curves on the system parameters and fractional orders are determined. Previous results for the transition curves reported for the damped Mathieu equation, delayed second-order oscillator, and fractional Mathieu equation are confirmed as special cases of the results for the current system.

  15. Ergodic Interference Alignment with Delayed Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Myung Gil; Choi, Wan

    2013-01-01

    We propose new ergodic interference alignment techniques for $K$-user interference channels with delayed feedback. Two delayed feedback scenarios are considered -- delayed channel information at transmitter (CIT) and delayed output feedback. It is proved that the proposed techniques achieve total $2K/(K+2)$ DoF which is higher than that by the retrospective interference alignment for the delayed feedback scenarios.

  16. Fractional variational principles with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Abdeljawad, Thabet Maaraba; Jarad, Fahd

    2008-01-01

    The fractional variational principles within Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives in the presence of delay are analyzed. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained and one example is analyzed in detail

  17. Linear rotary optical delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerboukha, Hichem; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-03-01

    We present a semi-analytical solution for the design of a high-speed rotary optical delay line that use a combination of two rotating curvilinear reflectors. We demonstrate that it is possible to design an infinite variety of the optical delay lines featuring linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle. This is achieved via shape optimization of the rotating reflector surfaces. Moreover, a convenient spatial separation of the incoming and outgoing beams is possible. For the sake of example, we present blades that fit into a circle of 10cm diameter. Finally, a prototype of a rotary delay line is fabricated using CNC machining, and its optical properties are characterized.

  18. Delays and networked control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hetel, Laurentiu; Daafouz, Jamal; Johansson, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This edited monograph includes state-of-the-art contributions on continuous time dynamical networks with delays. The book is divided into four parts. The first part presents tools and methods for the analysis of time-delay systems with a particular attention on control problems of large scale or infinite-dimensional systems with delays. The second part of the book is dedicated to the use of time-delay models for the analysis and design of Networked Control Systems. The third part of the book focuses on the analysis and design of systems with asynchronous sampling intervals which occur in Networked Control Systems. The last part of the book exposes several contributions dealing with the design of cooperative control and observation laws for networked control systems. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of control theory, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students. .

  19. Systematics in delayed neutron yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1998-03-01

    An attempt was made to reproduce the systematic trend observed in the delayed neutron yields for actinides on the basis of the five-Gaussian representation of the fission yield together with available data sets for delayed neutron emission probability. It was found that systematic decrease in DNY for heavier actinides is mainly due to decrease of fission yields of precursors in the lighter side of the light fragment region. (author)

  20. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes