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Sample records for delay frustration task

  1. Probing the limits of delay intolerance: preliminary young adult data from the Delay Frustration Task (DeFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsakou, Paraskevi; Antrop, Inge; Wiersema, Jan Roelf; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S

    2006-02-15

    Delay intolerance/aversion is one amongst a number of candidate neuropsychological endophenotypes for ADHD. Pilot data suggest that, because of potential ceiling effects, simple choice measures of delay tolerance used for children are probably not appropriate for adolescents and adults. The Delay Frustration Task (DeFT) is a new measure of delay intolerance, designed to be used in a similar form with adolescents and adults as well as children. In it delay frustration is indexed as the number and duration of responses made on a response key during a series of unpredictable and unsignalled delay periods, which interrupt the completion of a simple computer-based tests. The aim of this study was to provide preliminary data on the applicability of the task in a sample of young adults. The DeFT was administered to 49 male and female undergraduate students selected from a normal population-base. Their mean age was 23.14 (S.D.=1.54). Three measures of delay frustration were recorded across time intervals during the response window; the number of responses, their duration and their combined product (total time button was pressed) was calculated for each second interval bin during the post-response delay period. The AARS and HADS were used as screening questionnaires for ADHD and anxiety behaviour, respectively. The results indicated that young adults with high-ADHD symptoms scores pressed the button more than those with low ADHD scores during the post-response delay condition. While both groups increased responding across time within intervals this was significantly more marked in the high-ADHD symptom group. These effects became more pronounced when anxiety was controlled. Young adults with high-ADHD symptoms appear to be more sensitive to the imposition of unscheduled and unsignalled delay during a simple maths test. DeFT may provide a useful index of delay tolerance in young adults with ADHD. Future research needs to examine DeFT performance in different age groups and

  2. Understanding the Impact of User Frustration Intensities on Task Performance Using the OCC Theory of Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    Have you heard the saying "frustration is written all over your falce"? Well this saying is true, but that is not the only place. Frustration is written all over your face and your body. The human body has various means to communicate an emotion without the utterance of a single word. The Media Equation says that people interact with computers as if they are human: this includes experiencing frustration. This research measures frustration by monitoring human body-based measures such as heart rate, posture, skin temperature. and respiration. The OCC Theory of Emotions is used to separate frustration into different levels or intensities. The results of this study showed that individual intensities of frustration exist, so that task performance is not degraded. Results from this study can be used by usability testers to model how much frustration is needed before task performance measures start to decrease.

  3. Effects of Frustration on the Response Rate of Skid Row Alcoholics on a Performance Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, James F.; Reinke-Scorzelli, Mary

    1976-01-01

    Determines the changes that may occur in the response rates of 14 skid row alcoholics on a performance task after the introduction of a frustration operation. Results suggest a possible relationship between low frustration tolerance and the method by which these individuals tend to motivate themselves. (Author)

  4. Hyperactivity and frustration: the influence of control over and size of rewards in delaying gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, M D; Tucker, S B; DuPaul, G J; Merlo, M; Stoner, G

    1986-06-01

    This study examined the differential effects of frustration on normal children and those diagnosed as having Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity. Each group consisted of 16 boys between the ages of 6 and 8 years who were prematched for age, grade, and classroom placement. All children completed a series of arithmetic problems in order to earn toy rewards. Using a variant of Mischel's (1974) delay-of-gratification paradigm, children were presented with two choice-of-delay conditions in a randomly assigned, counterbalanced sequence: a free-choice conflict situation involving a long-passive or short-active reward delay, and a short-active delay. Results showed that a significantly greater proportion of hyperactive children chose to complete problems for an immediate reward compared to their normal control counterparts (p less than .01). Group differences were no longer apparent in the short-active delay trial. The results are discussed in terms of frustration tolerance and contributing factors such as cognitive-attentional style. Implications for treatment and future directions are delineated.

  5. Shared Task System Description: Frustratingly Hard Compositionality Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Anders Trærup; Martinez Alonso, Hector; Rishøj, Christian

    2011-01-01

    , and the likelihood of long translation equivalents in other languages. Many of the features we considered correlated significantly with human compositionality scores, but in support vector regression experiments we obtained the best results using only COALS-based endocentricity scores. Our system was nevertheless......We considered a wide range of features for the DiSCo 2011 shared task about compositionality prediction for word pairs, including COALS-based endocentricity scores, compositionality scores based on distributional clusters, statistics about wordnet-induced paraphrases, hyphenation...

  6. The Role of Covert Retrieval in Working Memory Span Tasks: Evidence from Delayed Recall Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, David P.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined delayed recall of items that had been processed during simple and complex span tasks. Three experiments were reported showing that despite more items being recalled initially from a simple span task (i.e., word span) than a complex span task (i.e., operation span), on a delayed recall test more items were recalled that…

  7. The effect of visual-motion time delays on pilot performance in a pursuit tracking task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.; Riley, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A study has been made to determine the effect of visual-motion time delays on pilot performance of a simulated pursuit tracking task. Three interrelated major effects have been identified: task difficulty, motion cues, and time delays. As task difficulty, as determined by airplane handling qualities or target frequency, increases, the amount of acceptable time delay decreases. However, when relatively complete motion cues are included in the simulation, the pilot can maintain his performance for considerably longer time delays. In addition, the number of degrees of freedom of motion employed is a significant factor.

  8. A 5-trial adjusting delay discounting task: Accurate discount rates in less than 60 seconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; Bickel, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who discount delayed rewards at a high rate are more likely to engage in substance abuse, overeating, or problem gambling. Findings such as these suggest the value of methods to obtain an accurate and fast measurement of discount rate that can be easily deployed in variety of settings. In the present study, we developed and evaluated the 5-trial adjusting delay task, a novel method of obtaining discount rate in less than one minute. We hypothesized that discount rates from the 5-trial adjusting delay task would be similar and correlated with discount rates from a lengthier task we have used previously, and that four known effects relating to delay discounting would be replicable with this novel task. To test these hypotheses, the 5-trial adjusting delay task was administered to 111 college students six times to obtain discount rates for six different commodities, along with a lengthier adjusting amount discounting task. We found that discount rates were similar and correlated between the 5-trial adjusting delay task and the adjusting amount task. Each of the four known effects relating to delay discounting was replicated with the 5-trial adjusting delay task to varying degrees. First, discount rates were inversely correlated with amount. Second, discount rates between past and future outcomes were correlated. Third, discount rates were greater for consumable rewards than with money, although we did not control for amount in this comparison. Fourth, discount rates were lower when zero amounts opposing the chosen time point were explicitly described. Results indicate that the 5-trial adjusting delay task is a viable, rapid method to assess discount rate. PMID:24708144

  9. A 5-trial adjusting delay discounting task: accurate discount rates in less than one minute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Bickel, Warren K

    2014-06-01

    Individuals who discount delayed rewards at a high rate are more likely to engage in substance abuse, overeating, or problem gambling. Such findings suggest the value of methods to obtain an accurate and fast measurement of discount rate that can be easily deployed in variety of settings. In the present study, we developed and evaluated the 5-trial adjusting delay task, a novel method of obtaining a discount rate in less than 1 min. We hypothesized that discount rates from the 5-trial adjusting delay task would be similar and would correlate with discount rates from a lengthier task we have used previously, and that 4 known effects relating to delay discounting would be replicable with this novel task. To test these hypotheses, the 5-trial adjusting delay task was administered to 111 college students 6 times to obtain discount rates for 6 different commodities, along with a lengthier adjusting amount discounting task. We found that discount rates were similar and correlated between the 5-trial adjusting delay task and the adjusting amount task. Each of the 4 known effects relating to delay discounting was replicated with the 5-trial adjusting delay task to varying degrees. First, discount rates were inversely correlated with amount. Second, discount rates between past and future outcomes were correlated. Third, discount rates were greater for consumable rewards than with money, although we did not control for amount in this comparison. Fourth, discount rates were lower when $0 amounts opposing the chosen time point were explicitly described. Results indicate that the 5-trial adjusting delay task is a viable, rapid method to assess discount rate. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Reward acts as a signal to control delay-period activity in delayed-response tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara-Takeda, Satoe; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Funahashi, Shintaro

    2010-03-31

    Prefrontal delay-period activity represents a neural mechanism for the active maintenance of information and needs to be controlled by some signal to appropriately operate working memory. To examine whether reward-delivery acts as this signal, the effects of delay-period activity in response to unexpected reward-delivery were examined by analyzing single-neuron activity recorded in the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Among neurons that showed delay-period activity, 34% showed inhibition of this activity in response to unexpected reward-delivery. The delay-period activity of these neurons was affected by the expectation of reward-delivery. The strength of the reward signal in controlling the delay-period activity is related to the strength of the effect of reward information on the delay-period activity. These results indicate that reward-delivery acts as a signal to control delay-period activity.

  11. Is It Really Self-Control? Examining the Predictive Power of the Delay of Gratification Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Tsukayama, Eli; Kirby, Teri A.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation tests whether the predictive power of the delay of gratification task (colloquially known as the “marshmallow test”) derives from its assessment of self-control or of theoretically unrelated traits. Among 56 school-age children in Study 1, delay time was associated with concurrent teacher ratings of self-control and Big Five conscientiousness—but not with other personality traits, intelligence, or reward-related impulses. Likewise, among 966 preschool children in Study 2, delay time was consistently associated with concurrent parent and caregiver ratings of self-control but not with reward-related impulses. While delay time in Study 2 was also related to concurrently measured intelligence, predictive relations with academic, health, and social outcomes in adolescence were more consistently explained by ratings of effortful control. Collectively, these findings suggest that delay task performance may be influenced by extraneous traits, but its predictive power derives primarily from its assessment of self-control. PMID:23813422

  12. Frustrated spin systems

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book covers all principal aspects of currently investigated frustrated systems, from exactly solved frustrated models to real experimental frustrated systems, going through renormalization group treatment, Monte Carlo investigation of frustrated classical Ising and vector spin models, low-dimensional systems, spin ice and quantum spin glass. The reader can - within a single book - obtain a global view of the current research development in the field of frustrated systems.This new edition is updated with recent theoretical, numerical and experimental developments in the field of frustrated

  13. Task-specific modulation of human auditory evoked responses in a delayed-match-to-sample task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eRong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus our investigation on task-specific cognitive modulation of early cortical auditory processing in human cerebral cortex. During the experiments, we acquired whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG data while participants were performing an auditory delayed-match-to-sample (DMS task and associated control tasks. Using a spatial filtering beamformer technique to simultaneously estimate multiple source activities inside the human brain, we observed a significant DMS-specific suppression of the auditory evoked response to the second stimulus in a sound pair, with the center of the effect being located in the vicinity of the left auditory cortex. For the right auditory cortex, a non-invariant suppression effect was observed in both DMS and control tasks. Furthermore, analysis of coherence revealed a beta band (12 ~ 20 Hz DMS-specific enhanced functional interaction between the sources in left auditory cortex and those in left inferior frontal gyrus, which has been shown to involve in short-term memory processing during the delay period of DMS task. Our findings support the view that early evoked cortical responses to incoming acoustic stimuli can be modulated by task-specific cognitive functions by means of frontal-temporal functional interactions.

  14. Frustration Tolerance in Youth With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Karen E; Macatee, Richard; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea

    2016-06-08

    The objective of this study was to compare children with ADHD with children without ADHD on frustration tolerance and to examine the role of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in frustration tolerance within the sample. Participants included 67 children ages 10 to 14 years-old with (n = 37) and without (n = 30) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) ADHD who completed the Mirror Tracing Persistence Task (MTPT), a validated computerized behavioral measure of frustration tolerance. Children with ADHD were more likely to quit this task than children without ADHD, demonstrating lower levels of frustration tolerance. There were no differences in frustration tolerance between children with ADHD + ODD and those with ADHD - ODD. Moreover, ODD did not moderate the relationship between ADHD and frustration tolerance. Our results suggest that low frustration tolerance is directly linked to ADHD and not better accounted for by ODD. This research highlights specific behavioral correlates of frustration in children with ADHD. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Prospective Memory Deficits in Ecstasy Users: Effects of Longer Ongoing Task Delay Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    WEINBORN, MICHAEL; WOODS, STEVEN PAUL; NULSEN, CLAIRE; PARK, KATHERINE

    2011-01-01

    Ecstasy use has been associated with neurotoxicity and neurocognitive impairment in a variety of domains, including prospective memory (ProM), which involves the delayed execution of a previously encoded intention in response to a specific cue. The present study adopted the multiprocess theory of ProM to evaluate the hypothesis that ecstasy users would evidence differentially impaired ProM on longer versus shorter ongoing task delays. Ecstasy (n = 31) users, high-risk alcohol users (n = 21) and healthy nonusers (n = 31) completed the short (2-min) and long (15-min) delay ProM scales of the Memory for Intentions Screening Test. Results showed a significant group by ProM delay interaction, such that ecstasy users performed comparably to the comparison groups on short-delay trials, but were impaired on long-delay ProM, particularly for time-based cues. Among the ecstasy users, long-delay ProM was positively associated with risky decision-making, but not with retrospective memory or other aspects of executive functions. These findings suggest that ecstasy users may be particularly susceptible to deficits in strategic target monitoring and maintenance of cue-intention pairings over longer ProM delays. Findings are discussed in the context of their potential everyday functioning (e.g., academic, vocational) and treatment implications for ecstasy users. PMID:22047194

  16. Is pupillary response a reliable index of word recognition? Evidence from a delayed lexical decision task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Juan; Guasch, Marc; Vallès, Blanca; Ferré, Pilar

    2017-10-01

    Previous word recognition studies have shown that the pupillary response is sensitive to a word's frequency. However, such a pupillary effect may be due to the process of executing a response, instead of being an index of word processing. With the aim of exploring this possibility, we recorded the pupillary responses in two experiments involving a lexical decision task (LDT). In the first experiment, participants completed a standard LDT, whereas in the second they performed a delayed LDT. The delay in the response allowed us to compare pupil dilations with and without the response execution component. The results showed that pupillary response was modulated by word frequency in both the standard and the delayed LDT. This finding supports the reliability of using pupillometry for word recognition research. Importantly, our results also suggest that tasks that do not require a response during pupil recording lead to clearer and stronger effects.

  17. Frustration in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2014-11-01

    Biomolecules are the prime information processing elements of living matter. Most of these inanimate systems are polymers that compute their own structures and dynamics using as input seemingly random character strings of their sequence, following which they coalesce and perform integrated cellular functions. In large computational systems with finite interaction-codes, the appearance of conflicting goals is inevitable. Simple conflicting forces can lead to quite complex structures and behaviors, leading to the concept of frustration in condensed matter. We present here some basic ideas about frustration in biomolecules and how the frustration concept leads to a better appreciation of many aspects of the architecture of biomolecules, and especially how biomolecular structure connects to function by means of localized frustration. These ideas are simultaneously both seductively simple and perilously subtle to grasp completely. The energy landscape theory of protein folding provides a framework for quantifying frustration in large systems and has been implemented at many levels of description. We first review the notion of frustration from the areas of abstract logic and its uses in simple condensed matter systems. We discuss then how the frustration concept applies specifically to heteropolymers, testing folding landscape theory in computer simulations of protein models and in experimentally accessible systems. Studying the aspects of frustration averaged over many proteins provides ways to infer energy functions useful for reliable structure prediction. We discuss how frustration affects folding mechanisms. We review here how the biological functions of proteins are related to subtle local physical frustration effects and how frustration influences the appearance of metastable states, the nature of binding processes, catalysis and allosteric transitions. In this review, we also emphasize that frustration, far from being always a bad thing, is an essential feature

  18. Choice in multitasking: how delays in the primary task turn a rational into an irrational multitasker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katidioti, Ioanna; Taatgen, Niels A

    2014-06-01

    The objective was to establish the nature of choice in cognitive multitasking. Laboratory studies of multitasking suggest people are rational in their switch choices regarding multitasking, whereas observational studies suggest they are not. Threaded cognition theory predicts that switching is opportunistic and depends on availability of cognitive resources. A total of 21 participants answered e-mails by looking up information (similar to customer service employees) while being interrupted by chat messages. They were free to choose when to switch to the chat message. We analyzed the switching behavior and the time they needed to complete the primary mail task. When participants are faced with a delay in the e-mail task, they switch more often to the chat task at high-workload points. Choosing to switch to the secondary task instead of waiting makes them slower. It also makes them forget the information in the e-mail task half of the time, which slows them down even more. When many cognitive resources are available, the probability of switching from one task to another is high. This does not necessarily lead to optimal switching behavior. Potential applications of this research include the minimization of delays in task design and the inability or discouragement of switching in high-workload moments.

  19. TTSA: An Effective Scheduling Approach for Delay Bounded Tasks in Hybrid Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haitao; Bi, Jing; Tan, Wei; Zhou, MengChu; Li, Bo Hu; Li, Jianqiang

    2017-11-01

    The economy of scale provided by cloud attracts a growing number of organizations and industrial companies to deploy their applications in cloud data centers (CDCs) and to provide services to users around the world. The uncertainty of arriving tasks makes it a big challenge for private CDC to cost-effectively schedule delay bounded tasks without exceeding their delay bounds. Unlike previous studies, this paper takes into account the cost minimization problem for private CDC in hybrid clouds, where the energy price of private CDC and execution price of public clouds both show the temporal diversity. Then, this paper proposes a temporal task scheduling algorithm (TTSA) to effectively dispatch all arriving tasks to private CDC and public clouds. In each iteration of TTSA, the cost minimization problem is modeled as a mixed integer linear program and solved by a hybrid simulated-annealing particle-swarm-optimization. The experimental results demonstrate that compared with the existing methods, the optimal or suboptimal scheduling strategy produced by TTSA can efficiently increase the throughput and reduce the cost of private CDC while meeting the delay bounds of all the tasks.

  20. Frustration and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality.

  1. Frustration and quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-03-15

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Delayed response task performance as a function of age in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, H S; Call, J; Sajuthi, D

    2014-01-01

    We compared delayed response task performance in young, middle-aged, and old cynomolgus monkeys using three memory tests that have been used with non-human primates. Eighteen cynomolgus monkeys-6 young (4-9 years), 6 middle-aged (10-19 years), and 6 old (above 20 years)-were tested. In general......, the old monkeys scored significantly worse than did the animals in the two other age groups. Longer delays between stimulus presentation and response increased the performance differences between the old and younger monkeys. The old monkeys in particular showed signs of impaired visuo-spatial memory...

  3. The effect of visual-motion time-delays on pilot performance in a simulated pursuit tracking task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.; Riley, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was made to determine the effect on pilot performance of time delays in the visual and motion feedback loops of a simulated pursuit tracking task. Three major interrelated factors were identified: task difficulty either in the form of airplane handling qualities or target frequency, the amount and type of motion cues, and time delay itself. In general, the greater the task difficulty, the smaller the time delay that could exist without degrading pilot performance. Conversely, the greater the motion fidelity, the greater the time delay that could be tolerated. The effect of motion was, however, pilot dependent.

  4. The influence of levels of processing on recall from working memory and delayed recall tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Vanessa M; McCabe, David P; Youngblood, Jessie L; Rose, Nathan S; Myerson, Joel

    2011-09-01

    Recent research in working memory has highlighted the similarities involved in retrieval from complex span tasks and episodic memory tasks, suggesting that these tasks are influenced by similar memory processes. In the present article, the authors manipulated the level of processing engaged when studying to-be-remembered words during a reading span task (Experiment 1) and an operation span task (Experiment 2) in order to assess the role of retrieval from secondary memory during complex span tasks. Immediate recall from both span tasks was greater for items studied under deep processing instructions compared with items studied under shallow processing instructions regardless of trial length. Recall was better for deep than for shallow levels of processing on delayed recall tests as well. These data are consistent with the primary-secondary memory framework, which suggests that to-be-remembered items are displaced from primary memory (i.e., the focus of attention) during the processing phases of complex span tasks and therefore must be retrieved from secondary memory. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Assessing delay and lag in sagittal trunk control using a tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, N Peter; Luis, Abraham; Chan, Elizabeth C; Sal Y Rosas, Victor G; Tanaka, Martin L

    2018-05-17

    Slower trunk muscle responses are linked to back pain and injury. Unfortunately, clinical assessments of spine function do not objectively evaluate this important attribute, which reflects speed of trunk control. Speed of trunk control can be parsed into two components: (1) delay, the time it takes to initiate a movement, and (2) lag, the time it takes to execute a movement once initiated. The goal of this study is to demonstrate a new approach to assess delay and lag in trunk control using a simple tracking task. Ten healthy subjects performed four blocks of six trials of trunk tracking in the sagittal plane. Delay and lag were estimated by modeling trunk control for predictable and unpredictable (control mode) trunk movements in flexion and extension (control direction) at movement amplitudes of 2°, 4°, and 6° (control amplitude). The main effect of control mode, direction, and amplitude of movement were compared between trial blocks to assess secondary influencers (e.g., fatigue). Only control mode was consistent across trial blocks with predictable movements being faster than unpredictable for both delay and lag. Control direction and amplitude effects on delay and lag were consistent across the first two trial blocks and less consistent in later blocks. Given the heterogeneity in the presentation of back pain, clinical assessment of trunk control should include different control modes, directions, and amplitudes. To reduce testing time and the influence of fatigue, we recommend six trials to assess trunk control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Executive functioning in preschool children: performance on A-not-B and other delayed response format tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, K A; Kaufmann, P M; McDiarmid, M D; Glisky, M L

    1999-11-01

    The A-not-B (AB) task has been hypothesized to measure executive/frontal lobe function; however, the developmental and measurement characteristics of this task have not been investigated. Performances on AB and comparison tasks adapted from developmental and neuroscience literature was examined in 117 preschool children (ages 23-66 months). Age significantly predicted performance on AB, Delayed Alternation, Spatial Reversal, Color Reversal, and Self-Control tasks. A four-factor analytic model best fit task performance data. AB task indices loaded on two factors with measures from the Self-Control and Delayed Alternation tasks, respectively. AB indices did not load with those from the reversal tasks despite similarities in task administration and presumed cognitive demand (working memory). These results indicate that AB is sensitive to individual differences in age-related performance in preschool children and suggest that AB performance is related to both working memory and inhibition processes in this age range.

  7. Stroop Interference in a Delayed Match-to-Sample Task: Evidence for Semantic Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley R. Sturz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Discussions of the source of the Stroop interference effect continue to pervade the literature. Semantic competition posits that interference results from competing semantic activation of word and color dimensions of the stimulus prior to response selection. Response competition posits that interference results from competing responses for articulating the word dimension versus the color dimension at the time of response selection. We embedded Stroop stimuli into a delayed match-to-sample task in an attempt to test semantic and response competition accounts of the interference effect. Participants viewed a sample color word in black or colored fonts that were congruent or incongruent with respect to the color word itself. After a 5s delay, participants were presented with two targets (i.e., a match and a foil and were instructed to select the correct match. We probed each dimension independently during target presentations via color targets (i.e., two colors or word targets (i.e., two words and manipulated whether the semantic content of the foil was related to the semantic content of the irrelevant sample dimension (e.g., word sample red in blue font with the word red as the match and the word blue as the foil. We provide evidence for Stroop interference such that response times increased for incongruent trials even in the presence of a response option with semantic content unrelated to the semantic content of the irrelevant sample dimension. Accuracy also deteriorated during the related foil trials. A follow-up experiment with a 10s delay between sample and targets replicated the results. Results appear to provide converging evidence for Stroop interference in a delayed match-to-sample task in a manner that is consistent with an explanation based upon semantic competition and inconsistent with an explanation based upon response competition.

  8. Hippocampal lesions impair performance on a conditional delayed matching and non-matching to position task in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Hazel L; Döbrössy, Màtè; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2006-08-10

    The hippocampus is thought to be involved in a range of cognitive processes, from the ability to acquire new memories, to the ability to learn about spatial relationships. Humans and monkeys with damage to the hippocampus are typically impaired on delayed matching to sample tasks, of which the operant delayed matching to position task (DMTP) is a rat analogue. The reported effects of hippocampal damage on DMTP vary, ranging from delay-dependent deficits to no deficit whatsoever. The present study investigates a novel memory task; the conditional delayed matching/non-matching to position task (CDM/NMTP) in the Skinner box. CDM/NMTP uses the presence of specific stimulus cues to signify whether a particular trial is matching or non-matching in nature. Thus, it incorporates both the task contingencies within one session, and supplements the requirement for remembering the side of the lever in the sample phase with attending to the stimulus and remembering the conditional discrimination for the rule. Rats were trained preoperatively and the effects of bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the hippocampus were examined on postoperative retention of the task. Rats with lesions of the hippocampus incurred a significant impairment on the task that was manifest at all delays intervals. Despite a bias towards matching during training, trials of either type were performed with equivalent accuracy and neither rule was affected differentially by the lesion. This task may prove useful in determining the cognitive roles of a range of brain areas.

  9. Dissociation of verbal working memory system components using a delayed serial recall task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, J M; Fiez, J A

    2001-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the neural substrates of component processes in verbal working memory. Based on behavioral research using manipulations of verbal stimulus type to dissociate storage, rehearsal, and executive components of verbal working memory, we designed a delayed serial recall task requiring subjects to encode, maintain, and overtly recall sets of verbal items for which phonological similarity, articulatory length, and lexical status were manipulated. By using a task with temporally extended trials, we were able to exploit the temporal resolution afforded by fMRI to partially isolate neural contributions to encoding, maintenance, and retrieval stages of task performance. Several regions commonly associated with maintenance, including supplementary motor, premotor, and inferior frontal areas, were found to be active across all three trial stages. Additionally, we found that left inferior frontal and supplementary motor regions showed patterns of stimulus and temporal sensitivity implicating them in distinct aspects of articulatory rehearsal, while no regions showed a pattern of sensitivity consistent with a role in phonological storage. Regional modulation by task difficulty was further investigated as a measure of executive processing. We interpret our findings as they relate to notions about the cognitive architecture underlying verbal working memory performance.

  10. Computerized spatial delayed recognition span task: a specific tool to assess visuospatial working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satler, Corina; Belham, Flávia Schechtman; Garcia, Ana; Tomaz, Carlos; Tavares, Maria Clotilde H

    2015-01-01

    A new tablet device version (IOS platform) of the Spatial Delayed Recognition Span Task (SDRST) was developed with the aim of investigating visuospatial Working Memory (WM) abilities based on touchscreen technology. This new WM testing application will be available to download for free in Apple Store app ("SDRST app"). In order to verify the feasibility of this computer-based task, we conducted three experiments with different manipulations and groups of participants. We were interested in investigating if (1) the SDRST is sensitive enough to tap into cognitive differences brought by aging and dementia; (2) different experimental manipulations work successfully; (3) cortical brain activations seen in other WM tasks are also demonstrated here; and (4) non-human primates are able to answer the task. Performance (scores and response time) was better for young than older adults and higher for the latter when compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. All groups performed better with facial stimuli than with images of scenes and with emotional than with neutral stimuli. Electrophysiology data showed activation on prefrontal and frontal areas of scalp, theta band activity on the midline area, and gamma activity in left temporal area. There are all scalp regions known to be related to attention and WM. Besides those data, our sample of adult captive capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) answered the task above chance level. Taken together, these results corroborate the reliability of this new computer-based SDRST as a measure of visuospatial WM in clinical and non-clinical populations as well as in non-human primates. Its tablet app allows the task to be administered in a wide range of settings, including hospitals, homes, schools, laboratories, universities, and research institutions.

  11. Computerized Spatial-Delayed Recognition Span Task: a specific tool to assess visuospatial working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina eSatler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new tablet device version (IOS platform of the Spatial Delayed Recognition Span Task (SDRST was developed with the aim of investigating visuospatial Working Memory (WM abilities based on touchscreen technology. This new WM testing application will be available to download for free in Apple Store app (SDRST app. In order to verify the feasibility of this computer-based task, we conducted three experiments with different manipulations and groups of participants. We were interested in investigating if (1 the SDRST is sensitive enough to tap into cognitive differences brought by ageing and dementia; (2 different experimental manipulations work successfully; (3 cortical brain activations seen in other WM tasks are also demonstrated here; and (4 non-human primates are able to answer the task. Performance (scores and response time was better for young than older adults and higher for the latter when compared to Alzheimer’s disease patients. All groups performed better with facial stimuli than with images of scenes and with emotional than with neutral stimuli. Electrophysiology data showed activation on prefrontal and frontal areas of scalp, theta band activity on the midline area, and gamma activity in left temporal area. There are all scalp regions known to be related to attention and WM. Besides those data, our sample of adult captive capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus answered the task above chance level. Taken together, these results corroborate the reliability of this new computer-based SDRST as a measure of visuospatial WM in clinical and non-clinical populations as well as in non-human primates. Its tablet app allows the task to be administered in a wide range of settings, including hospitals, homes, schools, laboratories, universities, and research institutions.

  12. A novel spatial Delayed Non-Match to Sample (DNMS) task in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Rune; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Moustgaard, Anette

    2009-01-01

    required an average of 144 trials to reach criterion for learning the task, which is similar to macaque monkeys. We also found that pigs, in contrast to rats, do not have a natural tendency to alternate in their choices in the task. To evaluate the sensitivity to reduced memory function longer delay...

  13. Simulator study of the effect of visual-motion time delays on pilot tracking performance with an audio side task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D. R.; Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of time delay was determined in the visual and motion cues in a flight simulator on pilot performance in tracking a target aircraft that was oscillating sinusoidally in altitude only. An audio side task was used to assure the subject was fully occupied at all times. The results indicate that, within the test grid employed, about the same acceptable time delay (250 msec) was obtained for a single aircraft (fighter type) by each of two subjects for both fixed-base and motion-base conditions. Acceptable time delay is defined as the largest amount of delay that can be inserted simultaneously into the visual and motion cues before performance degradation occurs. A statistical analysis of the data was made to establish this value of time delay. Audio side task provided quantitative data that documented the subject's work level.

  14. Multipartite entanglement and frustration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchi, P; Florio, G; Pascazio, S; Marzolino, U; Parisi, G

    2010-01-01

    Some features of the global entanglement of a composed quantum system can be quantified in terms of the purity of a balanced bipartition, made up of half of its subsystems. For the given bipartition, purity can always be minimized by taking a suitable (pure) state. When many bipartitions are considered, the requirement that purity be minimal for all bipartitions can engender conflicts and frustration will arise. This unearths an interesting link between frustration and multipartite entanglement, defined as the average purity over all (balanced) bipartitions.

  15. Multipartite entanglement and frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Marzolino, U.; Parisi, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2010-02-01

    Some features of the global entanglement of a composed quantum system can be quantified in terms of the purity of a balanced bipartition, made up of half of its subsystems. For the given bipartition, purity can always be minimized by taking a suitable (pure) state. When many bipartitions are considered, the requirement that purity be minimal for all bipartitions can engender conflicts and frustration will arise. This unearths an interesting link between frustration and multipartite entanglement, defined as the average purity over all (balanced) bipartitions.

  16. Multipartite entanglement and frustration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchi, P [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Florio, G; Pascazio, S [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Marzolino, U [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Parisi, G [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, Centre for Statistical Mechanics and Complexity (SMC), CNR-INFM, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, 00185 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.facchi@ba.infn.it

    2010-02-15

    Some features of the global entanglement of a composed quantum system can be quantified in terms of the purity of a balanced bipartition, made up of half of its subsystems. For the given bipartition, purity can always be minimized by taking a suitable (pure) state. When many bipartitions are considered, the requirement that purity be minimal for all bipartitions can engender conflicts and frustration will arise. This unearths an interesting link between frustration and multipartite entanglement, defined as the average purity over all (balanced) bipartitions.

  17. Retention of Esperanto Is Affected by Delay-Interval Task and Item Closure: A Partial Resolution of the Delay-Retention Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosvic, Gary M.; Epstein, Michael L.; Dihoff, Roberta E.; Cook, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The present studies were undertaken to examine the effects of manipulating delay-interval task (Study 1) and timing of feedback (Study 2) on acquisition and retention. Participants completed a 100-item cumulative final examination, which included 50 items from each laboratory examination, plus 50 entirely new items. Acquisition and retention were…

  18. Questioning the rule of thumb: can verbal tasks be administered during the CVLT-II delay interval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bethany R; Donovick, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    In the manual for the California Verbal Learning Test - II (CVLT-II), the authors suggest that nonverbal, rather than verbal, tasks be administered during the delay interval between administrations of the Short- and Long-Delay Recall trials of this test. They contend that this method minimizes the retroactive interference produced by intervening tasks. The purpose of the current study was to compare the extent to which verbal and nonverbal intervening tasks produce retroactive interference on CVLT-II List A recall following the long-delay. Participants in the present study were 120 undergraduate students. All participants completed the CVLT-II, and were randomly assigned to a group in which they were administered either a verbal (WAIS-III Vocabulary or Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - IIIB) or nonverbal (Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices or WAIS-III Block Design) intervening task during the long-delay interval of the CVLT-II. Statistical analyses revealed that regardless of the type of intervening task given, participants in all groups recalled the same number of words and produced a similar number of intrusions during the CVLT-II recall trials. This indicates that not all verbal tasks produce retroactive effects beyond those produced by nonverbal tasks.

  19. The effect of reinforcer magnitude on probability and delay discounting of experienced outcomes in a computer game task in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Anna K; Hunt, Maree J; Macaskill, Anne C; Harper, David N

    2015-09-01

    Delay and uncertainty of receipt both reduce the subjective value of reinforcers. Delay has a greater impact on the subjective value of smaller reinforcers than of larger ones while the reverse is true for uncertainty. We investigated the effect of reinforcer magnitude on discounting of delayed and uncertain reinforcers using a novel approach: embedding relevant choices within a computer game. Participants made repeated choices between smaller, certain, immediate outcomes and larger, but delayed or uncertain outcomes while experiencing the result of each choice. Participants' choices were generally well described by the hyperbolic discounting function. Smaller numbers of points were discounted more steeply than larger numbers as a function of delay but not probability. The novel experiential choice task described is a promising approach to investigating both delay and probability discounting in humans. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  20. Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 11. Frustrated Lewis Pairs : Enabling via inability. Sanjoy Mukherjee ... Author Affiliations. Sanjoy Mukherjee Pakkirisamy Thilagar1. Department of Inorgainic and Physical Chemistry Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  1. The Effect of Delayed Visual Feedback on Synchrony Perception in a Tapping Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Keetels

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensory events following a motor action are, within limits, interpreted as a causal consequence of those actions. For example, the clapping of the hands is initiated by the motor system, but subsequently visual, auditory, and tactile information is provided and processed. In the present study we examine the effect of temporal disturbances in this chain of motor-sensory events. Participants are instructed to tap a surface with their finger in synchrony with a chain of 20 sound clicks (ISI 750 ms. We examined the effect of additional visual information on this ‘tap-sound’-synchronization task. During tapping, subjects will see a video of their own tapping hand on a screen in front of them. The video can either be in synchrony with the tap (real-time recording, or can be slightly delayed (∼40–160 ms. In a control condition, no video is provided. We explore whether ‘tap-sound’ synchrony will be shifted as a function of the delayed visual feedback. Results will provide fundamental insights into how the brain preserves a causal interpretation of motor actions and their sensory consequences.

  2. How Is Frustration Related to Online Gamer Loyalty? A Synthesis of Multiple Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han-Chung; Liao, Gen-Yih; Chiu, Kay-Ling; Teng, Ching-I

    2017-11-01

    Online games can frustrate their gamers, but little was known about how such frustration impacts gamer loyalty. Because novice and experienced gamers may respond differently to frustration, this study investigates how gamers' frustration influences their loyalty and how this influence may differ between novice and experienced gamers. Because of the complexity of this issue, multiple theories were synthesized to develop the theoretical model. This study collected responses from 558 online gamers. Findings indicate that frustration is positively related to novice gamers' participation in task teams, and subsequently their loyalty. However, frustration is negatively related to the self-efficacy of experienced gamers and to their loyalty.

  3. Time and decision making: differential contribution of the posterior insular cortex and the striatum during a delay discounting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Marc; Leland, David S; Paulus, Martin P

    2007-06-01

    Delay discounting refers to the fact that an immediate reward is valued more than the same reward if it occurs some time in the future. To examine the neural substrates underlying this process, we studied 13 healthy volunteers who repeatedly had to decide between an immediate and parametrically varied delayed hypothetical reward using a delay discounting task during event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subject's preference judgments resulted in different discounting slopes for shorter ( or =1 year) delays. Neural activation associated with the shorter delays relative to the longer delays was associated with increased activation in the head of the left caudate nucleus and putamen. When individuals selected the delayed relative to the immediate reward, a strong activation was found in bilateral posterior insular cortex. Several brain areas including the left caudate nucleus showed a correlation between the behaviorally determined discounting and brain activation for the contrast of intervals with delays or =1 year. These results suggest that (1) the posterior insula, which is a critical component of the decision-making neural network, is involved in delaying gratification and (2) the degree of neural activation in the striatum, which plays a fundamental role in reward prediction and in time estimation, may code for the time delay.

  4. TASK, 1-D Multigroup Diffusion or Transport Theory Reactor Kinetics with Delayed Neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.; Hermann, O.W.; Hinton, R.J.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.; Robinson, J.C.; Lillie, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: TASK solves the one-dimensional multigroup form of the reactor kinetics equations, using either transport or diffusion theory and allowing an arbitrary number of delayed neutron groups. The program can also be used to solve standard static problems efficiently such as eigenvalue problems, distributed source problems, and boundary source problems. Convergence problems associated with sources in highly multiplicative media are circumvented, and such problems are readily calculable. 2 - Method of solution: TASK employs a combination scattering and transfer matrix method to eliminate certain difficulties that arise in classical finite difference approximations. As such, within-group (inner) iterations are eliminated and solution convergence is independent of spatial mesh size. The time variable is removed by Laplace transformation. (A later version will permit direct time solutions.) The code can be run either in an outer iteration mode or in closed (non-iterative) form. The running mode is dictated by the number of groups times the number of angles, consistent with available storage. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The principal restrictions are available storage and computation time. Since the code is flexibly-dimensioned and has an outer iteration option there are no internal restrictions on group structure, quadrature, and number of ordinates. The flexible-dimensioning scheme allows optional use of core storage. The generalized cylindrical geometry option is not complete in Version I of the code. The feedback options and omega-mode search options are not included in Version I

  5. Superconducting frustration bit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A frustration bit element is proposed for a conventional superconducting circuit. • It is composed of π-junctions. • It mimics the multiband superconductor. - Abstract: A basic design is proposed for a classical bit element of a superconducting circuit that mimics a frustrated multiband superconductor and is composed of an array of π-Josephson junctions (π-junction). The phase shift of π provides the lowest energy for one π-junction, but neither a π nor a zero phase shift gives the lowest energy for an assembly of π-junctions. There are two chiral states that can be used to store one bit information. The energy scale for reading and writing to memory is of the same order as the junction energy, and is thus in the same order of the driving energy of the circuit. In addition, random access is also possible

  6. Effects of frustration on explosive synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xia; Gao, Jian; Sun, Yu-Ting; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Can

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we consider the emergence of explosive synchronization in scale-free networks by considering the Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. The natural frequencies of oscillators are assumed to be correlated with their degrees and frustration is included in the system. This assumption can enhance or delay the explosive transition to synchronization. Interestingly, a de-synchronization phenomenon occurs and the type of phase transition is also changed. Furthermore, we provide an analytical treatment based on a star graph, which resembles that obtained in scale-free networks. Finally, a self-consistent approach is implemented to study the de-synchronization regime. Our findings have important implications for controlling synchronization in complex networks because frustration is a controllable parameter in experiments and a discontinuous abrupt phase transition is always dangerous in engineering in the real world.

  7. The amblyopic eye in subjects with anisometropia show increased saccadic latency in the delayed saccade task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej ePerdziak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The term amblyopia is used to describe reduced visual function in one eye (or both eyes, though not so often which cannot be fully improved by refractive correction and explained by the organic cause observed during regular eye examination. This developmental disorder of spatial vision affects about 2-5% of the population and is associated with abnormal visual experience (e.g. anisometropia, strabismus during infancy or early childhood. Several studies have shown prolongation of saccadic latency time in amblyopic eye. In our opinion, study of saccadic latency in the context of central vision deficits assessment, should be based on central retina stimulation. For this reason, we proposed saccade delayed task. It requires inhibitory processing for maintaining fixation on the central target until it disappears – what constitutes the GO signal for saccade. The experiment consisted of 100 trials for each eye and was performed under two viewing conditions: monocular amblyopic / non-dominant eye and monocular dominant eye. We examined saccadic latency in 16 subjects (mean age 30±11 years with anisometropic amblyopia (two subjects had also microtropia and in 17 control subjects (mean age 28±8 years. Participants were instructed to look at central (fixation target and when it disappears, to make the saccade toward the periphery (10 deg as fast as possible, either left or the right target. The study results have proved the significant difference in saccadic latency between the amblyopic (mean 262±48 ms and dominant (mean 237±45 ms eye, in anisometropic group. In the control group, the saccadic latency for dominant (mean 226±32ms and non-dominant (mean 230±29 ms eye was not significantly different.By the use of LATER (Linear Approach to the Threshold with Ergodic Rate decision model we interpret our findings as a decrease in accumulation of visual information acquired by means of central (affected retina in subjects with anisometropic amblyopia.

  8. User Frustrations as Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weiss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available User frustrations are an excellent source of new product ideas. Starting with this observation, this article describes an approach that entrepreneurs can use to discover business opportunities. Opportunity discovery starts with a problem that the user has, but may not be able to articulate. User-centered design techniques can help elicit those latent needs. The entrepreneur should then try to understand how users are solving their problem today, before proposing a solution that draws on the unique skills and technical capabilities available to the entrepreneur. Finally, an in-depth understanding of the user allows the entrepreneur to hone in on the points of difference and resonance that are the foundation of a strong customer value proposition.

  9. Semantic Interference in Immediate and Delayed Naming and Reading: Attention and Task Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piai, Vitoria; Roelofs, Ardi; Schriefers, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Disagreement exists about whether lexical selection in word production is a competitive process. Competition predicts semantic interference from distractor words in immediate but not in delayed picture naming. In contrast, Janssen, Schirm, Mahon, and Caramazza (2008) obtained semantic interference in delayed picture naming when participants had to…

  10. Teaching Students to Overcome Frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Offers concrete strategies for teaching students about frustration, reducing classroom stress, and integrating frustration-tolerance techniques into the regular curriculum. Discusses how to teach self-control within the curriculum with tips on relaxation, support, and acknowledging accomplishments. Claims that such steps will reduce related…

  11. The Influence of Levels of Processing on Recall from Working Memory and Delayed Recall Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Vanessa M.; McCabe, David P.; Youngblood, Jessie L.; Rose, Nathan S.; Myerson, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in working memory has highlighted the similarities involved in retrieval from complex span tasks and episodic memory tasks, suggesting that these tasks are influenced by similar memory processes. In the present article, the authors manipulated the level of processing engaged when studying to-be-remembered words during a reading…

  12. The nature of impulsivity: visual exposure to natural environments decreases impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith S Berry

    Full Text Available The benefits of visual exposure to natural environments for human well-being in areas of stress reduction, mood improvement, and attention restoration are well documented, but the effects of natural environments on impulsive decision-making remain unknown. Impulsive decision-making in delay discounting offers generality, predictive validity, and insight into decision-making related to unhealthy behaviors. The present experiment evaluated differences in such decision-making in humans experiencing visual exposure to one of the following conditions: natural (e.g., mountains, built (e.g., buildings, or control (e.g., triangles using a delay discounting task that required participants to choose between immediate and delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants viewed the images before and during the delay discounting task. Participants were less impulsive in the condition providing visual exposure to natural scenes compared to built and geometric scenes. Results suggest that exposure to natural environments results in decreased impulsive decision-making relative to built environments.

  13. Frustration: A common user experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    % of their time redoing lost work. Thus, the frustrating experiences accounted for a total of 27% of the time, This main finding is exacerbated by several supplementary findings. For example, the users were unable to fix 26% of the experienced problems, and they rated that the problems recurred with a median....... In the present study, 21 users self-reported their frustrating experiences during an average of 1.72 hours of computer use. As in the previous studies the amount of time lost due to frustrating experiences was disturbing. The users spent 16% of their time trying to fix encountered problems and another 11...

  14. Understanding Conservation Delays in Children with Specific Language Impairment: Task Representations Revealed in Speech and Gesture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainela-Arnold, Elina; Evans, Julia L.; Alibali, Martha W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated mental representations of Piagetian conservation tasks in children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing peers. Children with SLI have normal nonverbal intelligence; however, they exhibit difficulties in Piagetian conservation tasks. The authors tested the hypothesis that conservation…

  15. Getting Frustrated: Modelling Emotion Contagion in Stranded Passengers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, C. Natalie; Couwenberg, Maik; Bosse, T.

    2017-01-01

    Train passengers can get stranded due to a variety of events, such as a delay, technical malfunctioning or a natural disaster. Stranded passengers can get frustrated, which could escalate in misbehaviours. Examples are verbal and physical violence or dangerous behaviours such as opening emergency

  16. fNIRS evidence of prefrontal regulation of frustration in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Susan B; Luna, Beatriz; Hein, Tyler C; Huppert, Theodore J

    2014-01-15

    The experience of frustration is common in early childhood, yet some children seem to possess a lower tolerance for frustration than others. Characterizing the biological mechanisms underlying a wide range of frustration tolerance observed in early childhood may inform maladaptive behavior and psychopathology that is associated with this construct. The goal of this study was to measure prefrontal correlates of frustration in 3-5-year-old children, who are not readily adaptable for typical neuroimaging approaches, using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). fNIRS of frontal regions were measured as frustration was induced in children through a computer game where a desired and expected prize was "stolen" by an animated dog. A fNIRS general linear model (GLM) was used to quantify the correlation of brain regions with the task and identify areas that were statistically different between the winning and frustrating test conditions. A second-level voxel-based ANOVA analysis was then used to correlate the amplitude of each individual's brain activation with measure of parent-reported frustration. Experimental results indicated increased activity in the middle prefrontal cortex during winning of a desired prize, while lateral prefrontal cortex activity increased during frustration. Further, activity increase in lateral prefrontal cortex during frustration correlated positively with parent-reported frustration tolerance. These findings point to the role of the lateral prefrontal cortex as a potential region supporting the regulation of emotion during frustration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Frustration on Brain Activation Pattern in Subjects with Different Temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Bierzynska, Maria; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Marchewka, Artur; Debowska, Weronika; Duszyk, Anna; Zajkowski, Wojciech; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Nowicka, Anna; Strelau, Jan; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the prevalence of frustration in everyday life, very few neuroimaging studies were focused on this emotional state. In the current study we aimed to examine effects of frustration on brain activity while performing a well-learned task in participants with low and high tolerance for arousal. Prior to the functional magnetic resonance imaging session, the subjects underwent 2 weeks of Braille reading training. Frustration induction was obtained by using a novel highly difficult tact...

  18. The regulation of induced depression during a frustrating situation: benefits of expressive suppression in Chinese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiajin; Liu, Yingying; Ding, Nanxiang; Yang, Jiemin

    2014-01-01

    Studies from European-American cultures consistently reported that expressive suppression was associated with worse emotional consequence (e.g. depression) in comparison with acceptance. However, this conclusion may not apply to Chinese, as suppressing emotional displays to maintain relational harmony is culturally valued in East Asian countries. Thus, the present study examined the effects of suppression and acceptance on the depressive mood induced by a frustrating task in a Chinese sample. Sixty-four subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructions: suppression, acceptance or no-regulation during a frustrating arithmetic task. The experience of depressive emotion and skin conductance response (SCR) were recorded during pre-frustration baseline, frustration induction and post-frustration recovery phases, respectively. Compared with the control and acceptance instructions, suppression instruction was associated with decreased depressive experiences and smaller SCR activity during frustration. There were no significant differences between acceptance and control groups in both subjective depression and SCR activity during frustration. Moreover, the suppression group showed a better emotional recovery after the frustrating task, in comparison with the acceptance and control groups. Correlation analyses verified that SCR reactivity was a reliable index of experienced depression during the frustration. Expressive suppression is effective in reducing depressive experiences and depression-related physiological activity (SCR) when Chinese people are involved. By contrast, the acceptance of depressive emotion in Chinese people does not produce a similar regulation effect. These findings suggest that cultural context should be considered in understanding the emotional consequences of suppression and acceptance strategies.

  19. Delayed splenic rupture: dating the sub-capsular hemorrhage as a useful task to evaluate causal relationships with trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riezzo, Irene; Di Battista, Benedetta; De Salvia, Alessandra; Cantatore, Santina; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to perform a chronological assessment of the phenomenon of delayed rupture of the spleen, to assess the phenomenological order about the sub-capsular hematoma transformation to determine the causal relationship with trauma as hypothetical cause of death. 80 cases of blunt trauma with splenic capsular hematoma and subsequent rupture of the spleen were evaluated: 38 had an acute rupture of the spleen, 42 presented a break in days or weeks after the traumatic injury. Time between the traumatic event and delayed rupture of the spleen is within a range of time from one day to more than one month. Data recorded included age, sex, type of trauma, injury severity score, grade of splenic injury, associated intra-abdominal injuries, pathologic specimen evaluation. Immunohistochemical investigation of perisplenic hematoma or laceration was performed utilizing polyclonal antibodies anti-fibrinogen, CD61 and CD68, and showed structural chronological differences of sub-capsular hematoma. Expression of modification and organization of erythrocytes, fibrinogen, platelets and macrophages provides an informative picture of the progression of reparative phenomena associated with sub-capsular hematoma and subsequent delayed splenic rupture. Sub-capsular splenic hematoma dating, which we divided into 4 phases, is representing a task in both clinical practice and forensic pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysfunctional Prefrontal Function Is Associated with Impulsivity in People with Internet Gaming Disorder during a Delay Discounting Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet gaming disorder (IGD, defined as the persistent use of online games with ignorance of adverse consequences, has increasingly raised widespread public concerns. This study aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms underlying IGD by comparing intertemporal decision-making process between 18 IGD participants and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs. Both behavioral and fMRI data were recorded from a delay discounting task. At the behavioral level, the IGD showed a higher discount rate k than HC; and in IGD group, both the reaction time (delay − immediate and the discount rate k were significantly positively correlated with the severity of IGD. At the neural level, the IGD exhibited reduced brain activations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus compared to HC during performing delay trials relative to immediate ones. Taken together, the results suggested that IGD showed deficits in making decisions and tended to pursuit immediate satisfaction. The underlying mechanism arises from the deficient ability in evaluating between delayed reward and immediate satisfaction, and the impaired ability in impulse inhibition, which may be associated with the dysfunction of the prefrontal activation. These might be the reason why IGD continue playing online games in spite of facing severe negative consequences.

  1. Dysfunctional Prefrontal Function Is Associated with Impulsivity in People with Internet Gaming Disorder during a Delay Discounting Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Hu, Yanbo; Xu, Jiaojing; Zhou, Hongli; Lin, Xiao; Du, Xiaoxia; Dong, Guangheng

    2017-01-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD), defined as the persistent use of online games with ignorance of adverse consequences, has increasingly raised widespread public concerns. This study aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms underlying IGD by comparing intertemporal decision-making process between 18 IGD participants and 21 matched healthy controls (HCs). Both behavioral and fMRI data were recorded from a delay discounting task. At the behavioral level, the IGD showed a higher discount rate k than HC; and in IGD group, both the reaction time (delay - immediate) and the discount rate k were significantly positively correlated with the severity of IGD. At the neural level, the IGD exhibited reduced brain activations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus compared to HC during performing delay trials relative to immediate ones. Taken together, the results suggested that IGD showed deficits in making decisions and tended to pursuit immediate satisfaction. The underlying mechanism arises from the deficient ability in evaluating between delayed reward and immediate satisfaction, and the impaired ability in impulse inhibition, which may be associated with the dysfunction of the prefrontal activation. These might be the reason why IGD continue playing online games in spite of facing severe negative consequences.

  2. Anger under control: neural correlates of frustration as a function of trait aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Pawliczek

    Full Text Available Antisocial behavior and aggression are prominent symptoms in several psychiatric disorders including antisocial personality disorder. An established precursor to aggression is a frustrating event, which can elicit anger or exasperation, thereby prompting aggressive responses. While some studies have investigated the neural correlates of frustration and aggression, examination of their relation to trait aggression in healthy populations are rare. Based on a screening of 550 males, we formed two extreme groups, one including individuals reporting high (n=21 and one reporting low (n=18 trait aggression. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at 3T, all participants were put through a frustration task comprising unsolvable anagrams of German nouns. Despite similar behavioral performance, males with high trait aggression reported higher ratings of negative affect and anger after the frustration task. Moreover, they showed relatively decreased activation in the frontal brain regions and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as well as relatively less amygdala activation in response to frustration. Our findings indicate distinct frontal and limbic processing mechanisms following frustration modulated by trait aggression. In response to a frustrating event, HA individuals show some of the personality characteristics and neural processing patterns observed in abnormally aggressive populations. Highlighting the impact of aggressive traits on the behavioral and neural responses to frustration in non-psychiatric extreme groups can facilitate further characterization of neural dysfunctions underlying psychiatric disorders that involve abnormal frustration processing and aggression.

  3. Frustration in Condensed Matter and Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Tanner, S.; Conroy, B.; Owens, F.; Tran, M. M.; Boekema, C.

    2014-03-01

    By means of computer modeling, we are studying frustration in condensed matter and protein folding, including the influence of temperature and Thomson-figure formation. Frustration is due to competing interactions in a disordered state. The key issue is how the particles interact to reach the lowest frustration. The relaxation for frustration is mostly a power function (randomly assigned pattern) or an exponential function (regular patterns like Thomson figures). For the atomic Thomson model, frustration is predicted to decrease with the formation of Thomson figures at zero kelvin. We attempt to apply our frustration modeling to protein folding and dynamics. We investigate the homogeneous protein frustration that would cause the speed of the protein folding to increase. Increase of protein frustration (where frustration and hydrophobicity interplay with protein folding) may lead to a protein mutation. Research is supported by WiSE@SJSU and AFC San Jose.

  4. Task-irrelevant distractors in the delay period interfere selectively with visual short-term memory for spatial locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesco; Scott, Jerry; Aron, Adam R; Ester, Edward F

    2017-07-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) enables the representation of information in a readily accessible state. VSTM is typically conceptualized as a form of "active" storage that is resistant to interference or disruption, yet several recent studies have shown that under some circumstances task-irrelevant distractors may indeed disrupt performance. Here, we investigated how task-irrelevant visual distractors affected VSTM by asking whether distractors induce a general loss of remembered information or selectively interfere with memory representations. In a VSTM task, participants recalled the spatial location of a target visual stimulus after a delay in which distractors were presented on 75% of trials. Notably, the distractor's eccentricity always matched the eccentricity of the target, while in the critical conditions the distractor's angular position was shifted either clockwise or counterclockwise relative to the target. We then computed estimates of recall error for both eccentricity and polar angle. A general interference model would predict an effect of distractors on both polar angle and eccentricity errors, while a selective interference model would predict effects of distractors on angle but not on eccentricity errors. Results showed that for stimulus angle there was an increase in the magnitude and variability of recall errors. However, distractors had no effect on estimates of stimulus eccentricity. Our results suggest that distractors selectively interfere with VSTM for spatial locations.

  5. Load-Dependent Increases in Delay-Period Alpha-Band Power Track the Gating of Task-Irrelevant Inputs to Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Heinz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies exploring the role of neural oscillations in cognition have revealed sustained increases in alpha-band power (ABP during the delay period of verbal and visual working memory (VWM tasks. There have been various proposals regarding the functional significance of such increases, including the inhibition of task-irrelevant cortical areas as well as the active retention of information in VWM. The present study examines the role of delay-period ABP in mediating the effects of interference arising from on-going visual processing during a concurrent VWM task. Specifically, we reasoned that, if set-size dependent increases in ABP represent the gating out of on-going task-irrelevant visual inputs, they should be predictive with respect to some modulation in visual evoked potentials resulting from a task-irrelevant delay period probe stimulus. In order to investigate this possibility, we recorded the electroencephalogram while subjects performed a change detection task requiring the retention of two or four novel shapes. On a portion of trials, a novel, task-irrelevant bilateral checkerboard probe was presented mid-way through the delay. Analyses focused on examining correlations between set-size dependent increases in ABP and changes in the magnitude of the P1, N1 and P3a components of the probe-evoked response and how such increases might be related to behavior. Results revealed that increased delay-period ABP was associated with changes in the amplitude of the N1 and P3a event-related potential (ERP components, and with load-dependent changes in capacity when the probe was presented during the delay. We conclude that load-dependent increases in ABP likely play a role in supporting short-term retention by gating task-irrelevant sensory inputs and suppressing potential sources of disruptive interference.

  6. Strength of figure-ground activity in monkey primary visual cortex predicts saccadic reaction time in a delayed detection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supèr, Hans; Lamme, Victor A F

    2007-06-01

    When and where are decisions made? In the visual system a saccade, which is a fast shift of gaze toward a target in the visual scene, is the behavioral outcome of a decision. Current neurophysiological data and reaction time models show that saccadic reaction times are determined by a build-up of activity in motor-related structures, such as the frontal eye fields. These structures depend on the sensory evidence of the stimulus. Here we use a delayed figure-ground detection task to show that late modulated activity in the visual cortex (V1) predicts saccadic reaction time. This predictive activity is part of the process of figure-ground segregation and is specific for the saccade target location. These observations indicate that sensory signals are directly involved in the decision of when and where to look.

  7. A Novel Switching-Based Control Framework for Improved Task Performance in Teleoperation System With Asymmetric Time-Varying Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Di-Hua; Xia, Yuanqing

    2018-02-01

    This paper addresses the adaptive control for task-space teleoperation systems with constrained predefined synchronization error, where a novel switched control framework is investigated. Based on multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals method, the stability of the resulting closed-loop system is established in the sense of state-independent input-to-output stability. Compared with previous work, the developed method can simultaneously handle the unknown kinematics/dynamics, asymmetric varying time delays, and prescribed performance control in a unified framework. It is shown that the developed controller can guarantee the prescribed transient-state and steady-state synchronization performances between the master and slave robots, which is demonstrated by the simulation study.

  8. Deliberate exotic magnetism via frustration and topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Schiffer, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Introduced originally to mimic the unusual, frustrated behaviour of spin ice pyrochlores, artificial spin ice can be realized in odd, dedicated geometries that open the door to new manifestations of a higher level of frustration.

  9. Analog assessment of frustration tolerance: association with self-reported child abuse risk and physiological reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Christina M; Russa, Mary Bower; Kircher, John C

    2015-08-01

    Although frustration has long been implicated in promoting aggression, the potential for poor frustration tolerance to function as a risk factor for physical child abuse risk has received minimal attention. Instead, much of the extant literature has examined the role of anger in physical abuse risk, relying on self-reports of the experience or expression of anger, despite the fact that this methodology is often acknowledged as vulnerable to bias. Therefore, the present investigation examined whether a more implicit, analog assessment of frustration tolerance specifically relevant to parenting would reveal an association with various markers of elevated physical child abuse risk in a series of samples that varied with regard to age, parenting status, and abuse risk. An analog task was designed to evoke parenting-relevant frustration: the task involved completing an unsolvable task while listening to a crying baby or a toddler's temper tantrum; time scores were generated to gauge participants' persistence in the task when encountering such frustration. Across these studies, low frustration tolerance was associated with increased physical child abuse potential, greater use of parent-child aggression in discipline encounters, dysfunctional disciplinary style, support for physical discipline use and physical discipline escalation, and increased heart rate. Future research directions that could better inform intervention and prevention programs are discussed, including working to clarify the processes underlying frustration intolerance and potential interactive influences that may exacerbate physical child abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of communication delays to and from the International Space Station on self-reported individual and team behavior and performance: A mixed-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintz, Natalie M.; Chou, Chih-Ping; Vessey, William B.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2016-12-01

    Deep space explorations will involve significant delays in communication to and from Earth that will likely impact individual and team outcomes. However, the extent of these impacts and the appropriate countermeasures for their mitigation remain largely unknown. This study utilized the International Space Station (ISS), a high-fidelity analog for deep space, as a research platform to assess the impact of communication delays on individual and team performance, mood, and behavior. Three astronauts on the ISS and 18 mission support personnel performed tasks with and without communication delays (50-s one-way) during a mission lasting 166 days. Self-reported assessments of individual and team performance and mood were obtained after each task. Secondary outcomes included communication quality and task autonomy. Qualitative data from post-mission interviews with astronauts were used to validate and expand on quantitative data, and to elicit recommendations for countermeasures. Crew well-being and communication quality were significantly reduced in communication delay tasks compared to control. Communication delays were also significantly associated with increased individual stress/frustration. Qualitative data suggest communication delays impacted operational outcomes (i.e. task efficiency), teamwork processes (i.e. team/task coordination) and mood (i.e. stress/frustration), particularly when tasks involved high task-related communication demands, either because of poor communication strategies or low crew autonomy. Training, teamwork, and technology-focused countermeasures were identified to mitigate or prevent adverse impacts.

  11. Screening for speech and language delay in preschool children: systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Heidi D; Nygren, Peggy; Walker, Miranda; Panoscha, Rita

    2006-02-01

    PEDIATRICS (ISSN Numbers: Print, 0031-4005; Online, 1098-4275). Published in the public domain by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Speech and language development is a useful indicator of a child's overall development and cognitive ability and is related to school success. Identification of children at risk for developmental delay or related problems may lead to intervention services and family assistance at a young age, when the chances for improvement are best. However, optimal methods for screening for speech and language delay have not been identified, and screening is practiced inconsistently in primary care. We sought to evaluate the strengths and limits of evidence about the effectiveness of screening and interventions for speech and language delay in preschool-aged children to determine the balance of benefits and adverse effects of routine screening in primary care for the development of guidelines by the US Preventive Services Task Force. The target population includes all children up to 5 years old without previously known conditions associated with speech and language delay, such as hearing and neurologic impairments. Studies were identified from Medline, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases (1966 to November 19, 2004), systematic reviews, reference lists, and experts. The evidence review included only English-language, published articles that are available through libraries. Only randomized, controlled trials were considered for examining the effectiveness of interventions. Outcome measures were considered if they were obtained at any time or age after screening and/or intervention as long as the initial assessment occurred while the child was birth order, and family size. The performance characteristics of evaluation techniques that take or =2 screening techniques in 1 population, and comparisons of a single screening technique across different populations are lacking. Fourteen good- and fair-quality randomized, controlled trials of interventions

  12. The Regulation of Induced Depression during a Frustrating Situation: Benefits of Expressive Suppression in Chinese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nanxiang; Yang, Jiemin

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies from European-American cultures consistently reported that expressive suppression was associated with worse emotional consequence (e.g. depression) in comparison with acceptance. However, this conclusion may not apply to Chinese, as suppressing emotional displays to maintain relational harmony is culturally valued in East Asian countries. Thus, the present study examined the effects of suppression and acceptance on the depressive mood induced by a frustrating task in a Chinese sample. Method Sixty-four subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructions: suppression, acceptance or no-regulation during a frustrating arithmetic task. The experience of depressive emotion and skin conductance response (SCR) were recorded during pre-frustration baseline, frustration induction and post-frustration recovery phases, respectively. Results Compared with the control and acceptance instructions, suppression instruction was associated with decreased depressive experiences and smaller SCR activity during frustration. There were no significant differences between acceptance and control groups in both subjective depression and SCR activity during frustration. Moreover, the suppression group showed a better emotional recovery after the frustrating task, in comparison with the acceptance and control groups. Correlation analyses verified that SCR reactivity was a reliable index of experienced depression during the frustration. Conclusions Expressive suppression is effective in reducing depressive experiences and depression-related physiological activity (SCR) when Chinese people are involved. By contrast, the acceptance of depressive emotion in Chinese people does not produce a similar regulation effect. These findings suggest that cultural context should be considered in understanding the emotional consequences of suppression and acceptance strategies. PMID:24827934

  13. The regulation of induced depression during a frustrating situation: benefits of expressive suppression in Chinese individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajin Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies from European-American cultures consistently reported that expressive suppression was associated with worse emotional consequence (e.g. depression in comparison with acceptance. However, this conclusion may not apply to Chinese, as suppressing emotional displays to maintain relational harmony is culturally valued in East Asian countries. Thus, the present study examined the effects of suppression and acceptance on the depressive mood induced by a frustrating task in a Chinese sample. METHOD: Sixty-four subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructions: suppression, acceptance or no-regulation during a frustrating arithmetic task. The experience of depressive emotion and skin conductance response (SCR were recorded during pre-frustration baseline, frustration induction and post-frustration recovery phases, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with the control and acceptance instructions, suppression instruction was associated with decreased depressive experiences and smaller SCR activity during frustration. There were no significant differences between acceptance and control groups in both subjective depression and SCR activity during frustration. Moreover, the suppression group showed a better emotional recovery after the frustrating task, in comparison with the acceptance and control groups. Correlation analyses verified that SCR reactivity was a reliable index of experienced depression during the frustration. CONCLUSIONS: Expressive suppression is effective in reducing depressive experiences and depression-related physiological activity (SCR when Chinese people are involved. By contrast, the acceptance of depressive emotion in Chinese people does not produce a similar regulation effect. These findings suggest that cultural context should be considered in understanding the emotional consequences of suppression and acceptance strategies.

  14. High-sucrose diets in male rats disrupt aspects of decision making tasks, motivation and spatial memory, but not impulsivity measured by operant delay-discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alanna; Dogra, Vimi R; Reichelt, Amy C

    2017-06-01

    Excessive consumption of sugar sweetened drinks is proposed to produce functional changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, leading to perturbations in behavioural control. Impairments in behavioural control have been observed in obese people on tasks that involve making choices, including delay-discounting, indicative of increased impulsivity. In this study we examined the impact of 2h daily access to 10% sucrose (or no sucrose in controls) in young male rats on behavioural tasks reliant on hippocampal function including delay-discounting, T-maze forced choice alternation and place recognition memory, as well as progressive ratio to measure motivation. We observed deficits in place recognition memory and T-maze forced choice alternation, indicative of hippocampal deficits in rats with a history of sucrose consumption. Moreover, rats with a history of sucrose consumption were less motivated to lever press for rewards on a progressive ratio schedule. However, rats with a history of sucrose consumption performed equally to control animals during the delay-discounting task, suggesting that they discounted for reward size over a delay in a manner comparable to control animals. These findings indicate that high-sucrose diets impact on spatial and working memory processes, but do not induce impulsive-like choice behaviours in rats, suggesting that unhealthy diet choices may not influence this aspect of decision-making behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synchronous Spike Patterns in Macaque Motor Cortex during an Instructed-Delay Reach-to-Grasp Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Emiliano; Quaglio, Pietro; Denker, Michael; Brochier, Thomas; Riehle, Alexa; Grün, Sonja

    2016-08-10

    The computational role of spike time synchronization at millisecond precision among neurons in the cerebral cortex is hotly debated. Studies performed on data of limited size provided experimental evidence that low-order correlations occur in relation to behavior. Advances in electrophysiological technology to record from hundreds of neurons simultaneously provide the opportunity to observe coordinated spiking activity of larger populations of cells. We recently published a method that combines data mining and statistical evaluation to search for significant patterns of synchronous spikes in massively parallel spike trains (Torre et al., 2013). The method solves the computational and multiple testing problems raised by the high dimensionality of the data. In the current study, we used our method on simultaneous recordings from two macaque monkeys engaged in an instructed-delay reach-to-grasp task to determine the emergence of spike synchronization in relation to behavior. We found a multitude of synchronous spike patterns aligned in both monkeys along a preferential mediolateral orientation in brain space. The occurrence of the patterns is highly specific to behavior, indicating that different behaviors are associated with the synchronization of different groups of neurons ("cell assemblies"). However, pooled patterns that overlap in neuronal composition exhibit no specificity, suggesting that exclusive cell assemblies become active during different behaviors, but can recruit partly identical neurons. These findings are consistent across multiple recording sessions analyzed across the two monkeys. Neurons in the brain communicate via electrical impulses called spikes. How spikes are coordinated to process information is still largely unknown. Synchronous spikes are effective in triggering a spike emission in receiving neurons and have been shown to occur in relation to behavior in a number of studies on simultaneous recordings of few neurons. We recently published

  16. Loss anticipation and outcome during the Monetary Incentive Delay Task: a neuroimaging systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugré, Jules R.; Dumais, Alexandre; Bitar, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    Background Reward seeking and avoidance of punishment are key motivational processes. Brain-imaging studies often use the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT) to evaluate motivational processes involved in maladaptive behavior. Although the bulk of research has been done on the MIDT reward events, little is known about the neural basis of avoidance of punishment. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of brain activations during anticipation and receipt of monetary losses in healthy controls. Methods All functional neuro-imaging studies using the MIDT in healthy controls were retrieved using PubMed, Google Scholar & EMBASE databases. Functional neuro-imaging data was analyzed using the Seed-based d Mapping Software. Results Thirty-five studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising 699 healthy adults. In both anticipation and loss outcome phases, participants showed large and robust activations in the bilateral striatum, (anterior) insula, and anterior cingulate gyrus relatively to Loss > Neutral contrast. Although relatively similar activation patterns were observed during the two event types, they differed in the pattern of prefrontal activations: ventro-lateral prefrontal activations were observed during loss anticipation, while medial prefrontal activations were observed during loss receipt. Discussion Considering that previous meta-analyses highlighted activations in the medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula and the ventral striatum, the current meta-analysis highlighted the potential specificity of the ventro-lateral prefrontal regions, the median cingulate cortex and the amygdala in the loss events. Future studies can rely on these latter results to examine the neural correlates of loss processing in psychiatric populations characterized by harm avoidance or insensitivity to punishment. PMID:29761060

  17. Loss anticipation and outcome during the Monetary Incentive Delay Task: a neuroimaging systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules R. Dugré

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Reward seeking and avoidance of punishment are key motivational processes. Brain-imaging studies often use the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT to evaluate motivational processes involved in maladaptive behavior. Although the bulk of research has been done on the MIDT reward events, little is known about the neural basis of avoidance of punishment. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of brain activations during anticipation and receipt of monetary losses in healthy controls. Methods All functional neuro-imaging studies using the MIDT in healthy controls were retrieved using PubMed, Google Scholar & EMBASE databases. Functional neuro-imaging data was analyzed using the Seed-based d Mapping Software. Results Thirty-five studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising 699 healthy adults. In both anticipation and loss outcome phases, participants showed large and robust activations in the bilateral striatum, (anterior insula, and anterior cingulate gyrus relatively to Loss > Neutral contrast. Although relatively similar activation patterns were observed during the two event types, they differed in the pattern of prefrontal activations: ventro-lateral prefrontal activations were observed during loss anticipation, while medial prefrontal activations were observed during loss receipt. Discussion Considering that previous meta-analyses highlighted activations in the medial prefrontal cortex/anterior cingulate cortex, the anterior insula and the ventral striatum, the current meta-analysis highlighted the potential specificity of the ventro-lateral prefrontal regions, the median cingulate cortex and the amygdala in the loss events. Future studies can rely on these latter results to examine the neural correlates of loss processing in psychiatric populations characterized by harm avoidance or insensitivity to punishment.

  18. [The delayed word recall task using ADAS-Jcog word booklet effectively divides patients with mild cognitive impairment from normal elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Naoko; Umegaki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Sayaka; Mogi, Nanaka; Iguchi, Akihisa

    2007-07-01

    A new screening test for detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with higher sensitivity that can easily be administered at the bedside is necessary. In this study, we proposed the delayed recall task using the word booklet of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive component-Japanese version (ADAS-Jcog) and compared the score of the task in patients with MCI with that of cognitive normal elderly (NE) and patients with AD. Thirty six patients with MCI, 13 very mild AD, 104 mild AD, 13 moderate AD, and age- and education-matched 19 NE, recruited from the memory clinic of Nagoya University Hospital, were evaluated by the ADAS-Jcog word recall task which consisted of immediate recall (IR), a classical method on ADAS-Jcog, and delayed recall (DR) that has been newly introduced. Compared with controls, patients with MCI were significantly impaired on both IR and DR. On the other hand, DR is more sensitive than IR for distinguishing MCI from NE. The highest sensitivity (94.4%) and specificity (68.4%) were achieved when the results of IR were combined with those of DR. The result suggests that the delayed word recall task using the word booklet of ADAS-Jcog may be a useful tool as a screening method for the detection of MCI.

  19. Effect of frustration on brain activation pattern in subjects with different temperament.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eBierzynska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the prevalence of frustration in everyday life, very few neuroimaging studies were focused on this emotional state. In the current study we aimed to examine effects of frustration on brain activity while performing a well-learned task in participants with low and high tolerance for arousal. Prior to the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI session, the subjects underwent two weeks of Braille reading training. Frustration induction was obtained by using a novel highly difficult tactile task based on discrimination of Braille-like raised dots patterns and negative feedback. Effectiveness of this procedure has been confirmed in a pilot study using galvanic skin response (GSR and questionnaires. Brain activation pattern during tactile discrimination task before and after frustration were compared directly. Results revealed changes in brain activity in structures mostly reported in acute stress studies: striatum, cingulate cortex, insula, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus and in structures engaged in tactile Braille discrimination: SI and SII. Temperament type affected activation pattern. Subjects with low tolerance for arousal showed higher activation in the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL than high reactivity group. Even though performance in the discrimination trials following frustration was unaltered, we observed increased activity of primary and secondary somatosensory cortex processing the tactile information. We interpret this effect as an indicator of additional involvement required to counteract the effects of frustration.

  20. Effect of Frustration on Brain Activation Pattern in Subjects with Different Temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierzynska, Maria; Bielecki, Maksymilian; Marchewka, Artur; Debowska, Weronika; Duszyk, Anna; Zajkowski, Wojciech; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Nowicka, Anna; Strelau, Jan; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the prevalence of frustration in everyday life, very few neuroimaging studies were focused on this emotional state. In the current study we aimed to examine effects of frustration on brain activity while performing a well-learned task in participants with low and high tolerance for arousal. Prior to the functional magnetic resonance imaging session, the subjects underwent 2 weeks of Braille reading training. Frustration induction was obtained by using a novel highly difficult tactile task based on discrimination of Braille-like raised dots patterns and negative feedback. Effectiveness of this procedure has been confirmed in a pilot study using galvanic skin response and questionnaires. Brain activation pattern during tactile discrimination task before and after frustration were compared directly. Results revealed changes in brain activity in structures mostly reported in acute stress studies: striatum, cingulate cortex, insula, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus and in structures engaged in tactile Braille discrimination: SI and SII. Temperament type affected activation pattern. Subjects with low tolerance for arousal showed higher activation in the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, and inferior parietal lobule than high reactivity group. Even though performance in the discrimination trials following frustration was unaltered, we observed increased activity of primary and secondary somatosensory cortex processing the tactile information. We interpret this effect as an indicator of additional involvement required to counteract the effects of frustration.

  1. Frustrated lattices of Ising chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudasov, Yurii B; Korshunov, Aleksei S; Pavlov, V N; Maslov, Dmitrii A

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic structure and magnetization dynamics of systems of plane frustrated Ising chain lattices are reviewed for three groups of compounds: Ca 3 Co 2 O 6 , CsCoCl 3 , and Sr 5 Rh 4 O 12 . The available experimental data are analyzed and compared in detail. It is shown that a high-temperature magnetic phase on a triangle lattice is normally and universally a partially disordered antiferromagnetic (PDA) structure. The diversity of low-temperature phases results from weak interactions that lift the degeneracy of a 2D antiferromagnetic Ising model on the triangle lattice. Mean-field models, Monte Carlo simulation results on the static magnetization curve, and results on slow magnetization dynamics obtained with Glauber's theory are discussed in detail. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Neutron diffraction in a frustrated ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirebeau, I.; Iancu, G.; Gavoille, G.; Hubsch, J.

    1994-01-01

    The competition between a long range ordered ferrimagnetic lattice and small fluctuating clusters have been probed by neutron diffraction in a titanium magnesium frustrated ferrite. The description of the system is then compared to the predictions of several theoretical models for frustrated systems. 3 figs., 8 refs

  3. On the geometry of fracture and frustration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Vinzenz

    2014-01-01

    Geometric frustration occurs when local order cannot propagate through space. A common example is the surface of a soccer ball, which cannot be tiled with hexaganons only. Geometric frustration can also be present in materials. In fact, geometry can act as an instrument to design the mechanical,

  4. Meperidine addiction or treatment frustration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C I; Liu, C Y; Chen, C Y; Yang, C H; Yeh, E K

    2001-01-01

    There have been few studies of the psychiatric characteristics of analgesics addiction. The physician's perceptions that patients were addicted to analgesics might be partially attributable to frustration with poor response to treatment. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the medical records of 20 subjects (15 male and 5 female) who were perceived as having addiction to meperidine by general physicians. The most common medical diagnosis among these patients was chronic pancreatitis (7/20). Among them, five had a past history of suicide attempt and three had self-injury behavior during the index admission. The fact that subjects were perceived as being addicted might be attributable to a vicious cycle of the following factors: 1) chronic intractable pain; 2) poor staff-patient relationship; 3) lower pain threshold or tolerance due to anxiety or depression; 4) patients with a history or tendency of substance abuse; 5) placebo use and inadequate analgesics regimen. The findings of this study suggest that the importance of the following diagnostic and treatment procedures in these patients: 1) suicide risk should be evaluated; 2) comorbid psychiatric diseases should be treated; 3) factors that cause a vicious cycle in pain control should be identified; 4) misconceptions of opiate analgesics among medical staff should be discussed; 5) poor staff-patient relationship should be managed aggressively; and 6) "addiction" is a critical diagnosis that should be avoided if possible.

  5. The deployment of attention in short-term memory tasks: trade-offs between immediate and delayed deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Michael F; Cowan, Nelson; Colflesh, Greg H

    2008-06-01

    Memory at times depends on attention, as when attention is used to encode incoming, serial verbal information. When encoding and rehearsal are difficult or when attention is divided during list presentation, more attention is needed in the time following the presentation and just preceding the response. Across 12 experimental conditions observed in several experiments, we demonstrated this by introducing a nonverbal task with three levels of effort (no task, a natural nonverbal task, or an unnatural version of the task) during a brief retention interval in a short-term digit recall task. Interference from the task during the retention interval was greater when resources were drawn away from the encoding of the stimuli by other factors, including unpredictability of the end point of the list, rapid presentation, and a secondary task during list presentation. When those conditions complicate encoding of the list, we argue, attention is needed after the list so that the contents of passive memory (i.e., postcategorical phonological storage and/or precategorical sensory memory) may be retrieved and become the focus of attention for recall.

  6. Neutron scattering studies on frustrated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Taka-hisa

    2013-01-01

    A lot of frustrated magnetic systems exhibit a nontrivial magnetic order, such as long-wavelength modulation, noncollinear, or noncoplanar order. The nontrivial order may pave the way for the novel magnetic function of matter. Neutron studies are necessary to determine the magnetic structures in the frustrated magnetic systems. In particular, spin-polarized neutron scattering is a useful technique for the investigation of the novel physical properties relevant to the nontrivial spin arrangement. Here some neutron studies on a multiferroic perovskite manganese oxide system are demonstrated as a typical case. The frustrated magnetic systems may also a playground of novel types of local magnetic excitations, which behave like particles in contrast to the magnetic waves. It is becoming a good challenge to study such particle-type magnetic excitations relevant to the magnetic frustration. (author)

  7. Functional Dissociation of Confident and Not-Confident Errors in the Spatial Delayed Response Task Demonstrates Impairments in Working Memory Encoding and Maintenance in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta S. Mayer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Even though extensively investigated, the nature of working memory (WM deficits in patients with schizophrenia (PSZ is not yet fully understood. In particular, the contribution of different WM sub-processes to the severe WM deficit observed in PSZ is a matter of debate. So far, most research has focused on impaired WM maintenance. By analyzing different types of errors in a spatial delayed response task (DRT, we have recently demonstrated that incorrect yet confident responses (which we labeled as false memory errors rather than incorrect/not-confident responses reflect failures of WM encoding, which was also impaired in PSZ. In the present study, we provide further evidence for a functional dissociation between confident and not-confident errors by manipulating the demands on WM maintenance, i.e., the length over which information has to be maintained in WM. Furthermore, we investigate whether these functionally distinguishable WM processes are impaired in PSZ. Twenty-four PSZ and 24 demographically matched healthy controls (HC performed a spatial DRT in which the length of the delay period was varied between 1, 2, 4, and 6 s. In each trial, participants also rated their level of response confidence. Across both groups, longer delays led to increased rates of incorrect/not-confident responses, while incorrect/confident responses were not affected by delay length. This functional dissociation provides additional support for our proposal that false memory errors (i.e., confident errors reflect problems at the level of WM encoding, while not-confident errors reflect failures of WM maintenance. Schizophrenic patients showed increased numbers of both confident and not-confident errors, suggesting that both sub-processes of WM—encoding and maintenance—are impaired in schizophrenia. Combined with the delay length-dependent functional dissociation, we propose that these impairments in schizophrenic patients are functionally distinguishable.

  8. Selective lesion of septal cholinergic neurons in rats impairs acquisition of a delayed matching to position T-maze task by delaying the shift from a response to a place strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Nicholas F; Gibbs, Robert B; Johnson, David A

    2008-12-16

    This study tested the hypothesis that septal cholinergic lesions impair acquisition of a delayed matching to position (DMP) T-maze task in male rats by affecting learning strategy. Rats received either the selective cholinergic immunotoxin, 192 IgG-saporin (SAP) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid directly into the medial septum. Two weeks later, animals were trained to acquire the DMP task. SAP-treated rats took significantly longer to acquire the task than corresponding controls. Both SAP-treated and control rats adopted a persistent turn and utilized a response strategy during early periods of training. By the time rats reached criterion the persistent turn was no longer evident, and all rats had shifted to an allocentric strategy, i.e., were relying on extramaze cues to a significant degree. During the acquisition period, SAP-treated rats spent significantly more days showing a persistent turn and using a response strategy than corresponding controls. The added time spent using a response strategy accounted entirely for the added days required to reach criterion among the SAP-treated rats. This suggests that the principal mechanism by which septal cholinergic lesions impair DMP acquisition in male rats is by increasing the predisposition to use a response vs. a place strategy, thereby affecting the ability to switch from one strategy to another.

  9. Delayed-matching-to-place Task in a Dry Maze to Measure Spatial Working Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Krukowski, Karen; Jopson, Timothy; Rosi, Susanna

    2017-07-05

    The delayed-matching-to-place (DMP) dry maze test is a variant of DMP water maze (Steele and Morris, 1999; Faizi et al. , 2012) which measures spatial working/episodic-like learning and memory that depends on both hippocampal and cortical functions (Wang and Morris, 2010; Euston et al. , 2012). Using this test we can detect normal aging related spatial working memory decline, as well as trauma induced working memory deficits. Furthermore, we recently reported that fractionated whole brain irradiation does not affect working memory in mice (Feng et al. , 2016). Here we describe the experimental setup and procedures of this behavioral test.

  10. A novel variable delay Go/No-Go task to study attention, motivation and working memory in the head-fixed rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzani, Samuel D; Nakamura, Shinya; Cooper, Donald C

    2013-01-01

    In order to parse the causal elements underlying complex behaviors and decision-making processes, appropriate behavioral methods must be developed and used in concurrence with molecular, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches. Presented is a protocol for a novel Go/No-Go behavioral paradigm to study the brain attention and motivation/reward circuitry in awake, head-restrained rodents. This experimental setup allows: (1) Pharmacological and viral manipulation of various brain regions via targeted guide cannula; (2) Optogenetic cell-type specific activation and silencing with simultaneous electrophysiological recording and; (3) Repeated electrophysiological single and multiple unit recordings during ongoing behavior. The task consists of three components. The subject first makes an observing response by initiating a trial by lever pressing in response to distinctive Go or No-Go tones.  Then, after a variable delay period, the subject is presented with a challenge period cued by white noise during which they must respond with a lever press for the Go condition or withhold from lever pressing for the duration of the cue in the No-Go condition. After correctly responding during the challenge period (Challenge) and a brief delay, a final reward tone of the same frequency as the initiation tone is presented and sucrose reward delivery is available and contingent upon lever pressing. Here, we provide a novel procedure and validating data set that allows researchers to study and manipulate components of behavior such as attention, motivation, impulsivity, and reward-related working memory during an ongoing operant behavioral task while limiting interference from non task-related behaviors.

  11. Maximal frustration as an immunological principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, F Vistulo; Mostardinha, P

    2009-03-06

    A fundamental problem in immunology is that of understanding how the immune system selects promptly which cells to kill without harming the body. This problem poses an apparent paradox. Strong reactivity against pathogens seems incompatible with perfect tolerance towards self. We propose a different view on cellular reactivity to overcome this paradox: effector functions should be seen as the outcome of cellular decisions which can be in conflict with other cells' decisions. We argue that if cellular systems are frustrated, then extensive cross-reactivity among the elements in the system can decrease the reactivity of the system as a whole and induce perfect tolerance. Using numerical and mathematical analyses, we discuss two simple models that perform optimal pathogenic detection with no autoimmunity if cells are maximally frustrated. This study strongly suggests that a principle of maximal frustration could be used to build artificial immune systems. It would be interesting to test this principle in the real adaptive immune system.

  12. [French validation of the Frustration Discomfort Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamayou, J-L; Tsenova, V; Gonthier, C; Blatier, C; Yahyaoui, A

    2016-08-01

    Rational emotive behavior therapy originally considered the concept of frustration intolerance in relation to different beliefs or cognitive patterns. Psychological disorders or, to some extent, certain affects such as frustration could result from irrational beliefs. Initially regarded as a unidimensional construct, recent literature considers those irrational beliefs as a multidimensional construct; such is the case for the phenomenon of frustration. In order to measure frustration intolerance, Harrington (2005) developed and validated the Frustration Discomfort Scale. The scale includes four dimensions of beliefs: emotional intolerance includes beliefs according to which emotional distress is intolerable and must be controlled or avoided as soon as possible. The intolerance of discomfort or demand for comfort is the second dimension based on beliefs that life should be peaceful and comfortable and that any inconvenience, effort or hassle should be avoided. The third dimension is entitlement, which includes beliefs about personal goals, such as merit, fairness, respect and gratification, and that others must not frustrate those non-negotiable desires. The fourth dimension is achievement, which reflects demands for high expectations or standards. The aim of this study was to translate and validate in a French population the Frustration and Discomfort Scale developed by Harrington (2005), assess its psychometric properties, highlight the four factors structure of the scale, and examine the relationships between this concept and both emotion regulation and perceived stress. We translated the Frustration Discomfort Scale from English to French and back from French to English in order to ensure good quality of translation. We then submitted the scale to 289 students (239 females and 50 males) from the University of Savoy in addition to the Cognitive Emotional Regulation Questionnaire and the Perceived Stress Scale. The results showed satisfactory psychometric

  13. Frustration-Instigated Behavior and Learned Helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winefield, Anthony H.

    1979-01-01

    Compares M. E. P. Seligman's recent work on learned helplessness with N. R. F. Maier's 30-year-old work on frustration behavior. Notes striking similarities between the two approaches. Concludes that the learned helplessness model might explain the "abnormal fixations" that Maier reported. (Author/RL)

  14. Children, Hyperactivity and Low Frustration Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Scott, Patricia Carol

    This paper addresses issues regarding the hyperactive child, the impulsive child, and the low frustration tolerance child. It points out the subjectivity involved in identifying children as hyperactive, and outlines various forms of hyperactivity: the child who is in constant movement, the child who manages control in school but exhibits whirlwind…

  15. Frustrated Lewis pairs: Design and reactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for FLP systems and their unique reactivity are discussed here. Keywords. Lewis .... we will concentrate on the design principles of such. FLPs and the ... Designs of frustrated Lewis pairs ..... 64 and neutral titanium (III) complex [Cp2TiOC6.

  16. Frustrated Lewis pairs-assisted tritium labeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, Aleš; Široká, Sabina; Elbert, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2016), s. 219 ISSN 2336-7202. [Sjezd českých a slovenských chemických společností /68./. 04.09.2016-07.09.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : frustrated Lewis pairs * one-pot synthesis * tritium -labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  17. The effects of reinforcement and response-cost on a delayed response task in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanto, M V

    1990-07-01

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are more inattentive, active, and impulsive than normal children. Some researchers have postulated that these symptoms can all be explained as a result of reduced sensitivity to reinforcement. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, we tested 20 ADD-H children and 18 matched normal controls, 4 1/2-11 years of age, on a delayed response task, a measure of impulsiveness, under conditions of positive reinforcement, and punishment in the form of response-cost. The contingencies each improved performance compared to baseline but did not differ significantly from each other. Neither contingency affected the groups differentially, thus failing to provide support for the reinforcement hypothesis.

  18. Engineering of frustration in colloidal artificial ices realized on microfeatured grooved lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierno, Pietro

    Artificial spin-ice systems, namely lattices of interacting single domain ferromagnetic islands, have been used to date as microscopic models of frustration induced by lattice topology, allowing for the direct visualization of spin arrangements and textures. However, the engineering of frustrated ice states in which individual spins can be manipulated in situ and the real-time observation of their collective dynamics remain both challenging tasks. Inspired by recent theoretical advances, we realize a colloidal version of an artificial spin ice system using interacting polarizable particles confined to lattices of bistable gravitational traps. We show quantitatively that ice-selection rules emerge in this frustrated soft matter system by tuning the strength of the pair-interactions between the microscopic units. Via independent control of particle positioning and dipolar coupling, we introduce monopole-like defects and strings and use loops with defined chirality as an elementary unit to store binary information.

  19. Pupil dilation co-varies with memory strength of individual traces in a delayed response paired-associate task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedderik van Rijn

    Full Text Available Studies on cognitive effort have shown that pupil dilation is a reliable indicator of memory load. However, it is conceivable that there are other sources of effort involved in memory that also affect pupil dilation. One of these is the ease with which an item can be retrieved from memory. Here, we present the results of an experiment in which we studied the way in which pupil dilation acts as an online marker for memory processing during the retrieval of paired associates while reducing confounds associated with motor responses. Paired associates were categorized into sets containing either 4 or 7 items. After learning the paired associates once, pupil dilation was measured during the presentation of the retrieval cue during four repetitions of each set. Memory strength was operationalized as the number of repetitions (frequency and set-size, since having more items per set results in a lower average recency. Dilation decreased with increased memory strength, supporting the hypothesis that the amplitude of the evoked pupillary response correlates positively with retrieval effort. Thus, while many studies have shown that "memory load" influences pupil dilation, our results indicate that the task-evoked pupillary response is also sensitive to the experimentally manipulated memory strength of individual items. As these effects were observed well before the response had been given, this study also suggests that pupil dilation can be used to assess an item's memory strength without requiring an overt response.

  20. Memory retrieval of smoking-related images induce greater insula activation as revealed by an fMRI-based delayed matching to sample task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Amy C; Ross, Robert S; Farmer, Stacey; Frederick, Blaise B; Nickerson, Lisa D; Lukas, Scott E; Stern, Chantal E

    2015-03-01

    Nicotine dependence is a chronic and difficult to treat disorder. While environmental stimuli associated with smoking precipitate craving and relapse, it is unknown whether smoking cues are cognitively processed differently than neutral stimuli. To evaluate working memory differences between smoking-related and neutral stimuli, we conducted a delay-match-to-sample (DMS) task concurrently with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in nicotine-dependent participants. The DMS task evaluates brain activation during the encoding, maintenance and retrieval phases of working memory. Smoking images induced significantly more subjective craving, and greater midline cortical activation during encoding in comparison to neutral stimuli that were similar in content yet lacked a smoking component. The insula, which is involved in maintaining nicotine dependence, was active during the successful retrieval of previously viewed smoking versus neutral images. In contrast, neutral images required more prefrontal cortex-mediated active maintenance during the maintenance period. These findings indicate that distinct brain regions are involved in the different phases of working memory for smoking-related versus neutral images. Importantly, the results implicate the insula in the retrieval of smoking-related stimuli, which is relevant given the insula's emerging role in addiction. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Organizational Frustration: A Model and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Paul E.

    1978-01-01

    This discussion is divided into four parts: (1) the definition of frustration; (2) general behavioral reactions to frustration which have implications for organizations; (3) integration of the individual behavioral reactions into a model of organizational frustration; and (4) a review of the supporting evidence for the model. (Author)

  2. Frustration-free Hamiltonians supporting Majorana zero edge modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, Sania; Barnett, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional fermionic system, such as a superconducting wire, may host Majorana zero-energy edge modes (MZMs) at its edges when it is in the topological phase. MZMs provide a path to realising fault-tolerant quantum computation, and so are the focus of intense experimental and theoretical studies. However, given a Hamiltonian, determining whether MZMs exist is a daunting task as it relies on knowing the spectral properties of the Hamiltonian in the thermodynamic limit. The Kitaev chain is a paradigmatic non-interacting model that supports MZMs and the Hamiltonian can be fully diagonalised. However, for interacting models, the situation is far more complex. Here we consider a different classification of models, namely, ones with frustration-free Hamiltonians. Within this class of models, interacting and non-interacting systems are treated on an equal footing, and we identify exactly which Hamiltonians can realise MZMs. (paper)

  3. Frustration-free Hamiltonians supporting Majorana zero edge modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtic, Sania; Barnett, Ryan

    2017-10-01

    A one-dimensional fermionic system, such as a superconducting wire, may host Majorana zero-energy edge modes (MZMs) at its edges when it is in the topological phase. MZMs provide a path to realising fault-tolerant quantum computation, and so are the focus of intense experimental and theoretical studies. However, given a Hamiltonian, determining whether MZMs exist is a daunting task as it relies on knowing the spectral properties of the Hamiltonian in the thermodynamic limit. The Kitaev chain is a paradigmatic non-interacting model that supports MZMs and the Hamiltonian can be fully diagonalised. However, for interacting models, the situation is far more complex. Here we consider a different classification of models, namely, ones with frustration-free Hamiltonians. Within this class of models, interacting and non-interacting systems are treated on an equal footing, and we identify exactly which Hamiltonians can realise MZMs.

  4. Quantum phase transition with dissipative frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, D.; Andergassen, S.; Belzig, W.; Rastelli, G.

    2018-04-01

    We study the quantum phase transition of the one-dimensional phase model in the presence of dissipative frustration, provided by an interaction of the system with the environment through two noncommuting operators. Such a model can be realized in Josephson junction chains with shunt resistances and resistances between the chain and the ground. Using a self-consistent harmonic approximation, we determine the phase diagram at zero temperature which exhibits a quantum phase transition between an ordered phase, corresponding to the superconducting state, and a disordered phase, corresponding to the insulating state with localized superconducting charge. Interestingly, we find that the critical line separating the two phases has a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the dissipative coupling strength. This result is a consequence of the frustration between (i) one dissipative coupling that quenches the quantum phase fluctuations favoring the ordered phase and (ii) one that quenches the quantum momentum (charge) fluctuations leading to a vanishing phase coherence. Moreover, within the self-consistent harmonic approximation, we analyze the dissipation induced crossover between a first and second order phase transition, showing that quantum frustration increases the range in which the phase transition is second order. The nonmonotonic behavior is reflected also in the purity of the system that quantifies the degree of correlation between the system and the environment, and in the logarithmic negativity as an entanglement measure that encodes the internal quantum correlations in the chain.

  5. Quantum frustrated and correlated electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Thalmeier

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available  Quantum phases and fluctuations in correlated electron systems with frustration and competing interactions are reviewed. In the localized moment case the S=1/2 J1 - J2 - model on a square lattice exhibits a rich phase diagram with magnetic as well as exotic hidden order phases due to the interplay of frustration and quantum fluctuations. Their signature in magnetocaloric quantities and the high field magnetization are surveyed. The possible quantum phase transitions are discussed and applied to layered vanadium oxides. In itinerant electron systems frustration is an emergent property caused by electron correlations. It leads to enhanced spin fluctuations in a very large region of momentum space and therefore may cause heavy fermion type low temperature anomalies as in the 3d spinel compound LiV2O4 . Competing on-site and inter-site electronic interactions in Kondo compounds are responsible for the quantum phase transition between nonmagnetic Kondo singlet phase and magnetic phase such as observed in many 4f compounds. They may be described by Kondo lattice and simplified Kondo necklace type models. Their quantum phase transitions are investigated by numerical exact diagonalization and analytical bond operator methods respectively.

  6. In vivo polymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) in the living rat hippocampus does not cause a significant loss of performance in a delayed alternation task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liangqi; Shaw, Crystal L.; Kuo, Chin-chen; Griffin, Amy L.; Martin, David C.

    2014-04-01

    After extended implantation times, traditional intracortical neural probes exhibit a foreign-body reaction characterized by a reactive glial sheath that has been associated with increased system impedance and signal deterioration. Previously, we have proposed that the local in vivo polymerization of an electronically and ionically conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), might help to rebuild charge transport pathways across the glial scar between the device and surrounding parenchyma (Richardson-Burns et al 2007 J. Neural Eng. 4 L6-13). The EDOT monomer can be delivered via a microcannula/electrode system into the brain tissue of living animals followed by direct electrochemical polymerization, using the electrode itself as a source of oxidative current. In this study, we investigated the long-term effect of local in vivo PEDOT deposition on hippocampal neural function and histology. Rodent subjects were trained on a hippocampus-dependent task, delayed alternation (DA), and implanted with the microcannula/electrode system in the hippocampus. The animals were divided into four groups with different delay times between the initial surgery and the electrochemical polymerization: (1) control (no polymerization), (2) immediate (polymerization within 5 min of device implantation), (3) early (polymerization within 3-4 weeks after implantation) and (4) late (polymerization 7-8 weeks after polymerization). System impedance at 1 kHz was recorded and the tissue reactions were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We found that under our deposition conditions, PEDOT typically grew at the tip of the electrode, forming an ˜500 µm cloud in the tissue. This is much larger than the typical width of the glial scar (˜150 µm). After polymerization, the impedance amplitude near the neurologically important frequency of 1 kHz dropped for all the groups; however, there was a time window of 3-4 weeks for an optimal decrease in impedance. For all surgery

  7. Attention bias for sleep-related stimuli in primary insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome using the dot-probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Broomfield, Niall M; Espie, Colin A

    2006-11-01

    Cognitive models of primary insomnia (PI) suggest attention bias as a maintaining process. This study used a hallmark measure of attention bias, the dot-probe task, to determine whether attention bias to sleep-related stimuli is present in individuals with PI. Control groups of good sleepers (GS) and individuals with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), a sleep disorder with no presumed cognitive pathway and, hence, no predicted association with attention bias, were included. A between-groups (PI, DSPS, GS) design was employed. Participants completed a dot-probe task with stimuli comprising sleep-related and neutral words, balanced for length and frequency of usage. It was predicted a priori that PI would show greater attention bias to sleep stimuli compared with GS and DSPS groups. No difference between GS and DSPS was predicted. Sixty-three individuals completed the study (PI = 21; DSPS = 22; GS = 20), with those in PI and DSPS classified by International Classification of Sleep Disorders criteria according to self-report sleep diaries and actigraphy. GS scored Sleep Quality Index, reported being good sleepers, and met no criteria for a current or previous sleep disorder. N/A. As predicted, PI showed increased vigilance for sleep-related stimuli relative to GS and DSPS. No differences between GS and those with DSPS were found. The PI group showed shorter response latencies relative to the GS and DSPS groups. Results support an association between attention bias and PI. Further work must determine whether or not attention bias is a causal factor. Speeded responses in the PI group suggest heightened arousal, indicating that physiologic factors may play a related role.

  8. Noncollinear magnetic ordering in a frustrated magnet: Metallic regime and the role of frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Munir; Sengupta, Pinaki

    2017-12-01

    We explore the magnetic phases in a Kondo lattice model on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice at metallic electron densities, searching for noncollinear and noncoplanar spin textures. Motivated by experimental observations in many rare-earth-based frustrated metallic magnets, we treat the local moments as classical spins and set the coupling between the itinerant electrons and local moments as the largest energy scale in the problem. Our results show that a noncollinear flux state is stabilized over an extended range of Hamiltonian parameters. These spin states can be quenched efficiently by external fields like temperature and magnetic field as well as by varying the degree of frustration in the electronic itinerancy and exchange coupling between local moments. Interestingly, unlike insulating electron densities that we discussed in paper I of this sequence, a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction between the local moments is not essential for the emergence of their noncollinear ordering.

  9. The anticipation and outcome phases of reward and loss processing: A neuroimaging meta-analysis of the monetary incentive delay task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Stuart; Murawski, Carsten; Fornito, Alex; Youssef, George; Yücel, Murat; Lorenzetti, Valentina

    2018-04-25

    The processing of rewards and losses are crucial to everyday functioning. Considerable interest has been attached to investigating the anticipation and outcome phases of reward and loss processing, but results to date have been inconsistent. It is unclear if anticipation and outcome of a reward or loss recruit similar or distinct brain regions. In particular, while the striatum has widely been found to be active when anticipating a reward, whether it activates in response to the anticipation of losses as well remains ambiguous. Furthermore, concerning the orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal regions, activation is often observed during reward receipt. However, it is unclear if this area is active during reward anticipation as well. We ran an Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis of 50 fMRI studies, which used the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT), to identify which brain regions are implicated in the anticipation of rewards, anticipation of losses, and the receipt of reward. Anticipating rewards and losses recruits overlapping areas including the striatum, insula, amygdala and thalamus, suggesting that a generalised neural system initiates motivational processes independent of valence. The orbitofrontal/ventromedial prefrontal regions were recruited only during the reward outcome, likely representing the value of the reward received. Our findings help to clarify the neural substrates of the different phases of reward and loss processing, and advance neurobiological models of these processes. © 2018 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evolved Minimal Frustration in Multifunctional Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Konstantin; Wales, David J

    2018-05-25

    Protein folding is often viewed in terms of a funnelled potential or free energy landscape. A variety of experiments now indicate the existence of multifunnel landscapes, associated with multifunctional biomolecules. Here, we present evidence that these systems have evolved to exhibit the minimal number of funnels required to fulfil their cellular functions, suggesting an extension to the principle of minimum frustration. We find that minimal disruptive mutations result in additional funnels, and the associated structural ensembles become more diverse. The same trends are observed in an atomic cluster. These observations suggest guidelines for rational design of engineered multifunctional biomolecules.

  11. Complexity due to disorder and frustration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrington, D.

    1990-01-01

    In these lectures the author aims to demonstrate that quenched disorder and frustrated interactions combine to produce rich and complex behavior, static and dynamic, in a wealth of situations ranging from solid-state physics, through NP-hard optimization (e.g., in operational research), to neural models for memory. The techniques employed draw heavily on statistical mechanics and automaton theory, but the conventional versions of these subjects require non-trivial extension to deal with the new phenomena, leading to the development of new concepts. 16 refs., 12 figs

  12. Gifts and exchanges problems, frustrations, and triumphs

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S; Denning, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This important book explores the many questions challenging librarians who work with gifts and exchanges (G&E) as part of their daily responsibilities. Too often, because of shrinking library budgets, library gifts are considered burdensome and unprofitable drains on both financial and personnel resources. However, Gifts and Exchanges: Problems, Frustrations, . . . and Triumphs gives you solutions that will allow you to embrace your library's gifts as rewards. In this book, you will discover the latest ways of disposing unwanted materials, planning and holding book sales and auctions, and oper

  13. Probing quantum frustrated systems via factorization of the ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-05-21

    The existence of definite orders in frustrated quantum systems is related rigorously to the occurrence of fully factorized ground states below a threshold value of the frustration. Ground-state separability thus provides a natural measure of frustration: strongly frustrated systems are those that cannot accommodate for classical-like solutions. The exact form of the factorized ground states and the critical frustration are determined for various classes of nonexactly solvable spin models with different spatial ranges of the interactions. For weak frustration, the existence of disentangling transitions determines the range of applicability of mean-field descriptions in biological and physical problems such as stochastic gene expression and the stability of long-period modulated structures.

  14. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-07

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  15. Approximate eigenvalue determination of geometrically frustrated magnetic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Läuchli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Geometrically frustrated magnetic molecules have attracted a lot of interest in the field of molecular magnetism as well as frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnets. In this article we demonstrate how an approximate diagonalization scheme can be used in order to obtain thermodynamic and spectroscopic information about frustrated magnetic molecules. To this end we theoretically investigate an antiferromagnetically coupled spin system with cuboctahedral structure modeled by an isotropic Heisenberg Hamiltonian.

  16. Magnetic phase diagram of a frustrated spin ladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takanori; Mori, Michiyasu; Tohyama, Takami; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2018-04-01

    Frustrated spin ladders show magnetization plateaux depending on the rung-exchange interaction and frustration defined by the ratio of first and second neighbor exchange interactions in each chain. This paper reports on its magnetic phase diagram. Using the variational matrix-product state method, we accurately determine phase boundaries. Several kinds of magnetization plateaux are induced by the frustration and the strong correlation among quasiparticles on a lattice. The appropriate description of quasiparticles and their relevant interactions are changed by a magnetic field. We find that the frustration differentiates the triplet quasiparticle from the singlet one in kinetic energy.

  17. Domain wall motion in magnetically frustrated nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarda, M. V.; Escobar, M. A.; Li, S.; Chang, R.; Fullerton, E. E.; Lomakin, V.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a magnetically frustrated nanoring (MFNR) configuration which is formed by introducing antiferromagnetic coupling across an interface orthogonal to the ring's circumferential direction. Such structures have the unique characteristic that only one itinerant domain wall (DW) can exist in the ring, which does not need to be nucleated or injected into the structure and can never escape making it analogous to a magnetic Möbius strip. Numerical simulations show that the DW in a MFNR can be driven consecutively around the ring with a prescribed cyclicity, and that the frequency of revolutions can be controlled by the applied field. The energy landscapes can be controlled to be flat allowing for low fields of operation or to have a barrier for thermal stability. Potential logic and memory applications of MFNRs are considered and discussed.

  18. Characterizing and quantifying frustration in quantum many-body systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, S M; Gualdi, G; Monras, A; Illuminati, F

    2011-12-23

    We present a general scheme for the study of frustration in quantum systems. We introduce a universal measure of frustration for arbitrary quantum systems and we relate it to a class of entanglement monotones via an exact inequality. If all the (pure) ground states of a given Hamiltonian saturate the inequality, then the system is said to be inequality saturating. We introduce sufficient conditions for a quantum spin system to be inequality saturating and confirm them with extensive numerical tests. These conditions provide a generalization to the quantum domain of the Toulouse criteria for classical frustration-free systems. The models satisfying these conditions can be reasonably identified as geometrically unfrustrated and subject to frustration of purely quantum origin. Our results therefore establish a unified framework for studying the intertwining of geometric and quantum contributions to frustration.

  19. Shrink, twist, ripple and melt: Studies of frustrated liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, Jonathan G.

    Complex structures can arise out of a simple system with more than one competing influence on its behavior. The protypical example of this is the two-dimensional triangular lattice Ising model. The ferromagnetic model has two simple degenerate ground states of all spins up or down, but the antiferromagnetic model is a frustrated system. Its geometry does not allow satisfaction of the antiferro condition everywhere, which produces complex ordered structures with dimerization of the spins [1]. Without frustration, the complex structures and phase behavior are lost. All of the topics discussed in this thesis concern smectic liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are perhaps uniquely adept at manifesting frustrated phases. Their combination of periodicity in one or more dimensions allows ordered structures, yet their fluid nature in remaining dimensions allows creation of defects and extraordinarily complex structures in ways that a normal crystal could not tolerate. Liquid crystals contain a huge menagerie of frustrated phases and effects including the polarization modulated [2], vortex lattice [3], twist grain boundary [4], and blue [5] phases, as well as frustrated structures such as cholesteric or SmC* helix unwinding [6], defect lattices in thin films [7], and bend melted grain boundary defects [8], arising from boundary conditions and field effects. In this thesis, we study four liquid crystal systems that show unusual phase behavior or complex structures, deriving from the effects of frustration. Frustration, despite some human prejudices against the word, leaves nature all the more interesting and beautiful.

  20. Correlates of academic procrastination: discomfort, task aversiveness, and task capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, N; Marshevsky, S; Sadeh, C

    1995-03-01

    The relationships among five aspects of academic procrastination--behavioral delay, personal upset about the delay, task aversiveness, task capability, and the desire to reduce behavioral delay--were investigated in 10th-grade Israeli students (N = 195). Upset about delay was weakly related to delay itself, and--unlike delay--was strongly related to perceived capability to perform academic tasks and to the desire to change delaying behavior. Students delayed more on academic tasks labeled unpleasant than pleasant, were neutral in between, and were correspondingly more upset about the former than the latter. They more frequently acknowledged reasons for academic procrastination that were less threatening to their self-image (e.g., problems in time management) than reasons that were more threatening (e.g., lack of ability). Interest in reducing delay is related more to self-perceived ability to handle tasks than to time spent procrastinating or reasons given for procrastinating.

  1. Keep calm and carry on: improved frustration tolerance and processing speed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Plewnia

    Full Text Available Cognitive control (CC of attention is a major prerequisite for effective information processing. Emotional distractors can bias and impair goal-directed deployment of attentional resources. Frustration-induced negative affect and cognition can act as internal distractors with negative impact on task performance. Consolidation of CC may thus support task-oriented behavior under challenging conditions. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been put forward as an effective tool to modulate CC. Particularly, anodal, activity enhancing tDCS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC can increase insufficient CC in depression as indicated by a reduction of attentional biases induced by emotionally salient stimuli. With this study, we provide first evidence that, compared to sham stimulation, tDCS to the left dlPFC enhances processing speed measured by an adaptive version of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT that is typically thwarted by frustration. Notably, despite an even larger amount of error-related negative feedback, the task-induced upset was suppressed in the group receiving anodal tDCS. Moreover, inhibition of task-related negative affect was correlated with performance gains, suggesting a close link between enhanced processing speed and consolidation of CC by tDCS. Together, these data provide first evidence that activity enhancing anodal tDCS to the left dlPFC can support focused cognitive processing particularly when challenged by frustration-induced negative affect.

  2. Keep calm and carry on: improved frustration tolerance and processing speed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewnia, Christian; Schroeder, Philipp A; Kunze, Roland; Faehling, Florian; Wolkenstein, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive control (CC) of attention is a major prerequisite for effective information processing. Emotional distractors can bias and impair goal-directed deployment of attentional resources. Frustration-induced negative affect and cognition can act as internal distractors with negative impact on task performance. Consolidation of CC may thus support task-oriented behavior under challenging conditions. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been put forward as an effective tool to modulate CC. Particularly, anodal, activity enhancing tDCS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) can increase insufficient CC in depression as indicated by a reduction of attentional biases induced by emotionally salient stimuli. With this study, we provide first evidence that, compared to sham stimulation, tDCS to the left dlPFC enhances processing speed measured by an adaptive version of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task (PASAT) that is typically thwarted by frustration. Notably, despite an even larger amount of error-related negative feedback, the task-induced upset was suppressed in the group receiving anodal tDCS. Moreover, inhibition of task-related negative affect was correlated with performance gains, suggesting a close link between enhanced processing speed and consolidation of CC by tDCS. Together, these data provide first evidence that activity enhancing anodal tDCS to the left dlPFC can support focused cognitive processing particularly when challenged by frustration-induced negative affect.

  3. Edge currents in frustrated Josephson junction ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. M.; Santos, F. D. R.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    We present a numerical study of quasi-1D frustrated Josephson junction ladders with diagonal couplings and open boundary conditions, in the large capacitance limit. We derive a correspondence between the energy of this Josephson junction ladder and the expectation value of the Hamiltonian of an analogous tight-binding model, and show how the overall superconducting state of the chain is equivalent to the minimum energy state of the tight-binding model in the subspace of one-particle states with uniform density. To satisfy the constraint of uniform density, the superconducting state of the ladder is written as a linear combination of the allowed k-states of the tight-binding model with open boundaries. Above a critical value of the parameter t (ratio between the intra-rung and inter-rung Josephson couplings) the ladder spontaneously develops currents at the edges, which spread to the bulk as t is increased until complete coverage is reached. Above a certain value of t, which varies with ladder size (t = 1 for an infinite-sized ladder), the edge currents are destroyed. The value t = 1 corresponds, in the tight-binding model, to the opening of a gap between two bands. We argue that the disappearance of the edge currents with this gap opening is not coincidental, and that this points to a topological origin for these edge current states.

  4. Complexation of Nitrous Oxide by Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Edwin; Neu, Rebecca C.; Stephan, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    Frustrated Lewis pairs comprised of a basic yet sterically encumbered phosphine with boron Lewis acids bind nitrous oxide to give intact PNNOB linkages. The synthesis, structure, and bonding of these species are described.

  5. Frustrated Total Internal Reflection: A Simple Application and Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, F. P.; Magalhaes, D. V.; Oliveira, M. M.; Bianchi, R. F.; Misoguti, L.; Mendonca, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the total internal reflection process that occurs when the internal angle of incidence is equal to or greater than the critical angle. Presents a demonstration of the effect of frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR). (YDS)

  6. Low Tolerance for Frustration: Target Group for Reading Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlow, Maria

    1974-01-01

    Presents findings which can aid in the prevention and remediation of reading disabilities in children who have a low tolerance for frustration, many of whom often become acute reading disability cases. (TO)

  7. Task Difficulty Differentially Affects Two Measures of Processing Load: The Pupil Response during Sentence Processing and Delayed Cued Recall of the Sentences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; Festen, Joost M.; Kramer, Kramera

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed the influence of masking level (29% or 71% sentence perception) and test modality on the processing load during language perception as reflected by the pupil response. In addition, the authors administered a delayed cued stimulus recall test to examine whether processing load affected the encoding of…

  8. Magnetic domains and frustration in metallic CePdAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Stefan; Huesges, Zita; Huang, Chien-Lung; Stockert, Oliver [Max Planck Institute CPfS, Dresden (Germany); Fritsch, Veronika; Sakai, Akito [EP 6, Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg (Germany); Grube, Kai; Taubenheim, Christian; Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic frustration is an exciting topic in condensed matter physics, since it can lead to new ground states of materials, e.g. a spin liquid or spin glass state. Effects of magnetic frustration have been investigated intensively for insulating materials. However, the existence of magnetic frustration in metallic systems is still under debate. CePdAl is a metallic Kondo system, where geometric magnetic frustration arises from the formation of Ce ions on a distorted Kagome lattice. Neutron scattering experiments revealed, that only two thirds of the magnetic Ce moments order antiferromagnetically below T{sub N}=2.7 K, whereas the other third remains mainly disordered. Thermodynamic as well as neutron scattering measurements are presented to verify the existence of partial magnetic frustration in CePdAl. Recently neutron diffraction experiments under magnetic fields applied along two orthogonal directions in the magnetically hard basal plane were performed. They show opposite effects on the magnetic intensity of a selected magnetic domain depending on the field direction with respect to the propagation vector. If this is only an effect of different domain population or also due to a change in magnetic frustration shall be discussed.

  9. Topics on frustrated spin systems and high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yong.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical study of frustrated spin systems using the Monte Carlo simulation method and the analytic study of fluctuation phenomenon of the thermoelectric power near the superconducting transition using Green's function techniques are presented. The first frustrated system considered is the B-site antiferromagnetic (AF) spinel. Based on an Ising model, various thermodynamic and magnetic properties were studied for both the fully frustrated structure and partially frustrated cases of a small tetragonal distortion. When fully frustrated, an interesting short-range order and some unusual scaling behavior were obtained. The other frustrated spin system studied is the magnetic phase of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x via a classical spin model, with appropriate anisotropic exchange couplings and randomly located spins of distribution probability as a function of x. There is a first order boundary between Type 1 and Type 2 in the Ising case, while there is no real phase boundary in the cases of continuous spin. In the study on the thermopower fluctuation, the thermopower was determined by the linear response of the electric and heat currents to an electric field, and the linear responses were in turn calculated from correlation functions of the current

  10. Topics on frustrated spin systems and high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yong.

    1990-01-01

    The numerical study of frustrated spin systems using the Monte Carlo simulation method and the analytic study of fluctuation phenomenon of the thermoelectric power near the superconducting transition using Green's function techniques are presented. The first frustrated system considered was the B-site antiferromagnetic (AF) spinel. Based on an Ising model, various thermodynamic and magnetic properties for both the fully frustrated structure and partially frustrated cases of a small tetragonal distortion were studied. When fully frustrated, an interesting short range order and some unusual scaling behavior were obtained. In the two tetragonally distorted cases, contracting and expanding in the crystallographic c-direction, AF long range orders and some hysteresis behavior were found. A general phase diagram was constructed as a function of the degree of the distortion. The other frustrated spin system that was studied is the magnetic phase of YBa2Cu3O(6+x). A classical spin model, was constructed, and various properties in its Ising, Heisenberg, and x-y versions were studied. The susceptibility was calculated as a function of temperature for various values of x. In the study on the thermopower fluctuation, the thermopower was determined by the linear response of the electric and heat currents to an electric field, and the linear responses were in turn calculated from correlation functions of the current

  11. mGluR5 positive allosteric modulation and its effects on MK-801 induced set-shifting impairments in a rat operant delayed matching/non-matching-to-sample task

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCrosse, Amber L.; Burrows, Brian T.; Angulo, Rachel M.; Conrad, Phoebe R.; Himes, Sarah M.; Mathews, Nordia; Wegner, Scott A.; Taylor, Sara B.; Olive, M. Foster

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) exert pro-cognitive effects in animal models of various neuropsychiatric diseases. However, few studies to date have examined ability of mGluR5 PAMs to reverse cognitive deficits in operant delayed matching/non-matching-to-sample (DMS/DNMS) tasks. Objectives To determine the ability of the mGluR5 PAM 3-cyano-N-1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB) to reverse set-shifting deficits induced by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were initially trained to lever press for sucrose reinforcement under either DMS or DNMS conditions. Following successful acquisition of the task, reinforcement conditions were reversed (DNMS→DMS or DMS→DNMS). In Experiment 1, rats were treated daily prior to each session with either vehicle/vehicle, vehicle/MK-801 (0.06 mg/kg) simultaneously, CDPPB (20 mg/kg)/MK-801 simultaneously, or CDPPB 30 min prior to MK-801. In Experiment 2, rats were treated with either vehicle/vehicle, vehicle/MK-801, or CDPPB 30 min prior to MK-801 only prior to sessions that followed task reversal. Results In Experiment 1, no group differences in initial task acquisition were observed. Rats treated with vehicle+MK−801 showed significant set-shifting impairments following task reversal, which were partially attenuated by simultaneous administration of CDPPB/MK-801, and completely precluded by administration of CDPPB 30 min prior to MK-801. In Experiment 2, MK-801 did not impair reversal learning and no other group differences were observed. Conclusions MK-801 induced deficits in operant set-shifting ability were prevented by pretreatment with CDPPB. MK-801 did not produce deficits in initial task learning or when treatment was initiated following task reversal. PMID:24973895

  12. Effect of type of cue, type of response, time delay and two different ongoing tasks on prospective memory functioning after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Sarah A; Buckheit, Carol A; Waxman, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Failures of prospective memory (PM) are one of the most frequent, and least studied, sequelae of brain injury. PM, also referred to as memory for intentions, is the ability to remember to carry out a future task. Successful completion of a PM task requires the ability to monitor time, keep the action to be performed periodically in awareness, remember the task to be performed, and initiate the action. Although PM has been shown to be a common difficulty after brain injury, it remains unknown which aspects of performance are impaired. In this study, the performance of 25 individuals with brain injury and that of 25 healthy participants were measured separately on the following variables: time until completion of the task, difficulty of the ongoing task being performed while waiting, whether the task to be performed is an action or is verbal, and whether the cue to perform the task is the passing of a particular amount of time (e.g., 10 minutes) or is an external cue (e.g., an alarm sounding). Individuals with brain injury demonstrated impairment compared to healthy adults on virtually all variables. PM performance was also compared to a battery of standard neuropsychological measures of attention, memory, and executive functions, and to self-report measures of PM functioning, in order to determine the underlying cognitive deficits responsible for poor PM performance, if any. PM performance was correlated with measures of executive functioning but not to self-report measures of PM functioning. Implications are discussed in terms of cognitive rehabilitation recommendations.

  13. A novel variable delay Go/No-Go task to study attention, motivation and working memory in the head-fixed rodent [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1sn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D Dolzani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to parse the causal elements underlying complex behaviors and decision-making processes, appropriate behavioral methods must be developed and used in concurrence with molecular, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches. Presented is a protocol for a novel Go/No-Go behavioral paradigm to study the brain attention and motivation/reward circuitry in awake, head-restrained rodents. This experimental setup allows: (1 Pharmacological and viral manipulation of various brain regions via targeted guide cannula; (2 Optogenetic cell-type specific activation and silencing with simultaneous electrophysiological recording and; (3 Repeated electrophysiological single and multiple unit recordings during ongoing behavior. The task consists of three components. The subject first makes an observing response by initiating a trial by lever pressing in response to distinctive Go or No-Go tones.  Then, after a variable delay period, the subject is presented with a challenge period cued by white noise during which they must respond with a lever press for the Go condition or withhold from lever pressing for the duration of the cue in the No-Go condition. After correctly responding during the challenge period (Challenge and a brief delay, a final reward tone of the same frequency as the initiation tone is presented and sucrose reward delivery is available and contingent upon lever pressing. Here, we provide a novel procedure and validating data set that allows researchers to study and manipulate components of behavior such as attention, motivation, impulsivity, and reward-related working memory during an ongoing operant behavioral task while limiting interference from non task-related behaviors.

  14. Perfect synchronization in networks of phase-frustrated oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prosenjit; Hens, Chittaranjan; Barzel, Baruch; Pal, Pinaki

    2017-11-01

    Synchronizing phase-frustrated Kuramoto oscillators, a challenge that has found applications from neuronal networks to the power grid, is an eluding problem, as even small phase lags cause the oscillators to avoid synchronization. Here we show, constructively, how to strategically select the optimal frequency set, capturing the natural frequencies of all oscillators, for a given network and phase lags, that will ensure perfect synchronization. We find that high levels of synchronization are sustained in the vicinity of the optimal set, allowing for some level of deviation in the frequencies without significant degradation of synchronization. Demonstrating our results on first- and second-order phase-frustrated Kuramoto dynamics, we implement them on both model and real power grid networks, showing how to achieve synchronization in a phase-frustrated environment.

  15. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Characteristic signatures of quantum criticality driven by geometrical frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Stingl, Christian; Kim, Moo-Sung; Takabatake, Toshiro; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    Geometrical frustration describes situations where interactions are incompatible with the lattice geometry and stabilizes exotic phases such as spin liquids. Whether geometrical frustration of magnetic interactions in metals can induce unconventional quantum critical points is an active area of research. We focus on the hexagonal heavy fermion metal CeRhSn, where the Kondo ions are located on distorted kagome planes stacked along the c axis. Low-temperature specific heat, thermal expansion, and magnetic Grüneisen parameter measurements prove a zero-field quantum critical point. The linear thermal expansion, which measures the initial uniaxial pressure derivative of the entropy, displays a striking anisotropy. Critical and noncritical behaviors along and perpendicular to the kagome planes, respectively, prove that quantum criticality is driven be geometrical frustration. We also discovered a spin flop-type metamagnetic crossover. This excludes an itinerant scenario and suggests that quantum criticality is related to local moments in a spin liquid-like state.

  17. Ordering due to disorder in frustrated quantum magnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, T.

    1999-01-01

    The phenomenon of order by disorder in frustrated magnetic systems is reviewed. Disorder (thermal or quantum fluctuations) may sometimes give rise to long range ordering in systems with frustration, where one must often consider the selection among classically degenerate ground states which are not equivalent by any symmetry. The lowest order effects of quantum fluctuations in such frustrated systems usually resolves the continues degeneracy of the ground state manifold into discrete Ising-type degeneracy. A unique ground state selection out of this Ising degenerate manifold then occurs due to higher order effects of quantum fluctuations. For systems such as face-centered cubic and body-centered tetragonal antiferromagnets where the number of Ising parameters to describe the ground state manifold is not macroscopic, we show that quantum fluctuations choose a unique ground state at the first order in 1/S

  18. Torness delay is storing up trouble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavenagh, Andrew.

    1994-01-01

    A recent decision by the Scottish Office to delay planning permission for the construction of a 50 million dry store for spent nuclear fuel at Torness Power Station is proving frustrating and inexplicable to many in the nuclear industry. The possible reasons for this apparent about face in government policy on spent fuel management are debated and the economic ramifications of the decision for British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), if the store were to go ahead, are outlined. (UK)

  19. Frustrations among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Although previous researchers have begun to identify sources of athletic training student stress, the specific reasons for student frustrations are not yet fully understood. It is important for athletic training administrators to understand sources of student frustration to provide a supportive learning environment. To determine the factors that lead to feelings of frustration while completing a professional athletic training education program (ATEP). Qualitative study. National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) accredited postprofessional education program. Fourteen successful graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited professional undergraduate ATEPs enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data with a grounded theory approach using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. We negotiated over the coding scheme and performed peer debriefings and member checks to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Four themes emerged from the data: (1) Athletic training student frustrations appear to stem from the amount of stress involved in completing an ATEP, leading to anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed. (2) The interactions students have with classmates, faculty, and preceptors can also be a source of frustration for athletic training students. (3) Monotonous clinical experiences often left students feeling disengaged. (4) Students questioned entering the athletic training profession because of the fear of work-life balance problems and low compensation. In order to reduce frustration, athletic training education programs should validate students' decisions to pursue athletic training and validate their contributions to the ATEP; provide clinical education experiences with graded autonomy; encourage positive personal interactions between students, faculty, and preceptors; and successfully model the benefits of a career in athletic training.

  20. Psychometric properties of Frustration Discomfort Scale in a Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Bilge Uzun; Demir, Ayhan; Harrington, Neil

    2012-08-01

    The present study assessed the psychometric properties of the Frustration Discomfort Scale for Turkish college students. The Frustration Discomfort Scale (FDS), Procrastination Assessment Scale-Student, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were administered to a sample of 171 (98 women, 73 men) Turkish college students. The results of the confirmatory factor analysis yielded fit index values demonstrating viability of the four-dimensional solution as in the original. Findings also revealed that, as predicted, the Discomfort Intolerance subscale of Turkish FDS was most strongly correlated with procrastination. Overall results provided evidence for the factor validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the scale for use in a Turkish population.

  1. Two-dimensional frustrated spin systems in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, B; Shannon, N; Thalmeier, P

    2006-01-01

    We discuss our numerical results on the properties of the S = 1/2 frustrated J 1 -J 2 Heisenberg model on a square lattice as a function of temperature and frustration angle φ = tan -1 (J 2 /J 1 ) in an applied magnetic field. We cover the full phase diagram of the model in the range π ≤ φ ≤ π. The discussion includes the parameter dependence of the saturation field itself, and addresses the instabilities associated with it. We also discuss the magnetocaloric effect of the model and show how it can be used to uniquely determine the effective interaction constants of the compounds which were investigated experimentally

  2. Cognitive person variables in the delay of gratification of older children at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M L; Mischel, W; Shoda, Y

    1989-08-01

    The components of self-regulation were analyzed, extending the self-imposed delay of gratification paradigm to older children with social adjustment problems. Delay behavior was related to a network of conceptually relevant cognitive person variables, consisting of attention deployment strategies during delay, knowledge of delay rules, and intelligence. A positive relationship was demonstrated between concurrent indexes of intelligence, attention deployment, and actual delay time. Moreover, attention deployment, measured as an individual differences variable during the delay process, had a direct, positive effect on delay behavior. Specifically, as the duration of delay and the frustration of the situation increased, children who spent a higher proportion of the time distracting themselves from the tempting elements of the delay situation were able to delay longer. The effect of attention deployment on delay behavior was significant even when age, intelligence, and delay rule knowledge were controlled. Likewise, delay rule knowledge significantly predicted delay time, even when age, attention deployment, and intelligence were controlled.

  3. Influence of job frustration, narcissism and demographic variables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines the hypothesised relationship among job frustration, narcissism, demographic variables and professional ethical behaviour among Nigerian Police officers. One hundred policemen drawn from four police divisions of Benin Area Command of Edo State participated in the study. There were 18 females ...

  4. More Opportunities than Wealth. A Network of Power and Frustration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahault, Benoit Alexandre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Saxena, Avadh Behari [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nisoli, Cristiano [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We introduce a minimal agent-based model to qualitatively conceptualize the allocation of limited wealth among more abundant opportunities. We study the interplay of power, satisfaction and frustration in the problem of wealth distribution, concentration, and inequality. This framework allows us to compare subjective measures of frustration and satisfaction to collective measures of fairness in wealth distribution, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini index. We find that a completely libertarian, law-of-the-jungle setting, where every agent can acquire wealth from, or lose wealth to, anybody else invariably leads to a complete polarization of the distribution of wealth vs. opportunity, only minimally ameliorated by disorder in a non-optimized society. The picture is however dramatically modified when hard constraints are imposed over agents, and they are forced to share wealth with neighbors on a network. We discuss the case of random networks and scale free networks. We then propose an out of equilibrium dynamics of the networks, based on a competition of power and frustration in the decision-making of agents that leads to network evolution. We show that the ratio of power and frustration controls different dynamical regimes separated by kinetic transition and characterized by drastically different values of the indices of equality.

  5. 41 CFR 101-26.311 - Frustrated shipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Frustrated shipments. 101-26.311 Section 101-26.311 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  6. Frustrated Lewis pairs-assisted reduction of carbonyl compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, Aleš; Pedersen, M. H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2015), s. 917-921 ISSN 0040-4020 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : frustrated Lewis pairs * hydrogen activation * benzyl alcohol * tritium labeling * labeled compounds Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.645, year: 2015

  7. Academic Culture in Malaysia: Sources of Satisfaction and Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Wan, Chang; Chapman, David W.; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md; Hutcheson, Sigrid; Lee, Molly; Austin, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the sources of satisfaction and frustration among Malaysian academics across three types of higher education institutions (HEIs)--public research university, public comprehensive university and private non-profit university. Based on interview with 67 academics across six HEIs, there is a clear pattern and relationship between…

  8. Frustrated Lewis pairs-assisted reduction of carbonyl compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Ales; Pedersen, Martin Holst Friborg

    2015-01-01

    An alternative and robust method for the reduction of carbonyl groups by frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) is reported in this paper. With its very mild reaction conditions, good to excellent yields, absolute regioselectivity and the non-metallic character of the reagent, it provides an excellent too...

  9. Delayed power analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, L.A.; Azarov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Time dependent core power behavior in a nuclear reactor is described with well-known neutron kinetics equations. At the same time, two portions are distinguished in energy released from uranium nuclei fission; one released directly at fission and another delayed (residual) portion produced during radioactive decay of fission products. While prompt power is definitely described with kinetics equations, the delayed power presentation still remains outstanding. Since in operation the delayed power part is relatively small (about 6%) operation, it can be neglected for small reactivity disturbances assuming that entire power obeys neutron kinetics equations. In case of a high negative reactivity rapidly inserted in core (e.g. reactor scram initiation) the prompt and delayed components can be calculated separately with practically no impact on each other, employing kinetics equations for prompt power and known approximation formulas for delayed portion, named residual in this specific case. Under substantial disturbances the prompt component in the dynamic process becomes commensurable with delayed portion, thus making necessary to take into account their cross impact. A system of differential equations to describe time-dependent behavior of delayed power is presented. Specific NPP analysis shows a way to significantly simplify the task formulation. (author)

  10. fNIRS Evidence of Prefrontal Regulation of Frustration in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Perlman, Susan B.; Luna, Beatriz; Hein, Tyler C.; Huppert, Theodore J.

    2013-01-01

    The experience of frustration is common in early childhood, yet some children seem to possess a lower tolerance for frustration than others. Characterizing the biological mechanisms underlying a wide range of frustration tolerance observed in early childhood may inform maladaptive behavior and psychopathology that is associated with this construct. The goal of this study was to measure prefrontal correlates of frustration in 3–5 year-old children, who are not readily adaptable for typical neu...

  11. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  12. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; O'Brien, Liam; Watts, Justin D.; Manno, Michael; Leighton, Chris; Scholl, Andreas; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments. The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Frustrated Kondo Lattice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshihiro; Assaad, Fakher F.; Grover, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    The absence of the negative sign problem in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of spin and fermion systems has different origins. World-line based algorithms for spins require positivity of matrix elements whereas auxiliary field approaches for fermions depend on symmetries such as particle-hole symmetry. For negative-sign-free spin and fermionic systems, we show that one can formulate a negative-sign-free auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that allows Kondo coupling of fermions with the spins. Using this general approach, we study a half-filled Kondo lattice model on the honeycomb lattice with geometric frustration. In addition to the conventional Kondo insulator and antiferromagnetically ordered phases, we find a partial Kondo screened state where spins are selectively screened so as to alleviate frustration, and the lattice rotation symmetry is broken nematically.

  14. Social comparison mediates chimpanzees' responses to loss, not frustration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopper, Lydia M; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Why do chimpanzees react when their partner gets a better deal than them? Do they note the inequity or do their responses reflect frustration in response to unattainable rewards? To tease apart inequity and contrast, we tested chimpanzees in a series of conditions that created loss through...... individual contrast, through inequity, or by both. Chimpanzees were tested in four social and two individual conditions in which they received food rewards in return for exchanging tokens with an experimenter. In conditions designed to create individual contrast, after completing an exchange, the chimpanzees...... were given a relatively less-preferred reward than the one they were previously shown. The chimpanzees' willingness to accept the less-preferred rewards was independent of previously offered foods in both the social and individual conditions. In conditions that created frustration through inequity...

  15. VHA Chaplains: challenges, roles, rewards, and frustrations of the work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beder, Joan; Yan, Grace W

    2013-01-01

    Chaplains working in the Veterans Health Administration have numerous roles and challenges. They work closely with other behavioral health professionals, especially social workers, to address the multiplicity of needs of the Veteran population. They are essentially an understudied subset of the military Chaplaincy service (most studies focus on those engaged in combat areas). In this exploratory qualitative study, VHA Chaplains responded to a survey to determine how they defined their role and professional challenges, what they felt were the rewards and frustrations of their work and their unique function within the VHA system. Findings showed that role differences between Chaplains and social workers and other behavioral health providers are clearly defined; rewards and challenges were diverse and frustrations were common to those working in a bureaucratic structure.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigations of frustrated pyrochlore magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, John Dickon Mathison

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of frustrated magnetic systems based on the pyrochlore lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Monte Carlo simulations and analytical calculations have been performed on a pyrochlore ferromagnet with local (111) easy-axis anisotropy related to the problem of 'spin ice'. The anisotropy-temperature-magnetic field phase diagram was determined. It contained a tricritical point as well as features related to some real ferroelectrics. A pyrochlore antiferromagnet with local (111) easy-plane anisotropy was studied by Monte Carlo simulation. A general expression for its degenerate ground states was discovered and normal- modes out of the ground states were calculated. Both systems are frustrated yet have a long-range ordered state at low temperature. The degeneracy lifting observed is discussed as well as the reasons for its presence. The rare-earth titanate series Ln 2 Ti 2 O 7 (Ln = rare earth), crystallizes in the Fd3-barm space group, with the magnetic ions situated on the 16c sites which constitute the pyrochlore lattice. Crystal-field effects are known to play a significant role in the frustration observed in these compounds. Powder neutron diffraction was performed on gadolinium and erbium titanate. Both systems are frustrated antiferromagnets yet show long-range magnetic order at ∼ 1 K and ∼ 1.2 K respectively. The magnetic structures of both these compounds have been determined by powder neutron diffraction techniques and related to other theoretical results as well as the theoretical results of the author. Further neutron scattering experiments on the 'spin ice' materials Ho 2 Ti 2 O 7 and Dy 2 Ti 2 O 7 are also described. (author)

  17. Field-controlled spin current in frustrated spin chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Kolezhuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study states with spontaneous spin current, emerging in frustrated antiferromagnetic spin-S chains subject to a strong external magnetic field. As a numerical tool, we use a non-Abelian symmetry realization of the density matrix renormalization group. The field dependence of the order parameter and the critical exponents are presented for zigzag chains with S=1/2, 1, 3/2, and 2.

  18. Nuclear and magnetic correlations in a topologically frustrated elemental magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.R.; Andersen, K.H.; Cywinski, R.

    1999-01-01

    β-Mn is an exchange enhanced paramagnetic metal on the verge of antiferromagnetic order. However, strong spin-fluctuations and topological frustration prevent the formation of static long-range order. We investigate the magnetic properties of the β-MnAl series of alloys in which short-range magnetic order is achieved at low temperature. We extract the short-range nuclear and magnetic correlations using a novel reverse Monte-Carlo procedure. (authors)

  19. Devil's staircase in a fully frustrated superconducting array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Choi, M.Y.

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional fully frustrated superconducting array with a combined direct and alternating applied current is studied both analytically and numerically. At zero temperature equations of motion can be reduced through the use of the translational symmetry present in the system. Remarkably, we find a series of subharmonic steps in addition to standard integer and half-integer giant Shapiro steps, leading to devil's staircase structure. We also present results of detailed numerical simulations, which indeed reveal such subharmonic fine structure. (orig.)

  20. Thermal excitations of frustrated XY spins in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benakli, M.; Zheng, H.; Gabay, M.

    1996-11-01

    We present a new variational approach to the study of phase transitions in frustrated 2D XY models. In the spirit of Villain's approach for the ferromagnetic case we divide thermal excitations into a low temperature long wavelength part (LW) and a high temperature short wavelength part (SW). In the present work we mainly deal with LW excitations and we explicitly consider the cases of the fully frustrated triangular (FFTXY) and square (FFSQXY) XY models. The novel aspect of our method is that it preserves the coupling between phase (spin angles) and chiral degrees of freedom. LW fluctuations consist of coupled phase and chiral excitations. As a result, we find that for frustrated systems the effective interactions between phase variables is long range and oscillatory in contrast to the unfrustrated problem. Using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations we show that our analytical calculations produce accurate results at all temperature T; this is seen at low T in the spin wave stiffness constant and in the staggered chirality; this is also the case near T c : transitions are driven by the SW part associated with domain walls and vortices, but the coupling between phase and chiral variables is still relevant in the critical region. In that regime our analytical results yield the correct T dependence for bare couplings (given by the LW fluctuations) such as the Coulomb gas temperature T CG of the frustrated XY models. In particular, we find that T CG tracks chiral rather than phase fluctuations. Our results provide support for a single phase transition scenario in the FFTXY and FFSQXY models. (author). 35 refs, 8 figs

  1. Level of Ethics, Ethical Frustration and Accountant Discretionary Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Tamminen, Rauno; Leskinen, Markku

    1996-01-01

    In this paper it is shown with the help of a small sample that accounting is ethically loaded; that there exists ethical frustration caused by situational factors related to accounting; and that most probably the situational pressures may also change the level of ethics in the Kohlbergian sense; and that in studying accounting-related ethical problems empirically, the paper-and pencil tests and interviewing may give biased results. The accountant's model of the world is supplemented with ...

  2. Disulfide Bridges: Bringing Together Frustrated Structure in a Bioactive Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin; Bansal, Paramjit S; Wilson, David; Daly, Norelle L

    2016-04-26

    Disulfide bridges are commonly found covalent bonds that are usually believed to maintain structural stability of proteins. Here, we investigate the influence of disulfide bridges on protein dynamics through molecular dynamics simulations on the cysteine-rich trypsin inhibitor MCoTI-II with three disulfide bridges. Correlation analysis of the reduced cyclic peptide shows that two of the three disulfide distances (Cys(11)-Cys(23) and Cys(17)-Cys(29)) are anticorrelated within ∼1 μs of bridge formation or dissolution: when the peptide is in nativelike structures and one of the distances shortens to allow bond formation, the other tends to lengthen. Simulations over longer timescales, when the denatured state is less structured, do not show the anticorrelation. We propose that the native state contains structural elements that frustrate one another's folding, and that the two bridges are critical for snapping the frustrated native structure into place. In contrast, the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge is predicted to form together with either of the other two bridges. Indeed, experimental chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance data show that an engineered peptide with the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge deleted can still fold into its near-native structure even in its noncyclic form, confirming the lesser role of the Cys(4)-Cys(21) bridge. The results highlight the importance of disulfide bridges in a small bioactive peptide to bring together frustrated structure in addition to maintaining protein structural stability. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adiabatic cooling processes in frustrated magnetic systems with pyrochlore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate in detail the process of adiabatic cooling in the framework of the exactly solvable antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Ising model in the presence of the external magnetic field on an approximate lattice with pyrochlore structure. The behavior of the entropy of the model is studied and exact values of the residual entropies of all ground states are found. The temperature variation of the system under adiabatic (de)magnetization is investigated and the central role of the macroscopically degenerated ground states in cooling processes is explicitly demonstrated. It is shown that the model parameter space of the studied geometrically frustrated system is divided into five disjunct regions with qualitatively different processes of the adiabatic cooling. The effectiveness of the adiabatic (de)magnetization cooling in the studied model is compared to the corresponding processes in paramagnetic salts. It is shown that the processes of the adiabatic cooling in the antiferromagnetic frustrated systems are much more effective especially in nonzero external magnetic fields. It means that the frustrated magnetic materials with pyrochlore structure can be considered as very promising refrigerants mainly in the situations with nonzero final values of the magnetic field.

  4. USER FRUSTRATION IN HIT INTERFACES: EXPLORING PAST HCI RESEARCH FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CLINICIANS' EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Boateng, Gloria A

    2015-01-01

    User frustration research has been one way of looking into clinicians' experience with health information technology use and interaction. In order to understand how clinician frustration with Health Information Technology (HIT) use occurs, there is the need to explore Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) literature that addresses both frustration and HIT use. In the past three decades, HCI frustration research has increased and expanded. Researchers have done a lot of work to understand emotions, end-user frustration and affect. This paper uses a historical literature review approach to review the origins of emotion and frustration research and explore the research question; Does HCI research on frustration provide insights on clinicians' frustration with HIT interfaces? From the literature review HCI research on emotion and frustration provides additional insights that can indeed help explain user frustration in HIT. Different approaches and HCI perspectives also help frame HIT user frustration research as well as inform HIT system design. The paper concludes with a suggested directions on how future design and research may take.

  5. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, it is due to a combination of physical and psychological concerns. Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include: Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication ...

  6. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; Growth delay Images Toddler development References Cooke DW, Divall SA, Radovick S. Normal and aberrant growth in children. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, ...

  7. A Field-Tested Task Analysis for Creating Single-Subject Graphs Using Microsoft[R] Office Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ya-yu; Konrad, Moira

    2007-01-01

    Creating single-subject (SS) graphs is challenging for many researchers and practitioners because it is a complex task with many steps. Although several authors have introduced guidelines for creating SS graphs, many users continue to experience frustration. The purpose of this article is to minimize these frustrations by providing a field-tested…

  8. PREFACE: The International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism HFM2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, Ilya; Brenig, Wolfram; Kremer, Reinhard; Litterst, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    The International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism 2008 (HFM2008) took place on 7-12 September 2008 at the Technische Universität Carolo-Wilhelmina zu Braunschweig, Germany. This conference was the fourth event in a series of meetings, which started in Waterloo, Canada (HFM 2000), followed by the second one in Grenoble, France (HFM 2003), and the third meeting in Osaka, Japan (HFM 2006). HFM2008 attracted more than 220 participants from all over the world. The number of participants of the HFM conference series has been increasing steadily, from about 80 participants at HFM 2000, to 120 participants at HFM 2003, and 190 participants at HFM 2006, demonstrating that highly frustrated magnetism remains a rapidly growing area of research in condensed matter physics. At the end of HFM2008 it was decided that the next International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism will be held in Baltimore, USA in 2010. HFM2008 saw four plenary talks by R Moessner, S Nakatsuji, S-W Cheong, and S Sachdev, 18 invited presentations, 30 contributed talks and about 160 poster presentations from all areas of frustrated magnetism. The subjects covered by the conference included: Kagome systems Itinerant frustrated systems Spinels and pyrochlore materials Triangular systems Unconventional order and spin liquids Chain systems Chain systems Novel frustrated systems This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of HFM2008 with 83 papers that provide a scientific record of the scientific topics covered by the conference. All articles have been refereed by experts in the field. It is our hope that the reader will enjoy and profit from the HFM2008 Proceedings. Ilya Eremin Proceedings Editor Wolfram Brenig, Reinhard Kremer, and Jochen Litterst Co-Editors International Advisory Board L Balents (USA) F Becca (Italy) S Bramwell (UK) P Fulde (Germany) B D Gaulin (Canada) J E Greedan (Canada) A Harrison (France) Z Hiroi (Japan) H Kawamura (Japan) A Keren

  9. Understanding the delayed-keyword effect on metacomprehension accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiede, Keith W; Dunlosky, John; Griffin, Thomas D; Wiley, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    The typical finding from research on metacomprehension is that accuracy is quite low. However, recent studies have shown robust accuracy improvements when judgments follow certain generation tasks (summarizing or keyword listing) but only when these tasks are performed at a delay rather than immediately after reading (K. W. Thiede & M. C. M. Anderson, 2003; K. W. Thiede, M. C. M. Anderson, & D. Therriault, 2003). The delayed and immediate conditions in these studies confounded the delay between reading and generation tasks with other task lags, including the lag between multiple generation tasks and the lag between generation tasks and judgments. The first 2 experiments disentangle these confounded manipulations and provide clear evidence that the delay between reading and keyword generation is the only lag critical to improving metacomprehension accuracy. The 3rd and 4th experiments show that not all delayed tasks produce improvements and suggest that delayed generative tasks provide necessary diagnostic cues about comprehension for improving metacomprehension accuracy.

  10. Phase-space networks of geometrically frustrated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yilong

    2009-11-01

    We illustrate a network approach to the phase-space study by using two geometrical frustration models: antiferromagnet on triangular lattice and square ice. Their highly degenerated ground states are mapped as discrete networks such that the quantitative network analysis can be applied to phase-space studies. The resulting phase spaces share some comon features and establish a class of complex networks with unique Gaussian spectral densities. Although phase-space networks are heterogeneously connected, the systems are still ergodic due to the random Poisson processes. This network approach can be generalized to phase spaces of some other complex systems.

  11. Proposed frustrated-total-reflection acoustic sensing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Modulation of electromagnetic energy transmission through a frustrated-total-reflection device by pressure-induced changes in the index of refraction is proposed for use as an acoustic detector. Maximum sensitivity occurs for angles of incidence near the critical angle. The minimum detectable pressure in air is limited by Brownian noise. Acoustic propagation losses and diffraction of the optical beam by the acoustic signal limit the minimum acoustic wavelength to lengths of the order of the spatial extent of the optical beam. The response time of the method is fast enough to follow individual acoustic waves

  12. Frustration in the pattern formation of polysyllabic words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayata, Kazuya

    2016-12-01

    A novel frustrated system is given for the analysis of (m + 1)-syllabled vocal sounds for languages with the m-vowel system, where the varieties of vowels are assumed to be m (m > 2). The necessary and sufficient condition for observing the sound frustration is that the configuration of m vowels in an m-syllabled word has a preference for the ‘repulsive’ type, in which there is no duplication of an identical vowel. For languages that meet this requirement, no (m + 1)-syllabled word can in principle select the present type because at most m different vowels are available and consequently the duplicated use of an identical vowel is inevitable. For languages showing a preference for the ‘attractive’ type, where an identical vowel aggregates in a word, there arises no such conflict. In this paper, we first elucidate for Arabic with m = 3 how to deal with the conflicting situation, where a statistical approach based on the chi-square testing is employed. In addition to the conventional three-vowel system, analyses are made also for Russian, where a polysyllabic word contains both a stressed and an indeterminate vowel. Through the statistical analyses the selection scheme for quadrisyllabic configurations is found to be strongly dependent on the parts of speech as well as the gender of nouns. In order to emphasize the relevance to the sound model of binary oppositions, analyzed results of Greek verbs are also given.

  13. An exact method for computing the frustration index in signed networks using binary programming

    OpenAIRE

    Aref, Samin; Mason, Andrew J.; Wilson, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Computing the frustration index of a signed graph is a key step toward solving problems in many fields including social networks, physics, material science, and biology. The frustration index determines the distance of a network from a state of total structural balance. Although the definition of the frustration index goes back to 1960, its exact algorithmic computation, which is closely related to classic NP-hard graph problems, has only become a focus in recent years. We develop three new b...

  14. Frustration of contract e impossibility of performance en el common law inglés

    OpenAIRE

    José Félix Chamie

    2009-01-01

    Sumario: i. Premisa. Formación de la doctrina de la frustration of contract. ii. Implied term theory. iii. Just and reasonable solution theory. iv. Foundation of contract theory. v. Radical change in the obligation: The “Construction theory”. vi. Efectos de la aplicación de la doctrine of frustration. vii. Límites de la jurisprudencia a la aplicación de la doctrine of frustration of contract

  15. Frustration of contract e impossibility of performance en el common law inglés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Félix Chamie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sumario: i. Premisa. Formación de la doctrina de la frustration of contract. ii. Implied term theory. iii. Just and reasonable solution theory. iv. Foundation of contract theory. v. Radical change in the obligation: The “Construction theory”. vi. Efectos de la aplicación de la doctrine of frustration. vii. Límites de la jurisprudencia a la aplicación de la doctrine of frustration of contract

  16. Energetic frustrations in protein folding at residue resolution: a homologous simulation study of Im9 proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxiang Sun

    Full Text Available Energetic frustration is becoming an important topic for understanding the mechanisms of protein folding, which is a long-standing big biological problem usually investigated by the free energy landscape theory. Despite the significant advances in probing the effects of folding frustrations on the overall features of protein folding pathways and folding intermediates, detailed characterizations of folding frustrations at an atomic or residue level are still lacking. In addition, how and to what extent folding frustrations interact with protein topology in determining folding mechanisms remains unclear. In this paper, we tried to understand energetic frustrations in the context of protein topology structures or native-contact networks by comparing the energetic frustrations of five homologous Im9 alpha-helix proteins that share very similar topology structures but have a single hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic mutual mutation. The folding simulations were performed using a coarse-grained Gō-like model, while non-native hydrophobic interactions were introduced as energetic frustrations using a Lennard-Jones potential function. Energetic frustrations were then examined at residue level based on φ-value analyses of the transition state ensemble structures and mapped back to native-contact networks. Our calculations show that energetic frustrations have highly heterogeneous influences on the folding of the four helices of the examined structures depending on the local environment of the frustration centers. Also, the closer the introduced frustration is to the center of the native-contact network, the larger the changes in the protein folding. Our findings add a new dimension to the understanding of protein folding the topology determination in that energetic frustrations works closely with native-contact networks to affect the protein folding.

  17. [Tolerance for frustration as a reliability factor in the work of the human operator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevich, O F

    1986-01-01

    Frustration tolerance is a personality trait that contributes to the reliable performance of an air traffic controller. This paper presents the results of a psychological examination of air traffic controllers using the Rosenzweig frustration test and emphasizes a correlation between the predominant behavior type in frustrating circumstances and professional success. The paper contains examples of realistic observations over air traffic controllers which confirm experimental data.

  18. Developmental delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  19. The association between Internet addiction and belief of frustration intolerance: the gender difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Chung-Sheng; Wang, Shing-Yaw

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance, the gender difference of frustration intolerance, and the gender differences of the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance. Participants were 2,114 students (1,204 male and 910 female) who were recruited to complete the Chen Internet Addiction Scale and Frustration Discomfort scale. Females had higher scores on the subscale of entitlement and emotional intolerance and the total scale of the frustration intolerance. There was a significant gender difference on the association between Internet addiction and frustration intolerance. The association was higher in male adolescents. Regression analysis revealed male adolescents with Internet addiction had higher intolerance to frustration of entitlement and emotional discomfort, and female adolescents with it had higher intolerance to emotional discomfort and lower tolerance to frustration of achievement. Frustration intolerance should be evaluated for adolescents with Internet addiction, especially for males. Rational emotive behavior therapy focusing on different irrational beliefs should be provided to male and female adolescents with Internet addiction.

  20. A spin-frustrated cobalt(II) carbonate pyrochlore network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanzhen; Ellern, Arkady; Kögerler, Paul

    2011-11-01

    The crystal structure of the cobalt(II) carbonate-based compound cobalt(II) dicarbonate trisodium chloride, Co(CO(3))(2)Na(3)Cl, grown from a water-ethanol mixture, exhibits a three-dimensional network of corner-sharing {Co(4)(μ(3)-CO(3))(4)} tetrahedral building blocks, in which the Co(II) centres define a pyrochlore lattice and reside in a slightly distorted octahedral Co(O-CO(2))(6) environment. The space outside the hexagonal framework defined by these interlinked groups is occupied by Na(+) and Cl(-) ions. Antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent Co(II) centres, mediated by carbonate bridges, results in geometric spin frustration which is typical for pyrochlore networks. The Co and Cl atoms reside on the special position 3, one Na atom on position 2 and a carbonate C atom on position 3.

  1. The dynamics of the Frustrated Ising Lattice Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenzon, J.J.; Stariolo, D.A.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.

    2000-04-01

    The dynamical properties of a three dimensional model glass, the Frustrated Ising Lattice Gas (FILG) are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. We present results of compression experiments, where the chemical potential is either slowly or abruptly changed, as well as simulations at constant density. One-time quantities like density and two-times ones as correlations, responses and mean square displacements are measured, and the departure from equilibrium clearly characterized. The aging scenario, particularly in the case of the density autocorrelations, is reminiscent of spin glass phenomenology with violations of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, typical of systems with one replica symmetry breaking. The FILG, as a valid on-lattice model of structural glasses, can be described with tools developed in spin glass theory and, being a finite dimensional model, can open the way for a systematic study of activated processes in glasses. (author)

  2. Magnetocaloric properties of a frustrated Blume-Capel antiferromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žukovič Milan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature magnetization processes and magnetocaloric properties of a geometrically frustrated spin-1 Blume-Capel model on a triangular lattice are studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The model is found to display qualitatively different behavior depending on the sign of the single-ion anisotropy D. For positive values of D we observe two magnetization plateaus, similar to the spin-1/2 Ising antiferromagnet, and negative isothermal entropy changes for any field intensity. For a range of small negative values of D there are four magnetization plateaus and the entropy changes can be either negative or positive, depending on the field. If D is negative but large in absolute value then the entropy changes are solely positive.

  3. Trimeric Hydrogen Bond in Geometrically Frustrated Hydroxyl Cobalt Halogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dong, Liu; Masato, Hagihala; Xu-Guang, Zheng; Dong-Dong, Meng; Wan-Jun, Tao; Sen-Lin, Zhang; Qi-Xin, Guo

    2011-01-01

    The mid-infrared absorption spectra of geometrically frustrated hydroxyl cobalt halogenides Co 2 (OH) 3 Cl and Co 2 (OH) 3 Br are measured by FTIR spectrometers, and the stretching vibrational modes of hydroxyl groups are found to be 3549cm −1 and 3524cm −1 respectively. Through finding their true terminal O-H group stretching vibration frequencies, we obtain 107cm −1 and 99cm −1 red shift caused by the corresponding O-H···Cl and O-H···Br hydrogen bonds. Rarely reported trimeric hydrogen bonds (Co 3 ≡O-H) 3 ···Cl/Br are pointed out to demonstrate the relative weakness of this kind of hydrogen bond which may have a critical effect on the lattice symmetry and magnetic structures. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  4. Langevin dynamics simulations of large frustrated Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A.R.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Long-time Langevin dynamics simulations of large (N x N,N = 128) 2-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions in a uniformly frustrating external magnetic field are reported. The results demonstrate: (1) Relaxation from an initially random flux configuration as a universal fit to a glassy stretched-exponential type of relaxation for the intermediate temperatures T(0.3 T c approx-lt T approx-lt 0.7 T c ), and an activated dynamic behavior for T ∼ T c ; (2) a glassy (multi-time, multi-length scale) voltage response to an applied current. Intrinsic dynamical symmetry breaking induced by boundaries as nucleation sites for flux lattice defects gives rise to transverse and noisy voltage response

  5. Langevin dynamics simulations of large frustrated Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A.R.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Long-time Langevin dynamics simulations of large (N x N, N = 128) 2-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions in a uniformly frustrating external magnetic field are reported. The results demonstrate: Relaxation from an initially random flux configuration as a ''universal'' fit to a ''glassy'' stretched-exponential type of relaxation for the intermediate temperatures T (0.3 T c approx-lt T approx-lt 0.7 T c ), and an ''activated dynamic'' behavior for T ∼ T c A glassy (multi-time, multi-length scale) voltage response to an applied current. Intrinsic dynamical symmetry breaking induced by boundaries as nucleation sites for flux lattice defects gives rise to transverse and noisy voltage response

  6. Localized-magnon states in strongly frustrated quantum spin lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments concerning localized-magnon eigenstates in strongly frustrated spin lattices and their effect on the low-temperature physics of these systems in high magnetic fields are reviewed. After illustrating the construction and the properties of localized-magnon states we describe the plateau and the jump in the magnetization process caused by these states. Considering appropriate lattice deformations fitting to the localized magnons we discuss a spin-Peierls instability in high magnetic fields related to these states. Last but not least we consider the degeneracy of the localized-magnon eigenstates and the related thermodynamics in high magnetic fields. In particular, we discuss the low-temperature maximum in the isothermal entropy versus field curve and the resulting enhanced magnetocaloric effect, which allows efficient magnetic cooling from quite large temperatures down to very low ones

  7. Developmental Changes in the Rosenzweig Picture--Frustration Study, Children's Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Study examined the validity of 1948 norms of the Picture-Frustration Study, Children's Form. Instrument was administered to 140 children, grades 2 through 6, as part of a project investigating effects of video games. Though findings differed from the 1948 norms, they supported the validity of the Children's Form of the Picture-Frustration Study.…

  8. Controlling flow time delays in flexible manufacturing cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, J.; Caprihan, R.; Bokhorst, J. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Flow time delays in Flexible Manufacturing Cells (FMCs) are caused by transport and clamping/reclamping activities. This paper shows how dynamic scheduling parameters may control the flow times of jobs and the available task windows for flow time delays.

  9. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    . The underlying reasons for the large variation in the age at pubertal onset are not fully established; however, nutritional status and socioeconomic and environmental factors are known to be influencing, and a significant amount of influencing genetic factors have also been identified. The challenges...... optimal in discriminating especially CDGP from HH. Management of the delayed puberty depends on the etiology. For boys with CDGP an observational period will often reveal imminent puberty. If puberty is not progressing spontaneously, sex steroid replacement is effective in stimulating the development...

  10. Frustration influences impact of history and disciplinary attitudes on physical discipline decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russa, Mary B; Rodriguez, Christina M; Silvia, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Although intergenerational patterns of punitive physical punishment garner considerable research attention, the mechanisms by which historical, cognitive, and contextual factors interplay to influence disciplinary responding remains poorly understood. Disciplinary attitudes have been shown to mediate the association between disciplinary history and disciplinary responding. The present study investigated whether frustration influences these mediation effects. Half of a sample of 330 undergraduates was randomly assigned to frustration induction. Structural equation modeling confirmed that, for participants in the frustration condition, the relation between disciplinary history and physical discipline decision-making was fully mediated by attitudes approving physical discipline. In contrast, for respondents in the no-frustration condition, the pathway from disciplinary history to discipline decision-making was only partially mediated by attitudes. Under conditions of frustration, attitudes may become a more central means by which personal disciplinary history is associated with disciplinary decision-making. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Emergence and frustration of magnetism with variable-range interactions in a quantum simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R; Senko, C; Campbell, W C; Korenblit, S; Smith, J; Lee, A; Edwards, E E; Wang, C-C J; Freericks, J K; Monroe, C

    2013-05-03

    Frustration, or the competition between interacting components of a network, is often responsible for the emergent complexity of many-body systems. For instance, frustrated magnetism is a hallmark of poorly understood systems such as quantum spin liquids, spin glasses, and spin ices, whose ground states can be massively degenerate and carry high degrees of quantum entanglement. Here, we engineer frustrated antiferromagnetic interactions between spins stored in a crystal of up to 16 trapped (171)Yb(+) atoms. We control the amount of frustration by continuously tuning the range of interaction and directly measure spin correlation functions and their coherent dynamics. This prototypical quantum simulation points the way toward a new probe of frustrated quantum magnetism and perhaps the design of new quantum materials.

  12. Protein Frustratometer 2: a tool to localize energetic frustration in protein molecules, now with electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, R Gonzalo; Schafer, Nicholas P; Radusky, Leandro G; Tsai, Min-Yeh; Guzovsky, A Brenda; Wolynes, Peter G; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-07-08

    The protein frustratometer is an energy landscape theory-inspired algorithm that aims at localizing and quantifying the energetic frustration present in protein molecules. Frustration is a useful concept for analyzing proteins' biological behavior. It compares the energy distributions of the native state with respect to structural decoys. The network of minimally frustrated interactions encompasses the folding core of the molecule. Sites of high local frustration often correlate with functional regions such as binding sites and regions involved in allosteric transitions. We present here an upgraded version of a webserver that measures local frustration. The new implementation that allows the inclusion of electrostatic energy terms, important to the interactions with nucleic acids, is significantly faster than the previous version enabling the analysis of large macromolecular complexes within a user-friendly interface. The webserver is freely available at URL: http://frustratometer.qb.fcen.uba.ar. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. The classification of idiopathic spasmodic torticollis: three types based on social adaptation and frustration tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwase, H; Kato, M

    1997-12-01

    In this study, idiopathic spasmodic torticollis (ST) has been classfied into three types from the opinion of social adaptation and the differences of frustration tolerance. The three types were as follows: type I (overadaptive type), type II (maladaptive type), and type III (compatible type). Type I is a typical psychosomatic with high frustration tolerance. Type II is personality disorder with low frustration tolerance. In type III, frustration tolerance varies depending on social circumstances (i.e., different at home and at the office). In type I, the prognosis of ST is generally unfavorable, since it is associated with recurrence and prolongation of the symptoms. In type II, the prognosis of ST is generally favorable. However, type II patients experience relationship or social difficulties. One characteristic of type III is that the onset of symptoms is usually found in an older person because of proper use of frustration tolerance at home and at the office.

  14. CePdAl. A frustrated Kondo lattice at a quantum critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, Veronika [EP 6, Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Sakai, Akito; Gegenwart, Philipp [EP 6, Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, University of Augsburg (Germany); Huesges, Zita; Lucas, Stefan; Stockert, Oliver [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Kittler, Wolfram; Taubenheim, Christian; Grube, Kai; Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Huang, Chien-Lung [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    CePdAl is one of the rare frustrated Kondo lattice systems that can be tuned across a quantum critical point (QCP) by means of chemical pressure, i. e., the substitution of Pd by Ni. Magnetic frustration and Kondo effect are antithetic phenomena: The Kondo effect with the incipient delocalization of the magnetic moments, is not beneficial for the formation of a frustrated state. On the other hand, magnetic frustrated exchange interactions between the local moments can result in a breakdown of Kondo screening. Furthermore, the fate of frustration is unclear when approaching the QCP, since there is no simple observable to quantify the degree of frustration. We present thermodynamic and neutron scattering experiments on CePd{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Al close to the critical concentration x ∼0.14. Our experiments indicate that even at the QCP magnetic frustration is still present, opening the perspective to find new universality classes at such a quantum phase transition.

  15. Role-separating ordering in social dilemmas controlled by topological frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marco A.; Perc, Matjaž; Wardil, Lucas; Szolnoki, Attila; da Silva Júnior, Elton J.; da Silva, Jafferson K. L.

    2017-03-01

    ``Three is a crowd" is an old proverb that applies as much to social interactions as it does to frustrated configurations in statistical physics models. Accordingly, social relations within a triangle deserve special attention. With this motivation, we explore the impact of topological frustration on the evolutionary dynamics of the snowdrift game on a triangular lattice. This topology provides an irreconcilable frustration, which prevents anticoordination of competing strategies that would be needed for an optimal outcome of the game. By using different strategy updating protocols, we observe complex spatial patterns in dependence on payoff values that are reminiscent to a honeycomb-like organization, which helps to minimize the negative consequence of the topological frustration. We relate the emergence of these patterns to the microscopic dynamics of the evolutionary process, both by means of mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. For comparison, we also consider the same evolutionary dynamics on the square lattice, where of course the topological frustration is absent. However, with the deletion of diagonal links of the triangular lattice, we can gradually bridge the gap to the square lattice. Interestingly, in this case the level of cooperation in the system is a direct indicator of the level of topological frustration, thus providing a method to determine frustration levels in an arbitrary interaction network.

  16. The difficult doctor? Characteristics of physicians who report frustration with patients: an analysis of survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Joanne M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Literature on difficult doctor-patient relationships has focused on the "difficult patient." Our objective was to determine physician and practice characteristics associated with greater physician-reported frustration with patients. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of the Physicians Worklife Survey, which surveyed a random national sample of physicians. Participants were 1391 family medicine, general internal medicine, and medicine subspecialty physicians. The survey assessed physician and practice characteristics, including stress, depression and anxiety symptoms, practice setting, work hours, case-mix, and control over administrative and clinical practice. Physicians estimated the percentage of their patients who were "generally frustrating to deal with." We categorized physicians by quartile of reported frustrating patients and compared characteristics of physicians in the top quartile to those in the other three quartiles. We used logistic regression to model physician characteristics associated with greater frustration. Results In unadjusted analyses, physicians who reported high frustration with patients were younger (p 55 per week, higher stress, practice in a medicine subspeciality, and greater number of patients with psychosocial problems or substance abuse. Conclusion Personal and practice characteristics of physicians who report high frustration with patients differ from those of other physicians. Understanding factors contributing to physician frustration with patients may allow us to improve the quality of patient-physician relationships.

  17. Perceived levels of frustration during clinical situations in athletic training students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinerichs, Scott; Curtis, Neil; Gardiner-Shires, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Athletic training students (ATSs) are involved in various situations during the clinical experience that may cause them to express levels of frustration. Understanding levels of frustration in ATSs is important because frustration can affect student learning, and the clinical experience is critical to their development as professionals. To explore perceived levels of frustration in ATSs during clinical situations and to determine if those perceptions differ based on sex. Cross-sectional study with a survey instrument. A total of 14 of 19 professional, undergraduate athletic training programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education in Pennsylvania. Of a possible 438 athletic training students, 318 (72.6%) completed the survey. The Athletic Training Student Frustration Inventory was developed and administered. The survey gathered demographic information and included 24 Likert-scale items centering on situations associated with the clinical experience. Descriptive statistics were computed on all items. The Mann-Whitney U was used to evaluate differences between male and female students. A higher level of frustration was perceived during the following clinical situations: lack of respect by student-athletes and coaching staffs, the demands of the clinical experience, inability of ATSs to perform or remember skills, and ATSs not having the opportunity to apply their skills daily. Higher levels of frustration were perceived in female than male ATSs in several areas. Understanding student frustration during clinical situations is important to better appreciate the clinical education experience. Low levels of this emotion are expected; however, when higher levels exist, learning can be affected. Whereas we cannot eliminate student frustrations, athletic training programs and preceptors need to be aware of this emotion in order to create an environment that is more conducive to learning.

  18. Microfluidic Separation of Ethylene and Ethane Using Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, Dan; Stephan, Douglas W; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-12-21

    Separation of gaseous olefins and paraffins is one of the most important separation processes in the industry. Development of new cost-effective technologies aims at reducing the high energy consumption during the separation process. Here, we took advantage of the reaction of frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) with ethylene to achieve reactive extraction of ethylene from ethylene-ethane mixtures. The extraction was studied using a microfluidic platform, which enabled a rapid, high-throughput assessment of reaction conditions to optimize gas separation efficiency. A separation factor of 7.3 was achieved for ethylene from a 1:1 volume ratio mixture of ethylene and ethane, which corresponded to an extracted ethylene purity of 88 %. The results obtained in the microfluidic studies were validated using infrared spectroscopy. This work paves the way for further development of the FLPs and optimization of reaction conditions, thereby maximizing the separation efficiency of olefins from their mixtures with paraffins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Frustration-guided motion planning reveals conformational transitions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, Dominik; Fonseca, Rasmus; Leyendecker, Sigrid; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-10-01

    Proteins exist as conformational ensembles, exchanging between substates to perform their function. Advances in experimental techniques yield unprecedented access to structural snapshots of their conformational landscape. However, computationally modeling how proteins use collective motions to transition between substates is challenging owing to a rugged landscape and large energy barriers. Here, we present a new, robotics-inspired motion planning procedure called dCC-RRT that navigates the rugged landscape between substates by introducing dynamic, interatomic constraints to modulate frustration. The constraints balance non-native contacts and flexibility, and instantaneously redirect the motion towards sterically favorable conformations. On a test set of eight proteins determined in two conformations separated by, on average, 7.5 Å root mean square deviation (RMSD), our pathways reduced the Cα atom RMSD to the goal conformation by 78%, outperforming peer methods. We then applied dCC-RRT to examine how collective, small-scale motions of four side-chains in the active site of cyclophilin A propagate through the protein. dCC-RRT uncovered a spatially contiguous network of residues linked by steric interactions and collective motion connecting the active site to a recently proposed, non-canonical capsid binding site 25 Å away, rationalizing NMR and multi-temperature crystallography experiments. In all, dCC-RRT can reveal detailed, all-atom molecular mechanisms for small and large amplitude motions. Source code and binaries are freely available at https://github.com/ExcitedStates/KGS/. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Frustration under pressure: Exotic magnetism in new pyrochlore oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Wiebe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyrochlore structures, of chemical formula A2B2O7 (A and B are typically trivalent and tetravalent ions, respectively, have been the focus of much activity in the condensed matter community due to the ease of substitution of rare earth and transition metal ions upon the two interpenetrating corner-shared tetrahedral lattices. Over the last few decades, superconductivity, spin liquid states, spin ice states, glassy states in the absence of chemical disorder, and metal-insulator transitions have all been discovered in these materials. Geometric frustration plays a role in the relevant physics of all of these phenomena. In the search for new pyrochlore materials, it is the RA/RB cation radius ratio which determines the stability of the lattice over the defect fluorite structure in the lower limit. Under ambient pressure, the pyrochlores are stable for 1.36 ≤ RA/RB ≤ 1.71. However, using high pressure synthesis techniques (1-10 GPa of pressure, metastable pyrochlores exist up to RA/RB = 2.30. Many of these compounds are stable on a timescale of years after synthesis, and provide a means to greatly enhance exchange, and thus test theories of quantum magnetism and search for new phenomena. Within this article, we review new pyrochlore compounds synthesized via high pressure techniques and show how the ground states are extremely sensitive to chemical pressure.

  1. Phase transition and frustration in nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnaoui, K.

    2008-10-01

    The thermodynamics of nuclear matter which constitutes the crust of proto-neutron stars and neutron stars is studied in this thesis. Obtaining information on the star matter thermodynamics will enhance the understanding of physical phenomena involved in the cooling of proto-neutron stars, and in the formation of type II supernovae. One of the main goals is to extract the star-matter phase diagram in order to determine if instabilities and/or critical points are present. The work is divided into two parts: in the first one classical approaches are developed, while the second one presents a quantum approach. The classical approaches are based on the Ising model and on the renormalisation group. They give us qualitative information on the phenomenology of phase transitions for star matter, and allow a discussion on the properties of the phase diagram under the generic phenomenon of Coulomb frustration. The quantum approach is based on a fermionic molecular dynamics model that we have developed from the density functional formalism, and numerically implemented using Skyrme forces optimized on neutron rich nuclei and neutron matter. This thesis work shows some first applications to the study the thermodynamics of finite nuclear systems, as well as nuclear structure calculations for light nuclei. A new formalism based on the molecular dynamics model is sketched which will ultimately allow treating the numerical quantum problem for the infinite star matter. (author)

  2. Nematic quantum liquid crystals of bosons in frustrated lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guanyu; Koch, Jens; Martin, Ivar

    2016-04-01

    The problem of interacting bosons in frustrated lattices is an intricate one due to the absence of a unique minimum in the single-particle dispersion where macroscopic number of bosons can condense. Here, we consider a family of tight-binding models with macroscopically degenerate lowest energy bands, separated from other bands by a gap. We predict the formation of exotic states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry at relatively low filling. These states belong to three nematic phases: Wigner crystal, supersolid, and superfluid. The Wigner crystal phase is established exactly at low filling. Supersolid and superfluid phases, at larger filling, are obtained by making use of a projection onto the flat band, construction of an appropriate Wannier basis, and subsequent mean-field treatment. The nematic superfluid that we predict is uniform in real space but has an anisotropic momentum distribution, providing a novel scenario for Bose condensation with an additional nematic order. Our findings open up a promising direction of studying microscopic quantum liquid crystalline phases of bosons.

  3. Frustration in the energy landscapes of multidomain protein misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weihua; Schafer, Nicholas P; Wolynes, Peter G

    2013-01-29

    Frustration from strong interdomain interactions can make misfolding a more severe problem in multidomain proteins than in single-domain proteins. On the basis of bioinformatic surveys, it has been suggested that lowering the sequence identity between neighboring domains is one of nature's solutions to the multidomain misfolding problem. We investigate folding of multidomain proteins using the associative-memory, water-mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM), a predictive coarse-grained protein force field. We find that reducing sequence identity not only decreases the formation of domain-swapped contacts but also decreases the formation of strong self-recognition contacts between β-strands with high hydrophobic content. The ensembles of misfolded structures that result from forming these amyloid-like interactions are energetically disfavored compared with the native state, but entropically favored. Therefore, these ensembles are more stable than the native ensemble under denaturing conditions, such as high temperature. Domain-swapped contacts compete with self-recognition contacts in forming various trapped states, and point mutations can shift the balance between the two types of interaction. We predict that multidomain proteins that lack these specific strong interdomain interactions should fold reliably.

  4. Effects of interfacial frustration in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urazhdin, Sergei; Ma, Tianyu

    While the ferromagnet (F)/antiferromagnet (AF) bilayers have been extensively studied in the context of exchange bias, and more recently in the context of antiferromagnetic spintronics, the fundamental understanding of the nature of the magnetic state in this system is still a subject a debate. We will present measurements of magnetization aging in several F/AF systems based on AF=FeMn, CoO, and NiO, universally observed in all of these systems when AF layers are sufficiently thin. Quite generally, the aging curves are well-described by the power law with a small exponent. We show that the aging characteristics such as the dependence on temperature and the magnetic history are inconsistent with the Arrhenius activation, disproving the granular models of exchange bias. Furthermore, we show that the aging characteristics qualitatively change across the exchange bias blocking temperature, demonstrating that the latter is similar to the glass transition temperature, and is not simply of a characteristic activation temperature of the AF domains. We discuss the our findings in the context of frustration due to the random effective exchange field at the F/AF interface. supported by NSF DMR.

  5. The Act of Giving and Frustration: An Analysis in Determination of Psychological Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Junior Ladeira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze a scenario of giving, within a time gap, can be influenced by the frustration of an unfulfilled goal. From an experimental plan was checking the indulgence with others and with the gift at Christmas (Study 1, the influence of own frustrations (Study 2 and others (Study 3. The results show that the increase (decrease of frustration with the layout for goal himself can generate indulgence (control at the time of giving both to himself as another person.

  6. Frustrated magnetic response of a superconducting Nb film with a square lattice of columnar defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadorosny, R; Ortiz, W A [Grupo de Supercondutividade e Magnetismo, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lepienski, C M [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Patino, E; Blamire, M G [Department of Materials Science, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rafazad@df.ufscar.br

    2008-02-01

    The magnetic response of a superconducting system presenting a frustrated state is investigated. The system is a superconducting film with mechanically pierced columns, cooled in a field which is then removed. Frustration originates from the competition between return flux of a dipole - created by flux trapped in the empty columns - and flux exclusion by the surrounding superconductor in the Meissner state. The system resolves the incompatibility among conflicting constraints, leading to frustration, by eliminating return flux, which is possibly assimilated by nearby columns, as manifested by a sudden reduction of the magnetic moment on the decreasing field branch of the hysteresis loop.

  7. Frustrated magnetic response of a superconducting Nb film with a square lattice of columnar defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadorosny, R; Ortiz, W A; Lepienski, C M; Patino, E; Blamire, M G

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic response of a superconducting system presenting a frustrated state is investigated. The system is a superconducting film with mechanically pierced columns, cooled in a field which is then removed. Frustration originates from the competition between return flux of a dipole - created by flux trapped in the empty columns - and flux exclusion by the surrounding superconductor in the Meissner state. The system resolves the incompatibility among conflicting constraints, leading to frustration, by eliminating return flux, which is possibly assimilated by nearby columns, as manifested by a sudden reduction of the magnetic moment on the decreasing field branch of the hysteresis loop

  8. Magnetic dimerization in the frustrated spin ladder Li2Cu2O (SO4)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarelli, O.; Rousse, G.; Saúl, A.; Radtke, G.

    2017-11-01

    The magnetic properties of Li2Cu2O (SO4)2 are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. In its high-temperature tetragonal structure, this compound appears as a rare material realization of a frustrated spin-1/2 two-leg ladder, where magnetic frustration arises from competing nearest and next-nearest interactions along the legs. Through a large magnetoelastic coupling, the triclinic distortion occurring around 125 K is shown to induce the formation of a staggered dimer structure, lifting most of the magnetic frustration.

  9. The allure of the forbidden: breaking taboos, frustration, and attraction to violent video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Jodi L; Melzer, André; Steffgen, Georges; Bushman, Brad J

    2013-04-01

    Although people typically avoid engaging in antisocial or taboo behaviors, such as cheating and stealing, they may succumb in order to maximize their personal benefit. Moreover, they may be frustrated when the chance to commit a taboo behavior is withdrawn. The present study tested whether the desire to commit a taboo behavior, and the frustration from being denied such an opportunity, increases attraction to violent video games. Playing violent games allegedly offers an outlet for aggression prompted by frustration. In two experiments, some participants had no chance to commit a taboo behavior (cheating in Experiment 1, stealing in Experiment 2), others had a chance to commit a taboo behavior, and others had a withdrawn chance to commit a taboo behavior. Those in the latter group were most attracted to violent video games. Withdrawing the chance for participants to commit a taboo behavior increased their frustration, which in turn increased their attraction to violent video games.

  10. Frustration intolerance and unconditional self-acceptance as mediators of the relationship between perfectionism and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Sanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to further clarify the basic mechanism through which maladaptive perfectionism leads to depression, using the rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT framework. Previous studies have shown that depression is not associated with high personal standards, but rather with the tendency to evaluate one’s self-worth based on the attainment of these standards, i.e. conditional self-acceptance. The goal of this study was to investigate for the first time the mediating role of frustration intolerance beliefs in this relationship, beyond and above the contribution of unconditional self-acceptance (USA beliefs. The sample consisted of 321 undergraduate students. Consistent with REBT theory, the structural equation modeling showed that both frustration intolerance and USA mediated the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and dysphoria, with frustration intolerance beliefs being the stronger mediator. There was no evidence that maladaptive perfectionism influenced dysphoria independently of its effect on frustration intolerance and USA.

  11. Orbital frustration induced unusual ordering in semiconductor alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Yin, Wanjian; Chen, Shiyou; Gong, Xingao; Wei, Suhuai; Xiang, Hongjun

    It is well known that ternary zinc-blende semiconductors are always more stable in the chalcopyrite (CH) structure than the Cu-Au (CA) structure because CH structure has large Coulomb interaction and reduced strain energy. Surprisingly, an experimental study showed that ZnFeSe2 alloy takes the CA order as the ground state structure, which is consistent with our density function theory (DFT) calculations showing that the CA order has lower energy than the CH order for ZnFeSe2. We reveal that the orbital degree of freedom of high-spin Fe2+ ion (d6) in the tetrahedral crystal field plays a key role in stabilizing the CA order. First, the spin-minority d electron of the Fe2+ ion tends to occupy the dx2-y 2 -like orbital instead of the d3z2 -r2 -like orbital because of its large negative Coulomb energy. Second, for a nearest-neighboring Fe2+ pair, two spin-minority d electrons with occupied dx2-y 2 -like orbitals in the plane containing the Fe-Fe bond has lower electronic kinetic energy. Both conditions can be satisfied in the CA ordered ZnFeSe2 alloy, while there is an orbital frustration in the CH structure. Our results suggest that orbital degree of freedom provides a new way to manipulate the structure and properties of alloys. Work at Fudan was supported by NSFC (11374056), the Special Funds for Major State Basic Research (2012CB921400, 2015CB921700), Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar), and Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation.

  12. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David Tyler

    At ambient conditions, water sits close to phase coexistence with its crystal. More so than in many other materials, this fact is manifested in the fluctuations that maintain a large degree of local order in the liquid. These fluctuations and how they result in long-ranged order, or its absence, are emergent features of many interacting molecules. Their study therefore requires using the tools of statistical mechanics for their their systematic understanding. In this dissertation we develop such an understanding. In particular, we focus on collective behavior that emerges in liquid and solid water. At room temperatures, the thermophysical properties of water are quantified and rationalized with simple molecular models. A key feature of these models is the correct characterization of the competition between entropic forces of packing and the energetic preference for tetrahedral order. At cold temperatures, the properties of ice surfaces are studied with statistical field theory. The theory we develop for the long wavelength features of ice interfaces allows us to explain the existence of a premelting layer on the surface of ice and the stability of ice in confinement. In between these extremes, the dynamics of supercooled water are considered. A detailed theory for the early stages of coarsening is developed and used to explain the peculiar observation of a transient second liquid state of water. When coarsening dynamics are arrested, the result is the formation of a glassy states of water. We show that out-of-equilibrium the phase diagram for supercooled water exhibits a rich amount of structure, including a triple point between two glass phases of water and the liquid. At the end, we explore possible technological implications for the interplay between ordering and frustration in studies of water at metal interfaces.

  13. The resources of adaptability in a situation of frustration: a comparative experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Lyudmila M. Kolpakova

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with mechanisms for mobilizing the resources of the individual in a situation to overcome the frustration that is studied in the framework of the methodology of the subjective approach. The analysis used data from the experiment, organized as situation of frustration for students during the examination session. Used methods: φ* criterion (angular conversion Fischer), Q criterion Rosenbaum, goodness of fit Pearson (χ 2); methods comparison, analysis and synthe...

  14. Post-communist democracy vs. totalitarianism: Contrasting patterns of need satisfaction and societal frustration.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klicperová-Baker, Martina; Košťál, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2017), s. 99-111 ISSN 0967-067X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11062S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/14 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : Totalitarianism * Post- communism * Frustration * Societal frustration * Democracy * Memory * Maslow * Hierarchy of needs Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 0.607, year: 2016

  15. Post-communist democracy vs. totalitarianism: Contrasting patterns of need satisfaction and societal frustration.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klicperová-Baker, Martina; Košťál, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2017), s. 99-111 ISSN 0967-067X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11062S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/14 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : Totalitarianism * Post-communism * Frustration * Societal frustration * Democracy * Memory * Maslow * Hierarchy of needs Subject RIV: AN - Psychology OBOR OECD: Psychology (including human - machine relations) Impact factor: 0.607, year: 2016

  16. The nature of adolescent competencies predicted by preschool delay of gratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischel, W; Shoda, Y; Peake, P K

    1988-04-01

    Delay of gratification, assessed in a series of experiments when the subjects were in preschool, was related to parental personality ratings obtained a decade later for 95 of these children in adolescence. Clear and consistent patterns of correlations between self-imposed delay time in preschool and later ratings were found for both sexes over this time span. Delay behavior predicted a set of cognitive and social competencies and stress tolerance consistent with experimental analyses of the process underlying effective delay in the preschool delay situation. Specifically, children who were able to wait longer at age 4 or 5 became adolescents whose parents rated them as more academically and socially competent, verbally fluent, rational, attentive, planful, and able to deal well with frustration and stress. Comparisons with related longitudinal research using other delay situations help to clarify the important features of the situations and person variables involved in different aspects of delay of gratification.

  17. Phase diagram of the Kondo-Heisenberg model on honeycomb lattice with geometrical frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Song, Hai-Feng; Liu, Yu

    2016-11-01

    We calculated the phase diagram of the Kondo-Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice with both nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic spin exchanges, to investigate the interplay between RKKY and Kondo interactions in the presence of magnetic frustration. Within a mean-field decoupling technology in slave-fermion representation, we derived the zero-temperature phase diagram as a function of Kondo coupling J k and frustration strength Q. The geometrical frustration can destroy the magnetic order, driving the original antiferromagnetic (AF) phase to non-magnetic valence bond solids (VBS). In addition, we found two distinct VBS. As J k is increased, a phase transition from AF to Kondo paramagnetic (KP) phase occurs, without the intermediate phase coexisting AF order with Kondo screening found in square lattice systems. In the KP phase, the enhancement of frustration weakens the Kondo screening effect, resulting in a phase transition from KP to VBS. We also found a process to recover the AF order from VBS by increasing J k in a wide range of frustration strength. Our work may provide predictions for future experimental observation of new processes of quantum phase transitions in frustrated heavy-fermion compounds.

  18. Phosphorylation-induced changes in the energetic frustration in human Tank binding kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Shahrukh; Kumar, Vijay; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-07-14

    Tank binding kinase 1 (TBK-1) plays an important role in immunity, inflammation, autophagy, cell growth and proliferation. Nevertheless, a key molecular and structural detail of TBK-1 phosphorylation and activation has been largely unknown. Here we investigated the energy landscape of phosphorylated (active) and unphosphorylated (inactive) forms of human TBK-1 to characterize the interplay between phosphorylation and local frustration. By employing the algorithm equipped with energy function and implemented in Frustratometer web-server (http://www.frustratometer.tk), we quantify the role of frustration in the activation of TBK-1. Accordingly, the conformational changes were observed in phosphoregulated active and inactive TBK-1. Substantial changes in frustration, flexibility and interatomic motions were observed among different forms of TBK-1. Structurally rigid kinase domain constitutes a minimally frustrated hub in the core of the catalytic domain, and highly frustrated clusters mainly at the C-lobe might enable the conformational transitions during activation. Also, a large network of highly frustrated interactions is found in the SDD domain of TBK-1 involved in protein-protein interactions and dimerization. The contact maps of the activation loop and α-C helix of kinase domain showed significant changes upon phosphorylation. Cross correlation analysis indicate that both intra and inter subunit correlated motions increases with phosphorylation of TBK-1. Phosphorylation thus introduces subtle changes in long-range contacts that might lead to significant conformational change of TBK-1. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of the framing of time on delay discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHart, William Brady; Odum, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of the framing of time on delay discounting. Delay discounting is the process by which delayed outcomes are devalued as a function of time. Time in a titrating delay discounting task is often framed in calendar units (e.g., as 1 week, 1 month, etc.). When time is framed as a specific date, delayed outcomes are discounted less compared to the calendar format. Other forms of framing time; however, have not been explored. All participants completed a titrating calendar unit delay-discounting task for money. Participants were also assigned to one of two delay discounting tasks: time as dates (e.g., June 1st, 2015) or time in units of days (e.g., 5000 days), using the same delay distribution as the calendar delay-discounting task. Time framed as dates resulted in less discounting compared to the calendar method, whereas time framed as days resulted in greater discounting compared to the calendar method. The hyperboloid model fit best compared to the hyperbola and exponential models. How time is framed may alter how participants attend to the delays as well as how the delayed outcome is valued. Altering how time is framed may serve to improve adherence to goals with delayed outcomes. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  20. Amygdala dysfunction attenuates frustration-induced aggression in psychopathic individuals in a non-criminal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osumi, Takahiro; Nakao, Takashi; Kasuya, Yukinori; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2012-12-15

    Individuals with psychopathy have an increased tendency toward certain types of aggression. We hypothesized that successful psychopaths, who have no criminal convictions but can be diagnosed with psychopathy in terms of personality characteristics, are skilled at regulating aggressive impulses, compared to incarcerated unsuccessful psychopaths. In this block-designed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we sought to clarify the neural mechanisms underlying differences in frustration-induced aggression as a function of psychopathy in non-criminal populations. Twenty male undergraduate students who completed a self-report psychopathy questionnaire were scanned while they completed a task in which they either could or could not punish other individuals who made unfair offers of monetary distribution. Individuals with high psychopathic tendencies were less likely to make a decision to inflict costly punishment on people proposing unfair offers. During this decision-making, psychopathy was associated with less amygdala activity in response to the unfairness of offers. Moreover, the amygdala dysfunction in psychopathic individuals was associated with reduced functional connectivity with dopaminergic-related areas, including the striatum, when punishment was available compared to when it was unavailable. The possibility that levels of psychopathic traits in a regular population were milder than in incarcerated populations cannot be ruled out. The findings indicate that amygdala dysfunction underlies affective deficits of psychopathy. We propose that the insensitivity of the amygdala to the affective significance of social stimuli contributes to an increased risk of violation of social norms, but enhances the ability to attenuate impulses toward maladaptive aggression in successful psychopaths. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed puberty in girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sexual development - girls; Pubertal delay - girls; Constitutional delayed puberty ... In most cases of delayed puberty, growth changes just begin later than usual, sometimes called a late bloomer. Once puberty begins, it progresses normally. This pattern runs ...

  2. Delayed Puberty (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Delayed Puberty KidsHealth / For Teens / Delayed Puberty What's in this ... wonder if there's anything wrong. What Is Delayed Puberty? Puberty is the time when your body grows ...

  3. CGI delay compensation. [Computer Generated Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during agressive tasks such as nap of the earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitude distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  4. Delayed child-bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jo-Ann; Tough, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    To provide an overview of delayed child-bearing and to describe the implications for women and health care providers. Delayed child-bearing, which has increased greatly in recent decades, is associated with an increased risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, and adverse pregnancy outcome. This guideline provides information that will optimize the counselling and care of Canadian women with respect to their reproductive choices. Maternal age is the most important determinant of fertility, and obstetric and perinatal risks increase with maternal age. Many women are unaware of the success rates or limitations of assisted reproductive technology and of the increased medical risks of delayed child-bearing, including multiple births, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and Caesarean section. This guideline provides a framework to address these issues. Studies published between 2000 and August 2010 were retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library using appropriate key words (delayed child-bearing, deferred pregnancy, maternal age, assisted reproductive technology, infertility, and multiple births) and MeSH terms (maternal age, reproductive behaviour, fertility). The Internet was also searched using similar key words, and national and international medical specialty societies were searched for clinical practice guidelines and position statements. Data were extracted based on the aims, sample, authors, year, and results. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Women who delay child-bearing are at increased risk of infertility. Prospective parents, especially women, should know that their fecundity and fertility begin to decline significantly after 32 years of age. Prospective parents should know that assisted reproductive technologies cannot guarantee a live birth or completely

  5. Emergent inequality and self-organized social classes in a network of power and frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahault, Benoit; Saxena, Avadh; Nisoli, Cristiano

    2017-01-01

    We propose a simple agent-based model on a network to conceptualize the allocation of limited wealth among more abundant expectations at the interplay of power, frustration, and initiative. Concepts imported from the statistical physics of frustrated systems in and out of equilibrium allow us to compare subjective measures of frustration and satisfaction to collective measures of fairness in wealth distribution, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini index. We find that a completely libertarian, law-of-the-jungle setting, where every agent can acquire wealth from or lose wealth to anybody else invariably leads to a complete polarization of the distribution of wealth vs. opportunity. This picture is however dramatically ameliorated when hard constraints are imposed over agents in the form of a limiting network of transactions. There, an out of equilibrium dynamics of the networks, based on a competition between power and frustration in the decision-making of agents, leads to network coevolution. The ratio of power and frustration controls different dynamical regimes separated by kinetic transitions and characterized by drastically different values of equality. It also leads, for proper values of social initiative, to the emergence of three self-organized social classes, lower, middle, and upper class. Their dynamics, which appears mostly controlled by the middle class, drives a cyclical regime of dramatic social changes.

  6. Speech and Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OTC Relief for Diarrhea Home Diseases and Conditions Speech and Language Delay Condition Speech and Language Delay Share Print Table of Contents1. ... Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is a speech and language delay? A speech and language delay ...

  7. Frustration tuning and perfect phase synchronization in the Kuramoto-Sakaguchi model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, Markus; Kalloniatis, Alexander C

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of conditions under which the dynamics of a frustrated Kuramoto-or Kuramoto-Sakaguchi-model on sparse networks can be tuned to enhance synchronization. Using numerical optimization techniques, linear stability, and dimensional reduction analysis, a simple tuning scheme for setting node-specific frustration parameters as functions of native frequencies and degrees is developed. Finite-size scaling analysis reveals that even partial application of the tuning rule can significantly reduce the critical coupling for the onset of synchronization. In the second part of the paper, a codynamics is proposed, which allows a dynamic tuning of frustration parameters simultaneously with the ordinary Kuramoto dynamics. We find that such codynamics enhance synchronization when operating on slow time scales, and impede synchronization when operating on fast time scales relative to the Kuramoto dynamics.

  8. Spin frustration effects in an odd-member antiferromagnetic ring and the magnetic Mobius strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cador, Olivier; Gatteschi, Dante; Sessoli, Roberta; Barra, Anne-Laure; Timco, Grigore A.; Winpenny, Richard E.P.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the first odd-member antiferromagnetic ring comprising eight chromium(III) ions, S=32 spins, and one nickel(II) ion, S=1 spin, are investigated. The ring possesses an even number of unpaired electrons and a S=0 ground state but, due to competing AF interactions, the first excited spin states are close in energy. The spin frustrated ring is visualized by a Mobius strip. The 'knot' of the strip represents the region of the ring where the AF interactions are more frustrated. In the particular case of this bimetallic ring electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has unambiguously shown that the frustration is delocalized on the chromium chain, while the antiparallel alignment is more rigid at the nickel site

  9. Spin frustration effects in an odd-member antiferromagnetic ring and the magnetic Mobius strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cador, Olivier [Laboratory of Molecular Magnetism, Department of Chemistry and UdR INSTM, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via Lastruccia n. 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Gatteschi, Dante [Laboratory of Molecular Magnetism, Department of Chemistry and UdR INSTM, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via Lastruccia n. 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sessoli, Roberta [Laboratory of Molecular Magnetism, Department of Chemistry and UdR INSTM, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Via Lastruccia n. 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)]. E-mail: roberta.sessoli@unifi.it; Barra, Anne-Laure [Laboratoire des Champs Magnetiques Intenses-CNRS, F-38042 Grenoble Cede 9 (France); Timco, Grigore A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Winpenny, Richard E.P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-15

    The magnetic properties of the first odd-member antiferromagnetic ring comprising eight chromium(III) ions, S=32 spins, and one nickel(II) ion, S=1 spin, are investigated. The ring possesses an even number of unpaired electrons and a S=0 ground state but, due to competing AF interactions, the first excited spin states are close in energy. The spin frustrated ring is visualized by a Mobius strip. The 'knot' of the strip represents the region of the ring where the AF interactions are more frustrated. In the particular case of this bimetallic ring electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has unambiguously shown that the frustration is delocalized on the chromium chain, while the antiparallel alignment is more rigid at the nickel site.

  10. Dynamics of neurotic frustration of teenagers living in radioactive contaminated regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obukhov, S.G.

    1999-01-01

    Clinical psycho pathologic and psychologic examination of 150 teenagers (236 boys and 274 girls) living in radioactive contaminated regions (contaminated density of cesium 137 was 1,5 - 22 Ci/km 2 ) was fulfilled for neurotic frustration dynamics determination. Neurotic disorders of various degrees (from subclinical ones to those clinically diagnosed) such as vegetative dysfunction and frustration of adaptation were revealed in 42% of the examined patients. Therapeutic and rehabilitation measures resulted in positive changes reflecting the psycho pathologic symptoms reduction and stabilisation of a psycho emotional and vegetative state

  11. Spin-driven ferroelectricity and magneto-electric effects in frustrated magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Taka-hisa

    2011-01-01

    The interplay between magnetism and electricity in matter has become a central issue of condensed-matter physics. This review focuses on the ferroelectricity induced by magnetic order mostly in frustrated magnets, which is nowadays referred to as magneto-electric (ME) multiferroic, or often only as multiferroic. Some distinct types of microscopic origins relevant to the spin-driven ferroelectricity are discussed in detail. Then one sees that the frustration-based spin-driven ferroelectrics can exhibit nonlinear and giant ME responses of phase-transition type and of domain-control type, in contrast to the conventional magnetoelectrics hosting linear ME effects. (author)

  12. Spin freezing in the geometrically frustrated pyrochlore antiferromagnet Tb2Mo2O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaulin, B.D.; Reimers, J.N.; Mason, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic metal ions in the cubic pyrochlore Tb2Mo2O7 form an infinite three-dimensional network of corner-sharing tetrahedra with a very high potential for frustration in the presence of antiferromagnetism. We have performed neutron scattering measurements which show short-range spatial...... correlations that develop continuously with decreasing temperature, while the characteristic time scale for the fluctuating moments decreases dramatically below T(f) is similar to 25 K. Therefore, this pure material, which possesses frustration that is purely geometrical in origin, displays a spin-glass state...

  13. UAVs and Control Delays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Vries, S. C

    2005-01-01

    .... Delays of about 250-300 ms often lead to unacceptable airplane handling qualities. Techniques such as filtering and predictive displays may extend the range of acceptable delays up to about 400 ms...

  14. Delayed puberty in boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007695.htm Delayed puberty in boys To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Delayed puberty in boys is when puberty does not begin ...

  15. The allure of the forbidden: Breaking taboos, frustration, and attraction to violent video games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitaker, J.L.; Melzer, A.; Steffgen, G.; Bushman, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Although people typically avoid engaging in antisocial or taboo behaviors, such as cheating and stealing, they may succumb in order to maximize their personal benefit. Moreover, they may be frustrated when the chance to commit a taboo behavior is withdrawn. The present study tested whether the

  16. Psychometric Properties of the Psychological Needs Satisfaction Frustration Scale (BPNFS) in Chilean University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, Milenko; Matos, Lennia; Díaz, Alejandro; Pérez, María Victoria; Vergara, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    This research work aims to analyze the psychometric properties of the Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Frustration Scale (BPNSFS)--autonomy, competence and relatedness--identified by the self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000b), in a sample of 297 university students from different faculties and programs belonging to a Chilean…

  17. Switchable geometric frustration in an artificial-spin-ice-superconductor heterosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Ma, Xiaoyu; Xu, Jing; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Snezhko, Alexey; Divan, Ralu; Ocola, Leonidas E; Pearson, John E; Janko, Boldizsar; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2018-06-11

    Geometric frustration emerges when local interaction energies in an ordered lattice structure cannot be simultaneously minimized, resulting in a large number of degenerate states. The numerous degenerate configurations may lead to practical applications in microelectronics 1 , such as data storage, memory and logic 2 . However, it is difficult to achieve very high degeneracy, especially in a two-dimensional system 3,4 . Here, we showcase in situ controllable geometric frustration with high degeneracy in a two-dimensional flux-quantum system. We create this in a superconducting thin film placed underneath a reconfigurable artificial-spin-ice structure 5 . The tunable magnetic charges in the artificial-spin-ice strongly interact with the flux quanta in the superconductor, enabling switching between frustrated and crystallized flux quanta states. The different states have measurable effects on the superconducting critical current profile, which can be reconfigured by precise selection of the spin-ice magnetic state through the application of an external magnetic field. We demonstrate the applicability of these effects by realizing a reprogrammable flux quanta diode. The tailoring of the energy landscape of interacting 'particles' using artificial-spin-ices provides a new paradigm for the design of geometric frustration, which could illuminate a path to control new functionalities in other material systems, such as magnetic skyrmions 6 , electrons and holes in two-dimensional materials 7,8 , and topological insulators 9 , as well as colloids in soft materials 10-13 .

  18. Doctrine of Frustration of Contract in English, American and Iranian Law (Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Daraei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pacta sunt servanda” is one of the most fundamental principles in the common law and Iranian legal systems, which have been exposed to exceptions in the process of time. These exceptions are part of general doctrine of frustration. Iranians exceptions to this rule are named as “Ta`azzor” and “Ta`assor” rules. Doctrine of Frustration in Common law includes three subdivision theories: “impossibility of performance”, “frustration of purpose” and “impracticability” (hardship. All of these theories applied where a supervening event occurs. In English courts, only first two theories are accepted but third one is applicable in American courts. In imamieh Jurisprudence and Iranian law, “Ta`azzor” rule in most aspects is similar to Impossibility and “Ta`assor” rule is somehow like Impracticability. Some Iranian lawyers are said that we have no rule like “Frustration of Purpose” but I believe we can find traces of this theory in Imamieh jurisprudence and according which it is part of “Ta`azzor” rule.

  19. Aging Parents of Adults With Disabilities: The Gratifications and Frustrations of Later-Life Caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan S.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used stress process model to investigate impact of later-life caregiving on 105 mothers of adult children with mental illness and 208 mothers of adult children with mental retardation. Mothers of persons with mental illness reported higher levels of frustrations and lower levels of gratifications. Adult child's behavior problems were strongest…

  20. Relations of low frustration tolerance beliefs with stress, depression, and anxiety in young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Noreen E; Yarcheski, Adela; Yarcheski, Thomas J; Hanks, Michele M

    2007-02-01

    Young adolescents (N=144; 66 boys, 78 girls), ages 12 to 14 years (M=12.2, SD=.8), who reported lower scores on the Low Frustration Tolerance Beliefs Instrument had higher scores on the Perceived Stress Scale and the Profile of Mood States Subscales of Depression and Anxiety.

  1. More Opportunities than Wealth: Inequality and Emergent Social Classes in a Network of Power and Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Mahault, Benoit; Saxena, Avadh

    We introduce a minimal agent-based model to qualitatively conceptualize the allocation of limited wealth among more abundant opportunities. There the interplay of power, satisfaction and frustration determines the distribution, concentration, and inequality of wealth. Our framework allows us to compare subjective measures of frustration and satisfaction to collective measures of fairness in wealth distribution, such as the Lorenz curve and the Gini index. We find that a completely libertarian, law-of-the-jungle setting, where every agent can acquire wealth from, or lose wealth to, anybody else invariably leads to large inequality. The picture is however dramatically modified when hard constraints are imposed over agents, and they are limited to share wealth with neighbors on a network. We address dynamical societies via an out of equilibrium coevolution of the network, driven by a competition between power and frustration. The ratio between power and frustration controls different dynamical regimes separated by kinetic transitions and characterized by drastically different values of the indices of equality. In particular, it leads to the emergence of three self-organized social classes, lower, middle, and upper class, whose interactions drive a cyclical regime.

  2. Delayed Orgasm and Anorgasmia

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Lawrence C.; Mulhall, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies; which include: medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation and psychological etiologies, amongst others. Unfortunately, ...

  3. How checking breeds doubt: reduced performance in a simple working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkin, Ben; Kessler, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    A paradox of memory research is that repeated checking results in a decrease in memory certainty, memory vividness and confidence [van den Hout, M. A., & Kindt, M. (2003a). Phenomenological validity of an OCD-memory model and the remember/know distinction. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 41, 369-378; van den Hout, M. A., & Kindt, M. (2003b). Repeated checking causes memory distrust. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 41, 301-316]. Although these findings have been mainly attributed to changes in episodic long-term memory, it has been suggested [Shimamura, A. P. (2000). Toward a cognitive neuroscience of metacognition. Consciousness and Cognition, 9, 313-323] that representations in working memory could already suffer from detrimental checking. In two experiments we set out to test this hypothesis by employing a delayed-match-to-sample working memory task. Letters had to be remembered in their correct locations, a task that was designed to engage the episodic short-term buffer of working memory [Baddeley, A. D. (2000). The episodic buffer: a new component in working memory? Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4, 417-423]. Of most importance, we introduced an intermediate distractor question that was prone to induce frustrating and unnecessary checking on trials where no correct answer was possible. Reaction times and confidence ratings on the actual memory test of these trials confirmed the success of this manipulation. Most importantly, high checkers [cf. VOCI; Thordarson, D. S., Radomsky, A. S., Rachman, S., Shafran, R, Sawchuk, C. N., & Hakstian, A. R. (2004). The Vancouver obsessional compulsive inventory (VOCI). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 42(11), 1289-1314] were less accurate than low checkers when frustrating checking was induced, especially if the experimental context actually emphasized the irrelevance of the misleading question. The clinical relevance of this result was substantiated by means of an extreme groups comparison across the two studies. The findings

  4. Is Geometric Frustration-Induced Disorder a Recipe for High Ionic Conductivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düvel, Andre; Heitjans, Paul; Fedorov, Pavel; Scholz, Gudrun; Cibin, Giannantonio; Chadwick, Alan V; Pickup, David M; Ramos, Silvia; Sayle, Lewis W L; Sayle, Emma K L; Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C

    2017-04-26

    Ionic conductivity is ubiquitous to many industrially important applications such as fuel cells, batteries, sensors, and catalysis. Tunable conductivity in these systems is therefore key to their commercial viability. Here, we show that geometric frustration can be exploited as a vehicle for conductivity tuning. In particular, we imposed geometric frustration upon a prototypical system, CaF 2 , by ball milling it with BaF 2 , to create nanostructured Ba 1-x Ca x F 2 solid solutions and increased its ionic conductivity by over 5 orders of magnitude. By mirroring each experiment with MD simulation, including "simulating synthesis", we reveal that geometric frustration confers, on a system at ambient temperature, structural and dynamical attributes that are typically associated with heating a material above its superionic transition temperature. These include structural disorder, excess volume, pseudovacancy arrays, and collective transport mechanisms; we show that the excess volume correlates with ionic conductivity for the Ba 1-x Ca x F 2 system. We also present evidence that geometric frustration-induced conductivity is a general phenomenon, which may help explain the high ionic conductivity in doped fluorite-structured oxides such as ceria and zirconia, with application for solid oxide fuel cells. A review on geometric frustration [ Nature 2015 , 521 , 303 ] remarks that classical crystallography is inadequate to describe systems with correlated disorder, but that correlated disorder has clear crystallographic signatures. Here, we identify two possible crystallographic signatures of geometric frustration: excess volume and correlated "snake-like" ionic transport; the latter infers correlated disorder. In particular, as one ion in the chain moves, all the other (correlated) ions in the chain move simultaneously. Critically, our simulations reveal snake-like chains, over 40 Å in length, which indicates long-range correlation in our disordered systems. Similarly

  5. The 8th International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism (HFM 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J. S.; Kao, Y. J.

    2017-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism 2016 (HFM 2016) took place between the 7th and 11th of September 2016 at the GIS Convention Center at National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Over 260 participants from all over the world, attended the meeting making it the largest HFM to-date and revealing the impressive growth in the community since the original meeting in Waterloo, Canada where 80 participants attended. Preceding the meeting a school was held at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center to help those new to the field understand the material they were likely to see at HFM2016. Our thanks to the international speakers who attended this school John Chalker, Michel Kenzelmann, Philippe Mendels, Luigi Paolasini, Kirrily Rule, Yixi Su, Isao Watanabe and those from Taiwan W. T. Chen, Y-J, Kao, L. J. Chang and C. S. Ku, for their enlightening presentations. The HFM 2016 conference consisted of five plenary talks by H Takagi, B D Gaulin, L Balents, Y Tokura and S T Bramwell, 20 invited and 40 contributed presentations, and about 160 poster presentations from all aspects of theoretical and experimental frustrated magnetism. During the conference period, many stimulating discussions were held both inside and outside the conference room. Excursions to Taipei 101 and the National Palace Museum, as well as several organized dinners and receptions allowed the participants to initiate collaborations and discuss the hottest issues. The subjects covered in the conference included: · Quantum frustrated magnetism and spin liquids · Novel ordering of geometrically frustrated magnets · Frustration effect on the coupling to lattice, orbital and charge degrees of freedom · Exotic phenomena induced by macroscopic degeneracy · Field effect on frustrated magnetism etc. These proceeding represent a very small, but valuable contribution to the community. I hope you enjoy reading them. In view of the rapid growth of the field, it has been

  6. Internet Addiction and Delay Discounting in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, Bryan K.; Gisbert, Amanda; Kopp, Jason; Telesco, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relation between Internet addiction and delay discounting, we gave 276 college students a survey designed to measure Internet addiction and a paper-based delay-discounting task. In our larger sample, we identified 14 students who met the criteria for Internet addiction; we also identified 14 matched controls who were similar to the…

  7. Experiment with expert system guidance of an engineering analysis task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, V.H.; Fink, R.K.; Callow, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment is being conducted in which expert systems are used to guide the performance of an engineering analysis task. The task chosen for experimentation is the application of a large thermal hydraulic transient simulation computer code. The expectation from this work is that the expert system will result in an improved analytical result with a reduction in the amount of human labor and expertise required. The code associated functions of model formulation, data input, code execution, and analysis of the computed output have all been identified as candidate tasks that could benefit from the use of expert systems. Expert system modules have been built for the model building and data input task. Initial results include the observation that human expectations of an intelligent environment rapidly escalate and structured or stylized tasks that are tolerated in the unaided system are frustrating within the intelligent environment

  8. Solution to the sign problem in a frustrated quantum impurity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hann, Connor T., E-mail: connor.hann@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Box 90305, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Huffman, Emilie [Department of Physics, Box 90305, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Chandrasekharan, Shailesh [Department of Physics, Box 90305, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Center for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560 012 (India)

    2017-01-15

    In this work we solve the sign problem of a frustrated quantum impurity model consisting of three quantum spin-half chains interacting through an anti-ferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction at one end. We first map the model into a repulsive Hubbard model of spin-half fermions hopping on three independent one dimensional chains that interact through a triangular hopping at one end. We then convert the fermion model into an inhomogeneous one dimensional model and express the partition function as a weighted sum over fermion worldline configurations. By imposing a pairing of fermion worldlines in half the space we show that all negative weight configurations can be eliminated. This pairing naturally leads to the original frustrated quantum spin model at half filling and thus solves its sign problem.

  9. d-wave superconductivity in the frustrated two-dimensional periodic Anderson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Superconductivity in heavy-fermion materials can sometimes appear in the incoherent regime and in proximity to an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. Here, we study these phenomena using large-scale determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the dynamical cluster approximation with various impurity solvers for the periodic Anderson model with frustrated hybridization. We obtain solid evidence for a d_{x^{2}−y^{2}} superconducting phase arising from an incoherent normal state in the vicinity of an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. There is a coexistence region, and the width of the superconducting dome increases with frustration. Through a study of the pairing dynamics, we find that the retarded spin fluctuations give the main contribution to the pairing glue. These results are relevant for unconventional superconductivity in the Ce-115 family of heavy fermions.

  10. Frustration across the periodic table: heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen by metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, R Morris; Chambers, Geoffrey M

    2017-08-28

    This perspective examines frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) in the context of heterolytic cleavage of H 2 by transition metal complexes, with an emphasis on molecular complexes bearing an intramolecular Lewis base. FLPs have traditionally been associated with main group compounds, yet many reactions of transition metal complexes support a broader classification of FLPs that includes certain types of transition metal complexes with reactivity resembling main group-based FLPs. This article surveys transition metal complexes that heterolytically cleave H 2 , which vary in the degree that the Lewis pairs within these systems interact. Many of the examples include complexes bearing a pendant amine functioning as the base with the metal functioning as the hydride acceptor. Consideration of transition metal compounds in the context of FLPs can inspire new innovations and improvements in transition metal catalysis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Frustrated Lewis pair chemistry'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. From frustration to coping with caring for death by nurse technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldo, Lívia Maria; de Almeida, Débora Vieira; Bocchi, Silvia Cristina Mangini

    2015-01-01

    to understand nurse technicians' experience with caring for the death of terminal patients in ICUs and to configure a theoretical model. qualitative study with theoretical saturation when analyzing the 10th non-directive interview, having as reference Grounded Theory, Symbolic Interactionism and Bioethics. the core category - from frustration to coping with dignified nursing care for finitude: the acceptance of death as a therapeutic and intervenient component - emerged from the comparison of the sub-processes: when the nurse does not feel prepared for caring for death, accepting death as a therapeutic phenomenon and developing coping strategies. according to Symbolic Interactionism, a novice professional's frustration in caring for an individual for death is related to his/her interaction and interpretation of the situation as he/she feels prepared only to care for individuals for life.

  12. Noradrenergic and hormonal responses to physical exercise in adolescents. Relationship to anxiety and tolerance to frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerra, G; Caccavari, R; Reali, N; Bonvicini, P; Marcato, A; Fertonani, G; Delsignore, R; Passeri, M; Brambilla, F

    1993-01-01

    Seventy physically healthy 14-year-old adolescents, 40 boys and 30 girls, were evaluated psychologically and endocrinologically. After the psychological tests (Anxiety Score Test for Adolescents, Rosenzweig, Pictures Frustration Test for Children), subjects were divided into group A, with low anxiety/sense of guilt and high self-esteem/tolerance to frustration and group B with the opposite. In both groups, we measured basal plasma levels of noradrenaline (NE), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), melatonin (MT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and their response to physical exercise (the Harvard step test). Basal levels of the hormones and of NE were not different in the two groups. After the physical stimulus, NE levels rose significantly more in B girls than in A and significantly less in B than in A boys. GH and PRL levels increased only in A girls and MT in B boys, while LH levels decreased in A boys and girls but not in B subjects.

  13. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Field-induced cluster spin glass and inverse symmetry breaking enhanced by frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Zimmer, F. M.; Magalhaes, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    We consider a cluster disordered model to study the interplay between short- and long-range interactions in geometrically frustrated spin systems under an external magnetic field (h). In our approach, the intercluster long-range disorder (J) is analytically treated to get an effective cluster model that is computed exactly. The clusters follow a checkerboard lattice with first-neighbor (J1) and second-neighbor (J2) interactions. We find a reentrant transition from the cluster spin-glass (CSG) state to a paramagnetic (PM) phase as the temperature decreases for a certain range of h. This inverse symmetry breaking (ISB) appears as a consequence of both quenched disorder with frustration and h, that introduce a CSG state with higher entropy than the polarized PM phase. The competitive scenario introduced by antiferromagnetic (AF) short-range interactions increases the CSG state entropy, leading to continuous ISB transitions and enhancing the ISB regions, mainly in the geometrically frustrated case (J1 =J2). Remarkably, when strong AF intracluster couplings are present, field-induced CSG phases can be found. These CSG regions are strongly related to the magnetization plateaus observed in this cluster disordered system. In fact, it is found that each field-induced magnetization jump brings a CSG region. We notice that geometrical frustration, as well as cluster size, play an important role in the magnetization plateaus and, therefore, are also relevant in the field-induced glassy states. Our findings suggest that competing interactions support ISB and field-induced CSG phases in disordered cluster systems under an external magnetic field.

  15. Spin freezing in geometrically frustrated magnetic molecule Fe30 revealed by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Yuji; Borsa, Ferdinando; Fang Xikui; Kögerler, Paul; Micotti, Edoardo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Kumagai, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Static and dynamical properties of Fe 3+ (3d 5 ; S = 5/2) spins in geometrically frustrated magnetic molecule Fe30 have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the temperature range T = 0.1–300 K From a measurement of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates as a function of temperature, the fluctuation frequency of Fe 3+ spins is found to decrease with decreasing temperature, indicating spin freezing at low temperatures.

  16. Psycap and Amotivation to search for a job: the role of need frustration and family support

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Bernardo Lança Cirnes Nogueira de

    2016-01-01

    This work analyses unemployed individuals’ psychological capital (Psycap), and the mediating and moderation developments through which this resource is related with amotivation to search for a job. We tested, in particular, whether need frustration of autonomy, relatedness and competence mediated the relationship between Psycap and amotivation, by using a questionnaire that was applied to a sample of 298 unemployed people. Additionally, we also tested whether individuals’ famil...

  17. Frustration of Bragg reflection by cooperative dual-mode interference: a new mode of optical propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yariv, A

    1998-12-01

    A new optical mode of propagation is described, which is the natural eigenmode (supermode) of a fiber (or any optical waveguide) with two cospatial periodic gratings. The mode frustrates the backward Bragg scattering from the grating by destructive interference of its two constituent submodes (which are eigenmodes of a uniform waveguide). It can be used in a new type of spatial mode conversion in optical guides.

  18. Psychometric Properties of the Psychological Needs Satisfaction Frustration Scale (BPNSFS in Chilean University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenko Del Valle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work aims to analyze the psychometric properties of the Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Frustration Scale (BPNSFS -autonomy, competence and relatedness- identified by the self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000b, in a sample of 297 university students from different faculties and programs belonging to a Chilean university. To achieve the objective, through a psychometric study by confirmatory procedures, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was performed, analyzing the six-factor proposal developed by Chen et al. (2015, and the internal consistency of the scale was evaluated using the ordinal Alpha. The outcomes obtained from the sample of university students indicate a good internal consistency, Alpha = 0.90 and 0.86 for psychological needs satisfaction and frustration. Besides, the outcomes of the confirmatory factor analysis showed an adequate fit of the model (χ²/gl = 1.75; CFI = 0.92; IFI = 0.92; TLI = 0.90; RMSEA = .05 and SRMR =.05 to the data, showing evidences of the validity of the six-factor structure proposed. According to the foregoing, it is considered that the scale to measure satisfaction and frustration of the three basic psychological needs can be used initially in university students in the higher education of Chile, thus, allowing the relationship with other variables of interest to generate explanatory models that allow going in depth the understanding of aspects that are of institutional interest.

  19. Antiferromagnetism, structural instability and frustration in intermetallic AFe4X2 systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Helge; Bergmann, Christoph; Weber, Katharina; Kraft, Inga; Mufti, N.; Klauss, Hans-Henning; Dellmann, T.; Woike, T.; Geibel, Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic systems with reduced dimensionality or frustration attract strong interest because these features lead to an increase of quantum fluctuations and often result in unusual properties. Here, we present a detailed study of the magnetic, thermodynamic, and structural properties of the intermetallic AFe4X2 compounds (A=Sc,Y,Lu,Zr; X=Si,Ge) crystallizing in the ZrFe4Si2 structure type. Our results evidence that these compounds cover the whole regime from frustrated AFM order up to an AFM quantum critical point. Susceptibility χ(T), specific heat, resistivity, and T-dependent XRD measurements were performed on polycrystalline samples. In all compounds we observed a Curie-Weiss behavior in χ(T) at high T indicating a paramagnetic moment of about 3μB/Fe. Magnetic and structural transitions as previously reported for YFe4Ge2 occur in all compounds with trivalent A. However, transition temperatures, nature of the transition as well as the relation between structural and magnetic transitions change significantly with the A element. Low TN's and large θCW /TN ratios confirm the relevance of frustration. The results are analyzed and discussed with respect to electronic, structural and magnetic instabilities applying DFT calculations. Financial support from the DFG (GRK 1621) is acknowledged

  20. Group psychotherapy for persons with traumatic brain injury: management of frustration and substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonico, R L; Hanley-Peterson, P; Englander, J

    1998-12-01

    Residual emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been well documented in the literature. The issues are complex, interdependent, and often include substance abuse, depression, anxiety, chronic suicidal or homicidal ideation, poor impulse control, and significant degrees of frustration and anger. Often, preexisting psychological conditions and poor coping strategies are exacerbated by the trauma. Emotional and behavioral difficulties can interfere with the neurorehabilitation process at all levels. In acute rehabilitation, these issues have traditionally been addressed on an individual basis. However, in postacute settings, an interpersonal group format can be effectively implemented. The majority of individuals with TBI have minimal funding for long-term cognitive and behavioral remediation; often the only avenue available is support groups. This article will describe group psychotherapy models used with individuals with acute or postacute TBI within a comprehensive rehabilitation center. Interdisciplinary treatment of frustration and substance abuse and a continuum of care will be emphasized. Education, social support, skills development, interpersonal process, and cognitive-behavioral approaches will also be discussed. The psychotherapy groups focus on treatment of substance abuse and frustration management through education, social support, and development of interpersonal skills. Practical considerations of running such groups are presented.

  1. Using the Rosenzweig frustration picture test in the study of coping behaviour in thesituation of uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena N. L’vova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the relation between the relevance of coping behaviour and increasing interest to phenomena of uncertainty. The reviewing of coping as complicated setting notion including several levels is offered. The relevance of studying conscious and unconscious levels of coping is validated. Using coping questionnaires’ deficit of prognosis validity and the relevancy of using projective methods that are effective and useful in diagnostics of coping’ unconscious components are discussed. Due to the changes in viewing difficult life situations’ range and focusing on subjective perception of difficulties, the frustration situations are reviewed as difficult daily life situations. The Rosenzweig Picture Frustration test could be used for diagnosing coping’ unconscious components that compose meaning set level and coping behaviour basis. The relations among personal characteristics (tolerance/intolerance to uncertainty, noetic orientations, personal anxiety, locus of control and three types and three directions of subjects’ responses in test’ situations were examined, generalized linear models were used. The subjects of the research are 199 teachers from secondary schools of Russian Federation, mean age is 40.6 years old. The results showed significant relations between particular personal characteristics and types and directions of the responses: ego-defense type and tolerance to uncertainty, obstacle-dominance type and personal anxiety, intropunitive direction and personal anxiety, obstacledominance type and noetic orientations. The common discussion of current results and results obtained in previous studies demonstrates potential existence of mediating relations between particular coping strategies and types and directions of subjects’ responses in The Rosenzweig Picture Frustration test.

  2. An equilibrium for frustrated quantum spin systems in the stochastic state selection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munehisa, Tomo; Munehisa, Yasuko

    2007-01-01

    We develop a new method to calculate eigenvalues in frustrated quantum spin models. It is based on the stochastic state selection (SSS) method, which is an unconventional Monte Carlo technique that we have investigated in recent years. We observe that a kind of equilibrium is realized under some conditions when we repeatedly operate a Hamiltonian and a random choice operator, which is defined by stochastic variables in the SSS method, to a trial state. In this equilibrium, which we call the SSS equilibrium, we can evaluate the lowest eigenvalue of the Hamiltonian using the statistical average of the normalization factor of the generated state. The SSS equilibrium itself has already been observed in unfrustrated models. Our study in this paper shows that we can also see the equilibrium in frustrated models, with some restriction on values of a parameter introduced in the SSS method. As a concrete example, we employ the spin-1/2 frustrated J 1 -J 2 Heisenberg model on the square lattice. We present numerical results on the 20-, 32-, and 36-site systems, which demonstrate that statistical averages of the normalization factors reproduce the known exact eigenvalue to good precision. Finally, we apply the method to the 40-site system. Then we obtain the value of the lowest energy eigenvalue with an error of less than 0.2%

  3. Perceptions of Organisational Politics, Frustration with Work and Occupational Commitment in a Sport and Recreation Department in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Radebe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examinedthe relationship between perceptions of organisationalpolitics, frustration with work and occupational commitment among officers intheSport and Recreation Department in Gauteng, South Africa. A structuredquestionnaire was administered to 152officers in the department and theStatistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 23 was used to analysecollected data. A non-probability convenient sampling method was used to selectsample respondents. Statistical techniques utilised included factor analysis,correlation analysis and regression analysis. Correlation analysis results indicatedstatistically significant correlations between general political behaviour and goingalong to get ahead, pay and promotion as well as frustration with work. Negativecorrelation existed between frustration with work and occupational commitment.It was recommended that employees who showed sustained frustration with workbe identified and appropriate interventions such as coaching and mentoring beinstituted. Limitations and implications for further research were explored.

  4. Observation of Various and Spontaneous Magnetic Skyrmionic Bubbles at Room Temperature in a Frustrated Kagome Magnet with Uniaxial Magnetic Anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Zhipeng; Ren, Weijun; Ding, Bei; Xu, Guizhou; Wang, Yue; Yang, Bing; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Enke; Xu, Feng; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Baogen; Zhang, Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    to various external stimuli acting as information carriers in spintronic devices. Here, the first observation of skyrmionic magnetic bubbles with variable topological spin textures formed at room temperature in a frustrated kagome Fe3 Sn2 magnet with uniaxial

  5. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. American Dream Delayed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorunzhina, Natalia; Miller, Robert A.

    This paper investigates the delay in homeownership and a subsequent reduction in homeownership rate observed over the past decades. We focus on the delay in giving birth to children and increased labor market participation as contributing factors to homeownership dynamics for prime-age female hou...

  7. Extrapunitive and Intropunitive Individuals Activate Different Parts of the Prefrontal Cortex under an Ego-Blocking Frustration

    OpenAIRE

    Minamoto, Takehiro; Osaka, Mariko; Yaoi, Ken; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Different people make different responses when they face a frustrating situation: some punish others (extrapunitive), while others punish themselves (intropunitive). Few studies have investigated the neural structures that differentiate extrapunitive and intropunitive individuals. The present fMRI study explored these neural structures using two different frustrating situations: an ego-blocking situation which blocks a desire or goal, and a superego-blocking situation which blocks self-esteem...

  8. The Effect of Concurrent Semantic Categorization on Delayed Serial Recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, Daniel J.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of semantic processing on the serial ordering of items in short-term memory was explored using a novel dual-task paradigm. Participants engaged in 2 picture-judgment tasks while simultaneously performing delayed serial recall. List material varied in the presence of phonological overlap (Experiments 1 and 2) and in semantic content…

  9. A Job with a Future? Delay Discounting, Magnitude Effects, and Domain Independence of Utility for Career Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Thomas E.; Hantula, Donald A.

    2003-01-01

    Seniors (n=20) assessed two job offers with differences in domain (salary/tasks), delay (career-long earnings), and magnitude (initial salary offer). Contrary to discounted utility theory, choices reflected nonconstant discount rates for future salary/tasks (delay effect), lower discount rates for salary/preferred tasks (magnitude effect), and a…

  10. The functional neuroanatomy of multitasking: combining dual tasking with a short term memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Sabine; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Peeters, Ron; Emsell, Louise; Amant, Frederic; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Insight into the neural architecture of multitasking is crucial when investigating the pathophysiology of multitasking deficits in clinical populations. Presently, little is known about how the brain combines dual-tasking with a concurrent short-term memory task, despite the relevance of this mental operation in daily life and the frequency of complaints related to this process, in disease. In this study we aimed to examine how the brain responds when a memory task is added to dual-tasking. Thirty-three right-handed healthy volunteers (20 females, mean age 39.9 ± 5.8) were examined with functional brain imaging (fMRI). The paradigm consisted of two cross-modal single tasks (a visual and auditory temporal same-different task with short delay), a dual-task combining both single tasks simultaneously and a multi-task condition, combining the dual-task with an additional short-term memory task (temporal same-different visual task with long delay). Dual-tasking compared to both individual visual and auditory single tasks activated a predominantly right-sided fronto-parietal network and the cerebellum. When adding the additional short-term memory task, a larger and more bilateral frontoparietal network was recruited. We found enhanced activity during multitasking in components of the network that were already involved in dual-tasking, suggesting increased working memory demands, as well as recruitment of multitask-specific components including areas that are likely to be involved in online holding of visual stimuli in short-term memory such as occipito-temporal cortex. These results confirm concurrent neural processing of a visual short-term memory task during dual-tasking and provide evidence for an effective fMRI multitasking paradigm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical Vorticity Meter Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-05

    the major source of TITLE _., frustration in the 14-year history of laser-gyro • *" STREEt development, The usual solution is to impose a bias, STREET... opticws thed tra fre- Postulate, c’ =c, thenr 6’ - 6 / 0.the rines.jnfite ofusig uc aed ptis te srayre- Let us now turn to the experiment of Sagnac to

  12. The Effects of Inflation and Interest Rates on Delay Discounting in Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Interest and inflation rates may be major determinants of delay discounting, but these variables have not been controlled in past experiments because they depend on macroeconomic conditions. This study uses a computer game-like task to investigate the effects of inflation rates on people's subjective valuation of delayed rewards. During the task,…

  13. Neutron delayed choice experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed choice experiments for neutrons can help extend the interpretation of quantum mechanical phenomena. They may also rule out alternative explanations which static interference experiments allow. A simple example of a feasible neutron test is presented and discussed. (orig.)

  14. Quad nanosecond delay module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, R.J.; Hunter, J.B.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1986-04-01

    Four nanosecond (ns) delay units have been designed to fit in a single-width NIM module. This module is particularly suited for use in conjunction with quad constant fraction timing discriminators (CFTDs) since it has four delay units that can be placed adjacent to the four units of the CFTD. A series of different length cables connected via DIP toggle switches provide delays of 0.60 ns in 4 ns increments. Thus, the CFTD delay can be optimized for pulses of different rise times from approx.10-100 ns. Design work for the PC board and silkscreening of the front panel were done with the MacDraw program on the Apple Mackintosh computer and printed with the Lasewriter printer. 6 refs

  15. Delayed rule following

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Although the elements of a fully stated rule (discriminative stimulus [SD], some behavior, and a consequence) can occur nearly contemporaneously with the statement of the rule, there is often a delay between the rule statement and the SD. The effects of this delay on rule following have not been studied in behavior analysis, but they have been investigated in rule-like settings in the areas of prospective memory (remembering to do something in the future) and goal pursuit. Discriminative even...

  16. Vernier Delay Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    This module will accept differential ECL pulses from the auxiliary rear panel or NIM level pulses from the front panel. The pulses are produced at the output with a fixed delay that is software programmable in steps of 0.1 ns over the range of 0.1 to 10.5 ns. Multiple outputs are available at the front panel. Minimum delay through the module is 9 ns

  17. Quad precision delay generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Shanti; Gopalakrishnan, K.R.; Marballi, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    A Quad Precision Delay Generator delays a digital edge by a programmed amount of time, varying from nanoseconds to microseconds. The output of this generator has an amplitude of the order of tens of volts and rise time of the order of nanoseconds. This was specifically designed and developed to meet the stringent requirements of the plasma focus experiments. Plasma focus is a laboratory device for producing and studying nuclear fusion reactions in hot deuterium plasma. 3 figs

  18. Misjudging frustrations in spin liquids from oversimplified use of Curie-Weiss law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nag, Abhishek, E-mail: msan@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ray, Sugata [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Centre for Advanced Materials, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2017-02-15

    Absence of a single smoking-gun experiment to identify a quantum spin liquid, has kept their characterisation difficult till date. Featureless dc magnetic susceptibility and large antiferromagnetic frustration are always considered as the essential pointers to these systems. However, we show that the amount of frustration estimated by using generalised Curie-Weiss law on these susceptibility data are prone to errors and thus should be dealt with caution. We measure and analyse susceptibility data of Ba{sub 3}ZnIr{sub 2}O{sub 9}, a spin orbital liquid candidate and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, a 1.5 K antiferromagnet and show the distinguishing features between them. A continuous and significant change in Curie and Weiss constants is seen to take place in Ba{sub 3}ZnIr{sub 2}O{sub 9} and other reported spin liquids with the change in the range of fitting temperatures showing the need of a temperature ‘range-of-fit’ analysis before commenting on the Weiss constants of spin liquids. The variation observed is similar to fluctuations among topological sectors persisting over a range of temperature in spin-ice candidates. On the other hand, even though we find correlations to exist at even 100 times the ordering temperature in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, no such fluctuation is observed which may be used as an additional distinguishing signature of spin liquids over similarly featureless correlated paramagnets. - Highlights: • Curie-Weiss fitting may give erroneous frustration parameters in spin-liquids. • The results depend upon choice of fitting method and temperature range used. • More appropriate method is to use a ʽrange of fit’ analysis. • Can distinguish between spin-liquids and correlated paramagnets.

  19. Frustrated quantum magnetism in the Kondo lattice on the zigzag ladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschke, Matthias; Rausch, Roman; Potthoff, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The interplay between the Kondo effect, indirect magnetic interaction, and geometrical frustration is studied in the Kondo lattice on the one-dimensional zigzag ladder. Using the density-matrix renormalization group, the ground-state and various short- and long-range spin- and density-correlation functions are calculated for the model at half filling as a function of the antiferromagnetic Kondo interaction down to J =0.3 t , where t is the nearest-neighbor hopping on the zigzag ladder. Geometrical frustration is shown to lead to at least two critical points: Starting from the strong-J limit, where almost local Kondo screening dominates and where the system is a nonmagnetic Kondo insulator, antiferromagnetic correlations between nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor local spins become stronger and stronger, until at Jcdim≈0.89 t frustration is alleviated by a spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry and a corresponding transition to a dimerized state. This is characterized by antiferromagnetic correlations along the legs and by alternating antiferro- and ferromagnetic correlations on the rungs of the ladder. A mechanism of partial Kondo screening that has been suggested for the Kondo lattice on the two-dimensional triangular lattice is not realized in the one-dimensional case. Furthermore, within the symmetry-broken dimerized state, there is a magnetic transition to a 90∘ quantum spin spiral with quasi-long-range order at Jcmag≈0.84 t . The quantum-critical point is characterized by a closure of the spin gap (with decreasing J ) and a divergence of the spin-correlation length and of the spin-structure factor S (q ) at wave vector q =π /2 . This is opposed to the model on the one-dimensional bipartite chain, which is known to have a finite spin gap for all J >0 at half filling.

  20. Violence among peoples in the light of human frustration and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gaay Fortman, Bas

    2005-12-05

    This article sets out to provide a general background to the study of aggression in the social sciences, with a particular focus on its link to collective violence. While the study of what happens in the human brain appears to be already highly complex, analysis of violent behavior appears to be even more intricate. A deductive system in the sense of a general and clear system of propositions logically connected to one another is not feasible, principally because contrary to the natural sciences there are no verities but merely "stylized facts." One of these concerns the setting of human aggression in the light of frustration, as argued in the frustration-aggression hypothesis developed by Dollard et al. in 1939. Apart from conceiving of aggression as a pure human instinct, it may also be seen as externally driven, while a third possibility concerns culturally "learned" aggression. Proof of the latter is that the strongest correlation appears to be that between current violence and previous manifestations thereof. Attention is paid to the way in which Gurr has rooted his relative deprivation theory on causes of collective violence among peoples in mechanisms of frustration and aggression. That theory is taken a bit further in terms of "perceived acquirement failure," which appears to be highly connected to the role of the state. Based on certain observations by Hannah Arendt, the argument then proceeds to violence as a manifestation of powerlessness. Finally, this leads to a discussion of justice as a crucial factor in what Durkheim used to call a "right to conflict." In this way, human aggression is placed in a broad socio-economic context.

  1. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  2. Frustration of contracts, signed in compliance with law of England, as a probable consequence of EU sanctions against Russian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr V. Padiryakov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective comprehensive analysis of the doctrine of the frustration of contracts signed in compliance with law of England and the practice of its application for the Russian companies. Methods dialectical approach to cognition of social phenomena allowing to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the totality of objective and subjective factors that determined the choice of the following research methods systematicstructural formallegal comparativelegal legal modeling method. Results due to the introduction of the EU sanctions there is the risk of foreign counterpartiesrsquo refusal to execute contracts with Russian companies on the legal basis of frustration of treaties. The essence of the frustration doctrine is that the contract obligations may be terminated if after their signing such events occur which make their fulfillment impossible or unlawful. When signing international agreements under English law the lawyers of Russian companies should include provisions governing the relationships of the parties in case of impossibility of the contract execution due to the occurrence of an event that caused the treaty frustration in particular the imposition of sanctions. It is recommended to specify in the contract how the losses arising from the inability to execute the contract will be distributed between the parties. Scientific novelty for the first time basing on court practice review the definition of the frustration of contracts according to the law of England is formulated the legal implications of the recognition of the contract frustrated are discussed and the legal conditions are proposed that should be provided for in the text of a contract to avoid the problem of uncertainty in the allocation of losses of the parties in case of occurrence of external events including sanctions. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in scientific and lawenforcement activity

  3. Cooper pair induced frustration and nematicity of two-dimensional magnetic adatom lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecter, Michael; Syljuâsen, Olav F.; Paaske, Jens

    2018-05-01

    We propose utilizing the Cooper pair to induce magnetic frustration in systems of two-dimensional (2D) magnetic adatom lattices on s -wave superconducting surfaces. The competition between singlet electron correlations and the RKKY coupling is shown to lead to a variety of hidden-order states that break the point-group symmetry of the 2D adatom lattice at finite temperature. The phase diagram is constructed using a newly developed effective bond theory [M. Schecter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 157202 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.157202], and exhibits broad regions of long-range vestigial nematic order.

  4. Divide and conquer method for proving gaps of frustration free Hamiltonians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael J.; Lucia, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    Providing system-size independent lower bounds on the spectral gap of local Hamiltonian is in general a hard problem. For the case of finite-range, frustration free Hamiltonians on a spin lattice of arbitrary dimension, we show that a property of the ground state space is sufficient to obtain...... such a bound. We furthermore show that such a condition is necessary and equivalent to a constant spectral gap. Thanks to this equivalence, we can prove that for gapless models in any dimension, the spectral gap on regions of diameter $n$ is at most $o\\left(\\frac{\\log(n)^{2+\\epsilon}}{n}\\right)$ for any...... positive $\\epsilon$....

  5. Nonpolarizing beam splitter designed by frustrated total internal reflection inside a glass cube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueke; Shao, Jianda; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2006-06-20

    A method for the design of an all-dielectric nonpolarizing prism beam splitter utilizing the principle of frustrated total internal reflection is reported. The nonpolarizing condition for a prism beam splitter is discussed, and some single layer design examples are elaborated. The concept can be applied to a wide range of wavelengths and arbitrary transmittance values, and with the help of a computer design program examples of 400-700 nm, T(p)=T(s)=0.5+/-0.01, with incident angles of 45 degrees and 62 degrees are given. In addition, the sensitivity and application of the design are also discussed.

  6. Effects of Sublattice Symmetry and Frustration on Ionic Transport in Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinsky, Boris; Akhade, Sneha A.; Hirel, Pierre; Hashibon, Adham; Elsässer, Christian; Mehta, Prateek; Logeat, Alan; Eisele, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    We use rigorous group-theoretic techniques and molecular dynamics to investigate the connection between structural symmetry and ionic conductivity in the garnet family of solid Li-ion electrolytes. We identify new ordered phases and order-disorder phase transitions that are relevant for conductivity optimization. Ionic transport in this materials family is controlled by the frustration of the Li sublattice caused by incommensurability with the host structure at noninteger Li concentrations, while ordered phases explain regions of sharply lower conductivity. Disorder is therefore predicted to be optimal for ionic transport in this and other conductor families with strong Li interaction.

  7. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  8. Frustration by Multiple Spin Exchange in 2D Solid 3He Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, M.; Nyeki, J.; Cowan, B.; Saunders, J.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetization and heat capacity of the second layer of 3 He films adsorbed on graphite indicate that the evolution of the exchange from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic arises from a tuning of the competing exchange processes. At certain coverages the coexistence of an antiferromagnetic heat capacity with a ferromagnetic magnetization is a clear manifestation, predicted by theory, of frustration. At the ferromagnetic anomaly the system is well described by series expansions for a 2D Heisenberg ferromagnet on a triangular lattice. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. The “Frustrated Hawks,” Tet 1968, and the Transformation of American Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hagopian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available 1. The Rise of Conservatism and the “Frustrated Hawks”Although the 1960s are generally remembered as a decade of leftist protest and demands for radical change, and the year 1968 as a time of rebellion in the streets, this period has also begun to be recognized as a key moment in the emergence of the modern conservative movement, which Bruce and Laurie see as the “central story of American politics since World War II.” Historians of conservatism have noted that the modern American conservativ...

  10. Exploring Tinnitus-Induced Disablement by Persistent Frustration in Aging Individuals: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauman, Nicolas; Erlandsson, Soly I.; Albarracin, Dolorès; Dauman, René

    2017-01-01

    Background: Qualitative research can help to improve the management of patients, meet their expectations and assist physicians in alleviating their suffering. The perception of moment-to-moment variability in tinnitus annoyance is an emerging field of exploration. This study sought to enlighten variability in tinnitus-induced disablement using a qualitative approach. Methods: Twelve participants (six females, six males, aged 51–79) were recruited via the French Tinnitus Association Journal for participation in recorded semi-structured interviews. Each participant had three interviews lasting 1 h, the sessions being separated one from the other by 2 weeks. Following recommendations of Charmaz (2014), the second and third interviews were aimed at gathering rich data, by enhancing the participants' reflexivity in the circumstances of distress caused by tinnitus. After transcription, the data (n = 36 interviews) were analyzed using the approach to Grounded Theory proposed by Strauss and Corbin (1998). Results: Tinnitus as persistent frustration emerged as being the core category uniting all the other categories of the study. Hence, the core category accounted for the broader scope in participants' experience of chronic tinnitus. It is suggested that tinnitus-induced disablement varied according to the degree of frustration felt by the participants in not being able to achieve their goals. The implications of this were analyzed using the following categories: “Losing body ownership,” “Lacking perspectives,” and “Persevering through difficulties.” Based on these findings, we draw a substantive theory of tinnitus tolerance that promotes an active, disciplined and individualized approach to tinnitus-induced disablement. The model distinguishes pathways from sustained suffering to reduced annoyance (i.e., emerging tolerance). It accounts for difficulties that the participants experienced with a perceived unchanged annoyance over time. Furthermore, this model

  11. Exploring Tinnitus-Induced Disablement by Persistent Frustration in Aging Individuals: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauman, Nicolas; Erlandsson, Soly I; Albarracin, Dolorès; Dauman, René

    2017-01-01

    Background: Qualitative research can help to improve the management of patients, meet their expectations and assist physicians in alleviating their suffering. The perception of moment-to-moment variability in tinnitus annoyance is an emerging field of exploration. This study sought to enlighten variability in tinnitus-induced disablement using a qualitative approach. Methods: Twelve participants (six females, six males, aged 51-79) were recruited via the French Tinnitus Association Journal for participation in recorded semi-structured interviews. Each participant had three interviews lasting 1 h, the sessions being separated one from the other by 2 weeks. Following recommendations of Charmaz (2014), the second and third interviews were aimed at gathering rich data, by enhancing the participants' reflexivity in the circumstances of distress caused by tinnitus. After transcription, the data ( n = 36 interviews) were analyzed using the approach to Grounded Theory proposed by Strauss and Corbin (1998). Results: Tinnitus as persistent frustration emerged as being the core category uniting all the other categories of the study. Hence, the core category accounted for the broader scope in participants' experience of chronic tinnitus. It is suggested that tinnitus-induced disablement varied according to the degree of frustration felt by the participants in not being able to achieve their goals. The implications of this were analyzed using the following categories: "Losing body ownership," "Lacking perspectives," and "Persevering through difficulties." Based on these findings, we draw a substantive theory of tinnitus tolerance that promotes an active, disciplined and individualized approach to tinnitus-induced disablement. The model distinguishes pathways from sustained suffering to reduced annoyance (i.e., emerging tolerance). It accounts for difficulties that the participants experienced with a perceived unchanged annoyance over time. Furthermore, this model identifies a

  12. Exploring Tinnitus-Induced Disablement by Persistent Frustration in Aging Individuals: A Grounded Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dauman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Qualitative research can help to improve the management of patients, meet their expectations and assist physicians in alleviating their suffering. The perception of moment-to-moment variability in tinnitus annoyance is an emerging field of exploration. This study sought to enlighten variability in tinnitus-induced disablement using a qualitative approach.Methods: Twelve participants (six females, six males, aged 51–79 were recruited via the French Tinnitus Association Journal for participation in recorded semi-structured interviews. Each participant had three interviews lasting 1 h, the sessions being separated one from the other by 2 weeks. Following recommendations of Charmaz (2014, the second and third interviews were aimed at gathering rich data, by enhancing the participants' reflexivity in the circumstances of distress caused by tinnitus. After transcription, the data (n = 36 interviews were analyzed using the approach to Grounded Theory proposed by Strauss and Corbin (1998.Results: Tinnitus as persistent frustration emerged as being the core category uniting all the other categories of the study. Hence, the core category accounted for the broader scope in participants' experience of chronic tinnitus. It is suggested that tinnitus-induced disablement varied according to the degree of frustration felt by the participants in not being able to achieve their goals. The implications of this were analyzed using the following categories: “Losing body ownership,” “Lacking perspectives,” and “Persevering through difficulties.” Based on these findings, we draw a substantive theory of tinnitus tolerance that promotes an active, disciplined and individualized approach to tinnitus-induced disablement. The model distinguishes pathways from sustained suffering to reduced annoyance (i.e., emerging tolerance. It accounts for difficulties that the participants experienced with a perceived unchanged annoyance over time. Furthermore

  13. Enhancement of geometric phase by frustration of decoherence: A Parrondo-like effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subhashish; Chandrashekar, C. M.; Pati, Arun K.

    2013-04-01

    Geometric phase plays an important role in evolution of pure or mixed quantum states. However, when a system undergoes decoherence the development of geometric phase may be inhibited. Here we show that when a quantum system interacts with two competing environments there can be enhancement of geometric phase. This effect is akin to a Parrondo-like effect on the geometric phase which results from quantum frustration of decoherence. Our result suggests that the mechanism of two competing decoherence can be useful in fault-tolerant holonomic quantum computation.

  14. Development of a statistically based access delay timeline methodology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, W. Gary; Robinson, David Gerald; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2013-02-01

    The charter for adversarial delay is to hinder access to critical resources through the use of physical systems increasing an adversarys task time. The traditional method for characterizing access delay has been a simple model focused on accumulating times required to complete each task with little regard to uncertainty, complexity, or decreased efficiency associated with multiple sequential tasks or stress. The delay associated with any given barrier or path is further discounted to worst-case, and often unrealistic, times based on a high-level adversary, resulting in a highly conservative calculation of total delay. This leads to delay systems that require significant funding and personnel resources in order to defend against the assumed threat, which for many sites and applications becomes cost prohibitive. A new methodology has been developed that considers the uncertainties inherent in the problem to develop a realistic timeline distribution for a given adversary path. This new methodology incorporates advanced Bayesian statistical theory and methodologies, taking into account small sample size, expert judgment, human factors and threat uncertainty. The result is an algorithm that can calculate a probability distribution function of delay times directly related to system risk. Through further analysis, the access delay analyst or end user can use the results in making informed decisions while weighing benefits against risks, ultimately resulting in greater system effectiveness with lower cost.

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TASK AVERSIVENESS AND ACADEMIC PROCRASTINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magvirasari Lestari Linra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic procrastination occurs when certain tasks are considered unpleasant, an unpleasant task and the usual delayed them is the task of writing, reading, studying for the exam, meetings, and administrative. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of the task aversiveness with academic procrastination. Subject of the study were 100 students out of a population of 516 students of the Faculty of Psychology class of 2012-2014. The method used in this research is quantitative by using Spearman rho as data analysis techniques. The research instrument consists of academic procrastination scale and the scale of the task aversiveness. Based on the results of correlation is known that there is a positive relationship between task aversiveness with academic procrastination with a correlation coefficient r = 0.508; p = 0.000. The results showed that of the 100 students of the Faculty of Psychology University of Makassar has a degree of relationship between task aversiveness with academic procrastination is on the very low category (25, 8%. Area / types of tasks delayed is not necessarily an unpleasant task and otherwise unpleasant task may not be postponed. Area task the highest level of aversive and delays are areas the task of writing and reading. This study illustrates that academic procrastination can be lowered by a change in the mindset of an unpleasant task.

  16. [Delayed reactions of active avoidance in white rats under conditions of an alternative choice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioseliani, T K; Sikharulidze, N I; Kadagishvili, A Ia; Mitashvili, E G

    1995-01-01

    It was shown that if the rats had been learned and then tested using conventional pain punishment of erroneous choice they were able to solve the problem of alternative choice only in the period of immediate action of conditioned stimuli. If the pain punishment for erroneously chosen compartment had not been applied in animal learning and testing, rats successfully solved the problem of alternative choice even after 5-second delay. Introduction of pain punishment led to the frustration of earlier elaborated delayed avoidance reactions. Analysis of the obtained results allows us to argue that the apparent incapability of white rats for solving the problems of delayed avoidance is caused by simultaneous action of two different mechanisms, i.e., those of the active and passive avoidance rather than short-term memory deficit.

  17. Frustrated S = 1/2 Two-Leg Ladder with Different Leg Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Okamoto, Kiyomi; Hikihara, Toshiya; Sakai, Tôru

    2017-04-01

    We explore the ground-state phase diagram of the S = 1/2 two-leg ladder. The isotropic leg interactions J1,a and J1,b between nearest neighbor spins in the legs a and b, respectively, are different from each other. The xy and z components of the uniform rung interactions are denoted by Jr and ΔJr, respectively, where Δ is the XXZ anisotropy parameter. This system has a frustration when J1,aJ1,b employ the physical consideration, the level spectroscopy analysis of the results obtained by the exact diagonalization method and also the density-matrix renormalization-group method. It is found that the non-collinear ferrimagnetic (NCFR) state appears as the ground state in the frustrated region of the parameters. Furthermore, the direct-product triplet-dimer (TD) state in which all rungs form the TD pair is the exact ground state, when J1,a + J1,b = 0 and 0≤ Δ ≲ 0.83. The obtained phase diagrams consist of the TD, XY and Haldane phases as well as the NCFR phase.

  18. Competing Spin Liquids and Hidden Spin-Nematic Order in Spin Ice with Frustrated Transverse Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Taillefumier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Frustration in magnetic interactions can give rise to disordered ground states with subtle and beautiful properties. The spin ices Ho_{2}Ti_{2}O_{7} and Dy_{2}Ti_{2}O_{7} exemplify this phenomenon, displaying a classical spin-liquid state, with fractionalized magnetic-monopole excitations. Recently, there has been great interest in closely related “quantum spin-ice” materials, following the realization that anisotropic exchange interactions could convert spin ice into a massively entangled, quantum spin liquid, where magnetic monopoles become the charges of an emergent quantum electrodynamics. Here we show that even the simplest model of a quantum spin ice, the XXZ model on the pyrochlore lattice, can realize a still-richer scenario. Using a combination of classical Monte Carlo simulation, semiclassical molecular-dynamics simulation, and analytic field theory, we explore the properties of this model for frustrated transverse exchange. We find not one, but three competing forms of spin liquid, as well as a phase with hidden, spin-nematic order. We explore the experimental signatures of each of these different states, making explicit predictions for inelastic neutron scattering. These results show an intriguing similarity to experiments on a range of pyrochlore oxides.

  19. Quantum phase transitions and anomalous Hall effect in frustrated Kondo lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschen, Silke; Grefe, Sarah Elaine; Ding, Wenxin; Si, Qimiao

    Among the pyrochlore iridates, the metallic compound Pr2 Ir2O7 (Pr-227) has shown characteristics of a possible chiral spin liquid state and quantum criticality. An important question surrounding the significant anomalous Hall response observed in Pr-227 is the nature of the f-electron local moments, including their Kondo coupling with the conduction d-electrons. The heavy effective mass and related thermodynamic characteristics indicate the involvement of the Kondo effect in this system's electronic properties. In this work, we study the effects of Kondo coupling on candidate time-reversal-symmetry-breaking spin liquid states on frustrated lattices. Representing the f-moments as slave fermions Kondo-coupled to conduction electrons, we study the competition between Kondo-singlet formation and chiral spin correlations. We derive an effective chiral interaction between the local moments and the conduction electrons and calculate the anomalous Hall response across the quantum phase transition from the Kondo destroyed phase to the Kondo screened phase. We discuss our results' implications for Pr-227 and related frustrated Kondo-lattice systems.

  20. Spin-orbit interaction driven dimerization in one dimensional frustrated magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shang-Shun; Batista, Cristian D.

    Spin nematic ordering has been proposed to emerge near the saturation of field of a class of frustrated magnets. The experimental observation of this novel phase is challenging for the traditional experimental probes. Nematic spin ordering is expected to induce a local quadrupolar electric moment via the spin-orbit coupling. However, a finite spin-orbit interaction explicitly breaks the U(1) symmetry of global spin rotations down to Z2, which renders the traditional nematic order no longer well-defined. In this work we investigate the relevant effect of spin-orbit interaction on the 1D frustrated J1 -J2 model. The real and the imaginary parts of the nematic order parameter belong to different representations of the discrete symmetry group of the new Hamiltonian. We demonstrate that spin-orbit coupling stabilizes the real component and simultaneously induces bond dimerization in most of the phase diagram. Such a bond dimerization can be observed with X-rays or nuclear magnetic resonance. In addition, an incommensurate bond-density wave (ICBDW) appears for smaller values of J2 / |J1 | . The experimental fingerprint of the ICBDW is a double-horn shape of the the NMR line. These conclusions can shed light on the experimental search of this novel phase.

  1. Structural properties of the geometrically frustrated pyrochlore Tb2Ti2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang-Wook; Gardner, Jason S.; Booth, Corwin H.

    2004-01-01

    Although materials that exhibit nearest-neighbor-only antiferromagnetic interactions and geometrical frustration theoretically should not magnetically order in the absence of disorder, few such systems have been observed experimentally. One such system appears to be the pyrochlore Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 . However, previous structural studies indicated that Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 is an imperfect pyrochlore. To clarify the situation, we performed neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on samples that were prepared identically to those that show no magnetic order. The NPD measurements show that the long-range structure of Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 is well ordered with no structural transitions between 4.5 and 600 K. In particular, mean-squared displacements (u 2 's) for each site follow a Debye model with no offsets. No evidence for Tb/Ti site interchange was observed within an upper limit of 2%. Likewise, no excess or deficiency in the oxygen stoichiometry was observed, within an upper limit of 2% of the nominal pyrochlore value. Tb L III and Ti K-edge XAFS measurements from 20-300 K similarly indicate a well-ordered local structure. Other aspects of the structure are considered. We conclude that Tb 2 Ti 2 O 7 has, within experimental error, an ideal, disorder-free pyrochlore lattice, thereby allowing the system to remain in a dynamic, frustrated spin state to the lowest observed temperatures

  2. Frustrated antiferromagnets at high fields: Bose-Einstein condensation in degenerate spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackeli, G.; Zhitomirsky, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum phase transition at the saturation field is studied for a class of frustrated quantum antiferromagnets. The considered models include (i) the J 1 -J 2 frustrated square-lattice antiferromagnet with J 2 =(1/2)J 1 and (ii) the nearest-neighbor Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a face centered cubic lattice. In the fully saturated phase the magnon spectra for the two models have lines of degenerate minima. Transition into a partially magnetized state is treated via a mapping to a dilute gas of hard-core bosons and by complementary spin-wave calculations. Momentum dependence of the exact four-point boson vertex removes the degeneracy of the single-particle excitation spectra and selects the ordering wave vectors at (π,π) and (π,0,0) for the two models. We predict a unique form for the magnetization curve ΔM=S-M≅μ (d-1)/2 (logμ) (d-1) , where μ is a distance from the quantum critical point

  3. Thermodynamics of the frustrated ferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J; Haertel, M; Ihle, D; Drechsler, S-L

    2009-01-01

    We studied the thermodynamics of the one-dimensional J 1 -J 2 spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain for ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor bonds J 1 2 > 0 using full diagonalization of finite rings and a second-order Green-function formalism. Thereby we focus on J 2 1 |/4 where the ground state is still ferromagnetic, but the frustration influences the thermodynamic properties. We found that their critical indices are not changed by J 2 . The analysis of the low-temperature behavior of the susceptibility χ leads to the conclusion that this behavior changes from χ ∝ T -2 at J 2 1 |/4 to χ ∝ T -3/2 at the quantum-critical point J 2 = |J 1 |/4. Another effect of the frustration is the appearance of an extra low-T maximum in the specific heat C v (T) for J 2 and |J 1 |/8, indicating its strong influence on the low-energy spectrum.

  4. Optimal Joint Expected Delay Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Xu; Xin Feng; Wen Jun Yang; Ru Chuan Wang; Bing Qing Han

    2013-01-01

    Multicopy forwarding schemes have been employed in delay tolerant network (DTN) to improve the delivery delay and delivery rate. Much effort has been focused on reducing the routing cost while retaining high performance. This paper aims to provide an optimal joint expected delay forwarding (OJEDF) protocol which minimizes the expected delay while satisfying a certain constant on the number of forwardings per message. We propose a comprehensive forwarding metric called joint expected delay (JE...

  5. Delay and probability discounting among payday and title loan recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Colin T; Lawyer, Steven R

    2016-04-01

    Payday and title loans are short-term loans associated with significant economic impact. Behavioral theories of impulsive choice may provide insight into behavioral processes that underlie the propensity to take out payday and title loans. Adults between the ages of 18 and 30 recruited from the community completed delay and probability discounting tasks for hypothetical money as well as measures of substance use. Patterns of discounting were characterized using a hyperbolic decay model and area under the curve. Participants who took out a payday and/or title loan in the past (n=41) exhibited more impulsive choice patterns on the delay discounting task than did those who did not (n=255). Substance use mediated this relationship between payday and title loan retention and delay discounting. These findings suggest potentially important relationships between payday/title loan borrowing, substance use, and delay discounting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of geometrical frustration on ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model on the generalised Shastry-Sutherland lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkašovský, Pavol

    2018-05-01

    The small-cluster exact-diagonalization calculations and the projector quantum Monte Carlo method are used to examine the competing effects of geometrical frustration and interaction on ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model on the generalised Shastry-Sutherland lattice. It is shown that the geometrical frustration stabilizes the ferromagnetic state at high electron concentrations ( n ≳ 7/4), where strong correlations between ferromagnetism and the shape of the noninteracting density of states are observed. In particular, it is found that ferromagnetism is stabilized for these values of frustration parameters, which lead to the single-peaked noninterating density of states at the band edge. Once, two or more peaks appear in the noninteracting density of states at the band edge the ferromagnetic state is suppressed. This opens a new route towards the understanding of ferromagnetism in strongly correlated systems.

  7. Geometric Magnetic Frustration in Li3Mg2OsO6 Studied with Muon Spin Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, J. P.; Derakhshan, S.; Greedan, J. E.

    Geometric frustration manifests when the spatial arrangement of ions inhibits magnetic order. Typically associated with antiferromagnetically (AF)-correlated moments on triangular or tetrahedral lattices, frustration occurs in a variety of structures and systems, resulting in rich phase diagrams and exotic ground states. As a window to exotic physics revealed by the cancellation of normally dominant interactions, the research community has taken great interest in frustrated systems. One family of recent interest are the rock-salt ordered oxides A5BO6, in which the B sites are occupied by magnetic ions comprising a network of interlocked tetrahedra, and nonmagnetic ions on the A sites control the B oxidation state through charge neutrality. Here we will discuss studies of Li3Mg2OsO6 using muon spin relaxation (μSR), a highly sensitive local probe of magnetism. Previous studies of this family included Li5OsO6, which exhibits AF order below 50K with minimal evidence for frustration, and Li4MgReO6, which exhibits glassy magnetism. Li3Mg2RuO6, meanwhile, exhibits long-range AF, with the ordering temperature suppressed by frustration. But its isoelectronic twin, Li3Mg2OsO6 (5d3 vs. 4d3) exhibits very different behavior, revealed by μSR to be a glassy ground state below 12K. Understanding why such similar systems exhibit diverse ground-state behavior is key to understanding the nature of geometric magnetic frustration. Financial support from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  8. Hippocampus, delay discounting, and vicarious trial-and-error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, David; Murdoch, Lauren H; Wood, Emma R; Dudchenko, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    In decision-making, an immediate reward is usually preferred to a delayed reward, even if the latter is larger. We tested whether the hippocampus is necessary for this form of temporal discounting, and for vicarious trial-and-error at the decision point. Rats were trained on a recently developed, adjustable delay-discounting task (Papale et al. (2012) Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 12:513-526), which featured a choice between a small, nearly immediate reward, and a larger, delayed reward. Rats then received either hippocampus or sham lesions. Animals with hippocampus lesions adjusted the delay for the larger reward to a level similar to that of sham-lesioned animals, suggesting a similar valuation capacity. However, the hippocampus lesion group spent significantly longer investigating the small and large rewards in the first part of the sessions, and were less sensitive to changes in the amount of reward in the large reward maze arm. Both sham- and hippocampus-lesioned rats showed a greater amount of vicarious trial-and-error on trials in which the delay was adjusted. In a nonadjusting version of the delay discounting task, animals with hippocampus lesions showed more variability in their preference for a larger reward that was delayed by 10 s compared with sham-lesioned animals. To verify the lesion behaviorally, rat were subsequently trained on a water maze task, and rats with hippocampus lesions were significantly impaired compared with sham-lesioned animals. The findings on the delay discounting tasks suggest that damage to the hippocampus may impair the detection of reward magnitude. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Assessing delay discounting in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting (also intertemporal choice or impulsive choice) is the process by which delayed outcomes, such as delayed food delivery, are valued less than the same outcomes delivered immediately or with a shorter delay. This process is of interest because many psychopathologies, including substance dependence, pathological gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder, are characterized by heightened levels of delay discounting. Some of these disorders are herit...

  10. Phase transition for a uniformly frustrated 19-vertex model by use of the density matrix renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yasushi; Horiguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a uniformly frustrated 19-vertex model with an anisotropy parameter η by use of the density matrix renormalization group for the transfer matrix for 0.6≤η≤1.3. The scaling dimension x is calculated from eigenvalues of the transfer matrix for several values η. The finite-size scaling analyses with a logarithmic correction are carried out in order to determine transition temperatures. It is found that there are two kinds of phase transitions, although there is a possibility of a single transition. This result is not compatible with the result for the uniformly frustrated XY model

  11. Study of the time evolution of correlation functions of the transverse Ising chain with ring frustration by perturbative theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen-Yu; Li, Peng

    2018-04-01

    We consider the time evolution of two-point correlation function in the transverse-field Ising chain (TFIC) with ring frustration. The time-evolution procedure we investigated is equivalent to a quench process in which the system is initially prepared in a classical kink state and evolves according to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Within a framework of perturbative theory (PT) in the strong kink phase, the evolution of the correlation function is disclosed to demonstrate a qualitatively new behavior in contrast to the traditional case without ring frustration.

  12. Quadrupolar frustration in shastry-sutherland lattice of DyB4 studied by resonant x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takeshi; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi

    2005-01-01

    We have observed geometrical frustration of quadrupolar and magnetic moments in dysprosium tetraboride, DyB 4 , where the rare-earth sites form a Shastry-Sutherland lattice. Resonant X-ray scattering at the L III absorption edge of Dy was utilized. Analysis of the energy, polarization, temperature, and azimuthal-angle dependences of the E1 resonance of the (100) forbidden reflection show that the magnetic and quadrupolar components within the frustrated c plane have a short-range correlation, suggesting that the moments are fluctuating. In contrast, the basic antiferromagnetic component along the c-axis has a long-range order. (author)

  13. Estimating Delays In ASIC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gary; Nesheiwat, Jeffrey; Su, Ling

    1994-01-01

    Verification is important aspect of process of designing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). Design must not only be functionally accurate, but must also maintain correct timing. IFA, Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying timing of ASIC early in design process. This program speeds design-and-verification cycle by estimating delays before layouts completed. Written in C language.

  14. Permissible Delay in Payments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fu Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper wants to investigate the optimal retailer's lot-sizing policy with two warehouses under partially permissible delay in payments within the economic order quantity (EOQ framework. In this paper, we want to extend that fully permissible delay in payments to the supplier would offer the retailer partially permissible delay in payments. That is, the retailer must make a partial payment to the supplier when the order is received. Then the retailer must pay off the remaining balance at the end of the permissible delay period. In addition, we want to add the assumption that the retailer's storage space is limited. That is, the retailer will rent the warehouse to store these exceeding items when the order quantity is larger than retailer's storage space. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a cost minimization problem to determine the retailer's optimal cycle time and optimal order quantity. Three theorems are developed to efficiently determine the optimal replenishment policy for the retailer. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate these theorems and obtained a lot of managerial insights.

  15. Delayed neutrons in ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.

    1988-01-01

    Delayed neutron analysis carried out at the Australian Nuclear Scientific and Technology Organization facilities, provides a fast, high sensitivity, low cost, reliable method, particularly suitable for large batches of samples, and for non destructive analysis of a range of materials. While its main use has been in uranium exploration, other applications include archeological investigations, agriculture, oceanography and biology

  16. Bilingual Children's Lexical Strategies in a Narrative Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Poliana; Nicoladis, Elena; Keith, Margaux

    2017-01-01

    We investigated how bilinguals choose words in a narrative task, contrasting the possibilities of a developmental delay vs. compensatory strategies. To characterize a developmental delay, we compared younger (three to five years) and older (seven to ten years) children's lexicalization of target words (Study 1). The younger children told shorter…

  17. The impact of cognitive load on delayed recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camos, Valérie; Portrat, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that long-term retention of items studied in a working memory span task depends on the refreshing of memory items-more specifically, on the number of refreshing opportunities. However, it was previously shown that refreshing depends on the cognitive load of the concurrent task introduced in the working memory span task. Thus, cognitive load should determine the long-term retention of items assessed in a delayed-recall test if such retention relies on refreshing. In two experiments, while the amount of refreshing opportunities remained constant, we varied the cognitive load of the concurrent task by either introducing tasks differing in their attentional demands or varying the pace of the concurrent task. To verify that this effect was related to refreshing and not to any maintenance mechanism, we also manipulated the availability of subvocal rehearsal. Replicating previous results, increasing cognitive load reduced immediate recall. This increase also had a detrimental effect on delayed recall. Conversely, the addition of concurrent articulation reduced immediate but not delayed recall. This study shows that both working and episodic memory traces depend on the cognitive load of the concurrent task, whereas the use of rehearsal affects only working memory performance. These findings add further evidence of the dissociation between subvocal rehearsal and attentional refreshing.

  18. OPPORTUNITY COSTS OF REWARD DELAYS AND THE DISCOUNTING OF HYPOTHETICAL MONEY AND CIGARETTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patrick S.; Herrmann, Evan S.; Johnson, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are reported to discount delayed rewards at lower rates than nonhumans. However, nonhumans are studied in tasks that restrict reinforcement during delays, whereas humans are typically studied in tasks that do not restrict reinforcement during delays. In nonhuman tasks, the opportunity cost of restricted reinforcement during delays may increase delay discounting rates. The present within-subjects study used online crowdsourcing (Amazon Mechanical Turk, or MTurk) to assess the discounting of hypothetical delayed money (and cigarettes in smokers) under four hypothetical framing conditions differing in the availability of reinforcement during delays. At one extreme, participants were free to leave their computer without returning, and engage in any behavior during reward delays (modeling typical human tasks). At the opposite extreme, participants were required to stay at their computer and engage in little other behavior during reward delays (modeling typical nonhuman tasks). Discounting rates increased as an orderly function of opportunity cost. Results also indicated predominantly hyperbolic discounting, the “magnitude effect,” steeper discounting of cigarettes than money, and positive correlations between discounting rates of these commodities. This is the first study to test the effects of opportunity costs on discounting, and suggests that procedural differences may partially account for observed species differences in discounting. PMID:25388973

  19. Delayed discounting of pain with and without monetary reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kicman Paweł

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of monetary rewards on the rate of pain discounting. Our aim, also, was to understand the effect of previous painful dental experiences on the rate of discounting pain. Two groups (N = 148 completed a discounting task. In the first group, delayed pain was weaker than immediate pain, and in the second group delayed pain was stronger than immediate pain. Two conditions were studied: pain was either accompanied by a monetary reward or not. We found that people preferred immediate pain when it was weaker than delayed pain; however, when delayed pain was stronger than immediate pain, there was no clear preference. In both groups the preference for immediate pain was higher when pain was accompanied by a monetary reward. Previous painful experiences were not related to the rate of discounting. It was concluded that the preference for delayed pain depends on the intensity of pain, and it can be modified by rewards that accompany pain.

  20. Rigorous decoupling between edge states in frustrated spin chains and ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepiga, Natalia; Mila, Frédéric

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the occurrence of exact zero modes in one-dimensional quantum magnets of finite length that possess edge states. Building on conclusions first reached in the context of the spin-1/2 X Y chain in a field and then for the spin-1 J1-J2 Heisenberg model, we show that the development of incommensurate correlations in the bulk invariably leads to oscillations in the sign of the coupling between edge states, and hence to exact zero energy modes at the crossing points where the coupling between the edge states rigorously vanishes. This is true regardless of the origin of the frustration (e.g., next-nearest-neighbor coupling or biquadratic coupling for the spin-1 chain), of the value of the bulk spin (we report on spin-1/2, spin-1, and spin-2 examples), and of the value of the edge-state emergent spin (spin-1/2 or spin-1).

  1. Emergent criticality and Friedan scaling in a two-dimensional frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Schmalian, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    We study a two-dimensional frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the windmill lattice consisting of triangular and dual honeycomb lattice sites. In the classical ground state, the spins on different sublattices are decoupled, but quantum and thermal fluctuations drive the system into a coplanar state via an "order from disorder" mechanism. We obtain the finite temperature phase diagram using renormalization group approaches. In the coplanar regime, the relative U(1) phase between the spins on the two sublattices decouples from the remaining degrees of freedom, and is described by a six-state clock model with an emergent critical phase. At lower temperatures, the system enters a Z6 broken phase with long-range phase correlations. We derive these results by two distinct renormalization group approaches to two-dimensional magnetism: Wilson-Polyakov scaling and Friedan's geometric approach to nonlinear sigma models where the scaling of the spin stiffnesses is governed by the Ricci flow of a 4D metric tensor.

  2. Magnetic-field-induced Quantum Phase in S = 1/2 Frustrated Trellis Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Yoshizawa, Daichi; Kida, Takanori; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Matsuo, Akira; Kono, Yohei; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Tamekuni, Yusuke; Miyagai, Hirotsugu; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2018-04-01

    We present a new model compound of an S = 1/2 frustrated system with ferromagnetic interaction composed of verdazyl radical β-2,3,5-Cl3-V. The ab initio molecular orbital calculation indicates the formation of an S = 1/2 trellis lattice in which zigzag chains and ladders with ferromagnetic rung interaction are two-dimensionally coupled. We observe a field-induced successive phase transition and an unconventional change in the magnetization curve near the saturation field, accompanied by T2 dependence on the magnetic specific heat. A two-dimensional spin-nematic state attributed to the ferromagnetic rung interactions is a possible candidate for the ground state in high-field regions.

  3. Frustrated magnetism in Yb{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}P{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, Kai; Zocco, Diego A.; Weber, Frank; Kuntz, Sebastian; Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumbach, Ryan [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee (United States); Hamlin, James [Departement of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States); Lum, Ivy; Maple, M. Brian [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego (United States); Lynn, Jeff; Huang, Qingzhen [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg (United States); Janoschek, Marc [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Yb{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}P{sub 7} is characterized by a low magnetic transition temperature of T{sub N} ∼1 K and the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior. These properties suggest the proximity to a quantum critical point (QCP). The non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior, however, does not conform to the standard QCP scenario described by the Hertz-Millis-Moriya theory. We measured thermal expansion, magnetostriction and magnetization. The pressure dependence was studied up to 15 GPa using resistivity measurements in piston cylinder and diamond anvil cells. The measurements reveal that only a small fraction of the Yb moments participate in the long-range magnetic order. The Grueneisen ratio does not diverge for T → 0 indicating that the NFL behavior is not related to a nearby pressure-induced QCP. In view of the unusual noncentrometric crystal structure, our observations might point to geometric frustration of the magnetic moments.

  4. Magnetization plateaux and jumps in frustrated four-leg spin tubes in magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, H D; Arlego, M; Albarracín, F A Gómez

    2014-01-01

    We study the ground state phase diagram of a frustrated spin-1/2 four-leg tube in an external magnetic field. We explore the parameter space of this model in the regime of all-antiferromagnetic exchange couplings by means of three different approaches: density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), a low-energy effective Hamiltonian (LEH) and a Hartree variational approach (HVA). We find that in the limit of weakly interacting plaquettes, singlet and triplet states play an important role in the formation of magnetization plateaux. We study the transition regions numerically and analytically, and find that they are described, at first order in a strong- coupling expansion, by an XXZ spin-1/2 chain in a magnetic field. These results are consistent with the DMRG and HVA calculations

  5. Dynamic critical phenomena in two-dimensional fully frustrated Coulomb gas model with disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Luo Mengbo

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic critical phenomena near depinning transition in two-dimensional fully frustrated square lattice Coulomb gas model with disorders was studied using Monte Carlo technique. The ground state of the model system with disorder σ=0.3 is a disordered state. The dependence of charge current density J on electric field E was investigated at low temperatures. The nonlinear J-E behavior near critical depinning field can be described by a scaling function proposed for three-dimensional flux line system [M.B. Luo, X. Hu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 267002]. We evaluated critical exponents and found an Arrhenius creep motion for field region E c /2 c . The scaling law of the depinning transition is also obtained from the scaling function

  6. Geometric spin frustration for isolated plaquettes of the lattices: An extended irreducible tensor operator method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fan; Chen Zhida

    2006-01-01

    A new strategy to search for the good quantum numbers for the corner-sharing spin systems, as archetypal plaquettes of the lattices, was suggested for the first time in order to study on geometric spin frustration. The calculations on energy spectra by using the irreducible tensor operator method with the new strategy can be much reduced. As representative examples the energy spectra for the spin pentamer of the tetrahedron with a centered spin site and the spin heptamer of three corner-sharing equilateral-triangle were examined in order to confirm efficiency of the new strategy. Through our code, with automatically searching for the good quantum numbers, the projection operators S iz , S ix and S iy matrices in the ground state space for the spin heptamer were reliably constructed

  7. Quantum entanglement and quantum phase transitions in frustrated Majumdar-Ghosh model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guanghua; Wang Chunhai; Deng Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    By using the density matrix renormalization group technique, the quantum phase transitions in the frustrated Majumdar-Ghosh model are investigated. The behaviors of the conventional order parameter and the quantum entanglement entropy are analyzed in detail. The order parameter is found to peak at J 2 ∼0.58, but not at the Majumdar-Ghosh point (J 2 =0.5). Although, the quantum entanglements calculated with different subsystems display dissimilarly, the extremes of their first derivatives approach to the same critical point. By finite size scaling, this quantum critical point J C 2 converges to around 0.301 in the thermodynamic limit, which is consistent with those predicted previously by some authors (Tonegawa and Harada, 1987 ; Kuboki and Fukuyama, 1987 ; Chitra et al., 1995 ). Across the J C 2 , the system undergoes a quantum phase transition from a gapless spin-fluid phase to a gapped dimerized phase.

  8. 133Cs NMR investigation of 2D frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet, Cs2CuCl4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, M.-A.; Kundhikanjana, W.; Straub, A.; Mitrovic, V. F.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Coldea, R.; Tylczynski, Z.

    2006-10-01

    We report 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on the 2D frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet Cs2CuCl4 down to 2 K and up to 15 T. We show that 133Cs NMR is a good probe of the magnetic degrees of freedom in this material. Cu spin degrees of freedom are sensed through a strong anisotropic hyperfine coupling. The spin excitation gap opens above the critical saturation field. The gap value was determined from the activation energy of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in a magnetic field applied parallel to the Cu chains (\\skew3\\hat{b} axis). The values of the g-factor and the saturation field are consistent with the neutron-scattering and magnetization results. The measurements of the spin spin relaxation time are exploited to show that no structural changes occur down to the lowest temperatures investigated.

  9. Frustrated Achievers or Satisfied Losers? Inter- and Intragenerational Social Mobility and Happiness in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Zang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available How and to what extent is rank mobility associated with happiness of the Chinese population? Does mobility provide insight into the vast numbers of frustrated workers in times of economic growth? To date, few studies have examined the consequences of social mobility on happiness in transitional societies. The present analysis investigates the association of both inter- and intragenerational rank mobility with happiness in China using data from the General Social Survey's 2003, 2006, and 2008 waves. We examine two general mechanisms, social adaptation and social comparison, by statistically decomposing the independent contributions of social origin, social destination, and mobility. We find there is a significant positive association between short-distance intragenerational downward mobility and happiness, while not any intergenerational mobility pattern has been found to be significant. Apparently, we have a group of satisfied losers. Our findings favor social comparison explanations.

  10. A mechanism for the downturn in inverse susceptibility in triangle-based frustrated spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, M

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for the downturn of inverse magnetic susceptibility below an intermediate temperature, recently observed in many experiments, is proposed as an intrinsic feature of lattices with triangle-based frustrated geometries. The temperature at the bending of the inverse susceptibility curve may be related to the features of other thermodynamic properties; the hump of the specific heat and the emergence of a 1/3 plateau in magnetization under a magnetic field. This fact is derived through a Monte Carlo simulation study of the Ising model on triangular and kagome lattices, and the exact calculation for the single and small-sized triangle clusters, on both the Ising and Heisenberg models. These results may indicate the dominance of S(S z ) = 1/2 quantum (classical) trimer formation in the intermediate-energy regime in two-dimensional triangle-based lattices

  11. Watch your step! A frustrated total internal reflection approach to forensic footwear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, J A; Sharp, J S

    2016-02-16

    Forensic image retrieval and processing are vital tools in the fight against crime e.g. during fingerprint capture. However, despite recent advances in machine vision technology and image processing techniques (and contrary to the claims of popular fiction) forensic image retrieval is still widely being performed using outdated practices involving inkpads and paper. Ongoing changes in government policy, increasing crime rates and the reduction of forensic service budgets increasingly require that evidence be gathered and processed more rapidly and efficiently. A consequence of this is that new, low-cost imaging technologies are required to simultaneously increase the quality and throughput of the processing of evidence. This is particularly true in the burgeoning field of forensic footwear analysis, where images of shoe prints are being used to link individuals to crime scenes. Here we describe one such approach based upon frustrated total internal reflection imaging that can be used to acquire images of regions where shoes contact rigid surfaces.

  12. Topological magnon bands and unconventional thermal Hall effect on the frustrated honeycomb and bilayer triangular lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owerre, S A

    2017-09-27

    In the conventional ferromagnetic systems, topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect are due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). In principle, however, the DMI is either negligible or it is not allowed by symmetry in some quantum magnets. Therefore, we expect that topological magnon features will not be present in those systems. In addition, quantum magnets on the triangular-lattice are not expected to possess topological features as the DMI or spin-chirality cancels out due to equal and opposite contributions from adjacent triangles. Here, however, we predict that the isomorphic frustrated honeycomb-lattice and bilayer triangular-lattice antiferromagnetic system will exhibit topological magnon bands and topological thermal Hall effect in the absence of an intrinsic DMI. These unconventional topological magnon features are present as a result of magnetic-field-induced non-coplanar spin configurations with nonzero scalar spin chirality. The relevance of the results to realistic bilayer triangular antiferromagnetic materials are discussed.

  13. Watch your step! A frustrated total internal reflection approach to forensic footwear imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, J. A.; Sharp, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Forensic image retrieval and processing are vital tools in the fight against crime e.g. during fingerprint capture. However, despite recent advances in machine vision technology and image processing techniques (and contrary to the claims of popular fiction) forensic image retrieval is still widely being performed using outdated practices involving inkpads and paper. Ongoing changes in government policy, increasing crime rates and the reduction of forensic service budgets increasingly require that evidence be gathered and processed more rapidly and efficiently. A consequence of this is that new, low-cost imaging technologies are required to simultaneously increase the quality and throughput of the processing of evidence. This is particularly true in the burgeoning field of forensic footwear analysis, where images of shoe prints are being used to link individuals to crime scenes. Here we describe one such approach based upon frustrated total internal reflection imaging that can be used to acquire images of regions where shoes contact rigid surfaces.

  14. The Frustrations of Reader Generalizability and Grounded Theory: Alternative Considerations for Transferability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Misco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I convey a recurring problem and possible solution that arose during my doctoral research on the topic of cross-cultural Holocaust curriculum development for Latvian schools. Specifically, as I devised the methodology for my research, I experienced a number of frustrations concerning the issue of transferability and the limitations of both reader generalizability and grounded theory. Ultimately, I found a more appropriate goal for the external applicability of this and other highly contextual research studies in the form of "grounded understandings," which are tentative apprehensions of the importance or significance of phenomena and conceptualizations that hold meaning and explanatory power, but are only embryonic in their potential to generate theory.

  15. Hostility and hearing protection behavior: the mediating role of personal beliefs and low frustration tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, S; Melamed, S; Feiner, M; Weisberg, E; Ribak, J

    1996-10-01

    The authors examined whether hostility would negatively be associated with occupational health behavior, namely, the use of hearing protection devices (HPDs). Also examined as possible mediators were the protection motivation theory (PMT) components and low frustration tolerance (LFT). Participants were 226 male industrial workers, all exposed to potentially hearing-damaging noise. Hostility was negatively related to HPD use. It moderately correlated with the PMT components: negatively with perceived susceptibility, severity, effectiveness, and self-efficacy and positively with perceived barriers. Hostility correlated highly with LFT. Regression analyses confirmed the mediating role of perceived barriers, low self-efficacy, and LFT in the negative relationship between hostility and the use of HPDs. Thus, intrapsychic characteristics of hostile people may be significant for hearing protection behavior.

  16. Frustrated ground state in the metallic Ising antiferromagnet Nd2Ni2In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, G.; Mašková, S.; Stone, M. B.

    2017-10-01

    We used inelastic neutron scattering measurements to examine the intermetallic Ising antiferromagnet Nd2Ni2In . The dynamical structure factor displays a spectrum with multiple crystal field excitations. These crystal field excitations consist of a set of four transitions covering a range of energies between 4 and 80 meV. The spectrum is very sensitive to the temperature, and we observed a softening and a shift in the energies above the transition temperature of the system. The analysis of the crystalline electric field scheme confirms the Ising nature of the spins and their orientation as proposed by previous studies. We characterized Nd2Ni2In as a large moment intermetallic antiferromagnet with the potential to support a geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice.

  17. Role of entropy in the ground state formation of frustrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereni, Julian G.

    2018-05-01

    The absence of magnetic order in Rare Earth-based frustrated compounds allows to recognize the action of the third law of thermodynamics in the low temperature behavior of those systems. One of the most relevant findings is the appearance of a coincident specific heat Cm / T|T→0 ≈ 7 J /molK2 'plateau' in six Yb systems. This characteristic feature occurs after a systematic modification of the thermal trajectory of their entropies Sm (T) in the range of a few hundred milikelvin degrees. Such behavior is explained by the formation of an entropy-bottleneck imposed by the third law constraint (Sm|T→0 ≥ 0), that drives the system into alternative ground states. Based in these finding, three possible approaches to the Sm|T→0 limit observed in real systems are analyzed in terms of the ∂2Sm / ∂T2 dependencies.

  18. Candidate for a fully frustrated square lattice in a verdazyl-based salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Tamekuni, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Hosokoshi, Y.

    2018-05-01

    We present an experimental realization of an S =1 /2 fully frustrated square lattice (FFSL) composed of a verdazyl-based salt (p -MePy-V) (TCNQ ) .(CH3)2CO . Ab initio molecular orbital calculations indicate that there are four types of competing ferro- and antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interactions present in the system, which combine to form an S =1 /2 FFSL. Below room temperature, the magnetic susceptibility of the material can be considered to arise from the S =1 /2 FFSL formed by the p -MePy-V and indicates that the system forms a quantum valence-bond solid state whose excitation energy is gapped. Furthermore, we also observe semiconducting behavior arising from the one-dimensional chain structure of the TCNQ molecules.

  19. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Anger, frustration, boredom and the Department of Motor Vehicles: Can negative emotions impede organ donor registration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jason T; Tan, Cara N; Rosenberg, Benjamin D; Navarro, Mario A; Thomson, Andrew L; Lyrintzis, Elena A; Alvaro, Eusebio M; Jones, Natalie D

    2016-03-01

    The IIFF Model (Information, Immediate and Complete Registration Mechanism, Focused Engagement, Favorable Activation) offers a checklist of considerations for interventions seeking to influence organ donor registration behavior. One aspect of the model, favorable activation, recommends considering the emotional and motivational state of a potential donor registrant. Given that most donor registrations occur at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), we considered whether emotions experienced while at the DMV could influence registration rates. The current research effort investigated the emotions people experience while visiting the DMV, explored whether these emotions are associated with donor registration intentions, and experimentally assessed whether DMV experiences influence donor registration. Three studies were conducted through Amazon's Mechanical Turk. In Study 1, we randomly assigned participants to either recall a prior DMV experience or to a comparison condition. Emotions associated with the recalled experiences were the dependent variable. Study 2 assessed the correlations between nine different emotions and donor registration intentions. Study 3 randomly assigned participants to recall a prior frustrating DMV experience or to a comparison condition. Intention to register to donate was the dependent variable. Study 1 found that recalling a prior DMV experience was associated with more negative and less positive emotions than the comparison condition. Study 2 found that increased levels of negative emotion could be problematic, as negative emotions were associated with decreased donor intentions. Study 3 found that recalling a frustrating DMV experience resulted in significantly lower intentions to register as an organ donor (vs. a control condition). Although not all DMV experiences are negative, these data indicated a relationship between the DMV and negative emotions; an association between negative emotions and lower donor registration intentions

  1. Frustration and disorder in granular media and tectonic blocks: implications for earthquake complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sornette

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We present exploratory analogies and speculations on the mechanisms underlying the organization of faulting and earthquake in the earth crust. The mechanical properties of the brittle lithosphere at scales of the order or larger than a few kilometers are proposed to be analogous to those of non-cohesive granular media, since both systems present stress amplitudes controlled by gravity, and shear band (faulting localization is determined by a type of friction Mohr-Coulomb rupture criterion. here, we explore the implications of this correspondence with respect to the origin of tectonic and earthquake complexity, on the basis of the existing experimental data on granular media available in the mechanical literature. An important observation is that motions and deformations of non-cohesive granular media are characterized by important fluctuations both in time (sudden breaks, avalanches, which are analogous to earthquakes and space (strain localizations, yield surfaces forming sometimes complex patterns. This is in apparent contradiction with the conventional wisdom in mechanics, based on the standard tendency to homogenize, which has led to dismiss fluctuations as experimental noise. On the basis of a second analogy with spinglasses and neural networks, based on the existence of block and grain packing disorder and block rotation "frustration", we suggest that these fluctuations observed both at large scales and at the block scale constitute an intrinsic signature of the mechanics of granular media. The space-time complexity observed in faulting and earthquake phenomenology is thus proposed to result form the special properties of the mechanics of granular media, dominated by the "frustration" of the kinematic deformations of its constitutive blocks.

  2. Structural properties of the geometrically frustrated pyrochlore Tb2Ti2O7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang-Wook; Gardner, Jason S.; Booth, Corwin H.

    2004-06-14

    Although materials that exhibit nearest-neighbor-only antiferromagnetic interactions and geometrical frustration theoretically should not magnetically order in the absence of disorder, few such systems have been observed experimentally. One such system appears to be the pyrochlore Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. However, previous structural studies indicated that Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} is an imperfect pyrochlore. To clarify the situation, we performed neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on samples that were prepared identically to those that show no magnetic order. The NPD measurements show that the long-range structure of Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} is well ordered with no structural transitions between 4.5 and 600 K. In particular, mean-squared displacements (u{sup 2}'s) for each site follow a Debye model with no offsets. No evidence for Tb/Ti site interchange was observed within an upper limit of 2%. Likewise, no excess or deficiency in the oxygen stoichiometry was observed, within an upper limit of 2% of the nominal pyrochlore value. Tb L{sub III} and Ti K-edge XAFS measurements from 20-300 K similarly indicate a well-ordered local structure. Other aspects of the structure are considered. We conclude that Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} has, within experimental error, an ideal, disorder-free pyrochlore lattice, thereby allowing the system to remain in a dynamic, frustrated spin state to the lowest observed temperatures.

  3. Sources of motivation and frustration among healthcare workers administering antiretroviral treatment for HIV in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C; Scott, K; Madenhire, C; Nyamukapa, C; Gregson, S

    2011-07-01

    The roll-out of accessible and affordable antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for people living with HIV in low-income countries is drastically changing the nature of HIV-related healthcare. The Zimbabwean Ministry of Health has renewed efforts to make antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV free and publically available across the country. This paper describes the findings from a multi-method qualitative study including interviews and a focus group with healthcare workers (mostly nurses), totalling 25 participants, and field notes from over 100 hours of ethnographic observation in three rural Zimbabwean health centres. These health centres began providing free ARV drugs to HIV-positive people over one year prior to the research period. We examined sources of motivation and frustration among nurses administering ART in these resource-poor health centres. The findings suggest that healthcare workers administering ART in challenging circumstances are adept at drawing strength from the dramatic physical and emotional recoveries made possible by ART and from their personal memories of the suffering caused by HIV/AIDS among close friends or family. However, healthcare staff grappled with extreme resource shortages, which led to exhaustion and frustration. Surprisingly, only one year into ART provision, healthcare workers did not reference the professional challenges of their HIV work before ART became available, suggesting that medical breakthroughs such as ART rapidly come to be seen as a standard element of nursing. Our findings provide a basis for optimism that medical breakthroughs such as ART can reinvigorate healthcare workers in the short term. However, we caution that the daily challenges of nursing in poor environments, especially administering an ongoing and resource-intensive regime such as ART, must be addressed to enable nurses to continue delivering high-quality ART in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Computer Simulations and Theoretical Studies of Complex Systems: from complex fluids to frustrated magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsong

    Computer simulations are an integral part of research in modern condensed matter physics; they serve as a direct bridge between theory and experiment by systemactically applying a microscopic model to a collection of particles that effectively imitate a macroscopic system. In this thesis, we study two very differnt condensed systems, namely complex fluids and frustrated magnets, primarily by simulating classical dynamics of each system. In the first part of the thesis, we focus on ionic liquids (ILs) and polymers--the two complementary classes of materials that can be combined to provide various unique properties. The properties of polymers/ILs systems, such as conductivity, viscosity, and miscibility, can be fine tuned by choosing an appropriate combination of cations, anions, and polymers. However, designing a system that meets a specific need requires a concrete understanding of physics and chemistry that dictates a complex interplay between polymers and ionic liquids. In this regard, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an efficient tool that provides a molecular level picture of such complex systems. We study the behavior of Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and the imidazolium based ionic liquids, using MD simulations and statistical mechanics. We also discuss our efforts to develop reliable and efficient classical force-fields for PEO and the ionic liquids. The second part is devoted to studies on geometrically frustrated magnets. In particular, a microscopic model, which gives rise to an incommensurate spiral magnetic ordering observed in a pyrochlore antiferromagnet is investigated. The validation of the model is made via a comparison of the spin-wave spectra with the neutron scattering data. Since the standard Holstein-Primakoff method is difficult to employ in such a complex ground state structure with a large unit cell, we carry out classical spin dynamics simulations to compute spin-wave spectra directly from the Fourier transform of spin trajectories. We

  5. Isolating the delay component of impulsive choice in adolescent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse eMcClure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulsive choice — the preference for small immediate rewards over larger delayed rewards — has been linked to various psychological conditions ranging from behavioral disorders to addiction. These links highlight the critical need to dissect the various components of this multifaceted behavioral trait. Delay discounting tasks allow researchers to study an important factor of this behavior: how the subjective value of a rewards changes over a delay period. However, existing methods of delay discounting include a confound of modifying reward sizes during the procedure. Here we present a new approach of using a single constant reward size to assess delay discounting. A complementary approach could hold delay constant and assess the utility of changing quantities of a reward. Isolating these behavioral components can advance our ability to explore the behavioral complexity of impulsive choice. We present the methods for isolating delay in detail, and further capitalize on this method by pairing it with a standard peak interval task to test whether individual variation in delay discounting can be explained by differences in perception of time in male and female adolescent rats. We find that rats that were more precise in discriminating time intervals were also less impulsive in their choice. Our data suggest that differences in timing and delay discounting are not causally related, but instead are more likely influenced by a common factor. Further, the mean-level change in our measure between postnatal day 28 and 42 suggests this test may be capturing a developmental change in this factor. In summary, this new method of isolating individual components of impulsive choice (delay or quantity can be efficiently applied in either adolescent or adult animal models and may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying impulsivity and its links to psychological disorders.

  6. Topological Acoustic Delay Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwang; Tian, Ye; Cheng, Ying; Wei, Qi; Liu, Xiaojun; Christensen, Johan

    2018-03-01

    Topological protected wave engineering in artificially structured media is at the frontier of ongoing metamaterials research that is inspired by quantum mechanics. Acoustic analogues of electronic topological insulators have recently led to a wealth of new opportunities in manipulating sound propagation with strikingly unconventional acoustic edge modes immune to backscattering. Earlier fabrications of topological insulators are characterized by an unreconfigurable geometry and a very narrow frequency response, which severely hinders the exploration and design of useful devices. Here we establish topologically protected sound in reconfigurable phononic crystals that can be switched on and off simply by rotating its three-legged "atoms" without altering the lattice structure. In particular, we engineer robust phase delay defects that take advantage of the ultrabroadband reflection-free sound propagation. Such topological delay lines serve as a paradigm in compact acoustic devices, interconnects, and electroacoustic integrated circuits.

  7. Delayed traumatic intracranial hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroki

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed serially within 24 hours after head injury in 64 patients having Glasgow Coma Scale of 14 or less or cranial fracture shown on roentgenogram. Delayed traumatic extradural hematoma was observed within 7-12 hours after head injury in 6 cases (9.4%). This was prominent in the frontal and occipital regions (67%). Good recovery was seen in 83.3%. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma was observed within 6-24 hours after head injury in 17 cases (26.6%). This higher incidence was related to contre coup injury. Conservative treatment was possible in 14 of the 17 patients (82.4%), showing good recovery in 70%. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Effect of scattered feeding and feeding twice a day during rearing on indicators of hunger and frustration in broiler breeders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Wolthuis-Fillerup, M.; Blokhuis, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Broiler breeders are routinely fed restricted during rearing which has a major negative effect on their welfare. They suffer from hunger and frustration from thwarting of feeding. The aim of this experiment was therefore to study if broiler breeder welfare can be improved by changes in the feeding

  9. Chinese Children's Effortful Control and Dispositional Anger/Frustration: Relations to Parenting Styles and Children's Social Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Wang, Yun; Reiser, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Relations among authoritative and authoritarian parenting styles, children's effortful control and dispositional anger/frustration, and children's social functioning were examined for 425 first and second graders (7-10 years old) in Beijing, China. Parents reported on parenting styles; parents and teachers rated children's effortful control,…

  10. Geminal phosphorus/aluminum-based frustrated Lewis pairs: C-H versus C≡C activation and CO2 fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelt, C.; Westenberg, H.; Bertini, F.; Ehlers, A.W.; Slootweg, J.C.; Lammertsma, K.; Uhl, W.

    2011-01-01

    Catch it! Geminal phosphorus/aluminum-based frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) are easily obtained by hydroalumination of alkynylphosphines. These FLPs can activate terminal acetylenes by two competitive pathways, which were analyzed by DFT calculations, and they can bind carbon dioxide reversibly.

  11. Association of physicians' illness perception of fibromyalgia with frustration and resistance to accepting patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Mieko; Ishikawa, Hirono; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate whether physicians' illness perceptions correlate with their frustration or resistance to accepting patients with fibromyalgia (FM). In this cross-sectional postal survey, questionnaires were sent to member physicians of the Japan College of Rheumatology and Japan Rheumatism Foundation. Measures collected included the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire with Causal Attribution, the Illness Invalidation Inventory, and the Difficult Doctor-Patient Relationship Questionnaire (DDPRQ-10). Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine associations between the DDPRQ-10 and resistance to accepting patients with FM for treatment. We analyzed data from 233 physicians who had experience in consulting with patients with FM. Only 44.2 % answered that they wanted to accept additional patients with FM. Physicians' frustration was associated with difficulty controlling symptoms, patients' emotional responses, and causal attribution of FM to patient internal factors. Conversely, lower levels of frustration were associated with causal attributions to biological factors and uncontrollable external factors. However, the "difficult patient" perception did not correlate with resistance to accepting patients with FM. Difficulty controlling symptoms with treatment was the one factor common to both physicians' frustration and resistance to accepting patients with FM. Physicians may hesitate to accept patients with FM not because of the stigmatic image of the "difficult patient," but instead because of the difficulty in controlling the symptoms of FM. Thus, to improve the quality of consultation, physicians must continuously receive new information about the treatments and causes of FM.

  12. Time-Delay Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tinto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Equal-arm detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers, the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called time-delay interferometry (TDI. This article provides an overview of the theory, mathematical foundations, and experimental aspects associated with the implementation of TDI. Although emphasis on the application of TDI to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA mission appears throughout this article, TDI can be incorporated into the design of any future space-based mission aiming to search for gravitational waves via interferometric measurements. We have purposely left out all theoretical aspects that data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the TDI data combinations.

  13. Effects of cues in a binary categorization task on dual-task performance, mental workload, and effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Parmet, Yisrael

    2016-09-01

    Binary cues help operators perform binary categorization tasks, such as monitoring for system failures. They may also allow them to attend to other tasks they concurrently perform. If the time saved by using cues is allocated to other concurrent tasks, users' overall effort may remain unchanged. In 2 experiments, participants performed a simulated quality control task, together with a tracking task. In half the experimental blocks cues were available, and participants could use them in their decisions about the quality of products (intact or faulty). In Experiment 1, the difficulty of tracking was constant, while in Experiment 2, tracking difficulty differed in the 2 halves of the experiment. In both experiments, participants reported on the NASA Task Load Index that cues improved their performance and reduced their frustration. Consequently, their overall score on mental workload (MWL) was lower with cues. They also reported, however, that cues did not reduce their effort. We conclude that cues and other forms of automation may support task performance and reduce overall MWL, but this will not necessarily mean that users will work less hard. Thus, effort and overall MWL should be evaluated separately, if one wants to obtain a full picture of the effects of automation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Allowing Brief Delays in Responding Improves Event-Based Prospective Memory for Young Adults Living with HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Shayne; Doyle, Katie L.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Outlaw, Angulique Y.; Nichols, Sharon L.; Weber, Erica; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Event-based prospective memory (PM) tasks require individuals to remember to perform an action when they encounter a specific cue in the environment, and have clear relevance for daily functioning for individuals with HIV. In many everyday tasks, the individual must not only maintain the intent to perform the PM task, but the PM task response also competes with the alternative and more habitual task response. The current study examined whether event-based PM can be improved by slowing down the pace of the task environment. Fifty-seven young adults living with HIV performed an ongoing lexical decision task while simultaneously performing a PM task of monitoring for a specific word (which was focal to the ongoing task of making lexical decisions) or syllable contained in a word (which was nonfocal). Participants were instructed to refrain from making task responses until after a tone was presented, which occurred at varying onsets (0–1600ms) after each stimulus appeared. Improvements in focal and non-focal PM accuracy were observed with response delays of 600ms. Furthermore, the difference in PM accuracy between the low demand focal PM task and the resource demanding non-focal PM task was reduced by half across increasingly longer delays, falling from 31% at 0ms delay to only 14% at 1600ms delay. The degree of ongoing task response slowing for the PM conditions, relative to a control condition that did not have a PM task and made lexical decisions only, also decreased with increased delay. Overall, the evidence indicates that delaying the task responses of younger HIV-infected adults increased the probability that the PM relevant features of task stimuli were adequately assessed prior to the ongoing task response, and by implication that younger HIV infected adults can more adequately achieve PM goals when the pace of the task environment is slowed down. PMID:25116075

  15. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T.

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, [3H]glutamate and [3H]glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus

  16. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T. (Meijo Univ., Nagoya (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, (3H)glutamate and (3H)glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus.

  17. Delay and death-thought accessibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Christopher T; Updegraff, John A

    2015-12-01

    The dual-process component of Terror Management Theory (TMT) proposes that different types of threats lead to increases in death-thought accessibility (DTA) after different delay intervals. Experimental studies of terror management threats' effect on DTA were collected and coded for their use of explicitly death-related (vs. not explicitly death-related) threats, and for their use of delay and task-switching during the delay. Results reveal that studies using death-related threats achieved larger DTA effect-sizes when they included more task-switching or a longer delay between the threat and the DTA measurement. In contrast, studies using threats that were not explicitly death-related achieved smaller DTA effect-sizes when they included more task-switching between the threat and the DTA measurement. These findings provide partial support for the dual-process component's predictions regarding delay and DTA. Limitations and future directions are discussed. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  18. Low temperature spin dynamics and high pressure effects in frustrated pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirebeau, Isabelle

    2008-03-01

    Frustrated pyrochlores R2M2O7, where R^3+ is a rare earth and M^4+ a transition or sp metal ion, show a large variety of exotic magnetic states due to the geometrical frustration of the pyrochlore lattice, consisting of corner sharing tetrahedra for both R and M ions. Neutron scattering allows one to measure their magnetic ground state as well as the spin fluctuations, in a microscopic way. An applied pressure may change the subtle energy balance between magnetic interactions, inducing new magnetic states. In this talk, I will review recent neutron results on Terbium pyrochlores, investigated by high pressure neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering. Tb2M2O7 pyrochlores show respectively a spin liquid state for M=Ti [1], an ordered spin ice state for M= Sn [2], and a spin glass state with chemical order for M=Mo [3]. In Tb2Ti2O7 spin liquid, where only Tb^3+ ions are magnetic, an applied pressure induces long range antiferromagnetic order due to a small distortion of the lattice and magneto elastic coupling [4]. In Tb2Sn2O7, the substitution of Ti^4+ by the bigger Sn^4+ ion expands the lattice, inducing a long range ordered ferromagnetic state, with the local structure of a spin ice [2] and unconventional spin fluctuations [2,5]. The local ground state and excited crystal field states of the Tb^3+ ion were recently investigated by inelastic neutron scattering in both compounds [6]. Tb2Mo2O7, where Mo^4+ ions are also magnetic, shows an even more rich behaviour, due to the complex interaction between frustrated Tb and Mo lattices, having respectively localized and itinerant magnetism. In Tb2Mo2O7 spin glass, the lattice expansion induced by Tb/La substitution yields an ordered ferromagnetic state, which transforms back to spin glass under applied pressure [7]. New data about the spin fluctuations in these compounds, as measured by inelastic neutron scattering, will be presented. The talk will be dedicated to the memory of Igor Goncharenko, a renowned

  19. Delaying information search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Shani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In three studies, we examined factors that may temporarily attenuate information search. People are generally curious and dislike uncertainty, which typically encourages them to look for relevant information. Despite these strong forces that promote information search, people sometimes deliberately delay obtaining valuable information. We find they may do so when they are concerned that the information might interfere with future pleasurable activities. Interestingly, the decision to search or to postpone searching for information is influenced not only by the value and importance of the information itself but also by well-being maintenance goals related to possible detrimental effects that negative knowledge may have on unrelated future plans.

  20. Predicting memory performance under conditions of proactive interference: immediate and delayed judgments of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlheim, Christopher N

    2011-07-01

    Four experiments examined the monitoring accuracy of immediate and delayed judgments of learning (JOLs) under conditions of proactive interference (PI). PI was produced using paired-associate learning tasks that conformed to variations of classic A-B, A-D paradigms. Results revealed that the relative monitoring accuracy of interference items was better for delayed than for immediate JOLs. However, delayed JOLs were overconfident for interference items, but not for items devoid of interference. Intrusions retrieved prior to delayed JOLs produced inflated predictions of performance. These results show that delayed JOLs enhance monitoring accuracy in PI situations, except when intrusions are mistaken for target responses.

  1. Delayed Self-Recognition in Autism: A Unique Difficulty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy-Lelii, Sarah; Wellman, Henry M.

    2012-01-01

    Achieving a sense of self is a crucial task of ordinary development. With which aspects of self do children with autism have particular difficulty? Two prior studies concluded that children with autism are unimpaired in delayed self-recognition; we confirm and clarify this conclusion by examining it in conjunction with another key aspect of self…

  2. Delay-related cerebral activity and motor preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, R.B.; Coles, M.G.H.; Hulstijn, W.

    2008-01-01

    Flexible goal-oriented behavior requires the ability to carry information across temporal delays. This ability is associated with sustained neural firing. In cognitive terms, this ability has often been associated with the maintenance of sensory material online, as during short-term memory tasks, or

  3. Delay propagation and process management at railway stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goverde, R.M.P.; Hansen, I.A.

    2001-01-01

    Process operators at large railway stations have the difficult task to secure a fluent train traffic flow while minimizing deviations from established timetables. Variation in actual train departure times is inevitable due to many circumstances such as arrival delays and fluctuations in alighting

  4. Age Differences in Future Orientation and Delay Discounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence; Graham, Sandra; O'Brien, Lia; Woolard, Jennifer; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Banich, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Age differences in future orientation are examined in a sample of 935 individuals between 10 and 30 years using a delay discounting task as well as a new self-report measure. Younger adolescents consistently demonstrate a weaker orientation to the future than do individuals aged 16 and older, as reflected in their greater willingness to accept a…

  5. The complexity of scheduling trees with communication delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenstra, J.K.; Veldhorst, M.; Veltman, B.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding a minimum-length schedule onmmachines for a set ofnunit-length tasks with a forest of intrees as precedence relation, and with unit interprocessor communication delays. First, we prove that this problem is NP-complete; second, we derive a linear time algorithm for

  6. A Monte Carlo approach to combating delayed completion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to unveil the relevance of Monte Carlo critical path analysis in resolving problem of delays in scheduled completion of development projects. Commencing with deterministic network scheduling, Monte Carlo critical path analysis was advanced by assigning probability distributions to task times.

  7. The Ecological Rationality of Delay Tolerance: Insights from Capuchin Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Focaroli, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Both human and non-human animals often face decisions between options available at different times, and the capacity of delaying gratification has usually been considered one of the features distinguishing humans from other animals. However, this characteristic can widely vary across individuals, species, and types of task and it is still unclear…

  8. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  9. Determining team cognition from delay analysis using cross recurrence plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajari, Nasim; Cheng, Irene; Bin Zheng; Basu, Anup

    2016-08-01

    Team cognition is an important factor in evaluating and determining team performance. Forming a team with good shared cognition is even more crucial for laparoscopic surgery applications. In this study, we analyzed the eye tracking data of two surgeons during a laparoscopic simulation operation, then performed Cross Recurrence Analysis (CRA) on the recorded data to study the delay behaviour for good performer and poor performer teams. Dual eye tracking data for twenty two dyad teams were recorded during a laparoscopic task and then the teams were divided into good performer and poor performer teams based on the task times. Eventually we studied the delay between two team members for good and poor performer teams. The results indicated that the good performer teams show a smaller delay comparing to poor performer teams. This study is compatible with gaze overlap analysis between team members and therefore it is a good evidence of shared cognition between team members.

  10. Delayed rule following.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D R

    2001-01-01

    Although the elements of a fully stated rule (discriminative stimulus [S(D)], some behavior, and a consequence) can occur nearly contemporaneously with the statement of the rule, there is often a delay between the rule statement and the S(D). The effects of this delay on rule following have not been studied in behavior analysis, but they have been investigated in rule-like settings in the areas of prospective memory (remembering to do something in the future) and goal pursuit. Discriminative events for some behavior can be event based (a specific setting stimulus) or time based. The latter are more demanding with respect to intention following and show age-related deficits. Studies suggest that the specificity with which the components of a rule (termed intention) are stated has a substantial effect on intention following, with more detailed specifications increasing following. Reminders of an intention, too, are most effective when they refer specifically to both the behavior and its occasion. Covert review and written notes are two effective strategies for remembering everyday intentions, but people who use notes appear not to be able to switch quickly to covert review. By focusing on aspects of the setting and rule structure, research on prospective memory and goal pursuit expands the agenda for a more complete explanation of rule effects.

  11. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J.

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. γEG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed [fr

  12. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C; Lapresle, J [Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  13. Postural adjustments are modulated by manual task complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Augusto Teixeira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Daily life activities of humans are characterized by dual tasks, in which a manual task is performed concomitantly with a postural task. Based on the assumption that both manual and postural tasks require attentional resources, no consensus exists as to how the central nervous system modulates postural adjustments in dual tasks. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of a manual task requiring attentional resources on shoulder and ankle adjustments as a function of the direction and predictability of postural perturbation. The participants (n=6 were evaluated during the performance of a simple and a complex manual task, while the base of support was moved backward or forward. Latency of activation of the tibialis anterior and gastroc-nemius muscles and angular acceleration of the shoulder were analyzed. The results showed that execution of the complex manual task delayed postural adjustment. Moreover, this delay occurred differently depending on the direction of postural perturbation. The delay in postural adjustment occurred proximally in the case of anterior displacement of the platform, and distally in the case of posterior displacement. Postural adjustments were more affected by the attentional task than by the predictability of platform displacement. These results are consistent with the concept of an integrated control between manual actions and the maintenance of static posture.

  14. Emergent Criticality and Ricci Flow in a 2D Frustrated Heisenberg Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Peter P.

    2014-03-01

    In most systems that exhibit order at low temperatures, the order occurs in the elementary degrees of freedom such as spin or charge. Prominent examples are magnetic or superconducting states of matter. In contrast, emergent order describes the phenomenon where composite objects exhibit longer range correlations. Such emergent order has been suspected to occur in a range of correlated materials. One specific example are spin systems with competing interactions, where long-range discrete order in the relative orientation of spins may occur. Interestingly, this order parameter may induce other phase transitions as is the case for the nematic transition in the iron pnictides. In this talk, we introduce and discuss a system with emergent Z6 symmetry, a two-dimensional frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the windmill lattice consisting of interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The multiple spin stiffnesses can be captured in terms of a four-dimensional metric tensor, and the renormalization group flow of the stiffnesses is described by the Ricci flow of the metric tensor. The key result is a decoupling of an emergent collective degree of freedom given by the relative phase of spins on different sublattices. In particular, our results reveal a sequence of two Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transitions that bracket a critical phase.

  15. Origin of ferroelectricity and exotic magnetism in frustrated LiCuVO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourigal, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain with competing ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor (J1) and antiferromagnetic next-nearest neighbor (J2) interactions is probably one the simplest, yet richest model in frustrated magnetism. It is experimentally realized in a diversity of Mott insulators, in particular in copper-oxide materials built-up from edge-sharing CuO6 octahedra. The quasi-1D compound LiCuVO4 stands out for the diverse emergent magnetic and multiferroic phenomena it displays, its simple crystal structure and its availability as high-quality single crystals. I will review recent elastic neutron scattering works on LiCuVO4 which elucidate the nature of its ground-state as a function of applied electric field and magnetic field up to 14 T. Below 3.5 T, a model long-range ordered ferroelectric spin-cycloid is unveiled, its chirality fully controlled by an applied electric field, and the corresponding magnetoelectric coupling in excellent agreement with the predictions of a purely electronic mechanism based on spin currents. Above 8 T, a transition to a new quantum state is observed. This new phase resembles the longitudinal density-wave of magnon-pairs (p=2 SDW) predicted in the purely 1D case but is characterized by the intriguing absence of long-ranged dipolar correlations. Work performed at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble and in collaboration with M. Enderle, B. Fåk, R. K. Kremer and J. Law.

  16. Closing Gaps in Geometrically Frustrated Symmetric Clusters: Local Equivalence between Discrete Curvature and Twist Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In geometrically frustrated clusters of polyhedra, gaps between faces can be closed without distorting the polyhedra by the long established method of discrete curvature, which consists of curving the space into a fourth dimension, resulting in a dihedral angle at the joint between polyhedra in 4D. An alternative method—the twist method—has been recently suggested for a particular case, whereby the gaps are closed by twisting the cluster in 3D, resulting in an angular offset of the faces at the joint between adjacent polyhedral. In this paper, we show the general applicability of the twist method, for local clusters, and present the surprising result that both the required angle of the twist transformation and the consequent angle at the joint are the same, respectively, as the angle of bending to 4D in the discrete curvature and its resulting dihedral angle. The twist is therefore not only isomorphic, but isogonic (in terms of the rotation angles to discrete curvature. Our results apply to local clusters, but in the discussion we offer some justification for the conjecture that the isomorphism between twist and discrete curvature can be extended globally. Furthermore, we present examples for tetrahedral clusters with three-, four-, and fivefold symmetry.

  17. Interplay between spin frustration and magnetism in the exactly solved two-leg mixed spin ladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan; Lv, Song-Wei; Du, An; Yu, Nai-sen

    2016-11-01

    We study a mixed spin-(3/2, 1) ladder system with antiferromagnetic rung coupling and next-nearest-neighbor interaction. The exactly solved Ising-chain model is employed to investigate the ground-state properties and thermodynamics of the low-dimensional ladder system. Our results show that the competition between different exchange couplings brings in a large variety of ground states characterized by various values of normalized magnetization equal to 0, 1/5, 2/5, 3/5, 1. Moreover, an interesting double-peak structure is also detected in the thermal dependence of magnetic susceptibility and specific heat when the frustration comes into play. It is shown that the double-peak phenomenon at zero-field for the case of AF2 ground-state arises from the very strong antiferromagnetic rung coupling, while other cases are attributed to the excitations induced by temperature and external field around the phase boundary. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11547236), the General Project of the Education Department of Liaoning Province, China (Grant No. L2015130), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. DC201501065 and DCPY2016014), and the Doctoral Starting-up Foundation of Dalian Nationalities University, China.

  18. Semiclassical theory for liquidlike behavior of the frustrated magnet Ca10Cr7O28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sounak; Damle, Kedar

    2018-03-01

    We identify the low energy effective Hamiltonian that is expected to describe the low temperature properties of the frustrated magnet Ca10Cr7O28 . Motivated by the fact that this effective Hamiltonian has S =3 /2 effective moments as its degrees of freedom, we use semiclassical spin-wave theory to study the T =0 physics of this effective model and argue that singular spin-wave fluctuations destabilize the spiral order favored by the exchange couplings of this effective Hamiltonian. We also use a combination of classical Monte-Carlo simulations and molecular dynamics, as well as analytical approximations, to study the physics at low, nonzero temperatures. The results of these nonzero temperature calculations capture the liquidlike structure factors observed in the temperature range accessed by recent experiments. Additionally, at still lower temperatures, they predict that a transition to nematic order in the bond energies reflects itself in the spin channel in the form of a crossover to a regime with large but finite correlation length for spiral spin correlations and a corresponding slowing down of spin dynamics.

  19. 2D Kagome ordering in the 3D frustrated spinel Li2Mn2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, C R; Russo, P L; Savici, A T; Uemura, Y J; MacDougall, G J; Luke, G M; Kuchta, S; Greedan, J E

    2005-01-01

    Muon spin relaxation (μSR) experiments on the geometrically frustrated spinel oxide, Li 2 Mn 2 O 4 , show the development of spin correlations over a range of lengthscales with decreasing temperature. Increased relaxation below ∼150 K is consistent with the onset of spin correlations. Below 50 K, spin order, on a lengthscale which is long range for the μSR probe, appears abruptly in temperature, consistent with prior neutron diffraction results. The oscillations in the zero field asymmetry are analysed using a three frequency model. By locating the muon site, this is shown to be consistent with the unexpected 2Dq=√3x√3 structure on the Kagome planes proposed originally from neutron data. Longitudinal field data demonstrate that some spin dynamics persist even at 2 K. Thus, a very complex magnetic ground state, featuring the coexistence of long lengthscale 2D ordering and significant spin dynamics, is proposed. This is unusual considering the 3D topology of the Mn 3+ spins in this material

  20. How do passion for video games and needs frustration explain time spent gaming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Devin J; Milyavskaya, Marina; Mettler, Jessica; Heath, Nancy L; Derevensky, Jeffrey L

    2018-04-01

    Research applying self-determination theory and the dualistic model of passion (DMP) has shown video games may satisfy basic psychological needs (i.e., competence, autonomy, and relatedness) and be identified as a passion. The DMP distinguishes between healthy or harmonious passion and problematic or obsessive passion (OP), with the latter reflecting an overreliance towards one's passion to obtain needs satisfaction. The experience of daily obstructions to needs satisfaction, or needs frustration (NF), may facilitate such an overreliance. This study explored how NF and both types of passion explain the amount of time that university students spend gaming. The overall association between NF and time spent gaming was not significant. However, for video game users with low levels of OP for gaming, there was a significant negative association between NF and time spent gaming. Additionally, evidence of a mutually reinforcing association between NF and OP for gaming indicates that a vicious cycle exists, whereby a strong OP for gaming predicts and is reinforced by greater NF. The theoretical implications are discussed. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Frustrated total internal reflection in organic light-emitting diodes employing sphere cavity embedded in polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Peifen

    2016-01-01

    The light extraction efficiency of top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is numerically investigated employing the finite-difference time-domain method. The periodic nanostructures formed by embedding the sphere arrays in polystyrene (PS) are placed on top of OLED to frustrate the total internal reflection at the interface between OLED and free space. These nanostructures serve as an intermediate medium to extract the light out of OLED devices. Efficiently coupling both evanescent waves and propagation waves into spheres and subsequently extracting these light waves out of the sphere is key to achieving high extraction efficiency. By tuning the thickness of PS layer, both of the in-coupling efficiency and out-coupling efficiency are optimized for achieving high light extraction efficiency. Thicker PS layer results in higher in-coupling efficiency in sphere while the thinner PS layer leads to higher out-coupling efficiency. Thus the maximum light extraction is a trade-off between the in-coupling efficiency and out-coupling efficiency. The study shows that light extraction efficiency of 89% can be achieved by embedding 0.90 μm TiO 2 sphere in 0.30 μm PS layer with optimized in-coupling efficiency, out-coupling efficiency and cavity effect. (paper)

  2. Phase transitions in two-dimensional uniformly frustrated XY models. II. General scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    For two-dimensional uniformly frustrated XY models the group of symmetry spontaneously broken in the ground state is a cross product of the group of two-dimensional rotations by some discrete group of finite order. Different possibilities of phase transitions in such systems are investigated. The transition to the Coulomb gas with noninteger charges is widely used when analyzing the properties of relevant topological excitations. The number of these excitations includes not only domain walls and traditional (integer) vortices, but also vortices with a fractional number of circulation quanta which are to be localized at bends and intersections of domain walls. The types of possible phase transitions prove to be dependent on their relative sequence: in the case the vanishing of domain wall free energy occurs earlier (at increasing temperature) than the dissociation of pairs of ordinary vortices, the second phase transition is to be associated with dissociation of pairs of fractional vortices. The general statements are illustrated with a number of examples

  3. Creation and Annihilation of Skyrmions in the Frustrated Magnets with Competing Exchange Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Chi, Xiaodan; Li, Xuesi; Liu, Yan; Du, An

    2017-11-22

    In triangular-lattice magnets, the coexistence of third-neighbor antiferromagnetic and nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic exchange interactions can induce rich magnetic phases including noncoplanar skyrmion crystals. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we studied the dependence of magnetic phase transition on exchange interaction strength. Under the consideration of uniaxial anisotropy and magnetic field both perpendicular to the film plane, a large antiferromagnetic exchange interaction induces a high frustration. When the value of antiferromagnetic exchange interaction is one and a half times larger than the ferromagnetic one, a magnetic phase composed of canting spin stripes, never observed in the chiral magnets, forms. Interestingly, different canting spin stripes along three 120 degree propagation directions may coexist randomly in a magnetic phase, attesting that the canting spin stripes are three-fold degenerate states akin to helices and the multiple state of canting spin stripes is a circular configuration with zero skyrmion charge number. Moreover, skyrmions and antiskyrmions can be observed simultaneously in the configuration at the low temperature nearly close to 0 K, and their configuration and diameter properties are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms of skyrmion creation and annihilation are properly interpreted by comparing exchange and Zeeman energy terms.

  4. Fully frustrated Josephson junction ladders with Mobius boundary conditions as topologically protected qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristofano, Gerardo; Marotta, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Complesso Universitario M. Sant' Angelo, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Naddeo, Adele [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno and CNISM, Unita di Ricerca di Salerno, Via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)], E-mail: naddeo@sa.infn.it; Niccoli, Giuliano [LPTM, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 avenue Adolphe Chauvin, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France)

    2008-03-31

    We show how to realize a 'protected' qubit by using a fully frustrated Josephson junction ladder (JJL) with Mobius boundary conditions. Such a system has been recently studied within a twisted conformal field theory (CFT) approach [G. Cristofano, G. Maiella, V. Marotta, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 15 (2000) 1679; G. Cristofano, G. Maiella, V. Marotta, G. Niccoli, Nucl. Phys. B 641 (2002) 547] and shown to develop the phenomenon of flux fractionalization [G. Cristofano, V. Marotta, A. Naddeo, G. Niccoli, Eur. Phys. J. B 49 (2006) 83]. The relevance of a 'closed' geometry has been fully exploited in relating the topological properties of the ground state of the system to the presence of half flux quanta and the emergence of a topological order has been predicted [G. Cristofano, V. Marotta, A. Naddeo, J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2005) P03006]. In this Letter the stability and transformation properties of the ground states under adiabatic magnetic flux change are analyzed and the deep consequences on the realization of a solid state qubit, protected from decoherence, are presented.

  5. Accessible biometrics: A frustrated total internal reflection approach to imaging fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan D; Sharp, James S

    2017-05-01

    Fingerprints are widely used as a means of identifying persons of interest because of the highly individual nature of the spatial distribution and types of features (or minuta) found on the surface of a finger. This individuality has led to their wide application in the comparison of fingerprints found at crime scenes with those taken from known offenders and suspects in custody. However, despite recent advances in machine vision technology and image processing techniques, fingerprint evidence is still widely being collected using outdated practices involving ink and paper - a process that can be both time consuming and expensive. Reduction of forensic service budgets increasingly requires that evidence be gathered and processed more rapidly and efficiently. However, many of the existing digital fingerprint acquisition devices have proven too expensive to roll out on a large scale. As a result new, low-cost imaging technologies are required to increase the quality and throughput of the processing of fingerprint evidence. Here we describe an inexpensive approach to digital fingerprint acquisition that is based upon frustrated total internal reflection imaging. The quality and resolution of the images produced are shown to be as good as those currently acquired using ink and paper based methods. The same imaging technique is also shown to be capable of imaging powdered fingerprints that have been lifted from a crime scene using adhesive tape or gel lifters. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ising critical behaviour in the one-dimensional frustrated quantum XY model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granato, E.

    1993-06-01

    A generalization of the one-dimensional frustrated quantum XY model is considered in which the inter and intra-chain coupling constants of the two infinite XY (planar rotor) chains have different strengths. The model can describe the superconductor-insulator transition due to charging effects in a ladder of Josephson junctions in a magnetic field with half a flux quantum per plaquette. From a fluctuation-effective action, this transition is expected to be in the universality class of the two-dimensional classical XY-Ising model. The critical behaviour is studied using a Monte Carlo transfer matrix applied to the path-integral representation of the model and a finite-size-scaling analysis of data on small system sizes. It is found that, unlike the previous studied case of equal inter and intra-chain coupling constants, the XY and Ising-like excitations of the quantum model decouple for large interchain coupling, giving rise to pure Ising model critical behaviour for the chirality order parameter in good agreement with the results for the XY-Ising model. (author). 18 refs, 4 figs

  7. Machine learning of frustrated classical spin models. I. Principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ce; Zhai, Hui

    2017-10-01

    This work aims at determining whether artificial intelligence can recognize a phase transition without prior human knowledge. If this were successful, it could be applied to, for instance, analyzing data from the quantum simulation of unsolved physical models. Toward this goal, we first need to apply the machine learning algorithm to well-understood models and see whether the outputs are consistent with our prior knowledge, which serves as the benchmark for this approach. In this work, we feed the computer data generated by the classical Monte Carlo simulation for the X Y model in frustrated triangular and union jack lattices, which has two order parameters and exhibits two phase transitions. We show that the outputs of the principal component analysis agree very well with our understanding of different orders in different phases, and the temperature dependences of the major components detect the nature and the locations of the phase transitions. Our work offers promise for using machine learning techniques to study sophisticated statistical models, and our results can be further improved by using principal component analysis with kernel tricks and the neural network method.

  8. Dynamical phase transition in a fully frustrated Josephson array on a square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, K. D.; Stroud, D.; Janin, L.

    1999-01-01

    We study dynamical phase transitions at temperature T=0 in a fully frustrated square Josephson junction array subject to a driving current density, which has nonzero components i x , i y parallel to both axes of the lattice. Our numerical results show clear evidence for three dynamical phases: a pinned vortex lattice characterized by zero time-averaged voltages x > t and y > t , a ''plastic'' phase in which both x > t and y > t are nonzero, and a moving lattice phase in which only one of the time-average voltage components is nonzero. The last of these has a finite transverse critical current: if a current is applied in the x direction, a nonzero transverse current density i y is required before y > t becomes nonzero. The voltage traces in the moving lattice phase are periodic in time. By contrast, the voltages in the plastic phase have continuous power spectra that are weakly dependent on frequency. This phase diagram is found numerically to be qualitatively unchanged by the presence of weak disorder. We also describe two simple analytical models that recover some, but not all, the characteristics of the three dynamical phases, and of the phase diagram calculated numerically. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  9. Integrin-based diffusion barrier separates membrane domains enabling the formation of microbiostatic frustrated phagosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Michelle E; Naj, Xenia; O'Meara, Teresa R; Plumb, Jonathan D; Cowen, Leah E

    2018-01-01

    Candida albicans hyphae can reach enormous lengths, precluding their internalization by phagocytes. Nevertheless, macrophages engulf a portion of the hypha, generating incompletely sealed tubular phagosomes. These frustrated phagosomes are stabilized by a thick cuff of F-actin that polymerizes in response to non-canonical activation of integrins by fungal glycan. Despite their continuity, the surface and invaginating phagosomal membranes retain a strikingly distinct lipid composition. PtdIns(4,5)P2 is present at the plasmalemma but is not detectable in the phagosomal membrane, while PtdIns(3)P and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 co-exist in the phagosomes yet are absent from the surface membrane. Moreover, endo-lysosomal proteins are present only in the phagosomal membrane. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed the presence of a diffusion barrier that maintains the identity of the open tubular phagosome separate from the plasmalemma. Formation of this barrier depends on Syk, Pyk2/Fak and formin-dependent actin assembly. Antimicrobial mechanisms can thereby be deployed, limiting the growth of the hyphae. PMID:29553370

  10. Frustration-induced internal stresses are responsible for quasilocalized modes in structural glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Edan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2018-03-01

    It has been recently shown [E. Lerner, G. Düring, and E. Bouchbinder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 035501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.035501] that the nonphononic vibrational modes of structural glasses at low frequencies ω are quasilocalized and follow a universal density of states D (ω ) ˜ω4 . Here we show that the gapless nature of the observed density of states depends on the existence of internal stresses that generically emerge in glasses due to frustration, thus elucidating a basic element underlying this universal behavior. Similarly to jammed particulate packings, low-frequency modes in structural glasses emerge from a balance between a local elasticity term and an internal stress term in the dynamical matrix, where the difference between them is orders of magnitude smaller than their typical magnitude. By artificially reducing the magnitude of internal stresses in a computer glass former in three dimensions, we show that a gap is formed in the density of states below which no vibrational modes exist, thus demonstrating the crucial importance of internal stresses. Finally, we show that while better annealing the glass upon cooling from the liquid state significantly reduces its internal stresses, the self-organizational processes during cooling render the gapless D (ω ) ˜ω4 density of state unaffected.

  11. GPU-Accelerated Population Annealing Algorithm: Frustrated Ising Antiferromagnet on the Stacked Triangular Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borovský Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The population annealing algorithm is a novel approach to study systems with rough free-energy landscapes, such as spin glasses. It combines the power of simulated annealing, Boltzmann weighted differential reproduction and sequential Monte Carlo process to bring the population of replicas to the equilibrium even in the low-temperature region. Moreover, it provides a very good estimate of the free energy. The fact that population annealing algorithm is performed over a large number of replicas with many spin updates, makes it a good candidate for massive parallelism. We chose the GPU programming using a CUDA implementation to create a highly optimized simulation. It has been previously shown for the frustrated Ising antiferromagnet on the stacked triangular lattice with a ferromagnetic interlayer coupling, that standard Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations fail to equilibrate at low temperatures due to the effect of kinetic freezing of the ferromagnetically ordered chains. We applied the population annealing to study the case with the isotropic intra- and interlayer antiferromagnetic coupling (J2/|J1| = −1. The reached ground states correspond to non-magnetic degenerate states, where chains are antiferromagnetically ordered, but there is no long-range ordering between them, which is analogical with Wannier phase of the 2D triangular Ising antiferromagnet.

  12. Direct evidence of spin frustration in the fcc antiferromagnet NiS sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuura, M; Endoh, Y; Hirota, K; Yamada, K

    2002-01-01

    NiS sub 2 is a well-known Mott insulator with anomalous antiferromagnetic long-range order of coexistent type I (Q sub M =(1,0,0), T sub N sub 1 =40 K) and type II (Q sub M =(1/2,1/2,1/2), T sub N sub 2 =30 K). Extensive neutron-scattering measurements reveal that magnetism in NiS sub 2 is governed by geometrical spin frustration, resulting in magnetic diffuse scattering extending along the fcc zone boundary. Although the diffuse scattering exists at temperatures as high as 250 K (6T sub N sub 1), it disappears rapidly below T sub N sub 2 , associated with minor crystal distortion. We observed a clear energy gap in addition to the low-energy spin-wave excitation at significantly below 30 K, and obtain evidence that degeneracy due to the coexistence of the two types of antiferromagnetism is relieved in the ground state via the reduction in symmetry due to distortion. (orig.)

  13. A frustração profissional e a lei Professional frustration and the law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessé Marques Jr.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é analisar alguns conflitos emocionais que o sistema de direito positivo impõe a magistrados e promotores dentro do campo jurídico. Tendo como parâmetro o cotidiano profissional, assim como as ambiguidades que surgem entre o ideal jurídico e as práticas efetivas da execução penal, mostraremos que o sentimento de "frustração" constitui parte significativa do discurso sobre as emoções que caracterizam esta profissão.The objective of this article is to analyze some emotional conflicts that the civil law tradition imposes on magistrates and district attorneys within the judicial field. Based on research into the everyday practice of the profession and the ambiguities that emerge between the juridical ideal of law and the effective practices of penal enforcement, this study shows that a feeling of "frustration" underpins much of the discourse concerning the emotions that characterize this profession.

  14. Frustrated magnetization in PrxLa1-xBaCuO5Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, W.A.; Araujo-Moreira, F.M.; Prassides, K.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of the system Pr x La 1-x BaCuO 5 Fe has been recently reviewed. The magnetic structure of samples with x = 0 and x = 1 is mainly due to effective local moments of iron and copper. In Pr-rich samples, Fe ions occupy two non-equivalent positions, making it substantially plausible that two or more magnetic subsets might coexist in the system. This contribution presents magnetization studies on five samples of the Pr x La 1-x BaCuO 5 Fe system (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0). All samples exhibit a strong irreversible behavior between zero-field-cooled and field-cooled procedures below a certain irreversibility temperature T i . Above T i , both branches are coincident and well described by a Curie-Weiss fitting. Decreasing the temperature below T i , the zero-field-cooled response increases less than the field-cooled curve, indicating some degree of frustrated antiferromagnetic couplings. (orig.)

  15. Ordering phenomena in a heterostructure of frustrated and unfrustrated triangular-lattice Ising layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, Milan; Tomita, Yusuke; Kamiya, Y.

    2017-07-01

    We study critical and magnetic properties of a bilayer Ising system consisting of two triangular planes A and B, with the antiferromagnetic (AF) coupling JA and the ferromagnetic (FM) one JB for the respective layers, which are coupled by the interlayer interaction JAB by using Monte Carlo simulations. When JA and JB are of the same order, the unfrustrated FM plane orders first at a high temperature Tc 1˜JB . The spontaneous FM order then exerts influence on the other frustrated AF plane as an effective magnetic field, which subsequently induces a ferrimagnetic order in this plane at low temperatures below Tc 2. When short-range order is developed in the AF plane while the influence of the FM plane is still small, there appears a preemptive Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type pseudocritical crossover regime just above the ferrimagnetic phase transition point, where the short-distance behavior up to a rather large length scale exponentially diverging in ∝JA/T is controlled by a line of Gaussian fixed points at T =0 . In the crossover region, a continuous variation in the effective critical exponent 4/9 ≲ηeff≲1/2 is observed. The phase diagram by changing the ratio JA/JB is also investigated.

  16. Entropy Constraints in the Ground State Formation of Magnetically Frustrated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereni, Julian G.

    2018-01-01

    A systematic modification of the entropy trajectory (S_m(T)) is observed at very low temperature in magnetically frustrated systems as a consequence of the constraint (S_mg 0) imposed by the Nernst postulate. The lack of magnetic order allows to explore and compare new thermodynamic properties by tracing the specific heat (C_m) behavior down to the sub-Kelvin range. Some of the most relevant findings are: (i) a common C_m/T|_{T→ 0} ≈ 7 J/mol K^2 `plateau' in at least five Yb-based very-heavy-fermions (VHF) compounds; (ii) quantitative and qualitative differences between VHF and standard non-Fermi-liquids; (iii) entropy bottlenecks governing the change of S_m(T) trajectories in a continuous transition into alternative ground states. A comparative analysis of S_m(T→ 0) dependencies is performed in compounds suitable for adiabatic demagnetization processes according to their partial ^2 S_m/partial T^2 derivatives.

  17. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity.

  18. Cognitive task analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Cognitive task analysis is defined as the extension of traditional task analysis techniques to yield information about the knowledge, thought processes and goal structures that underlie observable task performance. Cognitive task analyses are conducted for a wide variety of purposes, including the

  19. Local bifurcations in differential equations with state-dependent delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Jan

    2017-11-01

    A common task when analysing dynamical systems is the determination of normal forms near local bifurcations of equilibria. As most of these normal forms have been classified and analysed, finding which particular class of normal form one encounters in a numerical bifurcation study guides follow-up computations. This paper builds on normal form algorithms for equilibria of delay differential equations with constant delay that were developed and implemented in DDE-Biftool recently. We show how one can extend these methods to delay-differential equations with state-dependent delay (sd-DDEs). Since higher degrees of regularity of local center manifolds are still open for sd-DDEs, we give an independent (still only partial) argument which phenomena from the truncated normal must persist in the full sd-DDE. In particular, we show that all invariant manifolds with a sufficient degree of normal hyperbolicity predicted by the normal form exist also in the full sd-DDE.

  20. Local bifurcations in differential equations with state-dependent delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Jan

    2017-11-01

    A common task when analysing dynamical systems is the determination of normal forms near local bifurcations of equilibria. As most of these normal forms have been classified and analysed, finding which particular class of normal form one encounters in a numerical bifurcation study guides follow-up computations. This paper builds on normal form algorithms for equilibria of delay differential equations with constant delay that were developed and implemented in DDE-Biftool recently. We show how one can extend these methods to delay-differential equations with state-dependent delay (sd-DDEs). Since higher degrees of regularity of local center manifolds are still open for sd-DDEs, we give an independent (still only partial) argument which phenomena from the truncated normal must persist in the full sd-DDE. In particular, we show that all invariant manifolds with a sufficient degree of normal hyperbolicity predicted by the normal form exist also in the full sd-DDE.

  1. The effect of response-delay on estimating reachability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Carl; Ammar, Diala

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was conducted to compare visual imagery (VI) and motor imagery (MI) reaching tasks in a response-delay paradigm designed to explore the hypothesized dissociation between vision for perception and vision for action. Although the visual systems work cooperatively in motor control, theory suggests that they operate under different temporal constraints. From this perspective, we expected that delay would affect MI but not VI because MI operates in real time and VI is postulated to be memory-driven. Following measurement of actual reach, right-handers were presented seven (imagery) targets at midline in eight conditions: MI and VI with 0-, 1-, 2-, and 4-s delays. Results indicted that delay affected the ability to estimate reachability with MI but not with VI. These results are supportive of a general distinction between vision for perception and vision for action.

  2. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  3. Delay tolerant networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Longxiang; Luan, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents emerging and promising communication methods for network reliability via delay tolerant networks (DTNs). Different from traditional networks, DTNs possess unique features, such as long latency and unstable network topology. As a result, DTNs can be widely applied to critical applications, such as space communications, disaster rescue, and battlefield communications. The brief provides a complete investigation of DTNs and their current applications, from an overview to the latest development in the area. The core issue of data forward in DTNs is tackled, including the importance of social characteristics, which is an essential feature if the mobile devices are used for human communication. Security and privacy issues in DTNs are discussed, and future work is also discussed.

  4. Delayed Match Retrieval: A Novel Anticipation-Based Visual Working Memory Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldy, Zsuzsa; Guillory, Sylvia B.; Blaser, Erik

    2016-01-01

    We tested 8- and 10-month-old infants' visual working memory (VWM) for object-location bindings--"what is where"--with a novel paradigm, Delayed Match Retrieval, that measured infants' anticipatory gaze responses (using a Tobii T120 eye tracker). In an inversion of Delayed-Match-to-Sample tasks and with inspiration from the game…

  5. Study into critical properties of 3D frustrated Heisenberg model on triangular lattice by the use of Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtazaev, A.K.; Ramazanov, M.K.; Badiev, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    The critical properties of the 3D frustrated antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a triangular lattice are investigated by the replica Monte Carlo method. The static magnetic and chiral critical exponents of heat capacity a = 0.05(2), magnetization Β 0.30(1), Β k = 0.52(2), susceptibility Γ = 1.36(2), Γ k = 0.93(3), and correlation radius Ν 0.64(1), Ν k = 0.64(2) are calculated by using the finitesize scaling theory. The critical Fisher exponents η = - 0.06(3), η k = 0.63(4) for this model are estimated for the first time. A new universality class of the critical behavior is shown to be formed by the 3D frustrated Heisenberg model on the triangular lattice. A type of the interlayer exchange interaction is found to influence the universality class of antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the a triangular lattice.

  6. Complete characterization of the ground-space structure of two-body frustration-free Hamiltonians for qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Zhengfeng; Wei Zhaohui; Zeng Bei

    2011-01-01

    The problem of finding the ground state of a frustration-free Hamiltonian carrying only two-body interactions between qubits is known to be solvable in polynomial time. It is also shown recently that, for any such Hamiltonian, there is always a ground state that is a product of single- or two-qubit states. However, it remains unclear whether the whole ground space is of any succinct structure. Here, we give a complete characterization of the ground space of any two-body frustration-free Hamiltonian of qubits. Namely, it is a span of tree tensor network states of the same tree structure. This characterization allows us to show that the problem of determining the ground-state degeneracy is as hard as, but no harder than, its classical analog.

  7. Highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states as source of specific heat capacity anomalies in magnetic frustrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2018-04-01

    Anomalies of the specific heat capacity are investigated in the framework of the exactly solvable antiferromagnetic spin- 1 / 2 Ising model in the external magnetic field on the geometrically frustrated tetrahedron recursive lattice. It is shown that the Schottky-type anomaly in the behavior of the specific heat capacity is related to the existence of unique highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states which are formed on the borders between neighboring plateau-like ground states. It is also shown that the very existence of these single-point ground states with large residual entropies predicts the appearance of another anomaly in the behavior of the specific heat capacity for low temperatures, namely, the field-induced double-peak structure, which exists, and should be observed experimentally, along with the Schottky-type anomaly in various frustrated magnetic system.

  8. Extrapunitive and intropunitive individuals activate different parts of the prefrontal cortex under an ego-blocking frustration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Minamoto

    Full Text Available Different people make different responses when they face a frustrating situation: some punish others (extrapunitive, while others punish themselves (intropunitive. Few studies have investigated the neural structures that differentiate extrapunitive and intropunitive individuals. The present fMRI study explored these neural structures using two different frustrating situations: an ego-blocking situation which blocks a desire or goal, and a superego-blocking situation which blocks self-esteem. In the ego-blocking condition, the extrapunitive group (n = 9 showed greater activation in the bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, indicating that these individuals prefer emotional processing. On the other hand, the intropunitive group (n = 9 showed greater activation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, possibly reflecting an effortful control for anger reduction. Such patterns were not observed in the superego-blocking condition. These results indicate that the prefrontal cortex is the source of individual differences in aggression direction in the ego-blocking situation.

  9. Extrapunitive and intropunitive individuals activate different parts of the prefrontal cortex under an ego-blocking frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Takehiro; Osaka, Mariko; Yaoi, Ken; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Different people make different responses when they face a frustrating situation: some punish others (extrapunitive), while others punish themselves (intropunitive). Few studies have investigated the neural structures that differentiate extrapunitive and intropunitive individuals. The present fMRI study explored these neural structures using two different frustrating situations: an ego-blocking situation which blocks a desire or goal, and a superego-blocking situation which blocks self-esteem. In the ego-blocking condition, the extrapunitive group (n = 9) showed greater activation in the bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, indicating that these individuals prefer emotional processing. On the other hand, the intropunitive group (n = 9) showed greater activation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, possibly reflecting an effortful control for anger reduction. Such patterns were not observed in the superego-blocking condition. These results indicate that the prefrontal cortex is the source of individual differences in aggression direction in the ego-blocking situation.

  10. Geometrically frustrated magnetic structures of the heavy-fermion compound CePdAl studied by powder neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doenni, A.; Fischer, P.; Zolliker, M. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, ETH Zuerich and Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ehlers, G.; Maletta, H. [Hahn Meitner Institute Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14092 Berlin (Germany); Kitazawa, H. [National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1996-12-09

    The heavy-fermion compound CePdAl with ZrNiAl-type crystal structure (hexagonal space group P6-bar2m) was investigated by powder neutron diffraction. The triangular coordination symmetry of magnetic Ce atoms on site 3f gives rise to geometrical frustration. CePdAl orders below T{sub N} = 2.7 K with an incommensurate antiferromagnetic propagation vector k=[1/2, 0, {tau}], {tau} approx. 0.35, and a longitudinal sine-wave (LSW) modulated spin arrangement. Magnetically ordered moments at Ce(1) and Ce(3) coexist with frustrated disordered moments at Ce(2). The experimentally determined magnetic structure is in agreement with group theoretical symmetry analysis considerations, calculated by the program MODY, which confirm that for Ce(2) an ordered magnetic moment parallel to the magnetically easy c-axis is forbidden by symmetry. Further low-temperature experiments give evidence for a second magnetic phase transition in CePdAl between 0.6 and 1.3 K. Magnetic structures of CePdAl are compared with those of the isostructural compound TbNiAl, where a non-zero ordered magnetic moment for the geometrically frustrated Tb(2) atoms is allowed by symmetry. (author)

  11. Least momentum space frustration as a condition for a ‘high Tc sweet spot’ in iron-based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Hidetomo; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Kuroki, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe how the band structure and the Fermi surface of iron-based superconductors vary as the Fe–As–Fe bond angle changes. We discuss how these Fermi surface configurations affect the superconductivity mediated by spin fluctuations, and show that, in several situations, frustration in the sign of the gap function arises due to the repulsive pairing interactions that requires a sign change of the order parameter. Such a frustration can result in nodes or very small gaps, and generally works destructively against superconductivity. Conversely, we propose that the optimal condition for superconductivity is realized for the Fermi surface configuration that gives the least frustration while maximizing the Fermi surface multiplicity. This is realized when there are three hole Fermi surfaces, where two of them have d XZ/YZ orbital character and one has d X 2 −Y 2 for all k z in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone. Looking at the band structures of various iron-based superconductors, the occurrence of such a ‘sweet spot’ situation is limited to a narrow window. (paper)

  12. Exploring the relationship between the magnetic frustration and the emergence of FFLO state on a triangular lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jia; Jiang Hongmin; Li Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the FFLO state on the anisotropic triangular lattices is investigated. Focus on the required lower critical magnetic field to enter the FFLO state. Magnetic frustration facilitates the formation of the FFLO state. Layered organic superconductors are good candidates for exploring the FFLO state. The Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) unconventional superconductors attract renewed interest in recent years. However, an unambiguous experimental demonstration of the FFLO state is hindered by the stringent requirements for its realization. In this paper, we explore the relationship between the magnetic frustration and the emergence of the FFLO state on an anisotropic triangular lattice, based on the self-consistent calculation of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. We find that the required lower critical magnetic field to enter the FFLO state decreases with the increase of both the anisotropic ratio and the on-site Coulomb repulsive interaction. This demonstrates that it is easier to enter the FFLO state on the structurally frustrated triangular lattice in comparison with the square lattice, and suggests that the layered organic superconductors with a triangular lattice may be good candidates for exploring the FFLO state.

  13. A Teacher-Focused Intervention to Decrease PE Students' Amotivation by Increasing Need Satisfaction and Decreasing Need Frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Sung Hyeon; Reeve, Johnmarshall; Song, Yong-Gwan

    2016-06-01

    Intervention-induced gains in need satisfaction decrease PE students' amotivation. The present study adopted a dual-process model to test whether an intervention could also decrease need frustration and hence provide a second supplemental source to further decrease students' PE amotivation. Using an experimental, longitudinal research design, 19 experienced PE teachers (9 experimental, 10 control) and their 1,017 students participated in an intervention program to help teachers become both more autonomy supportive and less controlling. Multilevel repeated measures analyses showed that students of teachers in the experimental group reported greater T2, T3, and T4 perceived autonomy support, need satisfaction, and engagement and lesser T2, T3, and T4 perceived teacher control, need frustration, and amotivation than did students of teachers in the control group. Multilevel structural equation modeling analyses confirmed the hypothesized dual-process model in which both intervention-induced increases in need satisfaction and intervention-induced decreases need frustration decreased students' end-of-semester amotivation. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of this new finding on the dual antecedents of diminished amotivation.

  14. Possibility of a two-dimensional spin liquid in CePdAl induced by partial geometric frustration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, V. [Universitaet Augsburg, Institut fuer Physik, Experimentalphysik VI (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Grube, K.; Kittler, W.; Taubenheim, C.; Loehneysen, H. von [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Huesges, Z.; Lucas, S.; Stockert, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Green, E. [Hochfeldzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    CePdAl crystallizes in the hexagonal ZrNiAl structure, where the magnetic ions form a distorted kagome lattice. At T{sub N} = 2.7 K the onset of antiferromagnetic (AF) order is observed. Neutron scattering experiments revealed a partial frustration in the distorted kagome planes of this structure: two-thirds of the Ce moments form ferromagnetic chains, which are antiferromagnetically coupled, the remaining third do not participate in any long-range order. Along the c-axis the magnetic moments exhibit an amplitude modulation. Accordingly, the kagome planes are stacked on top of each other, resulting in corrugated AF planes parallel to the c-axis formed by the ordered magnetic moments, which are separated by the frustrated moments. It is an intriguing and yet unresolved question if this third of frustrated moments forms a spin liquid state in CePdAl. Based on measurements of specific heat, thermal expansion, magnetization and electrical resistivity we want to discuss this possibility.

  15. Location Estimation using Delayed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Larsen, Thomas Dall; Nørgård, Peter Magnus

    1998-01-01

    When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new techn...... technique to a sensor fusion system for estimating the location of an autonomous guided vehicle. The system fuses encoder and vision measurements in an extended Kalman filter. Results from experiments in a real environment are reported...

  16. Modeling delay in genetic networks: from delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Bennett, Matthew R; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  17. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Bennett, Matthew R. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77204, USA and Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Josić, Krešimir [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  18. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-01-01

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay

  19. Systematic of delayed neutron parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, S.G.; Piksaikin, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental studies of the energy dependence of the delayed neutron (DN) parameters for various fission systems has shown that the behaviour of a some combination of delayed neutron parameters has a similar features. On the basis of this findings the systematics of delayed neutron experimental data for thorium, uranium, plutonium and americium isotopes have been investigated with the purpose to find a correlation of DN parameters with characteristics of fissioning system as well as a correlation between the delayed neutron parameters themselves. It was presented the preliminary results which were obtained during study the physics interpretation of the results [ru

  20. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  1. Mediating Political Action: Internet related Beliefs and Frustrations amongst International Solidarity Campaigns in Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Barassi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available El terreny de l'activisme en els mitjans de comunicació avui s'associa a internet; s'ha construït sobretot per mitjà de xarxes o plataformes en línia i, a poc a poc, va transformant la manera d'imaginar, experimentar i organitzar l'acció política. Aquest article explora els efectes que tenen les creences i frustracions relacionades amb internet sobre les formes contemporànies d'acció política. Partint del context etnogràfic en què se situen les campanyes de solidaritat internacional i els sindicats britànics, el treball proposa que la relació que mantenen els activistes amb les tecnologies d'internet és complexa i s'insereix en una doble tensió entre l'apoderament i la frustració. Tal com sosté l'article, és mitjançant una exploració etnogràfica d'aquesta tensió que els especialistes poden arribar a entendre més bé els conflictes permanents i les negociacions socials creats arran de les transformacions tecnològico-històriques dels últims quinze anys. The terrain of media activism today has become an internet connected one; one that is primarily constructed through online networks or platforms; one that is gradually transforming the way in which political action is imagined, experienced and organised. The following article explores the effects of internet related beliefs and frustrations on contemporary forms of political action. Drawing from the ethnographic context of international solidarity campaigns and the trade unions in Britain, the paper argues that activists' relationship to internet technologies is a complex one, which is embedded in a double tension of empowerment and frustration. It is by ethnographically exploring this tension, the paper contends, that scholars can gain important insights on the ongoing social conflicts and negotiations created by the techno-historical transformations of the last fifteen years.  El terreno del activismo en los medios de comunicación hoy se asocia a internet; se ha

  2. Regret Expression and Social Learning Increases Delay to Sexual Gratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Quisenberry

    Full Text Available Modification and prevention of risky sexual behavior is important to individuals' health and public health policy. This study employed a novel sexual discounting task to elucidate the effects of social learning and regret expression on delay to sexual gratification in a behavioral task.Amazon Mechanical Turk Workers were assigned to hear one of three scenarios about a friend who engages in similar sexual behavior. The scenarios included a positive health consequence, a negative health consequence or a negative health consequence with the expression of regret. After reading one scenario, participants were asked to select from 60 images, those with whom they would have casual sex. Of the selected images, participants chose one image each for the person they most and least want to have sex with and person most and least likely to have a sexually transmitted infection. They then answered questions about engaging in unprotected sex now or waiting some delay for condom-protected sex in each partner condition.Results indicate that the negative health outcome scenario with regret expression resulted in delayed sexual gratification in the most attractive and least STI partner conditions, whereas in the least attractive and most STI partner conditions the negative health outcome with and without regret resulted in delayed sexual gratification.Results suggest that the sexual discounting task is a relevant laboratory measure and the framing of information to include regret expression may be relevant for prevention of risky sexual behavior.

  3. Poverty and violence, frustration and inventiveness: hospital ward life in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Shahaduz

    2004-11-01

    An ethnographic exploration was done in an orthopaedic ward of a government teaching hospital in Bangladesh to understand the nature of hospital culture in the context of Bangladeshi society at large. Life and work in the ward result in a culture that is simultaneously created by its inhabitants and the conditions in which they are situated. The study shows that biomedicine is a product of particular social conditions and that the hospital reflects features of its society. Behind the injuries and broken limbs in the ward are stories of violence, crime, and intolerance occurring in a society where masses of people fight over limited resources. In the ward people interact in an extremely hierarchical manner. The patients, who are mainly from poor economic backgrounds, remain at the bottom of the hierarchy. Doctors and other staff members are often professionally frustrated. Strikes related to hospital staff's various professional demands hamper the regular flow of work in the ward. Family members are engaged in nursing and provide various kinds of support to their hospitalized relatives. Patients give small bribes to ward boys and cleaners to obtain their day-to-day necessities. Patients joke with each other and mock senior doctors. Thus, they neutralize their powerlessness and drive away the monotony of their stay. Doctors develop 'indigenous' solutions to orthopaedic problems. Instead of using high-tech devices, they employ instruments made of bamboo, bricks, and razor blades. This study shows how medical practice takes shape in an understaffed, under-resourced and poorly financed hospital operating in a low-income country.

  4. Universal properties of strongly frustrated quantum magnets in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.

    2007-01-01

    For a class of frustrated antiferromagnetic spin systems including e.g. the 1D saw tooth chain, the 2D kagom'e and checkerboard, the 3D pyrochlore lattices exact eigenstates consisting of several independent localized magnons in a ferromagnetic environment can be constructed. Important structural elements of the relevant systems are triangles being attached to polygons or lines. Then the magnons can be trapped on these polygons/lines. If the concentration of localized magnons is small they can be distributed randomly over the lattice. Increasing the number of localized magnons their distribution over the lattice becomes more regular and finally the magnons condensate in a crystal-like state. The physical relevance of these eigenstates emerges in high magnetic fields where they become ground states of the system. The spin systems having localized-magnon eigenstates exhibit universal features at low-temperatures in the vicinity of the saturation field: (i) The ground-state magnetization exhibits a macroscopic jump to saturation. This jump is accompanied by a preceding plateau (ii) The ground state at the saturation field is highly degenerate. The degeneracy grows exponentially with the system size and leads to a low-temperature maximum in the isothermal entropy versus field curve at the saturation field and to an enhanced magnetocaloric effect, which allows efficient magnetic cooling from quite large temperatures down to very low ones. (iii) By mapping the localized magnon spin degrees of freedom on a hard-core lattice gas one can find explicit analytical universal expressions for the low-temperature thermodynamics near saturation field. (iv) The magnetic system may exhibit a field-tuned structural instability in the vicinity of the saturation field. (author)

  5. Task demand, task management, and teamwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braarud, Per Oeivind; Brendryen, Haavar

    2001-03-15

    The current approach to mental workload assessment in process control was evaluated in 3 previous HAMMLAB studies, by analysing the relationship between workload related measures and performance. The results showed that subjective task complexity rating was related to team's control room performance, that mental effort (NASA-TLX) was weakly related to performance, and that overall activity level was unrelated to performance. The results support the argument that general cognitive measures, i.e., mental workload, are weakly related to performance in the process control domain. This implies that other workload concepts than general mental workload are needed for valid assessment of human reliability and for valid assessment of control room configurations. An assessment of task load in process control suggested that how effort is used to handle task demand is more important then the level of effort invested to solve the task. The report suggests two main workload related concepts with a potential as performance predictors in process control: task requirements, and the work style describing how effort is invested to solve the task. The task requirements are seen as composed of individual task demand and team demand. In a similar way work style are seen as composed of individual task management and teamwork style. A framework for the development of the concepts is suggested based on a literature review and experiences from HAMMLAB research. It is suggested that operational definitions of workload concepts should be based on observable control room behaviour, to assure a potential for developing performance-shaping factors. Finally an explorative analysis of teamwork measures and performance in one study indicated that teamwork concepts are related to performance. This lends support to the suggested development of team demand and teamwork style as elements of a framework for the analysis of workload in process control. (Author)

  6. Relapse (number of detoxifications) in abstinent male alcohol-dependent patients as related to personality traits and types of tolerance to frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Melanie Y; Müller, Matthias J; Gallhofer, Bernd; Netter, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Personality traits like depression on the one hand and aggression and impulsivity on the other are assumed to be predisposing factors for different types of alcohol dependence. Both types are associated with sensitivity to frustration, but this may be different for the two types of personality according to whether they are confronted with frustrations caused by withdrawal from positive or infliction of negative events. It has not been shown so far if both types of personality factors and the two different sources of frustration are differently relevant for the propensity of relapse. This was investigated here in a study on 60 abstinent male alcohol-dependent patients. Correlations between the number of previous detoxifications reflecting liability to relapse and questionnaire scores on personality factors and on reactions to frustration were computed. Bonferroni-corrected correlations yielded significant relationships between the number of detoxifications and the personality factor of aggression as well as pronounced depressive reactions to frustrating conditions of non-reward caused by humans. Controlling for impulsivity, aggression and depression revealed that depressive reactions to frustration are genuine predictors for probability of relapse independent of underlying personality factors. Persons particularly sensitive to frustrations from human denial of positive reinforcers are liable to relapse which fits the theory of sensitivity to reward in drug-addicted individuals. Results demonstrate that relapse is clearly more related to aggression than to impulsivity, depression and anxiety and may be facilitated if persons are sensitive to frustrating conditions of non-reward caused by social partners. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Parallel processing using an optical delay-based reservoir computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Delay systems subject to delayed optical feedback have recently shown great potential in solving computationally hard tasks. By implementing a neuro-inspired computational scheme relying on the transient response to optical data injection, high processing speeds have been demonstrated. However, reservoir computing systems based on delay dynamics discussed in the literature are designed by coupling many different stand-alone components which lead to bulky, lack of long-term stability, non-monolithic systems. Here we numerically investigate the possibility of implementing reservoir computing schemes based on semiconductor ring lasers. Semiconductor ring lasers are semiconductor lasers where the laser cavity consists of a ring-shaped waveguide. SRLs are highly integrable and scalable, making them ideal candidates for key components in photonic integrated circuits. SRLs can generate light in two counterpropagating directions between which bistability has been demonstrated. We demonstrate that two independent machine learning tasks , even with different nature of inputs with different input data signals can be simultaneously computed using a single photonic nonlinear node relying on the parallelism offered by photonics. We illustrate the performance on simultaneous chaotic time series prediction and a classification of the Nonlinear Channel Equalization. We take advantage of different directional modes to process individual tasks. Each directional mode processes one individual task to mitigate possible crosstalk between the tasks. Our results indicate that prediction/classification with errors comparable to the state-of-the-art performance can be obtained even with noise despite the two tasks being computed simultaneously. We also find that a good performance is obtained for both tasks for a broad range of the parameters. The results are discussed in detail in [Nguimdo et al., IEEE Trans. Neural Netw. Learn. Syst. 26, pp. 3301-3307, 2015

  8. Associations of employment frustration with self-rated physical and mental health among Asian American immigrants in the U.S. Labor force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A B; Rue, Tessa; Takeuchi, David T

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the associations between employment frustration and both self-rated physical health (SRPH) and self-rated mental health (SRMH) among Asian American immigrants. A cross-sectional quantitative analysis was conducted utilizing data from 1,181 Asian immigrants participating in the National Latino and Asian American Study. Employment frustration was measured by self-report of having difficulty finding the work one wants because of being of Asian descent. SRPH and SRMH were each assessed using a global one-item measure, with responses ranging from poor to excellent. Control variables included gender, age, ethnicity, education, occupation, income, whether immigrated for employment, years in the United States, English proficiency, and a general measure for everyday discrimination. Ordered logistic regression showed that employment frustration was negatively associated with SRPH. This relationship, however, was no longer significant in multivariate models including English proficiency. The negative association between employment frustration and SRMH persisted even when including all control variables. The findings suggest that Asian immigrants in the United States who experience employment frustration report lower levels of both physical and mental health. However, English proficiency may attenuate the relationship of employment frustration with physical health. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  10. #FakeNobelDelayReasons

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday’s hour-long delay of the Nobel Prize in Physics announcement was (and still is) quite the cause for speculation. But on the Twittersphere, it was simply the catalyst for some fantastic puns, so-bad-they're-good physics jokes and other shenanigans. Here are some of our favourite #FakeNobelDelayReasons.    

  11. Picosecond resolution programmable delay line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchenek, Mariusz

    2009-01-01

    The note presents implementation of a programmable delay line for digital signals. The tested circuit has a subnanosecond delay range programmable with a resolution of picoseconds. Implementation of the circuit was based on low-cost components, easily available on the market. (technical design note)

  12. Project Tasks in Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben; Hansen, Poul Erik

    1998-01-01

    Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics......Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics...

  13. Project delay analysis of HRSG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvianita; Novega, A. S.; Rosyid, D. M.; Suntoyo

    2017-08-01

    Completion of HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) fabrication project sometimes is not sufficient with the targeted time written on the contract. The delay on fabrication process can cause some disadvantages for fabricator, including forfeit payment, delay on HRSG construction process up until HRSG trials delay. In this paper, the author is using semi quantitative on HRSG pressure part fabrication delay with configuration plant 1 GT (Gas Turbine) + 1 HRSG + 1 STG (Steam Turbine Generator) using bow-tie analysis method. Bow-tie analysis method is a combination from FTA (Fault tree analysis) and ETA (Event tree analysis) to develop the risk matrix of HRSG. The result from FTA analysis is use as a threat for preventive measure. The result from ETA analysis is use as impact from fabrication delay.

  14. Task assignment and coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching from a manager, the junior employee only has information about his past performance. Based on his past performance, a talented junior who has performed a difficult task sometimes decides to leave the...

  15. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; hide

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  16. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  17. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshiko; Miyamoto, Kazuto; Beppu, Hirokuni; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author)

  18. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching

  19. Delay and probability discounting of sexual and monetary outcomes in individuals with cocaine use disorders and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; Johnson, Patrick S; Herrmann, Evan S; Sweeney, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorders are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS, partly due to higher rates of unprotected sex. Recent research suggests delay discounting of condom use is a factor in sexual HIV risk. Delay discounting is a behavioral economic concept describing how delaying an event reduces that event's value or impact on behavior. Probability discounting is a related concept describing how the uncertainty of an event decreases its impact on behavior. Individuals with cocaine use disorders (n = 23) and matched non-cocaine-using controls (n = 24) were compared in decision-making tasks involving hypothetical outcomes: delay discounting of condom-protected sex (Sexual Delay Discounting Task), delay discounting of money, the effect of sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk on likelihood of condom use (Sexual Probability Discounting Task), and probability discounting of money. The Cocaine group discounted delayed condom-protected sex (i.e., were more likely to have unprotected sex vs. wait for a condom) significantly more than controls in two of four Sexual Delay Discounting Task partner conditions. The Cocaine group also discounted delayed money (i.e., preferred smaller immediate amounts over larger delayed amounts) significantly more than controls. In the Sexual Probability Discounting Task, both groups showed sensitivity to STI risk, however the groups did not differ. The Cocaine group did not consistently discount probabilistic money more or less than controls. Steeper discounting of delayed, but not probabilistic, sexual outcomes may contribute to greater rates of sexual HIV risk among individuals with cocaine use disorders. Probability discounting of sexual outcomes may contribute to risk of unprotected sex in both groups. Correlations showed sexual and monetary results were unrelated, for both delay and probability discounting. The results highlight the importance of studying specific behavioral processes (e.g., delay and probability

  20. Delay and probability discounting of sexual and monetary outcomes in individuals with cocaine use disorders and matched controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Johnson

    Full Text Available Individuals with cocaine use disorders are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS, partly due to higher rates of unprotected sex. Recent research suggests delay discounting of condom use is a factor in sexual HIV risk. Delay discounting is a behavioral economic concept describing how delaying an event reduces that event's value or impact on behavior. Probability discounting is a related concept describing how the uncertainty of an event decreases its impact on behavior. Individuals with cocaine use disorders (n = 23 and matched non-cocaine-using controls (n = 24 were compared in decision-making tasks involving hypothetical outcomes: delay discounting of condom-protected sex (Sexual Delay Discounting Task, delay discounting of money, the effect of sexually transmitted infection (STI risk on likelihood of condom use (Sexual Probability Discounting Task, and probability discounting of money. The Cocaine group discounted delayed condom-protected sex (i.e., were more likely to have unprotected sex vs. wait for a condom significantly more than controls in two of four Sexual Delay Discounting Task partner conditions. The Cocaine group also discounted delayed money (i.e., preferred smaller immediate amounts over larger delayed amounts significantly more than controls. In the Sexual Probability Discounting Task, both groups showed sensitivity to STI risk, however the groups did not differ. The Cocaine group did not consistently discount probabilistic money more or less than controls. Steeper discounting of delayed, but not probabilistic, sexual outcomes may contribute to greater rates of sexual HIV risk among individuals with cocaine use disorders. Probability discounting of sexual outcomes may contribute to risk of unprotected sex in both groups. Correlations showed sexual and monetary results were unrelated, for both delay and probability discounting. The results highlight the importance of studying specific behavioral processes (e.g., delay and

  1. Temporal-contextual processing in working memory: evidence from delayed cued recall and delayed free recall tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Vanessa M; McCabe, David P

    2012-02-01

    Three experiments are reported that addressed the nature of processing in working memory by investigating patterns of delayed cued recall and free recall of items initially studied during complex and simple span tasks. In Experiment 1, items initially studied during a complex span task (i.e., operation span) were more likely to be recalled after a delay in response to temporal-contextual cues, relative to items from subspan and supraspan list lengths in a simple span task (i.e., word span). In Experiment 2, items initially studied during operation span were more likely to be recalled from neighboring serial positions during delayed free recall than were items studied during word span trials. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the number of attentional refreshing opportunities strongly predicts episodic memory performance, regardless of whether the information is presented in a spaced or massed format in a modified operation span task. The results indicate that the content-context bindings created during complex span trials reflect attentional refreshing opportunities that are used to maintain items in working memory.

  2. Predicting workload profiles of brain-robot interface and electromygraphic neurofeedback with cortical resting-state networks: personal trait or task-specific challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Meike; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Novel rehabilitation strategies apply robot-assisted exercises and neurofeedback tasks to facilitate intensive motor training. We aimed to disentangle task-specific and subject-related contributions to the perceived workload of these interventions and the related cortical activation patterns. Approach. We assessed the perceived workload with the NASA Task Load Index in twenty-one subjects who were exposed to two different feedback tasks in a cross-over design: (i) brain-robot interface (BRI) with haptic/proprioceptive feedback of sensorimotor oscillations related to motor imagery, and (ii) control of neuromuscular activity with feedback of the electromyography (EMG) of the same hand. We also used electroencephalography to examine the cortical activation patterns beforehand in resting state and during the training session of each task. Main results. The workload profile of BRI feedback differed from EMG feedback and was particularly characterized by the experience of frustration. The frustration level was highly correlated across tasks, suggesting subject-related relevance of this workload component. Those subjects who were specifically challenged by the respective tasks could be detected by an interhemispheric alpha-band network in resting state before the training and by their sensorimotor theta-band activation pattern during the exercise. Significance. Neurophysiological profiles in resting state and during the exercise may provide task-independent workload markers for monitoring and matching participants’ ability and task difficulty of neurofeedback interventions.

  3. Quantum phases, supersolids and quantum phase transitions of interacting bosons in frustrated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Jinwu; Chen, Yan

    2013-01-01

    By using the dual vortex method (DVM), we develop systematically a simple and effective scheme to use the vortex degree of freedoms on dual lattices to characterize the symmetry breaking patterns of the boson insulating states in the direct lattices. Then we apply our scheme to study quantum phases and phase transitions in an extended boson Hubbard model slightly away from 1/3 (2/3) filling on frustrated lattices such as triangular and Kagome lattice. In a triangular lattice at 1/3, we find a X-CDW, a stripe CDW phase which was found previously by a density operator formalism (DOF). Most importantly, we also find a new CDW-VB phase which has both local CDW and local VB orders, in sharp contrast to a bubble CDW phase found previously by the DOF. In the Kagome lattice at 1/3, we find a VBS phase and a 6-fold CDW phase. Most importantly, we also identify a CDW-VB phase which has both local CDW and local VB orders which was found in previous QMC simulations. We also study several other phases which are not found by the DVM. By analyzing carefully the saddle point structures of the dual gauge fields in the translational symmetry breaking sides and pushing the effective actions slightly away from the commensurate filling f=1/3(2/3), we classified all the possible types of supersolids and analyze their stability conditions. In a triangular lattice, there are X-CDW supersolid, stripe CDW supersolid, but absence of any valence bond supersolid (VB-SS). There are also a new kind of supersolid: CDW-VB supersolid. In a Kagome lattice, there are 6-fold CDW supersolid, stripe CDW supersolid, but absence of any valence bond supersolid (VB-SS). There are also a new kind of supersolid: CDW-VB supersolid. We show that independent of the types of the SS, the quantum phase transitions from solids to supersolids driven by a chemical potential are in the same universality class as that from a Mott insulator to a superfluid, therefore have exact exponents z=2, ν=1/2, η=0 (with

  4. Attosecond Delays in Molecular Photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Martin; Jordan, Inga; Baykusheva, Denitsa; von Conta, Aaron; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2016-08-26

    We report measurements of energy-dependent photoionization delays between the two outermost valence shells of N_{2}O and H_{2}O. The combination of single-shot signal referencing with the use of different metal foils to filter the attosecond pulse train enables us to extract delays from congested spectra. Remarkably large delays up to 160 as are observed in N_{2}O, whereas the delays in H_{2}O are all smaller than 50 as in the photon-energy range of 20-40 eV. These results are interpreted by developing a theory of molecular photoionization delays. The long delays measured in N_{2}O are shown to reflect the population of molecular shape resonances that trap the photoelectron for a duration of up to ∼110 as. The unstructured continua of H_{2}O result in much smaller delays at the same photon energies. Our experimental and theoretical methods make the study of molecular attosecond photoionization dynamics accessible.

  5. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T.

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed—for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants’ responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants’ performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse’s approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  6. Modified spin-wave theory with ordering vector optimization: frustrated bosons on the spatially anisotropic triangular lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauke, Philipp [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Meditarranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Roscilde, Tommaso [Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d' Italie, F-69007 Lyon (France); Murg, Valentin; Ignacio Cirac, J; Schmied, Roman, E-mail: Philipp.Hauke@icfo.e [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    We investigate a system of frustrated hardcore bosons, modeled by an XY antiferromagnet on the spatially anisotropic triangular lattice, using Takahashi's modified spin-wave (MSW) theory. In particular, we implement ordering vector optimization on the ordered reference state of MSW theory, which leads to significant improvement of the theory and accounts for quantum corrections to the classically ordered state. The MSW results at zero temperature compare favorably to exact diagonalization (ED) and projected entangled-pair state (PEPS) calculations. The resulting zero-temperature phase diagram includes a one-dimensional (1D) quasi-ordered phase, a 2D Neel ordered phase and a 2D spiraling ordered phase. Strong indications coming from the ED and PEPS calculations, as well as from the breakdown of MSW theory, suggest that the various ordered or quasi-ordered phases are separated by spin-liquid phases with short-range correlations, in analogy to what has been predicted for the Heisenberg model on the same lattice. Within MSW theory, we also explore the finite-temperature phase diagram. In agreement with the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory, we find that zero-temperature long-range-ordered phases turn into quasi-ordered phases (up to a BKT transition temperature), while zero-temperature quasi-ordered phases become short-range correlated at finite temperature. These results show that, despite its simplicity, MSW theory is very well suited to describing ordered and quasi-ordered phases of frustrated XY spins (or, equivalently, of frustrated lattice bosons) both at zero and finite temperatures. While MSW theory, just as other theoretical methods, cannot describe spin-liquid phases, its breakdown provides a fast and reliable method for singling out Hamiltonians that may feature these intriguing quantum phases. We thus suggest a tool for guiding our search for interesting systems whose properties are necessarily studied with a physical quantum simulator

  7. Antiferromagnetic geometric frustration under the influence of the next-nearest-neighbor interaction. An exactly solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2018-02-01

    The influence of the next-nearest-neighbor interaction on the properties of the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic systems is investigated in the framework of the exactly solvable antiferromagnetic spin- 1 / 2 Ising model in the external magnetic field on the square-kagome recursive lattice, where the next-nearest-neighbor interaction is supposed between sites within each elementary square of the lattice. The thermodynamic properties of the model are investigated in detail and it is shown that the competition between the nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interaction and the next-nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic interaction changes properties of the single-point ground states but does not change the frustrated character of the basic model. On the other hand, the presence of the antiferromagnetic next-nearest-neighbor interaction leads to the enhancement of the frustration effects with the formation of additional plateau and single-point ground states at low temperatures. Exact expressions for magnetizations and residual entropies of all ground states of the model are found. It is shown that the model exhibits various ground states with the same value of magnetization but different macroscopic degeneracies as well as the ground states with different values of magnetization but the same value of the residual entropy. The specific heat capacity is investigated and it is shown that the model exhibits the Schottky-type anomaly behavior in the vicinity of each single-point ground state value of the magnetic field. The formation of the field-induced double-peak structure of the specific heat capacity at low temperatures is demonstrated and it is shown that its very existence is directly related to the presence of highly macroscopically degenerated single-point ground states in the model.

  8. Incommensurate antiferromagnetic order in the manifoldly-frustrated SrTb2O4 with transition temperature up to 4.28 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng eLi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Neel temperature of the new frustrated family of SrRE2O4 (RE = rare earth compounds is yet limited to 0.9 K, which more or less hampers a complete understanding of the magnetic frustrations and spin interactions. Here we report on a new frustrated member to the family, SrTb2O4 with a record TN = 4.28(2 K, and an experimental study of the magnetic interacting and frustrating mechanisms by polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering. The compound of SrTb2O4 displays an incommensurate antiferromagnetic (AFM order with a transverse wave vector Q = (0.5924(1, 0.0059(1, 0 albeit with partially-ordered moments, 1.92(6 uB at 0.5 K, stemming from only one of the two inequivalent Tb sites by virtue of their different octahedral distortions. The localized moments are confined to the bc plane, 11.9(66 degree away from the b axis by single-ion anisotropy. We reveal that this AFM order is dominated mainly by dipole-dipole interactions and disclose that the octahedral distortion, nearest-neighbour (NN ferromagnetic (FM arrangement, different next NN FM and AFM configurations, and in-plane anisotropic spin correlations are vital to the magnetic structure and associated multiple frustrations. The discovery of the thus far highest AFM transition temperature renders SrTb2O4 a new friendly frustrated platform in the family for exploring the nature of magnetic interactions and frustrations.

  9. Photonic single nonlinear-delay dynamical node for information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortín, Silvia; San-Martín, Daniel; Pesquera, Luis; Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2012-06-01

    An electro-optical system with a delay loop based on semiconductor lasers is investigated for information processing by performing numerical simulations. This system can replace a complex network of many nonlinear elements for the implementation of Reservoir Computing. We show that a single nonlinear-delay dynamical system has the basic properties to perform as reservoir: short-term memory and separation property. The computing performance of this system is evaluated for two prediction tasks: Lorenz chaotic time series and nonlinear auto-regressive moving average (NARMA) model. We sweep the parameters of the system to find the best performance. The results achieved for the Lorenz and the NARMA-10 tasks are comparable to those obtained by other machine learning methods.

  10. Duration reproduction with sensory feedback delay: Differential involvement of perception and action time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eGanzenmüller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that voluntary action can attract subsequent, delayed feedback events towards the action, and adaptation to the sensorimotor delay can even reverse motor-sensory temporal-order judgments. However, whether and how sensorimotor delay affects duration reproduction is still unclear. To investigate this, we injected an onset- or offset-delay to the sensory feedback signal from a duration reproduction task. We compared duration reproductions within (visual, auditory modality and across audiovisual modalities with feedback signal onset- and offset-delay manipulations. We found that the reproduced duration was lengthened in both visual and auditory feedback signal onset-delay conditions. The lengthening effect was evident immediately, on the first trial with the onset delay. However, when the onset of the feedback signal was prior to the action, the lengthening effect was diminished. In contrast, a shortening effect was found with feedback signal offset-delay, though the effect was weaker and manifested only in the auditory offset-delay condition. These findings indicate that participants tend to mix the onset of action and the feedback signal more when the feedback is delayed, and they heavily rely on motor-stop signals for the duration reproduction. Furthermore, auditory duration was overestimated compared to visual duration in crossmodal feedback conditions, and the overestimation of auditory duration (or the underestimation of visual duration was independent of the delay manipulation.

  11. An alternative approach to calculating Area-Under-the-Curve (AUC) in delay discounting research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Allison M; Kuang, Jinyi; Milhorn, Hannah; Yi, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Applied to delay discounting data, Area-Under-the-Curve (AUC) provides an atheoretical index of the rate of delay discounting. The conventional method of calculating AUC, by summing the areas of the trapezoids formed by successive delay-indifference point pairings, does not account for the fact that most delay discounting tasks scale delay pseudoexponentially, that is, time intervals between delays typically get larger as delays get longer. This results in a disproportionate contribution of indifference points at long delays to the total AUC, with minimal contribution from indifference points at short delays. We propose two modifications that correct for this imbalance via a base-10 logarithmic transformation and an ordinal scaling transformation of delays. These newly proposed indices of discounting, AUClog d and AUCor d, address the limitation of AUC while preserving a primary strength (remaining atheoretical). Re-examination of previously published data provides empirical support for both AUClog d and AUCor d . Thus, we believe theoretical and empirical arguments favor these methods as the preferred atheoretical indices of delay discounting. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  12. Elastically frustrated rehybridization: Origin of chemical order and compositional limits in InGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperakis, L.; Schulz, T.; Freysoldt, C.; Anikeeva, M.; Chen, Z.; Zheng, X.; Shen, B.; Chèze, C.; Siekacz, M.; Wang, X. Q.; Albrecht, M.; Neugebauer, J.

    2018-01-01

    Nominal InN monolayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN(0001) are investigated combining in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and density functional theory (DFT). TEM reveals a chemical intraplane ordering never observed before. Employing DFT, we identify a novel surface stabilization mechanism elastically frustrated rehybridization, which is responsible for the observed chemical ordering. The mechanism also sets an incorporation barrier for indium concentrations above 25% and thus fundamentally limits the indium content in coherently strained layers.

  13. Frustration of Tilts and A-Site Driven Ferroelectricity in KNbO3-LiNbO3 Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilc, D. I.; Singh, D. J.

    2006-04-01

    Density functional calculations for K0.5Li0.5NbO3 show strong A-site driven ferroelectricity, even though the average tolerance factor is significantly smaller than unity and there is no stereochemically active A-site ion. This is due to the frustration of tilt instabilities by A-site disorder. There are very large off centerings of the Li ions, which contribute strongly to the anisotropy between the tetragonal and rhombohedral ferroelectric states, yielding a tetragonal ground state even without strain coupling.

  14. Antisite disorder-induced low-field magnetoresistance in some frustrated Sr2FeMoO6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Tianyi; Ju Sheng; Li Zhenya

    2006-01-01

    Considering the existence of antiferromagnetic patches induced by the antisite disorder in ferrimagnetic Sr 2 FeMoO 6 , we have developed a resistor network model to account for the effects of the antisite disorder on the magnetoresistance in this material. It is proposed that the magnetic disorder resulting from the existence of frustration around the antiferromagnetic patches will be suppressed under the applied magnetic field and low-field magnetoresistance will be observed. For samples with low levels of antisite defects, the magnetoresistive behaviour may be strongly affected by the different degrees of magnetic inhomogeneity. Our calculated results are in agreement with experimental observations

  15. An experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermendzhiev, E.; Nazarov, V.M.; Pavlov, S.S.; Ruskov, Iv.; Zamyatin, Yu.S.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental facility for studying delayed neutron emission has been designed and tested. A method based on utilization of the Dubna IBR-2 pulsed reactor, has been proposed and realized for periodical irradiation of targets composed of fissionable isotopes. Such a powerful pulsed neutron source in combination with a slow neutron chopper synchronized with the reactor bursts makes possible variation of the exposure duration and effective suppression of the fast neutron background due to delay neutrons emitted from the reactor core. Detection of delayed neutrons from the target is carried out by a high-efficiency multicounter neutron detector with a near-4π geometry. Some test measurements and results are briefly described. Possible use of the facility for other tasks is also discussed. 14 refs.; 14 figs

  16. Delay Tolerance in Underwater Wireless Communications: A Routing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safdar Hussain Bouk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar to terrestrial networks, underwater wireless networks (UWNs also aid several critical tasks including coastal surveillance, underwater pollution detection, and other maritime applications. Currently, once underwater sensor nodes are deployed at different levels of the sea, it is nearly impossible or very expensive to reconfigure the hardware, for example, battery. Taking this issue into account, considerable amount of research has been carried out to ensure minimum energy costs and reliable communication between underwater nodes and base stations. As a result, several different network protocols were proposed for UWN, including MAC, PHY, transport, and routing. Recently, a new paradigm was introduced claiming that the intermittent nature of acoustic channel and signal resulted in designing delay tolerant routing schemes for the UWN, known as an underwater delay tolerant network. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of underwater routing protocols with emphasis on the limitations, challenges, and future open issues in the context of delay tolerant network routing.

  17. An adaptive, individualized fMRI delay discounting procedure to increase flexibility and optimize scanner time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Deshpande, Harshawardhan U; Lisinski, Jonathan M; Eklund, Anders; Bickel, Warren K; LaConte, Stephen M

    2017-11-01

    Research on the rate at which people discount the value of future rewards has become increasingly prevalent as discount rate has been shown to be associated with many unhealthy patterns of behavior such as drug abuse, gambling, and overeating. fMRI research points to a fronto-parietal-limbic pathway that is active during decisions between smaller amounts of money now and larger amounts available after a delay. Researchers in this area have used different variants of delay discounting tasks and reported various contrasts between choice trials of different types from these tasks. For instance, researchers have compared 1) choices of delayed monetary amounts to choices of the immediate monetary amounts, 2) 'hard' choices made near one's point of indifference to 'easy' choices that require little thought, and 3) trials where an immediate choice is available versus trials where one is unavailable, regardless of actual eventual choice. These differences in procedure and analysis make comparison of results across studies difficult. In the present experiment, we designed a delay discounting task with the intended capability of being able to construct contrasts of all three comparisons listed above while optimizing scanning time to reduce costs and avoid participant fatigue. This was accomplished with an algorithm that customized the choice trials presented to each participant with the goal of equalizing choice trials of each type. We compared this task, which we refer to here as the individualized discounting task (IDT), to two other delay discounting tasks previously reported in the literature (McClure et al., 2004; Amlung et al., 2014) in 18 participants. Results show that the IDT can examine each of the three contrasts mentioned above, while yielding a similar degree of activation as the reference tasks. This suggests that this new task could be used in delay discounting fMRI studies to allow researchers to more easily compare their results to a majority of previous

  18. Delays and networked control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hetel, Laurentiu; Daafouz, Jamal; Johansson, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This edited monograph includes state-of-the-art contributions on continuous time dynamical networks with delays. The book is divided into four parts. The first part presents tools and methods for the analysis of time-delay systems with a particular attention on control problems of large scale or infinite-dimensional systems with delays. The second part of the book is dedicated to the use of time-delay models for the analysis and design of Networked Control Systems. The third part of the book focuses on the analysis and design of systems with asynchronous sampling intervals which occur in Networked Control Systems. The last part of the book exposes several contributions dealing with the design of cooperative control and observation laws for networked control systems. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of control theory, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students. .

  19. Linear rotary optical delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerboukha, Hichem; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-03-01

    We present a semi-analytical solution for the design of a high-speed rotary optical delay line that use a combination of two rotating curvilinear reflectors. We demonstrate that it is possible to design an infinite variety of the optical delay lines featuring linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle. This is achieved via shape optimization of the rotating reflector surfaces. Moreover, a convenient spatial separation of the incoming and outgoing beams is possible. For the sake of example, we present blades that fit into a circle of 10cm diameter. Finally, a prototype of a rotary delay line is fabricated using CNC machining, and its optical properties are characterized.

  20. Systematics in delayed neutron yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1998-03-01

    An attempt was made to reproduce the systematic trend observed in the delayed neutron yields for actinides on the basis of the five-Gaussian representation of the fission yield together with available data sets for delayed neutron emission probability. It was found that systematic decrease in DNY for heavier actinides is mainly due to decrease of fission yields of precursors in the lighter side of the light fragment region. (author)

  1. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes

  2. Humans Optimize Decision-Making by Delaying Decision Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Grinband, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Why do humans make errors on seemingly trivial perceptual decisions? It has been shown that such errors occur in part because the decision process (evidence accumulation) is initiated before selective attention has isolated the relevant sensory information from salient distractors. Nevertheless, it is typically assumed that subjects increase accuracy by prolonging the decision process rather than delaying decision onset. To date it has not been tested whether humans can strategically delay decision onset to increase response accuracy. To address this question we measured the time course of selective attention in a motion interference task using a novel variant of the response signal paradigm. Based on these measurements we estimated time-dependent drift rate and showed that subjects should in principle be able trade speed for accuracy very effectively by delaying decision onset. Using the time-dependent estimate of drift rate we show that subjects indeed delay decision onset in addition to raising response threshold when asked to stress accuracy over speed in a free reaction version of the same motion-interference task. These findings show that decision onset is a critical aspect of the decision process that can be adjusted to effectively improve decision accuracy. PMID:24599295

  3. Transport Task Force Leadership, Task 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    The Transport Task Force (TTF) was initiated as a broad-based US magnetic fusion community activity during the fall of 1988 to focus attention on and encourage development of an increased understanding of anomalous transport in tokamaks. The overall TTF goal is to make progress on Characterizing, Understanding and Identifying how to Reduce plasma transport in tokamaks -- to CUIR transport

  4. "Photographing money" task pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhongxiang

    2018-05-01

    "Photographing money" [1]is a self-service model under the mobile Internet. The task pricing is reasonable, related to the success of the commodity inspection. First of all, we analyzed the position of the mission and the membership, and introduced the factor of membership density, considering the influence of the number of members around the mission on the pricing. Multivariate regression of task location and membership density using MATLAB to establish the mathematical model of task pricing. At the same time, we can see from the life experience that membership reputation and the intensity of the task will also affect the pricing, and the data of the task success point is more reliable. Therefore, the successful point of the task is selected, and its reputation, task density, membership density and Multiple regression of task positions, according to which a nhew task pricing program. Finally, an objective evaluation is given of the advantages and disadvantages of the established model and solution method, and the improved method is pointed out.

  5. Board Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minichilli, Alessandro; Zattoni, Alessandro; Nielsen, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    identify three board processes as micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Specifically, we focus on effort norms, cognitive conflicts and the use of knowledge and skills as determinants of board control and advisory task performance. Further, we consider how two different institutional settings....... The findings show that: (i) Board processes have a larger potential than demographic variables to explain board task performance; (ii) board task performance differs significantly between boards operating in different contexts; and (iii) national context moderates the relationships between board processes...... and board task performance....

  6. Transverse phase-locking in fully frustrated Josephson junction arrays: A new type of fractional giant steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconi, Veronica I.; Kolton, Alejandro B.; Dominguez, Daniel; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    2003-05-01

    We study, analytically and numerically, phase locking of driven vortex lattices in fully-frustrated Josephson junction arrays at zero temperature. We consider the case when an ac current is applied perpendicular to a dc current. We observe phase locking, steps in the current-voltage characteristics, with a dependence on external ac-drive amplitude and frequency qualitatively different from the Shapiro steps, observed when the ac and dc currents are applied in parallel. Further, the critical current increases with increasing transverse ac-drive amplitude, while it decreases for longitudinal ac-drive. The critical current and the phase-locked current step width, increase quadratically with (small) amplitudes of the ac-drive. For larger amplitudes of the transverse ac-signal, we find windows where the critical current is hysteretic, and windows where phase locking is suppressed due to dynamical instabilities. We characterize the dynamical states around the phase-locking interference condition in the IV curve with voltage noise, Lyapunov exponents and Poincare sections. We find that zero temperature phase-locking behavior in large fully frustrated arrays is well described by an effective four plaquette model. (author)

  7. Are the benefits of autonomy satisfaction and the costs of autonomy frustration dependent on individuals' autonomy strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, Jasper; van der Kaap-Deeder, Jolene; Audenaert, Elien; De Schryver, Maarten; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2018-01-29

    From a self-determination theory perspective, individuals are assumed to benefit and suffer from, respectively, the satisfaction and frustration of the psychological need for autonomy, even if they score low on autonomy strength. Yet, previous studies on need strength are scarce, operationalized need strength differently, and produced inconsistent findings. In two studies among 224 South African adults (M age  = 24.13, SD = 4.25; 54.0% male) and 156 Belgian prisoners (M age  = 38.60, SD = 11.68; 88.5% male), we investigated the moderating role of autonomy valuation and desire in the relations of autonomy satisfaction and frustration with a variety of well-being and ill-being indicators. Study 1 provided some evidence for the moderating role of mostly explicit autonomy desire (rather than explicit autonomy valuation). In Study 2, neither explicit nor implicit autonomy desire played a consistent moderating role. Overall, these findings are congruent with a moderate (albeit not with a strong) interpretation of the universality claim made within self-determination theory, provide initial evidence for a differentiation between deficit-based and growth-oriented interpersonal differences in need strength, and indicate that the potential moderating role of need strength deserves continued attention before any firm conclusions can be drawn. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The interplay among stress, frustration tolerance, mindfulness, and social support in Internet gaming disorder symptoms among Chinese working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu; Mao, Sijie; Wu, Anise M S

    2018-05-24

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is a growing mental health threat across age groups, but existing literature regarding IGD mainly focuses on student populations. Empirical investigation of the risk and protective factors in adult populations is warranted. This study aimed to fill the research gap by examining whether stress and 3 positive psychology factors (ie, frustration tolerance, mindfulness, and social support) are associated with IGD symptoms in working adults. It was also the first attempt to test the buffering effects of these positive psychology factors on the relationship between stress and IGD vulnerability. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Shenzhen, China. We recruited 327 full-time working Chinese adults (mean age = 31.93 years), who had online gaming experience and voluntarily completed an anonymous questionnaire with DSM-5 criteria to measure their IGD symptoms. Internet gaming disorder symptoms were positively correlated with stress and negatively correlated with the 3 positive psychology factors, among which mindfulness emerged as the most salient protective factor. Moreover, mindfulness, but not frustration tolerance and social support, was found to significantly alleviate the relationship between stress and IGD. Our findings provide supportive evidence for the protective and moderating roles of positive psychology variables against IGD among Chinese working adults. Workplace-based prevention programs may take the identified factors into account to help promote individuals' personal resources to mitigate development of IGD. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. George E. Valley, Jr. Prize Talk: Quantum Frustrated Magnetism and its Expression in the Ground State Selection of Pyrochlore Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kate

    In the search for novel quantum states of matter, such as highly entangled Quantum Spin Liquids, ``geometrically frustrated'' magnetic lattices are essential for suppressing conventional magnetic order. In three dimensions, the pyrochlore lattice is the canonical frustrated geometry. Magnetic materials with pyrochlore structures have the potential to realize unusual phases such as ``quantum spin ice'', which is predicted to host emergent magnetic monopoles, electrons, and photons as its fundamental excitations. Even in pyrochlores that form long range ordered phases, this often occurs through unusual routes such as ``order by disorder'', in which the fluctuation spectrum dictates the preferred ordered state. The rare earth-based pyrochlore series R2Ti2O7 provides a fascinating variety of magnetic ground states. I will introduce the general anisotropic interaction Hamiltonian that has been successfully used to describe several materials in this series. Using inelastic neutron scattering, the relevant anisotropic interaction strengths can be extracted quantitatively. I will discuss this approach, and its application to two rare earth pyrochlore materials, Er2Ti2O7 and Yb2Ti<2O7, whose ground state properties have long been enigmatic. From these studies, ErTi2O7 and Yb2Ti2O7 have been suggested to be realizations of "quantum order by disorder" and "quantum spin ice", respectively. This research was supported by NSERC of Canada and the National Science Foundation.

  10. Relieving geometrical frustration through doping in the Dy1−x Cax BaCo4O7 swedenborgites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath Panja, Soumendra; Kumar, Jitender; Dengre, Shanu; Nair, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    The geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet DyBaCo 4 O 7 is investigated through a combination of x-ray diffraction, magnetization and dielectric measurements. Systematic doping in the series Dy 1−x Ca x BaCo 4 O 7 causes a lifting of the geometrical frustration resulting in a structural transition from a trigonal P31c to an orthorhombic Pbn2 1 symmetry at x   =  0.4. This structural transition can also be accessed as a function of temperature, and all our orthorhombic specimens exhibit this transition at elevated temperatures. The temperature at which this structural transition occurs is observed to scale linearly with the mean ionic radius of the R site ion. However, CaBaCo 4 O 7 which has an equal number of Co 2+  and Co 3+ ions clearly violates this quasilinear relationship, indicating that charge ordering could also play a critical role in stabilizing the orthorhombic distortion in this system. Using thermoremanent magnetization measurements to circumvent the problem of the large paramagnetic background arising from Dy 3+ ions, we chart out the phase diagram of the Dy 1−x Ca x BaCo 4 O 7 series. (paper)

  11. Delay or probability discounting in a model of impulsive behavior: effect of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J B; Zhang, L; Mitchell, S H; de Wit, H

    1999-01-01

    Little is known about the acute effects of drugs of abuse on impulsivity and self-control. In this study, impulsivity was assessed in humans using a computer task that measured delay and probability discounting. Discounting describes how much the value of a reward (or punisher) is decreased when its occurrence is either delayed or uncertain. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers ingested a moderate dose of ethanol (0.5 or 0.8 g/kg ethanol: n = 12 at each dose) or placebo before completing the discounting task. In the task the participants were given a series of choices between a small, immediate, certain amount of money and $10 that was either delayed (0, 2, 30, 180, or 365 days) or probabilistic (i.e., certainty of receipt was 1.0, .9, .75, .5, or .25). The point at which each individual was indifferent between the smaller immediate or certain reward and the $10 delayed or probabilistic reward was identified using an adjusting-amount procedure. The results indicated that (a) delay and probability discounting were well described by a hyperbolic function; (b) delay and probability discounting were positively correlated within subjects; (c) delay and probability discounting were moderately correlated with personality measures of impulsivity; and (d) alcohol had no effect on discounting. PMID:10220927

  12. Delay discounting, self-control, and substance use among adult drug court participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Craig G A; Fearnley, Helen; Panagiotopoulos, Barbara; Kemp, Richard I

    2015-08-01

    The current study examined the relationship between two measures of impulsiveness and the odds of substance use among a sample of participants on an Australian drug court (n=80). Participants completed a computer-based delay discounting task, a paper-based delay discounting task, and a questionnaire-based measure of self-control. The delay discounting tasks measured individual differences in the value attributed to distal outcomes, which is one aspect of impulsive behavior that has been found to be over-represented among illicit drug users. The relationship between the measures of impulsiveness and the odds of substance use was assessed by fitting longitudinal panel regression models with adjustment for informative treatment dropout. Consistent with previous research, drug court participants were found to have higher discount rates (i.e. were more impulsive) than a noncriminal population of university students (n=101). Drug court participants also discounted delayed gains more than delayed losses. Delay discounting was not significantly associated with the odds of substance use on the drug court program. There was a positive relationship between the survey-based measure of impulsivity and the mean substance use frequency. The authors conclude that impulsivity is correlated with substance use among drug court participants but not when measuring impulsivity using a delay discounting paradigm.

  13. Estimating Total Program Cost of a Long-Term, High-Technology, High-Risk Project with Task Durations and Costs That May Increase Over Time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Gerald G; Grose, Roger T; Koyak, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    .... Each task suffers some risk of delay and changed cost. Ignoring budget constraints, we use Monte Carlo simulation of the duration of each task in the project to infer the probability distribution of the project completion time...

  14. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    , is fragmented at best. The workshop addressed the many open research questions: What are the obvious use cases and applications of complex search? What are essential features of work tasks and search tasks to take into account? And how do these evolve over time? With a multitude of information, varying from...

  15. Task leaders reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loriaux, E.F.; Jehee, J.N.T.

    1995-01-01

    Report on CRP-OSS Task 4.1.1. ''Survey of existing documentation relevant to this programme's goals'' and report on CRP-OSS Task 4.1.2. ''Survey of existing Operator Support Systems and the experience with them'' are presented. 2 tabs

  16. The ecological rationality of delay tolerance: insights from capuchin monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Focaroli, Valentina

    2011-04-01

    Both human and non-human animals often face decisions between options available at different times, and the capacity of delaying gratification has usually been considered one of the features distinguishing humans from other animals. However, this characteristic can widely vary across individuals, species, and types of task and it is still unclear whether it is accounted for by phylogenetic relatedness, feeding ecology, social structure, or metabolic rate. To disentangle these hypotheses, we evaluated temporal preferences in capuchin monkeys, South-American primates that, despite splitting off from human lineage approximately 35 million years ago, show striking behavioural analogies with the great apes. Then, we compared capuchins' performance with that of the other primate species tested so far with the same procedure. Overall, capuchins showed a delay tolerance significantly higher than closely related species, such as marmosets and tamarins, and comparable to that shown by great apes. Capuchins' tool use abilities might explain their comparatively high preference for delayed options in inter-temporal choices. Moreover, as in humans, capuchin females showed a greater delay tolerance than males, possibly because of their less opportunistic foraging style. Thus, our results shed light on the evolutionary origins of self-control supporting explanations of delay tolerance in terms of feeding ecology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Delay effects in the human sensory system during balancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Gabor

    2009-03-28

    Mechanical models of human self-balancing often use the Newtonian equations of inverted pendula. While these mathematical models are precise enough on the mechanical side, the ways humans balance themselves are still quite unexplored on the control side. Time delays in the sensory and motoric neural pathways give essential limitations to the stabilization of the human body as a multiple inverted pendulum. The sensory systems supporting each other provide the necessary signals for these control tasks; but the more complicated the system is, the larger delay is introduced. Human ageing as well as our actual physical and mental state affects the time delays in the neural system, and the mechanical structure of the human body also changes in a large range during our lives. The human balancing organ, the labyrinth, and the vision system essentially adapted to these relatively large time delays and parameter regions occurring during balancing. The analytical study of the simplified large-scale time-delayed models of balancing provides a Newtonian insight into the functioning of these organs that may also serve as a basis to support theories and hypotheses on balancing and vision.

  18. Delay Discounting of Losses in Alcohol Use Disorders and Antisocial Psychopathology: Effects of a Working Memory Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerst, Kyle R; Gunn, Rachel L; Finn, Peter R

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are associated with increased discounting of delayed rewards and reduced executive working memory (eWM) capacity. This association is amplified when comorbid with antisocial psychopathology (AP). Furthermore, recent studies suggest that reduced WM capacity is associated with disinhibited decisions reflected by increased impulsive decision making on the delay discounting of rewards task. While discounting of delayed rewards is well studied, the discounting of delayed losses has received significantly less experimental attention. The current study investigated (i) the rate of discounting of delayed losses in individuals with AUD only (n = 61), AUD with comorbid AP (n = 79) and healthy controls (n = 64); (ii) the relationship between eWM capacity and discounting of delayed losses; and (iii) the effect of a WM load on discounting of delayed losses. Discounting performance was assessed using a computerized discounting of delayed losses task. Results showed that the AUD-only and AUD-AP groups had higher rates of discounting of delayed losses and lower eWM capacity compared to the control groups. Lower individual eWM capacity was associated with increased discounting of delayed losses. However, WM load did not increase discounting rates overall. These results support the hypothesis that greater discounting of delayed losses is associated with AUD and comorbid AP problems and lower individual eWM capacity. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Harsh discipline and readiness for interpersonal aggression in Poland and the USA: the mediating role of sensitivity to provocations and frustrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominiak-Kochanek Monika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of history of harsh parenting on readiness for aggression in young adults testing the mediating effect of emotional reaction to frustration and provocation that is assumed to arise in the context of a history of physical punishment and psychological aggression. Data were collected from 402 participants including 187 Poles (Mage = 9.5; SD = 1.2 and 215 Americans (Mage = 19.16, SD = 1.15. Participants reported retrospectively on corporal punishment and psychological aggression experienced during childhood. Based on self-report instruments, sensitivity to provocation and frustration and three patterns of readiness for aggression in adulthood were assessed. Contrary to the US sample, sensitivity to provocation and frustration were mediators in the Polish sample alone. The important role of contextual factors that define harsh parenting circumstances, such as cultural context and sex of the parent, are discussed.

  20. Anisotropic quantum quench in the presence of frustration or background gauge fields: A probe of bulk currents and topological chiral edge modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killi, Matthew; Trotzky, Stefan; Paramekanti, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Bosons and fermions, in the presence of frustration or background gauge fields, can form many-body ground states that support equilibrium charge or spin currents. Motivated by the experimental creation of frustration or synthetic gauge fields in ultracold atomic systems, we propose a general scheme by which making a sudden anisotropic quench of the atom tunneling across the lattice and tracking the ensuing density modulations provides a powerful and gauge-invariant route to probing diverse equilibrium current patterns. Using illustrative examples of trapped superfluid Bose and normal Fermi systems in the presence of artificial magnetic fluxes on square lattices, and frustrated bosons in a triangular lattice, we show that this scheme to probe equilibrium bulk current order works independent of particle statistics. We also show that such quenches can detect chiral edge modes in gapped topological states, such as quantum Hall or quantum spin Hall insulators.

  1. Testing the Reliability of Delay Discounting of Ten Commodities Using the Fill-in-the-Blank Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam; Terrell, Heather K.

    2011-01-01

    Several measures of delay discounting have been shown to be reliable over periods of up to 3 months. In the present study, 115 participants completed a fill-in-the-blank (FITB) delay-discounting task on sets of 5 different commodities, 12 weeks apart. Results showed that discounting rates were not well described by a hyperbolic function but were…

  2. Identifying and comparing states of time-delayed systems: phase diagrams and applications to human motor control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.; Friedrich, R.; Beek, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    A data driven characterization of time-delayed stochastic systems is proposed in terms of linear delay differential equations and two drift parameters. It is shown how these parameters determine the states of such systems with respect to generalized phase diagrams. This approach allows for a comparison of systems with different parameters as exemplified for two motor control tasks: tracking and force production

  3. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  4. Chaos in the delay logistic equation with discontinuous delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Ayan; Mukherjee, Debasis

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes a delay logistic equation which models a feedback control problem. Interval map associated to the system is derived. By calculating Lyapunov exponent, we indicate stable orbit and chaotic phenomenon respectively. The results are verified through computer simulation. We identify the parameter which controls the dynamics.

  5. Postraumatic delayed loss of vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partington, C.R.; Graves, V.B.; Ruetenacht, D.A.; Weinstein, J.M.; Strother, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging studies and clinical findings in 10 patients who suffered delayed vision loss beginning 1 day to 13 years after head trauma have been reviewed. Two different primary lesions could be identified: pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery and carotid cavernous fistula. The pathologic changes associated with pseudoaneurysm included compression of the optic nerves and/or chiasm by arterial aneurysm and intracranial hematoma. Carotid cavernous fistula caused delayed vision loss by compression of the optic nerves and chiasm by saccular dilatation of the cavernous sinus and by abnormal orbital venous drainage with retinal venous stasis, retinal edema, and glaucoma

  6. Time delayed Ensemble Nudging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; Abarbanel, Henry

    Optimal nudging method based on time delayed embedding theory has shows potentials on analyzing and data assimilation in previous literatures. To extend the application and promote the practical implementation, new nudging assimilation method based on the time delayed embedding space is presented and the connection with other standard assimilation methods are studied. Results shows the incorporating information from the time series of data can reduce the sufficient observation needed to preserve the quality of numerical prediction, making it a potential alternative in the field of data assimilation of large geophysical models.

  7. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time. ...

  8. Patterns of prospective memory impairment among individuals with depression: the influence of cue type and delay interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqi Ryan; Weinborn, Michael; Loft, Shayne; Maybery, Murray

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of cue type and delay interval on prospective memory performance in depressed, compared to non-depressed, individuals using a clinically relevant measure, the Memory for Intentions Screening Test. The depressed group demonstrated impaired performance on time-based, but not event-based, prospective memory tasks relative to the nondepressed group. The depressed group also demonstrated impaired prospective memory on tasks with longer delay intervals (15 min), but not on tasks with shorter delay intervals (2 min). These data support theoretical frameworks that posit that depression is associated with deficits in cognitive initiative (i.e., reduced ability to voluntarily direct attention to relevant tasks) and thus that depressed individuals are susceptible to poor performance on strategically demanding tasks. The results also raise multiple avenues for developing interventions (e.g., implementation intentions) to improve prospective memory performance among individuals with depression, with potential implications for medication and other treatment adherence.

  9. Persistent Memory in Single Node Delay-Coupled Reservoir Computing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André David Kovac

    Full Text Available Delays are ubiquitous in biological systems, ranging from genetic regulatory networks and synaptic conductances, to predator/pray population interactions. The evidence is mounting, not only to the presence of delays as physical constraints in signal propagation speed, but also to their functional role in providing dynamical diversity to the systems that comprise them. The latter observation in biological systems inspired the recent development of a computational architecture that harnesses this dynamical diversity, by delay-coupling a single nonlinear element to itself. This architecture is a particular realization of Reservoir Computing, where stimuli are injected into the system in time rather than in space as is the case with classical recurrent neural network realizations. This architecture also exhibits an internal memory which fades in time, an important prerequisite to the functioning of any reservoir computing device. However, fading memory is also a limitation to any computation that requires persistent storage. In order to overcome this limitation, the current work introduces an extended version to the single node Delay-Coupled Reservoir, that is based on trained linear feedback. We show by numerical simulations that adding task-specific linear feedback to the single node Delay-Coupled Reservoir extends the class of solvable tasks to those that require nonfading memory. We demonstrate, through several case studies, the ability of the extended system to carry out complex nonlinear computations that depend on past information, whereas the computational power of the system with fading memory alone quickly deteriorates. Our findings provide the theoretical basis for future physical realizations of a biologically-inspired ultrafast computing device with extended functionality.

  10. Persistent Memory in Single Node Delay-Coupled Reservoir Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, André David; Koall, Maximilian; Pipa, Gordon; Toutounji, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Delays are ubiquitous in biological systems, ranging from genetic regulatory networks and synaptic conductances, to predator/pray population interactions. The evidence is mounting, not only to the presence of delays as physical constraints in signal propagation speed, but also to their functional role in providing dynamical diversity to the systems that comprise them. The latter observation in biological systems inspired the recent development of a computational architecture that harnesses this dynamical diversity, by delay-coupling a single nonlinear element to itself. This architecture is a particular realization of Reservoir Computing, where stimuli are injected into the system in time rather than in space as is the case with classical recurrent neural network realizations. This architecture also exhibits an internal memory which fades in time, an important prerequisite to the functioning of any reservoir computing device. However, fading memory is also a limitation to any computation that requires persistent storage. In order to overcome this limitation, the current work introduces an extended version to the single node Delay-Coupled Reservoir, that is based on trained linear feedback. We show by numerical simulations that adding task-specific linear feedback to the single node Delay-Coupled Reservoir extends the class of solvable tasks to those that require nonfading memory. We demonstrate, through several case studies, the ability of the extended system to carry out complex nonlinear computations that depend on past information, whereas the computational power of the system with fading memory alone quickly deteriorates. Our findings provide the theoretical basis for future physical realizations of a biologically-inspired ultrafast computing device with extended functionality.

  11. The Watch-and-Wait Task: On the Reliability and Validity of a New Method of Assessing Self-Control in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Anna; Gawrilow, Caterina; Hasselhorn, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    A preschooler's ability to delay gratification in the waiting task is predictive of several developmental outcomes, despite this task's relatively low reliability level. Success in this task depends on the use of distraction strategies. The new Watch-and-Wait Task (WWT) has been developed to enhance reliability and to investigate whether the…

  12. Generic cognitive adaptations to task interference in task switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poljac, E.; Bekkering, H.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated how the activation of previous tasks interferes with the execution of future tasks as a result of temporal manipulations. Color and shape matching tasks were organized in runs of two trials each. The tasks were specified by a cue presented before a task run, cueing

  13. Energy Efficient Task Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadottir, Asta; Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this work is to develop a task light for office lighting that fulfils the minimum requirements of the European standard EN12464 - 1 : Light and lighting – Lighting of work places, Part 1: Indoor workplaces and the Danish standard DS 700 : Lys og belysning I arbejdsrum , or more...... specifically the requirements that apply to the work area and the immediate surrounding area. By providing a task light that fulfils the requirements for task lighting and the immediate surrounding area, the general lighting only needs to provide the illuminance levels required for background lighting...... and thereby a reduction in installed power for general lighting of about 40 % compared to the way illuminance levels are designed in an office environment in Denmark today. This lighting strategy is useful when the placement of the task area is not defined in the space before the lighting is design ed...

  14. Early-delayed radiation rhombencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, S.; Dawes, P.J.D.K.; Cartlidge, N.E.F.; Newcastle upon Tyne Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman developed an early-delayed rhombencephalopathy 7 weeks after completing a course of radiotherapy to a glomus jugulare tumour. The clinical features, comprising nystagmus, skew strabismus, unilateral facial weakness, dysarthria and ataxia, are compared with four previously reported patients with this syndrome. (author)

  15. Another definition for time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narnhofer, H.

    1980-01-01

    Time delay is defined by geometrical considerations which work in classical as well as in quantum mechanics, and its connection with the S-matrix and the virial is proven for potentials with V(x vector) and x vector V(x vector) vanishing as rsup(-1-epsilon) for r -> infinity. (Author)

  16. Weather delay costs to trucking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Estimates of the nations freight sector of transportation range to upwards of $600 billion of total gross domestic product with 70 percent of total value and 60 percent of total weight moving by truck. Weather-related delays can add significantly ...

  17. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  18. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  19. Concurrent Delay in Construction Disputes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleri, Sylvie Cécile

    the delay is contractually defined as a contractor's risk, the contractor is liable to pay liquidated damages to the employer; if it is not, the contractor can under certain circumstances claim an extension of time and in some cases also economic compensation from the employer. The situation where a given...

  20. Deconstructing delayed posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, G

    2011-01-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, delayed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) must be diagnosed in individuals fulfilling criteria for PTSD if the onset of symptoms is at least six months after the trauma. The purpose of this thesis was to establish the