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Sample records for dekieffer international fellowship

  1. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  2. The Tsao Fellowship in Global Health: A Model for International Fellowships in a Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Taro, Trisa B; Wipfli, Heather L; Ly, Stephanie; Gillenwater, Justin T; Costa, Melinda A; Gutierrez, Ricardo D; Magee, William

    2016-03-01

    To present a model for integrated global health fellowships in plastic surgical residency training. National surveys have found that North American surgical residents have significant interest in international training. While global health training opportunities exist, less than a third of these are housed within surgical residency programs; even fewer are designed specifically for plastic surgery residents. The Tsao Fellowship was created through a partnership between Operation Smile, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Shriners Hospital for Children, and the University of Southern California. Designed for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited plastic surgery residents between their third and fourth years of residency, the fellowship curriculum is completed over 24 months and divided into 3 areas: clinical research, international reconstructive surgery fieldwork, and the completion of a Master of Science in Clinical and Biomedical Investigations. The Tsao Fellowship has matriculated 4 fellows: 3 have graduated from the program and 1 is in the current cycle. Fellows completed 4 to 7 international missions each cycle and have performed an aggregate total of 684 surgical procedures. Each fellow also conducted 2 to 6 research projects and authored several publications. All fellows continue to assume leadership roles within the field of global reconstructive surgery. Comprehensive global health fellowships provide invaluable opportunities beyond surgical residency. The Tsao Fellowship is a model for integrating international surgical training with global health research in plastic surgical residency that can be applied to other residency programs and different surgical specialties.

  3. The Cunningham Fellowship : three international points of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flake, D; Verhoeven, A; Robu, I

    2001-01-01

    The Medical Library Association Cunningham Fellowship Program provides funds for one medical librarian per year from outside the United States or Canada to work and learn in United States or Canadian medical libraries for a period of 4 months. An overview of the Cunningham Fellowship is presented fr

  4. The Cunningham Fellowship : three international points of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flake, D; Verhoeven, A; Robu, I

    2001-01-01

    The Medical Library Association Cunningham Fellowship Program provides funds for one medical librarian per year from outside the United States or Canada to work and learn in United States or Canadian medical libraries for a period of 4 months. An overview of the Cunningham Fellowship is presented fr

  5. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Narmin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4 fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Results Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes: 1 Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2 Exposure in rotations and to role models 3 Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4 Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5 Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training Conclusions There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  6. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the Canadian R4 fellowship match: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vijay J; Kassam, Narmin

    2011-06-29

    There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match) and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4) fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes:1) Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2) Exposure in rotations and to role models 3) Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4) Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5) Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  7. Improving Knowledge and Process for International Emergency Medicine Fellowship Applicants: A Call for a Uniform Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle A. Jacquet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are currently 34 International Emergency Medicine (IEM fellowship programs. Applicants and programs are increasing in number and diversity. Without a standardized application, applicants have a difficulty approaching programs in an informed and an organized method; a streamlined application system is necessary. Objectives. To measure fellows’ knowledge of their programs’ curricula prior to starting fellowship and to determine what percent of fellows and program directors would support a universal application system. Methods. A focus group of program directors, recent, and current fellows convened to determine the most important features of an IEM fellowship application process. A survey was administered electronically to a convenience sample of 78 participants from 34 programs. Respondents included fellowship directors, fellows, and recent graduates. Results. Most fellows (70% did not know their program’s curriculum prior to starting fellowship. The majority of program directors and fellows support a uniform application service (81% and 67%, resp. and deadline (85% for both. A minority of program directors (35% and fellows (30% support a formal match. Conclusions. Program directors and fellows support a uniform application service and deadline, but not a formalized match. Forums for disseminating IEM fellowship information and for administering a uniform application service and deadline are currently in development to improve the process.

  8. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kassam Narmin; Daniels Vijay J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match) and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that det...

  9. A framework for understanding international medical graduate challenges during transition into fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Khan, Attia; Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Abbey, Susan; Jackson, Timothy; Zaretsky, Ari; Okrainec, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted unique needs of international medical graduates (IMG) during their transition into medical training programs; however, limited data exist on IMG needs specific to fellowship training. We conducted the following mixed-method study to determine IMG fellow training needs during the transition into fellowship training programs in psychiatry and surgery. The authors conducted a mixed-methods study consisting of an online survey of IMG fellows and their supervisors in psychiatry or surgery fellowship training programs and individual interviews of IMG fellows. The survey assessed (a) fellows' and supervisors' perceptions on IMG challenges in clinical communication, health systems, and education domains and (b) past orientation initiatives. In the second phase of the study, IMG fellows were interviewed during the latter half of their fellowship training, and perceptions regarding orientation and adaptation to fellowship in Canada were assessed. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive and Mann-Whitney U statistics. Qualitative interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. The survey response rate was 76% (35/46) and 69% (35/51) for IMG fellows and supervisors, respectively. Fellows reported the greatest difficulty with adapting to the hospital system, medical documentation, and balancing one's professional and personal life. Supervisors believed that fellows had the greatest difficulty with managing language and slang in Canada, the healthcare system, and an interprofessional team. In Phase 2, fellows generated themes of disorientation, disconnection, interprofessional team challenges, a need for IMG fellow resources, and a benefit from training in a multicultural setting. Our study results highlight the need for IMG specific orientation resources for fellows and supervisors. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs may be a useful framework for understanding IMG training needs.

  10. An international fellowship in trauma research and the potential benefits for fellows, sponsoring institution, and the global trauma community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubose, Joseph J; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Recinos, Gustavo; Barmparas, Galinos; Ottochian, Marcus; Inaba, Kenji; Petrone, Patrizio; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2009-04-01

    For over a decade, the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Hospital has supported an international fellowship in trauma that provides research experience, education, and opportunity for clinical observation at a high-volume American College of Surgeons (ACS) designated Level I trauma center. We performed a descriptive study of the design, implementation, and results of an international fellowship in trauma and critical care. Fellows from 27 countries throughout the world have actively engaged in trauma research at Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Hospital. Our program involves intensive education and clinical observation components designed to facilitate dissemination of evidence-based trauma practices throughout the world by graduates. The majority of alumni responding to a survey returned to their countries of origin, remaining active in trauma care and research. Motivation for participation varied, but former fellows universally rated their experience highly and stated they would recommend the program to their colleagues. An international research fellowship in trauma and critical care provides foreign medical trainees opportunities for exposure to research and evidence-based practices at a high-volume trauma center. The program is designed to be beneficial to both the participating fellow and sponsoring institution; and is constructed to effectively promote improved trauma education and the dissemination of quality trauma practices internationally.

  11. 22 CFR 196.1 - What is the Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the Fellowship Program? 196.1 Section 196.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.1 What is the Fellowship Program? The...

  12. Intercâmbios acadêmicos internacionais: bolsas Capes, CNPq e Fapesp International academic exchange programs: Capes, CNPq and Fapesp fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Mazza

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo é parte de pesquisa que atenta para o peso crescente que a circulação internacional de pessoas, saberes e práticas tem alcançado nos processos de escolarização e formação profissional de determinados setores sociais. Considerando os recursos públicos que a Capes, o CNPq e a Fapesp destinam à formação de pesquisadores com vistas ao fomento à pesquisa e aos investimentos em ciência e tecnologia no horizonte da circulação internacional, recortamos para este artigo a descrição e a análise preliminares da base de dados de bolsistas no exterior dessas agências de fomento, no período de 1970 a 2000. O movimento de fluxos, a partir da metodologia quantitativa de correlação de variáveis, desenha as tendências dos intercâmbios acadêmicos internacionais promovidos pelas três agências e nas diversas áreas do conhecimento, sendo que se procura contextualizá-las nas políticas de desenvolvimento científico-tecnológico desenvolvidas pelo Estado brasileiro no período.This article is part of a study considering the growing importance of the international transit of people, knowledge, and practices in the schooling and professional education processes of some social segments. Considering the public funds made available by the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel - Capes -, the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq - and the State of São Paulo Research Foundation - Fapesp - to support researchers' fellowships abroad, aming to improve research and investments on Science and Technology on the context of international exchanges, we have dedicated this article to the preliminary description and analysis of the database of fellows funded abroad by these research agencies from 1970 to 2000. The movement of flows based on the quantitative methodology of the correlation of variables draws the trends of international academic exchange programs in the three research

  13. 22 CFR 196.2 - How is the Fellowship Program administered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the Fellowship Program administered? 196.2 Section 196.2 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION THOMAS R. PICKERING FOREIGN AFFAIRS/GRADUATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 196.2 How is the Fellowship Program...

  14. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Report from July 1, 1974 through June 30, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    The report reviews: (1) foundation activities: purposes, programs (teacher fellowships, administrative intern program, visiting fellows, women's studies fellowships, a Woodrow Wilson Fellows study, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellowship program); program data (lists of fellows, institutions involved, and selection committee members); and…

  15. Women and Woodrow Wilson Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nancy J.

    1986-01-01

    Based on a presentation made at the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, considers the effect these fellowships had on the scholarly careers of the women to whom they have been awarded. (Author/ABB)

  16. Fellowship trends of pathology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagwinski, Nikolaj; Hunt, Jennifer L

    2009-09-01

    Recent changes in pathology residency education have included a decrease in the program length (from 5 years to 4 years for combined anatomic and clinical pathology training) and a national mandate for programs to assess 6 general competencies of trainees. These have undoubtedly led to changes in program curricula and in residents' desires to seek fellowship training. This study was designed to gather information about what residents are seeking from fellowship training programs. This study used an online survey to assess attitudes of residents in training programs toward fellowship training. The survey instrument had 26 questions pertaining to fellowship choices, motivations for pursuing fellowships, expectations of the fellowships, and postresidency concerns. There were 213 respondents from a mix of program types and representing each postgraduate year. Most residents will seek at least 1 or 2 fellowships after residency training. The most popular first-choice fellowship was surgical pathology (26%), followed by cytopathology (16%), hematopathology (15%), gastrointestinal pathology (10%), dermatopathology (8%), and forensic pathology (5%). The most common reasons for pursuing fellowship training were to "increase marketability" (43%) or to "become an expert in a particular area" (33%). Most trainees got their information about fellowship training programs from Internet sources. Fellowship programs will benefit from an optimally designed Web site because residents seek information predominantly from the Internet. Residents seeking fellowships are particularly concerned with selecting programs that provide job connections, an increase in their marketability, and the opportunity to develop diagnostic expertise.

  17. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  18. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  19. Can a resident's publication record predict fellowship publications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Prasad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internal medicine fellowship programs have an incentive to select fellows who will ultimately publish. Whether an applicant's publication record predicts long term publishing remains unknown. METHODS: Using records of fellowship bound internal medicine residents, we analyzed whether publications at time of fellowship application predict publications more than 3 years (2 years into fellowship and up to 7 years after fellowship match. We calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios for every cutoff number of application publications, and plot a receiver operator characteristic curve of this test. RESULTS: Of 307 fellowship bound residents, 126 (41% published at least one article 3 to 7 years after matching, and 181 (59% of residents do not publish in this time period. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve is 0.59. No cutoff value for application publications possessed adequate test characteristics. CONCLUSION: The number of publications an applicant has at time of fellowship application is a poor predictor of who publishes in the long term. These findings do not validate the practice of using application publications as a tool for selecting fellows.

  20. Fellowships in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to encourage stronger research ties between India and the United States, the Indo-U.S. Subcommission on Education and Culture is offering 12 long-term and 9 short-term research fellowships in India in 1985 and 1986. The only requirement is that the applicants be U.S. citizens at the postdoctoral or equivalent postdoctoral level. The awards have no restrictions as to field of study, and because the program seeks to open new channels of communication between academic and professional groups in the two countries, those who have had little or no experience in India are especially encouraged to apply.The long-term fellowships are for 6 to 10 months, with a monthly allowance of $1500. Long-term fellows will also receive travel money and allowances for dependents. The short-term awards, for periods of 2 to 3 months, also offer a monthly payment of $1500. Funding for these fellowships is provided by the U.S. Information Agency, the National Science Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Government of India.

  1. Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalist Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vintzileos, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    This article establishes the rationale and development of an obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist fellowship program. The pool of OB/GYN hospitalists needs to be drastically expanded to accommodate the country's needs. Fellowship programs should provide extra training and confidence for recent resident graduates who want to pursue a hospitalist career. Fellowships should train physicians in a way that aligns their interests with those of the hospital with respect to patient care, teaching, and research. Research in the core measures should be a necessary component of the fellowship so as to provide long-term benefits for all stakeholders, including hospitals and patients.

  2. American diagnostic radiology residency and fellowship programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumack, Carol Masters

    2011-03-01

    American Diagnostic Radiology Residency and Fellowship programmes are Graduate Medical Education programmes in the United States (US) equivalent to the Postgraduate Medical Education programmes in Singapore. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited diagnostic radiology residency programmes require 5 years total with Post Graduate Year (PGY) 1 year internship in a clinical specialty, e.g. Internal Medicine following medical school. PGY Years 2 to 5 are the core years which must include Radiology Physics, Radiation Biology and rotations in 9 required subspecialty rotations: Abdominal, Breast, Cardiothoracic, Musculoskeletal, Neuroradiology, Nuclear and Paediatric Radiology, Obstetric & Vascular Ultrasound and Vascular Interventional Radiology. A core curriculum of lectures must be organised by the required 9 core subspecialty faculty. All residents (PGY 2 to 4) take a yearly American College of Radiology Diagnostic In-Training Examination based on national benchmarks of medical knowledge in each subspecialty. Because the American Board of Radiology (ABR) examinations are changing, until 2012, residents have to take 3 ABR examinations: (i) ABR physics examination in the PGY 2 to 3 years, (ii) a written examination at the start of the PGY 5 year and (iii) an oral exam at the end of the PGY 5 year. Beginning in 2013, there will be only 2 examinations: (i) the physics and written examinations after PGY 4 will become a combined core radiology examination. Beginning in 2015, the final certifying examination will be given 15 months after the completion of residency. After residency, ACGME fellowships in PGY 6 are all one-year optional programmes which focus on only one subspecialty discipline. There are 4 ACGME accredited fellowships which have a Board Certifi cation Examination: Neuroradiology, Nuclear, Paediatric and Vascular Interventional Radiology. Some ACGME fellowships do not have a certifying examination: Abdominal, Endovascular

  3. 26 CFR 1.117-4 - Items not considered as scholarships or fellowship grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Items not considered as scholarships or... Income § 1.117-4 Items not considered as scholarships or fellowship grants. The following payments or allowances shall not be considered to be amounts received as a scholarship or a fellowship grant for...

  4. Wilderness Fellowship Program 2012 Fellows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Natural Resources and Conservation Planning Division of the National Wildlife Refuge System established the Wilderness Fellowship Program in 2011. The program...

  5. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in…

  6. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in particular,…

  7. "World-Mindedness": The Lisle Fellowship and the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in…

  8. Health economics and outcomes research fellowship practices reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Kangho; Gabriel, Susan; Adams, Michelle A; Arcona, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The guidelines for health economics and outcomes research (HEOR) fellowship training programs devised by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) and the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) suggest that continuous improvements are made to ensure that postgraduate training through didactic and professional experiences prepare fellows for HEOR research careers. The HEOR Fellowship Program at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation was standardized to enhance the fellows' HEOR research understanding and align professional skill sets with the ACCP-ISPOR Fellowship Program Guidelines. Based on feedback from an internal task force comprised of HEOR employees and current and former fellows, the HEOR Fellowship Program was normatively and qualitatively assessed to evaluate the current curricular program. Fellowship program activities were instituted to ensure that the suggested minimum level requirements established by the guidelines were being met. Research opportunities enabling fellows to work hand-in-hand with other fellows and HEOR professionals were emphasized. Curricular enhancements in research methodology and professional training and development, and materials for a structured journal club focusing on specific methodological and HEOR research topics were developed. A seminar series (e.g., creating SMART Goals, StrengthsFinder 2.0) and professional courses (e.g., ISPOR short courses, statistics.com) were included to enhance the fellows' short- and long-term professional experience. Additional program attributes include an online reference library developed to enrich the current research facilities and a Statistical Analysis Software training program. Continuously assessing and updating HEOR fellowship programs keeps programs up-to-date in the latest HEOR concepts and approaches used to evaluate health care, both professionally and educationally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world.In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care.I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  10. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  11. 26 CFR 143.2 - Taxes on self-dealing; scholarship and fellowship grants by private foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxes on self-dealing; scholarship and... REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX REFORM ACT OF 1969 § 143.2 Taxes on self-dealing; scholarship and fellowship grants... person of the income or assets of a private foundation. (b) Scholarship and fellowship grants....

  12. AMS/DOE Fellowship Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Stephanie [American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-21

    The AMS/DOE graduate fellowships were awarded to three students entering their first year of graduate study. The funds allowed each student to take a full course load during their first of year of graduate study which helps each of them to enter the professional, scientific community at an earlier date. Each recipient is academically outstanding, received glowing references of support and demonstrated their strong desire to perform scientific research. As part of the fellowship, each of the students was invited to attend the AMS Annual Meeting where they got to participate in the AMS student conference, attend scientific sessions and visit the exhibition hall. In addition, a student awards luncheon was held where each of the recipients got to meet their sponsor and receive a certificate.

  13. Boren Scholarship and Fellowship Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    from beginner to intermediate, and convinced me that I did want to make China studies central to my career. 2. After completing my NSEP/Boren...current career. 133. My Boren Fellowship provided an amazing experience to study abroad in Russia , which I would have not been able to undertake...otherwise. That overseas experience has been directly applicable to my professional work since graduation, even when I moved away from Russia as an

  14. Graduate School and Fellowship Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles Reed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    This was a presentation presented for the Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School. This is a set of slides about how to prepare for college, specifically graduate school. It gives instructions for succeeding and getting into a good school with financial aid through assistantships and scholarships, specifically applying to engineering backgrounds. Also, there are tips given for applying for fellowships and concludes with some general recommendations for graduate school.

  15. NASA Early Career Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Career Fellowship program was established in 2005 to facilitate the integration of outstanding early career planetary science researchers into established research funding programs by providing tools and experience useful to maintain a successful research program. Executing a successful research program requires a few key elements such as: successful proposal writing; adequate (paid) research time; management of a laboratory; collaboration and networking; frequent and high-quality publications; and adequate start-up equipment funds. These elements may be particularly critical for early career researchers searching for a tenure- track or equivalent position. The Early Career Fellowship program recognizes the importance of these skills and provides extra funding and resources to begin a successful research program. For consideration into The Early Career Fellowship program, the candidate needs to be the P. I. or Science P.I. of a funded research proposal from one of the participating R&A program areas, be within 7 years of earning a PhD, hold a non-tenure track position, and indicate the early career candidacy when submitting the research proposal. If the research proposal is funded and the discipline scientist nominates the candidate as an early career fellow, the candidate is then considered a Fellow and eligible to propose for Step 2. Upon obtaining a tenure-track equivalent position the Fellow submits a Step 2 proposal for up to one hundred thousand dollars in start-up funds. Start-up funds may be used for salary; undergraduate and/or graduate research assistants; supplies and instrument upgrades; travel to conferences, meetings, and advisory groups; time and travel for learning new skills; publication page charges; books and journal subscriptions; computer time and/or specialized software; and other justified research-specific needs. The early career fellowship program provides resources that a more established scientist would have acquired allowing

  16. Learning styles in otolaryngology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, David A Diaz Voss; Malik, Mohammad U; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Pandian, Vinciya; Brown, David J; Weatherly, Robert A; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have identified a predominant learning style in trainees from different specialties, more recently in otolaryngology residents. The purpose of our study was to determine a predominant learning style within otolaryngology fellowships and to identify any differences between otolaryngology fellows and residents. We conducted a survey of otolaryngology fellows at 25 otolaryngology fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We emailed Kolb's Learning Style Index version 3.1 to 16 pediatric otolaryngology (PO) and 24 otology/neurotology (ON) fellows. This index is a widely used 12-item questionnaire. The participants answered each item in the questionnaire as it applied to their preferred learning style: accommodating, converging, diverging, or assimilating. Results were then analyzed and compared between each subspecialty and the previously reported preferred styles of otolaryngology residents. Ten PO and 20 ON fellows completed the survey, with an overall response rate of 75%. PO and ON fellows (60% of each group) preferred a learning style that was "balanced" across all four styles. For ON fellows, 35% preferred converging and 5% preferred accommodating styles. For PO fellows, converging and accommodating styles accounted for 20% each. It was previously reported that 74.4% of otolaryngology residents prefer either converging or accommodating styles. We believe that the fellowship training environment calls for fellows to use more than one learning style to become proficient physicians, hence the trend toward potentially developing a balanced style when at this level. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. The Andrea Levialdi Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieschi, Roberto

    My first encounter with Cuba dates back to winter 1967-1968 at the Cultural Congress of La Havana, a very large international event to promote greater understanding of the reality of the Cuban Revolution. In fact the person invited was my friend and colleague Andrea Levialdi (Andrea already knew Cuba and loved it) who, unable to participate, allowed me to go in her place. So I landed at the airport of the "first free country in Latin America" with the delegation of the Italian Communist Party. In Havana I met other Italian physicists whom I already knew, among them Bruno Vitale and Daniele Amati. They, like me, were embarrassed by the generous hospitality of `Havana Libre,' especially in a country which was going through such difficulties. Despite our best efforts we did not succeed in receiving a more modest welcome.

  18. Resident interest and factors involved in entering a pediatric pulmonary fellowship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershan William M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known about interest in pediatric pulmonology among pediatric residents. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine at this institution: 1 the level of pediatric resident interest in pursuing a pulmonary fellowship, 2 potential factors involved in development of such interest, 3 whether the presence of a pulmonary fellowship program affects such interest. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all 52 pediatric residents at this institution in 1992 and to all 59 pediatric residents and 14 combined internal medicine/pediatrics residents in 2002, following development of a pulmonary fellowship program. Results Response rates were 79% in 1992 and 86% in 2002. Eight of the 43 responders in 1992 (19% had considered doing a pulmonary fellowship compared to 7 of 63 (11% in 2002. The highest ranked factors given by the residents who had considered a fellowship included wanting to continue one's education after residency, enjoying caring for pulmonary patients, and liking pulmonary physiology and the pulmonary faculty. Major factors listed by residents who had not considered a pulmonary fellowship included not enjoying the tracheostomy/ventilator population and chronic pulmonary patients in general, and a desire to enter general pediatrics or another fellowship. Most residents during both survey periods believed that they would be in non-academic or academic general pediatrics in 5 years. Only 1 of the 106 responding residents (~1% anticipated becoming a pediatric pulmonologist. Conclusions Although many pediatric residents consider enrolling in a pulmonary fellowship (~10–20% here, few (~1% here will actually pursue a career in pediatric pulmonology. The presence of a pulmonary fellowship program did not significantly alter resident interest, though other confounding factors may be involved.

  19. Transforming a hospital nursing research fellowship into an evidence-based practice fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, Jami S; Hinds, Pamela S; Beaumont, Cynthia; Funk, Adam J; Green, Jo; Max, Anita; Russell, Philisa; Windsor, Kelley

    2007-12-01

    An established hospital-based nursing research fellowship program was transformed into an evidence-based practice fellowship despite its previous high satisfaction ratings from nursing leaders and nurse fellow participants. The faculty for the fellowship program determined that the long-term outcomes of the research program were insufficient in light of the hospital resources committed to the fellowship program. An evidence-based practice approach was then created in anticipation that greater short-term and more sustained longer-term benefits for the hospital would be realized. The transformation of the fellowship and the short-term outcomes are described.

  20. 34 CFR 657.3 - Who is eligible to receive a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... student— (a)(1) Is a citizen or national of the United States; or (2) Is a permanent resident of the... allocation of fellowships; and (2) In a program that combines modern foreign language training with— (i) Area or international studies; or (ii) Research and training in the international aspects of...

  1. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  2. Accredited Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayac, Michael; Javandal, Mitra; Mulcahey, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of orthopaedic surgeons apply for sports medicine fellowships after residency completion. The Internet is one of the most important resources applicants use to obtain information about fellowship programs, with the program website serving as one of the most influential sources. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), San Francisco Match (SFM), and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) maintain databases of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs. A 2013 study evaluated the content and accessibility of the websites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships. Purpose: To reassess these websites based on the same parameters and compare the results with those of the study published in 2013 to determine whether any improvement has been made in fellowship website content or accessibility. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We reviewed all existing websites for the 95 accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM, SFM, and AANA databases. Accessibility of the websites was determined by performing a Google search for each program. A total of 89 sports fellowship websites were evaluated for overall content. Websites for the remaining 6 programs could not be identified, so they were not included in content assessment. Results: Of the 95 accredited sports medicine fellowships, 49 (52%) provided links in the AOSSM database, 89 (94%) in the SFM database, and 24 (25%) in the AANA database. Of the 89 websites, 89 (100%) provided a description of the program, 62 (70%) provided selection process information, and 40 (45%) provided a link to the SFM website. Two searches through Google were able to identify links to 88% and 92% of all accredited programs. Conclusion: The majority of accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs fail to utilize the Internet to its full potential as a resource to provide applicants with detailed information about the

  3. the Cecil John Adams Travelling Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-09-14

    Sep 14, 1994 ... founded the Cecil John Adams Travelling Fellowship Trust in 1945. (photograph taken .... awards have been made to 137 people. ... Dr Alexander (Sandy) A. Brown. He and Dr T. .... think of a suitable means of achieving this.

  4. Educational Research Postdoctoral Fellowship. Terminal Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeding, Robert W.

    During his postdoctoral fellowship year, Dr. Schmeding audited courses in the sociology and economics of education, educational development and planning, and instructional technology. He also did independent study in these areas. (RT)

  5. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  6. The Benjamin H. Kean Travel Fellowship in Tropical Medicine: Assessment of Impact at 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Aubri S; John, Chandy C

    2017-06-26

    The Benjamin H. Kean Fellowship in Tropical Medicine is an American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene initiative that provides medical students with funding for international clinical or research experiences lasting at least 1 month. Of the 175 Kean fellows from 1998 to 2013, 140 had current available e-mails, and 70 of the 140 (50%) responded to a survey about their fellowship experience. Alumni indicated that the Kean Fellowship had a high impact on their career plans with regard to preparation for (N = 65, 94.2%) and inspiration to pursue (N = 59, 88.1%) a career in tropical medicine and global health. Continued involvement in tropical medicine and global health was common: 52 alumni (74.3%) were currently working in tropical medicine or global health, 49 (71.0%) had done so in the interim between the Kean fellowship and their current position; and 17 of 19 Kean fellows (89.4%) who had completed all medical training and were now in professional practice continued to work in tropical medicine and global health. Alumni had been highly productive academically, publishing a total of 831 PubMed-indexed manuscripts, almost all on tropical medicine or global health topics, in the period between their fellowship year and 2013. Alumni reported strengths of the fellowship including funding, networking, and flexibility, and suggested that more networking and career mentoring would enhance the program. The Benjamin H. Kean fellowship program has been highly successful at inspiring and fostering ongoing work by trainees in tropical medicine and global health.

  7. 26 CFR 1.117-1 - Exclusion of amounts received as a scholarship or fellowship grant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusion of amounts received as a scholarship... from Gross Income § 1.117-1 Exclusion of amounts received as a scholarship or fellowship grant. (a) In general. Any amount received by an individual as a scholarship at an educational institution or as...

  8. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Reports for 1972-1973, 1973-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    Recently the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation has conducted a variety of programs that support high quality in education. These programs are described in this report. The Administrative Intern Program, begun in 1967, selects young men and women with masters of Business Administration degree to serve on administrative staffs of…

  9. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  10. The AOA-JOA 2014 exchange traveling fellowship: Banzai and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Wakenda K; Mir, Hassan R; Zlotolow, Dan A; Kroonen, Leo T

    2015-02-18

    The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association (AOA-JOA) traveling fellowship was established in 1992 as a method for creating collaboration between the American and Japanese orthopaedic communities and providing a friendly exchange of current practices and scientific endeavors. The fellowship is designed to allow early-career orthopaedic surgeons the opportunity to participate in international travel and scholarship. This year's traveling fellows (Hassan Mir, Wakenda Tyler, Leo Kroonen, and Dan Zlotolow) all hail from different parts of the United States and have a variety of practice subspecialties. During the fellowship, the fellows were able to visit five academic centers that spanned the entire country of Japan as well as the JOA meeting in Kobe. The experience is one that contributed to the growth and development of each fellow's practices and depth of understanding of orthopaedic surgery.

  11. Double Fellowships in Radiology: A Survey of 2014 Graduating Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas Y; Moriarity, Andrew; Lall, Neil; Hoffmann, Jason C; Katz, Douglas S; Flug, Jonathan A

    Radiology fellowship training has evolved from being an uncommon option to being a near requisite for post-training employment in the United States. A subset of fellows elect to pursue second fellowships with potentially substantial implications on both the private sector and academic radiology workforce. The purpose of this study was to assess the proportion of current radiology fellows pursuing multiple years of post-residency fellowship training. After obtaining IRB approval, an anonymous web-based survey was emailed to 1,269 radiology fellows listed as "completing fellowship" in the American College of Radiology database in June 2014. Questions were asked regarding current fellowship training, post-fellowship employment plans, and individual experience pursuing employment. Results were analyzed using the survey analytical software. There were 219 responses received, representing a 17.3% response rate. Ten-percent of respondents were currently completing their second radiology fellowship. Of those completing their first year of fellowship training, 11% indicated plans to complete a second radiology fellowship. This survey provides a snapshot of the percentage of radiology trainees who pursue a second year of fellowship training, currently in the range of 10%. Pursuing a second radiology fellowship may represent a safety net to a substantial subset of fellows who are not able to obtain satisfactory employment following training. Academic programs who rely heavily on fellows should be aware of the proportion of fellows pursuing two fellowships and should be prepared to adapt should this change over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Report for 1971-1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    This document presents the annual report for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation for 1971-72. Included in the report are a listing of the Board of Trustees; a listing of the officers and staff of the Foundation; descriptions of the First Year Fellowship Program, the Dissertation Fellowships, the Internship Programs, the Martin Luther…

  13. Perceived core competency achievements of fellowship and non-fellowship-trained early career pediatric hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Jamie; Winer, Jeffrey C; Banach, Laurie; Davis, Aisha

    2015-06-01

    The pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) core competencies were established in 2010 to identify the specific knowledge base and skill set needed to provide the highest quality of care for hospitalized children. The objectives of this study were to examine the perceived core competency achievements of fellowship-trained and non-fellowship-trained early career pediatric hospitalists and identify perceived gaps in our current training models. An anonymous Web-based survey was distributed in November 2013. Hospitalists within 5 years of their residency graduation reported their perceived competency in select PHM core competencies. χ(2) and multiprobit regression analyses were utilized. One hundred ninety-seven hospitalists completed the survey and were included; 147 were non-fellowship-trained and 50 were PHM fellowship graduates or current PHM fellows. Both groups reported feeling less than competent in sedation and aspects of business practice. Non-fellowship-trained hospitalists also reported mean scores in the less than competent range in intravenous access/phlebotomy, technology-dependent emergencies, performing Plan-Do-Study-Act process and root cause analysis, defining basic statistical terms, and identifying research resources. Non-fellowship-trained hospitalists reported mean competency scores greater than fellowship-trained hospitalists in pain management, newborn care, and transitions in care. Early career pediatric hospitalists report deficits in several of the PHM core competencies, which should be considered when designing PHM-specific training in the future. Fellowship-trained hospitalists report higher levels of perceived competency in many core areas. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Fellowship Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramsen, Neil

    2014-01-01

    In March and April 2014, the author travelled overseas on a 2013 Churchill Fellowship to study education programs that successfully engage and enthuse primary and middle school students in maths, engineering and science (MES) or science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) learning in schools, universities and institutions in the United…

  15. Attaining interprofessional competencies through a student interprofessional fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Amy; Mitcham, Maralynne; Koutalos, Yiannis; Howell, David; Leaphart, Amy

    2015-05-01

    For students interested in enriching their interprofessional competencies beyond those required and offered by their academic programs, an elective interprofessional education fellowship can serve that need. We designed a fellowship for students linking a conceptual framework grounded in adult learning principles. During the fellowship, students progress through three levels of learning as they acquire, apply, and demonstrate interprofessional collaborative knowledge and skills; fellowship activities are self-directed. A content analysis of students' fellowship summary reports sought to determine the effectiveness of the fellowship as a learning experience to acquire interprofessional collaborative competences. Results indicated that students most consistently report competencies associated with acquisition of values and ethics for interprofessional practice, roles/responsibilities, and teams/teamwork; interprofessional communication was implied. All students expressed commitment to interprofessional collaborative behavior when in practice. Based on the results from this study, this fellowship structure may serve as a model for other institutions to adapt and implement for best practice and best fit.

  16. Misrepresentation in multidisciplinary pain medicine fellowship applications to a single academic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kathryn M; Neuman, Stephanie; Schroeder, Darrell R; Moeschler, Susan M; Rho, Richard H; Farrell, Ann M; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2015-02-01

    Publication misrepresentation by residency applicants has been well documented, but fewer studies have investigated it in fellowship applicants, specifically in pain medicine. We therefore sought to evaluate the demographics of pain medicine fellowship applicants and the type, number, and accuracy of referenced publications they reported. Applications to the Multidisciplinary Pain Medicine fellowship program in the Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Rochester, Minnesota were reviewed for three consecutive academic years (2009-2012). Demographic information and publications claimed by applicants were compiled, and publications were scrutinized by a medical librarian for accuracy. Over a 3-year period, 179 fellowship applications were received. Of the 179 applicants, more than half (106 [59%]) listed at least one publication. Of 324 listed publications, 263 were verifiable; of these, 14 (5.3%) were deemed fraudulent, and six (2.3%) contained an inaccuracy possibly conferring a competitive advantage. In our small sample size, we found no difference in the rate of publications or in the accuracy of listed publications across subspecialties, or between US medical graduates and international medical graduates. The lack of national data, specifically on applicant misrepresentation, due to the heretofore absence of a universal application process or match, impedes assessment of the extent to which these findings are representative of the national applicant pool. We observed notable trends (few female applicants; numerous international medical graduate applicants) different from those reported by other specialties. Despite the low rate (5.3%) of fraudulent publications, fellowship program directors and selection committees should be aware of this possibility to ensure selection of fellows with the highest degree of professional and ethical integrity. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  18. Telling business stories as fellowship-tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Robert; Neergaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the “Fellowship-Tale” as an alternative tale type for narrating entrepreneur stories. The authors illustrate this by telling the Pilgrim business story. It is common for the deeds of men who founded businesses to be narrated as heroic entrepreneur stories...... – The research indicates that “fellowship-tales” provide a viable and credible alternative to the fairy-tale rendition common in entrepreneur and business stories. Research limitations/implications – An obvious limitation is that one merely swaps one narrative framework for another, albeit it offers dissenting....../value – A key contribution is to challenge the hegemony of a dominant and embedded social construct allowing new understandings to emerge via a novel combination of research methodologies...

  19. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  20. Fellowship Available: 2005 IIASA Young Scientists Summer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) near Vienna, Austria, will host its annual Young Scientists's Summer Program (YSSP) for a selected group of graduate students from around the world. These students, primarily doctoral, will work closely with IIASA's senior scientists on projects within the institute's theme areas: natural resources and environment (e.g., transboundary air pollution and greenhouse gas initiative), population and society (e.g., risk, modeling, and society, and sustainable rural development), and energy and technology (e.g., transitions to new technologies and dynamic systems). Applicants must be advanced graduate students at a U.S. university; have comparable experience with ongoing research at IIASA; students who would benefit from interactions with scientists worldwide; and be interested in investigating the policy implications of his/her work.The U.S. Committee for IIASA provides airfare and a living allowance for those selected to participate in the fellowship.

  1. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  3. NRAO Astronomer Wins Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Dr. Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, has been awarded a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship, according to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The Guggenheim Foundation describes its fellowships as "mid-career" awards "intended for men and women who have already demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts." Frail, 48, has worked at the NRAO for more than 20 years, first as a postdoctoral fellow, and then as a staff scientist. He received his bachelor's degree in physics from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, and his Ph.D in astronomy from the University of Toronto. Frail is best known for his landmark contributions to the understanding of gamma ray bursts, making critical measurements that provided key insights into the mechanisms of these superenergetic and once-mysterious explosions. He also has made important contributions to the understanding of other astronomical phenomena, including pulsars and their neighborhoods, supernova remnants, and magnetars. In 1992, he was the co-discoverer, with Alex Wolszczan, of the first planets outside our own solar system. "We congratulate Dale on this well-deserved honor that recognizes not only his past achievements but also his potential for exciting scientific work in the future," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "We're very proud to see one of our scientists receive such a great honor," Lo added. Frail is one of 180 recipients of this year's Guggenheim Fellowships, chosen from some 3,000 applicants. The fellowships were established in 1925 and past recipients include photographer Ansel Adams, author Saul Bellow, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and chemist Linus Pauling. 102 Guggenheim Fellows have subsequently won Nobel Prizes, and others have received Pulitzer Prizes and other honors. As a Guggenheim Fellow, Frail intends to intensify his research in the areas of pulsars

  4. Report from the 2014 Scoliosis Research Society Travelling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quraishi, Nasir A; Enercan, Meric; Naresh-Babu, J; Chopin, D

    2015-03-01

    The Scoliosis Research Society traveling fellowship was conceptualized in 1970, repeated in 1972, and, after a pause, restarted in 1993. International traveling fellows visiting North America first commenced in 2000 and have since alternated annually with the North American fellows. Although a senior fellow had always traveled with them, in 2012 the first senior international fellow traveled with the group. This year, the senior fellow was Daniel Chopin from the Neuro-Orthopedic Spine Unit, Lille University Hospital, France, and past Director of the Spine Center, Institut Calot Berck sur Mer (succeeding Dr. Cotrel). The junior fellows were Meric Enercan from the Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul Spine Center, Turkey; J. Naresh-Babu from Mallika Spine Centre, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India; and Nasir A. Quraishi from the Centre for Spine Studies and Surgery, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK. The host centers were initially suggested by Dr. Chopin, the senior fellow; after some minor tweaking and extensive planning from the Scoliosis Research Society office, the itinerary was confirmed. The researchers were to visit 7 centers in just over 3 weeks. All of the international fellows were going to have an extraordinary adventure although they had not met each other previously. As it turned out, the trip was indeed sensational-professionally stimulating and socially endearing. The following is a short report on this unforgettable experience.

  5. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow? (a) If the Director pays fellowship award directly to the fellow after the Director determines the amount of a fellowship award, the fellowship...

  6. Development of a Curricular Framework for Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerardi, Karen E; Fisher, Erin; Rassbach, Caroline; Maniscalco, Jennifer; Blankenburg, Rebecca; Chase, Lindsay; Shah, Neha

    2017-07-01

    Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) is an emerging field in pediatrics and one that has experienced immense growth and maturation in a short period of time. Evolution and rapid expansion of the field invigorated the goal of standardizing PHM fellowship curricula, which naturally aligned with the field's evolving pursuit of a defined identity and consideration of certification options. The national group of PHM fellowship program directors sought to establish curricular standards that would more accurately reflect the competencies needed to practice pediatric hospital medicine and meet future board certification needs. In this manuscript, we describe the method by which we reached consensus on a 2-year curricular framework for PHM fellowship programs, detail the current model for this framework, and provide examples of how this curricular framework may be applied to meet the needs of a variety of fellows and fellowship programs. The 2-year PHM fellowship curricular framework was developed over a number of years through an iterative process and with the input of PHM fellowship program directors (PDs), PHM fellowship graduates, PHM leaders, pediatric hospitalists practicing in a variety of clinical settings, and other educators outside the field. We have developed a curricular framework for PHM Fellowships that consists of 8 education units (defined as 4 weeks each) in 3 areas: clinical care, systems and scholarship, and individualized curriculum. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Building Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships: A Consortium Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Ronald D.; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E.; Ehrlich, Amy R.; Greene, Michele G.; Greenberg, Debra F.; Raik, Barrie L.; Raymond, Joshua J.; Clabby, John F.; Fields, Suzanne D.; Breznay, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area…

  8. An Evaluation of the Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesel, Justin; Gutmann, Babette

    The Allen J. Ellender Fellowship Program provides fellowships to economically disadvantaged secondary school students, secondary school teachers and administrators, and economically disadvantaged older citizens, and recent immigrants for participation in the Close Up Foundation's week-long civics education programs in Washington, D.C. The Close Up…

  9. Association of Fellowship Training With Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboyewa, Ibukun; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    No prior studies have evaluated whether residents who pursue fellowship training achieve higher performance on the Otolaryngology Training Examination (OTE) and whether a specific fellowship will demonstrate a correlation with the corresponding specialty-specific OTE score. To determine whether residents pursuing fellowship training achieve higher performance on the OTE and whether fellowship choice is correlated with higher scores on the related subspecialty section of the OTE. This retrospective analysis included 35 residents training in an academic otolaryngology residency program from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2014. The OTE scores for postgraduate years 2 through 5 and the type of fellowship were collected for all residents meeting inclusion criteria. Data were collected from September 1 to October 15, 2014, and analyzed from October 16 to December 1, 2014. Residents were divided by whether they pursued fellowship training and by the type of fellowship chosen. Outcome measures included comparison of scores between residents who pursued vs those who did not pursue fellowship training and comparison of subspecialty OTE scores between residents who pursued the corresponding fellowship and those who did not. Of the 35 residents who met the inclusion criteria (24 men and 11 women), 17 (49%) pursued fellowship training. The 3 most common fellowship choices were facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric otolaryngology, and rhinology (4 residents each [24%]). For all residents, mean scores on the OTE improved each subsequent training year, but this difference was only significant between postgraduate years 2 and 3 (from 60.9% to 68.6% correct; P otolaryngology, 72.9% vs 71.3% [P = .79]; and for rhinology, 72.2% vs 71.2% [P = .91]). Residents who pursued fellowship training did not achieve higher scores on the OTE in any examination year compared with residents who did not pursue fellowship training and did not achieve higher scores within the OTE

  10. Fellowship or Further Training for Family Medicine Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Dai, Mingliang; Eden, Aimee R; Peterson, Lars E; Mainous, Arch G

    2017-09-01

    The breadth of family medicine (FM) generates debate about the length of residency training. One argument used by proponents for lengthening training is that residents feel unprepared for practice. The objectives of our study were to (1) identify the proportion of FM residency graduates intending to pursue fellowship training and those who would have done an additional year of core residency training had it been available, and (2) determine whether an association exists between these two variables. We used data collected by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) as part of resident certification examination application in 2014 and 2015. Data included fellowship intention, and interest in pursuing another year of residency training if it were available. We used descriptive and bivariate statistics. The questionnaire was completed by 6,235 residents, of which 17.0% (n=1,063) intended to enroll in a fellowship. Overall 54.2% of residents were "not at all likely" to extend residency training, with 19.9% "extremely/moderately likely". Forty-six percent of those intending a fellowship were "not at all likely" to extend training and only 29% of those "extremely/moderately likely" to extend residency training intended to enroll in a fellowship. We found a disconnect between fellowship intention and desire for another year of residency training. Desire for fellowship may be more about obtaining specific skills and expertise or additional certifications, and less about being prepared for general practice in family medicine.

  11. 34 CFR 1100.1 - What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM § 1100.1 What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? (a) Under the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program, the Director... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Literacy Leader Fellowship Program? 1100.1...

  12. A Study of Four Federal Graduate Fellowship Programs: Education and Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Lewis E.; Henke, Robin R.; Nevill, Stephanie; Linnard, David; Pflueger, Jeff; Mattox, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    The Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) in the U.S. Department of Education (ED) sponsors four graduate fellowship programs: the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) fellowship program, the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship program, the Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) fellowship

  13. Improving Fellowship Training in Microsurgery: A Threshold Concepts Perspective on the Curricula of Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Tsironi, Maria; Riley, David

    2015-10-01

    The theory of "threshold concepts" argues that within every discipline there is knowledge that transforms understanding and leads to a previously inaccessible way of thinking, without which the learner cannot progress. This study investigates the factors influencing the development of the characteristic ways of thinking and practicing as a microsurgeon during a microsurgical fellowship. We analyze the challenges in the development of these characteristics during focused fellowship training in microsurgery, of which some could potentially represent "threshold concepts." A qualitative research methodology was followed. Semistructured interviews with trainers and trainees from microsurgical units in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US) were conducted. Data were analyzed using the Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, CA) qualitative data analysis software and interpreted using the theory of "threshold concepts." Five trainees and four trainers from the UK and the US participated in this research project. Although initially some trainees had particular difficulty in developing their practical microsurgical skills, this improved rapidly with adequate practice. Cognitive skills and especially the ability to expect the unexpected and the ability recognize complications presented as a significant challenge for trainees and transformed their understandings regarding the qualities of a microsurgeon. Microsurgical fellowship curricula can be redesigned using the theory of threshold concepts, creating a dynamic framework that addresses individual trainee needs to develop the practical and cognitive skills necessary for independent practice of microsurgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. The hand surgery fellowship application process: expectations, logistics, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Osterman, Meredith

    2015-04-01

    To investigate expectations, logistics, and costs relevant to the hand surgery fellowship application process. We sought to discover (1) what both applicants and program directors are seeking, (2) what both parties have to offer, (3) how both parties collect information about each other, and (4) the costs incurred in arranging each match. We conducted on-line surveys of hand surgery fellowship applicants for appointment in 2015 and of current fellowship program directors. Sixty-two applicants and 41 program directors completed the survey. Results revealed applicants' demographic characteristics, qualifications, method of ranking hand fellowship programs, costs incurred (both monetary and opportunity) during the application process, ultimate match status, and suggestions for change. Results also revealed program directors' program demographics, rationale for offering interviews and favorably ranking applicants, application-related logistical details, costs incurred (both monetary and opportunity) during the application process, and suggestions for change. Applicants for hand surgery fellowship training are primarily interested in a potential program's academic reputation, emphasis on orthopedic surgery, and location. The typical, successfully matched applicant was a 30-year-old male orthopedic resident with 3 publications to his credit. Applicants rely on peers and Web sites for information about fellowships. Fellowship directors are primarily seeking applicants recommended by other experienced surgeons and with positive personality traits. The typical fellowship director offers a single year of orthopedic-based fellowship training to 2 fellows per year and relies on a common application and in-person interviews to collect information about applicants. Applicants appear to be more concerned than directors about the current state of the match process. Applicants and directors alike incur heavy costs, in both dollars and opportunity, to arrange each match. A nuanced

  15. Clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics: A program description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Gilbertson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in pathology informatics. In 2011, the program benchmarked its structure and operations against a 2009 white paper "Program requirements for fellowship education in the subspecialty of clinical informatics," endorsed by the Board of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA that described a proposal for a general clinical informatics fellowship program. Methods: A group of program faculty members and fellows compared each of the proposed requirements in the white paper with the fellowship program′s written charter and operations. The majority of white paper proposals aligned closely with the rules and activities in our program and comparison was straightforward. In some proposals, however, differences in terminology, approach, and philosophy made comparison less direct, and in those cases, the thinking of the group was recorded. After the initial evaluation, the remainder of the faculty reviewed the results and any disagreements were resolved. Results: The most important finding of the study was how closely the white paper proposals for a general clinical informatics fellowship program aligned with the reality of our existing pathology informatics fellowship. The program charter and operations of the program were judged to be concordant with the great majority of specific white paper proposals. However, there were some areas of discrepancy and the reasons for the discrepancies are discussed in the manuscript. Conclusions: After the comparison, we conclude that the existing pathology informatics fellowship could easily meet all substantive proposals put forth in the 2009 clinical informatics program requirements white paper. There was also agreement on a number of philosophical issues, such as the advantages of multiple fellows, the need for core knowledge and skill sets, and the need to maintain clinical skills during informatics training. However

  16. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) fellowship program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCleary, D.D. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program administers a Graduate Fellowship Program focused toward helping students who are currently under represented in the nation`s pool of scientists and engineers, enter and complete advanced degree programs. The objectives of the program are to: (1) establish and maintain cooperative linkages between DOE and professors at universities with graduate programs leading toward degrees or with degree options in Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, and Ceramic Engineering, the disciplines most closely related to the AIM Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (2) strengthen the capabilities and increase the level of participation of currently under represented groups in master`s degree programs, and (3) offer graduate students an opportunity for practical research experience related to their thesis topic through the three-month research assignment or practicum at ORNL. The program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE).

  17. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Valdes, Carol (Editor); Brown, Tom (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1993 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC. The basic common objectives of the Program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. 1993 topics include wide band fiber optic communications, a prototype expert/information system for examining environmental risks of KSC activities, alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies, rack insertion end effector (RIEE) automation, FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene, switch configuration for migration to optical fiber network, and more.

  18. Creating a Fellowship Curriculum in Patient Safety and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookire, Susan A; Gandhi, Tejal K; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to create a curriculum suitable for a newly created clinical fellowship curriculum across Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching hospitals as part of a newly created 2-year quality and safety fellowship program described in the companion article "Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality." The aim of the curriculum development process was to define, coordinate, design, and implement a set of essential skills for future physician-scholars of any specialty to lead operational quality and patient safety efforts. The process of curriculum development and the ultimate content are described in this article. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The effect of residency and fellowship type on hand surgery clinical practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan; Pierce, Paul; Chiu, David T W; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires accredited fellowship programs to exhibit proficiency in six broadly defined domains; however, core competencies specifically mandated for hand surgery training have yet to be established. Several studies have demonstrated significant disparities in exposure to essential skills and knowledge between orthopedic surgery- and plastic surgery-based hand surgery fellowship programs. To determine whether significant discrepancies also exist after fellowship between hand surgeons trained in orthopedic surgery and those trained in plastic surgery, clinical practice patterns were evaluated. A 20-question survey was created and distributed electronically to American Society for Surgery of the Hand and American Association for Hand Surgery members. Responses were compared using descriptive statistics. Nine hundred eighty-two hand surgeons (76 percent orthopedic and 24 percent plastic) responded, representing a 39 percent response rate. Most plastic surgery hand practices were academic-based (41 percent), whereas orthopedic practices were private (67 percent). More orthopedic hand surgeons worked in multipractitioner practices than plastic surgeons (54 percent versus 30 percent; p digital replantation cases (53 percent versus 22 percent; p < 0.05) but treated significantly fewer open reduction and internal fixation distal radius fractures. Orthopedic and plastic surgery hand surgeons differ significantly in their clinical practice patterns. Differences in clinical exposure during training are reflected in practice and persist over time. Referral patterns and practice situations are also contributors to ultimate practice patterns.

  20. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matovu, Joseph K B; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Mawemuko, Susan; Wamuyu-Maina, Gakenia; Bazeyo, William; Olico-Okui; Serwadda, David

    2011-02-24

    Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The program, which began in 2002, is a 2-year, full-time, non-degree Fellowship. It is open to Ugandan nationals with postgraduate training in health-related disciplines. Enrolled Fellows are attached to host institutions implementing HIV/AIDS programs and placed under the supervision of host institution and academic mentors. Fellows spend 75% of their apprenticeship at the host institutions while the remaining 25% is dedicated to didactic short courses conducted at MakSPH to enhance their knowledge base. Overall, 77 Fellows have been enrolled since 2002. Of the 57 Fellows who were admitted between 2002 and 2008, 94.7% (54) completed the Fellowship successfully and 50 (92.3%) are employed in senior leadership and management positions in Uganda and internationally. Eighty-eight percent of those employed (44/54) work in institutions registered in Uganda, indicating a high level of in-country retention. Nineteen of the 20 Fellows who were admitted between 2009 and 2010 are still undergoing training. A total of 67 institutions have hosted Fellows since 2002. The host institutions have benefited through staff training and technical expertise from the Fellows as well as through grant support to Fellows to develop and implement innovative pilot projects. The success of the program hinges on support from mentors, stakeholder involvement, and the hands-on approach employed in training. The Fellowship Program offers a unique opportunity for hands-on training in HIV/AIDS program leadership and management for both

  1. Building capacity for HIV/AIDS program leadership and management in Uganda through mentored Fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph K.B. Matovu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Around the world, health professionals and program managers are leading and managing public and private health organizations with little or no formal management and leadership training and experience. Objective: To describe an innovative 2-year, long-term apprenticeship Fellowship training program implemented by Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH to strengthen capacity for leadership and management of HIV/AIDS programs in Uganda. Implementation process: The program, which began in 2002, is a 2-year, full-time, non-degree Fellowship. It is open to Ugandan nationals with postgraduate training in health-related disciplines. Enrolled Fellows are attached to host institutions implementing HIV/AIDS programs and placed under the supervision of host institution and academic mentors. Fellows spend 75% of their apprenticeship at the host institutions while the remaining 25% is dedicated to didactic short courses conducted at MakSPH to enhance their knowledge base. Achievements: Overall, 77 Fellows have been enrolled since 2002. Of the 57 Fellows who were admitted between 2002 and 2008, 94.7% (54 completed the Fellowship successfully and 50 (92.3% are employed in senior leadership and management positions in Uganda and internationally. Eighty-eight percent of those employed (44/54 work in institutions registered in Uganda, indicating a high level of in-country retention. Nineteen of the 20 Fellows who were admitted between 2009 and 2010 are still undergoing training. A total of 67 institutions have hosted Fellows since 2002. The host institutions have benefited through staff training and technical expertise from the Fellows as well as through grant support to Fellows to develop and implement innovative pilot projects. The success of the program hinges on support from mentors, stakeholder involvement, and the hands-on approach employed in training. Conclusion: The Fellowship Program offers a unique opportunity for hands

  2. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  3. A Community of Scholars: An NEH Summer Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keroack, Elizabeth Carros

    1990-01-01

    Describes the experiences of a secondary teacher participating in a six-week National Endowment for the Humanities summer fellowship at Oxford, England. Reports that the teacher went back to her duties renewed through change. (RS)

  4. PR Fellowships are Beneficial to Teachers and Private Firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Albert

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of a faculty fellowship with a public relations firm in terms of extra help for the sponsoring organization and improved knowledge and skills for the participating faculty. (HTH)

  5. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  6. Training minimal invasive approaches in hepatopancreatobilliary fellowship: the current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Mittal, Vijay K

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing role of advanced minimally invasive procedures in hepatopancreatobilliary (HPB) surgery. However, there are no set minimum laparoscopic case requirements. Methods A 14-question electronic survey was sent to 82 worldwide HPB fellowship programme directors. Results Forty-nine per cent (n = 40) of the programme directors responded. The programmes were predominantly university based (83%). Programmes had either one (55%) or two fellows (40%) each year. Programmes (35–48%) had average annual volumes of 51–100 hepatic, 51–100 pancreatic and 25–50 biliary cases. For many programmes, <10% of hepatic (48%), pancreatic (40%) and biliary (70%) cases were done laparoscopically. The average annual fellow case volumes for hepatic, pancreatic and biliary surgeries were 25–50 (62%), 25–50 (47%) and <25 (50%), respectively. The average annual number of hepatic, pancreatic and biliary cases done laparoscopically by a fellow was 9, 9 and 4, which constitutes 36%, 36% and 16%, respectively, of the International Hepato-Pancreato-Billiary Association (IHPBA) requirement. Conclusion We surmise that the low average number of surgeries performed by minimally-invasive techniques by HPB fellows is not sufficient in today's practice. Should there be an increase in the minimal number of hepatic, pancreatic and complex biliary cases to 50, 50, and 25, with at least 50% of these performed laparoscopically? PMID:21309929

  7. Gender differences in recommendation letters for postdoctoral fellowships in geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Kuheli; Pfaff, Danielle L.; Bernstein, Ariel F.; Dillard, Joseph S.; Block, Caryn J.

    2016-11-01

    Gender disparities in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, including the geosciences, are well documented and widely discussed. In the geosciences, despite receiving 40% of doctoral degrees, women hold less than 10% of full professorial positions. A significant leak in the pipeline occurs during postdoctoral years, so biases embedded in postdoctoral processes, such as biases in recommendation letters, may be deterrents to careers in geoscience for women. Here we present an analysis of an international data set of 1,224 recommendation letters, submitted by recommenders from 54 countries, for postdoctoral fellowships in the geosciences over the period 2007-2012. We examine the relationship between applicant gender and two outcomes of interest: letter length and letter tone. Our results reveal that female applicants are only half as likely to receive excellent letters versus good letters compared to male applicants. We also find no evidence that male and female recommenders differ in their likelihood to write stronger letters for male applicants over female applicants. Our analysis also reveals significant regional differences in letter length, with letters from the Americas being significantly longer than any other region, whereas letter tone appears to be distributed equivalently across all world regions. These results suggest that women are significantly less likely to receive excellent recommendation letters than their male counterparts at a critical juncture in their career.

  8. DOE/PSU Graduate Student Fellowship Program for Hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimbala, John M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-03-30

    The primary objective of this project is to stimulate academic interest in the conventional hydropower field by supplying research support for at least eight individual Master of Science (MS) or Doctoral (PhD) level research projects, each consisting of a graduate student supervised by a faculty member. We have completed many of the individual student research projects: 2 PhD students have finished, and 4 are still working towards their PhD degree. 4 MS students have finished, and 2 are still working towards their MS degree, one of which is due to finish this April. In addition, 4 undergraduate student projects have been completed, and one is to be completed this April. These projects were supervised by 7 faculty members and an Advisory/Review Panel. Our students and faculty have presented their work at national or international conferences and have submitted several journal publications. Three of our graduate students (Keith Martin, Dan Leonard and Hosein Foroutan) have received HRF Fellowships during the course of this project. All of the remaining students are anticipated to be graduated by the end of Fall Semester 2014. All of the tasks for this project will have been completed once all the students have been graduated, although it will be another year or two until all the journal publications have been finalized based on the work performed as part of this DOE Hydropower project.

  9. UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clow, Shandra Deann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The UC/Los Alamos Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot Program (Pilot) for existing postdoctoral researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) to gain skills in entrepreneurship and commercializing technology as part of their postdoctoral experience. This program will incorporate training and mentoring during the first 6-month period, culminating in a focused 6-month Fellowship aimed at creating a new business in Northern New Mexico.

  10. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, David S; Levy, Bruce P; Lane, William J; Lee, Roy E; Baron, Jason M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Onozato, Maristela L; Kim, Jiyeon; Dighe, Anand S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a

  11. The LSSTC Data Science Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam; Walkowicz, Lucianne; LSSTC DSFP Leadership Council

    2017-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Corporation (LSSTC) Data Science Fellowship Program (DSFP) is a unique professional development program for astronomy graduate students. DSFP students complete a series of six, one-week long training sessions over the course of two years. The sessions are cumulative, each building on the last, to allow an in-depth exploration of the topics covered: data science basics, statistics, image processing, machine learning, scalable software, data visualization, time-series analysis, and science communication. The first session was held in Aug 2016 at Northwestern University, with all materials and lectures publicly available via github and YouTube. Each session focuses on a series of technical problems which are written in iPython notebooks. The initial class of fellows includes 16 students selected from across the globe, while an additional 14 fellows will be added to the program in year 2. Future sessions of the DSFP will be hosted by a rotating cast of LSSTC member institutions. The DSFP is designed to supplement graduate education in astronomy by teaching the essential skills necessary for dealing with big data, serving as a resource for all in the LSST era. The LSSTC DSFP is made possible by the generous support of the LSST Corporation, the Data Science Initiative (DSI) at Northwestern, and CIERA.

  12. 7 CFR 3402.8 - Fellowship activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... supported by the grant. This includes the time used for special international study or thesis/dissertation research, if the international travel is funded through a special international study or thesis...

  13. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  14. DOE Theory Graduate Student Fellowship: Gustavo Marques Tavares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaltz, Martin [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Physics Dept.

    2015-12-30

    Marques Tavares was awarded a fellowship for his proposal “The ttbar asymmetry and beyond” to starting in September 2012. This is the final report summarizing the research activities and accomplishments achieved with this grant support. With support from the DOE graduate fellowship Marques Tavares, Katz and Xu at BU have investigated a new technique for obtaining quantitative results in strongly coupled field theories with broken conformal invariance. Such theories are especially interesting as they may be candidates for physics beyond the standard model with possible applications to strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking. However, because of the strong coupling even qualitative results about the spectrum of such theories are not rigorously understood.

  15. 21st Century Power Partnership: September 2016 Fellowship Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Timothy J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This report details the 21st Century Power Partnership fellowship from September 2016. This Fellowship is a follow-up to the Technical Audit of Eskom's Medium- and Long-term Modelling Capabilities, conducted by U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in April 2016. The prospect and role of variable renewable energy (vRE) in South Africa poses new modelling-related challenges that Eskom is actively working to address by improving the fidelity of PLEXOS LT and ST models.

  16. 22 CFR 140.8 - Recipients of scholarships, fellowships, and participant training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recipients of scholarships, fellowships, and... ASSISTANCE TO DRUG TRAFFICKERS Enforcement § 140.8 Recipients of scholarships, fellowships, and participant... of scholarships, fellowships, or participant training, except those falling under the...

  17. Status of pediatric anesthesiology fellowship research education in the United States: a survey of fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hubert A; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Hardy, Courtney A; Suresh, Santhanam

    2014-03-01

    Currently, very little information is known regarding the research education of pediatric anesthesia fellows. The main objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the status of research training in pediatric anesthesia fellowship programs in the United States. Survey responses were solicited from forty-six pediatric anesthesia fellowship directors. Questions evaluated department demographic information, the extent of faculty research activity, research resources and research funding in the department, the characteristics of fellow research education and fellow research productivity, departmental support for fellow research, and perceived barriers to fellow research education. Thirty-six of forty-six fellowship directors responded to the survey, for a response rate of 78%. Eight of fourteen (57%) programs with a structured curriculum had more than 20% of graduating fellows publish a peer-reviewed manuscript compared with only five of twenty-two (23%) programs, which did not have a structured research curriculum (P = 0.03). While the majority of program directors (thirty of thirty-six (83%)) did not think that fellows are adequately trained to pursue research activities, only a minority of program directors (7 of 36 (19%)) thought that an extra year of fellowship dedicated to research should become a requirement. Structured research curriculum is associated with increased research productivity during pediatric anesthesia fellowship. Important barriers to fellows' research education include high clinical demands and lack of research time for faculty. Despite acknowledging the poor research education, a small minority of fellowship directors supports the addition of an extra year exclusively dedicated to research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Prevention Fellowship provides a strong foundation for scientists and clinicians to train in the field of cancer prevention and control. This structured, multidisciplinary program offers early career scientists from different health disciplines a variety of postdoctoral training opportunities . | Training to form a strong foundation in cancer prevention and control for scientists and clinicians.

  19. Competitiveness of the match for interventional radiology and neuroradiology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jim Y; Agarwal, Vikas; Orons, Philip D

    2014-11-01

    Overall resident interest in certain subspecialties changes with time. We sought to investigate the latest 6-year trend in interventional radiology (IR) and neuroradiology fellowship applications and how it has affected competitiveness in obtaining a position. We analyzed statistics published by the National Resident Matching Program in Results and Data: Specialties Matching Service from 2008 to 2013. From these data, we calculated the positions per IR applicant (PPIRA) and positions per neuroradiology applicant (PPNRA) for each year. The number of positions per applicant is one way to assess specialty competitiveness on a supply-and-demand basis. A lower PPIRA or PPNRA indicates a more competitive year. PPIRA has decreased every year, from 1.71 to the present 0.84, and contributed to 52 applicants being unmatched in 2013, up from 9 in 2008. Accordingly, the number of unfilled positions has decreased from 86 in 2008 to 8 in 2013. PPNRA waxed and waned from 2008 to 2010 but stabilized at around 1.15 thereafter. The number of unfilled positions has never dropped below 46. The number of unmatched applicants was consistently in the teens, except in 2011, when it increased to 23. Interest in IR fellowship has increased significantly over the past 6 years, whereas interest in neuroradiology fellowships has plateaued. IR fellowships have become increasingly competitive, leading to many unmatched residents. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Personality traits within a pediatric surgery fellowship applicant pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazboun, Rajaie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Baerg, Joanne; Moores, Donald; Tagge, Edward P

    2017-10-01

    The Big Five framework examines five factors that represent a description of human personality. These factors correlate with success measures and job satisfaction. The Big Five Inventory is a 44-item instrument designed to measure the Big Five framework. Our aim was to document the distribution of Big Five personality traits among Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants, compare with community norms, surgical residents, between genders, and correlate to the fellowship match results. Forty Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants at a university hospital completed the Big Five Inventory during the interview process. It was analyzed and compared with general surgery residents' results and community norms. The data were compared regarding gender and match results. Continuous variables were compared by unpaired t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests. A P value surgery residents and community norms, applicants of both genders scored higher on agreeableness (P Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants expressed higher levels of desirable professional traits compared with general surgery residents and community norms. Male applicants demonstrated higher emotional stability than females. Conscientiousness was higher in matching applicants. This first reported experience with personality testing in Pediatric Surgery fellow selection demonstrated potential utility in applicant matching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  2. Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Educational Research. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James S.

    This postdoctoral fellowship program involved the following three phases: 1) systematic instruction in the sociology of complex organizations with particular emphasis on the organizational analysis of schools and schooling; 2) systematic instruction in multivariate regression approaches to non-experimental research with particular emphasis on…

  3. Seven Personal Accounts from the 2012 ACTE Fellowship Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebe, Connie; Mosley, Chaney; Biggerstaff, Patrick; Cox, Lynne Cagle; Williams, Hershel; Lindsley, Dawn; Umehira, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Each year since 2009, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) has supported the National Leadership Fellowship Program. This program is geared towards individuals with a desire not only to develop their own leadership skills, but also to become advocates for career and technical education (CTE). Responsibilities and expectations…

  4. A syllabus for fellowship education in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrand, Susan B; Walsh, Declan; Nelson, Kristine A; Davis, Mellar P

    2003-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant growth in palliative medicine training programs and positions. There are plans to pursue palliative medicine specialty status with the American Board of Medical Specialties and accreditation of fellowship programs with the American College of Graduate Medical Education. A work group of program directors, supported initially by the Cleveland Clinic and then by the American Board of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, has recently published standards for fellowship training. Despite this, fundamental questions remain about defining the field and delineating the knowledge and skills expected following completion of specialty training. In this article, we describe the first fellowship program in palliative medicine (PMP) in the United States, developed and supported by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. The program has been implemented as part of the Harry R. Horvitz Center for Palliative Medicine, founded in 1987 as the first comprehensive integrated US program in this field. This training program, in existence since 1989, features a traditional rotational structure with an inpatient primary care service, inpatient consult services, and an outpatient consult/hospice service. This article outlines the syllabus developed for this fellowship, given what we believe to be the essential knowledge base for the field of palliative medicine.

  5. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Kevin M; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of scholarly productivity as measured by research output is a key component of decisions regarding appointment and advancement in academic otolaryngology. An increasing number of graduating residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships, and evaluation of research productivity among these subspecialists is important in determining their role in academic otolaryngology departments. The h-index is a reliable indicator of research productivity, as it takes into account both quantity and relevance of research contributions. Our objective was to evaluate and compare trends in research productivity among the various otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of research productivity trends among otolaryngology subspecialties using the h-index. Faculty members from 92 academic otolaryngology departments were organized by subspecialty and academic rank, and their research productivity, as measured by the h-index, was calculated using the Scopus database. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists in academic programs had higher h-indices than non-fellowship-trained otolaryngologists. Head and neck surgeons and otologists had significantly higher research productivity than their peers in other otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of the subspecialties of chairpersons indicated that 62% were either head and neck surgeons or otologists. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists had higher h-indices, and faculty members trained in the subspecialties with the highest research productivity were disproportionately represented in positions of leadership within academic otolaryngology, probably reflecting the importance of research contributions in the academic advancement process, although other factors, such as educational contributions and clinical performance, may also be important factors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. The financial value of fellowship training in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Benjamin P; Darrow, David H; Derkay, Craig S

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the financial impact of pursuing a fellowship in otolaryngology. Retrospective financial analysis using American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery survey data. The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery report, entitled Socioeconomic Study among Members April 2011, gives a financial profile of respondents who reported their primary area of specialization as either general otolaryngology or a specific area of subspecialization. Weighted averages were calculated from the reported data. The weighted averages were used to calculate a net present value (NPV) over a 30-year contiguous career. The NPV for general otolaryngology was $4.73 million. The NPV for the following subspecialties in relation to general otolaryngology were (in hundred thousands) as follows: otolaryngologic allergy (-$1153), sleep medicine (-$677), otology/neurotology (-$339), laryngology (-$288), head and neck (-$191), pediatric otolaryngology (-$176), facial plastic surgery (-$139), skull base surgery ($122), rhinology ($285), and allergy and immunology ($350). Ninety-four percent of general otolaryngology respondents were in private practice. Most subspecialists worked in an academic setting. Fellowship training in otolaryngology will affect career earnings of prospective fellows. The overall financial impact of fellowship training, calculating in the delay in receiving a full clinical salary, should be factored into the decision to pursue fellowship training.

  7. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  8. “HAVING FELLOWSHIP WITH GOD” ACCORDING TO 1 JOHN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even an Internet search on this subject revealed 7,5 million sites in which the noun ... be seen as the first contribution and publication on “Spirituality in 1 John.” 5 ..... deep this fellowship can be is indicated by the Greek linguistics in verse. 3.

  9. Post-Doctoral Fellowship for Merton S. Krause. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Philip W.

    The final quarter of Krause's fellowship year was spent in completing his interviews with political socialization researchers in the eastern United States and his work on methodological problems. Krause also completed a long essay on the nature and implications of the "matrix perspective" for research planning, pursued his study of measurement…

  10. Participation of Negroes in Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhaupt, Hans

    Woodrow Wilson Fellowships were awarded to 107 graduates from Negro colleges between 1958 and 1962 but to only 69 graduates during the following 5 years. The realization that this drop may have been caused by increased recruiting of Negro students by northern colleges and concern about the small number of black students at the graduate level led…

  11. 42 CFR 61.3 - Purpose of regular fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mental diseases and impairments of man, (2) the organization, provision, and financing of health services, (3) the causes, prevention, and control of air pollution, and (4) medical library and related health... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose of regular fellowships. 61.3 Section...

  12. Family Therapy Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study describes the current state of family therapy training in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship programs. Method: Child and adolescent psychiatry fellows (N = 66) from seven training programs completed a questionnaire assessing demographics, family therapy training experiences, common models of treatment and…

  13. Trends in U.S. Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel, Ali; Poley, Marian; Zalzal, George H; Chan, Kenny; Preciado, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Interest in pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training is growing. The workforce implications of this growing interest are unclear and understudied. To analyze trends in pediatric otolaryngology training, determine where fellows who graduated over the past 10 years are currently practicing, and test the hypothesis that graduates from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–accredited programs were more likely to have academic tertiary positions with faculty appointments. We conducted a web-based analysis of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship graduates. The names of all 274 applicants who were matched to pediatric otolaryngology fellowships from May 31, 2003, to May 31, 2014, were obtained from the SF Match website. Accreditation status of each program for each match year was obtained from the ACGME website. We then performed an Internet search for the current practice location of each matched applicant. Analysis was conducted from January 1, 2015, to May 1, 2015. Practice setting per year of fellowship match and accreditation status of program. For the 2003 to the 2014 match years, there was an increase from 5 to 22 accredited pediatric otolaryngology fellowship programs overall; simultaneously, the number of yearly matched applicants increased from 14 to 35. More graduates with ACGME accreditation practice at academic settings compared with graduates without ACGME accreditation although the difference was not statistically significant (67.1% vs. 50.7%; P = .15). Graduates from accredited programs, however, were significantly more likely to practice at a hospital-based setting compared with those from nonaccredited programs (81.7% vs. 65.5%; P = .003). Fellows trained in the last 10 years are relatively well distributed across the country. The number of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship applicants as well as total number of matched applicants and ACGME-accredited positions has risen in the last 10 years. It appears that a higher

  14. 34 CFR 1100.25 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award through the fellow's employer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.25 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award through the fellow's employer? (a) If the Director pays a fellowship award through the fellow's employer, the employer shall submit a payment schedule to the Director for approval...

  15. Misrepresentation of research citations by applicants to a primary care sports medicine fellowship program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, James L; Hatzenbuehler, John R; Dexter, William W; Kuhn, Celine B

    2008-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of misrepresentation of publications and national presentations claimed in applications to the Maine Medical Center (MMC) Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Program from 2001 through 2004. A retrospective chart review study. The Maine Medical Center Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Program. Presentations were confirmed in the program of the cited meeting or by contacting the sponsoring organization. Publications were verified by performing a MEDLINE search or by cross-referencing in Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory. If the title was listed, the citation was verified by contacting the publisher. Fifty applicants reported research publications. Of those, 14 applications had publications that could not be verified. The overall misrepresentation rate was 11.3%; among applicants claiming publications it was 28%. There was no difference in misrepresentation rate between specialties. Eighteen applicants reported giving national presentations, and nine presentations could not be verified, corresponding to an overall misrepresentation rate of 5.6%. Of applicants claiming presentations, 38.9% had at least one misrepresentation. Applicants to the Maine Medical Center Sports Medicine Fellowship Program were found to have high rates of misrepresentation in their citations of both publications and presentations.

  16. Evaluation of Association Between Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship Length and a Career in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesterson, Joshua P; Szender, J Brian; Schaefer, Eric; Fanning, James; Lele, Shashikant; Frederick, Peter

    2016-04-28

    The purpose of this study is to determine the association between gynecologic oncology fellowship training factors, including fellowship length, and a career in academic medicine. A survey was sent to all 980 gynecologic oncologists identified via the SGO membership directory. The survey questions focused on demographics, fellowship training, practice- type, and research involvement. Demographics of the study population and survey responses were reported using frequencies and percentages. Chi-squared tests were used to test for associations between selected survey responses and length of fellowship. The authors received 410 (42 %) responses. Most respondents (60 %) graduated from a 3-year fellowship, while 27 and 13 % attended 2- and 4-year fellowships, respectively. Practice descriptions included academic/university (52 %), community/private practice (21 %), private practice with academic appointment (20 %), and other (7 %). A majority (64 %) reported current involvement in research as a principal investigator (PI); however, 54 % reported spending 10 % or less of their time in research-related activities. Approximately half reported that their fellowship research experience contributed to their current practice. Graduates of 3- and 4-year fellowships had similar rates of employment in academic/university settings (58 and 52 %, respectively). Graduates of 4-year fellowships were more likely to hold an advanced degree and 11 or more publications at completion of fellowship. A majority of graduates of a gynecologic oncology fellowship practice in an academic/university setting and are involved in research. Fellowship length does not correlate with a current academic medicine appointment. Graduates of 4-year fellowships are more likely to hold additional advanced degrees and more publications.

  17. Different tracks for pathology informatics fellowship training: Experiences of and input from trainees in a large multisite fellowship program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce P Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology Informatics is a new field; a field that is still defining itself even as it begins the formalization, accreditation, and board certification process. At the same time, Pathology itself is changing in a variety of ways that impact informatics, including subspecialization and an increased use of data analysis. In this paper, we examine how these changes impact both the structure of Pathology Informatics fellowship programs and the fellows′ goals within those programs. Materials and Methods: As part of our regular program review process, the fellows evaluated the value and effectiveness of our existing fellowship tracks (Research Informatics, Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics, Clinical One-year Focused Informatics, and Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics. They compared their education, informatics background, and anticipated career paths and analyzed them for correlations between those parameters and the fellowship track chosen. All current and past fellows of the program were actively involved with the project. Results: Fellows′ anticipated career paths correlated very well with the specific tracks in the program. A small set of fellows (Clinical - one or two year - Focused Informatics tracks anticipated clinical careers primarily focused in informatics (Director of Informatics. The majority of the fellows, however, anticipated a career practicing in a Pathology subspecialty, using their informatics training to enhance that practice (Clinical 1 + 1 Subspecialty Pathology and Informatics Track. Significantly, all fellows on this track reported they would not have considered a Clinical Two-year Focused Informatics track if it was the only track offered. The Research and the Clinical One-year Focused Informatics tracks each displayed unique value for different situations. Conclusions: It seems a "one size fits all" fellowship structure does not fit the needs of the majority of potential Pathology

  18. Information Update Research Fellowship for International Young Scientists NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Danish National Research Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects with DFG News in Brief: NSFC set up Department of Medical Sciences NSFC Announced Approved Cooperative Projects With France and Germany NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Academy of Finland NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects with K. T. Li Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research projects With Japan Science and Technology Agency NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects With Royal Society of Edinburgh for 2010 NSFC Announced a List of proved Cooperative Projects With Three International Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Research Fellowship for International Young Scientists NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Danish National Research Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects with DFG News in Brief: NSFC set up Department of Medical Sciences NSFC Announced Approved Cooperative Projects With France and Germany NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research Projects With Academy of Finland NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects with K. T. Li Foundation NSFC Announced Results of Preliminary Evaluation of Bilateral Cooperative Research projects With Japan Science and Technology Agency NSFC Announced Application Guide for Cooperative Research Projects With Royal Society of Edinburgh for 2010 NSFC Announced a List of proved Cooperative Projects With Three International Organizations

  19. Introduction to EU Grants and Fellowships for PhD students and early Post-docs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epp Julia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This talk is based on the presentation “Introduction to EU Grants and Fellowships for PhD students and early Post-docs” and aims at informing young scientists about individual funding schemes in FP7 Specific Programmes “People” and “Ideas”. It also aims at encouraging young scientists employed at Max Planck Institutes in the “Regional Cluster Bavaria”, or scientists who wish to come to Max Planck Institutes which are part of the cluster, to benefit from the support of the Regional EU Office Bavaria, whose consultants can give valuable administrative and tailor-made internal advice to add on the success of a competitive scientific proposal.

  20. Characteristics of pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M

    2009-03-01

    To explore the structure, components, and training goals of pediatric hospitalist fellowship programs in North America. We constructed a 17-item structured questionnaire to be administered by phone. Questionnaire items focused on documenting goals, training, requirements, and clinical duties of pediatric hospitalist training programs. From February through June 2007, research staff contacted directors of the programs. Responses were analyzed to determine program characteristics, including goals, formal training requirements, clinical rotations, and participation in hospital administrative activities. All 8 training programs completed the survey. There appear to be 2 distinct tracks for pediatric hospitalist training programs: clinical or academic specialization. Currently there are no standards or requirements for fellowship training from an external accrediting body and the curriculum for these programs is likely driven by service requirements and speculation on the needs of a future generation of pediatric hospitalists. The stated goals of the programs were quite similar. Seven reported that the provision of advanced training in the clinical care of hospitalized patients, quality improvement (QI), and hospital administration are central goals of their training program. Six reported training in the education of medical students and residents to be a primary goal, while 5 indicated training in health services research as a primary goal. Pediatric hospitalist fellowships are in the very early stages of their development. In time, greater structure across institutions will need to be put in place if they are to succeed in becoming a necessary prerequisite to the practice of hospital medicine. (c) 2009 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Core Competencies in Geriatric Dentistry Fellowship Programs: a Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Christie M; Andrade, Allen D; Ruiz, Jorge G; Gibson, Gretchen

    2016-07-01

    The healthcare workforce is challenged with preparing for the increasing number of older persons and complexities of their healthcare needs. Fellowship trained geriatric dentists are charged with the task of addressing the dental needs of this vastly growing cohort.The purpose of this study is to formulate a set of competencies for Geriatric Dental Fellowship Training Programs. The Delphi technique-a series of three rounds of anonymous questionnaires to obtain the opinions of experts without bringing them together. In Round 1, we proposed 45 competencies based on findings in previous literature. In Round 2, there were 19 respondents whose edits narrowed our list to 39 competencies proposed by the participants. In Round 3, based on group consensus we formulated a final list of 42 competencies. Utilizing the Delphi process, a panel of geriatric dental experts identified a set of core competencies for curriculums in dental fellowship programs. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Fellowship training in pediatric pathology: a guide for program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Raja M; Somers, Gino R; Comstock, Jessica M; Buchino, John J; Timmons, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has provided guidance for specialty and subspecialty fellowship training programs by defining 6 core competencies that must be met. Furthermore, the ACGME has defined several program requirements for pathology training, including those applicable to several pathology subspecialties. However, the requirements are broad and lack specific details, particularly as they pertain to the unique nature of pediatric pathology. The Fellowship Committee of the Society for Pediatric Pathology examined the ACGME requirements and interpreted the guidelines with respect to their application to training in pediatric pathology. The Committee worked within the ACGME guidelines to provide an expanded and more comprehensive set of guidelines for use by pediatric pathology fellowship directors and trainees. The resultant document lists the educational goals, core competencies, and program requirements with specific application to pediatric pathology. In addition, methods for assessing and documenting the progress of the individual trainees as they progress through each requirement are provided. It is to be emphasized that many of the guidelines set forthwith are flexible, and allowances should be made for individual differences of each training program.

  3. A suggested core content for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarris, Lalena M; Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Lind, Karen; Jordan, Jaime; Clarke, Sam; Guth, Todd A; Santen, Sally A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2012-12-01

    A working group at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on education research in emergency medicine (EM) convened to develop a curriculum for dedicated postgraduate fellowships in EM education scholarship. This fellowship is intended to create future education scholars, equipped with the skills to thrive in academic careers. This proceedings article reports on the consensus of a breakout session subgroup tasked with defining a common core content for education scholarship fellowships. The authors propose that the core content of an EM education scholarship fellowship can be categorized in four distinct areas: career development, theories of learning and teaching methods, education research methods, and educational program administration. This core content can be incorporated into curricula for education scholarship fellowships in EM or other fields and can also be adapted for use in general medical education fellowships.

  4. Adult nephrology fellowship training in the United States: trends and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Mark E

    2007-04-01

    This article reviews trends and issues related to adult nephrology fellowship education in the United States. The number of nephrology fellowship programs and trainees has continued to increase slowly despite limitations in funding of graduate medical education. The use of the Electronic Residency Application System has provided information for the first time on the number, demographics, and behavior of applicants that can be used as baseline data for tracking trends in fellowship applications and for formulating training policies. Issues that nephrology training programs face are discussed in this review: (1) A more stringent graduate medical education regulatory environment, (2) the use of the National Resident Matching Program to enhance the nephrology fellowship applicant selection process, (3) future nephrology workforce shortages, and (4) the continued subspecialization of nephrology. By working together, nephrology fellowship programs can overcome barriers that are raised by these issues and improve the fellowship training experience.

  5. For Love, Not Money: The Financial Implications of Surgical Fellowship Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inclan, Paul M; Hyde, Adam S; Hulme, Michael; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Surgical residents cite increased income potential as a motivation for pursuing fellowship training, despite little evidence supporting this perception. Thus, our goal is to quantify the financial impact of surgical fellowship training on financial career value. By using Medical Group Management Association and Association of American Medical Colleges physician income data, and accounting for resident salary, student debt, a progressive tax structure, and forgone wages associated with prolonged training, we generated a net present value (NPV) for both generalist and subspecialist surgeons. By comparing generalist and subspecialist career values, we determined that cardiovascular (NPV = 698,931), pediatric (430,964), thoracic (239,189), bariatric (166,493), vascular (96,071), and transplant (46,669) fellowships improve career value. Alternatively, trauma (11,374), colorectal (44,622), surgical oncology (203,021), and breast surgery (326,465) fellowships all reduce career value. In orthopedic surgery, spine (505,198), trauma (123,250), hip and joint (60,372), and sport medicine (56,167) fellowships improve career value, whereas shoulder and elbow (4,539), foot and ankle (173,766), hand (366,300), and pediatric (489,683) fellowships reduce career NPV. In obstetrics and gynecology, reproductive endocrinology (352,854), and maternal and fetal medicine (322,511) fellowships improve career value, whereas gynecology oncology (28,101) and urogynecology (206,171) fellowships reduce career value. These data indicate that the financial return of fellowship is highly variable.

  6. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  7. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  8. Academic Productivity of Faculty Associated With Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Ricci, Joseph A; Silvestre, Jason; Ho, Olivia A; Ganor, Oren; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-03-29

    The H-index is increasingly being used as a measure of academic productivity and has been applied to various surgical disciplines. Here the authors calculate the H-index of craniofacial surgery fellowship faculty in North America in order to determine its utility for academic productivity among craniofacial surgeons. A list of fellowship programs was obtained from the website of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery. Faculty demographics and institution characteristics were obtained from official program websites and the H-index was calculated using Scopus (Elsevier, USA). Data were assessed using bivariate analysis tools (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests) to determine the relationship between independent variables and career publications, H-index and 5-year H-index (H5-index) of faculty. Dunn test for multiple comparisons was also calculated. A total of 102 faculty members from 29 craniofacial surgery fellowship programs were identified and included. Faculty demographics reflected a median age of 48 (interquartile range [IQR] 13), a predominantly male sample (88/102, 89.7%), and the rank of assistant professor being the most common among faculty members (41/102, 40.2%). Median of career publications per faculty was 37 (IQR 52.5) and medians of H-index and H5-index were 10.0 (IQR 13.75) and 3.5 (IQR 3.25), respectively. Greater age, male gender, Fellow of the American College of Surgeons membership, higher academic rank, and program affiliation with ranked research medical schools were significantly associated with higher H-indices. Variables associated with seniority were positively associated with the H-index. These results suggest that the H-index may be used as an adjunct in determining academic productivity for promotions among craniofacial surgeons.

  9. Congenital cardiac surgery fellowship training: A status update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Brian; Karamlou, Tara; Baumgartner, William; Merrill, Walter; Backer, Carl

    2016-06-01

    In 2007, congenital cardiac surgery became a recognized fellowship by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and leads to board certification through the American Board of Thoracic Surgery (ABTS). We highlight the strengths and weaknesses in the current system of accredited training. Data were collected from program directors, the ACGME, and the ABTS. In addition, surveys were sent to training program graduates. Topics included program accreditation status, number of fellows trained per year and per program, match results, fellow operative experience, fellow satisfaction, and post-fellowship employment status. There are twelve active accredited fellowship programs, and 44 trainees have completed accredited training. Each active program has trained a median of 3 fellows (range: 0-7). Operative logs were obtained from 38 of 44 (86%) graduates. The median number of total cases (minimum 75) was 136 (range: 75-236). For complex neonates (minimum 5), the median number of cases was 6 (range: 2-17). Some fellows failed to meet the minimum requirements. Thirty-six (82%) graduates responded to the survey; most were satisfied with their overall operative experience, but less with their neonatal operative experience. Of this total, 84% are currently practicing congenital cardiac surgery, and 74% secured jobs prior to completing their residency. Since 2007, congenital cardiac surgery training has been accredited by the ACGME. In general, the training is uniform, the operative experience is robust, and the fellows are satisfied. Although shortcomings remain, this study highlights the many strengths of the current system. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 75 FR 49484 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Jacob K. Javits Fellowship Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... education. The selected fields in the arts are: Creative writing, music performance, music theory, music...: September 30, 2010. Deadline for Transmittal of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA... purpose of the Jacob K. Javits (JKJ) Fellowship Program is to award fellowships to eligible students...

  11. 34 CFR 1100.31 - Who is responsible for oversight of fellowship activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is responsible for oversight of fellowship activities? 1100.31 Section 1100.31 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... services, to assume direct supervision of the fellowship activities. (b) Fellows may be assigned a...

  12. 34 CFR 535.1 - What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship... (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION: GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 535.1 What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1250 - How we count grants, scholarships, fellowships or gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How we count grants, scholarships... grants, scholarships, fellowships or gifts. (a) When we determine your resources (or your spouse's, if any), we will exclude for 9 months any portion of any grant, scholarship, fellowship, or gift that...

  14. 34 CFR 1100.22 - How does the Director determine the amount of a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Director determine the amount of a... (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.22 How does the Director determine the amount of...

  15. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, P<.05). Fellowship training is thus a worthwhile endeavor.

  16. International Scientists Programs:A New Gateway to Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Ling

    2010-01-01

    @@ The Chinese Academy of Sciences(CAS)launched in 2009 a major effort to promote international cooperation and scientific innovation: the Visiting Professorship Program for Senior International Scientists and the Fellowship Program for Young International Scientists.As part of the Academy's long endeavor to attract foreign researchers,both programs received hundreds of applications from abroad.

  17. Orthopedic surgery fellowships: the effects of interviewing and how residents establish a rank list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Matthew C; Wong, Jeffrey; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia; SooHoo, Nelson Fong; Luck, James V; Eckardt, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match was established in 2008 to streamline and improve the process of matching residents and fellowships. The purpose of this study was to quantify the factors that affect the application process and to determine how residents establish a rank list. The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match has improved the ability of residents and programs to consider their options more carefully and to focus on finding the best match. However, this process introduces new factors for all parties involved to consider. The costs of the interview process and time away from service for residents may be larger than anticipated. Ultimately, residents value operative experience and staff members at a fellowship more than all other factors when selecting a fellowship.

  18. Factors impacting the decision to participate in and satisfaction with public/community psychiatry fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Michael; LeMelle, Stephanie; Ranz, Jules

    2014-10-01

    During yearly meetings of the recently developed network of 15 public/community psychiatry fellowships, it has been noted that programs are having varying degrees of success with regard to recruitment. To understand factors that impact recruitment, a quality improvement survey of fellows and alumni was conducted. Respondents were asked to rate overall satisfaction with their fellowship training as well as perceived benefits and obstacles to participating in a fellowship program, and impact on their careers. A total of 155 (57%) fellows and alumni responded. Factor analysis was used to condense the variables, and a multiple regression explored factors predicting overall fellowship program satisfaction. Factors that represented perceived benefits had higher means than did factors that represent obstacles. Respondents highly valued the extent to which these fellowships enhanced their careers, with regard to job opportunities, academics, networking and leadership.

  19. Education in Nephrology Fellowship: A Survey-Based Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rope, Robert W; Pivert, Kurtis A; Parker, Mark G; Sozio, Stephen M; Merell, Sylvia Bereknyei

    2017-07-01

    Educational needs assessments for nephrology fellowship training are limited. This study assessed fellows' perceptions of current educational needs and interest in novel modalities that may improve their educational experience and quantified educational resources used by programs and fellows. We distributed a seven-question electronic survey to all United States-based fellows receiving complimentary American Society of Nephrology (ASN) membership at the end of the 2015-2016 academic year in conjunction with the ASN Nephrology Fellows Survey. One third (320 of 863; 37%) of fellows in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited positions responded. Most respondents rated overall quality of teaching in fellowship as either "good" (37%) or "excellent" (44%), and most (55%) second-year fellows felt "fully prepared" for independent practice. Common educational resources used by fellows included UpToDate, Journal of the American Society of Nephrology/Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, and Nephrology Self-Assessment Program; others-including ASN's online curricula-were used less often. Fellows indicated interest in additional instruction in several core topics, including home dialysis modalities, ultrasonography, and pathology. Respondents strongly supported interventions to improve pathology instruction and increase time for physiology and clinical review. In conclusion, current nephrology fellows perceive several gaps in training. Innovation in education and training is needed to better prepare future nephrologists for the growing challenges of kidney care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  20. Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowships: a descriptive analysis of programs and postgraduate positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Stephanie; Gangadharan, Amy; Johnson, Hiliary; Schleck, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Alexander, James G

    2012-01-01

    Postdoctoral pharmacy industry fellowship programs and the employment of fellowship graduates are described. A list of postgraduate industry fellowships was gathered from the 2009 ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting. Data regarding program characteristics were collected using the Personnel Placement Service database and program-specific brochures. After data compilation, a standardized survey was sent in January 2010 via e-mail to the point of contact for all programs to confirm the accuracy of the program's characteristics. Only academically affiliated industry fellowship programs were analyzed. Retrospective data were collected regarding the first position of employment for all fellows who graduated from the program between 2005 and 2009 and the position of those same individuals at the time of survey completion. Surveys were sent to 64 postgraduate industry fellowship programs affiliated with a school of pharmacy, 56 (87.5%) of whom responded. The departmental breakdown for positions offered (n = 75) across all academically affiliated industry fellowship programs (including nonresponders) was as follows: medical affairs (38.7%, n = 29), clinical research (32.0%, n = 24), regulatory affairs (9.3%, n = 7), commercial (8.0%, n = 6), health economics and outcomes research (8.0%, n = 6), and pharmacovigilance (4.0%, n = 3). Data from fellows during years 1-5 after completion of the industry fellowship indicated that 90.5% of former fellows remained in the industry (n = 238). The postgraduate industry fellowship programs surveyed indicated that the majority of fellowship graduates continued to hold positions in industry after program completion. The majority of industry fellowships and subsequent job placements occurred in the areas of medical affairs, clinical research, and regulatory affairs.

  1. Emergency radiology fellowship training in the USA: a web-based survey of academic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Mougnyan; Hansberry, David; Balasubramanya, Rashmi; Li, Zhengteng; Gandhe, Ashish; Selvarajan, Santosh; Sharma, Pranshu

    2017-02-01

    Interest in emergency radiology as a distinct subspecialty within radiology continues to rise in the USA and globally. While acute care imaging has been performed since the earliest days of the specialty, fellowship training in emergency radiology is a relatively new phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of emergency radiology training in the USA, using data derived from the official websites of US residency training programs. The most current list of radiology residency programs participating in the 2017 match was obtained from the official Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) website. The total number of emergency radiology fellowships was recorded after visiting available websites of each academic radiology program. The total number of subspecialty fellowships offered by each academic radiology program was also recorded. There were 12 confirmed emergency radiology fellowships offered in the USA for a combined total of 22 fellowship positions. Eleven programs were 1 year in duration, with one program offering a one- or two-year option. One hundred eight of the 174 (approximately 62 %) surveyed academic radiology programs offered at least one subspecialty fellowship. Emergency radiology fellowships are on the rise, paralleling the growth of emergency radiology as a distinct subspecialty within radiology.

  2. Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furze, Jennifer A; Tichenor, Carol Jo; Fisher, Beth E; Jensen, Gail M; Rapport, Mary Jane

    2016-07-01

    The physical therapy profession continues to respond to the complex and changing landscape of health care to meet the needs of patients and the demands of patient care. Consistent with this evolution is the rapid development and expansion of residency and fellowship postprofessional programs. With the interested number of applicants exceeding the number of residency and fellowship slots available, a "critical period" in the educational process is emerging. The purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to analyze the state of residency and fellowship education within the profession, (2) to identify best practice elements from other health professions that are applicable to physical therapy residency and fellowship education, and (3) to propose a working framework grounded in common domains of competence to be used as a platform for dialogue, consistency, and quality across all residency and fellowship programs. Seven domains of competence are proposed to theoretically ground residency and fellowship programs and facilitate a more consistent approach to curricular development and assessment. Although the recent proliferation of residency and fellowship programs attempts to meet the demand of physical therapists seeking advanced educational opportunities, it is imperative that these programs are consistently delivering high-quality education with a common focus on delivering health care in the context of societal needs. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  3. Increasing Trends in Orthopedic Fellowships Are Not due to Inadequate Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Almansoori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic residents have one of the highest fellowship participation rates among medical specialities and there are growing concerns that inadequate residency training may be contributing to this trend. Therefore, a mixed-exploratory research survey was distributed to all 148 graduating Canadian orthopedic residents to investigate their perceptions and attitudes for pursuing fellowships. A response rate of 33% (n=49 was obtained with the majority of residents undertaking one (27% or two (60% fellowships. Surgical-skill development was reported as the most common motivating factor, followed by employment and marketability; malpractice protection and financial reasons were the least relevant. The overwhelming majority of residents (94%, n=46 felt adequately prepared by their residency training for independent general practice, and 84% (n=41 of respondents did not feel that current fellowship trends were due to poor residency training. Three common themes were expressed in their comments: the growing perceived expectation by healthcare professionals and employers to be fellowship-certified, the integration of fellowship training into the surgical education hierarchy, and the failure of residency training curriculums to accommodate for this trend. In conclusion, Canadian orthopedic residents are confident of their residency training and are increasingly pursuing fellowships to primarily develop their surgical skills and expertise.

  4. OB fellowship outcomes 1992-2010: where do they go, who stops delivering, and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, W MacMillan; Martinez, Conchita; Collins, Millard; Laurence, Greg; Pean, Carl; Stallings, Joe

    2010-01-01

    This study describes characteristics and the evolution of the careers of graduates from a 1-year post-residency fellowship program whose primary objectives included clinical skills in Cesarean section. Besides obstetrical practice, rural service and attainment of faculty appointment were used as surrogate measures of fulfilling an underserved need for family medicine obstetrics. For 18 years, the authors maintained contact with all 80 physicians completing 1-year fellowships in family medicine obstetrics in Memphis and Nashville. The founding chair of these programs surveyed each physician and maintained a network of contacts to study outcomes such as graduation, service location, hospital privileges, retention, and career changes. The study tracked 100% of the sample and documented high rates of fellowship completion (74/80 [93%]), Cesarean privileges (71/74 [96%]), and service in a rural community for at least 2 years (47/74 [64%]). The fellowship was also associated with participation as faculty (36/74 [46%]). This paper produces the first and longest-term data describing attrition over time and examines the reasons why fellowship-trained family physicians stop doing maternity care. It is the only series with a 100% response rate and provides longitudinal data on the outcomes of these fellowship programs. Attrition was highest at rural sites. Workforce planners and fellowship designers might benefit from these considerations.

  5. Factors Influencing Radiology Residents' Fellowship Training and Practice Preferences in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Philip S; Probyn, Linda; Finlay, Karen

    2016-05-01

    The study aimed to examine the postresidency plans of Canadian radiology residents and factors influencing their fellowship choices and practice preferences, including interest in teaching and research. Institutional ethics approval was obtained at McMaster University. Electronic surveys were sent to second to fifth-year residents at all 16 radiology residency programs across Canada. Each survey assessed factors influencing fellowship choices and practice preferences. A total of 103 (31%) Canadian radiology residents responded to the online survey. Over 89% from English-speaking programs intended to pursue fellowship training compared to 55% of residents from French-speaking programs. The most important factors influencing residents' decision to pursue fellowship training were enhanced employability (46%) and personal interest (47%). Top fellowship choices were musculoskeletal imaging (19%), body imaging (17%), vascular or interventional (14%), neuroradiology (8%), and women's imaging (7%). Respondents received the majority of their fellowship information from peers (68%), staff radiologists (61%), and university websites (58%). Approximately 59% planned on practicing at academic institutions and stated that lifestyle (43%), job prospects (29%), and teaching opportunities (27%) were the most important factors influencing their decisions. A total of 89% were interested in teaching but only 46% were interested in incorporating research into their future practice. The majority of radiology residents plan on pursuing fellowship training and often receive their fellowship information from informal sources such as peers and staff radiologists. Fellowship directors can incorporate recruitment strategies such as mentorship programs and improving program websites. There is a need to increase resident participation in research to advance the future of radiology. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Are general surgery residents adequately prepared for hepatopancreatobiliary fellowships? A questionnaire-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Houssam; Parikh, Janak; Patel, Shirali; Jeyarajah, D Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study was conducted to assess the preparedness of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) fellows upon entering fellowship, identify challenges encountered by HPB fellows during the initial part of their HPB training, and identify potential solutions to these challenges that can be applied during residency training. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all HPB fellows in accredited HPB fellowship programmes in two consecutive academic years (n = 42). Reponses were then analysed. Results A total of 19 (45%) fellows responded. Prior to their fellowship, 10 (53%) were in surgical residency and the rest were in other surgical fellowships or surgical practice. Thirteen (68%) were graduates of university-based residency programmes. All fellows felt comfortable in performing basic laparoscopic procedures independently at the completion of residency and less comfortable in performing advanced laparoscopy. Eight (42%) fellows cited a combination of inadequate case volume and lack of autonomy during residency as the reasons for this lack of comfort. Thirteen (68%) identified inadequate preoperative workup and management as their biggest fear upon entering practice after general surgery training. A total of 17 (89%) fellows felt they were adequately prepared to enter HPB fellowship. Extra rotations in transplant, vascular or minimally invasive surgery were believed to be most helpful in preparing general surgery residents pursing HPB fellowships. Conclusions Overall, HPB fellows felt themselves to be adequately prepared for fellowship. Advanced laparoscopic procedures and the perioperative management of complex patients are two of the challenges facing HPB fellows. General surgery residents who plan to pursue an HPB fellowship may benefit from spending extra rotations on certain subspecialties. Focus on perioperative workup and management should be an integral part of residency and fellowship training. PMID:25387852

  7. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral......In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  8. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1994 research reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A. (Editor); Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Camp, Warren (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the tenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1994 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1994. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  9. 2000 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2000 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 16th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2000 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 2000. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  10. 1999 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1999 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 15th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1999 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1999. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member.

  11. 1997 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 13th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1997 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1997. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  12. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. 1991 Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Beymer, Mark A. (Editor); Armstrong, Dennis W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Reports from the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program are presented. The editors are responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA Kennedy. Some representative titles are as follows: Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion; Hazardous Gas Leak Analysis in the Space Shuttle; Modeling and Control of the Automated Radiator Inspection Device; Study of the Finite Element Software Packages at KSC; Multispectral Image Processing for Plants; Algorithms for Contours Depicting Static Electric Fields during Adverse Weather Conditions; Transient Study of a Cryogenic Hydrogen Filling System; and Precision Cleaning Verification of Nonvolatile Residues by using Water, Ultrasonics, and Turbidity Analyses.

  13. 1998 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1998 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the 14th year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1998 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., and KSC. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA in 1998. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many problems of current interest to NASA/KSC.

  14. Science Communication Fellowship Program at the Pacific Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, E. M.; Vukajlovich, D.; Fitzwater, S.; Selvakumar, M.

    2011-12-01

    With funding from an NSF Informal Science Education grant, the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington began the Science Communication Fellowship program in 2009 as part of the Portal to the Public initiative. The purpose of the Science Communication Fellowship program is to train scientists and engineers to communicate more effectively with the general public regarding their research and to assist with the development of hands-on activities that can be used by the scientists and engineers for outreach activities. The program came out of a collaboration to develop a model for effectively communicating current science research at informal science education organizations. The program model has undergone in-depth research and evaluation to assess its effectiveness and impact. To become Science Communication Fellows, researchers participate in four three-hour professional development sessions, where they learn communication techniques through role-playing and hands-on activities. The workshops are supplemented with additional one-on-one meetings with Science Center staff to help the new Fellows develop activities for use at outreach events. These activities are then used by the Fellows at public events that highlight current research taking place in the region. To date over 80 scientists and engineers have gone through the training sessions to become Science Communication Fellows. The Pacific Science Center holds approximately 12 events a year in which Fellows can facilitate their activity. Public programs range from small, monthly programs to large, annual Research Weekends. Funding for this program continues through support from NIH, IMLS, NSF, and NASA grants. For more information, please contact the current program administrator Dana Vukajlovich at DVukajlovich@pacsci.org.

  15. NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program: 2003 Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnour, Tim (Editor); LopezdeCastillo, Eduardo (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2003 NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the nineteenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2003 program was administered by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 2003. The basic common objectives of the NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program are: A) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; B) To stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA; C) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; D) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The KSC Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks (May 19 through July 25, 2003) working with NASA scientists and engineers on research of mutual interest to the university faculty member and the NASA colleague. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many research areas of current interest to NASA/KSC. A separate document reports on the administrative aspects of the 2003 program. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. In many cases a faculty member has developed a close working relationship with a particular NASA group that had provided funding beyond the two-year limit.

  16. The primary care sports medicine fellowship: American Medical Society for Sports Medicine proposed standards of excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Irfan M; Stovak, Mark; Ray, Tracy; Weiss-Kelly, Amanda

    2017-09-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recognises a need to provide direction and continually enhance the quality of sports medicine fellowship training programmes. This document was developed to be an educational resource for sports medicine physicians who teach in a 1-year primary care sports medicine fellowship training programme. It is meant to provide high standards and targets for fellowship training programmes that choose to re-assess their curriculum and seek to make improvements. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  18. Virginia Bioinformatics Institute offers fellowships for graduate work in transdisciplinary science

    OpenAIRE

    Bland, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech, in collaboration with Virginia Tech's Ph.D. program in genetics, bioinformatics, and computational biology, is providing substantial fellowships in support of graduate work in transdisciplinary team science.

  19. Outcomes from the GLEON fellowship program. Training graduate students in data driven network science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, H.; Hanson, P. C.; Weathers, K. C.

    2016-12-01

    In the water sciences there is a massive need for graduate students who possess the analytical and technical skills to deal with large datasets and function in the new paradigm of open, collaborative -science. The Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) graduate fellowship program (GFP) was developed as an interdisciplinary training program to supplement the intensive disciplinary training of traditional graduate education. The primary goal of the GFP was to train a diverse cohort of graduate students in network science, open-web technologies, collaboration, and data analytics, and importantly to provide the opportunity to use these skills to conduct collaborative research resulting in publishable scientific products. The GFP is run as a series of three week-long workshops over two years that brings together a cohort of twelve students. In addition, fellows are expected to attend and contribute to at least one international GLEON all-hands' meeting. Here, we provide examples of training modules in the GFP (model building, data QA/QC, information management, bayesian modeling, open coding/version control, national data programs), as well as scientific outputs (manuscripts, software products, and new global datasets) produced by the fellows, as well as the process by which this team science was catalyzed. Data driven education that lets students apply learned skills to real research projects reinforces concepts, provides motivation, and can benefit their publication record. This program design is extendable to other institutions and networks.

  20. Current laparoscopy training in urology: a comparison of fellowships governed by the Society of Urologic Oncology and the Endourological Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Stanley A; Ellison, Lars M; Low, Roger K

    2008-08-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is now an integral technique in the practice of urology, particularly in the management of certain urologic malignancies. Advanced laparoscopy training in urology is primarily reserved for those pursuing fellowship training and is offered both by traditional endourology fellowships and increasingly in urologic oncology fellowships. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and compare current laparoscopy training at the fellowship level. A 17-item questionnaire was developed with support from both the Endourological Society (EUS) and Society of Urologic Oncology (SUO). Surveys were sent to program directors of fellowships recognized by the EUS and SUO. Directors were surveyed on the laparoscopic case volume, degree of oncology training, and career choice of their graduates. Data were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank-sum and Student t tests. Our survey had an overall response rate of 60%. Fellows performed more than 100 laparoscopies during their training period in 57% of EUS and 25% of SUO fellowship programs. Similar trends are demonstrated when analyzing robotic procedures, with 73% of EUS fellows performing more than 50 procedures compared with 43% of SUO fellows. The majority (59%) of EUS programs provide oncologic training. Between 44% and 100% of graduates from EUS and SUO fellowships obtain academic positions. The majority of SUO directors (63%) believe that fellowship training in laparoscopy should be provided in fellowships governed solely by the SUO, while 41% of EUS directors believe this training should be governed solely by the EUS. Endourology fellowships currently provide a greater exposure to laparoscopy and robotics than SUO fellowships. The percentage of fellows seeking academic positions is similar for EUS and SUO fellowship programs and has remained stable for several years. Directors of fellowship programs that offer advanced laparoscopic training have divergent views as to which administrative body should govern its future.

  1. Fellowships in community pharmacy research: Experiences of five schools and colleges of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Margie E; Frail, Caitlin K; Gernant, Stephanie A; Bacci, Jennifer L; Coley, Kim C; Colip, Lauren M; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Hagemeier, Nicholas E; McGivney, Melissa Somma; Rodis, Jennifer L; Smith, Megan G; Smith, Randall B

    2016-01-01

    To describe common facilitators, challenges, and lessons learned in 5 schools and colleges of pharmacy in establishing community pharmacy research fellowships. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States. Schools and colleges of pharmacy with existing community partnerships identified a need and ability to develop opportunities for pharmacists to engage in advanced research training. Community pharmacy fellowships, each structured as 2 years long and in combination with graduate coursework, have been established at the University of Pittsburgh, Purdue University, East Tennessee State University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and The Ohio State University. Program directors from each of the 5 community pharmacy research fellowships identified common themes pertaining to program structure, outcomes, and lessons learned to assist others planning similar programs. Common characteristics across the programs include length of training, prerequisites, graduate coursework, mentoring structure, and immersion into a pharmacist patient care practice. Common facilitators have been the existence of strong community pharmacy partnerships, creating a fellowship advisory team, and networking. A common challenge has been recruitment, with many programs experiencing at least one year without filling the fellowship position. All program graduates (n = 4) have been successful in securing pharmacy faculty positions. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy share similar experiences in implementing community pharmacy research fellowships. Early outcomes show promise for this training pathway in growing future pharmacist-scientists focused on community pharmacy practice. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Demographics and Fellowship Training of Residency Leadership in EM: A Descriptive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Josh; Hardy, Ross; Chacko, Jerel; Husain, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) fellowships are becoming increasingly numerous, and there is a growing trend among EM residents to pursue postgraduate fellowship training. Scant data have been published on the prevalence of postgraduate training among emergency physicians. We aimed to describe the prevalence and regional variation of fellowships among EM residency leadership. We conducted an online anonymous survey that was sent to the Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) membership in October 2014. The survey was a brief questionnaire, which inquired about fellowship, secondary board certification, gender, and length in a leadership position of each member of its residency leadership. We separated the responses to the survey into four different geographic regions. The geographic regions were defined by the same classification used by the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). We defined residency leadership as program director (PD), associate PD and assistant PD. Residencies that did not complete the survey were then individually contacted to encourage completion. The survey was initially piloted for ease of use and understanding of the questions with a select few EM PDs. We obtained responses from 145 of the 164 Accrediting Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited EM residencies (88%). The fellowship prevalence among PDs, associate PDs, and assistant PDs was 21.4%, 20.3%, and 24.9% respectively. The most common fellowship completed was a fellowship in toxicology. Secondary board certification among PDs, associate PDs, and assistant PDs was 9.7%, 4.8%, and 2.9% respectively. Eighty-two percent of PDs have at least five years in residency leadership. Seventy-six percent of PDs were male, and there was a near-even split of gender among associate PDs and assistant PDs. The Western region had the highest percentage of fellowship and or secondary board certification among all levels of residency leadership. There is a low prevalence of fellowship training and

  3. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mandelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program′s core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  4. Research Reports: 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Dowdy, J. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    For the 33rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period June 2, 1997 through August 8, 1997. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program, which are in the 34th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1997. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  5. Research Reports: 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. (Editor); Pruitt, J. (Editor); Nash-Stevenson, S. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Karr, C. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period May 29 - August 3, 2001. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the University Affairs Office, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the thirty-seventh year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 2001.

  6. Research Reports: 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 31st consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 15 May 1995 - 4 Aug. 1995. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 32nd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1995. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  7. Research Reports: 1996 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, M. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 32nd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama and MSFC during the period May 28, 1996 through August 2, 1996. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 33rd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1996. The University of Alabama presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  8. New Horizons Educator Fellowship Program: Taking You to Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, H. M.; Beisser, K.; Hallau, K. G.

    2011-12-01

    The New Horizons Educator Fellowship Program (NHEFP), originally based on the MESSENGER Fellows Program, is a public outreach initiative for motivated volunteers across the nation. These volunteers are master teachers who communicate the excitement of NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto and information about recent discoveries to teachers, students, and people in their local communities. Many of the Fellows utilize their experiences and knowledge as members of other programs such as MESSENGER Fellows, Heliophysics Educator Ambassadors, Solar System Educators and Ambassadors to promote the mission thorough professional development workshops incorporating themes, activities, and recent discoveries with other NASA programs to present a well-rounded view of our Solar System. Unlike teacher-volunteer programs tied to missions that take place closer to Earth, the time between New Horizons' launch and its closest approach to Pluto is 9.5 years, with the spacecraft in hibernation for most of its voyager. NHEFP has maintained a core group of Fellows who, through periodic face-to-face or remote training, have taken advantage of opportunities for networking, sharing of ideas in best practices, activities, and presenting and keeping audiences interested in the mission during its long journey to Pluto. This involvement has been key to the program's success.

  9. FY 2005 Congressional Earmark: The Environmental Institute Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon Tracey, Co-PI and Richard Taupier, Co-PI

    2007-02-06

    Congressional Earmark Funding was used to create a Postdoctoral Environmental Fellowship Program, interdisciplinary Environmental Working Groups, and special initiatives to create a dialogue around the environment at the University of Massachusetts Amherst to mobilize faculty to work together to respond to emerging environmental needs and to build institutional capacity to launch programmatic environmental activities across campus over time. Developing these networks of expertise will enable the University to more effectively and swiftly respond to emerging environmental needs and assume a leadership role in varied environmental fields. Over the course of the project 20 proposals were submitted to a variety of funding agencies involving faculty teams from 19 academic departments; 4 projects were awarded totaling $950,000; special events were organized including the Environmental Lecture Series which attracted more than 1,000 attendees over the course of the project; 75 University faculty became involved in one or more Working Groups (original three Working Groups plus Phase 2 Working Groups); an expertise database was developed with approximately 275 faculty involved in environmental research and education as part of a campus-wide network of environmental expertise; 12 University centers and partners participated; and the three Environmental Fellows produced 3 publications as well as a number of presentations and papers in progress.

  10. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  11. The COSPAR Capacity Building Initiative and its associated Fellowship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Carlos; Willmore, Peter; Mendez, Mariano; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Vogt, Joachim

    The COSPAR Capacity Building Workshops have been conceived to meet the following objec-tives: i) to increase knowledge and use of public archives of space data in order both to broaden the scope of research programmes in developing countries and also to ensure that scientists in those countries are aware of the full range of facilities that are available to them, ii) to provide highly-practical instruction in the use of these archives and the associated publicly-available software, and iii) to foster personal links between participants and experienced scientists at-tending the workshops to contribute to reducing the isolation often experienced by scientists in developing countries. Since 2001 a total of eleven workshops have been successfully held in different scientific areas (X-ray, Gamma-ray and Space Optical and UV Astronomy, Mag-netospheric Physics, Space Oceanography and Planetary Science) in nine developing countries (Brazil, India, China, South Africa, Morocco, Romania, Uruguay, Egypt and Malaysia). To enable young scientists who have participated in a Workshop to build on skills gained there, the COSPAR Panel for Capacity-Building has initiated in 2008 an associated Fellowship Programme. A total number of 14 institutes from several european countries, USA, China and India are participating in the programme offering those to carry out a 2-4 week research project together with a resident scientist. We will discuss the modalities of the workshops, the so-far gained experience, and the future including collaborations with other institutions sharing the aim of increasing the scientific activities in developing countries.

  12. Qualities and characteristics of successfully matched North American HPB surgery fellowship candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erin H.; Dowden, Jacob E.; Cochran, Allyson R.; Iannitti, David A.; Kimchi, Eric T.; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F.; Jeyarajah, D. Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) fellowships in North America are difficult to secure with an acceptance rate of 1 in 3 applicants. Desirable characteristics in an HPB surgery applicant have not been previously reported. This study examines the perceptions of trainees and HPB program directors with regards to positive attributes in applicants for HPB fellowships. Methods Parallel surveys were distributed by email with a web-link to current and recent HPB fellows in North America (from the past 5 years) with questions addressing the following domains: surgical training, research experience, and mentorship. A similar survey was distributed to HPB fellowship program directors in North America requesting their opinion as to the importance of these characteristics in potential applicants. Results 32 of 60 of surveyed fellows and 21 of 38 of surveyed program directors responded between November 2014–February 2015. Fellows overall came from fairly diverse backgrounds (13/32 were overseas medical graduates) about one third of respondents having had some prior research experience. Program directors gave priority to the applicant's interview, curriculum vitae, and their recommendation letters (in order of importance). Both the surveyed fellows and program directors felt that the characteristics most important in a successful HPB fellowship candidate include interpersonal skills, perceived operative skills, and perceived fund of knowledge. Conclusion Results of this survey provide useful and practical information for trainees considering applying to an HPB fellowship program. PMID:27154813

  13. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society-Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Amy L

    2016-05-01

    At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins) Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants' fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows). Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. In addition, some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago-a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging.

  14. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society–Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM, fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF, established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants’ fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows. Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. Some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago—a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging.

  15. Developing a quality and safety curriculum for fellows: lessons learned from a neonatology fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Munish; Ringer, Steve; Tess, Anjala; Hansen, Anne; Zupancic, John

    2014-01-01

    Formal training in health care quality and safety has become an important component of medical education at all levels, and quality and safety are core concepts within the practice-based learning and system-based practice medical education competencies. Residency and fellowship programs are rapidly attempting to incorporate quality and safety curriculum into their training programs but have encountered numerous challenges and barriers. Many program directors have questioned the feasibility and utility of quality and safety education during this stage of training. In 2010, we adopted a quality and safety educational module in our neonatal fellowship program that sought to provide a robust and practical introduction to quality improvement and patient safety through a combination of didactic and experiential activities. Our module has been successfully integrated into the fellowship program's curriculum and has been beneficial to trainees, faculty, and our clinical services, and our experience suggests that fellowship may be particularly well suited to incorporation of quality and safety training. We describe our module and share tools and lessons learned during our experience; we believe these resources will be useful to other fellowship programs seeking to improve the quality and safety education of their trainees.

  16. Survey on Robot-Assisted Surgical Techniques Utilization in US Pediatric Surgery Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Ilan I; Shroyer, Michelle C; Yu, David C; Martin, Colin A; Chen, Mike K; Russell, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Robotic technology has transformed both practice and education in many adult surgical specialties; no standardized training guidelines in pediatric surgery currently exist. The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence of robotic procedures and extent of robotic surgery education in US pediatric surgery fellowships. A deidentified survey measured utilization of the robot, perception on the utility of the robot, and its incorporation in training among the program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) pediatric surgery fellowships in the United States. Forty-one of the 47 fellowship programs (87%) responded to the survey. While 67% of respondents indicated the presence of a robot in their facility, only 26% reported its utilizing in their surgical practice. Among programs not utilizing the robot, most common reasons provided were lack of clear supportive evidence, increased intraoperative time, and incompatibility of instrument size to pediatric patients. While 58% of program directors believe that there is a future role for robotic surgery in children, only 18% indicated that robotic training should play a part in pediatric surgery education. Consequently, while over 66% of survey respondents received training in robot-assisted surgical technique, only 29% of fellows receive robot-assisted training during their fellowship. A majority of fellowships have access to a robot, but few utilize the technology in their current practice or as part of training. Further investigation is required into both the technology's potential benefits in the pediatric population and its role in pediatric surgery training.

  17. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2016-12-21

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  18. Evaluation results of the GlobalWatershed GK-12 Fellowship Program - a model for increased science literacy and partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A. S.; Vye, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Michigan Tech GlobalWatershed GK-12 Fellowship program bridges the gap between K-12 learning institutions and the scientific community with a focus on watershed research. Michigan Tech graduate students (fellows) work in tandem with teachers on the development of relevant hands-on, inquiry based lesson plans and activities based on their doctoral research projects in watershed science. By connecting students and teachers to state of the art academic research in watershed science, teachers are afforded a meaningful way in which to embed scientific research as a component of K-12 curricula, while mentoring fellows on the most pertinent and essential topics for lesson plan development. Fellows fulfill their vital responsibility of communicating their academic research to a broader public while fostering improved teaching and communication skills. A goal of the project is to increase science literacy among students so they may understand, communicate and participate in decisions made at local, regional, and global levels. The project largely works with schools located in Michigan's western Upper Peninsula but also partners with K-12 systems in Sonora, Mexico. While focusing on local and regional issues, the international element of the project helps expand student, teacher, and fellow worldviews and global awareness of watershed issues and creates meaningful partnerships. Lesson plans are available online and teacher workshops are held regularly to disseminate the wealth of information and resources available to the broader public. Evaluation results indicate that fellows' skill and confidence in their ability to communicate science increased as a results of their participation of the program, as well as their desire to communicate science in their future careers. Teachers' confidence in their capacity to present watershed science to their students increased, along with their understanding of how scientific research contributes to understanding of water

  19. The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program: The First Five Years 1989-1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, J.; Ward, E.

    1996-03-01

    NASA accepted the Congressional mandate to manage the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (NSGC&FP) and announced the original competition for Space Grant awards in 1989. Currently, 52 independently governed Space Grant consortia administer programs in three areas of university and NASA concern: research, education, and public service. NASA funds have remained stable at $15 million since 1991, but the consortia have leveraged matching funds, including in-kind contributions, to approximately double the Space Grant awards. The number of affiliated Space Grant institutions has grown from 86 affiliates in 1990 to over 550 affiliates in 1996. Members include many of the finest colleges and universities in the nation, internationally competitive business and industrial partners, small businesses, state and local government agencies, private colleges, community colleges, medical colleges, and other nonprofit organizations. Though the program has been fully operational in all 52 consortia for less than five years, the benefits to the taxpayer have been significant. Space Grant faculty and students obtained funding for over 300 research proposals. Since 1990, the NSGC&FP has served close to 6500 citizens by providing tuition assistance. Among these 6500 were significant numbers of students from underrepresented groups in science and engineering. Space Grant consortia leveraged $16.5 million for precollege activities and administered over 1300 precollege projects that promote NASA-related science education. Space Grant precollege programs, serving both teachers and students, provide good examples of higher education faculty working well with local school systems. The consortia administered over 600 public service programs and leveraged approximately $4.5 million. Space Grant funds provided science and technology lectures, demonstrations, science exhibits, space-related periodicals, audio and video productions of NASA-related subjects, and have helped to

  20. Guidelines of the Indian Association of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Anaesthesiologists and Indian College of Cardiac Anaesthesia for perioperative transesophageal echocardiography fellowship examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchi Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During current medical care, perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE has become a vital component of patient management, especially in cardiac operating rooms and in critical care medicine. Information derived from echocardiography has an important bearing on the patient′s outcome. The Indian Association of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Anaesthesiologists (IACTA has promoted the use of TEE during routine clinical care of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. An important mission of IACTA is to oversee training and certify anesthesiologists in the perioperative and intensive care use of TEE. The provision of "Fellowship" is by way of conducting IACTA - TEE fellowship (F-TEE examination. This has been done annually for the past 7 years using well-established curriculums by accredited national and international societies. Now, with the transformation and reconstitution of IACTA education and research cell into the newly formed Indian College of Cardiac Anaesthesia, F-TEE is bound to meet international standards. To ensure that the examinations are conducted in a transparent and foolproof manner, the guideline committee (formulated in 2010 of IACTA has taken the onus of formulating the guidelines for the same. These guidelines have been formally reviewed and updated since 2010 and are detailed here to serve as a guide to both the examinee and examiner ensuring standardization, efficiency, and competency of the IACTA F-TEE certification process.

  1. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994. Report To Accompany S. 2104. 103D Congress, 2d Session, Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    This document contains the text of the "Albert Einstein Distinguished Educators Fellowship Act of 1994" (S. 2104) along with related analysis. The bill establishes a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that provides them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and…

  2. Impact of implementation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rebecca A; Phillips, Sharon E; Terhune, Kyla P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the initiation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume at 1 major academic institution. Retrospective review of operative records obtained from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general surgery resident and pediatric surgery fellow case logs. Data collected included number and type of pediatric index cases per year, number of total pediatric surgery cases per year, and number of total cases logged as primary surgeon to date. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, which has an accredited general surgery program, finishes 7 chief residents per year during the study period, and instituted a new pediatric surgery fellowship in 2007. Case logs submitted by third and fourth year general surgery residents and first and second year pediatric surgery fellows were studied. The number of pediatric attending surgeons, relative value units (RVUs), and hospital admissions increased from 2003 to 2011. The median number of pediatric index cases performed by a resident decreased after the onset of fellowship from 34 cases to 23.5 cases per year (p pediatric surgery rotation also decreased from 74 to 53 cases per year after onset of the fellowship (p surgery resident index and overall case volume in pediatric surgery. Although operative volume is only 1 measure of surgical educational value, these findings suggest that the addition of surgical fellowships affects the educational experience of general surgery residents. We recommend that residency programs establish goals and calculate any potential impact on general surgery resident case volume before initiating a new surgical fellowship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors influencing scholarly impact: does urology fellowship training affect research output?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasabwala, Khushabu; Morton, Christopher M; Svider, Peter F; Nahass, Thomas A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Jackson-Rosario, Imani

    2014-01-01

    Residents seek postresidency fellowship training to increase competency with novel surgical techniques and augment their fund of knowledge. Research productivity is a vital component of advancement in academic urology. Our objectives were to use the h-index (an objective and readily available bibliometric that has been repeatedly shown to correlate with scholarly impact, funding procurement, and academic promotion in urology as well as other specialties) to determine whether any relationship exists between fellowship training and scholarly impact among academic urologists. Additional examination was performed to determine whether any differences in scholarly influence are present among practitioners in the major urologic subspecialties. Overall, 851 faculty members from 101 academic urology departments were organized by academic rank and fellowship completed. Research productivity was calculated using the h-index, calculated from the Scopus database. There was no statistical difference in h-index found between fellowship-trained and nonfellowship-trained academic urologists. The highest h-indices were seen among urologic oncologists (18.1 ± 0.95) and nonfellowship-trained urologists (14.62 ± 0.80). Nearly 70% of department chairs included in this analysis were urologic oncologists or general urologists. No difference in h-index existed between fellowship-trained and nonfellowship-trained urologists, although practitioners in the subspecialty cohorts with the highest research productivity (nonfellowship-trained and urologic oncologists) comprised 70% of department chairpersons. This relationship suggests that a strong research profile is highly valued during selection for academic promotion. Differences existed on further comparison by subspecialty. Fellowship training may represent another potential opportunity to introduce structured research experiences for trainees. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of

  4. Attributes of successfully matched versus unmatched obstetrics and gynecology fellowship applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Imran J; Sareen, Pratibha; Shoup, Brenda; Muffly, Tyler

    2014-06-01

    We sought to determine the attributes of successful and unsuccessful fellowship applicants of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology Inc (ABOG)-approved fellowship programs and to identify salient differences between subspecialty applicants. Anonymous questionnaires were completed by obstetrics and gynecology fellowship applicants using a web-based survey after match day of 2012. Fellowship applicant practices were evaluated and included importance of prematch preparations, interview process, networking practices, and postmatch reflections. A total of 327 fellowship applicants applying to programs accredited by the ABOG were surveyed, and 200 completed the survey (61% response rate). A comparison between prematch educational preparations pursued by applicants showed that matched applicants were more likely to come from allopathic medical schools (94%), attain membership in Alpha Omega Alpha and/or Phi Beta Kappa (27%), and receive a letter of recommendation from a nationally known subspecialist (77%) than unmatched applicants (P = .03, .005, and .007, respectively). Applicants to reproductive endocrinology and infertility were more likely than female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery to be members of academic honor societies (P = .008). Research publication was common among matched subspecialist applicants, with over half publishing 1-3 peer-reviewed manuscripts prior to matching. Applicants to gynecologic oncology did more visiting electives than any other specialty applicants (P obstetrics and gynecology fellowship applicants have superior prematch preparations, strong letters of recommendation from leaders in their field of interest, and multiple research publications. These data will guide applicants to a critical self-analysis before deciding to apply. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ACE Action Fellowship Bridges Climate Education into Action for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Alliance for Climate Education educates young people on the science of climate change and empowers them to take action. Since 2009, ACE has educated over two million students and trained more than 4,000 young leaders. The ACE Action Fellowship is a yearlong training program that gives young people the knowledge, skills and confidence to be strong climate leaders. Here, we present the results of the first year of evaluation of the Fellowship program in the 2014-15 school year. Sixty high school students completed matched surveys before and after completing the program. Students were evaluated on skills learned, actions taken, confidence gained, civic engagement, and plans to continue action on climate in the future. Results show that the Fellowship increases young people's confidence: 52% of Fellows report an increase in confidence in leading a group of peers on a climate-related campaign. Fellows also gained leadership skills. More than half of Fellows say they improved in the areas of recruitment, interpersonal communication skills, campaign planning, and public speaking. 50% of Fellows reported an increase in their likelihood of seeking elected office when of age. The Fellowship positively influences young people's intent to study a climate, energy or sustainability-related field. 63% of Fellows identify as people of color. Notably, despite entering the Fellowship with significantly lower self-ratings than white students in experience and skill sets, young people of color reported greater improvement in the areas of public speaking (25% improvement vs. 6% improvement) and petitioning (27% improvement vs. 1% improvement). These results show that the ACE Fellowship gives young people tangible skills and confidence that puts them on a path of climate leadership. Further evaluation will be done to expand the dataset, but early indications show that these young people are poised to make valuable contributions and bring a much needed diverse youth perspective to the

  6. Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Tejal K; Abookire, Susan A; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality is a 2-year physician-oriented training program with a strong operational orientation, embedding trainees in the quality departments of participating hospitals. It also integrates didactic and experiential learning and offers the option of obtaining a master's degree in public health. The program focuses on methodologically rigorous improvement and measurement, with an emphasis on the development and implementation of innovative practice. The operational orientation is intended to foster the professional development of future quality and safety leaders. The purpose of this article is to describe the design and development of the fellowship.

  7. Hunting for the Right Research Fellowship: The Dos and Don′ts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, thousands and thousands of people from Asia, most of them PhDs, make the ultimate transition in their lives when they travel to the west to take up fellowship positions (in this case a research fellowship position in leading labs in North America and Europe. Many of these people travel with their families, not knowing what is coming their way. In this article, a number of issues have been discussed that might help these potential scientists of the future to plan ahead for such a shift and make their transition as smooth as possible.

  8. Education on, Exposure to, and Management of Vascular Anomalies During Otolaryngology Residency and Pediatric Otolaryngology Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Robert; Jabbour, Noel; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Bauman, Nancy; Darrow, David H; Elluru, Ravindhra; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Perkins, Jonathan; Richter, Gresham; Shin, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The field of vascular anomalies presents diverse challenges in diagnosis and management. Although many lesions involve the head and neck, training in vascular anomalies is not universally included in otolaryngology residencies and pediatric otolaryngology (POTO) fellowships. To explore the education in, exposure to, and comfort level of otolaryngology trainees with vascular anomalies. A survey was distributed to 39 POTO fellows and 44 residents in postgraduate year 5 who matched into POTO fellowships from April 22 through June 16, 2014. Survey responses from trainees on exposure to, education on, and comfort with vascular anomalies. Forty-four residents in postgraduate year 5 who applied to POTO fellowships and 39 POTO fellows were emailed the survey. Fourteen respondents were unable to be contacted owing to lack of a current email address. Thirty-six of 69 residents and fellows (18 fellows and 18 residents [52%]) responded to the survey. Twenty-seven trainees (75%) reported no participation in a vascular anomalies clinic during residency; 6 of these 27 individuals (22%) trained at institutions with a vascular anomalies clinic but did not participate in the clinic, and 28 of the 36 respondents (78%) reported that they had less than adequate or no exposure to vascular anomalies in residency. Among POTO fellows, 11 of 17 (65%) did not participate in a vascular anomalies clinic during fellowship, even though 8 of the 11 had a vascular anomalies clinic at their fellowship program. During fellowship training, 12 of 18 fellows (67%) reported that they had adequate exposure to vascular anomalies. Only 20 respondents (56%) felt comfortable distinguishing among diagnoses of vascular anomalies, and only 4 residents (22%) and 9 fellows (50%) felt comfortable treating patients with vascular anomalies. All fellows believed that training in vascular anomalies was important in fellowship, and 100% of respondents indicated that increased exposure to diagnosis and management of

  9. Creating a Cadre of Fellowship-Trained Medical Educators, Part II: A Formal Needs Assessment to Structure Postgraduate Fellowships in Medical Education Scholarship and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jaime; Yarris, Lalena M; Santen, Sally A; Guth, Todd A; Rougas, Steven; Runde, Daniel P; Coates, Wendy C

    2017-08-01

    Education leaders at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on education research proposed that dedicated postgraduate education scholarship fellowships (ESFs) might provide an effective model for developing future faculty as scholars. A formal needs assessment was performed to understand the training gap and inform the development of ESFs. A mixed-methods needs assessment was conducted of four emergency medicine national stakeholder groups in 2013: department chairs; faculty education/research leaders; existing education fellowship directors; and current education fellows/graduates. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data. Qualitative data from semistructured interviews and free-text responses were analyzed using a thematic approach. Participants were 11/15 (73%) education fellowship directors, 13/20 (65%) fellows/graduates, 106/239 (44%) faculty education/research leaders, and a convenience sample of 26 department chairs. Department chairs expected new education faculty to design didactics (85%) and teach clinically (96%). Faculty education/research leaders thought new faculty were inadequately prepared for job tasks (83.7%) and that ESFs would improve the overall quality of education research (91.1%). Fellowship directors noted that ESFs provide skills, mentorship, and protected time for graduates to become productive academicians. Current fellows/graduates reported pursing an ESF to develop skills in teaching and research methodology. Stakeholder groups uniformly perceived a need for training in education theory, clinical teaching, and education research. These findings support dedicated, deliberate training in these areas. Establishment of a structure for scholarly pursuits prior to assuming a full-time position will effectively prepare new faculty. These findings may inform the development, implementation, and curricula of ESFs.

  10. A meta-analysis of studies of publication misrepresentation by applicants to residency and fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Michael N

    2010-09-01

    Many studies from various fields of medicine about the accuracy of residency and fellowship applications have reported disturbing percentages of candidates with publication misrepresentation on their applications. However, other similar studies have found much lower percentages. No evaluation of these types of studies is currently available to explain this disparity. Therefore, this study evaluated the wide range of percentages of applicants with publication misrepresentation reported in the literature. Studies of residency and fellowship applicant misrepresentation were identified and reviewed. Using uniform inclusion criteria, the data reported by each study were recalculated to determine the percentage of candidates with misrepresentation. Thirteen out of 18 studies (eight residency and five fellowship) found in the literature from 1995 to 2008 reported sufficient details to perform a recalculation. The most common type of misrepresentation reported was listing nonexistent articles, followed by errors in authorship order and nonauthorship. After recalculation, the mean percentage of candidates with misrepresentation per applicant pool decreased significantly (7.2% to 4.9%, P = .03048). No study characteristic, such as sample size, was found to be predictive of the percentage of applicants with misrepresentation. No difference was found in the percentage of applicants with misrepresentation in residency versus fellowship programs. The variance in study results of misrepresentation decreases when uniform inclusion criteria are applied. Caution must be used in directly comparing the results of these studies as originally reported. Program directors should be aware that self-promotion in the authorship list is a common form of misrepresentation.

  11. A pharmaceutical industry elective course on practice experience selection and fellowship pursuit by pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Rhea; Blustein, Leona; Morel, Diane; Davis, Lisa

    2014-08-15

    To design and implement 2 pharmaceutical industry elective courses and assess their impact on students' selection of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) and pursuit of pharmaceutical industry fellowships. Two 2-credit-hour elective courses that explored careers within the prescription and nonprescription pharmaceutical drug industries were offered for second- and third-year pharmacy students in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program. The impact of the courses on pharmacy students' pursuit of a pharmaceutical industry fellowship was evaluated based on responses to annual graduating students' exit surveys. A greater percentage (17.9%) of students who had taken a pharmaceutical industry elective course pursued a pharmaceutical industry fellowship compared to all PharmD graduates (4.8%). Of the students who enrolled in pharmaceutical industry APPEs, 31% had taken 1 of the 2 elective courses. Exposure to a pharmaceutical industry elective course within a college or school of pharmacy curriculum may increase students' interest in pursuing pharmaceutical industry fellowships and enrolling in pharmaceutical industry APPEs.

  12. 78 FR 44579 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Program Evaluation. OMB Approval Number: 2528--New. Type of Request: New collection. Form Number: None... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Evaluation AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD has...

  13. 76 FR 22412 - Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Requests for Expressions of Interests To Administer Pilot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Fellowship Placement Pilot Program Requests for Expressions of Interests To Administer Pilot Contact Information Correction AGENCY: Office of the General Counsel, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On April 13, 2011, at 71 FR 20699, HUD published a notice announcing HUD's proposal to conduct...

  14. Defining a core curriculum for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Clarke, Samuel; Jordan, Jaime; Guth, Todd; Santen, Sally A; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    A trained cadre of medical education scholars with a focus on methodologically sound research techniques is needed to ensure development of innovations that can be translated to educational practice, rigorous evaluation of instructional strategies, and progress toward improving patient care outcomes. Most established educational programs are aimed at existing faculty members and focus primarily on the development of teaching and leadership skills. At the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success," a breakout session was convened to develop training recommendations for postgraduate fellowship programs in medical education scholarship that would enable residency graduates to join academic faculties armed with the skills needed to perform research in medical education. Additionally, these graduates would enjoy the benefits of established mentorships. A group of 23 medical education experts collaborated to address the following objectives: 1) construct a formal needs assessment for fellowship training in medical education scholarship in emergency medicine (EM), 2) compare and contrast current education scholarship programs in both EM and non-EM specialties, and 3) develop a set of core curriculum guidelines for specialized fellowship training in medical education scholarship in EM. Fellowship-trained faculty need to be proficient in learner instruction and assessment, organizational leadership, curriculum development, educational methodology, and conducting generalizable hypothesis-driven research to improve patient care.

  15. Development of a Post-Master's Fellowship Program in Oncology Nursing Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Dorothy; Henderson, Billie

    A one-year Post-Master's Fellowship in Oncology Nursing Education for nurse educators was developed through the collaboration of San Jose State University (California) and University of Alabama at Birmingham. The project was designed to: develop or update undergraduate/graduate oncology nursing programs; provide continuing education for practicing…

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Andragogical Teaching in Adult Bible Fellowships at the Chapel, Akron, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Jeffrey Ronald

    2011-01-01

    This project evaluated the effectiveness of andragogical teaching in adult Bible fellowships at The Chapel in Akron, Ohio. The project found that andragogical teaching was more effective than pedagogical teaching in students learning factual content on Ephesians. Both andragogical teaching and pedagogical teaching had no effect, or even a negative…

  17. Professional Development in Law, Health Care, and Aging: A Model Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    2000-01-01

    Argues there is a growing need for a core of professionals with the education and sensitivities necessary to integrate the fields of law, health care, and gerontology. Paper describes a professional development fellowship program which attempts to address this need by having recently graduated attorneys assess, on a firsthand level, provisions of…

  18. 34 CFR 535.57 - How shall the fellowship recipient account for the obligation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How shall the fellowship recipient account for the obligation? 535.57 Section 535.57 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  19. 34 CFR 535.50 - What is the service requirement for a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the service requirement for a fellowship? 535.50 Section 535.50 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL...

  20. 34 CFR 535.51 - What are the requirements for repayment of the fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for repayment of the fellowship? 535.51 Section 535.51 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  1. 34 CFR 535.3 - What financial assistance is available for fellowship recipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What financial assistance is available for fellowship recipients? 535.3 Section 535.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  2. 34 CFR 535.42 - What is the period of a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the period of a fellowship? 535.42 Section 535.42 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION:...

  3. 34 CFR 535.30 - How does an individual apply for a fellowship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does an individual apply for a fellowship? 535.30 Section 535.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION:...

  4. A Case Study of Leadership Development in Action: The UJIA Ashdown Fellowship 2000-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Lira

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The United Jewish Israel Appeal Ashdown Fellowship was launched in 2000 with the aim of creating high quality leadership for educational organisations in the British Jewish community. It sought to develop talented and committed people who demonstrated leadership potential. The purpose of this paper is to record the narrative of the…

  5. Ownership and Autonomy in Early Learning: The Froebel Research Fellowship Project, 2002-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, David J.; Robson, Sue; Greenfield, Sue; Fumoto, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a brief review of the main phases and findings of the Froebel Research Fellowship project, which has been funded by the Froebel Trust (previously the Incorporated Froebel Educational Institute) since 2002. The project is investigating the extent to which Froebelian ideals, such as the notion that children's knowledge should…

  6. Academic Training in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship: A Curriculum Based on Leadership Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivany, Christopher G.; Russell, Robert K.; Vanessa, Venezia A.; Saito, Albert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe how one child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship program responded to emerging trends in clinical practice which increasingly demand that child and adolescent psychiatrists lead their colleagues through instruction and supervision. Methods: Data from surveys of recent graduates of child and adolescent training…

  7. The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation: Providing Teachers with Opportunities for Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation sponsors rigorous summer residential institutes in math and science that reinvigorate secondary teachers and encourage lifelong learning. Laboratory and field experiences that model student-centered approaches allow teachers to develop strong content knowledge and research skills. Participants…

  8. Improving Michigan STEM Teachers and Teaching: The W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The W. K. Kellogg Foundation's Woodrow Wilson Michigan Teaching Fellowship successfully addressed the challenge of preparing and supporting effective teachers for Michigan's high-need classrooms, while helping transform teacher education across the state for the long term. This report analyzes the efforts of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation's Woodrow…

  9. A Psychological Rationale in Support of the Alcoholics Anonymous' Concept of Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machell, David F.

    1992-01-01

    Develops a theoretical rationale in support of the concept of "fellowship," the healing cornerstone of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Reviews supporting literature from the areas of personality theory, group psychotherapy, alcoholism psychopathology, and alcoholism psychological treatment. Suggests a common premise and common ground of…

  10. Postprofessional cartography in physical therapy: charting a pathway for residency and fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eric K; Tichenor, Carol Jo

    2015-02-01

    Remarkably little is known about what constitutes a good residency or fellowship training program. In contrast to entry-level programs, the job of residency and fellowship educators is sometimes more subtle and difficult to articulate. Developing advanced clinical reasoning, communication skills, use of evidence, and patient-management approaches beyond entry-level competencies for students of various levels of education and backgrounds creates unique and diverse teaching challenges. There is no gold standard and precious little evidence to guide us on how best to sequence and pace residency/fellowship curricula, integrate mentoring into didactic and clinical coursework, conduct examinations, and measure the impact of training on patient care. To this end, we'd like to congratulate Drs Rodeghero, Wang, Flynn, Cleland, Wainner, and Whitman on their paper, “The Impact of Physical Therapy Residency or Fellowship Education on Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Musculoskeletal Conditions.” This is a significant first step in the effort to explore that most important challenge of any health profession's educational initiatives: did training result in improved patient outcomes?

  11. Unverifiable Academic Work by Applicants to Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert B; Hatzenbuehler, John R; Dexter, William W; Haskins, Amy E; Holt, Christina T

    2016-12-01

    In 2008, it was shown that 11% of applications to a primary care sports medicine program contained unverifiable citations for publications. In 2009, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine changed the application requirements, requiring proof that all claimed citations (publications and presentations) be included with the fellowship application. We determined the rate of unverifiable academic citations in applications to primary care sports medicine fellowship programs after proof of citations was required. We retrospectively examined all applications submitted to 5 primary care sports medicine fellowship programs across the country for 3 academic years (2010-2013), out of 108 to 131 programs per year. For claimed citations that did not include proof of publication or presentation, we attempted to verify them using PubMed and Google Scholar searches, a medical librarian search, and finally directly contacting the publisher or sponsoring conference organization for verification. Fifteen of 311 applications contained at least 1 unverifiable citation. The total unverifiable rate was 4.8% (15 of 311) for publications and 11% (9 of 85) for presentations. These rates were lower than previously published within the same medical subspecialty. After requiring proof of publication and presentation citations within applications to primary care sports medicine fellowship programs, unverifiable citations persisted but were less than previously reported.

  12. Graduate Student Fellowship Program Effects on Attitude and Interest toward Science of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, James R.; Rayfield, John; Briers, Gary; Johnson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of a graduate student fellowship program on middle school students' attitude toward science and their interest in science. Using a descriptive and correlational research design, data were collected from 588 middle school students (grades 6, 7, and 8). Participants completed a pretest and a…

  13. Accessibility and quality of online information for pediatric orthopaedic surgery fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Austin R; Murphy, Robert F; Spence, David D; Kelly, Derek M; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric orthopaedic fellowship applicants commonly use online-based resources for information on potential programs. Two primary sources are the San Francisco Match (SF Match) database and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) database. We sought to determine the accessibility and quality of information that could be obtained by using these 2 sources. The online databases of the SF Match and POSNA were reviewed to determine the availability of embedded program links or external links for the included programs. If not available in the SF Match or POSNA data, Web sites for listed programs were located with a Google search. All identified Web sites were analyzed for accessibility, content volume, and content quality. At the time of online review, 50 programs, offering 68 positions, were listed in the SF Match database. Although 46 programs had links included with their information, 36 (72%) of them simply listed http://www.sfmatch.org as their unique Web site. Ten programs (20%) had external links listed, but only 2 (4%) linked directly to the fellowship web page. The POSNA database does not list any links to the 47 programs it lists, which offer 70 positions. On the basis of a Google search of the 50 programs listed in the SF Match database, web pages were found for 35. Of programs with independent web pages, all had a description of the program and 26 (74%) described their application process. Twenty-nine (83%) listed research requirements, 22 (63%) described the rotation schedule, and 12 (34%) discussed the on-call expectations. A contact telephone number and/or email address was provided by 97% of programs. Twenty (57%) listed both the coordinator and fellowship director, 9 (26%) listed the coordinator only, 5 (14%) listed the fellowship director only, and 1 (3%) had no contact information given. The SF Match and POSNA databases provide few direct links to fellowship Web sites, and individual program Web sites either do not exist or do not

  14. Integration of a NASA faculty fellowship project within an undergraduate engineering capstone design class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen, C.

    2012-11-01

    The United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) provides university faculty fellowships that prepare the faculty to implement engineering design class projects that possess the potential to contribute to NASA ESMD objectives. The goal of the ESMD is to develop new capabilities, support technologies and research that will enable sustained and affordable human and robotic space exploration. In order to create a workforce that will have the desire and skills necessary to achieve these goals, the NASA ESMD faculty fellowship program enables university faculty to work on specific projects at a NASA field center and then implement the project within their capstone engineering design class. This allows the senior - or final year - undergraduate engineering design students, the opportunity to develop critical design experience using methods and design tools specified within NASA's Systems Engineering (SE) Handbook. The faculty fellowship projects focus upon four specific areas critical to the future of space exploration: spacecraft, propulsion, lunar and planetary surface systems and ground operations. As the result of a 2010 fellowship, whereby faculty research was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama (AL), senior design students in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) department at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) had the opportunity to complete senior design projects that pertained to current work conducted to support ESMD objectives. Specifically, the UAH MAE students utilized X-TOOLSS (eXploration Toolset for the Optimization Of Launch and Space Systems), an Evolutionary Computing (EC) design optimization software, as well as design, analyze, fabricate and test a lunar regolith burrowing device - referred to as the Lunar Wormbot (LW) - that is aimed at exploring and retrieving samples of lunar regolith. These two projects were

  15. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  16. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2008 - May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2010-03-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 16th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. We provide this annual report to review program activities from June 2008 through May 2009 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2008. Contents include: Welcome Letter Introduction The NGFP Team Program Management Highlights Class of 2008 Incoming Fellows Orientation Travel Career Development Management of the Fellows Performance Highlights Closing Ceremony Encore Performance Where They Are Now Alumnus Career Highlights: Christine Buzzard Class of 2009 Applicant Database Upgrades Fall Recruitment Activities Interviews Hiring and Clearances Introducing the Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Recruitment Strategy On the Horizon Appendix A: Class of 2009 Fellows

  17. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-04-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It’s all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies

  18. National Nuclear Security Administration Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report in Brief: October 2007 - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Sandusky, Jessica A.

    2009-05-01

    This abbreviated Annual Report covers program activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) from October 2007 through May 2008--the timeframe between the last Annual Report (which covered activities through September 2007) and the next report (which will begin with June 2008 activities). In that timeframe, the NGFP continued building a solid foundation as the program began reaping the benefits of recently implemented changes. This report is organized by Fellowship class and the pertinent program activities for each, including: October 2007 Recruiting events and final applications (Class of 2008) Winter 2007 Selection and hiring (Class of 2008) Spring 2008 Career development roundtables (Class of 2007) Orientation planning (Class of 2008) Recruitment planning and university outreach (Class of 2009) May 2008 Closing ceremony (Class of 2007)

  19. A WAY BACK IN: THE CERN POST-CAREER BREAK FELLOWSHIP

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    This video showcases the Post Career Break Fellowship programme launched in 2014. It is aimed at people looking to return to work in science and engineering after a break for personal reasons such as family or caring responsibilities or health issues for at least 2 years. The video features two current post career break fellows, talking about their journey of starting a career, taking some time off and returning to science.

  20. Update on factors motivating pharmacy students to pursue residency and fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Bryan C; Weber, Lynn M

    2013-08-15

    The factors motivating pharmacy students to pursue residency and fellowship training in 2011 versus 1993 were assessed. A survey replicating previous research was electronically sent to 794 residency directors and 29 fellowship program directors with a request to forward the survey to current residents and fellows. A similar survey was sent to 124 colleges of pharmacy with a request to forward the survey to the faculty member most involved with residency and fellowship promotion within their doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) curriculum. Participants were asked to rank leading motivating factors and barriers to pharmacy students pursuing these programs. Additional data collected included when and the methods by which these programs are promoted. Among residents and fellows, 865 usable surveys were returned. The leading motivating reasons for residents and fellows to pursue training were "to gain knowledge and experience," a "desire for specialized training," [corrected] and "understood as a prerequisite for certain jobs." A total of 124 U.S. pharmacy schools were surveyed, and 65 (52%) returned completed responses. "Understood as a prerequisite for certain jobs," "faculty stressing importance," and "recognition of the new and challenging roles for pharmacists in the future" were the factors most frequently cited by faculty members. Compared with previous research, a new factor motivating pharmacy students to pursue residency and fellowship training is the consideration that these opportunities are a prerequisite for certain jobs. This development may be attributable to trends in the supply and demand of pharmacists, the recognition of the value in these programs by major pharmacy organizations, and the evolving role of pharmacists in direct patient care.

  1. Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karles Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL /MR/6750--15-9650 Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL ...ABSTRACT Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karle’s Fellowship Sandra (Hernandez) Hangarter Naval Research Laboratory 4555...Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL /MR/6750--15-9650 ONR Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Unclassified Unlimited

  2. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  3. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The study program consists of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the research topics.

  4. The gynecologic oncology fellowship interview process: Challenges and potential areas for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Gressel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The application and interview process for gynecologic oncology fellowship is highly competitive, time-consuming and expensive for applicants. We conducted a survey of successfully matched gynecologic oncology fellowship applicants to assess problems associated with the interview process and identify areas for improvement. All Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO list-serve members who have participated in the match program for gynecologic oncology fellowship were asked to complete an online survey regarding the interview process. Linear regression modeling was used to examine association between year of match, number of programs applied to, cost incurred, and overall satisfaction. Two hundred and sixty-nine eligible participants reported applying to a mean of 20 programs [range 1–45] and were offered a mean of 14 interviews [range 1–43]. They spent an average of $6000 [$0–25,000], using personal savings (54%, credit cards (50%, family support (12% or personal loans (3%. Seventy percent of respondents identified the match as fair, and 93% were satisfied. Interviewees spent a mean of 15 [0–45] days away from work and 37% reported difficulty arranging coverage. Linear regression showed an increase in number of programs applied to and cost per applicant over time (p < 0.001 between 1993 and 2016. Applicants who applied to all available programs spent more (p < 0.001 than those who applied to programs based on their location or quality. The current fellowship match was identified as fair and satisfying by most respondents despite being time consuming and expensive. Suggested alternative options included clustering interviews geographically or conducting preliminary interviews at the SGO Annual Meeting.

  5. Perspectives of female medical faculty in Ethiopia on a leadership fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvach, Elizabeth; Yesehak, Bethlehem; Abebaw, Hiwot; Conniff, James; Busse, Heidi; Haq, Cynthia

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate a leadership fellowship program through perspectives of Ethiopian women medical faculty participants. An intensive two-week leadership development fellowship was designed for women faculty from Ethiopian medical schools and conducted from 2011-2015 at the University of Wisconsin-School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Nine Ethiopian women working in early- or mid-level academic positions were selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the fellows. Transcripts were reviewed through qualitative analysis to assess the perceived impact of the training on their careers. Three male academic leaders were interviewed to solicit feedback on the program. Eight of 9 fellows were interviewed. Themes describing the benefits of the fellowship included: increased awareness of gender inequities; enhanced motivation for career advancement; increased personal confidence; and improved leadership skills. Fellows provided suggestions for future training and scaling up efforts to promote gender equity. Male leaders described the benefits of men promoting gender equity within academic health centers. This paper provides evidence that targeted brief training programs can enhance women's motivation and skills to become effective leaders in academic medicine in Ethiopia. Promoting gender equity in academic medicine is an important strategy to address health workforce shortages and to provide professional role models for female students in the health professions.

  6. Misrepresentation of research publications among orthopedic surgery fellowship applicants: a comparison with documented misrepresentations in other fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish V; Pradhan, Ben B; Meals, Roy A

    2003-04-01

    Study Design. A retrospective study was used to review fellowship applications over 3 years. Objectives. To assess the prevalence of research misrepresentation in orthopedic fellowship applications, and to compare such activity between subspecialties (e.g. spine, sports, hand). Summary of Background Data. Competition for orthopedic surgery fellowships is intense. The applicant pool includes orthopedic, plastic, and general surgeons, as well as neurosurgeons. Residency and fellowship training programs in other disciplines have documented shocking levels of misrepresentation in the curriculum vitae of prospective applicants. However, no study has looked at orthopedic residents applying for subspecialty fellowship programs. Methods. A retrospective analysis investigated 280 applications for fellowship positions in the department of orthopedic surgery at the authors' academic institution from 1996 to 1998 inclusively. To allow for press and publication delays, a minimum 24-month follow-up period was instituted. The listings of applicants' research publications were analyzed for evidence of misrepresentation through an exhaustive literature search. Only the most obvious confirmable discrepancies were labeled as misrepresentations. The results then were compared with those found in studies conducted in other fields: gastroenterology fellowship, emergency medicine residency, pediatric residency, dermatology residency, orthopedic residency, and medical faculty applications. Results. Among 280 (54%) applicants for orthopedic surgery candidates, 151 claimed journal publications. It was found that 16 (10.6%) of these 151 applicants had misrepresented their citations. This rate was highest in spine fellowship applicants (20%). However, considering the numbers available, this was not significantly different among the various subspecialty fellowship applicants (P>0.1). In addition, various demographic data did not correlate with the rate of misrepresentation (P>0.1). These

  7. (Dis)Orientation of International Medical Graduates: An Approach to Foster Teaching, Learning, and Collaboration (TLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Abbey, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Teaching for Learning and Collaboration (TLC) Program is a teaching-skills program focusing on methods to improve student learning. This program was adopted to address the professional and personal challenges faced by International Medical Graduates (IMGs) completing a fellowship in psychosomatic medicine. Method: The authors…

  8. (Dis)Orientation of International Medical Graduates: An Approach to Foster Teaching, Learning, and Collaboration (TLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Abbey, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Teaching for Learning and Collaboration (TLC) Program is a teaching-skills program focusing on methods to improve student learning. This program was adopted to address the professional and personal challenges faced by International Medical Graduates (IMGs) completing a fellowship in psychosomatic medicine. Method: The authors…

  9. Advances in Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Boot Camp Training Promotes Fellowship Readiness and Enables Retention of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Sacks, Loren D; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2017-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that a pediatric cardiology boot camp can improve knowledge acquisition and decrease anxiety for trainees. We sought to determine if boot camp participants entered fellowship with a knowledge advantage over fellows who did not attend and if there was moderate-term retention of that knowledge. A 2-day training program was provided for incoming pediatric cardiology fellows from eight fellowship programs in April 2016. Hands-on, immersive experiences and simulations were provided in all major areas of pediatric cardiology. Knowledge-based examinations were completed by each participant prior to boot camp (PRE), immediately post-training (POST), and prior to the start of fellowship in June 2016 (F/U). A control group of fellows who did not attend boot camp also completed an examination prior to fellowship (CTRL). Comparisons of scores were made for individual participants and between participants and controls. A total of 16 participants and 16 control subjects were included. Baseline exam scores were similar between participants and controls (PRE 47 ± 11% vs. CTRL 52 ± 10%; p = 0.22). Participants' knowledge improved with boot camp training (PRE 47 ± 11% vs. POST 70 ± 8%; p cardiology knowledge after the training program and had excellent moderate-term retention of that knowledge. Participants began fellowship with a larger fund of knowledge than those fellows who did not attend.

  10. Paediatric cardiology fellowship training: effect of work-hour regulations on scholarly activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronai, Christina; Lang, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In 2003, work-hour regulations were implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Much has been published regarding resident rest and quality of life as well as patient safety. There has been no examination on the effect of work-hour restrictions on academic productivity of fellows in training. Paediatric subspecialty fellows have a scholarly requirement mandated by the American Board of Pediatrics. We have examined the impact of work-hour restrictions on the scholarly productivity of paediatric cardiology fellows during their fellowship. We conducted a literature search for all paediatric cardiology fellows between 1998 and 2007 at a single academic institution as first or senior authors on papers published during their 3-year fellowship and 3 years after completion of their categorical fellowship (n=63, 30 fellows before 2003 and 33 fellows after 2003). The numbers of first- or senior-author fellow publications before and after 2003 were compared. We also collected data on final paediatric cardiology subspecialty career choice. There was no difference in the number of fellow first-author publications before and after 2003. Before work-hour restrictions, the mean number of publications per fellow was 2.1 (±2.2), and after work-hour restrictions it was 2.0 (±1.8), (p=0.89). By subspecialty career choice, fellows who select electrophysiology, preventative cardiology, and heart failure always published within the 6-year time period. Since the implementation of work-hour regulations, total number of fellow first-authored publications has not changed. The role of subspecialty choice may play a role in academic productivity of fellows in training.

  11. Nonverifiable research publications among applicants to an academic trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Bernardino C; Inaba, Kenji; Gausepohl, Andrew; Okoye, Obi; Teixeira, Pedro G; Breed, Wynne; Lam, Lydia; Talving, Peep; Sullivan, Maura; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and predictors of nonverifiable research publications among applicants to a trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program. All complete applications submitted to our trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program were prospectively collected for 4 application cycles (2009 to 2012). All publications listed by applicants were tabulated and underwent verification using MEDLINE and direct journal search with verification by a team of professional health sciences librarians. Demographics and academic criteria were compared between applicants with nonverifiable and verifiable publications. A total of 100 applicants reported 301 publications. Of those, 20 applicants (20%) listed 32 papers (11%) that could not be verified. These applicants comprised 30% of those with 1 or more peer-reviewed publications. There were no significant differences in sex (male, 55% nonverifiable vs 60% verifiable, p = 0.684) or age (34.3 ± 6.6 years vs 34.2 ± 5.0 years, p = 0.963). There were no differences with regard to citizenship status (foreign medical graduates, 20% nonverifiable vs 28% verifiable, p = 0.495). Applicants with nonverified publications were less likely to be in the military (0% vs 14%, p = 0.079), more likely to have presented their work at surgical meetings (80% vs 58%, p = 0.064), and to be individuals with 3 or more peer-reviewed publications (55% vs 25%, p = 0.009). In this analysis of academic integrity, one-fifth of all applicants applying to a trauma and surgical critical care fellowship program and 30% of those with 1 or more peer-reviewed publications had nonverifiable publications listed in their curricula vitae. These applicants were less likely to be in the military, more likely to have presented their work at surgical meetings and to have 3 or more peer-reviewed publications. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The feasibility of implementing a communication skills training course in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Lauren; Figueiredo, Lisa; Roth, Michael; Levy, Adam

    Communication skills are a competency highlighted by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education; yet, little is known about the frequency with which trainees receive formal training or what programs are willing to invest. We sought to answer this question and designed a program to address identified barriers. We surveyed pediatric fellowship program directors from all disciplines and, separately, pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship program directors to determine current use of formal communication skills training. At our institution, we piloted a standardized patient (SP)-based communication skills training program for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Twenty-seven pediatric hematology/oncology program directors and 44 pediatric program directors participated in the survey, of which 56% and 48%, respectively, reported having an established, formal communication skills training course. Multiple barriers to implementation of a communication skills course were identified, most notably time and cost. In the pilot program, 13 pediatric hematology/oncology fellows have participated, and 9 have completed all 3 years of training. Precourse assessment demonstrated fellows had limited comfort in various areas of communication. Following course completion, there was a significant increase in self-reported comfort and/or skill level in such areas of communication, including discussing a new diagnosis (p =.0004), telling a patient they are going to die (p =.005), discussing recurrent disease (p communicating a poor prognosis (p =.002), or responding to anger (p ≤.001). We have designed a concise communication skills training program, which addresses identified barriers and can feasibly be implemented in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

  13. Opinion & special articles: a guide from fellowship to faculty: Nietzsche and the academic neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, S Thomas

    2012-10-02

    The role of the physician scientist in biomedical research is increasingly threatened. Despite a clear role in clinical advances in translational medicine, the percentage of physicians engaged in research has steadily declined. Several programmatic efforts have been initiated to address this problem by providing time and financial resources to the motivated resident or fellow. However, this decline in physician scientists is due not only to a lack of time and resources but also a reflection of the uncertain path in moving from residency or postdoctoral training toward junior faculty. This article is a practical guide to the milestones and barriers to successful faculty achievement after residency or fellowship training.

  14. The 1993 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  15. 1994 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  16. American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators is described. The program involves participation in cooperative research and study. Results of the program evaluation are summarized. The research fellows indicated satisfaction with the program. Benefits of the program cited include: (1) enhancement of professional abilities; (2) contact with professionals in a chosen area of research; (3) familiarity with research facilities; and (4) development of new research techniques and their adaptation to an academic setting. Abstracts of each of the research projects undertaken are presented.

  17. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Andrew M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mandelker, Diana L; Platt, Mia Y; Rao, Luigi K F; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E; Levy, Bruce P; McClintock, David S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank C; Gilbertson, John R

    2014-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows' ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the

  18. General versus vascular surgeon: impact of a vascular fellowship on clinical practice, surgical case load, and lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Randall W

    2010-02-01

    An applicant shortage for vascular surgery (VS) residencies exists despite an increase in available training positions created to meet the growing demands for vascular surgeons. After 3 years of practice as an American Board of Surgery (ABS)-certified/board-eligible general surgeon, the author of this study attended an accredited 1-year VS training fellowship and received an ABS certificate of Added Qualifications in VS. The purpose of this review was to investigate the implications completing a vascular fellowship has had on VS procedure patterns, vascular procedure competency, clinical practice, career, and lifestyle with the aim of attracting trainees to the field of VS. The author's operative logs were reviewed retrospectively to summarize vascular procedures performed before and after the vascular fellowship. Statistical analysis was performed comparing the types and volume of vascular procedures before and after the vascular fellowship. Changes in professional career and personal life also were examined. The author performed 401 vascular procedures during 2.8 years as a general surgeon. In the first 3.4 years after the vascular fellowship, vascular procedure volume increased to 1563. The mean number of vascular procedures performed per year increased from 143.2 as a general surgeon to 459.7 as a vascular surgeon. The three major differences in vascular procedures occurring after the vascular fellowship were (1) a threefold increase in the number of vascular procedures performed, (2) a shift from major open to venous and endovascular procedures, and (3) an increase in case complexity. Specializing in VS also has resulted in increased career opportunities, more career satisfaction, a direct financial benefit, and more flexibility for lifestyle and family. Because of these positive changes, the author encourages medical students and residents interested in VS to explore the specialty early, seek vascular surgeons to serve as mentors, and enter one of the new VS

  19. Meeting ACGME and ABMS Quality Improvement Requirements in a Sleep Medicine Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelgikar, Anita Valanju; Priddy, Cindy; Van Harrison, R

    2017-08-29

    To describe a sustainable program of teaching and implementing quality improvement (QI) in a 12-month sleep medicine fellowship. We created a QI curriculum based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) Part IV Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirements for QI. Two program faculty with prior QI training volunteered to mentor fellows. Our institution's central QI office houses QI experts who teach QI across the health system. One of these experts, referred to as the "QI consultant," helped us adapt QI teaching materials to include 4 online modules and 5 group sessions. Fellows worked in teams to complete 2 data-guided QI cycles. The curriculum required 29 hours for fellows, 18 hours for faculty, and 55 hours for the QI consultant; now that teaching materials have been created, the QI consultant's involvement will decrease over time. Post-curriculum surveys showed that fellows' knowledge of QI concepts increased, as did their confidence performing QI activities. Fellows' QI projects objectively improved timeliness and quality of care for patients. Sleep medicine fellows and QI faculty mentors evaluated the curriculum positively. The curriculum met ACGME requirements for QI, and fellows and mentoring faculty received ABMS Part IV MOC credit upon completion of the curriculum. A QI curriculum can successfully be implemented into a 12-month sleep medicine fellowship to increase sleep medicine fellows' QI knowledge and confidence, meet ACGME and MOC requirements, and contribute to care of patients with sleep disorders.

  20. Advancing geriatrics fellowship programs through a community-based residency network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin; Neuberger, Marolee; Noel, Mary; Sleight, Deborah; vanSchagen, John; Wadland, William

    2013-01-01

    Our nation faces unprecedented challenges in caring for older adults. Geriatricians who provide care and teach geriatrics are underrepresented in the workforce, especially in non-metropolitan communities. In Michigan, geriatricians and geriatrics fellowship (GF) programs are clustered in the Southeast, suggesting that training site demographics may influence fellows' career location decisions. A project was undertaken at Michigan State University to determine if an established family medicine residency network (FMRN) could facilitate the accreditation of new GF programs in non-metropolitan communities, recruit fellows, and retain graduates to practice and teach in neighboring areas. A team (department chair, appointed GF network director, site program directors, and education specialists) conducted participating site needs and readiness assessments, facilitated collaboration between GF programs, assisted with completion of new program applications, led development of a curriculum utilizing shared instructional resources and evaluation tools, and provided career counseling to fellows. Two GF programs were accredited and accepted applicants. Ongoing cooperative efforts resulted in the writing of a GF curriculum, organization of a joint Observed Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE), and monthly information-sharing teleconferences with program directors. Following training, graduates have chosen to practice in areas underserved by geriatricians in Michigan and elsewhere. Early experience with this model of GF development indicates that new fellowships can be established in community-based residencies that competitively recruit and train fellows who are inclined to practice in areas of greatest need. Creation of more non-metropolitan GF programs could provide a means to stabilize and redistribute the geriatrician workforce.

  1. Report on the American Association of Medical Physics Undergraduate Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Avery, Stephen; Gueye, Paul; Sandison, George A

    2013-01-07

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) sponsors two summer undergraduate research programs to attract top performing undergraduate students into graduate studies in medical physics: the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship Program (SUFP) and the Minority Undergraduate Summer Experience (MUSE). Undergraduate research experience (URE) is an effective tool to encourage students to pursue graduate degrees. The SUFP and MUSE are the only medical physics URE programs. From 2001 to 2012, 148 fellowships have been awarded and a total of $608,000 has been dispersed to fellows. This paper reports on the history, participation, and status of the programs. A review of surveys of past fellows is presented. Overall, the fellows and mentors are very satisfied with the program. The efficacy of the programs is assessed by four metrics: entry into a medical physics graduate program, board certification, publications, and AAPM involvement. Sixty-five percent of past fellow respondents decided to pursue a graduate degree in medical physics as a result of their participation in the program. Seventy percent of respondents are currently involved in some educational or professional aspect of medical physics. Suggestions for future enhancements to better track and maintain contact with past fellows, expand funding sources, and potentially combine the programs are presented.

  2. Assessment of Clinical Teachers' Professionalism in Iran: From Residents and Fellowships' Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Garshasbi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, professional conduct of clinical teachers in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran was assessed by their residents (n=292 and fellowships (n=48 using a standard questioner called self-reported measurement equipment. This evaluation was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Professionalism was questioned in four domains including clinical teacher-patient, clinical teacher-student, inter-professional and clinical teacher-self relationships. Accordingly, mean scores of the teachers in cases of clinical teacher-patient; clinical teacher-student, inter-professional (teamwork and clinical teacher-self relations were 61%, 62.2%, 60.6% and 57.6%, respectively. Generally, the teachers achieved 60.35% of the positive scores, and as a result, they were assessed intermediate in the professional behaviors. The residents and fellowships stated that they were not completely satisfied with their teacher's professional conduct and had hidden concerns. It shows that the clinical teachers in our project may not be ideal role models. As a result, developing a comprehensive professionalism and implementing regulations to ensure a successful professionalism are necessary. The precise evaluation of professional conduct in clinical faculty could encourage the maintenance of professional behaviors and potentially decrease negative role modeling and positively influence the hidden curriculums. Operational approaches to formulating regulations and appropriate measures for establishing professional ethics are of great importance.

  3. An analytical perspective on the Fellowship Narrative of Genesis 18:1–15

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    Ahn Sang Keun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The narrative in Genesis 18:1–15 deals with God’s visit to Abraham at Mamre. The general tendency in the interpretation of this narrative is to focus on Abraham’s hospitality. It is usually interpreted as an example of his righteousness, in line with Hebrews 13:2, or with the test motive of the Greek myth of the birth of Orion. These interpretations, however, seem to be in conflict with the narrator’s own theological views.This study, therefore, attempts to explore the view point of the author of the Fellowship Narrative (Gn 18:1–15 within the context of the larger Abraham narrative (Gn 11:27–25:11. The method used for the investigation is mainly that of narrative criticism. Attention is paid to the narrator’s various literary skills: ‘linking structure with preceding episode’ (Gn 18:1a, the ‘sandwiched structure’ of the larger context (Gn 18:1–21:7, the unique plot sequence, as well as repeated clue words and phrases (such as ‘laugh’, ‘Sarah’ and ‘this time next year’. These literary aspects are used by the narrator to depict the faithfulness of the Lord who fulfils what he promised. The conclusion of this study overturns the traditional interpretations of the Fellowship Narrative.

  4. The 2016 American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association Traveling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumon; Cho, Samuel K; Freedman, Brett A; Firoozabadi, Reza

    2017-06-07

    The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association (AOA-JOA) Traveling Fellowship, which began in 1992 as a collaborative effort between the 2 orthopaedic communities, is aimed at fostering leadership among early-career surgeons through clinical, academic, and cultural exchange. Over 3 weeks, we experienced an extraordinary journey that led us across nearly 800 miles of the picturesque Japanese countryside, with stops at 6 distinguished academic centers. The opportunity to become personally acquainted with orthopaedic leaders in Japan, learn from their experiences, and immerse ourselves in the ancient and storied culture of a beautiful country was one that we will not soon forget. Along the way, we accumulated a wealth of information while enjoying the legendary hospitality of the Japanese people. There is a ubiquitous challenge in delivering cost-effective, accessible health care while maintaining a commitment to education and research. The U.S. orthopaedic community may take solace in the fact that our Japanese colleagues stand with us as partners in this pursuit, and our relationship with them continues to grow stronger through endeavors such as the AOA-JOA Traveling Fellowship. We look forward to honoring our Japanese colleagues in 2017 when we host them in the United States.

  5. Assessment of Clinical Teachers' Professionalism in Iran: From Residents and Fellowships' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garshasbi, Sima; Bahador, Hamidollah; Fakhraei, Nahid; Farbod, Abolfazl; Mohammadi, Maryam; Ahmady, Soleiman; Emami Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, professional conduct of clinical teachers in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran was assessed by their residents (n=292) and fellowships (n=48) using a standard questioner called self-reported measurement equipment. This evaluation was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Professionalism was questioned in four domains including clinical teacher-patient, clinical teacher-student, inter-professional and clinical teacher-self relationships. Accordingly, mean scores of the teachers in cases of clinical teacher-patient; clinical teacher-student, inter-professional (teamwork) and clinical teacher-self relations were 61%, 62.2%, 60.6% and 57.6%, respectively. Generally, the teachers achieved 60.35% of the positive scores, and as a result, they were assessed intermediate in the professional behaviors. The residents and fellowships stated that they were not completely satisfied with their teacher's professional conduct and had hidden concerns. It shows that the clinical teachers in our project may not be ideal role models. As a result, developing a comprehensive professionalism and implementing regulations to ensure a successful professionalism are necessary. The precise evaluation of professional conduct in clinical faculty could encourage the maintenance of professional behaviors and potentially decrease negative role modeling and positively influence the hidden curriculums. Operational approaches to formulating regulations and appropriate measures for establishing professional ethics are of great importance.

  6. MONJU AS AN INTERNATIONAL ASSET: INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE AND COOPERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, G.; Wisner, R.S.; Stuart, R.

    2004-10-06

    The role of the fast breeder reactor prototype Monju has expanded to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Today instead of being merely a demonstration of an economical, safe, environmentally responsible source of energy, as originally designed, it has also the capability to be transformed into a unique International Irradiations Test Facility. The potential for Monju's role in the Generation IV nuclear energy systems development, and fast reactor research and development area is clear. Its incomparable fast neutron spectrum density will be a major interest not only for Sodium Fast Reactor but for all the Generation IV concepts. As Monju's potential future role is laid out, plans for future tests can be made. Tests of advanced fuels and materials in support of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, as well as Minor Actinide Burning can be envisaged. Tests planned on transmutation of minor actinides have the objectives of an industrial demonstration of the reduction of toxic wastes and the stewardship burden of the long-lived wastes. Tests and demonstrations carried out at Monju will provide a bridge from existing Generation III fast reactor systems, now in the later stages of their projected operational lifetimes, to Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The JNC founded the International Cooperation and Technology Development Center and the International Research Fellowship program to facilitate this international effort. The Center exists specifically to formulate and perform projects ensuring the maximum technical benefit from Monju. The staff includes physicists, engineers and nuclear industry leaders from around the world. Research Fellowships center is based on several technical areas: advanced instrumentation, inspection techniques, plant reliability and safety, nucleonics, sodium handling technologies, irradiation and experiment management and coordination and advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities and techniques. This paper describes

  7. 76 FR 77361 - Announcement of Funding Award for 2011 for Request for Qualification (RFQ) for the Fellowship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... the Fellowship Placement Pilot Program AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy..., Policy Division, Office of Policy Development and Research, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban... persons who are hearing- or speech-impaired, this number may be reached via TTY by dialing the...

  8. Impact of minimally invasive/bariatric surgery fellowship on perioperative complications and outcomes in the first year of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iswanto Sucandy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several reports have described worse perioperative outcomes of laparoscopic gastric bypass procedure during learning curve, which improved after completion of one-year fellowship training. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate impact of fellowship training on perioperative complications and outcomes of various bariatric procedures. Materials and Methods: One hundred initial patients who underwent laparoscopic gastric banding, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and robotically-assisted laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch by a single fellowship trained surgeon were analyzed. Results: Overall average Body Mass Index (BMI of the patients was 45.9 kg/m 2 , age was 47.5 years, and the American Society of Anesthesiologist Score was 2.89. There were no intraoperative, major 30-day complications, or open conversions. Average operative time was 62 minutes in gastric banding, 160 minutes in gastric bypass, 119 minutes in vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and 320 minutes in biliopancreatic diversion. Length of stay ranged from 0.5 day after gastric banding to 3.9 days after biliopancreatic diversion. The perioperative complications and outcomes are comparable with those reported by experienced surgeons. No mortality occurred in this series. Conclusions: Bariatric fellowship ensured skills acquisition for new surgeons to safely and effectively perform various types of bariatric operations, with minimal perioperative complications and excellent outcomes.

  9. An Anonymous Survey of Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship Directors regarding Breaches of Contracts and a Proposal for Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, James L.; Bialer, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied how often applicants accept positions at more than one program, or programs offer positions to applicants who have already signed contracts with other programs. Methods: An anonymous survey was distributed to all psychosomatic medicine fellowship program directors. Results: It is fairly common for applicants to sign…

  10. Fellowship training at John Hopkins: programs leading to careers in librarianship and informatics as informaticians or informationists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jayne M; Roderer, Nancy K

    2005-01-01

    Preparing librarians to meet the information challenges faced in the current and future health care environments is critical. At Johns Hopkins University, three NLM-funded fellowship programs provide opportunities for librarians to utilize the rich environments of the Welch Medical Library and the Division of Health Sciences Informatics in support of life-long learning.

  11. Issues of Education at Community Colleges: Essays by Fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princeton Univ., NJ. Mid-Career Fellowship Program.

    This document contains the following nine essays by fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University, New Jersey: (1) Promotion Processes at the Public Community Colleges of New Jersey, by Harvey Braverman; (2) Plagiarism in ESL Contexts at the Community College, by Barrie Chi. Contains eight references; (3) Partnership and…

  12. "A Way to Talk about the Institution as Opposed to Just My Field": WAC Fellowships and Graduate Student Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps, Michael J.; Hall, Jonathan; Robinson, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    The teaching assistantship is a venerable model for funding graduate studies, staffing undergraduate courses, and providing pedagogical support for emerging college and university instructors. In this article, we present a variation of this model of graduate student support: the WAC Fellowship at the City University of New York. Using survey data…

  13. The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2010 traveling fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh A; Cheng, Ivan; Yao, Jeffrey; Huffman, G Russell

    2011-12-21

    We started this journey excited by the prospects of visiting Japan, a country with a proud and historic past. We ended the fellowship accomplishing those goals, and we left with a great deal of admiration for our orthopaedic colleagues halfway around the world for their excellence in education, clinical care, and research. Their hospitality and attention to the details of our visit were exemplary and a lesson to us as we host visiting fellows in the future. Japan reflects its past, but it also offers a preview into our own nation's future: an aging population, a shrinking workforce, a stagnant economy, nationalized health care, and a mushrooming national debt. Of all of these factors, it is the aging population that we, as orthopaedic surgeons, will be most acutely aware of and involved with. The degenerative disorders that affect elderly patients dominate the landscape of surgical care in Japan. Osteoporosis and osteopenia permeate many aspects of care across orthopaedic subspecialties. The surgeons in Japan are developing innovative and cost-effective means of treating the large volume of older patients within the fiscal constraints of a nationalized health-care system. We learned, and will continue to learn more, from Japan about the management of this growing patient population with its unique pathologies and challenges. With the recent natural disaster and ongoing safety concerns in Japan, the character and will of the people of Japan have been on display. Their courage and resolve combined with order and compassion are a testament to the nation's cultural identity. The seeds of the Traveling Fellowship were planted shortly after Japan's last wide-scale reconstruction, and the ties that have bound the JOA and the AOA together are strengthened through this trying time. We strongly urge our colleagues in the U.S. to help support the people, the physicians, and the health-care system of Japan through its most recent tribulations and offer them the same care and

  14. AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program: Building Communication Skills in Young Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, S.

    2006-12-01

    The AAAS Mass Media Science &Engineering Fellowship program has succeeded in training scientists to become more effective communicators for more than 30 years. The program places advanced science, engineering and mathematics students at media sites to work as science reporters for ten weeks each summer. AAAS places between 15 to 20 students a year at newspapers, magazines and radio stations. Our goal is to create better science communicators who understand their role in fostering the public's understanding of science. Fellows leave the program with a greater awareness of how to communicate complex issues by making the connection as to why people should be interested in certain developments, and more specifically, how they will impact their communities. 2004 AGU Fellow Rei Ueyama put her lessons learned to good use during her Fellowship at the Sacramento Bee. "In a regional paper like The Bee, a (story) also had to have a local touch. I needed to show why people in Sacramento (or California) should bother to read the story. One example is the story I wrote about seeding the ocean with iron particles to fight global warming. Since ocean fertilization is a global issue, I had to clearly specify the reason why The Bee and not The New York Times was running the story. The local angle I chose was to point out that the core group of scientists involved in this study was from Monterey Bay, Calif." Many alumni tell us the program has been an integral force in shaping the course of their career. Similarly, sites often report that having a scientist on staff is an invaluable resource that allows them to cover additional science stories as well as report some technical stories in more depth. The American Geophysical Union has sponsored a Mass Media Fellow since 1997. Sponsorship allows affiliate program partners to establish connections with young professionals in their field. They are then also able to take advantage of the communication skills resident in their alumni base

  15. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Partners HealthCare system′s Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1 New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2 taxing electronic health record (EHR and laboratory information system (LIS implementations; and (3 increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows′ ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship′s core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among

  16. Healthy Native Community Fellowship: An Indigenous Leadership Program to Enhance Community Wellness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Rae

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Healthy Native Communities Fellowship (HNCF is a grassroots evidence-based mentorship and leadership program that develops the skills and community-building capacities of leaders and community teams to improve health status through several intermediate social and cultural mechanisms: (a strengthening social participation (also known as social capital or cohesion; (b strengthening cultural connectedness and revitalization of cultural identity; and (c advocating for health-enhancing policies, practices, and programs that strengthen systems of prevention and care, as well as address the structural social determinants of health. This leadership program uses a community-based participatory research (CBPR approach and participatory evaluation to investigate how the work of local American Indian and Alaska Native leaders (fellows and their community coalitions contributes to individual, family, and community level health outcomes.

  17. Current status of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy training fellowships in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Heller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Heller, Jeffrey L TokarDepartment of Medicine, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Rapid growth in the field of advanced gastrointestinal endoscopy has led to an increase in specialized therapeutic endoscopy fellowships. The cornerstones of these programs are training in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound. These procedures are more complex and challenging to master than routine colonoscopy and upper endoscopy, and in the case of ERCP, higher risk. The concentration of the educational experience in the hands of relatively fewer trainees with specialized interest in advanced endoscopy has resulted in providing a focused cohort of graduating fellows with higher case volumes in training, which likely enhances diagnostic and therapeutic success and safer performance of these procedures. Endoscopic simulators, although not currently in widespread use, have the potential to improve advanced procedural training without jeopardizing patient safety.Keywords: gastrointestinal endoscopy, training, procedures, safety 

  18. The 1995 Research Reports: NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Buckingham, Gregg (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the eleventh year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 1995 program was administered by the University of Central Florida in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) with sponsorship and funding from the Office of Educational Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC Program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 1995. The NASA/ASEE Program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the University faculty member.

  19. Leadership for Addressing Aging in America: The Health and Aging Policy Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacchione, Pamela Z; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Borer, Amanda; Curran, Peter; DeVito Dabbs, Annette; Driessen, Julia; Kaskie, Brian; Khan, Fazal; Naegle, Madeline; Ordway, Anne; Reinke, Lynn F; Stein, Gary; West, Turner; Wright, Katie; Inouye, Sharon K

    2017-10-01

    The Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation and Atlantic Philanthropies trains future leaders to influence healthcare policy, systems, and program development in aging. Following a rigorous residential training in Washington, DC, Fellows establish placements of up to 1 year in the executive, legislative, or judicial branch of government, at a federal agency, state or community agency or committee, or with a nongovernmental organization. The 2016-2017 Fellows' activities represent a broad scope of work, including contributions to national and local policy priorities expected to build over time far beyond the core fellowship year. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  1. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teachning activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lecture and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  2. CAS-TWAS Fellowships Boost S&T Capacity in the Dcveloping World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    With the objectives of supporting S&T development of developing nations, promoting cooperation and exchanges among their S&T workers and improve their capacity in S&T innovation and train their S&T talent, the CAS-TWAS Fellowships Program was launched in 2004. So far, CAS institutes have hosted some 280 scientists from developing countries, including 96 PhD students, 71 postdocs and 115 visiting scholars. These scientists have come from more than 30 developing countries, including Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Nigeria, Pakistan and Sudan. Once they return home, they become an important scientific force in and for their countries. The followings are BCAS interviews with three Nigerian winners of the program.

  3. Global Surgery Fellowship: A model for surgical care and education in resource-poor countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarabi, Shahram; Smithers, Charles; Fils, Marie-May Louis; Godson, Jean-Louis; Pierre, Jean-Hamilton; Mukherjee, Joia; Meara, John; Farmer, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Surgical diseases have recently been shown to be a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Effective methods to decrease the burden of surgical disease and provide care in resource-poor settings are unknown. An opportunity to meet this need exists through collaborative efforts to train local surgeons in specialty care, such as pediatric general surgery. We present a novel model for the provision of surgical care and education in a resource-poor setting via a collaborative Global Surgery Fellowship program. Through Partners in Health in Haiti, this program placed a fully trained pediatric surgeon at an established rural hospital, both to temporarily serve that community and to teach local surgeons pediatric surgical care. The Global Surgery Fellow performed the cases presented here during his term, between July 2009 and June 2010. A total of 147 operative procedures were performed on 131 patients over the course of 12 weeks in Haiti. A total of 134 of the 147 total cases performed (91.2%) were educational cases, in which the Fellow operated with and trained one or more of the following: American medical students, American residents, Haitian residents, or Haitian staff surgeons. The Global Surgery Fellowship model overcomes many of the traditional challenges to providing adequate surgical care in resource-poor countries. Specifically, it meets the challenge of providing a broad educational experience for many levels of local and foreign physicians, while working within an established locally run health care system. We believe that this model is generalizable to many resource-poor hospitals with permanent local staff that are open to collaboration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementing the objective structured clinical examination in a geriatrics fellowship program-a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino-Silva, Thiago J; Gil, Luiz A; Suemoto, Claudia K; Kikuchi, Elina L; Lin, Sumika M; Farias, Luciana L; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) appears to be an effective alternative for assessing not only medical knowledge, but also clinical skills, including effective communication and physical examination skills. The purpose of the current study was to implement an OSCE model in a geriatrics fellowship program and to compare the instrument with traditional essay examination. Seventy first- and second-year geriatric fellows were initially submitted to a traditional essay examination and scored from 0 to 10 by a faculty member. The same fellows subsequently underwent an OSCE with eight 10-minute stations covering a wide range of essential aspects of geriatric knowledge. Each OSCE station had an examiner responsible for its evaluation according to a predefined checklist. Checklist items were classified for analysis purposes as clinical knowledge items (CKI) and communication skills items (CSI); fellow responses were scored from 0 to 10.Although essay examinations took from 30 to 45 minutes to complete, 180-200 minutes were required to evaluate fellows using the proposed OSCE method. Fellows scored an average of 6.2 ± 1.2 on the traditional essay examination and 6.6 ± 1.0 on the OSCE (P OSCE scores indicated that average performance on CKI was lower than the average on CSI (6.4 ± 1.1 vs. 8.4 ± 1.1; P examination was similar to their performance on CKI (P = .13). Second-year fellows performed better than first-year fellows on the essay examination (P OSCE was successfully implemented as an educational strategy during a geriatrics fellowship program. Combining different testing modalities may provide the best assessment of competence for various domains of knowledge, skills, and behavior.

  5. What is the chance all your trainees will pass the next Fellowship exam: A statistician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kevin H; Mahmoud, Ibrahim; Brown, Anthony Ft

    2017-02-01

    Your department has had a good track record over many years for preparing trainees to successfully sit for the ACEM Fellowship exam. On average the pass rate for your trainees is over 80%. Then, to your dismay, suddenly only two of five of your trainees pass the latest Fellowship exam. Does this anomaly necessitate an urgent review of your department's training programme, or is it just a statistical quirk? Let us suppose you can prepare candidates so that they all have at least an 80% chance of passing. The probability that all five candidates would have passed is 32.8% (or 0.8(5) ) based on the multiplication rule of probability for independent events. The probability that only two of five passed is 5.1% (or 10 × 0.8(2) × 0.2(3) ) based on the binomial distribution, which is a probability distribution analogous to the normal distribution. The construction of the binomial distribution depends on two parameters: (i) number of candidates sitting ('n'), and (ii) probability of passing for any individual candidate ('P'). The distribution gives the probability that 'x' number of individuals will pass when 'n' number of individuals sit. Thus despite an 80% pass rate historically, the probability that only two of five candidates will pass is not negligible at 5.1%. It is an anomaly, which we may choose not to act on unless it is recurrent, noting it will be expected to occur naturally about one time out of 20. The real challenge is to maintain or increase that individual probability at 80% or higher.

  6. Life after National Science Foundation fellowships: The implications for a graduate student's professional endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarski, Kelly Josephine

    Each year, hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, participate as Fellows in National Science Foundation GK-12 Grants throughout the U.S. These Fellowships create opportunities for university students to improve their communication skills, teaching proficiencies, and team-building skills, in addition to expanding their interest in educational endeavors in their respective communities while pursuing their college degrees. STEP (Science and Technology Enhancement Project) is one such project. University faculty, public school teachers, and community leaders collaborated together in order to bring scientists into middle and secondary classrooms to focus on increasing student interest and proficiency in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills. Seventeen Fellows, in the previous four years, designed, developed, and implemented innovative, hands-on lessons in seven local schools. The evaluation team collected a tremendous amount of research evidence focused on the effect of the program on the Fellows while they were participants in the study, but there has been very little data collected about the Fellows after leaving the program. This research study, consisting of two-hour interviews, qualitatively explores how the skills learned while participating in the STEP program affected the Fellows' career and educational choices once leaving the project. This data was analyzed along with historical attitude surveys and yearly tracking documents to determine the effect that participation in the program had on their choices post-STEP. An extensive literature review has been conducted focusing on other GK-12 programs throughout the country, K-16 collaboration, Preparing Future Faculty Programs, as well as on teaching and learning literature. These bodies of literature provide the theoretical basis in which the research is framed in order to assess the impact on Fellow educational and professional choices since leaving the STEP program. This

  7. Current status of preventive cardiology training among United States cardiology fellowships and comparison to training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Keteyian, Steven J; McBride, Patrick E; Weaver, W Douglas; Kim, Henry E

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated preventive cardiology education in United States cardiology fellowship programs and their adherence to Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium training guidelines, which recommend 1 month of training, faculty with expertise, and clinical experience in cardiac rehabilitation, lipid disorder management, and diabetes management as a part of the prevention curricula. We sent an anonymous survey to United States cardiology program directors and their chief fellow. The survey assessed the program curricula, rotation structure, faculty expertise, obstacles, and recommended improvements. The results revealed that 24% of surveyed programs met the Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium guidelines with a dedicated 1-month rotation in preventive cardiology, 24% had no formalized training in preventive cardiology, and 30% had no faculty with expertise in preventive cardiology, which correlated with fewer rotations in prevention than those with specialized faculty (p = 0.009). Fellows rotated though the following experiences (% of programs): cardiac rehabilitation, 71%; lipid management, 37%; hypertension, 15%; diabetes, 7%; weight management/obesity, 6%; cardiac nutrition, 6%; and smoking cessation, 5%. The program directors cited "lack of time" as the greatest obstacle to providing preventive cardiology training and the chief fellows reported "lack of a developed curriculum" (p = 0.01). The most recommended improvement was for the American College of Cardiology to develop a web-based curriculum/module. In conclusion, most surveyed United States cardiology training programs currently do not adhere to basic preventive cardiovascular medicine Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium recommendations. Additional attention to developing curricular content and structure, including the creation of an American College of Cardiology on-line knowledge module might improve fellowship training in preventive cardiology.

  8. The Molecular Neurobiology of Twelve Steps Program & Fellowship: Connecting the Dots for Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Thompson, Benjamin; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Femino, John; Giordano, John; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Teitelbaum, Scott; Smith, David E; Roy, A Kennison; Agan, Gozde; Fratantonio, James; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Gold, Mark S

    There are some who suggest that alcoholism and drug abuse are not diseases at all and that they are not consequences of a brain disorder as espoused recently by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Some would argue that addicts can quit on their own and moderate their alcohol and drug intake. When they present to a treatment program or enter the 12 Step Program & Fellowship, many addicts finally achieve complete abstinence. However, when controlled drinking fails, there may be successful alternatives that fit particular groups of individuals. In this expert opinion, we attempt to identify personal differences in recovery, by clarifying the molecular neurobiological basis of each step of the 12 Step Program. We explore the impact that the molecular neurobiological basis of the 12 steps can have on Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) despite addiction risk gene polymorphisms. This exploration has already been accomplished in part by Blum and others in a 2013 Springer Neuroscience Brief. The purpose of this expert opinion is to briefly, outline the molecular neurobiological and genetic links, especially as they relate to the role of epigenetic changes that are possible in individuals who regularly attend AA meetings. It begs the question as to whether "12 steps programs and fellowship" does induce neuroplasticity and continued dopamine D2 receptor proliferation despite carrying hypodopaminergic type polymorphisms such as DRD2 A1 allele. "Like-minded" doctors of ASAM are cognizant that patients in treatment without the "psycho-social-spiritual trio," may not be obtaining the important benefits afforded by adopting 12-step doctrines. Are we better off with coupling medical assisted treatment (MAT) that favors combining dopamine agonist modalities (DAM) as possible histone-deacetylase activators with the 12 steps followed by a program that embraces either one or the other? While there are many unanswered questions, at least we have reached a time when "science

  9. Predicting performance using background characteristics of international medical graduates in an inner-city university-affiliated Internal Medicine residency training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhuetie Jane

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IMGs constitute about a third of the United States (US internal medicine graduates. US residency training programs face challenges in selection of IMGs with varied background features. However data on this topic is limited. We analyzed whether any pre-selection characteristics of IMG residents in our internal medicine program are associated with selected outcomes, namely competency based evaluation, examination performance and success in acquiring fellowship positions after graduation. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 51 IMGs at our ACGME accredited teaching institution between 2004 and 2007. Background resident features namely age, gender, self-reported ethnicity, time between medical school graduation to residency (pre-hire time, USMLE step I & II clinical skills scores, pre-GME clinical experience, US externship and interest in pursuing fellowship after graduation expressed in their personal statements were noted. Data on competency-based evaluations, in-service exam scores, research presentation and publications, fellowship pursuance were collected. There were no fellowships offered in our hospital in this study period. Background features were compared between resident groups according to following outcomes: (a annual aggregate graduate PGY-level specific competency-based evaluation (CBE score above versus below the median score within our program (scoring scale of 1 – 10, (b US graduate PGY-level specific resident in-training exam (ITE score higher versus lower than the median score, and (c those who succeeded to secure a fellowship within the study period. Using appropriate statistical tests & adjusted regression analysis, odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 94% of the study sample were IMGs; median age was 35 years (Inter-Quartile range 25th – 75th percentile (IQR: 33–37 years; 43% women and 59% were Asian physicians. The median pre-hire time was 5 years (IQR: 4–7

  10. The adequacy of hepatopancreatobiliary training: How does operative exposure and perceived readiness in fellowship translate into subsequent practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Jean-Michel; Bressan, Alexsander K.; Edwards, Janet P.; Grondin, Sean C.; Dixon, Elijah; Minter, Rebecca M.; Jeyarajah, D. Rohan; Hansen, Paul; Cooper, Amanda B.; Ball, Chad G.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Over the last 3 decades, expansion in the scope and complexity of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgery has resulted in significant improvements in postoperative outcomes. As a result, the importance of dedicated fellowship training for HPB surgery is now well established, and the definition of formal program requirements has been actively pursued by a collaboration of the 3 distinct accrediting bodies within North America. Although major advances have been made in defining minimum case volume requirements, qualitative assessment of the operative experience remains challenging. Our research collaborative (HPB Manpower and Education Study Group) has previously explored the perceived case volume adequacy of core HPB procedures within fellowship programs. We conducted a 1-year follow-up survey targeting the same cohort to investigate the association between operative case volumes and comfort performing HPB procedures within initial independent practice. PMID:28234214

  11. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries - An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Käser

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers' and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs

  12. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries - An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M M; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-05-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers' and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  13. Extended training to prepare GPs for future workforce needs: a qualitative investigation of a 1-year fellowship in urgent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jeremy; Russell, Rachel; Harkness, Frances; Wilkie, Veronica; Aiello, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    It has been argued that UK general practice specialist training should be extended to better prepare GPs for the challenges facing 21st-century health care. Evidence is needed to inform how this should occur. To investigate the experience of recently trained GPs undertaking a 1-year full-time fellowship programme designed to provide advanced skills training in urgent care, integrated care, leadership, and academic practice; and its impact on subsequent career development. Semi-structured interviews conducted longitudinally over 2 years augmented by observational data in the West Midlands, England. Participants were interviewed on at least three occasions: twice while undertaking the fellowship, and at least once post-completion. Participants' clinical and academic activities were observed. Data were analysed using a framework approach. Seven GPs participated in the pilot scheme. The fellowship was highly rated and felt to be balanced in terms of the opportunities for skill development, academic advancement, and confidence building. GPs experienced enhanced employability on completing the scheme, and at follow-up were working in a variety of primary care/urgent care interface clinical and leadership roles. Participants believed it was making general practice a more attractive career option for newly qualified doctors. The 1-year fellowship provides a defined framework for training GPs to work in an enhanced manner across organisational interfaces with the skills to support service improvement and integration. It appears to be well suited to preparing GPs for portfolio roles, but its wider applicability and impact on NHS service delivery needs further investigation. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  14. Educational Gaps in Molecular Diagnostics, Genomics, and Personalized Medicine in Dermatopathology Training: A Survey of US Dermatopathology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kristin; Russomanno, Kristen; Ferringer, Tammie; Elston, Dirk; Murphy, Michael J

    2017-05-02

    Molecular technologies offer clinicians the tools to provide high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We evaluated education focused on molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine in dermatopathology fellowship. A 20-question online survey was emailed to all (n = 53) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited dermatopathology training programs in the United States. Thirty-one of 53 program directors responded (response rate = 58%). Molecular training is undertaken in 74% of responding dermatopathology fellowships, with levels of instruction varying among dermatology-based and pathology-based programs. Education differed for dermatology- and pathology-trained fellows in approximately one-fifth (19%) of programs. Almost half (48%) of responding program directors believe that fellows are not currently receiving adequate molecular education although the majority (97%) expect to incorporate additional instruction in the next 2-5 years. Factors influencing the incorporation of relevant education include perceived clinical utility and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/residency review committee (RRC) requirements. Potential benefits of molecular education include increased medical knowledge, improved patient care, and promotion of effective communication with other healthcare professionals. More than two-thirds (68%) of responding program directors believe that instruction in molecular technologies should be required in dermatopathology fellowship training. Although all responding dermatopathology fellowship program directors agreed that molecular education is important, only a little over half of survey participants believe that their fellows receive adequate instruction. This represents an important educational gap. Discussion among those who oversee fellow education is necessary to best integrate and evaluate teaching of molecular dermatopathology.

  15. Meeting the milestones. Strategies for including high-value care education in pulmonary and critical care fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Katherine R; Weinberger, Steven E; Wagner, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Physician decision making is partially responsible for the roughly 30% of U.S. healthcare expenditures that are wasted annually on low-value care. In response to both the widespread public demand for higher-quality care and the cost crisis, payers are transitioning toward value-based payment models whereby physicians are rewarded for high-value, cost-conscious care. Furthermore, to target physicians in training to practice with cost awareness, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has created both individual objective milestones and institutional requirements to incorporate quality improvement and cost awareness into fellowship training. Subsequently, some professional medical societies have initiated high-value care educational campaigns, but the overwhelming majority target either medical students or residents in training. Currently, there are few resources available to help guide subspecialty fellowship programs to successfully design durable high-value care curricula. The resource-intensive nature of pulmonary and critical care medicine offers unique opportunities for the specialty to lead in modeling and teaching high-value care. To ensure that fellows graduate with the capability to practice high-value care, we recommend that fellowship programs focus on four major educational domains. These include fostering a value-based culture, providing a robust didactic experience, engaging trainees in process improvement projects, and encouraging scholarship. In doing so, pulmonary and critical care educators can strive to train future physicians who are prepared to provide care that is both high quality and informed by cost awareness.

  16. Improving capacity for evidence-based practice in South East Asia: evaluating the role of research fellowships in the SEA-ORCHID Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martis Ruth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fellowships are a component of many professional education programs. They provide opportunities to develop skills and competencies in an environment where time is protected and resources and technical support are more readily available. The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program aimed to increase capacity for evidence-based practice and research synthesis, and to encourage fellows to become leaders in these areas. Methods Fellows included doctors, nurses, midwives and librarians working in the maternal and neonatal areas of nine hospitals in South East Asia. Fellowships were undertaken in Australia and involved specific outputs related to evidence-based practice or research synthesis. Training and support was tailored according to the type of output and the fellow's experience and expertise. We evaluated the fellowships program quantitatively and qualitatively through written evaluations, interviews and follow-up of fellowship activities. Results During 2006-07, 23 fellows from Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines undertook short-term fellowships (median four weeks in Australia. The main outputs were drafts of Cochrane systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines and protocols for randomised trials, and training materials to support evidence-based practice. Protocols for Cochrane systematic reviews were more likely to be completed than other outcomes. The fellows identified several components that were critical to the program's overall success; these included protected time, tailored training, and access to technical expertise and resources. On returning home, fellows identified a lack of time and limited access to the internet and evidence-based resources as barriers to completing their outputs. The support of colleagues and senior staff was noted as an important enabler of progress, and research collaborators from other institutions and countries were also important sources of support. Conclusions The SEA

  17. Residency Training: Quality improvement projects in neurology residency and fellowship: applying DMAIC methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassardjian, Charles D; Williamson, Michelle L; van Buskirk, Dorothy J; Ernste, Floranne C; Hunderfund, Andrea N Leep

    2015-07-14

    Teaching quality improvement (QI) is a priority for residency and fellowship training programs. However, many medical trainees have had little exposure to QI methods. The purpose of this study is to review a rigorous and simple QI methodology (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control [DMAIC]) and demonstrate its use in a fellow-driven QI project aimed at reducing the number of delayed and canceled muscle biopsies at our institution. DMAIC was utilized. The project aim was to reduce the number of delayed muscle biopsies to 10% or less within 24 months. Baseline data were collected for 12 months. These data were analyzed to identify root causes for muscle biopsy delays and cancellations. Interventions were developed to address the most common root causes. Performance was then remeasured for 9 months. Baseline data were collected on 97 of 120 muscle biopsies during 2013. Twenty biopsies (20.6%) were delayed. The most common causes were scheduling too many tests on the same day and lack of fasting. Interventions aimed at patient education and biopsy scheduling were implemented. The effect was to reduce the number of delayed biopsies to 6.6% (6/91) over the next 9 months. Familiarity with QI methodologies such as DMAIC is helpful to ensure valid results and conclusions. Utilizing DMAIC, we were able to implement simple changes and significantly reduce the number of delayed muscle biopsies at our institution. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. 1998 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The program objectives include: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  19. 1999 NASA - ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program or summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  20. 1997 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program description is as follows: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  1. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  2. Impact of Professional Student Mentored-Research Fellowship on Medical Education and Academic Medicine Career Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Terry; Kelly, Thomas H.; Starnes, Catherine P.; Sawaya, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Context This study explores the long-term impact of the Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship (PSMRF) program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCOM) on medical students’ research productivity and career paths. Methods Demographic characteristics, academic profiles, number of publications and residency placements from 2007-2012 were used to assess 119 PSMRF graduates against a comparison cohort of 898 UKCOM (non-PSMRF) students. Results PSMRF students had higher MCAT scores at admission (31.5 ± 0.6 vs. 30.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.007) and achieved higher USMLE Step 1 scores (228 ± 4.2 vs. 223 ± 1.5, p = 0.03) than comparison group. PSMRF students were more likely to publish Pubmed-indexed papers (36.7% vs. 17.9%, p < 0.0001), achieve AOA status (19.3% vs. 8.5%, p = 0.0002) and match to top 25 U.S. News and World Report residency programs (23.4% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.008). A greater proportion of PSMRF fellows matched to top tier competitive specialties (23% vs. 14.2%, p= 0.07), however this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions The PSMRF program shows a significant increase in enrollment, as well as positive associations with indicators of success in medical school and subsequent quality of residency program. PMID:25996460

  3. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members were appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow devoted approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program consisted of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  4. Hampton University/American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university will be faculty members appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education or industry.

  5. 2001 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises these programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4 To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellow's research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders wil be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education and industry.

  6. 2000 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend ten weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend ten weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry. A list of the abstracts of the presentations is provided.

  7. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goglia, G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to simulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as research fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fellows will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, the educational community, or industry.

  8. 1996 NASA-Hampton University American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives were: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  9. Career prospects and professional landscape after advanced endoscopy fellowship training: a survey assessing graduates from 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Christine M; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Truptesh; Damania, Dushyant; Kothari, Shivangi

    2016-08-01

    The advanced endoscopy (AE) fellowship is a popular career track for graduating gastroenterology fellows. The number of fellows completing AE fellowships and the number of programs offering this training have increased in the past 5 years. Despite this, we suspect that the number of AE attending (staff physician) positions have decreased (relative to the number of fellows graduating), raising concerns regarding AE job market saturation. Our aim was to survey practicing gastroenterology physicians who completed an AE fellowship within the past 5 years regarding their current professional status. A 16-question survey was distributed using Research Electronic Data Capture by e-mail to practicing gastroenterologists who completed an AE fellowship between 2009 and 2013. The survey questions elicited information regarding demographics, professional status, and additional information. A total of 96 invitations were distributed via e-mail. Forty-one of 96 respondents (43%) replied to the survey. Approximately half of the respondents were employed in an academic practice, with the remainder in private practice (56% and 44%, respectively). Nearly half (46%) of the respondents found it "difficult" to find an AE position after training. Thirty-nine percent of private-practice endoscopists were performing > 200 ERCPs/year, whereas 65% were doing so in academic settings (P = .09). Fifty-six percent of respondents were in small practices (0 to 1 partner), with a significantly smaller group size in private versus academic practice (72% versus 43%, P = .021). Seventy-eight percent of respondents believed the AE job market was saturated; most responded that the AE job market was saturated in both academic and private practice (44%), whereas 34% believed the job market was saturated in academics only. Most respondents (73%) who were training AE fellows found it difficult to place them in AE attending positions. Respondents from academic practice found it significantly more

  10. Preparedness of Ob/Gyn residents for fellowship training in gynecologic oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Doo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Residency training in obstetrics and gynecology is being challenged by increasingly stringent regulations and decreased operative experience. We sought to determine the perception of preparedness of incoming gynecologic oncology fellows for advanced surgical training in gynecologic oncology. An online survey was sent to gynecologic oncologists involved in fellowship training in the United States. They were asked to evaluate their most recent incoming clinical fellows in the domains of professionalism, level of independence/graduated responsibility, psychomotor ability, clinical evaluation and management, and academia and scholarship using a standard Likert-style scale. The response rate among attending physicians was 40% (n = 105/260 and 61% (n = 28/46 for program directors. Of those who participated, 49% reported that their incoming fellows could not independently perform a hysterectomy, 59% reported that they could not independently perform 30 min of a major procedure, 40% reported that they could not control bleeding, 40% reported that they could not recognize anatomy and tissue planes, and 58% reported that they could not dissect tissue planes. Fellows lacked an understanding of pathophysiology, treatment recommendations, and the ability to identify and treat critically ill patients. In the academic domain, respondents agreed that fellows were deficient in the areas of protocol design (54%, statistical analysis (54%, and manuscript writing (65%. These results suggest that general Ob/Gyn residency is ineffective in preparing fellows for advanced training in gynecologic oncology and should prompt a revision of the goals and objectives of resident education to correct these deficiencies.

  11. Building a Bright Future. The Hydro Research Foundation's Fellowship Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Brenna [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Linke, Deborah M. [Hydro Research Foundation, Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States)

    2015-12-29

    The Hydro Fellowship Program (program) began as an experiment to discover whether the hydropower industry could find mechanisms to attract new entrants through conducting relevant research to benefit the industry. This nationwide, new-to-the-world program was started through funding from the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE). Between 2010-2015, the Hydro Research Foundation (HRF) designed and implemented a program to conduct valuable research and attract new entrants to the hydro workforce. This historic grant has empowered and engaged industry members from 25 organizations by working with 91 students and advisors at 24 universities in 19 states. The work funded answered pressing research needs in the fields of civil, mechanical, environmental, and electrical engineering, as well as law, energy engineering and materials innovation. In terms of number of individuals touched through funding, 148 individuals were supported by this work through direct research, mentorship, oversight of the work, partnerships and the day-to-day program administration. Based on the program results, it is clear that the funding achieved the hoped-for outcomes and has the capacity to draw universities into the orbit of hydropower and continue the conversation about industry research and development needs. The Foundation has fostered unique partnerships at the host universities and has continued to thrive with the support of the universities, advisors, industry and the DOE. The Foundation has demonstrated industry support through mentorships, partnerships, underwriting the costs and articulating the universities’ support through in-kind cost sharing. The Foundation recommends that future work be continued to nurture these graduate level programs using the initial work and improvements in the successor program, the Research Awards Program, while stimulating engagement of academia at the

  12. Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miani, Celine; Marjanovic, Sonja; Jones, Molly Morgan; Marshall, Martin; Meikle, Samantha; Nolte, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is seen to be central to improving the quality of healthcare and existing research suggests that absence of leadership is related to poor quality and safety performance. Leadership training might therefore provide an important means through which to promote quality improvement and, more widely, performance within the healthcare environment. This article presents an evaluation of the Fellowships in Clinical Leadership Programme, which combines leadership training and quality improvement initiatives with the placement of temporary external clinical champions in Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust. We assessed impacts of the Programme on individual and organisational change, alongside core enablers and barriers for Programme success. Analyses drew on the principles of a theory-of-change-led realist evaluation, using logic modelling to specify the underlying causal mechanisms of the Programme. Data collection involved a stakeholder workshop, online questionnaires of programme participants, senior managers and support staff (n=114), and follow-up in-depth semi-structured interviews with a subsample of survey participants (n=15). We observed that the Programme had notable impacts at individual and organisational levels. Examples of individual impact included enhanced communication and negotiation skills or increased confidence as a result of multi-modal leadership training. At the organisational level, participants reported indications of behaviour change among staff, with evidence of spill-over effects to non-participants towards a greater focus on patient-centred care. Our findings suggest that there is potential for combined leadership training and quality improvement programmes to contribute to strengthening a culture of care quality in healthcare organisations. Our study provides useful insights into strategies seeking to achieve sustainable improvement in NHS organisations.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  14. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985. [Space Stations and Their Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, R. G. (Editor); Williams, C. E. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and the Johnson Space Center. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The faculty fellows spent the time at JSC engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with NASA/JSC colleagues. This document is a compilation of the final reports of their research during the summer of 1985.

  15. Study Abroad: International Scholarships and Courses. Etudes a L'entranger: Bourses et Cours internationaux. Estudios en el extranjero: Becas y cursos internacionales. 1970-71, 1971-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This book provides information on courses, scholarships, and fellowships available to students planning to study abroad primarily during the normal academic year. This volume, the 18th edition of "Study Abroad," provides information for the academic years 1969-70, 1970-71, and 1971-72. It includes the period of the International Education Year and…

  16. 21st Century Power Partnership Fellowship Program: Supporting Next-generation Planning Modeling Practices at South Africa's Power Utility Eskom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinaman, Owen

    2016-10-01

    This presentation details the 21st Century Power Partnership's fellowship program accomplishments from 2016. This fellowship brought two fellows from South Africa's power utility, Eskom, to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The fellows spent two weeks working to improve the fidelity of Eskom's PLEXOS long-term and short-term models, which are used in long-term generation planning exercises and capacity adequacy assessments. The fellows returned to Eksom equipped with a new suite of tools and skills to enhance Eksom's PLEXOS modeling capabilities.

  17. Design and Implementation of an Evaluation Methodology for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, M. G.; Miller, M.; Freeman, M.; Watson, C.; Khalkho, M.; Smith, T.

    2005-12-01

    The NFFP was created in 2002 to accommodate the needs and capabilities of both NASA and the university community. The program combines aspects of two successful former NASA programs, the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA/USRA JOint VEnture (JOVE) program. The NFFP contributes directly to NASA's strategic goal to "inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics", and NASA's Office of Education strategic objective to "strengthen NASA's involvement in higher education to enhance the nation's science and technology capability in NASA related fields to help meet NASA's future personnel needs." The primary goals of the NFFP are to increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to Agency research objectives; provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; involve faculty in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA's strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; facilitate interdisciplinary networking; and establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of the program. Participants are required to submit a research report and complete a program evaluation. The NFFP is evaluated using Web-based survey instruments in the NASA Education Evaluation Information System (NEEIS) that have been designed to collect data that measure program activities and accomplishments against program goals and NASA's education programs evaluation criteria. Data are collected from Faculty Fellows, NASA Colleagues, and students who accompanied Faculty Fellows. Participant Feedback Forms gather quantitative and qualitative information on research accomplishments, the benefits and impacts of the program, and overall program evaluation data. Follow-up feedback instruments are designed to

  18. Bursaries, writing grants and fellowships: a strategy to develop research capacity in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmer Elizabeth A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners and other primary health care professionals are often the first point of contact for patients requiring health care. Identifying, understanding and linking current evidence to best practice can be challenging and requires at least a basic understanding of research principles and methodologies. However, not all primary health care professionals are trained in research or have research experience. With the aim of enhancing research skills and developing a research culture in primary health care, University Departments of General Practice and Rural Health have been supported since 2000 by the Australian Government funded 'Primary Health Care Research Evaluation and Development (PHCRED Strategy'. A small grant funding scheme to support primary health care practitioners was implemented through the PHCRED program at Flinders University in South Australia between 2002 and 2005. The scheme incorporated academic mentors and three types of funding support: bursaries, writing grants and research fellowships. This article describes outcomes of the funding scheme and contributes to the debate surrounding the effectiveness of funding schemes as a means of building research capacity. Methods Funding recipients who had completed their research were invited to participate in a semi-structured 40-minute telephone interview. Feedback was sought on acquisition of research skills, publication outcomes, development of research capacity, confidence and interest in research, and perception of research. Data were also collected on demographics, research topics, and time needed to complete planned activities. Results The funding scheme supported 24 bursaries, 11 writing grants, and three research fellows. Nearly half (47% of all grant recipients were allied health professionals, followed by general practitioners (21%. The majority (70% were novice and early career researchers. Eighty-nine percent of the grant recipients were

  19. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Association between Fellowship Training, Surgical Volume, and Laparoscopic Suturing Techniques among Members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To compare surgical volume and techniques including laparoscopic suturing among members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL according to fellowship training status. Design. A web-based survey was designed using Qualtrics and sent to AAGL members. Results. Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery (FMIGS trained surgeons were more likely to perform more than 8 major conventional laparoscopic cases per month (63% versus 38%, P<0.001, OR [95% CI] = 2.78 [1.54–5.06] and were more likely to perform laparoscopic suturing during these cases (32% versus 16%, P<0.004, OR [95% CI] = 2.44 [1.25–4.71]. The non-fellowship trained (NFT surgeons in private practice were less likely to perform over 8 conventional laparoscopic cases (34% versus 51%, P=0.03, OR [95% CI] = 0.50 [0.25–0.99] and laparoscopic suturing during these cases (13% versus 27%, P=0.01, OR [95% CI] = 0.39 [0.17–0.92] compared to NFT surgeons in academic practice. Conclusion. The surgical volume and utilization of laparoscopic suturing of FMIGS trained surgeons are significantly increased compared to NFT surgeons. Academic practice setting had a positive impact on surgical volume of NFT surgeons but not on FMIGS trained surgeons.

  1. Association between Fellowship Training, Surgical Volume, and Laparoscopic Suturing Techniques among Members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Emad; Scott, Lauren; Miladinovic, Branko; Imudia, Anthony N; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective. To compare surgical volume and techniques including laparoscopic suturing among members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL) according to fellowship training status. Design. A web-based survey was designed using Qualtrics and sent to AAGL members. Results. Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery (FMIGS) trained surgeons were more likely to perform more than 8 major conventional laparoscopic cases per month (63% versus 38%, P < 0.001, OR [95% CI] = 2.78 [1.54-5.06]) and were more likely to perform laparoscopic suturing during these cases (32% versus 16%, P < 0.004, OR [95% CI] = 2.44 [1.25-4.71]). The non-fellowship trained (NFT) surgeons in private practice were less likely to perform over 8 conventional laparoscopic cases (34% versus 51%, P = 0.03, OR [95% CI] = 0.50 [0.25-0.99]) and laparoscopic suturing during these cases (13% versus 27%, P = 0.01, OR [95% CI] = 0.39 [0.17-0.92]) compared to NFT surgeons in academic practice. Conclusion. The surgical volume and utilization of laparoscopic suturing of FMIGS trained surgeons are significantly increased compared to NFT surgeons. Academic practice setting had a positive impact on surgical volume of NFT surgeons but not on FMIGS trained surgeons.

  2. Breaking through the glass ceiling: a survey of promotion rates of graduates of a primary care Faculty Development Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mindy A; Barry, Henry C; Dunn, Ruth Ann; Keefe, Carole; Weismantel, David

    2006-01-01

    Academic promotion has been difficult for women and faculty of minority race. We investigated whether completion of a faculty development fellowship would equalize promotion rates of female and minority graduates to those of male and white graduates. All graduates of the Michigan State University Primary Care Faculty Development Fellowship Program from 1989-1998 were sent a survey in 1999, which included questions about academic status and appointment. We compared application and follow-up survey data by gender and race/ethnicity. Telephone calls were made to nonrespondents. A total of 175 (88%) graduating fellows responded to the follow-up survey. Information on academic rank at entry and follow-up was obtained from 28 of 48 fellows with missing information on promotion. Male and female graduates achieved similar academic promotion at follow-up, but there was a trend toward lower promotion rates for minority faculty graduates compared to white graduates. In the multivariate analysis, however, only age, years in rank, initial rank, and type of appointment (academic versus clinical) were significant factors for promotion. Academic advancement is multifactorial and appears most related to time in rank, stage of life, and career choice. Faculty development programs may be most useful in providing skill development and career counseling.

  3. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012 and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions. Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship′s educational platform.

  4. Broadening Educational Horizons: The National Science Foundation GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Program at the University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. R.; Kelley, J. T.

    2005-12-01

    The future of meaningful scientific research in the United States depends heavily upon the quality of the science and mathematics education received by students in our grade K-12 education system. The National Science Foundation's GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Program provides opportunities for scientific enrichment for students and their teachers at the K-12 level. Currently in its fifth year at the University of Maine, Orono, the program is one of over 100 such programs in the country. Last year, the program was honored by the New England Board of Higher Education with a Regional Award for Excellence in Project Achievement. The program has three broad goals: to enrich the scientific education of students by providing equipment, role models, and expertise that they may not otherwise be exposed; to provide professional development for teachers through curriculum enrichment and participation at scientific conferences; and to improve the teaching and communication skills of fellows. Fellows represent a broad spectrum of research interests at the University of Maine, including Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Forestry, Geological Sciences, and Marine Science. This past year, 13 graduate students and 1 undergraduate student worked with 52 teachers and 2300 students in 26 schools across the state of Maine. The benefits of this program are tangible and substantial. New awareness of the innovative ways that K-12 and University education systems can work together to promote hands-on science and the scientific method, is one of the major contributions of the NSF GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Program.

  5. Terra Cognita: Graduate Students in the Archives. A Retrospective on the CLIR Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources. CLIR Publication No. 170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council on Library and Information Resources, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "Terra Cognita" surveys the current landscape of archival research and the experiences of emerging scholars seeking to navigate it. Drawing on data from the Council on Library and Information Resources' (CLIR's) Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources, the report takes an in-depth look at how the conditions and…

  6. Do Financial Incentives Draw Promising Teachers to Low-Performing Schools? Assessing the Impact of the California Governor's Teaching Fellowship. Policy Brief 10-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Murnane, Richard J.; Willett, John B.

    2010-01-01

    During a two-year period from 2000-2002, California awarded a $20,000 Governor's Teaching Fellowship (GTF) to 1,169 people enrolled in traditional, post-baccalaureate teacher licensure programs who agreed to teach in low-performing public schools for four years after earning their licenses. The GTF was a policy response to longstanding evidence…

  7. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael N; Maynard, Sharon; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents' interest in nephrology careers. Residents endorsed several negative

  8. The Current Status of Nurse-Administered Propofol Sedation in Endoscopy: An Evidence-Based Practice Nurse Fellowship Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates (SGNA) launched a nurse fellowship program in 2011 to promote evidence-based practice. Each accepted applicant was challenged to select a relevant topic, explore the current research, and translate this information to daily practice. The author, an SGNA Fellow, selected the topic, nurse-administered propofol sedation, that has been a prevailing subject in endoscopy for many years. A significant amount of literature has been written on the drug's safety and efficacy. This article explores a brief history of the practice and the future of this controversial drug for procedural sedation. A review of current literature is explored with an emphasis on the past 5 years as well as a discussion on regulatory limitations that have been placed on the practice of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC, under ASEE. The objectives of the program are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants; and contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the fellows' research projects performed during the summer of 1998. Volume 1, current volume, contains the first reports, and volume 2 contains the remaining reports.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) /American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1996.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are as follows: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1994, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard; Sickorez, Donn G.

    1995-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to: (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1994.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993 is presented.

  2. Results of distal hypospadias repair after pediatric urology fellowship training: A comparison of junior surgeons with their mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, N C; Barber, T D; Dajusta, D; Prieto, J C; Ziada, A; Snodgrass, W

    2016-06-01

    Teaching and learning hypospadias repair is a major component of pediatric urology fellowship training. Educators must transfer skills to fellows, without increasing patient complications. Nevertheless, few studies report results of surgeons during their first years of independent practice. To review outcomes of distal hypospadias repairs performed during the same 2-year period by consecutive, recently matriculated, surgeons in independent practice, and to compare them to results by their mentor (with >20 years of experience). Exposure to hypospadias surgery during fellowship was determined from case logs of five consecutive fellows completing training from 2007-2011. TIP was the only technique used to repair distal hypospadias. No fellow operated independently or performed complete repairs under supervision. Instead, the first 3 months were spent assisting their mentor, observing surgical methodology and decision-making. Then, each performed selected portions under direct supervision, including: degloving, penile straightening, developing glans wings, incising and tubularizing the urethral plate, creating a barrier layer, sewing the glansplasty, and skin closure. Overall fellow participation in each case was skills sufficient to duplicate the mentor's results were transferred. These data suggest there should be no learning curve for distal hypospadias after training. This report raises several considerations for surgical educators. First, mentors should review their own results, to be certain that they are correctly performing and teaching procedures. Second, programs need to determine key steps for procedures they teach, and then emphasize their optimal performance. Finally, mentors should expect former fellows to report back their initial results of hypospadias repair to be certain lessons taught were learned. Otherwise, preventable complications resulting from technical errors will be multiplied in the children operated by their trainees as they enter

  3. Internal and International Corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Mario Antinucci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This subject, whence the name of this paper originates from, must be addressed with courage and intellectual integrity by all of us, the different parts of the civil society, the public institutions, the entrepreneurs and the legal professionals, the youth and the new generations. All the public policies of the European governments share the belief of a direct correlation between the criminal density connected to corruption of States political and economic protagonists and the lack of availability of investments on young talents, new generations, both in the entrepreneurial and in the professional fields. In most Member States, anticorruption policies have gained an increased prominence in government agendas and the financial crisis has drawn attention to the integrity and accountability of policy-makers. Most Member States that are currently in serious financial difficulties have acknowledged the seriousness of issues related to corruption and have created (or are planning anticorruption programs in order to deal with the risks deriving from this issue and with the diversion of public funds. In some Member States, the economic adjustment programs provide for explicit obligations related to anti-corruption policies. Even when not formally connected to adjustment programs, anticorruption policies complement the adjustment measures, especially in those countries in which corruption is a serious issue.  During the European Semester of economic policy coordination, recommendations for efficiently fighting corruption have been laid out; Among the most vulnerable sectors, urban development and building projects are certainly very exposed to corruption risks and to infiltration of internal and transnational organized crime.

  4. International arbejdsdeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders

    1998-01-01

    Article dealing with the implications of informátion and communication technologies on the international division of labour.......Article dealing with the implications of informátion and communication technologies on the international division of labour....

  5. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Paralyzed Monkeys Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Wounds Soft-Tissue Injuries Severed or Constricted Limbs ...

  6. His Majesty Carl XVI Gustav, King of Sweden, Honorary President of the World Scout Foundation, and about 80 fellows, on the occasion of the 48th World Baden-Powell Fellowship Event on Saturday, 18th September 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    His Majesty Carl XVI Gustav, King of Sweden, Honorary President of the World Scout Foundation, and about 80 fellows, on the occasion of the 48th World Baden-Powell Fellowship Event on Saturday, 18th September 2004

  7. 'Lessons learnt from America'--Reflections from a fellowship examining the prevention, recognition and treatment of operational stress injuries in U.S. Army serving personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    These are my personal views and reflections from a hugely rewarding experience. They are not opinions or recommendations of the MOD or any other institution I am associated with. I realise that there may be various logistical reasons why my recommendations cannot be carried out; however I do hope that some will be able to be put into place. If nothing else I gained a massive amount from my travelling fellowship and it has already had a positive impact on my own clinical work. I hope to continue to pass on what I have learnt from the fellowship for many years to come. A special thank you goes to the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust for providing me with this fantastic opportunity and everyone who helped me before and during my visit.

  8. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Act of 1994. Hearing on S. 2104 To Establish within the National Laboratories of the Department of Energy a National Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program, before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Development of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    These hearings addressed proposed Bill S. 2104 to create a Department of Energy (DOE) fellowship program for math and science teachers that would provide them opportunities to work at DOE labs in order to enhance coordination and communication among the educational community, the Congress, and the Executive Agencies responsible for developing and…

  9. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzmiller JP

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Joseph P Kitzmiller,1,4 Mitch A Phelps,2 Marjorie V Neidecker,3 Glen Apseloff41Center for Pharmacogenomics, Colleges of Medicine and of Engineering, The Ohio State University Medical Center, 2Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, Pharmacoanalytic Shared Resources Laboratory, The Ohio State University, 3Colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, 4Department of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program – one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology – that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.Keywords: clinical pharmacology education, clinical pharmacology fellowship

  10. Research Capacity Strengthening in Low and Middle Income Countries – An Evaluation of the WHO/TDR Career Development Fellowship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Michael; Maure, Christine; Halpaap, Beatrice M. M.; Vahedi, Mahnaz; Yamaka, Sara; Launois, Pascal; Casamitjana, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Between August 2012 and April 2013 the Career Development Fellowship programme of the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (World Health Organization) underwent an external evaluation to assess its past performance and determine recommendations for future programme development and continuous performance improvement. The programme provides a year-long training experience for qualified researchers from low and middle income countries at pharmaceutical companies or product development partnerships. Independent evaluators from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute and the Barcelona Institute for Global Health used a results-based methodology to review the programme. Data were gathered through document review, surveys, and interviews with a range of programme participants. The final evaluation report found the Career Development Fellowship to be relevant to organizers’ and programme objectives, efficient in its operations, and effective in its training scheme, which was found to address needs and gaps for both fellows and their home institutions. Evaluators found that the programme has the potential for impact and sustainability beyond the programme period, especially with the successful reintegration of fellows into their home institutions, through which newly-developed skills can be shared at the institutional level. Recommendations included the development of a scheme to support the re-integration of fellows into their home institutions post-fellowship and to seek partnerships to facilitate the scaling-up of the programme. The impact of the Professional Membership Scheme, an online professional development tool launched through the programme, beyond the scope of the Career Development Fellowship programme itself to other applications, has been identified as a positive unintended outcome. The results of this evaluation may be of interest for other efforts in the field of research capacity strengthening in LMICs or, generally, to

  11. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program – one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology – that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions. PMID:25018660

  12. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program - one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology - that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.

  13. International skatteret

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Sørensen, Niels; Wittendorff, Jens

    1996-01-01

    De seneste 6 måneders udvikling indenfor international skatteret beskrives. NW-S har skrevet artiklens afsnit om udvalgte afgørelser og om EU-skatteret.......De seneste 6 måneders udvikling indenfor international skatteret beskrives. NW-S har skrevet artiklens afsnit om udvalgte afgørelser og om EU-skatteret....

  14. International indsats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachs, Therese

    En analyse af Beredskabsstyrelsens internationale engagement og muligheder for international indsats fremover. Forslag til struktur logistisk og materielt samt til udvikling af personel-kompetencer......En analyse af Beredskabsstyrelsens internationale engagement og muligheder for international indsats fremover. Forslag til struktur logistisk og materielt samt til udvikling af personel-kompetencer...

  15. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  16. International Specialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleindienst, Ingo; Geisler Asmussen, Christian; Hutzschenreuter, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    Whether and how international diversification and cross-border arbitrage affects firm performance remains one of the major unresolved research questions in the strategy and international business literatures. We propose that knowing how much a firm has internationally diversified tells us very...... little about performance implications, if we do not know, and do not ask, how the firm has diversified. Therefore, building on the two broad arguments of operating flexibility and location-specific commitment, we develop a theoretical framework that focuses on the extent to which a firm's international...... arbitrage strategy is characterized by specialization versus replication and argue that these different strategies may have differential impact on profitability and risk reduction. Developing a sophisticated measure of international specialization and using a unique panel data set of 92 German MNEs to test...

  17. International Specialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleindienst, Ingo; Geisler Asmussen, Christian; Hutzschenreuter, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Whether and how international diversification and cross-border arbitrage affects firm performance remains one of the major unresolved research questions in the strategy and international business literatures. We propose that knowing how much a firm has internationally diversified tells us very...... little about performance implications, if we do not know, and do not ask, how the firm has diversified. Therefore, building on the two broad arguments of operating flexibility and location-specific commitment, we develop a theoretical framework that focuses on the extent to which a firm's international...... arbitrage strategy is characterized by specialization versus replication and argue that these different strategies may have differential impact on profitability and risk reduction. Developing a sophisticated measure of international specialization and using a unique panel data set of 92 German MNEs to test...

  18. International Relations:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This is the textbook for the Open University module International Relations: Continuity and Change in Global Politics. Instead of leading with a succession of theoretical 'isms', the module structures its presentation of the subject around six teaching ‘blocks’, each of which explores a dilemma......: Flat or uneven? Change and transformation in the international system • Block 3: Just or unjust? Intervention and inequality in the international system • Block 4: Top-down or bottom-up? Governance in the international system • Block 5: Secure or insecure? Pursuing security in the international system...... • Block 6: Continuity or change in global politics? Each block introduces new IR theories through discussions of the substantive dilemmas and adds in a layered way levels of analysis and conceptual complexity....

  19. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelund, C; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J; Hadler-Olsen, E; Johannessen, A C; Kenrad, B; Nylander, K; Puranen, M; Salo, T; Syrjänen, S; Søland, T M; van der Waal, I; van der Wal, J E; Warfvinge, G

    2012-11-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must have knowledge of clinical symptoms, local and systemic signs and clinical differential diagnoses to make an accurate diagnosis. The dentist must be competent in selecting appropriate diagnostic tests, for example, tissue biopsy and microbiological samples, and conducting them correctly, as well as in interpreting test results and taking appropriate action accordingly. Furthermore, the dentist must be aware of diseases demanding multidisciplinary cooperation and be able to recognise his/her professional limitation, and to refer to other specialists when required. The dental curriculum changes over time as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995.. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at JSC, including the White Sands Test Facility, by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports.

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the first fifteen of twenty-seven final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports included in Volume 2.

  3. Characteristics of Resilient Development of Migrant Children's Fellowship%流动儿童同伴关系的弹性发展特点研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱丹; 王国锋; 刘军; 彭小虎

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨流动儿童同伴关系的弹性发展特点.方法:采用社会测量法和父母教养方式、大五人格问卷对603名流动儿童与312名非流动儿童进行测查.结果:①流动儿童与非流动儿童在同伴关系上存在显著差异;②流动儿童同伴关系发展有弹性组与非弹性组,不同的弹性水平在父母教养方式与大五人格方面存在显著差异,弹性组儿童具有高父母温暖理解、高外倾性、高宜人性,低父母惩罚严厉、低父母拒绝否认、低父亲过度保护、低母亲偏爱被试与低神经质;③父母教养方式、大五人格与同伴关系弹性发展相关显著,母亲温暖理解、外倾性与宜人性能预测心理弹性高低.结论:流动儿童同伴关系的弹性发展受儿童大五人格和父母教养方式影响.%Objective:To probe into the characteristics of resilience development of migrant children's fellowship.Methods:603 migrant children and 312 urban children were surveyed with the EMBU Questionnaire and the five-factor personality model questionnaire (NEO-FFI),and the social nomination method.Results:There are significant difference of fellowship between the urban children and migrant children.The fellowship of the migrant children could be divided into flexible development group and non-flexible group.There are significant difference between these two groups in parents' parenting education style and the NEO-FFI.Mother's warmth,understanding and open-minded could predict flexible fellowship development.Conclusion:Resilience development of migrant children's fellowship was effected by parents' parenting education style and the NEO-FFI.

  4. International Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  5. International Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valauskas, Edward J.; Stowe, Jennifer L.; Haycock, Ken; Dodd, Frances

    1998-01-01

    Presents three reports: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; Special Libraries Association; and Canadian library trends, focusing on information technology and access to information and rights and examining provincial libraries and library education. (PEN)

  6. Juris International

    CERN Document Server

    A database on international trade law aimed at lawyers and legal counsel in developing and transition economies. Juris International is a multilingual collection (English, Spanish, and French) of legal information on international trade. Juris International aims to facilitate and reduce the work involved in research for business lawyers, advisers and in-house counsel, and state organizations in developing nd transition economies, by providing access to texts which have often been difficult to obtain. Its objective is to gather a large quantity of basic information at one site (favoring complete legal texts), without the need to send for the information, and consequently without excessive communication costs for users who d benefit from an efficient and cheap telecommunications network.

  7. Internal education

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Zagorc

    2016-01-01

    Research Question (RQ): The importance of internal trainings in an organization. Purpose: The purpose of research is to examine and present internal trainings in an organization and their contribution to greater success of an organization. The paper studies employee training in a company, how the organization itself looks after its employees during training, how trainings contribute to further development of organization and the advancement of knowledge for successful operation of organi...

  8. Recruiting post-doctoral fellows into global health research: selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimburger, Douglas C; Warner, Tokesha L; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H

    2014-08-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Outcomes of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy: Experience of a fellowship trainee at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to report a single trainee's experience of learning and performing endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (En-DCR. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective, interventional case series. Subjects and Methods: Fifty-four eyes of fifty patients presenting at a tertiary eye care center over 1 year were included in the study. All cases underwent endoscopic DCR with mitomycin-C and silicone intubation. The parameters studied included demographics, clinical features, intraoperative details, and postoperative ostium evaluation. Stent removal and nasal endoscopy were performed at 6 weeks and a further ostium evaluation at 3 and 6 months following surgery. Anatomical success rate was defined as patent irrigation, and functional success rate was defined as positive functional endoscopic dye test and absence of epiphora. Results: Fifty-four eyes of fifty patients were operated, and three cases were lost to follow-up after surgery. The mean age at presentation was 34 (4–75 years. Clinical diagnosis included primary acquired nasolacrimal duct (NLD obstruction in 72% (39/54, acute dacryocystitis in 15% (8/54, failed DCR in 7% (4/54, and persistent congenital NLD obstruction in 5% (3/54. The first five cases needed intervention by the mentor for superior osteotomy. Common variations in anatomical landmarks were posterior location of sac, large ethmoidal bulla, high internal common opening, and thick maxillary bone. Surgical time taken in the last 27 eyes was significantly lesser compared to the surgical duration taken in the initial 27 cases (P < 0.05. Anatomical and functional success rate was 94% (48/51 at 6 months follow-up period. Conclusions: Endoscopic En-DCR has a good success rate when performed by oculoplastic surgery trainees. Nasal anatomical variations, instrument handling, and adaptation to monocular view of endoscope are few of the challenges for beginners. Structured skill transfer can help trainees to learn

  10. Embodying the Global Soul: Internationalism and the American Evangelical Left

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Swartz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last half of the twentieth century, neo-evangelicalism moved from an anticommunist nationalist consensus to a new internationalism characterized by concern for human rights, justice, and economic development. Case studies of World Vision, a global relief and development organization, and InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, a campus ministry, demonstrate that this trajectory was due in part to a growing global reflex in which many missionaries and third-world evangelicals “spoke back” to American evangelicalism. Interpreting the Bible for themselves—and increasingly for American evangelicals—substantial numbers of non-Western converts and missionaries offered sharp criticisms of American politics, culture, and capitalism. These critiques, sacralized by their origins on the mission field, helped turn some young evangelicals toward Vietnam protests, poverty relief, civil rights, and a tempered nationalism. By the 1970s, these progressive elements—and a more resolute global concern generally—had become important markers of the evangelical left.

  11. Septic arthritis of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: results of a survey of sports medicine fellowship directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matava, M J; Evans, T A; Wright, R W; Shively, R A

    1998-10-01

    To determine the incidence of joint sepsis following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the prevailing attitudes toward its treatment, we surveyed the directors of Sports Medicine Fellowship programs about their practices in treating and preventing this complication. Of the 74 surgeons surveyed, 61 (82%) responded. These 61 surgeons performed an average of 98 ACL reconstructions yearly; 31 (51 %) routinely used a drain after ACL surgery, 18 (30%) had treated an ACL infection within the past 2 years, and 26 (43%) had treated an infection within the past 5 years. There was no significant difference in the number of infections and the surgeons' case load, graft choice, or method of reconstruction. Fifty-two surgeons (85%) selected culture-specific intravenous (IV) antibiotics and surgical irrigation of the joint with graft retention as initial treatment for the infected patellar tendon autograft, and 39 (64%) chose this regimen to treat the infected allograft. For the resistant infection unresponsive to initial treatment, IV antibiotics with surgical irrigation and graft retention were also selected as the most common treatment combination for 25 (39%) of the 61 respondents. After graft removal, the earliest a revision procedure would be considered was 6 to 9 months. The results of this survey confirm the widely held belief that septic arthritis of the knee is a relatively rare complication following ACL reconstruction. Once an infection is encountered, culture-specific IV antibiotics and surgical joint irrigation with graft retention are recommended as initial treatment. Graft excision and hardware removal is considered only for those infections resistant to initial treatment and for the infected allograft.

  12. Lessons learned from a 5-year experience with a 4-week experiential quality improvement curriculum in a preventive medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Prathibha; Karlapudi, Sudhakar Prakash

    2009-09-01

    Competency in practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) and systems-based practice (SBP) empowers learners with the skills to plan, lead, and execute health care systems improvement efforts. Experiences from several graduate medical education programs describe the implementation of PBLI and SBP curricula as challenging because of lack of adequate curricular time and faculty resources, as well as a perception that PBLI and SBP are not relevant to future careers. A dedicated experiential rotation that requires fellow participation in a specialty-specific quality improvement project (QIP) may address some of these challenges. We describe a retrospective analysis of our 5-year experience with a dedicated 3-week PBLI-SBP experiential curriculum in a preventive medicine fellowship program at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Between 2004 and 2008, 19 learners including 7 preventive medicine fellows participated in the rotation. Using just-in-time learning, fellows work together on a relatively complex QIP of community or institutional significance. Since 2004, all 19 learners (100%) participating in this rotation have consistently demonstrated statistically significant increase in their quality improvement knowledge application tool (QIKAT) scores at the end of the rotation. At the end of the rotation, all 19 learners stated that they were either confident or very confident of making a change to improve health care in a local setting. Most of the QIPs resulted in sustainable practice improvements, and resultant solutions have been disseminated beyond the location of the original QIP. A dedicated experiential rotation that requires learner participation in a QIP is one of the effective methods to address the needs of the SBP and PBLI competencies.

  13. Department of Homeland Security Fellowship Internship Experience at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, J

    2006-08-30

    As a DHS intern at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), I was a member of the Agricultural Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (AgDDAP) under the mentorship of Benjamin Hindson. This group is focused on developing assays for the rapid detection of animal diseases that threaten agriculture in the United States. The introduction of a foreign animal disease to the US could potentially result in devastating economic losses. The 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in the UK cost over 20 billion dollars and resulted in the death of over 6 million animals. FMD virus is considered to be one of greatest threats to agriculture due to its high infectivity, robustness, and broad species range. Thus, export of meat and animal products from FMD endemic countries is strictly regulated. Although the disease is rarely fatal in adult animals, morbidity is close to 100%. FMD also causes overall production (i.e. milk, mass) to decrease dramatically and can reduce it permanently. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of FMD and other foreign animal diseases is essential to prevent these diseases from spreading and becoming endemic to the country. Every hour delay in the detection of FMD is estimated to cost up to 3 million dollars. Diagnosis of FMD is often complicated by other diseases manifesting similar symptoms in the animal, such as vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, etc. Typically, diagnosis cannot be made by clinical signs alone and samples must be sent away for testing. Depending on the test, such as in virus isolation, this can take several days. AgDDAP had previously developed a high-throughput multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rule-out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and six other look-alike diseases. This assay is intended for use in FMD surveillance, differential diagnosis in an outbreak scenario, and to establish an FMD-clean state after an outbreak. PCR based assays are favorable for multiple reasons. Viral nucleic acids can be

  14. Interne evalueringer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    Det er en gennemgående tese i denne undersøgelse af interne evalueringer, at en af de vigtigste kendetegn ved den New Public Management -dominerede udvikling af den offentlige sektors reguleringspolitik, som Danmark såvel som en række andre OECD lande har gennemlevet, er en omfattende brug af alle...

  15. Transparency International

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M. (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    Established in 1993, Transparency International (TI) defines itself as “the global civil society organization leading the fight against corruption, that brings people together in a powerful worldwide coalition to end the devastating impact of corruption on men, women and children around the wo

  16. International Business

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anne van Delft

    2011-01-01

    Internationalisation is the expansion of a firms operations to foreign markets and includes not only import and export but also foreign direct investments and international cooperation. Today’s globalising economy has resulted in a growing number of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) undertaking

  17. International Entomology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pests and diseases of plants in agriculture are a shared international problem. Yet some of the very places that pest invaders come from often lack the institutional structure and organization necessary to help in understanding the biology of the pest or disease. Strengthening entomology by stimulat...

  18. International Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, Winston; Bender, David R.; Haycock, Ken; Horodyski, John

    2001-01-01

    Includes three annual reports: one from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, the Special Libraries Association, and a report on innovations in Canadian libraries that discusses electronic initiatives, partnerships, books and publishing, school libraries, national issues, local challenges, and funding. (LRW)

  19. Ascott International

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    "Heart-to-Heart" Charity Event for Hearing-Impaired Children in Beijing On June 12, Ascott International North China held a "heart-to-heart" charity event for hearing-impaired children in the Heritage Room at the Ascott Beijing.

  20. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Manufacturing & Processing Predoctoral Fellowships. 2000-2001 Annual Progress Report. Reporting period - July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, J.

    2001-08-28

    Administration and management of predoctoral fellowship program for the reporting period. The objective of the program was threefold: to create a pool of PhD's trained in the integrated approach to manufacturing and processing, to promote academic interest in the field, and to attract talented professionals to this challenging area of engineering. It was anticipated that the program would result in the creation of new manufacturing methods that would contribute to improved energy efficiency, to better utilization of scarce resources, and to less degradation of the environment. Emphasis in the competition was on integrated systems of manufacturing and the integration of product design with manufacturing processes.

  2. The resident scholar program: a research training opportunity for internal medicine house staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Abigail B; McCormack, Francis X; Diers, Tiffiny; Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman

    2007-01-01

    Housestaff research training is a challenging task that is complicated by the lack of a structured process and dedicated time. The Resident Scholar Program (RSP) at the University of Cincinnati, Department of Internal Medicine was created to overcome these challenges. Interested internal medicine house staff are required to submit an application to the residency research director including a project description signed by a faculty mentor. If the project is approved, a 4-month elective rotation is scheduled for the following year. Residents spend the first month on a consult service in the subspecialty area of their research and the remaining 3 months performing their research project. The RSP was launched in July 2003. The percentage of residents participating in research more than tripled. The subspecialty areas represented by RSP research were more diverse than those represented in prior years. Most participants participated in clinical research projects (84%), with 63% of projects being prospective in design. The RSP residents were twice as likely to obtain subspecialty fellowship positions compared to non-RSP residents (89% vs 46%, respectively). The RSP enables house staff to participate in research opportunities in their areas of interest. Development of a more systematic assessment method to study the impact of the program is underway, but the high participation rate reflects resident interest in such a program, particularly for residents with aspirations in pursuing fellowship training.

  3. Liver International

    OpenAIRE

    Quarantini, Lucas de Castro [UNIFESP; Rodrigo A Bressan; Galvão, Amanda; Neves, Susana Batista; Raymundo PARANÁ

    2007-01-01

    p. 1098-1102 Objective: Evaluate the incidence of mental disorders using pegylated interferon plus ribavirin retreatment in nonresponder hepatitis C virus-infected patients. Method: The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used to evaluate 30 hepatitis C virus-infected interferon-nonresponder patients at baseline and following 4, 12 and 24 weeks of pegylated interferon retreatment. Results: During the pegylated interferon/ribavirin retreatment, 5(16.6%) patient...

  4. Teaching International Law: Concepts in International Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbird, Caroline; Pettit, Jenny; Singleton, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce students to public international law. Topics covered include international public organizations, such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, international courts, international human rights law, international trade law, and international environmental law. The goal of each study is to examine how…

  5. [Internal migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisovna, L

    1991-06-01

    Very few studies have been conducted that truly permit explanation of internal migration and it repercussions on social and economic structure. It is clear however that a profound knowledge of the determinants and consequences of internal migration will be required as a basis for economic policy decisions that advance the goal of improving the level of living of the population. the basic supposition of most studies of the relationship of population and development is that socioeconomic development conditions demographic dynamics. The process of development in Mexico, which can be characterized by great heterogeneity, consequently produces great regional disparities. At the national level various studies have estimated the volume of internal migration in Mexico, but they have usually been limited to interstate migration because the main source of data, the census, is classified by states. But given the great heterogeneity within states in all the elements related to internal migration, it is clear that studies of internal migration within states are also needed. Such studies are almost nonexistent because of their technical difficulty. National level studies show that interstate migration increased significantly between 1940-80. The proportion of Mexicans living outside their states of birth increased by 558% in those years, compared to the 342% increase in the total Mexican population. Although Puebla has a high rate of increase, migration has kept it below Mexico's national growth rate. Migration between Puebla and other states and within Puebla has led to an increasing unevenness of spatial distribution. Between 1970-80, 57 of Puebla's municipios had growth rates above the state average of 2.8%/year, 6 had growth rates equal to the average, and 129 had growth rates that were below the average but not negative. 25 states with negative growth rates that were considered strongly expulsive. In 1980, 51.7% of the population was concentrated in the 57 municipios

  6. International Arctic Research Collaborations: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    International cooperation on Arctic research has a long and storied history, predating even the first International Polar Year in 1881. But scientists want to improve and expand current efforts to conduct international Arctic research, despite politcal and legal barriers that can hamper it. A review of the past and present aspects of such research can inform that effort. As part of a six month fellowship at the Center for Science Diplomacy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science I studied the history and current status of international cooperation in the Arctic. I will report on my findings, which include the fact that some of the first substantial international environmental research and regulatory cooperation began in the far North. My session will identify the elements that make international research collaborations successful, for example more than a century of cooperative work by Russian and Norwegian fishery scientists to monitor and regulate the cod trade in the Barents Sea. And it will explore the challenges that can threaten such collaborations. These can include rules that stymie data collection, block the import of certain analytical equipment across national boundaries, and bar the export of soil or water samples. I will mention specific complications to recent international arctic research projects. These include the SWERUS cruise, a joint effort between Sweden, Russia and the US, an effort to study carbon fluxes over the East Siberian Arctic Shelf in 2014. The session will also review progress towards a new international agreeement, first proposed by the US, on improving arctic research cooperation. That deal is focused on removing the bureacratic and legal barriers to scientists seeking to conduct arctic research on foreign waters and land.

  7. Endocrine surgery fellowship graduates past, present, and future: 8 years of early job market experiences and what program directors and trainees can expect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram D; Gutnick, Jesse; Slotcavage, Rachel; Jin, Judy; Berber, Eren; Siperstein, Allan; Shin, Joyce J

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing number of endocrine surgery fellowship graduates, we investigated if expectations and job opportunities changed over time. American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES) fellowship graduates, surgery department chairs, and physician recruiters were surveyed. Univariate analysis was performed with JMP Pro 12 software. We identified 141 graduates from 2008-2015; survey response rate was 72% (n = 101). Compared to earlier graduates, fewer academic opportunities were available for the recent graduates who intended to join them (P = .001). Unlike earlier graduates, recent graduates expected to also perform elective general surgery, which ultimately represented a greater percentage of their practices (both P job offers decreased. Overall, 84% of graduates matched their intended practice type and 98% reported being satisfied. Reponses from graduates, department chairs, and physician recruiters highlighted opportunities to improve mentor involvement, job search strategies, and online job board utilization. The endocrine surgery job market has diversified resulting in more graduates entering nonacademic practices and performing general surgery. This rapid evolution supports future analyses of the job market and opportunities for job creation. Almost every graduate reported job satisfaction, which encourages graduates to consider joining both academic and nonacademic practices equally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing a Pipeline for the Community-Based Primary Care Workforce and Its Leadership: The Kraft Center for Community Health Leadership's Fellowship and Practitioner Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtasel, Derri; Hobbs-Knutson, Katherine; Tolpin, Harriet; Weinstein, Debra; Gottlieb, Gary L

    2015-09-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) face challenges recruiting and retaining primary care clinicians. Providing advanced training that enhances clinical skills within a public health framework, teaches leadership, protects time for scholarly activities, and focuses on the social mission may be a successful career development strategy. In July 2012, the Kraft Center for Community Health Leadership developed and implemented two 2-year programs to develop physician and nursing leaders with blended academic-community career paths and identities. The fellowship program for physicians and the practitioner program for early-career physicians and advanced practice nurses include mentored practice in a CHC; monthly learning days; completion of a community-based research project; and, for fellows, matriculation in an MPH program and engagement in a bimonthly leadership seminar. The first classes of 5 fellows and 14 practitioners graduated in June 2014. All 5 fellowship graduates were offered full-time positions at the CHCs where they practiced, and 2 have accepted leadership positions at their CHCs. All 14 practitioner graduates remain in community health, 5 have accepted leadership positions, and 2 have obtained grants to support ongoing projects. The authors are tracking graduates' career paths and the programs' impact on CHCs while modifying the programs on the basis of feedback; identifying elements of the programs that may be amenable to more cost-effective delivery; and exploring the potential for federal funding to support expansion of the practitioner program, and for the practitioner program to increase the return on investment provided by the National Health Service Corps.

  9. Clinical Informatics Fellowship Programs: In Search of a Viable Financial Model: An open letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Longhurst, C A; Hersh, W; Mohan, V; Levy, B P; Embi, P J; Finnell, J T; Turner, A M; Martin, R; Williamson, J; Munger, B

    2015-01-01

    In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

  10. In-Training Practice Patterns of Combined Emergency Medicine/Internal Medicine Residents, 2003-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Templeman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study seeks to evaluate the practice patterns of current combined emergency medicine/internal medicine (EM/IM residents during their training and compare them to the typical practice patterns of EM/IM graduates. We further seek to characterize how these current residents perceive the EM/IM physician’s niche. Methods: This is a multi-institution, cross-sectional, survey-based cohort study. Between June 2008 and July 2008, all 112 residents of the 11 EM/IM programs listed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were contacted and asked to complete a survey concerning plans for certification, fellowship, and practice setting. Results: The adjusted response rate was 71%. All respondents anticipated certifying in both specialties, with 47% intending to pursue fellowships. Most residents (97% allotted time to both EM and IM, with a median time of 70% and 30%, respectively. Concerning academic medicine, 81% indicated intent to practice academic medicine, and 96% planned to allocate at least 10% of their future time to a university/academic setting. In evaluating satisfaction, 94% were (1 satisfied with their residency choice, (2 believed that a combined residency will advance their career, and (3 would repeat a combined residency if given the opportunity. Conclusion: Current EM/IM residents were very content with their training and the overwhelming majority of residents plan to devote time to the practice of academic medicine. Relative to the practice patterns previously observed in EM/IM graduates, the current residents are more inclined toward pursuing fellowships and practicing both specialties. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:530–536.

  11. International Exchanges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    On October 12,2015,Mr.Zhu Rui,CPAPD Secretary General,chaired informal discussions with U.S.young experts and scholars on arms control and non-proliferation.The two sides exchanged views on international arms control,disarmament,non-proliferation and nuclear security,etc.During October 12 to 16,2015,at the invitation of the CPAPD,a four-member delegation from the Vietnam Peace Committee headed by its Vice-President Ms.Nguyen Thi Hoang Van

  12. Internal education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Zagorc

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: The importance of internal trainings in an organization. Purpose: The purpose of research is to examine and present internal trainings in an organization and their contribution to greater success of an organization. The paper studies employee training in a company, how the organization itself looks after its employees during training, how trainings contribute to further development of organization and the advancement of knowledge for successful operation of organization. Method: How to achieve the purpose of research, used methods and theoretical approach. Results: Specific examples and opinions of employees. Results show the importance of trainings for an organization. We can see that all employees are fairly motivated and ready to participate in trainings and can adapt to changing business environment very well. The results demonstrate that all trainings in the organization are very important and welcome. Only with continuous learning, the organization can be successful and survive in the market despite strong competition. Organization: Trainings are designed for all employees inside an organization. Different employees participate in trainings in a different way as all trainings are divided into certain work and fields that are important for each individual or department in an organization. Society: Trainings have an impact on the whole organization by contributing to its development. Originality: The originality of study is what was new in the research, what is the value and originality of research. Limitations/Future Research: Research was limited to a small number of sources.

  13. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael N.; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Background Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. Methods This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. Results 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). Conclusions The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents’ interest in nephrology

  14. Attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Scott; Heffner, John; Carson, Shannon

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care medicine (PCCM) training. Prospective study. Three university hospitals. An eight-page survey was distributed and collected between March 1, 2002, and June 30, 2002. All internal medicine or internal medicine/pediatric residents training at the three institutions were eligible for the study. One hundred seventy-eight residents in internal medicine from an eligible pool of 297 residents returned the survey (61% response rate). PCCM accounted for only 3.4% of the career choices. Forty-one percent of the residents seriously considered a pulmonary and/or critical care fellowship during their residency. Of these residents, 23.5% found the combination of programs the more attractive option, while 2.8% found pulmonary alone and 14.5% found critical care alone more attractive. Key factors associated with a higher resident interest in PCCM subspecialty training included more weeks in the ICU (p = 0.008), more role models in PCCM (3.02 +/- 0.78 vs 3.45 +/- 0.78, p = 0.0004), and resident observations of a greater sense of satisfaction among PCCM faculty (3.07 +/- 0.82 vs 3.33 +/- 0.82, p = 0.04) and fellows (3.05 +/- 0.69 vs 3.31 +/- 0.86, p = 0.03) [mean +/- SD]. The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM fellowship that would attract residents to the field included intellectual stimulation (69%), opportunities to manage critically ill patients (51%), application of complex physiologic principles (45%), number of procedures performed (31%), and academically challenging rounds (29%). The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM that would dissuade residents from the field included overly demanding responsibilities with lack of leisure time (54%), stress among faculty and fellows (45%), management responsibilities for chronically ill patients (30%), poor match of career with resident personality (24%), and treatment of pulmonary diseases (16%). Internal

  15. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1.2 A 50-year-old woman presents with pain in the lower left quadrant worsening .... 2.2.1 What key areas should you focus on during your .... make everyone feel comfortable. Observe .... Are there similarities of the study population to my own.

  16. Quantum Computing Graduate Fellowship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-31

    collisions," Physical Review Letters 91, 183201 (2003). 3. A. Silberfarb and I. H. Deutsch, "Entanglement generated between a single atom and a...Measurement and Nonlinear Dynamics in a Cold Spin Ensemble”, to appear in Physical Review Letters (2004). 5. R. Stock, A. Silberfarb, I. H. Deutsch, and E. L...Bolda, “Generalized pseudo-potentials for higher partial wave scattering”, submitted to Physical Review Letters (2004). 6. T. E. Tessier, C. M. Caves

  17. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She has no medical problems, but the spinal anaesthetic fails despite ... community health centre. Your next patient ... school. She has missed a few days of work due to her symptoms ... identified, the option for referral to a regional facility exists. It is ... South African guidelines make recommendations on equipment. Figure 1: ...

  18. Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrie, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    This 16-year-old top level leader grant program offers selected mature men from 40 countries a view of professional, political and social facets of American life through unrestricted travel, seminars, interviews with leaders in government, management, education and industry and visits to private homes. (IR)

  19. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    methodology limitations with this definition? 3.3 What type of sample size calculation was used, and was it adequately described? 3.4 What were ..... to be available), quota sampling (a convenience sample of different subgroups, such as men ...

  20. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    domains of family medicine, the MEQs will be aligned with the .... sub-district on the topic of ADHD in school age children. .... Practising of the skill by the participants – simulation needs .... Education: Does it challenge my knowledge?

  1. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This section in the South African Family Practice Journal aims to help registrars ... lead the process of prioritising health issues for this community. 2.1 Describe the .... Health status:Primary care morbidity, i.e. what are common reasons for ...

  2. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    include evidence-based medicine and primary care research methods ... national learning outcomes: http://www.collegemedsa.ac.za/ ... patient lives with her boyfriend and their two children aged four ... three key criteria of cooperative enquiry.

  3. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of family-oriented interviews on ... (4 marks). 3.4 Briefly critique the authors' decision to categorise the ... childbirth in the context of the district health services; auditing the quality of ... Informed Consent: The ethical considerations (2nd edition), .... This article reports on the value of employing a family-oriented interview ...

  4. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diseases and HIV/AIDS and mental health care through the involvement of ... with another group of clinics in the district that had not used ... steps, which address the stabilisation, transition and recovery .... A number of factors may contribute to.

  5. Mastering your Fellowship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MEQ) and critical reading paper (evidence-based .... for the presentation, the clinical diagnosis and management .... Viljoen W. How to organise and run morbidity and mortality .... whether or not improvements in health-related behaviour, disease ...

  6. Dorado Montero, JAE’s fellowship in Paris (1910 Dorado Montero, becario de la JAE en París (1910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureano ROBLES CARCEDO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This document recover the Dorado’s epistolary during his stay in Paris (1910, when he was fellowship by JAE. He was a respected lower penalist professor in the University of Salamanca, introduce the Italian positivism in Spain, and is the maker of the correctional pedagogy. Trought their personal texts show his intellectual preoccupations and interests.El autor rescata el epistolario de Dorado Montero durante su estancia en París en 1910, becado por la Junta para la Ampliación de Estudios. Quien era ya un respetado penalista en la Universidad de Salamanca, introductor en España del positivismo italiano, y creador de la pedagogía correccional, da muestras de sus actividades y preocupaciones intelectuales en aquellos primeros años del siglo XX.

  7. Stato-nazione e mobilità degli studenti universitari dall'Unità alla Repubblica: la situazione degli studi / National state and international mobility of Italian university students from the Unification to the Republic: a reflection on the "state-of-the-art"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariuzzo, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The essay deals with the development of international mobility programs for Italian university students in post-unification Italy. Considering the most important studies addressing the topic, the author highlights the attempts of the Italian government to promote state-controlled programs of international experience for the most talented students, both in the liberal and in the fascist era, in order to avoid the "peripherization" of the country in the academic world. However, he recognizes their failure in the competition with the emerging American foundations' international fellowships, which would become the model for post-WWII "denationalization" of university training.

  8. International Geoscience Workforce Trends: More Challenges for Federal Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, C. G.

    2005-12-01

    Concern about the decreasing number of students entering undergraduate geoscience programs has been chronic and, at times, acute over the past three decades. Despite dwindling populations of undergraduate majors, graduate programs have remained relatively robust, bolstered by international students. With Increasing competition for graduate students by universities in Europe, Japan, Australia, and some developing countries, and with procedural challenges faced by international students seeking entry into the United States and its universities, this supply source is threatened. For corporations operating on a global scale, the opportunity to employ students from and trained in the regions in which they operate is generally a plus. For U.S. universities that have traditionally supplied this workforce, the changing situation poses challenges, but also opportunities for creative international partnerships. Federal government science agencies face more challenges than opportunities in meeting workforce needs under both present and changing education conditions. Restrictions on hiring non-U.S. citizens into the permanent workforce have been a long-standing issue for federal agencies. Exceptions are granted only where they can document the absence of eligible U.S.-citizen candidates. The U.S. Geological Survey has been successful in doing this in its Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program, but there has been no solution to the broader limitation. Under current and forecast workforce recruitment conditions, creativity, such as that evidenced by the Mendenhall program,will be necessary if federal agencies are to draw from the increasingly international geoscience talent pool. With fewer U.S. citizens in U.S. geoscience graduate programs and a growing number of advanced-degreed scientists coming from universities outside the U.S., the need for changes in federal hiring policies is heightened. The near-term liklihood of this is low and combined with the decline in

  9. Principles to consider in defining new directions in internal medicine training and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barbara J; Centor, Robert M; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2006-03-01

    SGIM endorses seven principles related to current thinking about internal medicine training: 1) internal medicine requires a full three years of residency training before subspecialization; 2) internal medicine residency programs must dramatically increase support for training in the ambulatory setting and offer equivalent opportunities for training in both inpatient and outpatient medicine; 3) in settings where adequate support and time are devoted to ambulatory training, the third year of residency could offer an opportunity to develop further expertise or mastery in a specific type or setting of care; 4) further certification in specific specialties within internal medicine requires the completion of an approved fellowship program; 5) areas of mastery in internal medicine can be demonstrated through modified board certification and recertification examinations; 6) certification processes throughout internal medicine should focus increasingly on demonstration of clinical competence through adherence to validated standards of care within and across practice settings; and 7) regardless of the setting in which General Internists practice, we should unite to promote the critical role that this specialty serves in patient care.

  10. Profile and scientific output analysis of physical therapy researchers with research productivity fellowship from the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Análise do perfil e da produção científica dos fisioterapeutas bolsistas produtividade do Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Sturmer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the profile and the scientific output of physical therapists researchers holding a research productivity fellowship (PQ from the Brazilian National Council of Scientific and Technological Development (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico-CNPq. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study, which has evaluated the Lattes Curriculum of all PQ physiotherapy researchers registered at CNPq holding a research productivity fellowship in the period of 2010. The variables analyzed were: gender, geographic and institutional distribution, duration since doctorate defense, research productivity fellowship level, scientific output until 2010 and the H index in Scopus® and ISI databases. RESULTS: A total of 55 PQ from the CNPq were identified in the area of knowledge of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy, being 81.8% from the Southeast region of Brazil. They were predominantly female (61.8%, with research productivity fellowship level PQ2 (74.5%, and with average time since doctorate defense of 10.1 (±4.1 years. A total of 2.381 articles were published, with average of 42.5 (±18.9 articles/researcher. The average of articles published after doctorate defense was 39.40 (±18.9 articles/researchers with a mean output of 4.2 (±2.0 articles/year. We found 304 articles indexed in the Scopus® database with 2.463 citations, and 222 articles indexed in the Web of Science with 1.805 citations. The articles were published in 481 journals, being 244 (50.7% of them listed on JCR-web. The researchers presented a median 5 of the H index in the Scopus® database, and a median 3 in ISI. CONCLUSION: The scientific output of the researchers with research productivity fellowship in the field of physical therapy stands out in their indicators, since the figures are very promising for a relatively young area and as it can be observed by the amount of published articles and citations obtained by the national and international

  11. Community College Internal Auditors: Internal Audit Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronna; And Others

    This guidebook includes information compiled by the "Audit Manual" committee of Community College Internal Auditors (CCIA) from several California community college districts regarding their internal auditing practices. The first section of the guidebook discusses the purpose of internal audits, indicating that audits assist members of…

  12. Lü Shengrong Competes Internationally

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Little-known by her Chinese compatriots but wellknown in the international sports world, L(?) Shengrong,president of the International Badminton Federation (IBF) and member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), has had a legendary career.

  13. Surveying your internal customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, V L

    1998-06-01

    Internal customers often are overlooked when business techniques are applied. By applying common external customer satisfaction survey techniques to internal business functions, one hospital identified areas for improvement.

  14. Duncan Tanner Essay Prize Winner 2014. Against the 'Sacred Cow': NHS Opposition and the Fellowship for Freedom in Medicine, 1948-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This essay recovers organized opposition to the National Health Service (NHS) by considering the Fellowship for Freedom in Medicine (FFM), a conservative organization of doctors who challenged the 'Sacred Cow' of nationalized healthcare in the 1950s and 1960s. While there has been little interest in anti-NHS politics because of shortcomings in the institution's historiography, this study suggests ways a new history of the service can be written. Central to that project is taking the broader ideological and emotive quality of the NHS seriously, and appreciating the way, for all sides of the political spectrum, as well as the general public, the service has always been a contested symbol of post-war British identity. This essay argues that two NHS 'crises'--panics over costs, and disillusionment within general practice--were not merely disagreements over budgets and pay-packets but politically charged moments infused with conservative anxieties over Britain's post-war trajectory. The FFM imagined the NHS as an economically dangerous bureaucratic machine that crushed medical independence and risked pushing the country towards dictatorship. Allies within the Conservative Party, private health insurance industry, and free-market 'think-tanks' worked with the FFM to challenge defences of both the service's operation and meaning. To appreciate why the NHS remains 'the closest thing the English have to a religion', one must consider the apostates as well as the faithful.

  15. The International Criminal Court

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ciara Therése

    This article considers whether acts of international terrorism can and should be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court as crimes against humanity.......This article considers whether acts of international terrorism can and should be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court as crimes against humanity....

  16. International Engagement Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T... International Engagement Strategy is intended to establish clear goals and objectives to guide S&T’s international cooperative research, development... International Engagement Strategy, the 2015 White House National Security Strategy, the 2014 Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, and the DHS Fiscal

  17. The Internal Audit Outsourcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Gołębiowski

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The article explores an issue of the internal audit outsourcing. It indicates the differences between internal audit, outsourcing and cosourcing of this service as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Drawing from the research on internal audit outsourcing the recent market trends were identified as well as motivations for choosing different forms of internal auditing.

  18. Models of international entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Servais, Per

    2012-01-01

    on International Entrepreneurship, and specifically but not exclusively, International New Ventures (INVs). The three resulting ‘meta-models’ depict the activities and loci of such firms (Figure 1), the motivating factors that give rise to such firms (Figure 2) and their growth modalities and strategies (Figure 3......The purpose with this article is to review models used to describe and explain the establishment and development of international new ventures in order to investigate how and why international new ventures are established and developed. This article attempts an integration of extant theory......). These models reflect the merger of entrepreneurship and international business into the field of international entrepreneurship. Managers in international entrepreneurial firms and students in international business and entrepreneurship can use the models as framework for understanding international...

  19. Models of international entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Servais, Per

    2012-01-01

    ). These models reflect the merger of entrepreneurship and international business into the field of international entrepreneurship. Managers in international entrepreneurial firms and students in international business and entrepreneurship can use the models as framework for understanding international......The purpose with this article is to review models used to describe and explain the establishment and development of international new ventures in order to investigate how and why international new ventures are established and developed. This article attempts an integration of extant theory...... on International Entrepreneurship, and specifically but not exclusively, International New Ventures (INVs). The three resulting ‘meta-models’ depict the activities and loci of such firms (Figure 1), the motivating factors that give rise to such firms (Figure 2) and their growth modalities and strategies (Figure 3...

  20. Internal septorhinoplasty technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Peter D

    2012-02-01

    The internal septorhinoplasty was the standard operating procedure until the popularity of the external or open rhinoplasty technique. The internal technique of the rhinoplasty should be in the armamentarium of every cosmetic surgeon. There will always be indications for both internal and external rhinoplasty. The advantages of the internal technique are several. Rhinoplasty should be treatment planned based on the individual diagnosis. With experience, most surgeons find the internal rhinoplasty to be successful and extremely rewarding. A simple internal rhinoplasty will produce a good result and satisfied patients.

  1. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, Bruce F; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution - a community hospital - in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available.

  2. Center for Evaluation of Resilience Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-14

    wounds and injuries or food habits or nutritional assessment or leisure activities or work or health services accessibility or health care disparities or...Research Grants: 2223 International travel Grants: 2555 Newton International Fellowships: 2559 Science Policy Centre General enquiries: 2550 Science...and fellowships) Research Appointments (Fellowships): 2542 Research Grants: 2223 International travel Grants: 2555 Newton International Fellowships

  3. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Awards Overview Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards Overview Health Policy Scholarships Scholarships for International Surgeons Research Scholarships and Fellowships Resident Scholarships Special Opportunity Scholarships ...

  4. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Awards Overview Scholarships, Fellowships, and Awards Overview Health Policy Scholarships Scholarships for International Surgeons Research Scholarships and Fellowships Resident Scholarships Special Opportunity Scholarships ...

  5. International diversification and Microfinance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galema, Rients; Lensink, Robert; Spierdijk, Laura

    2011-01-01

    International commercial banks, institutional investors, and private investors have become increasingly interested in financing microfinance institutions (MFIs). This paper investigates whether adding microfinance funds to a portfolio of risky international assets yields diversification gains. By us

  6. Training for International Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Judy

    1980-01-01

    As many corporations widen their scope to international markets, there arises a need for specialized management development. To be effective in an international environment, a manager requires linguistic, social, and communication skills, functional expertise, and familiarity with cultural differences. (SK)

  7. International Transplant Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Mission of ITNS The International Transplant Nurses Society is committed to the promotion of excellence in ... 20-1589538 Copyright © 2006 - 2014 International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS). No materials, including graphics, may be reused, ...

  8. Generalized internal multiple imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zuberi, Mohammad Akbar Hosain

    2014-12-04

    Various examples are provided for generalized internal multiple imaging (GIMI). In one example, among others, a method includes generating a higher order internal multiple image using a background Green\\'s function and rendering the higher order internal multiple image for presentation. In another example, a system includes a computing device and a generalized internal multiple imaging (GIMI) application executable in the computing device. The GIMI application includes logic that generates a higher order internal multiple image using a background Green\\'s function and logic that renders the higher order internal multiple image for display on a display device. In another example, a non-transitory computer readable medium has a program executable by processing circuitry that generates a higher order internal multiple image using a background Green\\'s function and renders the higher order internal multiple image for display on a display device.

  9. National and International Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, David

    1992-01-01

    Discusses Canadian government policy dealing with internal matters of party politics and international questions of human rights. Describes the political situation in Burma as an oppressive military regime. Urges the Canadian government to take a firmer stand to influence the international community against tolerating regimes that are guilty of…

  10. Improving Internal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonus, Thaddeus, Ed.

    Guidelines for developing the internal communications of colleges and universities, researching internal communication needs, and increasing information flow through traditional and nontraditional media are provided in 11 articles. Titles and authors include the following: "Work for an Open Internal Communication Policy" (Thaddeus Bonus); "Five…

  11. CHINA INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The China International Publishing Group (CIPG) specializes in international communications. Its operationsencompass reporting, editing, translation, publishing, printing, distribution, and the Internet. It incorporates sevenpublishing companies, five magazines and 19 periodicals, published in over 20 languages. The ChinaInternational Book Trading Corporation, another group facet, distributes all of these to over 180 countries and

  12. Windows® Internals

    CERN Document Server

    Russinovich, Mark E; Ionescu, Alex

    2009-01-01

    See how the core components of the Windows operating system work behind the scenes-guided by a team of internationally renowned internals experts. Fully updated for Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista, this classic guide delivers key architectural insights on system design, debugging, performance, and support-along with hands-on experiments to experience Windows internal behavior firsthand.Delve inside Windows architecture and internals:Understand how the core system and management mechanisms work-from the object manager to services to the registryExplore internal system data structures usin

  13. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  14. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  15. Internal auditing in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Don; Kusel, Jim; Oxner, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyzed two national surveys to determine answers for two basic questions: How do the roles of internal auditors compare with those of their counterparts in other industries and to what extent over the past 6 years have the activities of internal auditors changed? Internal auditors in hospitals allocate their time primarily to financial/compliance and operational types of audits, as do their counterparts. The current trend is toward more operational types of audits. In the early years of employment, staff turnover in hospitals is significantly higher than in all combined industries, often leading to internal auditors' filling other positions in the organization. Hospital staff salaries are higher than are salaries in other industries combined. Staff composition continues to reflect the growing presence of women in the field. The majority of internal auditing directors believe that their salaries are fair, would recommend internal auditing as a career position, and are treated as valued consultants in the organization.

  16. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high “motivation score” (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49–9.59; P = 0.005) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01–6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: “attending physician” (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86–11.37; P = 0.001); “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51–11.23; P = 0.006); “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university” (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91–6.46; P = 0.0001); and “male gender” (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02–3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: “considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential” (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33–15.19; P = 0.0002) and “knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university

  17. Predictors of High Motivation Score for Performing Research Initiation Fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD Curricula During Medical Studies: A Strobe-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlova, Eva; Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Antonelli, Arnaud; Hadjadj, Samy; Marechaud, Richard; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Roblot, Pascal; Braun, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Translational research plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between fundamental and clinical research. The importance of integrating research training into medical education has been emphasized. Predictive factors that help to identify the most motivated medical students to perform academic research are unknown. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample of 315 medical students, residents and attending physicians, using a comprehensive structured questionnaire we assessed motivations and obstacles to perform academic research curricula (ie, research initiation fellowship, Master 1, Research Master 2, and PhD). Independent predictive factors associated with high "motivation score" (top quartile on motivation score ranging from 0 to 10) to enroll in academic research curricula were derived using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing Master 1 curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.49-9.59; P = 0.005) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.01-6.47; P motivation score for performing Research Master 2 curriculum were: "attending physician" (OR, 4.60; 95% CI, 1.86-11.37; P = 0.001); "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.51-11.23; P = 0.006); "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.91-6.46; P = 0.0001); and "male gender" (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.02-3.25; P = 0.04). Independent predictors of high motivation score for performing PhD curriculum were: "considering that the integration of translational research in medical curriculum is essential" (OR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.33-15.19; P = 0.0002) and "knowledge of at least 2 research units within the university" (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.46-4.77; P = 0.001). This is the

  18. Post-doctoral research fellowship as a health policy and systems research capacity development intervention: a case of the CHESAI initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembani, Martina; Teddy, Gina; Molosiwa, Dintle; Hwabamungu, Boroto

    2016-12-20

    Building capacity in health policy and systems research (HPSR), especially in low- and middle-income countries, remains a challenge. Various approaches have been suggested and implemented by scholars and institutions using various forms of capacity building to address challenges regarding HPSR development. The Collaboration for Health Systems Analysis and Innovation (CHESAI) - a collaborative effort between the Universities of Cape Town and the Western Cape Schools of Public Health - has employed a non-research based post-doctoral research fellowship (PDRF) as a way of building African capacity in the field of HPSR by recruiting four post-docs. In this paper, we (the four post-docs) explore whether a PDRF is a useful approach for capacity building for the field of HPSR using our CHESAI PDRF experiences. We used personal reflections of our written narratives providing detailed information regarding our engagement with CHESAI. The narratives were based on a question guide around our experiences through various activities and their impacts on our professional development. The data analysis process was highly iterative in nature, involving repeated meetings among the four post-docs to reflect, discuss and create themes that evolved from the discussions. The CHESAI PDRF provided multiple spaces for our engagement and capacity development in the field of HPSR. These spaces provided us with a wide range of learning experiences, including teaching and research, policy networking, skills for academic writing, engaging practitioners, co-production and community dialogue. Our reflections suggest that institutions providing PDRF such as this are valuable if they provide environments endowed with adequate resources, good leadership and spaces for innovation. Further, the PDRFs need to be grounded in a community of HPSR practice, and provide opportunities for the post-docs to gain an in-depth understanding of the broader theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the field

  19. The International Trade Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, K.; Mukherjee, G.; Manna, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    Bilateral trade relationships in the international level between pairs of countries in the world give rise to the notion of the International Trade Network (ITN). This network has attracted the attention of network researchers as it serves as an excellent example of the weighted networks, the link weight being defined as a measure of the volume of trade between two countries. In this paper we analyzed the international trade data for 53 years and studied in detail the variations of different ...

  20. International safeguards data authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, R.B.; Smith, C.E.; DeLand, S.M.; Manatt, D.R.

    1996-07-01

    The International Safeguards community is becoming increasingly reliant on information stored in electronic form. In international monitoring and related activities it must be possible to verify and maintain the integrity of this electronic information. This paper discusses the use of data authentication technology to assist in accomplishing this task. The paper provides background information, identifies the relevance to international safeguards, discusses issues related to export controls, algorithm patents, key management and the use of commercial vs. custom software.

  1. International migration, international relations and foreign policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C

    1989-01-01

    Recent literature on migration, international relations, and foreign policy is reviewed in this article, stressing applications of global systems paradigms, studies of state entry and exit rules, and anatomies of domestic policy-setting processes on migration. After a concise assessment of the contemporary theory of global political economy, the paper argues for seeking mid-range generalizations on the international relations of migration. It also suggests that analysis begin with the policy-setting processes of the state. Especially through the use of comparative perspectives available from domestic policy making studies and from the field of international comparative public policy, this approach offers the opportunity to fix empirically the political roles of transnational social forces, which often present themselves as participants in domestic policy contests. Promising future directions in the study of state-to-state relations are also evaluated, with the anticipation that verifying regional or other intermediate patterns of world migration politics may contribute to more general theories of international political economy.

  2. EM International. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    It is the intent of EM International to describe the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management`s (EM`s) various roles and responsibilities within the international community. Cooperative agreements and programs, descriptions of projects and technologies, and synopses of visits to international sites are all highlighted in this semiannual journal. Focus on EM programs in this issue is on international collaboration in vitrification projects. Technology highlights covers: in situ sealing for contaminated sites; and remote sensors for toxic pollutants. Section on profiles of countries includes: Arctic contamination by the former Soviet Union, and EM activities with Germany--cooperative arrangements.

  3. Models og International Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Morten; Servais, Per

    2015-01-01

    on International Entrepreneurship, and specifically but not exclusively, International New Ventures (INVs). The three resulting ‘meta-models’ depict the activities and loci of such firms, the motivating factors that give rise to such firms and their growth modalities and strategies. These models reflect the merger......The purpose with this article is to review models used to describe and explain the establishment and development of international new ventures in order to investigate how and why international new ventures are established and developed. This article attempts an integration of extant theory...

  4. Interne eller eksterne ledere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Royer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    used internal successors for the last 12 successions. We argue that in industries where tacit knowledge forms the basis for competitive advantage, the use of internal successors can help family firms excel after a transition of power has occurred. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed...

  5. International Entrepreneurship and Sourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Servais, Per; Zucchella, Antonella; Palamera, Giada

    2006-01-01

    This contribution focuses on international sourcing as an entrepreneurial act and aims at demonstrating that it is actually at the core of internationalization processes of small firms, both established and international new ventures. Another issue of this research is to understand how these firm...

  6. International Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    This article, with a focus on North American postsecondary education, identifies international students as a strategic enrollment management institutional priority; presents themes in the international student retention, satisfaction, and success research literature; and describes related best practices. It also presents the findings from an…

  7. Sovereignty in International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana MAFTEI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at highlighting in this paper, after analyzing the transformations that took place in the international society, the importance of a particularly sensitive and current topic for public international law, namely the sovereignty. A political and legal concept at the same time, the state sovereignty remains permanently into the attention of researchers in an attempt to determine its role in international relations governed by the international law. The concept of sovereignty is complex, it can be analyzed in terms of the national law, but as a member of international society, a State participates in international relations on the basis of sovereign equality principle, which causes another meaning of sovereignty, which completes the one specific to the internal life. We have analyzed the evolution of the concept of sovereignty and we have identified the causes that led to changes in its characteristics, in order to predict the tendencies in its development. We have highlighted the aspects of the exercise of sovereignty as a result of limiting the powers of state in the favor of international bodies. In preparing this article we have used as research methods the analysis of the problems generated by mentioned subject with reference to the doctrinal views expressed in specialized papers, documentary research, and interpretation of legal norms in the field.

  8. International mercury conference

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leaner, J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg) affects human health and the environment, it calls for immediate action. Action is needed at local, regional and international level to reduce the risk associated with mercury, which is a global international problem, as it is a...

  9. International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Maus, S.; Beggan, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The eleventh generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2009 by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy Working Group V‐MOD. It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2005.0, a main field...

  10. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  11. Embracing an International Board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A new international stock board will soon be established in Shanghai,allowing foreign companies to list their businesses and tap into the China market China is moving closer to launching its own international stock board,a market for foreign companies to list their stocks in China,said Shang Fulin,

  12. Unilateralism in International Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    international law. This note considers when and how a State or a regional organisation may legitimately take unilateral measures to protect the environment. The note will does not consider the legality of including foreign aircraft within the ETS, which has been dealt with elsewhere. Instead, it will focus...... on the legality and importance of unilateral acts for the development of international law....

  13. Intern kommunikation under forandring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm, Helle; Asmuss, Birte; Ditlevsen, Marianne Grove;

    , organisation og ledelse, som er relevante for arbejdet med den interne kommunikation. Bogen beskæftiger sig med intern kommunikation i bred forstand, dvs. med tekster og genrer, der ikke kun produceres af kommunikationsafdelingen, men også af ledelse, medarbejdere og HR-afdeling. Blandt bogens emner kan nævnes......, men kan læses med stort udbytte af alle, der arbejder med eller interesserer sig for, hvordan organisationer kommunikerer med sig selv, og hvordan den interne kommunikation forandrer sig. Bogen udfylder et hul i den danske faglitteratur om strategisk kommunikation, hvor der i mange år har manglet en......Intern kommunikation under forandring giver en teoretisk og praktisk indføring i de tekster, genrer og kommunikationsformer, som den interne kommunikation i private og offentlige virksomheder eller organisationer typisk omfatter. Dertil kommer en indføring i opfattelser af kommunikation...

  14. International Fisheries Agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pintassilgo, Pedro; Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Lindroos, Marko

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys the application of game theory to the economic analysis of international fisheries agreements. The relevance of this study comes not only from the existence of a vast literature on the topic but especially from the specific features of these agreements. The emphasis of the survey...... and stability of international fisheries agreements. A key message that emerges from this literature strand is that self-enforcing cooperative management of internationally shared fish stocks is generally difficult to achieve. Hence, the international legal framework and regulations play a decisive role...... is on coalition games, an approach that has become prominent in the fisheries economics literature over the last decade. It is shown that coalition games were first applied to international fisheries agreements in the late 1990s addressing cooperative issues under the framework of characteristic function games...

  15. Attracting International Hotels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A. George; Josiassen, Alexander; Agbola, Frank Wogbe

    2015-01-01

    With the increased international competition facing hotel chains, it is essential that the next destination they enter is the most attractive option possible. The host destinations too have a keen interest in strategically positioning themselves in order to attract international hotels since...... their presence has several positive effects. Using, for the first time, actual on-location data we investigate the factors that matter most for international hotels when selecting host destinations. Specifically, we identify 23 factors that make a destination an attractive (or unattractive) location...... for international hotels. We then rank these. The results show that welcomeness, infrastructure, and crime rate are the three most important factors that influence the location of international hotels in host destinations....

  16. Immunity of international organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Immunity rules are part and parcel of the law of international organizations. It has long been accepted that international organizations and their staff need to enjoy immunity from the jurisdiction of national courts. However, it is the application of these rules in practice that increasingly causes controversy. Claims against international organizations are brought before national courts by those who allegedly suffer from their activities. These can be both natural and legal persons such as companies. National courts, in particular lower courts, have often been less willing to recognize the immunity of the organization concerned than the organization s founding fathers. Likewise, public opinion and legal writings frequently criticize international organizations for invoking their immunity and for the lack of adequate means of redress for claimants. It is against this background that an international conference was organized at Leiden University in June 2013. A number of highly qualified academics and practit...

  17. Dalian International Garment Fair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Yifeng

    2004-01-01

    @@ The 17th Dalian International Garment Fair is a new starting point. In the face of the main development trend of international and domes tic convention and exhibition industry, the fierce competition among the domestic exhibition industry, Dalian International Garment Fair sizes up the situation and the golden opportunity that China will revitalize the Northeast old industrial base and turn Dalian into the international shipping center in Northeast Asia; it takes the new Dalian Convention and Exhibition Center as a turning point. Under the leadership of Dalian Mu-nicipal Party Committee and Dalian municipal government, and under the support and assistance of the sponsors, Dalian International Garment Fair emancipates the mind and plans the future with the viewpoint of scientific development, innovative thinking and practical operation.

  18. FINANCING OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADU NICOLAE BĂLUNĂ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Financing (funding is essentially the purchase of funds necessary for a business. This can be done from internal sources (company’s own funds or external (borrowed funds. The high value of goods traded in international trade makes revenues generated from internal resources not sufficient to settle the value of the goods. Thus, it is frequent to resort to borrowed funds. In International Business Transactions, external financing is done both by classical techniques of credit (credit supplier and buyer credit and modern techniques of financing (factoring, forfeiting, leasing all trade tailored. In terms of the length of financing, accounting funding is short-term (1-12 months and long-term financing (over a year. In principle, export and import operations prevailing short-term financing techniques, while international investment and industrial cooperation actions are specific long-term funding

  19. Wilderness Fellowship Program 2011 Fellows

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Natural Resources and Conservation Planning Division of the National Wildlife Refuge System, in cooperation with 19 refuges across 6 regions, has established a...

  20. Exploring Links between Internal and International Migration in Albania : a View from Internal Migrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caro, Erka; Bailey, Ajay; Van Wissen, Leo J. G.

    Over the last 20years, Albania has experienced sweeping economic and social changes, caused in part by increasing internal and international migration flows. Migration trajectories of Albanians represent a combination of internal, international, and return migration. Whereas scholars have previously

  1. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  2. Generalized internal multiple imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zuberi, M. A. H.

    2014-08-05

    Internal multiples deteriorate the image when the imaging procedure assumes only single scattering, especially if the velocity model does not have sharp contrasts to reproduce such scattering in the Green’s function through forward modeling. If properly imaged, internal multiples (internally scattered energy) can enhance the seismic image. Conventionally, to image internal multiples, accurate, sharp contrasts in the velocity model are required to construct a Green’s function with all the scattered energy. As an alternative, we have developed a generalized internal multiple imaging procedure that images any order internal scattering using the background Green’s function (from the surface to each image point), constructed from a smooth velocity model, usually used for conventional imaging. For the first-order internal multiples, the approach consisted of three steps, in which we first back propagated the recorded surface seismic data using the background Green’s function, then crosscorrelated the back-propagated data with the recorded data, and finally crosscorrelated the result with the original background Green’s function. This procedure images the contribution of the recorded first-order internal multiples, and it is almost free of the single-scattering recorded energy. The cost includes one additional crosscorrelation over the conventional single-scattering imaging application. We generalized this method to image internal multiples of any order separately. The resulting images can be added to the conventional single-scattering image, obtained, e.g., from Kirchhoff or reverse-time migration, to enhance the image. Application to synthetic data with reflectors illuminated by multiple scattering (double scattering) demonstrated the effectiveness of the approach.

  3. International energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  4. International New Venture Legitimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    There is limited theoretical understanding and empirical evidence for how international new ventures legitimate. Drawing from legitimation theory, this study fills in this gap by exploring how international new ventures legitimate and strive for survival in the face of critical events during...... the process of their emergence. It is a longitudinal, multiple-case study research that employs critical incident technique for data collection, analysis and interpretation. Following theory driven sampling, five international new ventures were selected that were operating in the software sector in the UK...

  5. International Students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut ÖZER

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are over three million international students worldwide, and in recent years higher education institutions compete with each other in order to receive these students to their institutions. International students are now one of the most important indicator of the internationalization of the higher education systems and institutions. In this context, the detection of the status of this indicator in our higher education system and institutions is of great importance as our higher education system shows a large expansion. This study, discusses the status of international students in our country.

  6. Developing international personas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Iben

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Personas have become a well-known method for IT-designers when developing new products. However, the vast majority of personas constructed are created from a mono-cultural (Western) perspective, representing users from a single national culture at a time. Due to the growing global market......, international companies show an increasing interest in creating international personas, but research on personas in a global context is still limited. To address this gap, this paper first offers a review on articles addressing international personas, and second it presents an empirical Danish study...

  7. International Institutions and GHG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Jiyong

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is pushing public health crises beyond traditional national boundaries. It has also transformed international health governance into global health governance. Health security is one aspect of global public welfare. International institutions, such as the WHO, the WTO, the World Bank, and the BWC, are main providers of global public welfare for health. However, those institutions' role in global health governance is not optimized. An analysis of the shortcomings of the international institutions concerned with global heath can contribute to better global health governance. Some tentative solutions to such problems are put forward in this paper.

  8. International petroleum statistics report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  9. Veterinary practice internal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzaro, T E

    1996-02-01

    This chapter explores the responsive management requirements critical for effective internal controls. Internal control techniques offered include the application of segregation of function, goal-orientation, performance planning, and training objectives in five veterinary practice areas. These areas are client controls, cash controls, inventory controls, purchase controls, and stock controls. Because only trusted staff members are given access to practice assets, the veterinary leadership must have a responsive management plan to protect the life of the practice while building the practice team. Methods are shared for controlling opportunities that can lead to employee fraud while concurrently building a team approach to internal controls.

  10. National narcissism: Internal dimensions and international correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huajian; Gries, Peter

    2013-08-01

    In studies conducted in the United States and China, we explored the impact of national narcissism, grandiosity, and entitlement, demonstrating that: (a) national narcissism was distinct from both individual narcissism and collective self-esteem (patriotism); (b) national entitlement and national grandiosity constituted two distinct dimensions of national narcissism; and (c) national narcissism, national grandiosity, and national entitlement, but not individual narcissism, were uniquely predictive of political attitudes, foreign policy preferences, and purchase intentions. Together, these findings provided convergent evidence for the utility of national narcissism and its two internal dimensions, national entitlement and national grandiosity.

  11. The Internal Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    Internal control comprises the plan of organization and all the coordinate methods and measures adopted within a school system to safeguard its assets, check the reliability of its accounting data, promote operational efficiency, and encourage adherence to prescribed policies. (Author)

  12. NCEP Internal Office Notes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and its predecessors have produced internal publications, known as Office Notes, since the mid-1950's. In...

  13. Globalisation of international health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, G

    1998-02-07

    40 years ago, activities in international health were the domain of WHO, governments (based on bilateral agreements), and non-governmental organisations. This has changed. Today, new players (such as the World Bank and, increasingly, the World Trade Organisation) have an influence on international health. As globalisation of trade and markets takes hold, new coalitions and alliances are forming to examine and deal with the direct and indirect consequences on health. This paper examines the changing context of cooperation in international health, and voices concerns about rising potential inequalities in health, both within and between countries. The question of how such changes will affect the actions of organisations working in international health is also addressed.

  14. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  15. ASKME Enterprise Portal (internal) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The ASKME Enterprise Portal Internal (AEPi) is envisioned to be an integrated, single-point-of-entry solution that contains modular components. The AEPi will provide...

  16. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  17. International petroleum statistics report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

  18. INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caescu Stefan Claudiu; Popescu Andrei; Ploesteanu Mara Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    .... Objectives of the Research The main purpose of the study of the analysis techniques of the internal environment is to provide insight on those aspects that are of strategic importance to the organization...

  19. International resources law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This book covers: Historical origins of civil code legal systems; Modern civil law practice for mineral lawyers; Treaties and agreements for protection of international investments; Europe 1992-toward a single energy market; Dispute resolution in international agreements; Assessment of political risk; Reducing political risk; Protecting mineral investments from upheaval in developing countries; Typical world petroleum arrangements; government take in the Pacific Rim - Papua New Guinea; Mineral base of the USSR and prospects of investment; International taxation for the mining practitioner; Tax considerations - branch versus subsidiary; Doing business in the host country - nontax considerations; Impact of host-country laws on operations and profits; Mineral development and native rights - New Zealand; Designing the investment vehicle: mining; International oil and gas joint ventures; Selected U.S. laws with extraterritorial effect; U.S. tax and securities laws applied to foreign joint venturers; and Extraterritorial effect of U.S. laws.

  20. Developing international personas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Iben; Hautopp, Heidi; Nielsen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    when using the persona method to collect and present insights about their international users. A key finding in both the literature review and the empirical study was the ambiguity concerning the concept of culture. Therefore, the paper draws on theories about culture, and especially practice theory......, to discuss how challenges related to perceptions of culture and intercultural communication might be overcome when working with international personas. In particular, it is suggested that the persona method could benefit from creating narratives that focus more on the similar practices enacted...... as they show an increasing interest in international personas. However, research on personas in a global context is limited. To address this gap, this paper provides an overview of extant research on international personas. Secondly, it presents an empirical study on challenges Danish IT companies experience...

  1. International Physiotherapy Eduication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brownb

    KEY WORDS: Physiotherapy education, future direction, international education, transnational education ... didactic and clinical teaching practices and options, and also provides .... delivery modes especially in distance education in all fields.

  2. Galaxy International Mall Unveiled

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An agreement between Galaxy International Mall (hereinafter referred to as Galaxy) and its three main partners was signed on January 12, 2011, in the city of Tianjin. The partners are Lotte Department

  3. International standards in metallurgy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fomina; O.; N.

    2005-01-01

    The existence of incompatible standards in many technical fields represents a technical barrier to international cooperation between enterprises in different countries in the manufacture of high technology products.……

  4. The Internal Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    Internal control comprises the plan of organization and all the coordinate methods and measures adopted within a school system to safeguard its assets, check the reliability of its accounting data, promote operational efficiency, and encourage adherence to prescribed policies. (Author)

  5. Evolutionary internalized regularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R

    2001-08-01

    Roger Shepard's proposals and supporting experiments concerning evolutionary internalized regularities have been very influential in the study of vision and in other areas of psychology and cognitive science. This paper examines issues concerning the need, nature, explanatory role, and justification for postulating such internalized constraints. In particular, I seek further clarification from Shepard on how best to understand his claim that principles of kinematic geometry underlie phenomena of motion perception. My primary focus is on the ecological validity of Shepard's kinematic constraint in the context of ordinary motion perception. First, I explore the analogy Shepard draws between internalized circadian rhythms and the supposed internalization of kinematic geometry. Next, questions are raised about how to interpret and justify applying results from his own and others' experimental studies of apparent motion to more everyday cases of motion perception in richer environments. Finally, some difficulties with Shepard's account of the evolutionary development of his kinematic constraint are considered.

  6. International Cometary Explorer (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    NASA spacecraft, originally known as ISEE-3 (International Sun-Earth Explorer). First spacecraft to encounter a comet. Launched in August 1978. After completing its original mission, it was reactivated and diverted to pass through the tail of Comet Giacobini-Zinner on 11 September 1985. It also observed Halley's Comet from a distance of 28 million km in March 1986. (See also INTERNATIONAL SUN-EAR...

  7. USSR Report, International Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    167092 JPRS-UIA-87-014 7 APRIL 1987 USSR Report INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DTSTPIBÜTTON HT^TFM’oKT Ä Approved fox ou’-K- ’c<£x;se; Distribution... USSR REPORT INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS CONTENTS EAST-WEST RELATIONS Ambassador, Correspondents View CSCE Process, Progress (NEPSZABADSAG, 13 Feb 87...Range Program (Boris Remizov, Valdimir Proskuryakov ; EKONOMICHESKOYE SOTRUDNICHESTVO STRAN-CHLENOV SEV, No 10, 1986) 21 - a - Measures for

  8. Criteria for internal auditing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, W W; Clay, R J

    1979-01-01

    An effective, inclusive internal auditing endeavor should help assure hospital managements that (1) an adequate system of internal control exists to assure the safeguarding of assets and the reliability of data produced by the financial information system, (2) uneconomic operating practices are detected promptly so they can be remedied, and (3) program results and effectiveness levels are of sufficiently high quality to demonstrate managerial competence.

  9. Existing chemicals: international activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, J F

    1989-01-01

    The standards of care used in the protection of the health and safety of people exposed to chemicals has increased dramatically in the last decade. Standards imposed by regulation and those adopted by industry have required a greater level of knowledge about the hazards of chemicals. In the E.E.C., the 6th amendment of the dangerous substances directive imposed the requirement that al new chemicals should be tested according to prescribed programme before introduction on to the market. The development of a European inventory of existing chemicals was an integral part of the 6th amendment. It has now become clear that increased standards of care referred to above must be applied to the chemicals on the inventory list. There is, however, a considerable amount of activity already under way in various international agencies. The OECD Chemicals Programme has been involved in considering the problem of existing chemicals for some time, and is producing a priority list and action programme. The International Programme on Chemical Safety produces international chemical safety cards, health and safety guides and environmental health criteria documents. The international register of potentially toxic compounds (part of UNEP) has prepared chemical data profiles on 990 compounds. The International Agency for Research on Cancer prepared monographs on the carcinogenic risk of chemicals to man. So far 42 volumes have been prepared covering about 900 substances. IARC and IPCS also prepare periodic reports on ongoing research on carcinogenicity or toxicity (respectively) of chemicals. The chemical industry through ECETOC (the European Chemical Industry Ecology and Toxicology Centre) has mounted a major initiative on existing chemicals. Comprehensive reviews of the toxicity of selected chemicals are published (Joint Assessment of Commodity Chemicals). In its technical report no. 30 ECETOC lists reviews and evaluations by major national and international organisations, which provides

  10. Managerial Attention in International SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Jiasi

    2017-01-01

    Managerial attention affects organizational strategies and the resulting consequences. In the international business context, it is noted that how much attention managers give to the international marketplace, i.e., international attention, has profound implications for large global companies’

  11. The art of internalizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleijenberg, A.N.

    1993-10-01

    Generally speaking, there is economical and political support for the idea that road users should pay the full share of their costs, including environmental costs. The Dutch government has also made pricing a key element of its traffic policy. However, between this general aspiration and concrete policy measures there is a yawning gap. The Dutch government`s main recommendations for increasing the price of road traffic, road pricing and toll collections were voted down in parliament. Real fuel taxes in Europe probably decreased rather than increased over the years. Even the recent EC agreement on the minimum vehicle tax level for trucks and the so-called Euro vignet mean only a slight improvement in cost allocation. What is behind the described gap between general aspiration and concrete policy? This is the key question addressed in this report, that, after setting out a largely economic analysis, provides suggestions for achieving true internalization of all traffic costs. The problem of cost internalization is virtually congruent to that of abolishing or reducing subsidies. An essential step towards reducing subsidies or allocating costs is an independent analysis of the major consequences involved. In this report, first the main background and impact of internalizing transport costs are reviewed. Topics covered included economic and social effects and the need for international harmonization. Next, the policy instruments that are available for the internalization of traffic costs are discussed, partly based on the above-mentioned analysis. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 15 refs.

  12. Internal Markets for Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfram, Pierre; Brem, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    of R&D to affiliated companies in the same business group. The challenges are analysed for affiliates in order to engage themselves in group-internal markets, for instance to avoid bottlenecks in the product development or to improve their technological knowledge. To research this phenomenon, a case...... study is accomplished by investigating a Multinational company whose affiliates are self-reliant and horizontally diversified. Mixed methods are applied by having structured depth interviews with the responsible R&D managers as well as by sending a survey out to associated project managers. The study...... indicates that the organizational complexity, infrastructures within the business group and the impact of external market structures play an essential role for the usage and effectiveness of group-internal markets. Hence, the insights offer valuable clues why internal markets have advantages...

  13. Internal Markets for Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfram, Pierre; Brem, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    of R&D to affiliated companies in the same business group. The challenges are analysed for affiliates in order to engage themselves in group-internal markets, for instance to avoid bottlenecks in the product development or to improve their technological knowledge. To research this phenomenon, a case...... study is accomplished by investigating a Multinational company whose affiliates are self-reliant and horizontally diversified. Mixed methods are applied by having structured depth interviews with the responsible R&D managers as well as by sending a survey out to associated project managers. The study...... indicates that the organizational complexity, infrastructures within the business group and the impact of external market structures play an essential role for the usage and effectiveness of group-internal markets. Hence, the insights offer valuable clues why internal markets have advantages...

  14. Determinants of International Competiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Mehdi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available International competitiveness is a main source of economic advancement which results in higher standards of living. This paper examines the determinants of international competitiveness as it defines international competitiveness and discusses two common conceptions that are required to achieve higher level of economic competitiveness: government policies and culture. It further explains a research methodology which is known as “Innovation Matrix”. Data is collected from two areas:  competitiveness and culture. After describing two sets of data, the researcher tests two hypotheses: (1 long-term economic growth is a function of government policies and (2 culture plays an insignificant role in gaining competitiveness and economic growth. In conclusion, the paper makes recommendations as how a country can improve its economic competitiveness.

  15. International user studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Madsen, Sabine; Jensen, Iben

    across nationalities and (2) that it often is more important to focus on and take differences in market conditions into account than national culture per se. Companies are in the process of finding out how best to present the insights about international end users to their employees. However, so far...... a company’s general attitude and approach to (1) international markets and (2) user studies. Lastly, we present the theoretical ideas and concepts about culture that has informed the research....... in Sydhavnen, and it is funded by InfinIT. Based on a qualitative interview study with 15 user researchers from 11 different companies, we have investigated how companies collect and present data about users on international markets. Key findings are: Companies do not collect data about end users in all...

  16. International energy annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  17. International energy outlook 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

  18. International user studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Madsen, Sabine; Jensen, Iben;

    in Sydhavnen, and it is funded by InfinIT. Based on a qualitative interview study with 15 user researchers from 11 different companies, we have investigated how companies collect and present data about users on international markets. Key findings are: Companies do not collect data about end users in all....../region. The preferred data collection method is field studies. If possible, user researchers choose to go to the field themselves to gain rich insights and to control the data collection process. The main insights companies gain from international user studies are (1) that there are many similarities among end users...... across nationalities and (2) that it often is more important to focus on and take differences in market conditions into account than national culture per se. Companies are in the process of finding out how best to present the insights about international end users to their employees. However, so far...

  19. Constructivism and International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This new book unites in one volume some of the most prominent critiques of Alexander Wendt's constructivist theory of international relations and includes the first comprehensive reply by Wendt. Partly reprints of benchmark articles, partly new original critiques, the critical chapters are informed...... critique of the realist school, the conceptualism of identity, and his teleological theory of history. Wendt's reply is not limited to rebuttal only. For the first time, he develops his recent idea of quantum social science, as well as its implications for theorising international relations. This unique...... by a wide array of contending theories ranging from realism to poststructuralism. The collected leading theorists critique Wendt's seminal book Social Theory of International Politics and his subsequent revisions. They take issue with the full panoply of Wendt's approach, such as his alleged positivism, his...

  20. Sport and International Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yimeng

    2008-01-01

    As China takes center stage for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games in August, enthusiasm for the Games extends far beyond the capital city. For Chinese, the Olympics is about national pride and cultural legacy. The Chinese government hopes to make this event a morale booster for the development of the whole country. And for the world, the Olympics is not just a global sporting event, but also an important platform for promoting world harmony and communication between cultures. As editor of Contemporary International Relations, I am mindful of the connection between sport and international relations. Sport today plays a highly significant role in the world, and the impact of this global phenomenon on international relations is often underestimated.

  1. Internalized Meaning Factualism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwy, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    are defended by, e.g., Robert Brandom, Paul Horwich and Huw Price), that promises to solve the problems. According to this position, the problem of meaning can be solved by prohibiting an external perspective on meaning constituting properties. The idea is that if we stick to a perspective on meaning......The normative character of meaning creates deep problems for the attempt to give a reductive explanation of the constitution of meaning. I identify and critically examine an increasingly popular Carnap-style position, which I call Internalized Meaning Factualism (versions of which I argue...... that is internal to meaning discourse, then we can preserve the normativity of meaning and yet locate meaning in the natural world. I develop a generic motivation for this position, but argue that, since this motivation is consistent with the Ramsey-Carnap-Lewis-Jackson reductionist strategy, internalized meaning...

  2. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  3. International Data & Economic Analysis (IDEA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — International Data UN Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Price Index; IMF, Direction of Trade Statistics; Millennium Challenge Corporation; and World Bank,...

  4. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration".

  5. International Energy Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Hongtu

    2007-01-01

    The international energy situation has entered a new phase of change and readjustment. On the one hand, while imbalances in petroleum market supply-demand have been alleviated , the consuming states are now focusing on demand side management and development of new and renewable energy. There has been great progress in international energy security dialogue and cooperation. On the other hand , supply-demand market balance remains fragile , and restrictions due to insufficient energy investment are more evident. The concerned states have taken a stronger grip over their own resources. Implementation of energy diplomacy has also further complicated the relationship between energy and geo-politics, causing an upsurge of competition.

  6. Internal polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  7. The international RESPO network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Winrock International, with sponsorship from the Center for Environment of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), is building a global network of non-governmental organizations to help catalyze the use of renewable energy technologies for rural energy supply in developing countries. Known as the Renewable Energy Project Support Offices (REPSOs), these in-country facilities are managed by local institutions in coordination with Winrock. REPSOs provide an array of technical and financial support services to help developers identify and evaluate opportunities for renewable energy projects.

  8. Major international sport profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R; Stier, Bernhard; Luckstead, Eugene F

    2002-08-01

    Sports are part of the sociocultural fabric of all countries. Although different sports have their origins in different countries, many sports are now played worldwide. International sporting events bring athletes of many cultures together and provide the opportunity not only for athletic competition but also for sociocultural exchange and understanding among people. This article reviews five major sports with international appeal and participation: cricket, martial arts, field hockey, soccer, and tennis. For each sport, the major aspects of physiological and biomechanical demands, injuries, and prevention strategies are reviewed.

  9. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  10. Beredskab eller intern sikkerhed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, Henrik Ø.

    2012-01-01

    Skal Danmark have en beredskabspolitik eller en politik for intern sikkerhed? Det er et af de spørgsmål, den internationale institutionsudvikling inden for det robuste og sikre samfund stiller til det danske beredskabspolitiske univers. På baggrund af en ekspertpraktikerworkshop beskriver denne...... at anvende den nye robusthedstænkning som basis for en intern sikkerhedsstrategi. Den klassiske helhedsorienterede beredskabsplanlægning som traditionelt har fokuseret på beredskab som noget lokalt forankret gives dermed en ny ramme på europæisk plan. Det har politisk betydning fordi et forøget sagsområde...

  11. INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caescu Stefan Claudiu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Theme The situation analysis, as a separate component of the strategic planning, involves collecting and analysing relevant types of information on the components of the marketing environment and their evolution on the one hand and also on the organization’s resources and capabilities on the other. Objectives of the Research The main purpose of the study of the analysis techniques of the internal environment is to provide insight on those aspects that are of strategic importance to the organization. Literature Review The marketing environment consists of two distinct components, the internal environment that is made from specific variables within the organization and the external environment that is made from variables external to the organization. Although analysing the external environment is essential for corporate success, it is not enough unless it is backed by a detailed analysis of the internal environment of the organization. The internal environment includes all elements that are endogenous to the organization, which are influenced to a great extent and totally controlled by it. The study of the internal environment must answer all resource related questions, solve all resource management issues and represents the first step in drawing up the marketing strategy. Research Methodology The present paper accomplished a documentary study of the main techniques used for the analysis of the internal environment. Results The special literature emphasizes that the differences in performance from one organization to another is primarily dependant not on the differences between the fields of activity, but especially on the differences between the resources and capabilities and the ways these are capitalized on. The main methods of analysing the internal environment addressed in this paper are: the analysis of the organizational resources, the performance analysis, the value chain analysis and the functional analysis. Implications Basically such

  12. Internal variables in thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Berezovski, Arkadi

    2017-01-01

    This book describes an effective method for modeling advanced materials like polymers, composite materials and biomaterials, which are, as a rule, inhomogeneous. The thermoelastic theory with internal variables presented here provides a general framework for predicting a material’s reaction to external loading. The basic physical principles provide the primary theoretical information, including the evolution equations of the internal variables. The cornerstones of this framework are the material representation of continuum mechanics, a weak nonlocality, a non-zero extra entropy flux, and a consecutive employment of the dissipation inequality. Examples of thermoelastic phenomena are provided, accompanied by detailed procedures demonstrating how to simulate them.

  13. International emissions trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Jan Tjeerd

    This thesis discusses the design and political acceptability of international emissions trading. It is shown that there are several designs options for emissions trading at the national level that have a different impact on output and thereby related factors such as employment and consumer prices....... The differences in impact of the design make that governments may prefer different designs of emissions trading in different situations. The thesis furthermore establishes that international emissions trading may lead to higher overall emissions, which may make it a less attractive instrument....

  14. International Market Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    2009-01-01

    The review presents the book International Market Analysis: Theories and Methods, written by John Kuiada, professor at Centre of International Business, Department of Business Studies, Aalborg University. The book is refreshingly new in its way of looking at a classical problem. It looks at market...... analysis from the point of vie of ways of thinking about markets. Furthermore, the book includes the concept of learning in the analysis of markets og how the way we understand business reality influneces our choice of methodology for market analysis....

  15. INTERNATIONAL DATA ARCHIVE AND ANALYSIS CENTER. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ARCHIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Relations Archive undertakes as its primary goal the acquisition, management and dissemination of international affairs data. This...goal necessitates direct interaction between the International Relations Archive staff and the academic community to ensure more adequate standards...contains two documents. The first document is the latest version of the memorandum, ’Data Holdings and Servicing Policies, International Relations Archive

  16. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful, a

  17. Internal displacement in Burma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjouw, S; Mortimer, G; Bamforth, V

    2000-09-01

    The internal displacement of populations in Burma is not a new phenomenon. Displacement is caused by numerous factors. Not all of it is due to outright violence, but much is a consequence of misguided social and economic development initiatives. Efforts to consolidate the state by assimilating populations in government-controlled areas by military authorities on the one hand, while brokering cease-fires with non-state actors on the other, has uprooted civilian populations throughout the country. Very few areas in which internally displaced persons (IDPs) are found are not facing social turmoil within a climate of impunity. Humanitarian access to IDP populations remains extremely problematic. While relatively little information has been collected, assistance has been focused on targeting accessible groups. International concern within Burma has couched the problems of displacement within general development modalities, while international attention along its borders has sought to contain displacement. With the exception of several recent initiatives, few approaches have gone beyond assistance and engaged in the prevention or protection of the displaced.

  18. International Outreach from Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton, John

    1980-01-01

    Programs at Western Kentucky University including undergraduate curricula in Latin-American and Asian studies, technical assistance projects overseas, student and faculty exchange programs, seminars and workshops, and community activities are described. "Friendship teams" (a faculty advisor, four international students, and an American…

  19. Internal budget control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Mervete Shala

    2011-06-01

    Generally, duties of internal control officers within ministries and institutions must be clearly divided to reduce the risk of inco-rrect behaviour. Operations of an efficient control mechanism influence and ensure conditions for rule of law, good governance, and democracy.

  20. International Neutron Radiography Newsletter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    At the First World Conference on Neutron Radiography i t was decided to continue the "Neutron Radiography Newsletter", published previously by J.P. Barton, as the "International Neutron Radiography Newsletter" (INRNL), with J.C. Doraanus as editor. The British Journal of Non-Destructive Testing...