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Sample records for dehydrogenase nadp-malic enzyme

  1. The regulation and catalytic mechanism of the NADP-malic enzyme from tobacco leaves

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    VERONIKA DOUBNEROVÁ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-photosynthetic NADP-malic enzyme EC 1.1.1.40 (NADP-ME, which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate and NADP+ to produce pyruvate and NADPH, respectively, and which could be involved in plant defense responses, was isolated from Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves. The mechanism of the enzyme reaction was studied by the initial rate method and was found to be an ordered sequential one. Regulation possibilities of purified cytosolic NADP-ME by cell metabolites were tested. Intermediates of the citric acid cycle (a-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, metabolites of glycolysis (pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate, glucose-6-phosphate, compounds connected with lipogenesis (coenzyme A, acetyl-CoA, palmitoyl-CoA and some amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate did not significantly affect the NADP-ME activity from tobacco leaves. In contrast, macroergic compounds (GTP, ATP and ADP were strong inhibitors of NADP-ME; the type of inhibition and the inhibition constants were determined in the presence of the most effective cofactors (Mn2+ or Mg2+, required by NADP-ME. Predominantly non-competitive type of inhibitions of NADP-ME with respect to NADP+ and mixed type to L-malate were found.

  2. Purification, kinetic behavior, and regulation of NAD(P)+ malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    The purification and kinetic characterization of an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme from 22aH mouse hepatoma mitochondria are described. The enzyme was purified 328-fold with a final yield of 51% and specific activity of 38.1 units/mg of protein by employing DEAE-cellulose chromatography and an ATP affinity column. Sephadex G-200 chromatography yielded a native Mr = 240,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a major subunit with Mr = 61,000, suggesting a tetrameric structure, and also showed that the preparation contained less than 10% polypeptide impurities. Use of the ATP affinity column required the presence of MnCl2 and fumarate (an allosteric activator) in the elution buffers. In the absence of fumarate, the Michaelis constants for malate, NAD+, and NADP+ were 3.6 mM, 55 microM, and 72 microM, respectively; in the presence of fumarate (2 mM), the constants were 0.34 mM, 9 microM, and 13 microM, respectively. ATP was shown to be an allosteric inhibitor, competitive with malate. However, the inhibition by ATP displayed hyperbolic competitive kinetics with a KI (ATP) of 80 microM (minus fumarate) and 0.5 mM (plus 2 mM fumarate). The allosteric properties of the enzyme are integrated into a rationale for its specific role in the pathways of malate and glutamate oxidation in tumor mitochondria.

  3. Elements required for an efficient NADP-malic enzyme type C4 photosynthesis.

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    Wang, Yu; Long, Stephen P; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2014-04-01

    C4 photosynthesis has higher light, nitrogen, and water use efficiencies than C3 photosynthesis. Although the basic anatomical, cellular, and biochemical features of C4 photosynthesis are well understood, the quantitative significance of each element of C4 photosynthesis to the high photosynthetic efficiency are not well defined. Here, we addressed this question by developing and using a systems model of C4 photosynthesis, which includes not only the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch synthesis, sucrose synthesis, C4 shuttle, and CO₂ leakage, but also photorespiration and metabolite transport between the bundle sheath cells and mesophyll cells. The model effectively simulated the CO₂ uptake rates, and the changes of metabolite concentrations under varied CO₂ and light levels. Analyses show that triose phosphate transport and CO₂ leakage can help maintain a high photosynthetic rate by balancing ATP and NADPH amounts in bundle sheath cells and mesophyll cells. Finally, we used the model to define the optimal enzyme properties and a blueprint for C4 engineering. As such, this model provides a theoretical framework for guiding C4 engineering and studying C4 photosynthesis in general.

  4. Faster Rubisco Is the Key to Superior Nitrogen-Use Efficiency in NADP-Malic Enzyme Relative to NAD-Malic Enzyme C4 Grasses1

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    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T. John; Conroy, Jann P.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (kcat; 3.8 versus 5.7 s−1 at 25°C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)−1 in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster kcat. PMID:15665246

  5. Faster Rubisco is the key to superior nitrogen-use efficiency in NADP-malic enzyme relative to NAD-malic enzyme C4 grasses.

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    Ghannoum, Oula; Evans, John R; Chow, Wah Soon; Andrews, T John; Conroy, Jann P; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2005-02-01

    In 27 C4 grasses grown under adequate or deficient nitrogen (N) supplies, N-use efficiency at the photosynthetic (assimilation rate per unit leaf N) and whole-plant (dry mass per total leaf N) level was greater in NADP-malic enzyme (ME) than NAD-ME species. This was due to lower N content in NADP-ME than NAD-ME leaves because neither assimilation rates nor plant dry mass differed significantly between the two C4 subtypes. Relative to NAD-ME, NADP-ME leaves had greater in vivo (assimilation rate per Rubisco catalytic sites) and in vitro Rubisco turnover rates (k(cat); 3.8 versus 5.7 s(-1) at 25 degrees C). The two parameters were linearly related. In 2 NAD-ME (Panicum miliaceum and Panicum coloratum) and 2 NADP-ME (Sorghum bicolor and Cenchrus ciliaris) grasses, 30% of leaf N was allocated to thylakoids and 5% to 9% to amino acids and nitrate. Soluble protein represented a smaller fraction of leaf N in NADP-ME (41%) than in NAD-ME (53%) leaves, of which Rubisco accounted for one-seventh. Soluble protein averaged 7 and 10 g (mmol chlorophyll)(-1) in NADP-ME and NAD-ME leaves, respectively. The majority (65%) of leaf N and chlorophyll was found in the mesophyll of NADP-ME and bundle sheath of NAD-ME leaves. The mesophyll-bundle sheath distribution of functional thylakoid complexes (photosystems I and II and cytochrome f) varied among species, with a tendency to be mostly located in the mesophyll. In conclusion, superior N-use efficiency of NADP-ME relative to NAD-ME grasses was achieved with less leaf N, soluble protein, and Rubisco having a faster k(cat).

  6. Elements Required for an Efficient NADP-Malic Enzyme Type C4 Photosynthesis1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Long, Stephen P.; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis has higher light, nitrogen, and water use efficiencies than C3 photosynthesis. Although the basic anatomical, cellular, and biochemical features of C4 photosynthesis are well understood, the quantitative significance of each element of C4 photosynthesis to the high photosynthetic efficiency are not well defined. Here, we addressed this question by developing and using a systems model of C4 photosynthesis, which includes not only the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch synthesis, sucrose synthesis, C4 shuttle, and CO2 leakage, but also photorespiration and metabolite transport between the bundle sheath cells and mesophyll cells. The model effectively simulated the CO2 uptake rates, and the changes of metabolite concentrations under varied CO2 and light levels. Analyses show that triose phosphate transport and CO2 leakage can help maintain a high photosynthetic rate by balancing ATP and NADPH amounts in bundle sheath cells and mesophyll cells. Finally, we used the model to define the optimal enzyme properties and a blueprint for C4 engineering. As such, this model provides a theoretical framework for guiding C4 engineering and studying C4 photosynthesis in general. PMID:24521879

  7. Regulation of the expression of NADP-malic enzyme by UV-B, red and far-red light in maize seedlings

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    P. Casati

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The induction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malic enzyme (NADP-ME in etiolated maize (Zea mays seedlings by UV-B and UV-A radiation, and different levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm was investigated by measuring changes in activity, protein quantity and RNA levels as a function of intensity and duration of exposure to the different radiations. Under low levels of PAR, exposure to UV-B radiation but not UV-A radiation for 6 to 24 h caused a marked increase in the enzyme levels similar to that observed under high PAR in the absence of UV-B. UV-B treatment of green leaves following a 12-h dark period also caused an increase in NADP-ME expression. Exposure to UV-B radiation for only 5 min resulted in a rapid increase of the enzyme, followed by a more gradual rise with longer exposure up to 6 h. Low levels of red light for 5 min or 6 h were also effective in inducing NADP-ME activity equivalent to that obtained with UV-B radiation. A 5-min exposure to far-red light following UV-B or red light treatment reversed the induction of NADP-ME, and this effect could be eliminated by further treatment with UV-B or red light. These results indicate that physiological levels of UV-B radiation can have a positive effect on the induction of this photosynthetic enzyme. The reducing power and pyruvate generated by the activity of NADP-ME may be used for respiration, in cellular repair processes and as substrates for fatty acid synthesis required for membrane repair.

  8. Induced Expression of the Gene for NADP-malic Enzyme in Leaves of Aloe vera L. under Salt Stress%盐胁迫对库拉索芦荟叶片中NADP-苹果酸酶基因的诱导表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙淑斌; 沈其荣; 万建民; 刘兆普

    2003-01-01

    A cDNA fragment for NADP-malic enzyme, catalyzing the reversible oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to produce CO2, pyruvate and NADPH, was isolated from the leaves of a 2-month-old Aloe vera L., The level of expression of NADP-ME mRNA and accumulation of NADP-ME (AvME) protein under salt stress conditions were compared between a tolerant aloe, Aloe vera L. and a sensitive aloe, Aloe saponarea Haw. The results suggested that both the expression of the gene and the accumulation of the protein were induced in the two kinds of aloe, and the strength was related to the degree of salt tolerance. Northern blot analysis revealed that the gene for NADP-malic enzyme in Aloe vera L.(AvME) was induced by high salt, dehydration, and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), but not by cold treatment. To further confirm whether the synthesis of AvME protein was induced with hours of treatment, Western blot analysis of the samples was conducted. The results indicated that the induction of AvME protein expression was obvious after 48 h at high salt and the level was increased with the hours of treatment.%为弄清景天酸代谢植物-库拉索芦荟中NADP-苹果酸酶(NADP-ME)基因的表达与其耐盐间的关系, 根据已知NADP-苹果酸酶序列设计引物, 从库拉索芦荟的2个月幼苗中扩增克隆了NADP-苹果酸酶496 bp的cDNA片段, 并对其进行了序列测定; 选用敏感品种皂质芦荟和耐盐品种库拉索芦荟做材料, 分别检测高盐胁迫条件下NADP-ME的表达和NADP-ME的活性. 结果表明, 两者在不同品种的芦荟中均被诱导, 但诱导的强度与芦荟的耐盐程度相关. Northern杂交分析表明, 高盐、干旱、外源ABA均能强烈诱导苹果酸酶的表达, 但寒冷对其影响不大, 这与库拉索芦荟的生物学特性相符合; 此外, 为了检测库拉索芦荟中NADP-苹果酸酶受盐诱导情况, 利用Western 印迹对样品进行了分析, 结果显示高盐条件不仅明显诱导NADP-ME的合成, 而

  9. NADPH-generating dehydrogenases: their role in the mechanism of protection against nitro-oxidative stress induced by adverse environmental conditions

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    Francisco Javier Corpas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available NADPH is an essential reductive coenzyme in biosynthetic processes such as cell growth, proliferation and detoxification in eukaryotic cells. It is required by antioxidative systems such as the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and is also necessary for the generation of superoxide radicals by plant NADPH oxidases and for the generation of nitric oxide (NO by L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide syntase. This coenzyme is principally re-generated by a group of NADP-dehydrogenases enzymes including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH, both belonging to the pentose phosphate pathway, the NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH. In this study, current perspectives on these enzymes in higher plants under different stress situations are reviewed and it is also pointed out that this group of NADPH-generating dehydrogenases is a key element in supporting the mechanism of response to nitro-oxidative stress situations.

  10. Effect of trichloroethylene (TCE) toxicity on the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane and oxidative stress in kidney and other rat tissues.

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    Khan, Sheeba; Priyamvada, Shubha; Khan, Sara A; Khan, Wasim; Farooq, Neelam; Khan, Farah; Yusufi, A N K

    2009-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial solvent, is a major environmental contaminant. Histopathological examinations revealed that TCE caused liver and kidney toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, biochemical mechanism and tissue response to toxic insult are not completely elucidated. We hypothesized that TCE induces oxidative stress to various rat tissues and alters their metabolic functions. Male Wistar rats were given TCE (1000 mg/kg/day) in corn oil orally for 25 d. Blood and tissues were collected and analyzed for various biochemical and enzymatic parameters. TCE administration increased blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, cholesterol and alkaline phosphatase but decreased serum glucose, inorganic phosphate and phospholipids indicating kidney and liver toxicity. Activity of hexokinase, lactate dehydrogenase increased in the intestine and liver whereas decreased in renal tissues. Malate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase decreased in all tissues whereas increased in medulla. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased but NADP-malic enzyme decreased in all tissues except in medulla. The activity of BBM enzymes decreased but renal Na/Pi transport increased. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities variably declined whereas lipid peroxidation significantly enhanced in all tissues. The present results indicate that TCE caused severe damage to kidney, intestine, liver and brain; altered carbohydrate metabolism and suppressed antioxidant defense system.

  11. Structure of a bacterial enzyme regulated by phosphorylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase [threo-DS-isocitrate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42] from Escherichia coli has been solved and refined at 2.5 A resolution and is topologically different from that of any other dehydrogenase. This enzyme, a dimer of identical 416-residue subunits, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-113, which lies at the edge of an interdomain pocket that also contains many residues conserved between isocitrate dehydrogenase and isopropylma...

  12. Overproduction of C4 photosynthetic enzymes in transgenic rice plants: an approach to introduce the C4-like photosynthetic pathway into rice.

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    Taniguchi, Yojiro; Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Chisato; Fukuda, Takuya; Tamai, Tesshu; Lee, Kwanghong; Sudoh, Sizue; Tsuchida, Hiroko; Sasaki, Haruto; Fukayama, Hiroshi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2008-01-01

    Four enzymes, namely, the maize C(4)-specific phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), the maize C(4)-specific pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), the sorghum NADP-malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and the rice C(3)-specific NADP-malic enzyme (ME), were overproduced in the mesophyll cells of rice plants independently or in combination. Overproduction individually of PPDK, MDH or ME did not affect the rate of photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation, while in the case of PEPC it was slightly reduced. The reduction in CO(2) assimilation in PEPC overproduction lines remained unaffected by overproduction of PPDK, ME or a combination of both, however it was significantly restored by the combined overproduction of PPDK, ME, and MDH to reach levels comparable to or slightly higher than that of non-transgenic rice. The extent of the restoration of CO(2) assimilation, however, was more marked at higher CO(2) concentrations, an indication that overproduction of the four enzymes in combination did not act to concentrate CO(2) inside the chloroplast. Transgenic rice plants overproducing the four enzymes showed slight stunting. Comparison of transformants overproducing different combinations of enzymes indicated that overproduction of PEPC together with ME was responsible for stunting, and that overproduction of MDH had some mitigating effects. Possible mechanisms underlying these phenotypic effects, as well as possibilities and limitations of introducing the C(4)-like photosynthetic pathway into C(3) plants, are discussed.

  13. Calculations of hydrogen tunnelling and enzyme catalysis: a comparison of liver alcohol dehydrogenase, methylamine dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase

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    Tresadern, Gary; McNamara, Jonathan P.; Mohr, Matthias; Wang, Hong; Burton, Neil A.; Hillier, Ian H.

    2002-06-01

    Although the potential energy barrier for hydrogen transfer is similar for the enzymes liver alcohol dehydrogenase, methylamine dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase, the degree of tunnelling is predicted to differ greatly, and is reflected by their primary kinetic isotope effects.

  14. Enzyme dynamics and hydrogen tunnelling in a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase

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    Kohen, Amnon; Cannio, Raffaele; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Klinman, Judith P.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1999-06-01

    Biological catalysts (enzymes) speed up reactions by many orders of magnitude using fundamental physical processes to increase chemical reactivity. Hydrogen tunnelling has increasingly been found to contribute to enzyme reactions at room temperature. Tunnelling is the phenomenon by which a particle transfers through a reaction barrier as a result of its wave-like property. In reactions involving small molecules, the relative importance of tunnelling increases as the temperature is reduced. We have now investigated whether hydrogen tunnelling occurs at elevated temperatures in a biological system that functions physiologically under such conditions. Using a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), we find that hydrogen tunnelling makes a significant contribution at 65°C this is analogous to previous findings with mesophilic ADH at 25°C ( ref. 5). Contrary to predictions for tunnelling through a rigid barrier, the tunnelling with the thermophilic ADH decreases at and below room temperature. These findings provide experimental evidence for a role of thermally excited enzyme fluctuations in modulating enzyme-catalysed bond cleavage.

  15. Redesigning the substrate specificity of an enzyme: isocitrate dehydrogenase.

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    Doyle, S A; Fung, S Y; Koshland, D E

    2000-11-21

    Despite the structural similarities between isocitrate and isopropylmalate, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) exhibits a strong preference for its natural substrate. Using a combination of rational and random mutagenesis, we have engineered IDH to use isopropylmalate as a substrate. Rationally designed mutations were based on comparison of IDH to a similar enzyme, isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH). A chimeric enzyme that replaced an active site loop-helix motif with IPMDH sequences exhibited no activity toward isopropylmalate, and site-directed mutants that replaced IDH residues with their IPMDH equivalents only showed small improvements in k(cat). Random mutants targeted the IDH active site at positions 113 (substituted with glutamate), 115, and 116 (both randomized) and were screened for activity toward isopropylmalate. Six mutants were identified that exhibited up to an 8-fold improvement in k(cat) and increased the apparent binding affinity by as much as a factor of 80. In addition to the S113E mutation, five other mutants contained substitutions at positions 115 and/or 116. Most small hydrophobic substitutions at position 116 improved activity, possibly by generating space to accommodate the isopropyl group of isopropylmalate; however, substitution with serine yielded the most improvement in k(cat). Only two substitutions were identified at position 115, which suggests a more specific role for the wild-type asparagine residue in the utilization of isopropylmalate. Since interactions between neighboring residues in this region greatly influenced the effects of each other in unexpected ways, structural solutions were best identified in combinations, as allowed by random mutagenesis.

  16. Heterozygosity of the sheep: Polymorphism of 'malic enzyme', isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+), catalase and esterase.

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    Baker, C M; Manwell, C

    1977-04-01

    In contrast to other reports, it is found that the sheep has approximately as much enzyme variation as man. Most of the genetically interpretable enzyme variation in heart, liver, kidney and muscle from 52 sheep (Merinos or Merino crosses) is in the NADP-dependent dehydrogenases [two 'malic enzymes' and the supernatant isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+)] and in the esterases. Ten different loci for NAD-dependent dehydrogenases are electrophoretically monomorphic, as are five different NADH diaphorases from heart muscle and 15 different major proteins from skeletal muscle. It is highly statistically significant that NADP-dependent dehydrogenases and esterases are polymorphic but representatives of several other major classes of enzymes are not. The physiological significance of this polymorphism may be related to the role of these enzymes in growth and detoxication, sheep having been selected by man for faster growth, of wool or of carcass, and for grazing a wide variety of plants.

  17. Malate dehydrogenases from actinomycetes: structural comparison of Thermoactinomyces enzyme with other actinomycete and Bacillus enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases from bacteria belonging to the genus Thermoactinomyces are tetrameric, like those from Bacillus spp., and exhibit a high degree of structural homology to Bacillus malate dehydrogenase as judged by immunological cross-reactivity. Malate dehydrogenases from other actinomycetes are dimers and do not cross-react with antibodies to Bacillus malate dehydrogenase.

  18. Construction of an integrated enzyme system consisting azoreductase and glucose 1-dehydrogenase for dye removal.

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    Yang, Yuyi; Wei, Buqing; Zhao, Yuhua; Wang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Azo dyes are toxic and carcinogenic and are often present in industrial effluents. In this research, azoreductase and glucose 1-dehydrogenase were coupled for both continuous generation of the cofactor NADH and azo dye removal. The results show that 85% maximum relative activity of azoreductase in an integrated enzyme system was obtained at the conditions: 1U azoreductase:10U glucose 1-dehydrogenase, 250mM glucose, 1.0mM NAD(+) and 150μM methyl red. Sensitivity analysis of the factors in the enzyme system affecting dye removal examined by an artificial neural network model shows that the relative importance of enzyme ratio between azoreductase and glucose 1-dehydrogenase was 22%, followed by dye concentration (27%), NAD(+) concentration (23%) and glucose concentration (22%), indicating none of the variables could be ignored in the enzyme system. Batch results show that the enzyme system has application potential for dye removal.

  19. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

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    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  20. Role of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in traumatic brain injury and Measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme by dipstick test

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    Sharma Pushpa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate the role of a mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH on the severity of brain injury, and the effects of pyruvate treatment in rats with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Materials and Methods: We examined rats subjected to closed head injury using a fluid percussion device, and treated with sodium pyruvate (antioxidant and substrate for PDH enzyme. At 72 h post injury, blood was analyzed for blood gases, acid-base status, total PDH enzyme using a dipstick test and malondialdehyde (MDA levels as a marker of oxidative stress. Brain homogenates from right hippocampus (injured area were analyzed for PDH content, and immunostained hippocampus sections were used to determine the severity of gliosis and PDH E1-∞ subunit. Results: Our data demonstrate that TBI causes a significant reduction in PDH enzyme, disrupt-acid-base balance and increase oxidative stress in blood. Also, lower PDH enzyme in blood is related to the increased gliosis and loss of its PDH E1-∞ subunit PDH in brain tissue, and these effects of TBI were prevented by pyruvate treatment. Conclusion: Lower PDH enzyme levels in blood are related to the global oxidative stress, increased gliosis in brain, and severity of brain injury following TBI. These effects can be prevented by pyruvate through the protection of PDH enzyme and its subunit E-1.

  1. Comparative enzymology-new insights from studies of an "old" enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-09-01

    Comparative enzymology explores the molecular mechanisms that alter the properties of enzymes to best fit and adapt them to the biotic demands and abiotic stresses that affect the cellular environment in which these protein catalysts function. For many years, comparative enzymology was primarily concerned with analyzing enzyme functional properties (e.g. substrate affinities, allosteric effectors, responses to temperature or pH, stabilizers, denaturants, etc.) in order to determine how enzyme properties were optimized to function under changing conditions. More recently it became apparent that posttranslational modifications of enzymes play a huge role in metabolic regulation. At first, such modifications appeared to target just crucial regulatory enzymes but recent work is showing that many dehydrogenases are also targets of posttranslational modification leading to substantial changes in enzyme properties. The present article focuses in particular on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) showing that stress-induced changes in enzyme properties can be linked with reversible posttranslational modifications; e.g. changes in the phosphorylation state of LDH occur in response to dehydration stress in frogs and anoxia exposure of turtles and snails. Furthermore, these studies show that LDH is also a target of other posttranslational modifications including acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination that change in response to anoxia or dehydration stress. Selected new methods for exploring posttranslational modifications of dehydrogenases are discussed and new challenges for the future of comparative enzymology are presented that will help to achieve a deeper understanding of biochemical adaptation through enzyme regulation.

  2. Enzyme inhibition assay for pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: Clinical utility for the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katsuhisa Omagri; Hiroaki Hazama; Shigeru Kohno

    2005-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is usually diagnosed by the presence of characteristic histopathological features of the liver and/or antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) in the serum traditionally detected by immunofluorescence.Recently, new and more accurate serological assays for the detection of AMA, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting, and enzyme inhibition assay, have been developed. Of these,the enzyme inhibition assay for the detection of antipyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) antibodies offers certain advantages such as objectivity, rapidity,simplicity, and low cost. Since this assay has almost 100% specificity, it may have particular applicability in screening the at-risk segment of the population in developing countries. Moreover, this assay could be also used for monitoring the disease course in PBC. Almost all sera of PBC-suspected patients can be confirmed for PBC or non-PBC by the combination results of immunoblotting and enzyme inhibition assay without histopathological examination. For the development of a "complete" or "gold standard" diagnostic assay for PBC, similar assays of the enzyme inhibition for anti2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) and anti-branched chain oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex (BCOADC) antibodies will be needed in future.

  3. Escherichia coli D-malate dehydrogenase, a generalist enzyme active in the leucine biosynthesis pathway.

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    Vorobieva, Anastassia A; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-10-17

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of D-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on D-malate as a carbon source, the D-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB(-) strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (L(+)-tartrate, D-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution.

  4. Radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes - Molecular mechanism based on inactivation of dehydrogenases

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    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Gerszon, Joanna; Puchala, Mieczyslaw; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2016-11-01

    Proteins, which have enzymatic activities play a fundamental role in the cell due to participation in most of biological processes. Oxidative-induced damage of enzymes often have marked effects on cellular processes, which in consequence determine cell functioning and survival. In this review, we focused on the radiation-induced inactivation of enzymes with particular emphasis on the inactivation of dehydrogenases. For a better understanding of this issue, the efficiency of products of water radiolysis (•OH, O2•- and H2O2) in enzyme inactivation has been analysed. Reactions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with amino acids present in the active site of enzymes appear to have the greatest impact on enzyme inactivation.

  5. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, M.J.; Beekhuis, H.; Duursma, A.M.; Bouma, J.M.; Gruber, M.

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1, intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected SVI-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of T I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats.

  6. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, M J; Beekhuis, H; Duursma, A M; Bouma, J M; Gruber, M

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1 (EC 1.1.1.27), intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected 125I-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of 131I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats.

  7. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  8. Detection of enzymes dehydrogenases and proteases inBrugia malayi filarial parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Y P; Krithika, K N; Kulkarni, Sandeep; Reddy, M V R; Harinath, B C

    2006-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis caused mainly by infection fromW. bancrofti andB. malayi remains a major cause of clinical morbidity in tropical and subtropical countries. Analysis ofB. malayi mf, infective larval and adult worm lysates for the activity of enzymes led to the demonstration of activities of three key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism viz., Malate dehydrogenase (MDH), Malic enzyme (ME) and Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in all the three stages of the parasite. The specific activity of all the three dehydrogenases was significantly high in mf lysate compared to their activity in lysates of the other two stages (PFlouride (PMSF). In sodium do-decyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), using gelatin copolymerized gel, the microfilarial lysate showed 3 protease molecules of 40 kDa, 180 kDa and 200 kDa and the L(3) larval lysate had 6 protease molecules of 18, 25, 37, 49, 70 and 200 kDa size.

  9. Enhancement of the activity of enzyme immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by rational orientation of formate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Ni, Kefeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-10-20

    Immobilization of enzymes onto nanoparticles and retention of their structure and activity, which may be related to the orientation of enzymes on nanoparticles, remain a challenge. Here, we developed a novel enzyme-orientation strategy to enhance the activity of formate dehydrogenase immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via site-directed mutation. Seven mutants were constructed based on homology modeling of formate dehydrogenase and immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles to investigate the influence of these mutations on immobilization. The immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C demonstrated the highest immobilization yield and retained 90% of its initial activity, which was about 3-fold higher than that of wild-type formate dehydrogenase. Moreover, co-immobilization of formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase was performed for the synthesis of l-tert-leucine. The catalytic efficiency of the co-immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C and leucine dehydrogenase increased by more than 4-fold compared to that of co-immobilized wild-type formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational optimization of AG18051 inhibitor for amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alexandra T.; Antunes, Agostinho; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in maintaining the homeostasis. The enzyme can also mediate some diseases, including genetic diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly some prostate cancers. Potent inhibitors of ABAD might facilitate a better clarification of the functions of the enzyme under normal and pathogenic conditions and might also be used for therapeutic intervention in disease conditions mediated by the enzyme. The AG18051 is the only presently available inhibitor of ABAD. It binds in the active-site cavity of the enzyme and reacts with the NAD+ cofactor to form a covalent adduct. In this work, we use computational methods to perform a rational optimization of the AG18051 inhibitor, through the introduction of chemical substitutions directed to improve the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology was used to predict the relative free binding energy of the different modified inhibitor-NAD-enzyme complexes. We show that it is possible to increase significantly the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme with small modifications, without changing the overall structure and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties of the original inhibitor.

  11. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases: structures of the human liver enzymes, functional properties and evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J; von Bahr-Lindström, H; Höög, J O; Vallee, B L

    1987-01-01

    All three types of subunit of class I human alcohol dehydrogenase have been analyzed both at the protein and cDNA levels, and the structures of alpha, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 1, and gamma 2 subunits are known. The same applies to class II pi subunits. Extensive protein data are also available for class III chi subunits. In the class I human isozymes, amino acid exchanges occur at 35 positions in total, with 21-28 replacements between any pair of the alpha/beta/gamma chains. These values, compared with those from species differences between the corresponding human and horse enzymes, suggest that isozyme developments in the class I enzyme resulted from separate gene duplications after the divergence of the human and equine evolutionary lines. All subunits exhibit some unique properties, with slightly closer similarity between the human gamma and horse enzyme subunits and somewhat greater deviations towards the human alpha subunit. Differences are large also in segments close to the active site zinc ligands and other functionally important positions. Species differences are distributed roughly equally between the two types of domain in the subunit, whereas isozyme differences are considerably more common in the catalytic than in the coenzyme-binding domain. These facts illustrate a functional divergence among the isozymes but otherwise similar changes during evolution. Polymorphic forms of beta and gamma subunits are characterized by single replacements at one and two positions, respectively, explaining known deviating properties. Class II and class III subunits are considerably more divergent. Their homology with class I isozymes exhibits only 60-65% positional identity. Hence, they reflect further steps towards the development of new enzymes, with variations well above the horse/human species levels, in contrast to the class I forms. Again, functionally important residues are affected, and patterns resembling those previously established for the divergently related

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase is not a mitochondrial enzyme in human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans N; van Hall, Gerrit; Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-01-01

    procedure were assayed for marker enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The mitochondrial fraction contained no LDH activity (detection limit approximately 0.05 % of the tissue activity) and the distribution of LDH activity among the fractions paralleled that of pyruvate kinase, i.e. LDH was fractionated...... as a cytoplasmic enzyme. Respiratory experiments with the mitochondrial fraction also indicated the absence of LDH. Lactate did not cause respiration, nor did it affect the respiration of pyruvate + malate. The major part of the native cytochrome c was retained in the isolated mitochondria, which, furthermore......, showed high specific rates of state 3 respiration. This excluded artificial loss from the mitochondria of all activity of a possible LDH. It was concluded that skeletal muscle mitochondria are devoid of LDH and unable to metabolize lactate....

  13. Empirical evaluation of a virtual laboratory approach to teach lactate dehydrogenase enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Christine; Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Bellinson, Zack; Maguire, Danni; Zimitat, Craig; Abraham, Joyce; Eri, Rajaraman

    2016-06-01

    Personalised instruction is increasingly recognised as crucial for efficacious learning today. Our seminal work delineates and elaborates on the principles, development and implementation of a specially-designed adaptive, virtual laboratory. We strived to teach laboratory skills associated with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme kinetics to 2nd-year biochemistry students using our adaptive learning platform. Pertinent specific aims were to:(1)design/implement a web-based lesson to teach lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) enzyme kinetics to 2nd-year biochemistry students(2)determine its efficacious in improving students' comprehension of enzyme kinetics(3)assess their perception of its usefulness/manageability(vLab versus Conventional Tutorial). Our tools were designed using HTML5 technology. We hosted the program on an adaptive e-learning platform (AeLP). Provisions were made to interactively impart informed laboratory skills associated with measuring LDH enzyme kinetics. A series of e-learning methods were created. Tutorials were generated for interactive teaching and assessment. The learning outcomes herein were on par with that from a conventional classroom tutorial. Student feedback showed that the majority of students found the vLab learning experience "valuable"; and the vLab format/interface "well-designed". However, there were a few technical issues with the 1st roll-out of the platform. Our pioneering effort resulted in productive learning with the vLab, with parity with that from a conventional tutorial. Our contingent discussion emphasises not only the cornerstone advantages, but also the shortcomings of the AeLP method utilised. We conclude with an astute analysis of possible extensions and applications of our methodology.

  14. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  15. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  16. Rapid induction by fungal elicitor of the synthesis of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, a specific enzyme of lignin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, C; Sarni, F; Lamb, C J

    1987-11-16

    A fivefold increase in the extractable activity of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme of phenylpropanoid metabolism specific for lignin synthesis, was observed within 10 h of treatment of cell-suspension cultures of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with a high-molecular-mass elicitor preparation heat-released from mycelial cell walls of the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Elicitor caused a rapid, marked but transient increase in the synthesis of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase with maximum rates 2-3 h after elicitation, concomitant with the phase of rapid increase in enzyme activity. There is a close correspondence between increased polysomal mRNA activity encoding cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, as measured by incorporation of [35S]methionine into immunoprecipitable enzyme subunits in vitro, and the stimulation of enzyme synthesis in vivo in response to elicitor. This marked increase in polysomal mRNA activity represents an increase as a proportion of total cellular mRNA activity, indicating that elicitor does not stimulate synthesis of this enzyme by selective recruitment from the total pool of cellular mRNA. Elicitor stimulation of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and enzyme synthesis is more rapid than previously observed for other proteins involved inducible defense mechanisms, such as enzymes of phytoalexin biosynthesis or the apoproteins of cell-wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins.

  17. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    +)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore...

  19. Novel fungal FAD glucose dehydrogenase derived from Aspergillus niger for glucose enzyme sensor strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, Koji; Loew, Noya; Ohnishi, Yosuke; Tsuruta, Hayato; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; LaBelle, Jeffrey T; Klonoff, David C

    2017-01-15

    In this study, a novel fungus FAD dependent glucose dehydrogenase, derived from Aspergillus niger (AnGDH), was characterized. This enzyme's potential for the use as the enzyme for blood glucose monitor enzyme sensor strips was evaluated, especially by investigating the effect of the presence of xylose during glucose measurements. The substrate specificity of AnGDH towards glucose was investigated, and only xylose was found as a competing substrate. The specific catalytic efficiency for xylose compared to glucose was 1.8%. The specific activity of AnGDH for xylose at 5mM concentration compared to glucose was 3.5%. No other sugars were used as substrate by this enzyme. The superior substrate specificity of AnGDH was also demonstrated in the performance of enzyme sensor strips. The impact of spiking xylose in a sample with physiological glucose concentrations on the sensor signals was investigated, and it was found that enzyme sensor strips using AnGDH were not affected at all by 5mM (75mg/dL) xylose. This is the first report of an enzyme sensor strip using a fungus derived FADGDH, which did not show any positive bias at a therapeutic level xylose concentration on the signal for a glucose sample. This clearly indicates the superiority of AnGDH over other conventionally used fungi derived FADGDHs in the application for SMBG sensor strips. The negligible activity of AnGDH towards xylose was also explained on the basis of a 3D structural model, which was compared to the 3D structures of A. flavus derived FADGDH and of two glucose oxidases.

  20. Determining Structure and Function of Steroid Dehydrogenase Enzymes by Sequence Analysis, Homology Modeling, and Rational Mutational Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Duax, William L.; Thomas, James; Pletnev, Vladimir; Addlagatta, Anthony; Huether, Robert; Habegger, Lukas; Weeks, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, ~300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of ~40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently u...

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in rat lung alveolar epithelial cells. An ultrastructural enzyme-cytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Matsubara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD is the key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway in carbohydrate metabolism, and it plays an important role in cell proliferation and antioxidant regulation within cells in various organs. Although marked cell proliferation and oxidant/antioxidant metabolism occur in lung alveolar epithelial cells, definite data has been lacking as to whether cytochemically detectable G6PD is present in alveolar epithelial cells. The distribution pattern of G6PD within these cells, if it is present, is also unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the subcellular localization of G6PD in alveolar cells in the rat lung using a newly- developed enzyme-cytochemistry (copper-ferrocyanide method. Type I cells and stromal endothelia and fibroblasts showed no activities. Electron-dense precipitates indicating G6PD activity were clearly visible in the cytoplasm and on the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum of type II alveolar epithelial cells. The cytochemical controls ensured specific detection of enzyme activity. This enzyme may play a role in airway defense by delivering substances for cell proliferation and antioxidant forces, thus maintaining the airway architecture.

  2. Multiple independent fusions of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Stover

    Full Text Available Fusions of the first two enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL, have been previously described in two distant clades, chordates and species of the malarial parasite Plasmodium. We have analyzed genome and expressed sequence data from a variety of organisms to identify the origins of these gene fusion events. Based on the orientation of the domains and range of species in which homologs can be found, the fusions appear to have occurred independently, near the base of the metazoan and apicomplexan lineages. Only one of the two metazoan paralogs of G6PD is fused, showing that the fusion occurred after a duplication event, which we have traced back to an ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. The Plasmodium genes are known to contain a functionally important insertion that is not seen in the other apicomplexan fusions, highlighting this as a unique characteristic of this group. Surprisingly, our search revealed two additional fusion events, one that combined 6PGL and G6PD in an ancestor of the protozoan parasites Trichomonas and Giardia, and another fusing G6PD with phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD in a species of diatoms. This study extends the range of species known to contain fusions in the pentose phosphate pathway to many new medically and economically important organisms.

  3. Suitability of the hydrocarbon-hydroxylating molybdenum-enzyme ethylbenzene dehydrogenase for industrial chiral alcohol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataruch, M; Heider, J; Bryjak, J; Nowak, P; Knack, D; Czerniak, A; Liesiene, J; Szaleniec, M

    2014-12-20

    The molybdenum/iron-sulfur/heme protein ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EbDH) was successfully applied to catalyze enantiospecific hydroxylation of alkylaromatic and alkylheterocyclic compounds. The optimization of the synthetic procedure involves use of the enzyme in a crude purification state that saves significant preparation effort and is more stable than purified EbDH without exhibiting unwanted side reactions. Moreover, immobilization of the enzyme on a crystalline cellulose support and changes in reaction conditions were introduced in order to increase the amounts of product formed (anaerobic atmosphere, electrochemical electron acceptor recycling or utilization of ferricyanide as alternative electron acceptor in high concentrations). We report here on an extension of effective enzyme activity from 4h to more than 10 days and final product yields of up to 0.4-0.5g/l, which represent a decent starting point for further optimization. Therefore, we expect that the hydrocarbon-hydroxylation capabilities of EbDH may be developed into a new process of industrial production of chiral alcohols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene clone,expression and enzyme activity assay of a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase from apple fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxin YAO; Yujin HAO; Ming LI; Mingli PANG; Zhi LIU; Heng ZHAI

    2008-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) ubiquitously exists in animals,plants and microoganisms,and catalyzes the interconversion from oxaloacetate to malate.Cytosolic NAD-dependent MDH gene (cyMDH)encodes a key enzyme crucial for malic acid synthesis in the cytosol which has not been extensively characterized in plants.In this study,a full-length cDNA of cyMDH was isolated from apple fruits with RT-PCR as well as 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends,and designated as Mal-cyMDH (GenBank accession No.DQ221207).It contained a 996-bp ORF and its sequence analysis shows a high similarity to other plant cyMDHs.Phylogenetic analysis indicated that almost all the cyMDHs could be clustered into the same group and it was likely to represent the original MDH.A roughly 37-kDa fused protein was obtained by the recombinant prokaryotic expression and its enzyme activity assay showed that it mainly catalyzed oxaloacetate to malate.It was also discovered that the enzyme activity of cyMDH exhibited remarkable difference between the high- and low-acid apple germplasm.

  5. Screening of Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Leite

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activity of crude extracts of Meliaceae and Rutaceae plants on glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated at 100 μg/mL. Forty-six extracts were tested and fifteen of them showed significant inhibitory activity (IA % > 50. The majority of the assayed extracts of Meliaceae plants (Cedrela fissilis, Cipadessa fruticosa and Trichilia ramalhoi showed high ability to inhibit the enzymatic activity. The fractionation of the hexane extract from branches of C. fruticosa led to the isolation of three flavonoids: flavone, 7-methoxyflavone and 3',4',5',5,7-pentamethoxyflavone. The two last compounds showed high ability to inhibit the gGAPDH activity. Therefore, the assayed Meliaceae species could be considered as a promising source of lead compounds against Chagas' disease.

  6. Class 2 aldehyde dehydrogenase. Characterization of the hamster enzyme, sensitive to daidzin and conserved within the family of multiple forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmqvist, L; Lundgren, R; Norin, A; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B; Klyosov, A; Keung, W M

    1997-10-13

    Mitochondrial (class 2) hamster aldehyde dehydrogenase has been purified and characterized. Its primary structure has been determined and correlated with the tertiary structure recently established for this class from another species. The protein is found to represent a constant class within a complex family of multiple forms. Variable segments that occur in different species correlate with non-functional segments, in the same manner as in the case of the constant class of alcohol dehydrogenases (class III type) of another protein family, but distinct from the pattern of the corresponding variable enzymes. Hence, in both these protein families, overall variability and segment architectures behave similarly, with at least one 'constant' form in each case, class III in the case of alcohol dehydrogenases, and at least class 2 in the case of aldehyde dehydrogenases.

  7. Enzymic analysis of NADPH metabolism in beta-lactam-producing Penicillium chrysogenum: presence of a mitochondrial NADPH dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Diana M; Diderich, Jasper A; van der Krogt, Zita A; Luttik, Marijke A H; Raamsdonk, Léonie M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van Gulik, Walter M; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T

    2006-03-01

    Based on assumed reaction network structures, NADPH availability has been proposed to be a key constraint in beta-lactam production by Penicillium chrysogenum. In this study, NADPH metabolism was investigated in glucose-limited chemostat cultures of an industrial P. chrysogenum strain. Enzyme assays confirmed the NADP(+)-specificity of the dehydrogenases of the pentose-phosphate pathway and the presence of NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase. Pyruvate decarboxylase/NADP(+)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and NADP(+)-linked glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were not detected. Although the NADPH requirement of penicillin-G-producing chemostat cultures was calculated to be 1.4-1.6-fold higher than that of non-producing cultures, in vitro measured activities of the major NADPH-providing enzymes were the same. Isolated mitochondria showed high rates of antimycin A-sensitive respiration of NADPH, thus indicating the presence of a mitochondrial NADPH dehydrogenase that oxidises cytosolic NADPH. The presence of this enzyme in P. chrysogenum might have important implications for stoichiometric modelling of central carbon metabolism and beta-lactam production and may provide an interesting target for metabolic engineering.

  8. Structural characterization of tartrate dehydrogenase: a versatile enzyme catalyzing multiple reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Radhika; Viola, Ronald E. (Toledo)

    2010-10-28

    The first structure of an NAD-dependent tartrate dehydrogenase (TDH) has been solved to 2 {angstrom} resolution by single anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing as a complex with the intermediate analog oxalate, Mg{sup 2+} and NADH. This TDH structure from Pseudomonas putida has a similar overall fold and domain organization to other structurally characterized members of the hydroxy-acid dehydrogenase family. However, there are considerable differences between TDH and these functionally related enzymes in the regions connecting the core secondary structure and in the relative positioning of important loops and helices. The active site in these complexes is highly ordered, allowing the identification of the substrate-binding and cofactor-binding groups and the ligands to the metal ions. Residues from the adjacent subunit are involved in both the substrate and divalent metal ion binding sites, establishing a dimer as the functional unit and providing structural support for an alternating-site reaction mechanism. The divalent metal ion plays a prominent role in substrate binding and orientation, together with several active-site arginines. Functional groups from both subunits form the cofactor-binding site and the ammonium ion aids in the orientation of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. A lysyl amino group (Lys192) is the base responsible for the water-mediated proton abstraction from the C2 hydroxyl group of the substrate that begins the catalytic reaction, followed by hydride transfer to NAD. A tyrosyl hydroxyl group (Tyr141) functions as a general acid to protonate the enolate intermediate. Each substrate undergoes the initial hydride transfer, but differences in substrate orientation are proposed to account for the different reactions catalyzed by TDH.

  9. Triiodothyronine (T3)-associated upregulation and downregulation of nuclear T3 binding in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5)--stimulation of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase by insulin, but not by T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The specific nuclear binding of triiodothyronine (T3) (NBT3) and the activity of malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6PGD) were studied in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5). The overall apparent binding affinity (Ka) was 2.7 x 10(9) L...

  10. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  11. The separate roles of PQQ and apo-enzyme syntheses in the regulation of glucose dehydrogenase activity in Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTC 418.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, R W; Herman, P T; Postma, P W; Tempest, D W; Neijssel, O M

    1989-01-01

    No holoenzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and only very low apoenzyme levels could be detected in cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae, growing anaerobically, or carrying out a fumarate or nitrate respiration. Low glucose dehydrogenase activity in some aerobic glucose-excess cultures of K. pneumoniae (ammonia or sulphate limitation) was increased significantly by addition of PQQ, whereas in cells already possessing a high glucose dehydrogenase activity (phosphate or potassium limitation) extra PQQ had almost no effect. These observations indicate that the glucose dehydrogenase activity in K. pneumoniae is modulated by both PQQ synthesis and synthesis of the glucose dehydrogenase apo-enzyme.

  12. Enzymatic conversion of CO2 to CH3OH via reverse dehydrogenase cascade biocatalysis: Quantitative comparison of efficiencies of immobilized enzyme systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marpani, Fauziah Binti; Pinelo, Manuel; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    A designed biocatalytic cascade system based on reverse enzymatic catalysis by formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.46), and alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) can convert carbon dioxide (CO2) to methanol (CH3OH) via formation of formic acid (CHOOH...... the reaction warrants innovative development. There is a particular need for development of i) better enzymes; ii) improved understanding of enzyme structure function aspects of reverse catalysis by dehydrogenases, iii) quantitative kinetic models of the enzymatic cascade reaction during simultaneous cofactor...

  13. Geraniol dehydrogenase, the key enzyme in biosynthesis of the alarm pheromone, from the astigmatid mite Carpoglyphus lactis (Acari: Carpoglyphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noge, Koji; Kato, Makiko; Mori, Naoki; Kataoka, Michihiko; Tanaka, Chihiro; Yamasue, Yuji; Nishida, Ritsuo; Kuwahara, Yasumasa

    2008-06-01

    Geraniol dehydrogenase (GeDH), which plays an important role in the biosynthesis of neral, an alarm pheromone, was purified from the astigmatid mite Carpoglyphus lactis. The enzyme was obtained in an apparently homogeneous and active form after 1879-fold purification through seven steps of chromatography. Car. lactis GeDH was determined to be a monomer in its active form with a relative molecular mass of 42 800, which is a unique subunit structure in comparison with already established alcohol dehydrogenases. Car. lactis GeDH oxidized geraniol into geranial in the presence of NAD+. NADP+ was ineffective as a cofactor, suggesting that Car. lactis GeDH is an NAD+-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase. The optimal pH and temperature for geraniol oxidation were determined to be pH 9.0 and 25 degrees C, respectively. The Km values for geraniol and NAD+ were 51.0 microm and 59.5 microm, respectively. Car. lactis GeDH was shown to selectively oxidize geraniol, whereas its geometrical isomer, nerol, was inert as a substrate. The high specificity for geraniol suggests that Car. lactis GeDH specializes in the alarm pheromone biosynthesis of Car. lactis. Car. lactis GeDH is composed of 378 amino acids. Structurally, Car. lactis GeDH showed homology with zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases found in mammals and a mosquito (36.6-37.6% identical), and the enzyme was considered to be a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, in view of the highly conserved sequences of zinc-binding and NAD+-binding sites. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Car. lactis GeDH could be categorized as a new class, different from other established alcohol dehydrogenases.

  14. Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase is a secreted enzyme that confers resistance to H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girinathan, Brintha Prasummanna; Braun, Sterling E; Govind, Revathi

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile produces an NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), which converts l-glutamate into α-ketoglutarate through an irreversible reaction. The enzyme GDH is detected in the stool samples of patients with C. difficile-associated disease and serves as one of the diagnostic tools to detect C. difficile infection (CDI). We demonstrate here that supernatant fluids of C. difficile cultures contain GDH. To understand the role of GDH in the physiology of C. difficile, an isogenic insertional mutant of gluD was created in strain JIR8094. The mutant failed to produce and secrete GDH as shown by Western blot analysis. Various phenotypic assays were performed to understand the importance of GDH in C. difficile physiology. In TY (tryptose yeast extract) medium, the gluD mutant grew slower than the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the growth defect in TY medium. The presence of extracellular GDH may have a functional role in the pathogenesis of CDI. In support of this assumption we found higher sensitivity to H2O2 in the gluD mutant as compared to the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the H2O2 sensitivity.

  15. Polyol specificity of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana sorbitol dehydrogenase studied by enzyme kinetics and in silico modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Francisca eAguayo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyols are enzymatically-produced plant compounds which can act as compatible solutes during periods of abiotic stress. NAD+-dependent SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, E.C. 1.1.1.14 from Arabidopsis thaliana L. (AtSDH is capable of oxidizing several polyols including sorbitol, ribitol and xylitol. In the present study, enzymatic assays using recombinant AtSDH demonstrated a higher specificity constant for xylitol compared to sorbitol and ribitol, all of which are C2 (S and C4 (R polyols. Enzyme activity was reduced by preincubation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, indicating a requirement for zinc ions. In humans, it has been proposed that sorbitol becomes part of a pentahedric coordination sphere of the catalytic zinc during the reaction mechanism. In order to determine the validity of this pentahedric coordination model in a plant SDH, homology modeling and Molecular Dynamics simulations of AtSDH ternary complexes with the three polyols were performed using crystal structures of human and Bemisia argentifolii (Genn. (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae SDHs as scaffolds. The results indicate that the differences in interaction with structural water molecules correlate very well with the observed enzymatic parameters, validate the proposed pentahedric coordination of the catalytic zinc ion in a plant SDH, and provide an explanation for why AtSDH shows a preference for polyols with a chirality of C2 (S and C4 (R.

  16. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  17. Antimalarial activity of potential inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase enzyme selected by docking studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Penna-Coutinho

    Full Text Available The Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (PfLDH has been considered as a potential molecular target for antimalarials due to this parasite's dependence on glycolysis for energy production. Because the LDH enzymes found in P. vivax, P. malariae and P. ovale (pLDH all exhibit ∼90% identity to PfLDH, it would be desirable to have new anti-pLDH drugs, particularly ones that are effective against P. falciparum, the most virulent species of human malaria. Our present work used docking studies to select potential inhibitors of pLDH, which were then tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum in vitro and P. berghei malaria in mice. A virtual screening in DrugBank for analogs of NADH (an essential cofactor to pLDH and computational studies were undertaken, and the potential binding of the selected compounds to the PfLDH active site was analyzed using Molegro Virtual Docker software. Fifty compounds were selected based on their similarity to NADH. The compounds with the best binding energies (itraconazole, atorvastatin and posaconazole were tested against P. falciparum chloroquine-resistant blood parasites. All three compounds proved to be active in two immunoenzymatic assays performed in parallel using monoclonals specific to PfLDH or a histidine rich protein (HRP2. The IC(50 values for each drug in both tests were similar, were lowest for posaconazole (<5 µM and were 40- and 100-fold less active than chloroquine. The compounds reduced P. berghei parasitemia in treated mice, in comparison to untreated controls; itraconazole was the least active compound. The results of these activity trials confirmed that molecular docking studies are an important strategy for discovering new antimalarial drugs. This approach is more practical and less expensive than discovering novel compounds that require studies on human toxicology, since these compounds are already commercially available and thus approved for human use.

  18. Determination of the inhibitory effect of green tea extract on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase based on multilayer capillary enzyme microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yujia; Yang, Jiqing; Yang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Natural herbal medicines are an important source of enzyme inhibitors for the discovery of new drugs. A number of natural extracts such as green tea have been used in prevention and treatment of diseases due to their low-cost, low toxicity and good performance. The present study reports an online assay of the activity and inhibition of the green tea extract of the Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using multilayer capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme microreactors (CE-IMERs). The multilayer CE-IMERs were produced with layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly, which can easily enhance the enzyme loading capacity of the microreactor. The activity of the G6PDH enzyme was determined and the enzyme inhibition by the inhibitors from green tea extract was investigated using online assay of the multilayer CE-IMERs. The Michaelis constant (Km ) of the enzyme, the IC50 and Ki values of the inhibitors were achieved and found to agree with those obtained using offline assays. The results show a competitive inhibition of green tea extract on the G6PDH enzyme. The present study provides an efficient and easy-to-operate approach for determining G6PDH enzyme reaction and the inhibition of green tea extract, which may be beneficial in research and the development of natural herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. On-plate enzyme and inhibition assay of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miaomiao; Mohamed, Amara Camara; Wang, Shengtian; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    We performed on-plate enzyme and inhibition assays of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase using thin-layer chromatography. The assays were accomplished based on different retardation factors of the substrates, enzyme, and products. All the necessary steps were integrated on-plate in one developing process, including substrate/enzyme mixing, reaction starting, and quenching as well as product separation. In order to quantitatively measure the enzyme reaction, the developed plate was then densitometrically evaluated to determine the peak area of the product. Rapid and high-throughput assays were achieved by loading different substrate spots and/or enzyme (and inhibition) spots in different tracks on the plate. The on-plate enzyme assay could be finished in a developing time of only 4 min, with good track-to-track and plate-to-plate repeatability. Moreover, we determined the Km values of the enzyme reaction and Ki values of the inhibition (Pb(2+) Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) as inhibitors), as well as the corresponding kinetics using the on-plate assay. Taken together, our method expanded the application of thin-layer chromatography in enzyme assays, and it could be potentially used in research fields for rapid and quantitative measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Estrogen modification of human glutamate dehydrogenases is linked to enzyme activation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borompokas, Nikolas; Papachatzaki, Maria-Martha; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Zaganas, Ioannis; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-10-08

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a housekeeping enzyme central to the metabolism of glutamate. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP (IC(50) = 0.1-0.3 μM) and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell in ATP. Estrogens are also known to inhibit mammalian GDH, but at relatively high concentrations. Because, in addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired via a duplication event an hGDH2 isoform expressed in human cortical astrocytes, we tested here the interaction of estrogens with the two human isoenzymes. The results showed that, under base-line conditions, diethylstilbestrol potently inhibited hGDH2 (IC(50) = 0.08 ± 0.01 μM) and with ∼18-fold lower affinity hGDH1 (IC(50) = 1.67 ± 0.06 μM; p < 0.001). Similarly, 17β-estradiol showed a ∼18-fold higher affinity for hGDH2 (IC(50) = 1.53 ± 0.24 μM) than for hGDH1 (IC(50) = 26.94 ± 1.07 μM; p < 0.001). Also, estriol and progesterone were more potent inhibitors of hGDH2 than hGDH1. Structure/function analyses revealed that the evolutionary R443S substitution, which confers low basal activity, was largely responsible for sensitivity of hGDH2 to estrogens. Inhibition of both human GDHs by estrogens was inversely related to their state of activation induced by ADP, with the slope of this correlation being steeper for hGDH2 than for hGDH1. Also, the study of hGDH1 and hGDH2 mutants displaying different states of activation revealed that the affinity of estrogen for these enzymes correlated inversely (R = 0.99; p = 0.0001) with basal catalytic activity. Because astrocytes are known to synthesize estrogens, these hormones, by interacting potently with hGDH2 in its closed state, may contribute to regulation of glutamate metabolism in brain.

  1. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yong Q

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the dietary essential amino acids, the most severely limiting in the cereals is lysine. Since cereals make up half of the human diet, lysine limitation has quality/nutritional consequences. The breakdown of lysine is controlled mainly by the catabolic bifunctional enzyme lysine ketoglutarate reductase - saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH. The LKR/SDH gene has been reported to produce transcripts for the bifunctional enzyme and separate monofunctional transcripts. In addition to lysine metabolism, this gene has been implicated in a number of metabolic and developmental pathways, which along with its production of multiple transcript types and complex exon/intron structure suggest an important node in plant metabolism. Understanding more about the LKR/SDH gene is thus interesting both from applied standpoint and for basic plant metabolism. Results The current report describes a wheat genomic fragment containing an LKR/SDH gene and adjacent genes. The wheat LKR/SDH genomic segment was found to originate from the A-genome of wheat, and EST analysis indicates all three LKR/SDH genes in hexaploid wheat are transcriptionally active. A comparison of a set of plant LKR/SDH genes suggests regions of greater sequence conservation likely related to critical enzymatic functions and metabolic controls. Although most plants contain only a single LKR/SDH gene per genome, poplar contains at least two functional bifunctional genes in addition to a monofunctional LKR gene. Analysis of ESTs finds evidence for monofunctional LKR transcripts in switchgrass, and monofunctional SDH transcripts in wheat, Brachypodium, and poplar. Conclusions The analysis of a wheat LKR/SDH gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes show lineage-specific differences between monocots and dicots, and

  2. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  3. Determining structure and function of steroid dehydrogenase enzymes by sequence analysis, homology modeling, and rational mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duax, William L; Thomas, James; Pletnev, Vladimir; Addlagatta, Anthony; Huether, Robert; Habegger, Lukas; Weeks, Charles M

    2005-12-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, approximately 300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of approximately 40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown and to determine their three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30-40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including cofactor preference, catalytic residues, and substrate specificity. Human type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3beta-HSDI) has 30% sequence identity with a human UDP galactose 4-epimerase (UDPGE), a SCOR family enzyme for which an X-ray structure has been reported. Both UDPGE and 3-HSDI appear to trace their origins back to bacterial 3alpha,20beta-HSD. Combining three-dimensional structural information and sequence data on the 3alpha,20beta-HSD, UDPGE, and 3beta-HSDI subfamilies with mutational analysis, we were able to identify the residues critical to the dehydrogenase function of 3-HSDI. We also identified the residues most probably responsible for the isomerase activity of 3beta-HSDI. We test our predictions by specific mutations based on sequence analysis and our structure-based model.

  4. Arsenite release on enzymic transformation of arsonomethyl substrate analogues: a potentially lethal synthesis by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutenda, E K; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1995-09-15

    The isosteric arsenical analogue of glycerol 3-phosphate, 3,4-dihydroxybutylarsonic acid, is a good substrate for rabbit muscle glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Its oxidation is accompanied by release of arsenite. This release seems to be due to a spontaneous elimination of arsenite by 3-oxoalkylarsonic acids, as it is also observed in (1) the oxidation of 3-hydroxypropylarsonic acid by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, (2) treatment of 3,4-dihydroxybutylarsonic acid with periodate and (3) nonenzymic transamination of the glutamate analogue 2-amino-4-arsonobutyric acid. Enzymic formation of 3-oxoalkylarsonic acids in cells can therefore be lethal, as arsenite is poisonous to most organisms because of its high affinity for dithiols such as dihydrolipoyl groups.

  5. Analysis of Enzyme Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3 Gene Polymorphism of Alcoholics and Non-Alcoholics in Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Suhartini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is an addictive substance that is often misused worldwide, including in Indonesia. Ninety percent of the alcohol that enters the body will be metabolized in the liver using the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH enzyme. It is important to determine the activity of ADH enzyme and ADH3 gene polymorphism on alcoholics and non-alcoholics in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The aim of the study is  to determine ADH activity and identify ADH3 gene polymorphism of alcoholics and non-alcoholics in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. This study was an observational study with a cross-sectional design method. Blood samples were taken from 71 Javanese alcoholics and 71 non-alcoholics of Javanese descent in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The participants were initially requested to sign an informed consent form. Examination of ADH enzyme activity used the spectrophotometry method and ADH3 gene polymorphism was assessed with PCR-RFLP using Ssp I restriction enzyme. The activity of ADH enzyme in all individuals appeared to be a slower type. The average of the ethanol value of alcoholics and non-alcoholics were 0.05554 mM and 0.0758 mM respectively. Gene type of alcoholics were ADH3*2(75.4%, ADH3*1/3*2(21.5%, and ADH3*1(3.1%, and non-alcoholics were ADH3*2(88.6%, ADH3*1/3*2(10.0%, and ADH3*1(1.4%. There were no significant differences between the activity of ADH with polymorphism of ADH3 gene in either alcoholics and non-alcoholics (p>0,05. Conclusion: The activity of ADH enzyme in all participants appeared to be a slower type. Most of the ADH3 gene polymorphism of alcoholics and non-alcoholics were both ADH3*2 (75.4% and 88.6%. There was no differences of ADH enzyme activity with ADH3 gene polymorphism between alcoholics and non-alcoholics of Javanese population in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

  6. Five Fatty Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Enzymes from Marinobacter and Acinetobacter spp. and Structural Insights into the Aldehyde Binding Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jonathan H; Mulliner, Kalene M; Shi, Ke; Plunkett, Mary H; Nixon, Peter; Serratore, Nicholas A; Douglas, Christopher J; Aihara, Hideki; Barney, Brett M

    2017-06-15

    Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism play an important role in energy conversion and storage and in the function of structural components such as cell membranes. The fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAldDH) plays a central function in the metabolism of lipid intermediates, oxidizing fatty aldehydes to the corresponding fatty acid and competing with pathways that would further reduce the fatty aldehydes to fatty alcohols or require the fatty aldehydes to produce alkanes. In this report, the genes for four putative FAldDH enzymes from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 and an additional enzyme from Acinetobacter baylyi were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to display FAldDH activity. Five enzymes (Maqu_0438, Maqu_3316, Maqu_3410, Maqu_3572, and the enzyme reported under RefSeq accession no. WP_004927398) were found to act on aldehydes ranging from acetaldehyde to hexadecanal and also acted on the unsaturated long-chain palmitoleyl and oleyl aldehydes. A comparison of the specificities of these enzymes with various aldehydes is presented. Crystallization trials yielded diffraction-quality crystals of one particular FAldDH (Maqu_3316) from M. aquaeolei VT8. Crystals were independently treated with both the NAD(+) cofactor and the aldehyde substrate decanal, revealing specific details of the likely substrate binding pocket for this class of enzymes. A likely model for how catalysis by the enzyme is accomplished is also provided.IMPORTANCE This study provides a comparison of multiple enzymes with the ability to oxidize fatty aldehydes to fatty acids and provides a likely picture of how the fatty aldehyde and NAD(+) are bound to the enzyme to facilitate catalysis. Based on the information obtained from this structural analysis and comparisons of specificities for the five enzymes that were characterized, correlations to the potential roles played by specific residues within the structure may be drawn. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  7. Transcription analysis of pyranose dehydrogenase from the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus and characterization of the recombinantly expressed enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonaus, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    Agaricus bisporus is a litter degrading basidiomycete commonly found in humic-rich environments. It is used as model organism and cultivated in large scale for food industry. Due to its ecological niche it produces a variety of enzymes for detoxification and degradation of humified plant litter. One of these, pyranose dehydrogenase, is thought to play a role in detoxification and lignocellulose degradation. It is a member of the glucose-methanol-choline family of flavin-dependent enzymes and oxidizes a wide range of sugars with concomitant reduction of electron acceptors like quinones. In this work, transcription of pdh in A. bisporus was investigated with real-time PCR revealing influence of the carbon source on pdh expression levels. The gene was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed a higher affinity towards disaccharides compared to other tested pyranose dehydrogenases from related Agariceae. Homology modeling and sequence alignments indicated that two loops of high sequence variability at substrate access site could play an important role in modulating these substrate specificities.

  8. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses.

  9. Expression of Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase Enzymes in Mucosal Dendritic Cells and Gut-Draining Lymph Node Stromal Cells Is Controlled by Dietary Vitamin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Molenaar; M. van Knippenberg; G. Goverse; B.J. Olivier; A.F. de Vos; T. O'Toole; R.E. Mebius

    2011-01-01

    The vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) plays a crucial role in mucosal immune responses. We demonstrate in this study that RA-producing retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH) enzymes are postnatally induced in mesenteric lymph node (MLN) dendritic cells (DCs) and MLN stromal cells. RALDH enzyme ac

  10. Radiation-induced enzyme efflux from rat heart: sedentary animals. [Gamma radiation, lactate dehydrogenase, creative kinase, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacWilliam, L.D.; Bhakthan, N.M.G.

    1976-01-01

    Serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase show initial elevations within 12 hr of exposure to 2,000 rads of ..gamma..-radiation to the thoracic region of rats. Significant decreases in heart muscle homogenate levels of these enzymes parallel initial elevations in the serum and may suggest that enhanced leakage of enzymes is a consequence of radiation injury to heart muscle. Insignificant alterations in mitochondrial glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase levels after exposure indicate that in vivo injury to the mitochondria from therapeutic levels of ..gamma..-radiation is questionable. The results support the contention that ionizing radiation instigates alterations in the dynamic permeability of membranes, allowing leakage of biologically active material out of the injured cell.

  11. Cloning, sequencing and functional expression of cytosolic malate dehydrogenase from Taenia solium: Purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P; Bobes, Raúl; Carrero, Julio C; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Enriquez-Flores, Sergio; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Plancarte, Agustín

    2011-07-01

    We report herein the complete coding sequence of a Taenia solium cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (TscMDH). The cDNA fragment, identified from the T. solium genome project database, encodes a protein of 332 amino acid residues with an estimated molecular weight of 36517Da. For recombinant expression, the full length coding sequence was cloned into pET23a. After successful expression and enzyme purification, isoelectrofocusing gel electrophoresis allowed to confirm the calculated pI value at 8.1, as deduced from the amino acid sequence. The recombinant protein (r-TscMDH) showed MDH activity of 409U/mg in the reduction of oxaloacetate, with neither lactate dehydrogenase activity nor NADPH selectivity. Optimum pH for enzyme activity was 7.6 for oxaloacetate reduction and 9.6 for malate oxidation. K(cat) values for oxaloacetate, malate, NAD, and NADH were 665, 47, 385, and 962s(-1), respectively. Additionally, a partial characterization of TsMDH gene structure after analysis of a 1.56Kb genomic contig assembly is also reported.

  12. Analysis of Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase N-glycosylation sites and performance of partially non-glycosylated enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonaus, Christoph; Maresch, Daniel; Schropp, Katharina; Ó Conghaile, Peter; Leech, Dónal; Gorton, Lo; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2017-04-01

    Pyranose Dehydrogenase 1 from the basidiomycete Agaricus meleagris (AmPDH1) is an oxidoreductase capable of oxidizing a broad variety of sugars. Due to this and its ability of dioxidation of substrates and no side production of hydrogen peroxide, it is studied for use in enzymatic bio-fuel cells. In-vitro deglycosylated AmPDH1 as well as knock-out mutants of the N-glycosylation sites N(75) and N(175), near the active site entrance, were previously shown to improve achievable current densities of graphite electrodes modified with AmPDH1 and an osmium redox polymer acting as a redox mediator, up to 10-fold. For a better understanding of the role of N-glycosylation of AmPDH1, a systematic set of N-glycosylation site mutants was investigated in this work, regarding expression efficiency, enzyme activity and stability. Furthermore, the site specific extend of N-glycosylation was compared between native and recombinant wild type AmPDH1. Knocking out the site N(252) prevented the attachment of significantly extended N-glycan structures as detected on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but did not significantly alter enzyme performance on modified electrodes. This suggests that not the molecule size but other factors like accessibility of the active site improved performance of deglycosylated AmPDH1/osmium redox polymer modified electrodes. A fourth N-glycosylation site of AmPDH1 could be confirmed by mass spectrometry at N(319), which appeared to be conserved in related fungal pyranose dehydrogenases but not in other members of the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase structural family. This site was shown to be the only one that is essential for functional recombinant expression of the enzyme.

  13. Leflunomide induces NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 enzyme via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Amrit Kumar; Patel, Ananddeep; Menon, Renuka T; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2017-03-25

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been increasingly recognized to play a crucial role in normal physiological homeostasis. Additionally, disrupted AhR signaling leads to several pathological states in the lung and liver. AhR activation transcriptionally induces detoxifying enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1). The toxicity profiles of the classical AhR ligands such as 3-methylcholanthrene and dioxins limit their use as a therapeutic agent in humans. Hence, there is a need to identify nontoxic AhR ligands to develop AhR as a clinically relevant druggable target. Recently, we demonstrated that leflunomide, a FDA approved drug, used to treat rheumatoid arthritis in humans, induces CYP1A enzymes in adult mice via the AhR. However, the mechanisms by which this drug induces NQO1 in vivo are unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that leflunomide will induce pulmonary and hepatic NQO1 enzyme in neonatal mice via AhR-dependent mechanism(s). Leflunomide elicited significant induction of pulmonary CYP1A1 and NQO1 expression in neonatal mice. Interestingly, the dose at which leflunomide increased NQO1 was significantly higher than that required to induce CYP1A1 enzyme. Likewise, it also enhanced hepatic CYP1A1, 1A2 and NQO1 expression in WT mice. In contrast, leflunomide failed to induce these enzymes in AhR-null mice. Our results indicate that leflunomide induces pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A and NQO1 enzymes via the AhR in neonatal mice. These findings have important implications to prevent and/or treat disorders such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia in human infants where AhR may play a crucial role in the disease pathogenesis.

  14. The crystal structure of Lactococcus lactis dihydroorotate dehydrogenase A complexed with the enzyme reaction product throws light on its enzymatic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowland, Paul; Bjørnberg, Olof; Nielsen, Finn S.

    1998-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODs) catalyze the oxidation of (S)-dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. A description is given of the crystal structure of Lactococcus lactis dihydroorotate dehydrogenase A (DHODA......) complexed with the product of the enzyme reaction orotate. The structure of the complex to 2.0 A resolution has been compared with the structure of the native enzyme. The active site of DHODA is known to contain a water filled cavity buried beneath a highly conserved and flexible loop. In the complex...

  15. The crystal structure of Lactococcus lactis dihydroorotate dehydrogenase A complexed with the enzyme reaction product throws light on its enzymatic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowland, Paul; Bjørnberg, Olof; Nielsen, Finn S.

    1998-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODs) catalyze the oxidation of (S)-dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. A description is given of the crystal structure of Lactococcus lactis dihydroorotate dehydrogenase A (DHODA......) complexed with the product of the enzyme reaction orotate. The structure of the complex to 2.0 A resolution has been compared with the structure of the native enzyme. The active site of DHODA is known to contain a water filled cavity buried beneath a highly conserved and flexible loop. In the complex...

  16. Analysis of lactate and malate dehydrogenase enzyme profiles of selected major carps of wetland of Calcutta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Priyanka

    2012-07-01

    The East Calcutta Wetland (ECW), a Ramsar site in India, acts as the only sink for both city sewages as well as effluents from the surrounding small-scale industries and is alarmingly polluted with heavy metals. The three best edible major carp species rohu (Labeo rohita,), catla (Catla catla,) and mrigala (Cirrhinus mrigala) were undertaken to monitor lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) by cellulose acetate electrophoresis (CAE) to assess the effects of pollutants, if any. Crude tissue extracts were prepared from brain, eye, heart, skeletal muscle and kidney tissue respectively from each type of fish. No differences were not found in MDH of catla from both sites for all tissues analyzed in this study. Rohu also showed similar mobility for all tissues except for heart tissue which was distinctly different in fishes from ECW site than that of its counterpart from non ECW site. On the other hand, MDH of two tissues of mrigala, eye and muscle respectively showed different migration patterns. LDH profiles for all tissues of three fish species from both the sites were consistently similar, only the expression levels of muscle LDH of mrigala and kidney LDH of rohu varied little.

  17. Action of metadoxine on isolated human and rat alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Effect on enzymes in chronic ethanol-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés, X; Moreno, A; Peralba, J M; Font, M; Bruseghini, L; Esteras, A

    1991-01-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to accelerate ethanol metabolism. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on the activities of isolated alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases from rat and man, and on the activity of these enzymes in chronic ethanol-fed rats. Our results indicate that in vitro metadoxine does not activate any of the enzymatic forms of alcohol dehydrogenase (classes I and II) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (low-Km and high-Km, cytosolic and mitochondrial). At concentrations higher than 0.1 mM, metadoxine inhibits rat class II alcohol dehydrogenase, although this would probably not affect the physiological ethanol metabolism. Chronic ethanol intake for 5 weeks results in a 25% decrease of rat hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) activity as compared with the pair-fed controls. The simultaneous treatment with metadoxine prevents activity loss, suggesting that the positive effect of metadoxine on ethanol metabolism can be explained by the maintenance of normal levels of alcohol dehydrogenase during chronic ethanol intake. No specific effect of chronic exposure to ethanol or to metadoxine was detected on rat aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  18. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  19. Salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase--reversible oxidation of the enzyme and its inhibition by caffeine, investigated using fluorimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchowski, Jacek; Pietrzak, Monika; Szelag, Malgorzata; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2008-05-01

    We have applied fluorimetric method to monitor aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH*) activity in human saliva samples to study inactivation, reactivation and inhibition of the enzyme. Saliva samples were collected to buffer stock solution, containing various thiols, and assayed in the presence of the fluorogenic substrate 6-dimethylamino-2-naphthaldehyde and NAD(+). Fluorescence of the produced 6-dimethylamino-2-naphthalene carboxylate was used to measure the reaction rate. Kinetic parameters for the highly fluorogenic substrate, 6-dimethylamino-2-naphthaldehyde were measured, with apparent K(m) of 7.9 microM at pH 7.3. The apparent K(m) for NAD(+) was 1.2 microM. The observed ALDH activity is unstable in the absence of thiols, but can be stabilized by 1mM glutathione, and inactivated enzyme can be re-activated within 10 min by treatment of 0.5 mM DTT. Two-assay procedure was applied to measure degree of inactivation of ALDH in saliva samples. It was found that degree of ALDH inactivation in fresh samples, stabilized by glutathione, is between 0% and 90%, with average value ca. 40%. Caffeine and theophylline were shown to be moderate inhibitors of salivary ALDH. Oxidation of the salivary ALDH in fresh saliva may be reliably measured using fluorimetric two-assay procedure. Preliminary statistics indicate that in most individuals this enzyme is partially inactive. Inhibition of the salivary ALDH by caffeine may have consequences for nutrition safety.

  20. Impacts of some divalent cations on periplasmic nitrate reductase and dehydrogenase enzymes of Escherichia, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian E. Nwanyanwu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of Hg2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ on the activities of periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP and dehydrogenase (DHA enzymes of three organisms isolated from soil and sediment-water interface were analysed in liquid culture studies. NAP and DHA activities were estimated from nitrite and triphenyl formazan were produced respectively after 4h incubation at 28 ± 2oC. Hg2+ completely inhibited NAP activity in Escherichia and Pseudomonas spp at all the concentrations (0.2 – 1mM while progressive inhibitions of NAP activity were observed in Escherichia and Pseudomonas spp with increasing concentrations of Zn2+ and Cd2+. Both metals were stimulatory to NAP of Acinetobacter sp at 0.2 – 1mM. Apart from stimulation of DHA activity by Zn2+ (0.2 – 1mM in Escherichia sp, Cd2+ (0.4 -1.0mM in Acinetobacter sp and (1.0mM in Pseudomonas sp, all the metals progressively inhibited DHA activities in the three organisms. In Escherichia sp, the activities of the two enzymes were negatively correlated on exposure to Zn2+ (r = -0.91 and positively correlated (r = >0.90 on exposure to Cd2+ and Hg2+. Based on IC50 values of the metals for the DHA and NAP enzymes, the most resistant of the three organisms were Escherichia sp and Acinetobacter sp respectively. Quantitatively, NAP with its lower IC50 values than DHA was a more sensitive toxicity measure for Hg2+ in all the organisms. The sensitivity of microbial metabolic enzymes to the toxic effects of metals varies with the type of enzyme, metal and the microorganism involved.

  1. Chloroplast NDH: A different enzyme with a structure similar to that of respiratory NADH dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Eleven genes encoding chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex have been discovered in plastid genomes on the basis of their homology with genes encoding respiratory complex I. Despite this structural similarity, chloroplast NDH and its evolutionary origin NDH-1 in cyanobacteria accept electrons from ferredoxin (Fd), indicating that chloroplast NDH is an Fd-dependent plastoquinone (PQ) reductase rather than an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase. In Arabidopsis thaliana, chloroplast NDH interacts with photosystem I (PSI); this interaction is needed to stabilize NDH, especially under high light. On the basis of these distinct characters of chloroplast and cyanobacterial NDH, it can be distinguished as a photosynthetic NDH from respiratory complex I. In fact, chloroplast NDH forms part of the machinery of photosynthesis by mediating the minor pathway of PSI cyclic electron transport. Along with the antimycin A-sensitive main pathway of PSI cyclic electron transport, chloroplast NDH compensates the ATP/NADPH production ratio in the light reactions of photosynthesis. In this review, I revisit the original concept of chloroplast NDH on the basis of its similarity to respiratory complex I and thus introduce current progress in the field to researchers focusing on respiratory complex I. I summarize recent progress on the basis of structure and function. Finally, I introduce the results of our examination of the process of assembly of chloroplast NDH. Although the process requires many plant-specific non-subunit factors, the core processes of assembly are conserved between chloroplast NDH and respiratory complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  3. Immunological response and protection of mice immunized with plasmid encoding Toxoplasma gondii glycolytic enzyme malate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, I A; Wang, S; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; XiangRui, L

    2014-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii Malate dehydrogenase (TgMDH) plays an important role as part of the energy production cycle. In this investigation, immunological changes and protection efficiency of this protein delivered as a DNA vaccine have been evaluated. Mice were intramuscularly immunized with pTgMDH, followed by challenge with virulent T. gondii RH strain, 2 weeks after the booster immunization. Compared to the control groups, the results showed that pTgMDH has stimulated specific humoral response as demonstrated by significant high titers of total IgG and subclasses IgG1 and IgG2a , beside IgA and IgM, but not IgE. Analysis of cytokine profiles revealed significant increases of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17, while no significant changes were detected in TGF-β1. In cell-mediated response, both T lymphocytes subpopulations CD4(+) and CD8(+) were positively recruited as significant percentages were recorded in response to immunization with TgMDH. Significant long survival rate, 17 days, has been observed in the TgMDH vaccinated group, in contrast with control groups which died within 8-9 days after challenge. These results demonstrated that TgMDH could induce significant immunological responses leading to a considerable level of protection against acute toxoplasmosis infection.

  4. Functional expression of a fragment of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by means of the baculovirus expression vector system, and kinetic investigation of the purified recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, W; Bergjohann, U; Gonski, S; Kirschbaum, B; Löffler, M

    1996-08-15

    Human mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis) has been overproduced by means of a recombinant baculovirus that contained the human cDNA fragment for this protein. After virus infection and protein expression in Trichoplusia ni cells (BTI-Tn-5B1-4), the subcellular distribution of the recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was determined by two distinct enzyme-activity assays and by Western blot analysis with anti-(dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) Ig. The targeting of the recombinant protein to the mitochondria of the insect cells was verified. The activity of the recombinant enzyme in the mitochondria of infected cells was about 740-fold above the level of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in human liver mitochondria. In a three-step procedure, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was purified to a specific activity of greater than 50 U/mg. Size-exclusion chromatography showed a molecular mass of 42 kDa and confirmed the existence of the fully active enzyme as a monomeric species. Fluorimetric cofactor analysis revealed the presence of FMN in recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. By kinetics analysis, Km values for dihydroorotate and ubiquinone-50 were found to be 4 microM and 9.9 microM, respectively, while Km values for dihydroorotate and decylubiquinone were 9.4 microM and 13.7 microM, respectively. The applied expression system will allow preparation of large quantities of the enzyme for structure and function studies. Purified recombinant human dihytdroorotate dehydrogenase was tested for its sensitivity to a reported inhibitor A77 1726 (2-hydroxyethyliden-cyanoacetic acid 4-trifluoromethyl anilide), which is the active metabolite of the isoxazole derivative leflunomide [5-methyl-N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide]. An IC50 value of 1 microM was determined for A77 1726. Detailed kinetics experiments revealed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to dihydroorotate (Kiu = 0.94 microM) and non

  5. Electric organ lactate dehydrogenase:physical and kinetic properties of the purified enzyme from Electrophorus electricus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-da Matta, J; da Matta, A N; Hassón-Voloch, A

    1983-04-01

    L(+)lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.) was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. Purified LDH was homogeneous when examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Both LDH activity and protein were demonstrable in the same band. The mobility of the LDH-5 isozyme is characteristic of the muscle type enzyme. Isoelectric focusing showed a single molecular species of pIO 6.5 +/- 0.4. The apparent molecular weight was 140,000 (+/- 10%) on the basis of gel filtration of Sephadex G-200. The effect of organic acids on the enzyme activity towards pyruvate (NADH) and lactate (NAD) was determined spectrophotometrically at 340 nm. Sodium oxamate behaved as a mixed inhibitor when lactate (NAD) was the substrate, whereas ethyl oxamate was an uncompetitive inhibitor. Both the sodium salt and the ester of oxamic acid were competitive inhibitors when pyruvate (NADH) was the substrate.

  6. The X-ray crystal structure of Escherichia coli succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase; structural insights into NADP+/enzyme interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Langendorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH plays an essential role in the metabolism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA to succinic acid (SA. Deficiency of SSADH in humans results in elevated levels of GABA and gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB, which leads to psychomotor retardation, muscular hypotonia, non-progressive ataxia and seizures. In Escherichia coli, two genetically distinct forms of SSADHs had been described that are essential for preventing accumulation of toxic levels of succinic semialdehyde (SSA in cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we structurally characterise SSADH encoded by the E coli gabD gene by X-ray crystallographic studies and compare these data with the structure of human SSADH. In the E. coli SSADH structure, electron density for the complete NADP+ cofactor in the binding sites is clearly evident; these data in particular revealing how the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor is positioned in each active site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our structural data suggest that a deletion of three amino acids in E. coli SSADH permits this enzyme to use NADP+, whereas in contrast the human enzyme utilises NAD+. Furthermore, the structure of E. coli SSADH gives additional insight into human mutations that result in disease.

  7. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes modulate effects of glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin; Straub, Rainer H

    2015-01-01

    The tissue availability of active glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans) depends on their rate of synthesis from cholesterol, downstream metabolism, excretion and interconversion. The latter is mediated by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11βHSDs). In this review, we summarize the features of the two isoenzymes, 11βHSD1 and 11βHSD2, and current available experimental data related to 11βHSDs, which are relevant in the context of synovial cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conclude that due to complex feedback mechanisms inherent to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, currently available transgenic animal models cannot display the full potential otherwise inherent to the techniques. Studies with tissue explants, mixed synovial cell preparations, cell lines derived from synovial cells, and related primary cells or established cell lines indicate that there are relatively clear differences between the two isoenzymes. 11βHSD1 is expressed primarily in fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and may be responsible for fibroblast survival and aid in the resolution of inflammation, but it is also involved in bone damage. 11βHSD2 is expressed primarily in macrophages and lymphocytes, and may be responsible for their survival, suggesting that it is critical in chronic inflammation. The situation in synovial tissue would allow 11βHSD2-expressing cells to tap the energy resources of 11βHSD1-expressing cells. The overall properties of this local glucocorticoid interconversion system might limit therapeutic use of glucocorticoids in RA. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from Mucor mucedo, an enzyme of the sexual hormone pathway: purification, and cloning of the corresponding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czempinski, K; Kruft, V; Wöstemeyer, J; Burmester, A

    1996-09-01

    We have purified the NADP-dependent 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from the zygomycete Mucor mucedo. The enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of trisporic acid, the sexual hormone of zygomycetes, which induces the first steps of zygophore development. Protein was obtained from the (-) mating type of M. mucedo after induction with trisporic acid, and purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography steps. On SDS-PAGE a band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa was ascribed to the enzyme. After transferring onto PVDF membranes the protein was digested with endoprotease Lys-C, and several peptides were sequenced. Oligonucleotides derived from protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic M. mucedo DNA. The PCR fragment was used as probe for isolation of the corresponding cDNA and complete genomic DNA clones. Comparison of protein and DNA sequence data showed that the cloned fragment corresponded to the purified protein. Search for similarity with protein sequences of the Swiss-Prot database revealed a relationship to enzymes belonging to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA with the labelled cloned fragment detected a single-copy gene in both mating types of M. mucedo. PCR with genomic DNA from other zygomycetes gave rise to several fragments. Hybridization analysis with the cloned M. mucedo fragment showed that a fragment of similar length cross-hybridized in Blakeslea trispora (Choanephoraceae) as well as in Parasitella parasitica and Absidia glauca (Mucoraceae). The promoter region of the gene contains DNA elements with similarity to a cAMP-regulated gene of Dictyostelium discoideum.

  9. Reassessment of the transhydrogenase/malate shunt pathway in Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 through kinetic characterization of malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, M; Rydzak, T; Levin, D B; Oresnik, I J; Sparling, R

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium thermocellum produces ethanol as one of its major end products from direct fermentation of cellulosic biomass. Therefore, it is viewed as an attractive model for the production of biofuels via consolidated bioprocessing. However, a better understanding of the metabolic pathways, along with their putative regulation, could lead to improved strategies for increasing the production of ethanol. In the absence of an annotated pyruvate kinase in the genome, alternate means of generating pyruvate have been sought. Previous proteomic and transcriptomic work detected high levels of a malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme, which may be used as part of a malate shunt for the generation of pyruvate from phosphoenolpyruvate. The purification and characterization of the malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme are described in order to elucidate their putative roles in malate shunt and their potential role in C. thermocellum metabolism. The malate dehydrogenase catalyzed the reduction of oxaloacetate to malate utilizing NADH or NADPH with a kcat of 45.8 s(-1) or 14.9 s(-1), respectively, resulting in a 12-fold increase in catalytic efficiency when using NADH over NADPH. The malic enzyme displayed reversible malate decarboxylation activity with a kcat of 520.8 s(-1). The malic enzyme used NADP(+) as a cofactor along with NH4 (+) and Mn(2+) as activators. Pyrophosphate was found to be a potent inhibitor of malic enzyme activity, with a Ki of 0.036 mM. We propose a putative regulatory mechanism of the malate shunt by pyrophosphate and NH4 (+) based on the characterization of the malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme.

  10. cDNA cloning and analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, a salt inducible enzyme in sugar beet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Betaine accumulates and serves as a compatible osmolyte in some plants subjected to drought or salinity stress. The last enzyme in the betaine biosynthetic pathway is betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The activity of BADH increases in response to increasing salinity levels. This increase in activity corresponds to an increase in protein detectable by immunoblotting, and to an increase in the translatable BADH mRNA. BADH was cloned from a cDNA library constructed in {lambda}gt10 using poly(A){sup +} RNA from sugar beets salinized to 500 mM NaCl. cDNAs were size selected (>1kb) before ligation into the vector, and the library was screened with a spinach BADH cDNA probe. Three nearly full length clones obtained were confirmed as BADH by their nucleotide and deduced amino acid homology to spinach BADH. Clones averaged 1.8 kb and contained open reading frames of 500 amino acids at 80% identity with spinach BADH. RNA gel blot analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA indicated that salinization to 500 mM NaCl resulted in a 5-fold increase of BADH mRNA level.

  11. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T; Fernie, Alisdair R; Talla, Sai K; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-02-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C(3) plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck-Halliwell-Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants.

  12. Putative role of the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase in H2O2 signalling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyno, Eiri; Innocenti, Gilles; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2014-04-19

    In photosynthetic organisms, sudden changes in light intensity perturb the photosynthetic electron flow and lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species. At the same time, thioredoxins can sense the redox state of the chloroplast. According to our hypothesis, thioredoxins and related thiol reactive molecules downregulate the activity of H2O2-detoxifying enzymes, and thereby allow a transient oxidative burst that triggers the expression of H2O2 responsive genes. It has been shown recently that upon light stress, catalase activity was reversibly inhibited in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in correlation with a transient increase in the level of H2O2. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking the NADP-malate dehydrogenase have lost the reversible inactivation of catalase activity and the increase in H2O2 levels when exposed to high light. The mutants were slightly affected in growth and accumulated higher levels of NADPH in the chloroplast than the wild-type. We propose that the malate valve plays an essential role in the regulation of catalase activity and the accumulation of a H2O2 signal by transmitting the redox state of the chloroplast to other cell compartments.

  13. Effects and Mechanism of Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Cold Plasma on Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Li, Xu; Ding, Lili; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xia, Weidong; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zelong; Chu, Paul K

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are carriers of biological functions and the effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasmas on proteins are important to applications such as sterilization and plasma-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Herein, we report our detailed investigation of the effects of helium-oxygen non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas on the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme solutions. Circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicate that the loss of activity stems from plasma-induced modification of the secondary molecular structure as well as polymerization of the peptide chains. Raising the treatment intensity leads to a reduced alpha-helix content, increase in the percentage of the beta-sheet regions and random sequence, as well as gradually decreasing LDH activity. However, the structure of the LDH plasma-treated for 300 seconds exhibits a recovery trend after storage for 24 h and its activity also increases slightly. By comparing direct and indirect plasma treatments, plasma-induced LDH inactivation can be attributed to reactive species (RS) in the plasma, especially ones with a long lifetime including hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and nitrate ion which play the major role in the alteration of the macromolecular structure and molecular diameter in lieu of heat, UV radiation, and charged particles.

  14. Effects and Mechanism of Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Cold Plasma on Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Li, Xu; Ding, Lili; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xia, Weidong; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zelong; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    Proteins are carriers of biological functions and the effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasmas on proteins are important to applications such as sterilization and plasma-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Herein, we report our detailed investigation of the effects of helium-oxygen non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas on the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme solutions. Circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicate that the loss of activity stems from plasma-induced modification of the secondary molecular structure as well as polymerization of the peptide chains. Raising the treatment intensity leads to a reduced alpha-helix content, increase in the percentage of the beta-sheet regions and random sequence, as well as gradually decreasing LDH activity. However, the structure of the LDH plasma-treated for 300 seconds exhibits a recovery trend after storage for 24 h and its activity also increases slightly. By comparing direct and indirect plasma treatments, plasma-induced LDH inactivation can be attributed to reactive species (RS) in the plasma, especially ones with a long lifetime including hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and nitrate ion which play the major role in the alteration of the macromolecular structure and molecular diameter in lieu of heat, UV radiation, and charged particles.

  15. The Effect of Multilayer Gold Nanoparticles on the Electrochemical Response of Ammonium Ion Biosensor Based on Alanine Dehydrogenase Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Ling Ling

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of multilayer of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs attached on gold electrode surface via thiol chemistry to fabricate an ammonium (NH4+ ion biosensor based on alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH was investigated. The approach of the study was based on construction of biosensor by direct deposition of AuNPs and 1,8-octanedithiol (C8-DT onto the gold electrode surface. For the immobilisation of enzyme, 2-mercaptoethanol (2BME was first covalently attached to AlaDH via esther bonding and then followed by chemically attached the 2BME-modified AlaDH (2BME-AlaDH moiety onto the AuNPs electrode via the exposed thiol group of 2BME. The resulting biosensor response was examined by means of amperometry for the quantification of NH4+ ion. In the absence of enzyme attachment, the use of three layers of AuNPs was found to improve the electrochemistry of the gold electrode when compared with no AuNPs was coated. However, when more than three layers of AuNPs were coated, the electrode response deteriorated due to excessive deposition of C8-DT. When AlaDH was incoporated into the AuNPs modified electrode, a linear response to NH4+ ion over the concentration range of 0.1–0.5 mM with a detection limit of 0.01 mM was obtained. In the absence of AuNPs, the NH4+ ion biosensor did not exhibit any good linear response range although the current response was observed to be higher. This work demonstrated that the incorporation of AuNPs could lead to the detection of higher NH4+ ion concentration without the need of dilution for high NH4+ ion concentration samples with a rapid response time of <1 min.

  16. 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway of Mucor mucedo: purification, cloning of the corresponding gene, and developmental expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Scheibner, Olaf; Burmester, Anke; Schimek, Christine; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The NADP-dependent 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase is a (-) mating-type-specific enzyme in the pathway from beta-carotene to trisporic acid. This substance and its isomers and derivatives represent the general system of sexual communication in zygomycetes. The (-) mating type of Mucor mucedo was stimulated by trisporic acid and the enzyme was purified by ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Several peptides of the 26-kDa protein, digested with trypsin, were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Oligonucleotides based on protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The primary PCR fragment was sequenced and the complete gene, TSP2, was isolated. A labeled TSP2 hybridization probe detects a single-copy gene in the genome of M. mucedo. Northern blot analysis with RNAs from different growth stages reveals that the expression of the gene depends on the developmental stage of the mycelium in both mating types of M. mucedo. At the enzyme level, activity is found exclusively in the (-) mating type. However, renaturation of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels revealed the TSP2 gene product in both mating types. Analyzing the protein sequence places the enzyme in the short chain dehydrogenase superfamily. Thus, it has an evolutionary origin distinct from that of the previously isolated 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, which belongs to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Apart from the TSP2 genes in the three sequenced zygomycetous genomes (Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Mucor circinelloides), the closest relative is the Myxococcus xanthus CsgA gene product, which is also a short chain dehydrogenase, involved in C signaling and fruiting body formation.

  17. 4-Dihydrotrisporin-Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of the Sex Hormone Pathway of Mucor mucedo: Purification, Cloning of the Corresponding Gene, and Developmental Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Scheibner, Olaf; Burmester, Anke; Schimek, Christine; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The NADP-dependent 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase is a (−) mating-type-specific enzyme in the pathway from β-carotene to trisporic acid. This substance and its isomers and derivatives represent the general system of sexual communication in zygomycetes. The (−) mating type of Mucor mucedo was stimulated by trisporic acid and the enzyme was purified by ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Several peptides of the 26-kDa protein, digested with trypsin, were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Oligonucleotides based on protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The primary PCR fragment was sequenced and the complete gene, TSP2, was isolated. A labeled TSP2 hybridization probe detects a single-copy gene in the genome of M. mucedo. Northern blot analysis with RNAs from different growth stages reveals that the expression of the gene depends on the developmental stage of the mycelium in both mating types of M. mucedo. At the enzyme level, activity is found exclusively in the (−) mating type. However, renaturation of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels revealed the TSP2 gene product in both mating types. Analyzing the protein sequence places the enzyme in the short chain dehydrogenase superfamily. Thus, it has an evolutionary origin distinct from that of the previously isolated 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, which belongs to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Apart from the TSP2 genes in the three sequenced zygomycetous genomes (Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Mucor circinelloides), the closest relative is the Myxococcus xanthus CsgA gene product, which is also a short chain dehydrogenase, involved in C signaling and fruiting body formation. PMID:18931040

  18. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH. We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6 and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  19. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-07

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  20. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high...

  1. Electron transfer from NADH bound to horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD+ dependent dehydrogenase): visualisation of the activity in the enzyme crystals and adsorption of formazan derivatives by these crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud-Mercier, Karine; Blaghen, Mohamed; Lee, Kang Min; Tritsch, Denis; Biellmann, Jean-François

    2007-02-01

    The crystals of holoenzyme from native and cross-linked alcohol dehydrogenase exhibit electron transfer from NADH to phenazinium methosulfate (PMS), and then to the tetrazolium salt sodium 3,3'-{1-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium}-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulfonate (XXT). The slow dissociation of the cofactor and/or the conformational change associated can now be bypassed. The reduction product, formazan, did not diffuse out of the crystals in buffer and the crystals turned colored. In the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide or dimethoxyethane, the formazan diffused out to the solution. The reaction rates were found to be, respectively, 18% and 15% of the redox reaction rate of ethanol with cinnamaldehyde, close to the activity determined for the enzyme in solution in the presence of dimethoxyethane. The use of system PMS-tetrazolium salt is a useful tool to visualize the activity of dehydrogenases and other electron transferring systems in the crystalline state. The adsorption of formazan by the alcohol dehydrogenase crystals occurs in solution.

  2. Human placental glucose dehydrogenase: IEF polymorphism in two Italian populations and enzyme activity in the six common phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchi, R; Corbo, R M; Calzolari, E; Laconi, G; Palmarino, R; Lucarelli, P

    1985-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) has been assayed qualitatively and quantitatively in more than 600 human placentae collected in two Italian populations. The gene frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were, respectively, 0.66, 0.21 and 0.12 in Continental Italy and 0.65, 0.23 and 0.12 in Sardinia. Among the six common phenotypes there was no difference in catalytic activity.

  3. Enzymic synthesis of lignin precursors. Comparison of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol:NADP+ dehydrogenase from spruce (Picea abies L.) and soybean (Glycine max L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, T; Grisebach, H

    1981-09-01

    Cambial sap of spruce (Picea abies) proved to be a good source for isolation of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol:NADP+ dehydrogenase. Apparently homogeneous enzymes were obtained by a multistep procedure including dye-ligand chromatography and for the reductase also affinity chromatography on (coenzyme A)-agarose. An improved purification procedure for the reductase from soybean cell cultures is also reported. Molecular weights and subunit composition of reductase and dehydrogenase from spruce are very similar to those of the corresponding enzymes from soybean. Reduction of feruloyl-CoA to coniferaldehyde catalysed by the reductase is a freely reversible reaction with an equilibrium constant of 5.6 x 10(-4) M at pH 6.25. A strong dependence of the Michaelis constants on the type of buffer was found. For reductase the Km-value of feruloyl-CoA in phosphate buffer (5.2 microM) is about 14-times similar than in citrate buffer (73 microM). Pronounced differences in substrate specificities between the enzymes from spruce and soybean were found, which reflect the different lignin composition of gymnosperms and dicotyledenous angiosperms. From the kinetic constants of the enzymes it can be concluded that under physiological conditions feruloyl-CoA is the preferred substrate for the reductase from both sources whereas sinapoyl-CoA is a substrate only for the soybean reductase and sinapyldehyde a substrate only for the soybean dehydrogenase. 4-Coumaroyl-CoA is a poor substrate for the reductase from both spruce and soybean. This result is consistent with the low content of 4-coumaryl alcohol units in gymnosperm and angiosperm lignin.

  4. Crystal structure of porcine mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase complexed with Mn2+ and isocitrate. Insights into the enzyme mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Christopher; Grodsky, Neil B; Ariyaratne, Nandana; Colman, Roberta F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2002-11-08

    The crystal structure of porcine heart mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) complexed with Mn2+ and isocitrate was solved to a resolution of 1.85 A. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein, and cleaved with thrombin to yield homogeneous enzyme. The structure was determined by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing using selenium substitution in the form of selenomethionine as the anomalous scatterer. The porcine NADP+-IDH enzyme is structurally compared with the previously solved structures of IDH from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis that share 16 and 17% identity, respectively, with the mammalian enzyme. The porcine enzyme has a protein fold similar to the bacterial IDH structures with each monomer folding into two domains. However, considerable differences exist between the bacterial and mammalian forms of IDH in regions connecting core secondary structure. Based on the alignment of sequence and structure among the porcine, E. coli, and B. subtilis IDH, a putative phosphorylation site has been identified for the mammalian enzyme. The active site, including the bound Mn2+-isocitrate complex, is highly ordered and, therefore, mechanistically informative. The consensus IDH mechanism predicts that the Mn2+-bound hydroxyl of isocitrate is deprotonated prior to its NADP+-dependent oxidation. The present crystal structure has an active site water that is well positioned to accept the proton and ultimately transfer the proton to solvent through an additional bound water.

  5. Pronounced between-subject and circadian variability in thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase enzyme activity in human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Bart A W; Deenen, Maarten J; Pluim, Dick; van Hasselt, J G Coen; Krähenbühl, Martin D; van Geel, Robin M J M; de Vries, Niels; Rosing, Hilde; Meulendijks, Didier; Burylo, Artur M; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The enzymatic activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are important for the tolerability and efficacy of the fluoropyrimidine drugs. In the present study, we explored between-subject variability (BSV) and circadian rhythmicity in DPD and TS activity in h

  6. Benzylidenemalononitrile derivatives as substrates and inhibitors of a new NAD(P)H dehydrogenase of erythrocytes. Purification and crystallisation of two forms of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberschär, K H; Kille, S; Laule, G; Maurer, P; Wallenfels, K

    1979-10-01

    Using the powerful lachrymator (2-chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile as electron acceptor, two types of NAD(P)H dehydrogenases have been isolated from human blood. Crystallisation of the homogenous enzymes was performed in 50% polyethylene glycol solution. The enzymes (average molecular weight 18 000) are composed of only one polypeptide chain and have a very similar amino acid composition. B-side stereospecificity was determined with respect to the cofactor by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the reductase. Besides (2-chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile, 2,6-dichloroindophenol, methylene blue, 4-benzoquinone, FMN and FAD are also reduced using NADH or NADPH as hydrogen donor with the rates decreasing in the given order. Reduction of methemoglobin is observed only upon addition of methylene blue, FMN or FAD as carriers. (2-Chlorobenzylidene)malononitrile reduction is inhibited by most of the compounds known to be decouplers of oxidative phosphorylation.

  7. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway in Mucor mucedo, is constitutively transcribed but its activity is differently regulated in (+) and (-) mating types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimek, Christine; Petzold, Annett; Schultze, Kornelia; Wetzel, Jana; Wolschendorf, Frank; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase (TDH) converts the (+) mating type sex pheromone 4-dihydromethyltrisporate into methyltrisporate. In Mucor mucedo, this conversion is required only in the (-) mating type. Expression of the TDH encoding TSP1 gene was analyzed qualitatively using reverse-transcribed PCR. TSP1 is constitutively transcribed in the (+) and in the (-) mating type, irrespective of the mating situation. By immunodetection, the translation product is also formed constitutively. In contrast to gene expression, TDH enzyme activity depends on the sexual status of the mycelium. Activity is restricted to the sexually stimulated (-) mating type. Non-stimulated (-), as well as stimulated and non-stimulated (+) mycelia exhibit no activity and do not influence activity in stimulated (-) mycelia. Time course analysis shows strongly increased enzyme activity at 80 min after stimulation. Low activity exists from the onset of stimulation, indicating that additional regulation mechanisms are involved in TDH function.

  8. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  9. The PduQ enzyme is an alcohol dehydrogenase used to recycle NAD+ internally within the Pdu microcompartment of Salmonella enterica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouqiang Cheng

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica uses a bacterial microcompartment (MCP for coenzyme B(12-dependent 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD utilization (Pdu. The Pdu MCP consists of a protein shell that encapsulates enzymes and cofactors required for metabolizing 1,2-PD as a carbon and energy source. Here we show that the PduQ protein of S. enterica is an iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase used for 1,2-PD catabolism. PduQ is also demonstrated to be a new component of the Pdu MCP. In addition, a series of in vivo and in vitro studies show that a primary function of PduQ is to recycle NADH to NAD(+ internally within the Pdu MCP in order to supply propionaldehyde dehydrogenase (PduP with its required cofactor (NAD(+. Genetic tests determined that a pduQ deletion mutant grew slower than wild-type Salmonella on 1,2-PD and that this phenotype was not complemented by a non-MCP associated Adh2 from Zymomonas that catalyzes the same reaction. This suggests that PduQ has a MCP-specific function. We also found that a pduQ deletion mutant had no growth defect in a genetic background having a second mutation that prevents MCP formation which further supports a MCP-specific role for PduQ. Moreover, studies with purified Pdu MCPs demonstrated that the PduQ enzyme can convert NADH to NAD(+ to supply the PduP reaction in vitro. Cumulatively, these studies show that the PduQ enzyme is used to recycle NADH to NAD(+ internally within the Pdu MCP. To our knowledge, this is the first report of internal recycling as a mechanism for cofactor homeostasis within a bacterial MCP.

  10. 15 Hypoxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.

    1976-01-01

    A review is given on the enzyme 15 hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. The determination, activity, distribution, purification, properties and physiological aspects are discussed. 128 references.......A review is given on the enzyme 15 hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. The determination, activity, distribution, purification, properties and physiological aspects are discussed. 128 references....

  11. Dynamic expression of the retinoic acid-synthesizing enzyme retinol dehydrogenase 10 (rdh10) in the developing mouse brain and sensory organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romand, Raymond; Kondo, Takako; Cammas, Laura; Hashino, Eri; Dollé, Pascal

    2008-06-20

    Organs develop through many tissue interactions during embryogenesis, involving numerous signaling cascades and gene products. One of these signaling molecules is retinoic acid (RA), an active vitamin A derivative, which in mammalian embryos is synthesized from maternal retinol by two oxidative reactions involving alcohol/retinol dehydrogenases (ADH/RDHs) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDHs), respectively. The activity of RALDHs is known to be crucial for RA synthesis; however, recently a retinol dehydrogenase (RDH10) has been shown to represent a new limiting factor in this synthesis. We investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of Rdh10 gene transcripts by in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) during development of the brain and sensory organs. Although Rdh10 relative mRNA levels decline throughout brain development, we show a strong and lasting expression in the meninges and choroid plexuses. Rdh10 expression is also specifically seen in the striatum, a known site of retinoid signaling. In the eye, regional expression is observed both in the prospective pigmented epithelium and neural retina. In the inner ear Rdh10 expression is specific to the endolymphatic system and later the stria vascularis, both organs being involved in endolymph homeostasis. Furthermore, in the peripheral olfactory system and the vibrissae follicles, expression is present from early stages in regions where sensory receptors appear and mesenchymal/epithelial interactions take place. The distribution of Rdh10 transcripts during brain and sensory organ development is consistent with a role of this enzyme in generating region-specific pools of retinaldehyde that will be used by the various RALDHs to refine the patterns of RA synthesis.

  12. Piper sarmentosum Effects on 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Enzyme in Serum and Bone in Rat Model of Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Asri, Siti Fadziyah; Mohd Ramli, Elvy Suhana; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Mat Noh, Muhamad Alfakry; Abdul Rashid, Abdul Hamid; Suhaimi, Farihah

    2016-11-15

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is one of the common causes of secondary osteoporosis. Piper sarmentosum (Ps) extract possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we determined the correlation between the effects of Ps leaf water extract with the regulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type 1 enzyme activity in serum and bone of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic rats. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were grouped into following: G1: sham-operated group administered with intramuscular vehicle olive oil and vehicle normal saline orally; G2: adrenalectomized (adrx) control group given intramuscular dexamethasone (120 μg/kg/day) and vehicle normal saline orally; G3: adrx group given intramuscular dexamethasone (120 μg/kg/day) and water extract of Piper sarmentosum (125 mg/kg/day) orally. After two months, the femur and serum were taken for ELISA analysis. Results showed that Ps leaf water extract significantly reduced the femur corticosterone concentration (p < 0.05). This suggests that Ps leaf water extract was able to prevent bone loss due to long-term glucocorticoid therapy by acting locally on the bone cells by increasing the dehydrogenase action of 11β-HSD type 1. Thus, Ps may have the potential to be used as an alternative medicine against osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture in patients on long-term glucocorticoid treatment.

  13. Effects of organic solvents on the enzyme activity of Trypanosoma cruzi glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in calorimetric assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Henrik; Cheleski, J; Zottis, A

    2007-01-01

    .0% for MeOH and up to 7.5% for DMSO. The results show that when GAPDH is assayed in the presence of DMSO (5%, v/v) using the ITC experiment, the enzyme exhibits approximately twofold higher activity than that of GAPDH with no cosolvent added. When MeOH (5%, v/v) is the cosolvent, the GAPDH activity...... is sixfold higher. The favorable effects of the organic solvents on the Michaelis-Menten enzyme-substrate complex formation ensure the consistency of the biological assays, structural integrity of the protein, and reproducibility over the measurement time. The reaction was also kinetically monitored......In drug discovery programs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a standard solvent widely used in biochemical assays. Despite the extensive use and study of enzymes in the presence of organic solvents, for some enzymes the effect of organic solvent is unknown. Macromolecular targets may be affected...

  14. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalytic co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase, on aldehyde functional ReSyn™ polymer microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twala, Busisiwe V; Sewell, B Trevor; Jordaan, Justin

    2012-05-10

    The use of enzymes in industrial applications is limited by their instability, cost and difficulty in their recovery and re-use. Immobilisation is a technique which has been shown to alleviate these limitations in biocatalysis. Here we describe the immobilisation of two biocatalytically relevant co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADH oxidase (NOD) on aldehyde functional ReSyn™ polymer microspheres with varying functional group densities. The successful immobilisation of the enzymes on this new high capacity microsphere technology resulted in the maintenance of activity of ∼40% for GDH and a maximum of 15.4% for NOD. The microsphere variant with highest functional group density of ∼3500 μmol g⁻¹ displayed the highest specific activity for the immobilisation of both enzymes at 33.22 U mg⁻¹ and 6.75 U mg⁻¹ for GDH and NOD with respective loading capacities of 51% (0.51 mg mg⁻¹) and 129% (1.29 mg mg⁻¹). The immobilised GDH further displayed improved activity in the acidic pH range. Both enzymes displayed improved pH and thermal stability with the most pronounced thermal stability for GDH displayed on ReSyn™ A during temperature incubation at 65 °C with a 13.59 fold increase, and NOD with a 2.25-fold improvement at 45 °C on the same microsphere variant. An important finding is the suitability of the microspheres for stabilisation of the multimeric protein GDH.

  15. Inter-species variation in the oligomeric states of the higher plant Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoribulokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Thomas P; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A

    2011-07-01

    In darkened leaves the Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a regulatory multi-enzyme complex with the small chloroplast protein CP12. GAPDH also forms a high molecular weight regulatory mono-enzyme complex. Given that there are different reports as to the number and subunit composition of these complexes and that enzyme regulatory mechanisms are known to vary between species, it was reasoned that protein-protein interactions may also vary between species. Here, this variation is investigated. This study shows that two different tetramers of GAPDH (an A2B2 heterotetramer and an A4 homotetramer) have the capacity to form part of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex. The role of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex is not simply to regulate the 'non-regulatory' A4 GAPDH tetramer. This study also demonstrates that the abundance and nature of PRK/GAPDH/CP12 interactions are not equal in all species and that whilst NAD enhances complex formation in some species, this is not sufficient for complex formation in others. Furthermore, it is shown that the GAPDH mono-enzyme complex is more abundant as a 2(A2B2) complex, rather than the larger 4(A2B2) complex. This smaller complex is sensitive to cellular metabolites indicating that it is an important regulatory isoform of GAPDH. This comparative study has highlighted considerable heterogeneity in PRK and GAPDH protein interactions between closely related species and the possible underlying physiological basis for this is discussed.

  16. Characterization of a novel PQQ-dependent quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea classified into auxiliary activities family 12 in carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouta Takeda

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper, which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18 from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall.

  17. The determination and arrangement of a combination of enzyme lactate dehydrogenase of bacteria Acinetobacter sp. as a device the identity important bacteria agent composts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmawati, D.; Puspitaningrum, R.; Muzajjanah

    2017-07-01

    The number of garbage generated by the industry or society is a usual problem encountered by almost all urban centers, especially large cities such as Jakarta. Waste prevention strategy required quickly and accurately. One strategy for tackling the Junk was getting lactic acid-producing bacteria. It has been shown that lactic acid can increase the acceleration of organic matter such as an overhaul of lignin and cellulose as well as out causing toxic compounds arising from decay. This research will be conducted on the determination and characterization of the enzyme-producing compost bacteria LDH lactate dehydrogenase LDH - which in isolation from the garbage Landfill Rawasari. Methodology: Research carried out consists: isolation of lactic acid-producing bacteria; identification of microscopic, macroscopic and staining Gram; cellulose assay, and optimization of PCR conditions LDH enzymes producing bacteria. Isolation is performed by dilution method and the direct method. As many as 5-point sampling. Each stage is conducted from 10 grams of soil from the top surface of the compost. Isolation results obtained 100 isolate the bacteria. Base on the characteristic of macroscopic and microscopic observations retrieved 14 isolates of bacteria have shaped rods and brought forth a negative kind of Gram positive staining. Bacterial isolates with codes (BK1; BK3; BK4; BK5; BK6; BK7; BK8; BK9; BK10; BK11: BK12; BK 13). The potential bacteria with ability produce lactate dehydrogenase was BK1 and BK3. Base for analysis phylogenetic there was identification bacteria bak1 and bak3 where Acinetobacter sp.

  18. Role of positron emission tomography and bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of bone involvement in metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma: specific implications for succinate dehydrogenase enzyme subunit B gene mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelinka, T.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Kozupa, A.; Chen, C.C.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Reynolds, J.C.; Ling, A.; Eisenhofer, G.; Lazurova, I.; Adams, K.T.; Whatley, M.A.; Widimsky, J.Jr.; Pacak, K.

    2008-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of 71 subjects with metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (30 subjects with mutation of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme subunit B (SDHB) gene and 41 subjects without SDHB mutation). Sixty-nine percent presented with bone metastases (SDHB +/-: 77% vs 63%),

  19. Adsorption of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme on carbon nanotubes: how to get accurate results for the cytotoxicity of these nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Valérie; Figarol, Agathe; Boudard, Delphine; Cottier, Michèle; Grosseau, Philippe; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2015-03-31

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) cytotoxicity is frequently investigated using in vitro classical toxicology assays. However, these cellular tests, usually based on the use of colorimetric or fluorimetric dyes, were designed for chemicals and may not be suitable for nanosized materials. Indeed, because of their unique physicochemical properties CNT can interfere with the assays and bias the results. To get accurate data and draw reliable conclusions, these artifacts should be carefully taken into account. The aim of this study was to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the interferences occurring between CNT and the commonly used lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Experiments under cell-free conditions were performed, and it was clearly demonstrated that artifacts occurred. They were due to the intrinsic absorbance of CNT on one hand and the adsorption of LDH at the CNT surface on the other hand. The adsorption of LDH on CNT was modeled and was found to fit the Langmuir model. The K(ads) and n(eq) constants were defined, allowing the correction of results obtained from cellular experiments to get more accurate data and lead to proper conclusions on the cytotoxicity of CNT.

  20. Detection of the gene encoding the small subunit of the CO dehydrogenase enzyme in the H{sub 2}-evolving bacterium Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, A.; Levin, D. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)]|[Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    A purple non-sulfur bacterium, Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS presents great opportunities, on a commercial scale, for the biological hydrogen production. A water-gas shift reaction is catalyzed when the bacterium is cultured in the presence of carbon oxide in the dark. The result is carbon monoxide (and water) being shifted into hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon dioxide in near stoichiometric quantities. The production of hydrogen as a clean alternative fuel could be accomplished by using carbon monoxide generated from gasified waste biomass, using the bacterial water-gas shift reaction for that purpose. The characterization of three key enzymes and the genes encoding them was performed in a closely related purple non-sulfur bacterium called Rhodospirillum rubrum. They were: (1) a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), (2) the ferredoxin-like electron-carrier small subunit of the CODH enzyme, and (3) an hydrogen-evolving hydrogenase. A transcriptional unit separate from the genes encoding the CODH and its ferredoxin-like small subunit encode the genes for the hydrogenase. A fragment of the Rhodospirillum rubrum ferredoxin-like subunit gene was amplified through the use of a polymerase chain reaction. Southern blots of restriction endonuclease digested genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS was probed with the fragment of the Rhodospirillum rubrum previously amplified using the polymerase chain reaction. Confirmation of the identification is being confirmed, while the gene is sequenced. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  1. The Enzyme Activity and Substrate Specificity of Two Major Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), SbCAD2 and SbCAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Young; Walker, Alexander M; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E; Kang, ChulHee

    2017-08-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyzes the final step in monolignol biosynthesis, reducing sinapaldehyde, coniferaldehyde, and p-coumaraldehyde to their corresponding alcohols in an NADPH-dependent manner. Because of its terminal location in monolignol biosynthesis, the variation in substrate specificity and activity of CAD can result in significant changes in overall composition and amount of lignin. Our in-depth characterization of two major CAD isoforms, SbCAD2 (Brown midrib 6 [bmr6]) and SbCAD4, in lignifying tissues of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a strategic plant for generating renewable chemicals and fuels, indicates their similarity in both structure and activity to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CAD5 and Populus tremuloides sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. This first crystal structure of a monocot CAD combined with enzyme kinetic data and a catalytic model supported by site-directed mutagenesis allows full comparison with dicot CADs and elucidates the potential signature sequence for their substrate specificity and activity. The L119W/G301F-SbCAD4 double mutant displayed its substrate preference in the order coniferaldehyde > p-coumaraldehyde > sinapaldehyde, with higher catalytic efficiency than that of both wild-type SbCAD4 and SbCAD2. As SbCAD4 is the only major CAD isoform in bmr6 mutants, replacing SbCAD4 with L119W/G301F-SbCAD4 in bmr6 plants could produce a phenotype that is more amenable to biomass processing. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  3. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Debasish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. Results We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2Å resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in

  4. The activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 enzyme and cortisol secretion in patients with adrenal incidentalomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Valentina; Polledri, Elisa; Mercadante, Rosa; Zhukouskaya, Volha; Palmieri, Serena; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna; Fustinoni, Silvia; Chiodini, Iacopo

    2016-09-01

    In adrenal incidentaloma (AI) patients, beside the cortisol secretion, a different 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD11B2) activity, measurable by 24-h urinary cortisol/cortisone ratio (R-UFF/UFE) (the higher R-UFF/UFE the lower HSD11B2 activity), could influence the occurrence of the subclinical hypercortisolism (SH)-related complications (hypertension, type 2 diabetes, obesity). We evaluated whether in AI patients, UFF levels are associated to UFE levels, and the HSD11B2 activity to the complications presence. In 156 AI patients (93F, age 65.2 ± 9.5 years), the following were measured: serum cortisol after 1 mg-dexamethasone test (1 mg-DST), ACTH, UFF, UFE levels, and R-UFF/UFE (by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry), the latter was also evaluated in 63 matched-controls. We diagnosed SH (n = 22) in the presence of ≥2 among ACTH 83 nmol/L. Patients showed higher UFF levels and R-UFF/UFE than controls (75.9 ± 43.1 vs 54.4 ± 22.9 nmol/24 h and 0.26 ± 0.12 vs 0.20 ± 0.07, p < 0.005, respectively) but comparable UFE levels (291 ± 91.1 vs 268 ± 61.5, p = 0.069). The R-UFF/UFE was higher in patients with high (h-UFF, n = 28, 0.41 ± 0.20) than in those with normal (n-UFF, 0.22 ± 0.10, p < 0.005) UFF levels and in patients with SH than in those without SH (0.30 ± 0.12 vs 0.25 ± 0.12, p = 0.04). UFF levels were associated with R-UFF/UFE (r = 0.849, p < 0.001) in n-UFF, but not in h-UFF patients. Among h-UFF patients, the complications prevalence was not associated with R-UFF/UFE values. In AI patients, the UFF increase is not associated with a UFE increase. The HSD11B2 activity is inversely associated with UFF levels in n-UFF patients but not in h-UFF patients, and it is not associated with the SH complications.

  5. (R,R)-Butane-2,3-diol dehydrogenase from Bacillus clausii DSM 8716(T): Cloning and expression of the bdhA-gene, and initial characterization of enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschallik, Lukas; Molinnus, Denise; Bongaerts, Johannes; Pohl, Martina; Wagner, Torsten; Schöning, Michael J; Siegert, Petra; Selmer, Thorsten

    2017-09-20

    The gene encoding a putative (R,R)-butane-2,3-diol dehydrogenase (bdhA) from Bacillus clausii DSM 8716(T) was isolated, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The amino acid sequence of the encoded protein is only distantly related to previously studied enzymes (identity 33-43%) and exhibited some uncharted peculiarities. An N-terminally StrepII-tagged enzyme variant was purified and initially characterized. The isolated enzyme catalyzed the (R)-specific oxidation of (R,R)- and meso-butane-2,3-diol to (R)- and (S)-acetoin with specific activities of 12U/mg and 23U/mg, respectively. Likewise, racemic acetoin was reduced with a specific activity of up to 115U/mg yielding a mixture of (R,R)- and meso-butane-2,3-diol, while the enzyme reduced butane-2,3-dione (Vmax 74U/mg) solely to (R,R)-butane-2,3-diol via (R)-acetoin. For these reactions only activity with the co-substrates NADH/NAD(+) was observed. The enzyme accepted a selection of vicinal diketones, α-hydroxy ketones and vicinal diols as alternative substrates. Although the physiological function of the enzyme in B. clausii remains elusive, the data presented herein clearly demonstrates that the encoded enzyme is a genuine (R,R)-butane-2,3-diol dehydrogenase with potential for applications in biocatalysis and sensor development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Endocrine disruptors and other inhibitors of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and 2: Tissue-specific consequences of enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitku, Jana; Starka, Luboslav; Bicikova, Marie; Hill, Martin; Heracek, Jiri; Sosvorova, Lucie; Hampl, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Numerous chemicals in the environment have the ability to interact with the endocrine system. These compounds are called endocrine disruptors (EDs). Exposure to EDs represents one of the hypotheses for decreasing fertility, the increased risk of numerous cancers and obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. There are various mechanisms of ED action, one of which is their interference in the action of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11βHSD) that maintains a balance between active and inactive glucocorticoids on the intracellular level. This enzyme has two isoforms and is expressed in various tissues. Inhibition of 11βHSD in various tissues can have different consequences. In the case of EDs, the results of exposure are mainly adverse; on the other hand pharmaceutically developed inhibitors of 11βHSD type 1 are evaluated as an option for treating metabolic syndrome, as well as related diseases and depressive disorders. This review focuses on the effects of 11βHSD inhibitors in the testis, colon, adipose tissue, kidney, brain and placenta.

  7. Waste recycling by vermicomposting: Maturity and quality assessment via dehydrogenase enzyme activity, lignin, water soluble carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and other indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidadi, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh, Ahmad; Najafpoor, Ali Asghar; Esmaili, Habibollah; Zanganeh, Jafar; Dolatabadi Takabi, Maryam; Piranloo, Fardin Ghasemy

    2016-11-01

    Present study aims to examine the dynamics of maturation and qualification indicators in various vermicompost treatments and selection of the best treatment along with best maturation time in this regard. In this empirical study, dynamics of chemical (pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorous, lignin, water soluble carbon (WSC), C/N, NH4/NO3) and biological (dehydrogenase enzyme (DEH) and DEH/WSC) properties were investigated in four various treatments, including various ratios of compost produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) and carbonaceous materials (50:50, 70:30, 85:15 and 100:0) over 100 days. Results showed a significant fluctuation in EC, DEH and DEH/WSC proportions over the process. In addition, a noticeable increase was observed for the dynamics of TN, phosphorous and lignin. In contrast, the C/N, NH4/NO3 and WSC values gradually decreased during the process. Moreover, it was observed that the length of 75 days for the process is an appropriate time for maturation of all treatments. However, the first and second treatments resulted in better outcomes compared with the other types of treatments. From the point of view of quality obtained vermicompost was nitrogen enriched product in all treatments. Whereas, for the phosphorous elements this method is appropriate for the first treatment only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Somatic-cell selection is a major determinant of the blood-cell phenotype in heterozygotes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations causing severe enzyme deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filosa, S.; Giacometti, N.; Wangwei, C.; Martini, G. [Istituto Internazionale di Genetica e Biofisica, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    X-chromosome inactivation in mammals is regarded as an essentially random process, but the resulting somatic-cell mosaicism creates the opportunity for cell selection. In most people with red-blood-cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, the enzyme-deficient phenotype is only moderately expressed in nucleated cells. However, in a small subset of hemizygous males who suffer from chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the underlying mutations (designated class I) cause more-severe G6PD deficiency, and this might provide an opportunity for selection in heterozygous females during development. In order to test this possibility we have analyzed four heterozygotes for class I G6PD mutations: two with G6PD Portici (1178G{r_arrow}A) and two with G6PD Bari (1187C{r_arrow}T). We found that in fractionated blood cell types (including erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages) there was a significant excess of G6PD-normal cells. The significant concordance that we have observed in the degree of imbalance in the different blood-cell lineages indicates that a selective mechanism is likely to operate at the level of pluripotent blood stem cells. Thus, it appears that severe G6PD deficiency affects adversely the proliferation or the survival of nucleated blood cells and that this phenotypic characteristic is critical during hematopoiesis. 65 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a steroidogenic enzyme, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14, from the stony coral Euphyllia ancora (Cnidaria, Anthozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikina, Shinya; Chung, Yi-Jou; Chiu, Yi-Ling; Huang, Yi-Jie; Lee, Yan-Horn; Chang, Ching-Fong

    2016-03-01

    Sex steroids play a fundamental role not only in reproduction but also in various other biological processes in vertebrates. Although the presence of sex steroids has been confirmed in cnidarians (e.g., coral, sea anemone, jellyfish, and hydra), which are basal metazoans, only a few studies to date have characterized steroidogenesis-related genes in cnidarians. Based on a transcriptomic analysis of the stony coral Euphyllia ancora, we identified the steroidogenic enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14 (17beta-hsd 14), an oxidative enzyme that catalyzes the NAD(+)-dependent inactivation of estrogen/androgen (estradiol to estrone and testosterone to androstenedione) in mammals. Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. ancora 17beta-Hsd 14 (Ea17beta-Hsd 14) clusters with other animal 17beta-HSD 14s but not with other members of the 17beta-HSD family. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a lack of correlation of Ea17beta-hsd 14 transcript levels with the coral's reproductive cycle. In addition, Ea17beta-hsd 14 transcript and protein were detected in all tissues examined, such as the tentacles, mesenterial filaments, and gonads, at similar levels in both sexes, as determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blotting with an anti-Ea17beta-Hsd 14 antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Ea17beta-Hsd 14 is mainly distributed in the endodermal regions of the polyps, but the protein was also observed in all tissues examined. These results suggest that Ea17beta-Hsd 14 is involved in important functions that commonly occur in endodermal cells or has multiple functions in different tissues. Our data provide information for comparison with advanced animals as well as insight into the evolution of steroidogenesis-related genes in metazoans.

  11. Role of secreted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the infection mechanism of enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: interaction of the extracellular enzyme with human plasminogen and fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, L; Aguilera, L; Giménez, R; Sorolla, M A; Aguilar, J; Badía, J; Baldoma, L

    2007-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (EC 1.2.1.12) is an anchorless, multifunctional protein displayed on the surface of several fungi and Gram-positive pathogens, which contributes to their adhesion and virulence. To date a role for extracellular GAPDH in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative bacteria has not been described. The aim of this study was to analyze the extracellular localization of GAPDH in enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli strains and to examine its interaction with host components that could be related to the infection mechanism. Recombinant E. coli GAPDH was purified and polyclonal antibodies were obtained. Western blotting and immunoelectron microscopy showed that GAPDH is located on the bacterial surface and released to the culture medium of EHEC and EPEC strains. GAPDH export in these Gram-negative pathogens depends on the external medium, is not mediated by vesicles and leads to an extracellular active enzyme. Non-pathogenic E. coli strains do not secrete GAPDH. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis showed that in E. coli GAPDH is present at least in two major forms with different isoelectric points. Of these forms, the more basic is secreted. Purified GAPDH was found to bind human plasminogen and fibrinogen in Far-Western blot and ELISA-based assays. In addition, GAPDH remained associated with colonic Caco-2 epithelial cells after adhesion of EHEC or EPEC. These observations indicate that exported GAPDH may act as a virulence factor which could contribute to EHEC and EPEC pathogenesis. This is the first description of an extracellular localization for this enzyme, with a function other than its glycolytic role in Gram-negative pathogens.

  12. Studies on lipoamide dehydrogenase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.

    1992-01-01

    At the onset of the investigations described in this thesis progress was being made on the elucidation of the crystal structure of the Azotobactervinelandii lipoamide dehydrogenase. Also the gene encoding this enzyme was cloned in our laboratory. By this, a firm basis was laid to start site directed

  13. The dilemma of the gender assignment in a Portuguese adolescent with disorder of sex development due to 17β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 3 enzyme deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carla; Castro-Correia, Cíntia; Mira-Coelho, Alda; Monteiro, Bessa; Monteiro, Joaquim; Hughes, Ieuan; Fontoura, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The development of male internal and external genitalia in an XY fetus requires a complex interplay of many critical genes, enzymes, and cofactors. The enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase type 3 (17βHSD3) is present almost exclusively in the testicles and converts Delta 4-androstenodione (Δ4) to testosterone. A deficiency in this enzyme is rare and is a frequently misdiagnosed autosomal recessive cause of 46,XY, disorder of sex development. The case report is of a 15-year-old adolescent, who was raised according to female gender. At puberty, the adolescent had a severe virilization and primary amenorrhea. The physical examination showed a male phenotype with micropenis and blind vagina. The Tanner stage was A3B1P4, nonpalpable gonads. The karyotype revealed 46,XY. The endocrinology study revealed: testosterone=2.38 ng/ml, Δ4>10.00 ng/ml, and low testosterone/Δ4 ratio=0.23. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdominal-pelvic showed the presence of testicles in inguinal canal, seminal vesicle, prostate, micropenis, and absence of uterus and vagina. The genetic study confirmed the mutation p.Glu215Asp on HSD17B3 gene in homozygosity. The dilemma of sex reassignment was seriously considered when the diagnosis was made. During all procedures the patient was accompanied by a child psychiatrist/psychologist. The teenager desired to continue being a female, so gonadectomy was performed. Estrogen therapy and surgical procedure to change external genitalia was carried out. In this case, there was a severe virilization at puberty. It is speculated to be due to a partial activity of 17βHSD3 in the testicles and/or extratesticular ability to convert Δ4 to testosterone by 17βHSD5. Prenatal exposure of the brain to androgens has increasingly been put forward as a critical factor in gender identity development, but in this case the social factor was more important for the gender assignment. In this case, we highlight the late diagnosis, probably because the patient

  14. NADH dehydrogenase subunit-2 237 Leu/Met polymorphism modifies effects of cigarette smoking on risk of elevated levels of serum liver enzyme in male Japanese health check-up examinees: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Kokaze, Akatsuki; Yoshida, Masao; Ishikawa, Mamoru; Matsunaga, Naomi; Karita, Kanae; Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nanri, Hinako; Baba, Yuta; HOSHINO, Hiromi; Takashima, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Background NADH dehydrogenase subunit-2 237 leucine/methionine (ND2-237 Leu/Met) polymorphism reportedly influences the effects of cigarette smoking on respiratory function, risk of dyslipidemia, serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, hematological parameters and intraocular pressure. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ND2-237 Leu/Met polymorphism modifies the effects of cigarette smoking on serum liver enzyme levels in male Japanese health check-up examine...

  15. Population screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiencies in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands, using a modified enzyme assay on filter paper dried bloodspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landry Losi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency poses a significant impediment to primaquine use for the elimination of liver stage infection with Plasmodium vivax and for gametocyte clearance, because of the risk of life-threatening haemolytic anaemia that can occur in G6PD deficient patients. Although a range of methods for screening G6PD deficiency have been described, almost all require skilled personnel, expensive laboratory equipment, freshly collected blood, and are time consuming; factors that render them unsuitable for mass-screening purposes. Methods A published WST8/1-methoxy PMS method was adapted to assay G6PD activity in a 96-well format using dried blood spots, and used it to undertake population screening within a malaria survey undertaken in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. The assay results were compared to a biochemical test and a recently marketed rapid diagnostic test. Results Comparative testing with biochemical and rapid diagnostic test indicated that results obtained by filter paper assay were accurate providing that blood spots were assayed within 5 days when stored at ambient temperature and 10 days when stored at 4 degrees. Screening of 8541 people from 41 villages in Isabel Province, Solomon Islands revealed the prevalence of G6PD deficiency as defined by enzyme activity Conclusions The assay enabled simple and quick semi-quantitative population screening in a malaria-endemic region. The study indicated a high prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Isabel Province and highlights the critical need to consider G6PD deficiency in the context of P. vivax malaria elimination strategies in Solomon Islands, particularly in light of the potential role of primaquine mass drug administration.

  16. Structural and functional properties of isocitrate dehydrogenase from the psychrophilic bacterium Desulfotalea psychrophila reveal a cold-active enzyme with an unusual high thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Yang, Nannan; Martinez, Aurora; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Steen, Ida Helene

    2007-09-07

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) has been studied extensively due to its central role in the Krebs cycle, catalyzing the oxidative NAD(P)(+)-dependent decarboxylation of isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate and CO(2). Here, we present the first crystal structure of IDH from a psychrophilic bacterium, Desulfotalea psychrophila (DpIDH). The structural information is combined with a detailed biochemical characterization and a comparative study with IDHs from the mesophilic bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense (DhIDH), porcine (PcIDH), human cytosolic (HcIDH) and the hyperthermophilic Thermotoga maritima (TmIDH). DpIDH was found to have a higher melting temperature (T(m)=66.9 degrees C) than its mesophilic homologues and a suboptimal catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. The thermodynamic activation parameters indicated a disordered active site, as seen also for the drastic increase in K(m) for isocitrate at elevated temperatures. A methionine cluster situated at the dimeric interface between the two active sites and a cluster of destabilizing charged amino acids in a region close to the active site might explain the poor isocitrate affinity. On the other hand, DpIDH was optimized for interacting with NADP(+) and the crystal structure revealed unique interactions with the cofactor. The highly acidic surface, destabilizing charged residues, fewer ion pairs and reduced size of ionic networks in DpIDH suggest a flexible global structure. However, strategic placement of ionic interactions stabilizing the N and C termini, and additional ionic interactions in the clasp domain as well as two enlarged aromatic clusters might counteract the destabilizing interactions and promote the increased thermal stability. The structure analysis of DpIDH illustrates how psychrophilic enzymes can adjust their flexibility in dynamic regions during their catalytic cycle without compromising the global stability of the protein.

  17. An alpha-proteobacterial type malate dehydrogenase may complement LDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. Cloning and biochemical characterization of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Pradhan, Anupam; Khan, Shabana I; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2004-09-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) may be important in carbohydrate and energy metabolism in malarial parasites. The cDNA corresponding to the MDH gene, identified on chromosome 6 of the Plasmodium falciparum genome, was amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant Pf MDH was purified to homogeneity and biochemically characterized as an NAD(+)(H)-specific MDH, which catalysed reversible interconversion of malate to oxaloacetate. Pf MDH could not use NADP/NADPH as a cofactor, but used acetylpyridine adenine dinucleoide, an analogue of NAD. The enzyme exhibited strict substrate and cofactor specificity. The highest levels of Pf MDH transcripts were detected in trophozoites while the Pf MDH protein level remained high in trophozoites as well as schizonts. A highly refined model of Pf MDH revealed distinct structural characteristics of substrate and cofactor binding sites and important amino acid residues lining these pockets. The active site amino acid residues involved in substrate binding were conserved in Pf MDH but the N-terminal glycine motif, which is involved in nucleotide binding, was similar to the GXGXXG signature sequence found in Pf LDH and also in alpha-proteobacterial MDHs. Oxamic acid did not inhibit Pf MDH, while gossypol, which interacts at the nucleotide binding site of oxidoreductases and shows antimalarial activity, inhibited Pf MDH also. Treatment of a synchronized culture of P. falciparum trophozoites with gossypol caused induction in expression of Pf MDH, while expression of Pf LDH was reduced and expression of malate:quinone oxidoreductase remained unchanged. Pf MDH may complement Pf LDH function of NAD/NADH coupling in malaria parasites. Thus, dual inhibitors of Pf MDH and Pf LDH may be required to target this pathway and to develop potential new antimalarial drugs.

  18. Quantum chemical modeling of methanol oxidation mechanisms by methanol dehydrogenase enzyme: effect of substitution of calcium by barium in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B; Mainardi, Daniela S

    2010-02-04

    Previous experimental studies have shown that the activation energy for methanol oxidation by naturally occurring Ca(2+)-containing methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) enzyme is double the methanol activation energy by Ba(2+)-MDH. However, neither the reason for this difference nor the specific transition states and intermediates involved during the methanol oxidation by Ba(2+)-MDH have been clearly stated. Hence, an MDH active site model based on the well-documented X-ray crystallographic structure of Ca(2+)-MDH is selected, where the Ca(2+) is replaced by a Ba(2+) ion at the active site center, and the addition-elimination (A-E) and hydride-transfer (H-T) methanol oxidation mechanisms, already proposed in the literature for Ca(2+)-MDH, are tested for Ba(2+)-MDH at the BLYP/DNP theory level. Changes in the geometries and energy barriers for all the steps are identified, and qualitatively, similar (when compared to Ca(2+)-MDH) intermediates and transition states associated with each step of the mechanisms are found in the case of Ba(2+)-MDH. For both the A-E and H-T mechanisms, almost all the free-energy barriers associated with all of the steps are reduced in the presence of Ba(2+)-MDH, and they are kinetically feasible. The free energy barriers for methanol oxidation by Ba(2+)-MDH, particularly for the rate-limiting steps of both mechanisms, are almost half the corresponding barriers calculated for the case of Ca(2+)-MDH, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1670 - Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system. 862.1670... Systems § 862.1670 Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system. (a) Identification. A sorbitol dehydrogenase test system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme sorbitol dehydrogenase in...

  20. Human 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3: structural clues of 5α-DHT reverse binding and enzyme down-regulation decreasing MCF7 cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Thériault, Jean-François; Zhu, Dao-Wei; Shang, Peng; Labrie, Fernand; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2016-04-15

    Human 3α-HSD3 (3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 3) plays an essential role in the inactivation of the most potent androgen 5α-DHT (5α-dihydrotestosterone). The present study attempts to obtain the important structure of 3α-HSD3 in complex with 5α-DHT and to investigate the role of 3α-HSD3 in breast cancer cells. We report the crystal structure of human 3α-HSD3·NADP(+)·A-dione (5α-androstane-3,17-dione)/epi-ADT (epiandrosterone) complex, which was obtained by co-crystallization with 5α-DHT in the presence of NADP(+) Although 5α-DHT was introduced during the crystallization, oxidoreduction of 5α-DHT occurred. The locations of A-dione and epi-ADT were identified in the steroid-binding sites of two 3α-HSD3 molecules per crystal asymmetric unit. An overlay showed that A-dione and epi-ADT were oriented upside-down and flipped relative to each other, providing structural clues for 5α-DHT reverse binding in the enzyme with the generation of different products. Moreover, we report the crystal structure of the 3α-HSD3·NADP(+)·4-dione (4-androstene-3,17-dione) complex. When a specific siRNA (100 nM) was used to suppress 3α-HSD3 expression without interfering with 3α-HSD4, which shares a highly homologous active site, the 5α-DHT concentration increased, whereas MCF7 cell growth was suppressed. The present study provides structural clues for 5α-DHT reverse binding within 3α-HSD3, and demonstrates for the first time that down-regulation of 3α-HSD3 decreases MCF7 breast cancer cell growth. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  1. Effects of two mutations detected in medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)-deficient patients on folding, oligomer assembly, and stability of MCAD enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Jespersen, C; Jensen, T G

    1995-01-01

    We have used expression of human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) in Escherichia coli as a model system for dissecting the molecular effects of two mutations detected in patients with MCAD deficiency. We demonstrate that the R28C mutation predominantly affects polypeptide folding...

  2. Common catabolic enzyme patterns in a microplankton community of the Humboldt Current System off northern and central-south Chile: Malate dehydrogenase activity as an index of water-column metabolism in an oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    An extensive subsurface oxygen minimum zone off northern and central-south Chile, associated with the Peru-Chile undercurrent, has important effects on the metabolism of the organisms inhabiting therein. Planktonic species deal with the hypoxic and anoxic environments by relying on biochemical as well as physiological processes related to their anaerobic metabolisms. Here we characterize, for the first time, the potential enzymatic activities involved in the aerobic and anaerobic energy production pathways of microplanktonic organisms (catabolic pathways in the oxygen minimum zone. Malate dehydrogenase had the highest oxidizing activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form) in the batch of catabolic enzymatic activities assayed, including potential pyruvate oxidoreductases activity, the electron transport system, and dissimilatory nitrate reductase. Malate dehydrogenase correlated significantly with almost all the enzymes analyzed within and above the oxygen minimum zone, and also with the oxygen concentration and microplankton biomass in the water column of the Humboldt Current System, especially in the oxygen minimum zone off Iquique. These results suggest a possible specific pattern for the catabolic activity of the microplanktonic realm associated with the oxygen minimum zone spread along the Humboldt Current System off Chile. We hypothesize that malate dehydrogenase activity could be an appropriate indicator of microplankton catabolism in the oxygen minimum zone and adjacent areas.

  3. Characterization of wild-type human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and mutant enzymes present in MCAD-deficient patients by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, P; Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S;

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to study and compare wild-type medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD; EC 1.3.99.3) and mis-sense mutant enzyme found in patients with MCAD deficiency. By comparing the patterns for wild-type and mutant MCAD expressed in Escherichia coli or in eukar......Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to study and compare wild-type medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD; EC 1.3.99.3) and mis-sense mutant enzyme found in patients with MCAD deficiency. By comparing the patterns for wild-type and mutant MCAD expressed in Escherichia coli...... of one aspartic acid residue per monomer. Comparison of pulse labeling and steady-state amounts of MCAD protein in overexpressing COS-7 cells confirms that K304E MCAD is synthesized and transported into mitochondria in amounts similar to the wild-type protein, but is degraded much more readily. For wild...

  4. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Resch, V.A.; Jin, J.; Chen, B.S.; Hanefeld, U.

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a

  5. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Resch, V.A.; Jin, J.; Chen, B.S.; Hanefeld, U.

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a s

  6. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking catabolic NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Growth characteristics of the mutant and regulation of enzyme synthesis in the wild-type strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, W J; van Eijk, J; van Renesse, R; Blijham, J M

    1978-01-01

    NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-B) was induced in a wild-type strain derived of alpha-sigma 1278b by alpha-amino acids, the nitrogen of which according to known degradative pathways is transferred to 2-oxoglutarate. A recessive mutant (gdhB) devoid of GDH-B activity grew more slowly than the wild type if one of these amino acids was the sole source of nitrogen. Addition of ammonium chloride, glutamine, asparagine or serine to growth media with inducing alpha-amino acids as the main nitrogen source increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant to the wild-type level and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the wild type. Arginine, urea and allantoin similarly increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the presence of glutamate, but not in the presence of aspartate, alanine or proline as the main nitrogen source. These observations are consistent with the view that GDH-B in vivo deaminates glutamate. Ammonium ions are required for the biosynthesis of glutamine, asparagine, arginine, histidine and purine and pyrimidine bases. Aspartate and alanine apparently are more potent inducers of GDH-B than glutamate. Anabolic NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-A) can not fulfil the function of GDH-B in the gdhB mutant. This is concluded from the equal growth rates in glutamate, aspartate and proline media as observed with a gdhB mutant and with a gdhA, gdhB double mutant in which both glutamate dehydrogenases area lacking. The double mutant showed an anomalous growth behaviour, growth rates on several nitrogen sources being unexpectedly low.

  7. High performance enzyme fuel cells using a genetically expressed FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase α-subunit of Burkholderia cepacia immobilized in a carbon nanotube electrode for low glucose conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fapyane, Deby; Lee, Soo-Jin; Kang, Seo-Hee; Lim, Du-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Nam, Tae-hyun; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Kim, Seon-Won; Chang, In Seop

    2013-06-28

    FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) of Burkholderia cepacia was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified in order to use it as an anode catalyst for enzyme fuel cells. The purified enzyme has a low Km value (high affinity) towards glucose, which is 463.8 μM, up to 2-fold exponential range lower compared to glucose oxidase. The heterogeneous electron transfer coefficient (Ks) of FAD-GDH-menadione on a glassy carbon electrode was 10.73 s(-1), which is 3-fold higher than that of GOX-menadione, 3.68 s(-1). FAD-GDH was able to maintain its native glucose affinity during immobilization in the carbon nanotube and operation of enzyme fuel cells. FAD-GDH-menadione showed 3-fold higher power density, 799.4 ± 51.44 μW cm(-2), than the GOX-menadione system, 308.03 ± 17.93 μW cm(-2), under low glucose concentration, 5 mM, which is the concentration in normal physiological fluid.

  8. [Frequency of color blindness and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency in non-industrialized populations in the state of Nuevo León, México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceda-Flores, R M; Arriaga-Ríos, G; Muñoz-Campos, J; Bautista-Peña, V A; Angeles Rojas-Alvarado, M; González-Quiróga, G; Leal-Garza, C H; Garza-Chapa, R

    1990-01-01

    In order to know if there would be genetic structural differences among non industrial and industrial populations, two genetic markers were studied: color-blindness (CPC) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), in students, males and females that were resident in five non industrial populations in the State of Nuevo Leon. The results were compared with the information for industrial zone from the Monterrey Metropolitan area (AMM). It was found that the frequencies of CPC and G6PD in non industrial populations (2.57 and 0.00 per cent), were lower than the ones in the industrial AMM (4.0 and 0.66 per cent), probably as a result that in the first populations, with minor urbanization, the main factors that influence are: natural selection, interacial mixed or genetic drift and the second population is the immigration, since 1940 to present time, of Mexican populations with greater influence from the Indians and Africans.

  9. Misconceptions regarding basic thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics have led to erroneous conclusions regarding the metabolic importance of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate involving the coenzyme NAD(+) . Part of the foundation for the proposed shuttling of lactate from astrocytes to neurons during brain activation is the differential distribution of LDH isoenzymes between the two cell...... types. In this short review, we outline the basic kinetic properties of the LDH isoenzymes expressed in neurons and astrocytes, and argue that the distribution of LDH isoenzymes does not in any way govern directional flow of lactate between the two cellular compartments. The two main points...... which cells are producing and which are consuming lactate. Second, the thermodynamic equilibrium of the reaction is toward the reduced substrate (i.e., lactate), which is reflected in the concentrations measured in brain tissue, suggesting that the reaction is at near-equilibrium at steady state...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzyme is involved in the normal processing of carbohydrates. It also protects red blood cells from the ... of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or alter its structure, this enzyme can no longer play its protective ...

  11. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalytic co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase, on aldehyde functional ReSynTM polymer microspheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twala, BV

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of enzymes in industrial applications is limited by their instability, cost and difficulty in their recovery and re-use. Immobilisation is a technique which has been shown to alleviate these limitations in biocatalysis. Here we describe...

  12. Validation of caffeine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBB1 as a suitable enzyme for a rapid caffeine detection and potential diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sujit K; Yu, Chi Li; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2014-08-06

    Excess consumption of caffeine (>400 mg/day/adult) can lead to adverse health effects. Recent introduction of caffeinated products (gums, jelly beans, energy drinks) might lead to excessive consumption, especially among children and nursing mothers, hence attracting the Food and Drug Administration's attention and product withdrawals. An "in-home" test will aid vigilant consumers in detecting caffeine in beverages and milk easily and quickly, thereby restricting its consumption. Known diagnostic methods lack speed and sensitivity. We report a caffeine dehydrogenase (Cdh)-based test which is highly sensitive (1-5 ppm) and detects caffeine in beverages and mother's milk in 1 min. Other components in these complex test samples do not interfere with the detection. Caffeine-dependent reduction of the dye iodonitrotetrazolium chloride results in shades of pink proportional to the levels in test samples. This test also estimates caffeine levels in pharmaceuticals, comparable to high-performance liquid chromatography. The Cdh-based test is the first with the desired attributes of a rapid and robust caffeine diagnostic kit.

  13. Gene structure and mutations of glutaryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase: Impaired association of enzyme subunits that is due to an A421V substitution causes glutaric acidemia type I in the Amish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biery, B.J.; Stein, D.E.; Goodman, S.I. [Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    The structure of the human glutaryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (GCD) gene was determined to contain 11 exons and to span {approximately}7 kb. Fibroblast DNA from 64 unrelated glutaric academia type I (GA1) patients was screened for mutations by PCR amplification and analysis of SSCP. Fragments with altered electrophoretic mobility were subcloned and sequenced to detect mutations that caused GA1. This report describes the structure of the GCD gene, as well as point mutations and polymorphisms found in 7 of its 11 exons. Several mutations were found in more than one patient, but no one prevalent mutation was detected in the general population. As expected from pedigree analysis, a single mutant allele causes GA1 in the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Several mutations have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and all produce diminished enzyme activity. Reduced activity in GCD encoded by the A421V mutation in the Amish may be due to impaired association of enzyme subunits. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The –SH Protection Method for Determining Accurate Kd Values for Enzyme-Coenzyme Complexes of NAD+-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Engineered Mutants: Evidence for Nonproductive NADPH Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Griffin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation rates have been measured for clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase and several engineered mutants at various DTNB concentrations. Analysis of rate constants allowed determination of Kd for each non-covalent enzyme-DTNB complex and the rate constant for reaction to form the inactive enzyme-thionitrobenzoate adduct. Both parameters are sensitive to the mutations F238S, P262S, the double mutation F238S/P262S, and D263K, all in the coenzyme binding site. Study of the effects of NAD+, NADH and NADPH at various concentrations in protecting against inactivation by 200 μM DTNB allowed determination of Kd values for binding of these coenzymes to each protein, yielding surprising results. The mutations were originally devised to lessen discrimination against the disfavoured coenzyme NADP(H, and activity measurements showed this was achieved. However, the Kd determinations indicated that, although Kd values for NAD+ and NADH were increased considerably, Kd for NADPH was increased even more than for NADH, so that discrimination against binding of NADPH was not decreased. This apparent contradiction can only be explained if NADPH has a nonproductive binding mode that is not weakened by the mutations, and a catalytically productive mode that, though strengthened, is masked by the nonproductive binding. Awareness of the latter is important in planning further mutagenesis.

  15. The cortisol and androgen pathways cross talk in high temperature-induced masculinization: the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase as a key enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandino, Juan Ignacio; Hattori, Ricardo Shohei; Kishii, Ai; Strüssmann, Carlos Augusto; Somoza, Gustavo Manuel

    2012-12-01

    In many ectotherm species the gonadal fate is modulated by temperature early in life [temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD)] but the transducer mechanism between temperature and gonadal differentiation is still elusive. We have recently shown that cortisol, the glucocorticoid stress-related hormone in vertebrates, is involved in the TSD process of pejerrey, Odontesthes bonariensis. Particularly, all larvae exposed to a male-producing temperature (MPT, 29 C) after hatching showed increased whole-body cortisol and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT; the main bioactive androgen in fish) levels and developed as males. Moreover, cortisol administration at an intermediate, mixed sex-producing temperature (MixPT, 24 C) caused increases in 11-KT and in the frequency of males, suggesting a relation between this glucocorticoid and androgens during the masculinization process. In order to clarify the link between stress and masculinization, the expression of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (hsd)11b2, glucocorticoid receptors gr1 and gr2, and androgen receptors ar1 and ar2 was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR and in situ hybridization in larvae reared at MPT, MixPT, and female-producing temperature (FPT, 17 C) during the sex determination period. We also analyzed the effects of cortisol treatment in larvae reared at MixPT and in adult testicular explants incubated in vitro. MPT and cortisol treatment produced significant increases in hsd11b2 mRNA expression. Also, gonadal explants incubated in the presence of cortisol showed increases of 11-KT levels in the medium. Taken together these results suggest that cortisol promotes 11-KT production during high temperature-induced masculinization by modulation of hsd11b2 expression and thus drives the morphogenesis of the testes.

  16. NdhO, a subunit of NADPH dehydrogenase, destabilizes medium size complex of the enzyme in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaohong; Gao, Fudan; Zhang, Jingsong; Ogawa, Teruo; Ma, Weimin

    2014-09-26

    Two mutants that grew faster than the wild-type (WT) strain under high light conditions were isolated from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 transformed with a transposon-bearing library. Both mutants had a tag in ssl1690 encoding NdhO. Deletion of ndhO increased the activity of NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1)-dependent cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (NDH-CET), while overexpression decreased the activity. Although deletion and overexpression of ndhO did not have significant effects on the amount of other subunits such as NdhH, NdhI, NdhK, and NdhM in the cells, the amount of these subunits in the medium size NDH-1 (NDH-1M) complex was higher in the ndhO-deletion mutant and much lower in the overexpression strain than in the WT. NdhO strongly interacts with NdhI and NdhK but not with other subunits. NdhI interacts with NdhK and the interaction was blocked by NdhO. The blocking may destabilize the NDH-1M complex and repress the NDH-CET activity. When cells were transferred from growth light to high light, the amounts of NdhI and NdhK increased without significant change in the amount of NdhO, thus decreasing the relative amount of NdhO. This might have decreased the blocking, thereby stabilizing the NDH-1M complex and increasing the NDH-CET activity under high light conditions. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2 from the fruitfly: dehydrogenase and hydratase act as separate entities, as revealed by structure and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haataja, Tatu J K; Koski, M Kristian; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Glumoff, Tuomo

    2011-05-01

    All of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathways characterized thus far house at least one MFE (multifunctional enzyme) catalysing two out of four reactions of the spiral. MFE type 2 proteins from various species display great variation in domain composition and predicted substrate preference. The gene CG3415 encodes for Drosophila melanogaster MFE-2 (DmMFE-2), complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MFE-2 deletion strain, and the recombinant protein displays both MFE-2 enzymatic activities in vitro. The resolved crystal structure is the first one for a full-length MFE-2 revealing the assembly of domains, and the data can also be transferred to structure-function studies for other MFE-2 proteins. The structure explains the necessity of dimerization. The lack of substrate channelling is proposed based on both the structural features, as well as by the fact that hydration and dehydrogenation activities of MFE-2, if produced as separate enzymes, are equally efficient in catalysis as the full-length MFE-2.

  18. Conversion of Human Steroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) into 3[beta]-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase by Single Point Mutation E120H: Example of Perfect Enzyme Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mo; Drury, Jason E.; Christianson, David W.; Penning, Trevor M. (UPENN)

    2012-10-10

    Human aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) and AKR1C enzymes are essential for bile acid biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism. AKR1D1 catalyzes the 5{beta}-reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids, whereas AKR1C enzymes are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs). These enzymes share high sequence identity and catalyze 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH to an electrophilic carbon but differ in that one residue in the conserved AKR catalytic tetrad, His120 (AKR1D1 numbering), is substituted by a glutamate in AKR1D1. We find that the AKR1D1 E120H mutant abolishes 5{beta}-reductase activity and introduces HSD activity. However, the E120H mutant unexpectedly favors dihydrosteroids with the 5{alpha}-configuration and, unlike most of the AKR1C enzymes, shows a dominant stereochemical preference to act as a 3{beta}-HSD as opposed to a 3{alpha}-HSD. The catalytic efficiency achieved for 3{beta}-HSD activity is higher than that observed for any AKR to date. High resolution crystal structures of the E120H mutant in complex with epiandrosterone, 5{beta}-dihydrotestosterone, and {Delta}{sup 4}-androstene-3,17-dione elucidated the structural basis for this functional change. The glutamate-histidine substitution prevents a 3-ketosteroid from penetrating the active site so that hydride transfer is directed toward the C3 carbonyl group rather than the {Delta}{sup 4}-double bond and confers 3{beta}-HSD activity on the 5{beta}-reductase. Structures indicate that stereospecificity of HSD activity is achieved because the steroid flips over to present its {alpha}-face to the A-face of NADPH. This is in contrast to the AKR1C enzymes, which can invert stereochemistry when the steroid swings across the binding pocket. These studies show how a single point mutation in AKR1D1 can introduce HSD activity with unexpected configurational and stereochemical preference.

  19. Characterization of the Enantioselective Properties of the Quinohemoprotein Alcohol Dehydrogenase of Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1635. 1. Different Enantiomeric Ratios of Whole Cells and Purified Enzyme in the Kinetic Resolution of Racemic Glycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, S S; Wandel, U; Jongejan, J A; Straathof, A J; Duine, J A

    1999-01-01

    Resting cells of Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1635 (ATCC 12874) show appreciable enantioselectivity (E=16-18) in the oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol, glycidol. Distinctly lower values (E=7-9) are observed for the ferricyanide-coupled oxidation of glycidol by the isolated quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase, QH-ADH, which is responsible for the enantiospecific oxidation step in whole cells. The accuracy of E-values from conversion experiments could be verified using complementary methods for the measurement of enantiomeric ratios. Effects of pH, detergent, the use of artificial electron acceptors, and the presence of intermediate aldehydes, could be accounted for. Measurements of E-values at successive stages of the purification showed that the drop in enantioselectivity correlates with the separation of QH-ADH from the cytoplasmic membrane. It is argued that the native arrangement of QH-ADH in the membrane-associated complex favors the higher E-values. The consequences of these findings for the use of whole cells versus purified enzymes in biocatalytic kinetic resolutions of chiral alcohols are discussed.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of a modified two-step algorithm using a combined glutamate dehydrogenase/toxin enzyme immunoassay and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasoo, Shawn; Stevens, Jane; Portillo, Lena; Barza, Ruby; Schejbal, Debra; Wu, May May; Chancey, Christina; Singh, Kamaljit

    2014-02-01

    The analytical performance and cost-effectiveness of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, the C. Diff. Quik Chek Complete (CdQCC) (a combined glutamate dehydrogenase antigen/toxin enzyme immunoassay), two RT-PCR assays (Progastro Cd and BD GeneOhm) and a modified two-step algorithm using the CdQCC reflexed to RT-PCR for indeterminate results were compared. The sensitivity of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, CdQCC (GDH antigen), BD GeneOhm and Progastro Cd RT-PCR were 85.4%, 95.8%, 100% and 93.8%, respectively. The algorithm provided rapid results for 86% of specimens and the remaining indeterminate results were resolved by RT-PCR, offering the best balance of sensitivity and cost savings per test (algorithm ∼US$13.50/test versus upfront RT-PCR ∼US$26.00/test). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Clostridium difficile testing algorithms using glutamate dehydrogenase antigen and C. difficile toxin enzyme immunoassays with C. difficile nucleic acid amplification testing increase diagnostic yield in a tertiary pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kaede V; McGowan, Karin L

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the rapid C. diff Quik Chek Complete's glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (GDH) and toxin A/B (CDT) tests in two algorithmic approaches for a tertiary pediatric population: algorithm 1 entailed initial testing with GDH/CDT followed by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and algorithm 2 entailed GDH/CDT followed by cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) for adjudication of discrepant GDH-positive/CDT-negative results. A true positive (TP) was defined as positivity by CCNA or positivity by LAMP plus another test (GDH, CDT, or the Premier C. difficile toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay [P-EIA]). A total of 141 specimens from 141 patients yielded 27 TPs and 19% prevalence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 56%, 100%, 100%, and 90% for P-EIA and 81%, 100%, 100%, and 96% for both algorithm 1 and algorithm 2. In summary, GDH-based algorithms detected C. difficile infections with superior sensitivity compared to P-EIA. The algorithms allowed immediate reporting of half of all TPs, but LAMP or CCNA was required to confirm the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile in GDH-positive/CDT-negative specimens.

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that helps red ...

  3. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  4. Immobilisation and characterisation of glucose dehydrogenase immobilised on ReSyn: a proprietary polyethylenimine support matrix

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twala, BV

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Immobilisation of enzymes is of considerable interest due to the advantages over soluble enzymes, including improved stability and recovery. Glucose Dehydrogenase (GDH) is an important biocatalytic enzyme due to is ability to recycle the biological...

  5. Malate dehydrogenase: a model for structure, evolution, and catalysis.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases are widely distributed and alignment of the amino acid sequences show that the enzyme has diverged into 2 main phylogenetic groups. Multiple amino acid sequence alignments of malate dehydrogenases also show that there is a low degree of primary structural similarity, apart from in several positions crucial for nucleotide binding, catalysis, and the subunit interface. The 3-dimensional structures of several malate dehydrogenases are similar, despite their low amino acid s...

  6. Arsenic-induced stress activates sulfur metabolism in different organs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) plants accompanied by a general decline of the NADPH-generating systems in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-Torres, Carmelo; Feriche-Linares, Rafael; Rodríguez-Ruíz, Marta; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination is a major environmental problem which affects most living organisms from plants to animals. This metalloid poses a health risk for humans through its accumulation in crops and water. Using garlic (Allium sativum L.) plants as model crop exposed to 200μM arsenate, a comparative study among their main organs (roots and shoots) was made. The analysis of arsenic, glutathione (GSH), phytochelatins (PCs) and lipid peroxidation contents with the activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate-glutathione cycle), and the main components of the NADPH-generating system, including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) was carried out. Data showed a correlation among arsenic accumulation in the different organs, PCs content and the antioxidative response, with a general decline of the NADPH-generating systems in roots. Overall, our results demonstrate that there are clear connections between arsenic uptake, increase of their As-chelating capacity in roots and a decline of antioxidative enzyme activities (catalase and the ascorbate peroxidase) whose alteration provoked As-induced oxidative stress. Thus, the data suggest that roots act as barrier of arsenic mediated by a prominent sulfur metabolism which is characterized by the biosynthesis of high amount of PCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of positron emission tomography and bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of bone involvement in metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma: specific implications for succinate dehydrogenase enzyme subunit B gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Tomás; Timmers, Henri J L M; Kozupa, Anna; Chen, Clara C; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Reynolds, James C; Ling, Alexander; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Lazúrová, Ivica; Adams, Karen T; Whatley, Millie A; Widimsky, Jirí; Pacak, Karel

    2008-03-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of 71 subjects with metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (30 subjects with mutation of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme subunit B (SDHB) gene and 41 subjects without SDHB mutation). Sixty-nine percent presented with bone metastases (SDHB +/-: 77% vs 63%), 39% with liver metastases (SDHB +/-: 27% vs 47%), and 32% with lung metastases (SDHB +/-: 37% vs 29%). The most common sites of bone involvement were thoracic spine (80%; SDHB+/-: 83% vs 77%), lumbar spine (78%; SDHB +/-: 78% vs 75%), and pelvic and sacral bones (78%; SDHB +/-: 91% vs 65%, P=0.04). Subjects with SDHB mutation also showed significantly higher involvement of long bones (SDHB +/-: 78% vs 30%, P=0.007) than those without the mutation. The best overall sensitivity in detecting bone metastases demonstrated positron emission tomography (PET) with 6-[(18)F]-fluorodopamine ([(18)F]-FDA; 90%), followed by bone scintigraphy (82%), computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI; 78%), 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) PET (76%), and scintigraphy with [(123/131)I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine (71%). In subjects with SDHB mutation, imaging modalities with best sensitivities for detecting bone metastases were CT/MRI (96%), bone scintigraphy (95%), and [(18)F]-FDG PET (92%). In subjects without SDHB mutations, the modality with the best sensitivity for bone metastases was [(18)F]-FDA PET (100%). In conclusion, bone scintigraphy should be used in the staging of patients with malignant pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, particularly in patients with SDHB mutations. As for PET imaging, [(18)F]-FDG PET is highly recommended in SDHB mutation patients, whereas [(18)F]-FDA PET is recommended in patients without the mutation.

  8. Increased Whole-Body and Sustained Liver Cortisol Regeneration by 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 in Obese Men With Type 2 Diabetes Provides a Target for Enzyme Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimson, Roland H.; Andrew, Ruth; McAvoy, Norma C.; Tripathi, Dhiraj; Hayes, Peter C.; Walker, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The cortisol-regenerating enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) amplifies glucocorticoid levels in liver and adipose tissue. 11β-HSD1 inhibitors are being developed to treat type 2 diabetes. In obesity, 11β-HSD1 is increased in adipose tissue but decreased in liver. The benefits of pharmacological inhibition may be reduced if hepatic 11β-HSD1 is similarly decreased in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. To examine this, we quantified in vivo whole-body, splanchnic, and hepatic 11β-HSD1 activity in obese type 2 diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten obese men with type 2 diabetes and seven normal-weight control subjects were infused with 9,11,12,12-[2H]4cortisol (40%) and cortisol (60%) at 1.74 mg/h. Adrenal cortisol secretion was suppressed with dexamethasone. Samples were obtained from the hepatic vein and an arterialized hand vein at steady state and after oral administration of cortisone (5 mg) to estimate whole-body and liver 11β-HSD1 activity using tracer dilution. RESULTS In obese type 2 diabetic subjects, the appearance rate of 9,12,12-[2H]3cortisol in arterialized blood was increased (35 ± 2 vs. 29 ± 1 nmol/min, P cortisol production was not reduced (29 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 6 nmol/min), and cortisol appearance in the hepatic vein after oral cortisone was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS Whole-body 11β-HSD1 activity is increased in obese men with type 2 diabetes, whereas liver 11β-HSD1 activity is sustained, unlike in euglycemic obesity. This supports the concept that inhibitors of 11β-HSD1 are likely to be most effective in obese type 2 diabetic subjects. PMID:21266326

  9. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  10. Characterization of CIM monoliths as enzyme reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopivec, Martina; Podgornik, Ales; Berovic, Marin; Strancar, Ales

    2003-09-25

    The immobilization of the enzymes citrate lyase, malate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase to CIM monolithic supports was performed. The long-term stability, reproducibility, and linear response range of the immobilized enzyme reactors were investigated along with the determination of the kinetic behavior of the enzymes immobilized on the CIM monoliths. The Michaelis-Menten constant K(m) and the turnover number k(3) of the immobilized enzymes were found to be flow-unaffected. Furthermore, the K(m) values of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were found to be comparable. Both facts indicate the absence of a diffusional limitation in immobilized CIM enzyme reactors.

  11. Optimization of Adsorptive Immobilization of Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivedi, Archana; Heinemann, Matthias; Spiess, Antje C.; Daussmann, Thomas; Büchs, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a systematic examination of various parameters of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) on solid support is performed and the impact of these parameters on immobilization efficiency is studied. Depending on the source of the enzymes, these parameters differently in

  12. Binding of small molecules to lipoamide dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiswinkel-Voetberg, van H.

    1972-01-01

    The existence of a monomer-dimer equilibrium with lipoamide dehydrogenase is demonstrated. The equilibrium can be shifted to the monomer side at low ionic strength and low pH by removing the phosphate ions by extensive dialysis. At low ionic strength, I : 0.01 and 0.02, the enzyme

  13. Relationships between the H and A-O blood types, phosphohexose isomerase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase red cell enzyme systems and halothane sensitivity, and economic traits in a superior and an inferior selection line of swiss landrace pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, P; Stranzinger, G; Schneebeli, H; Hagger, C; Künzi, N; Gerwig, C

    1984-12-01

    Associations between production traits and the genes for halothane sensitivity (HAL), S, A and H blood group systems and phosphohexose isomerase (PHI) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6-PGD) enzyme systems were investigated in two lines of pigs selected for an index. The phenotypic variance-covariance matrix of the index included backfat thickness and daily gain, whereas the genetic variance-covariance matrix included daily gain, feed conversion and percentage of lean meat. The experiment was conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Animal Production and has been underway since 1973. The same index was applied but in two opposite directions to give a superior and inferior line in relation to the production traits. One hundred twenty-nine animals of the superior line in the seventh generation and 88 animals of the inferior line in the sixth generation were studied. Forty-two percent (54/129) of the animals of the superior line were halothane-positive. No animals in the inferior line were halothane reactors. Of the halothane-positive pigs, 70.4% (38/54) in the superior line had the HaHa and 94.4% (51/54) had the SsSs genotype, whereas only 4% (3/75) of the HaHa and 12% (9/75) of the SsSs pigs were halothane-negative. By practicing selection at the H and S loci, it seems possible to efficiently reduce halothane sensitivity in Swiss Landrace pigs. In pigs of the superior line, there were significant differences in percentage of lean meat, carcass length, pH1 (pH value at 45 min to 1 h postmortem, M. longissimus) and reflectance values among genotypes of the HAL, S and H systems and among some genotypes of the 6-PGD system. Poorest meat quality, highest percentage of lean meat and shortest carcass length were observed in pigs homozygous for the alleles HALn, Ss, Ha, PHIB and 6-PGDA. In the inferior line, these associations were absent. As the HAL locus is associated with the above mentioned production traits, linkage disequilibria may explain the

  14. Malate dehydrogenase in phototrophic purple bacteria: purification, molecular weight, and quaternary structure.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The citric acid cycle enzyme malate dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity from the nonsulfur purple bacteria Rhodobacter capsulatus, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodomicrobium vannielii, and Rhodocyclus purpureus. Malate dehydrogenase was purified from each species by either a single- or a two-step protocol: triazine dye affinity chromatography was the key step in purification of malate dehydrogenase in all cases. Purification of malate dehydrogenase resulted in a 130- to 240-fold increase in ...

  15. Induction of glutamate dehydrogenase in the ovine fetal liver by dexamethasone infusion during late gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Timmerman (Michelle); R.B. Wilkening; T.R. Regnault

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids near term are known to upregulate many important enzyme systems prior to birth. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes both the reversible conversion of ammonium nitrogen into organic nitrogen (glutamate production) and th

  16. Induction of glutamate dehydrogenase in the ovine fetal liver by dexamethasone infusion during late gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Timmerman (Michelle); R.B. Wilkening; T.R. Regnault

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids near term are known to upregulate many important enzyme systems prior to birth. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes both the reversible conversion of ammonium nitrogen into organic nitrogen (glutamate production) and th

  17. Cell wall-associated malate dehydrogenase activity from maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vesna; Vuletić, Mirjana; Marković, Ksenija; Vučinić, Zeljko

    2011-10-01

    Isolated cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) roots exhibited ionically and covalently bound NAD-specific malate dehydrogenase activity. The enzyme catalyses a rapid reduction of oxaloacetate and much slower oxidation of malate. The kinetic and regulatory properties of the cell wall enzyme solubilized with 1M NaCl were different from those published for soluble, mitochondrial or plasma membrane malate dehydrogenase with respect to their ATP, Pi, and pH dependence. Isoelectric focusing of ionically-bound proteins and specific staining for malate dehydrogenase revealed characteristic isoforms present in cell wall isolate, different from those present in plasma membranes and crude homogenate. Much greater activity of cell wall-associated malate dehydrogenase was detected in the intensively growing lateral roots compared to primary root with decreased growth rates. Presence of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) in the assay medium inhibited the activity of the wall-associated malate dehydrogenase. Exposure of maize plants to excess concentrations of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) in the hydroponic solution inhibited lateral root growth, decreased malate dehydrogenase activity and changed isoform profiles. The results presented show that cell wall malate dehydrogenase is truly a wall-bound enzyme, and not an artefact of cytoplasmic contamination, involved in the developmental processes, and detoxification of heavy metals.

  18. Changes in C-N metabolism under elevated CO2 and temperature in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.): an adaptation strategy under climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Chandra Shekhar; Misra, Virendra

    2014-11-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the possible role of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism in adaptation of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) growing under ambient (370 ± 15 ppm) and elevated CO2 (700 ± 15 ppm), and jointly in elevated CO2 and temperature (30/22 °C for day/night). The key enzymes responsible for C-N metabolism were studied in different samples of Brassica juncea L. collected from ambient (AMB), elevated (ELE) and ELExT growth conditions. Total percent amount of C and N in leaves were particularly estimated to establish a clear understanding of aforesaid metabolism in plant adaptation. Furthermore, key morphological and physiological parameters such as plant height, leaf area index, dry biomass, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration, total protein and chlorophyll contents were also studied in relation to C/N metabolism. The results indicated that the C-metabolizing enzymes, such as (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, NAD-malic enzyme, NADP-malic enzyme and citrate synthase) and the N-metabolizing enzymes, such as (aspartate amino transferase, glutamine synthetase, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase) showed significantly (P ELExT > AMB growth conditions. This is also evident by significant (P adaptation in Brassica juncea L. against elevated CO2 and temperature prevailing in climate change scenarios.

  19. Pyruvate Is Synthesized by Two Pathways in Pea Bacteroids with Different Efficiencies for Nitrogen Fixation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mulley, Geraldine; Lopez-Gomez, Miguel; Zhang, Ye; Terpolilli, Jason; Prell, Jurgen; Finan, Turlough; Poole, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legume bacteroids is energized by the metabolism of dicarboxylic acids, which requires their oxidation to both oxaloacetate and pyruvate. In alfalfa bacteroids, production of pyruvate requires NAD+ malic enzyme (Dme) but not NADP+ malic enzyme (Tme). However, we show that Rhizobium leguminosarum has two pathways for pyruvate formation from dicarboxylates catalyzed by Dme and by the combined activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (PckA) and pyruvate kinase (...

  20. [Regularities of organ-specific expression of enzyme systems in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarenko, O F; Glazko, V I

    1992-01-01

    The organ specificity of creatine kinase, esterase, isocitrate dehydrogenase lactate dehydrogenase, nucleoside phosphorylase, adenylate kinase, hexokinase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of black-white cattle has been studied. Esterases, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have a very wide spectrum of the organ variabilities. Liver and heart have the largest specificity of enzymes activity. Some peculiarities of isozyme spectrum are found in ovaries and spleen.

  1. Purification and characterization of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, H; Inagaki, K; Matsunami, H; Nakayama, Y; Tano, T; Tanaka, H

    2000-01-01

    3-Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity from the acidophilic autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans. The native enzyme was a dimer of molecular weight 40,000. The apparent K(m) values for 3-isopropylmalate and NAD+ were estimated to be 0.13 mM and 8.7 mM, respectively. The optimum pH for activity was 9.0 and the optimum temperature was 65 degrees C. The properties of the enzyme were similar to those of the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans enzyme, expect for substrate specificity. T. thiooxidans 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase could not utilize malate as a substrate.

  2. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  3. Selective inhibition of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Massimo; El-Bastawissy, Eman; Knaggs, Michael H.; Barrett, Michael P.; Hanau, Stefania; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2001-05-01

    A number of triphenylmethane derivatives have been screened against 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei and sheep liver. Some of these compounds show good inhibition of the enzymes and also selectivity towards the parasite enzyme. Modelling was undertaken to dock the compounds into the active sites of both enzymes. Using a combination of DOCK 3.5 and FLEXIDOCK a correlation was obtained between docking score and both activity for the enzymes and selectivity. Visualisation of the docked structures of the inhibitors in the active sites of the enzymes yielded a possible explanation of the selectivity for the parasite enzyme.

  4. Identity of the subunits and the stoicheiometry of prosthetic groups in trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, A A; Papas, E J; Steenkamp, D J

    1983-01-01

    Trimethylamine dehydrogenases from bacterium W3A1 and Hyphomicrobium X and the dimethylamine dehydrogenase from Hyphomicrobium X were found to contain only one kind of subunit. The millimolar absorption coefficient of a single [4Fe-4S] cluster in trimethylamine dehydrogenase from bacterium W3A1 was estimated to be 14.8 mM-1 . cm-1 at 443 nm. From this value a 1:1 stoicheiometry of the prosthetic groups, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and the [4Fe-4S] cluster, was established. Millimolar absorption coefficients of the three enzymes were in the range 49.4-58.7 mM-1 . cm-1 at approx. 440 nm. This range of values is consistent with the presence of two [4Fe-4S] clusters and two flavin residues, for which the millimolar absorption coefficient had earlier been found to be 12.3 mM-1 . cm-1 at 437 nm. The N-terminal amino acid was alanine in each of the three enzymes. Sequence analysis of the first 15 residues from the N-terminus of dimethylamine dehydrogenase indicated a single unique sequence. Two identical subunits, each containing covalently bound 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and a [4Fe-4S] cluster, in each of the enzymes are therefore indicated. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882357

  5. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Winkler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S-selectivity and together with a highly (R-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases.

  6. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms, alcohol intake and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, P.; McKay, J.D.; Jenab, M.; Brennan, P.; Canzian, F.; Vogel, U.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Tolstrup, J.S.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Morois, S.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Bergmann, M.; Trichopoulou, A.; Katsoulis, M.; Trichopoulos, D.; Krogh, V.; Panico, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Palli, D.; Tumino, R.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.; Vrieling, A.; Lund, E.; Hjartaker, A.; Agudo, A.; Suarez, L.R.; Arriola, L.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Sanchez, M.J.; Manjer, J.; Lindkvist, B.; Hallmans, G.; Palmqvist, R.; Allen, N.; Key, T.; Khaw, K.T.; Slimani, N.; Rinaldi, S.; Romieu, I.; Boffetta, P.; Romaguera, D.; Norat, T.; Riboli, E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenase – physiological and diagnostic Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Łaniewska-Dunaj

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH is a polymorphic enzyme, existing in multiple isoenzymes divided into several classes and localized in different organs. ADH plays a significant role in the metabolism of many biologically important substances, catalyzing the oxidation or reduction of a wide spectrum of specific substrates. The best characterized function of ADH is protection against excess of ethanol and some other exogenous xenobiotics and products of lipid peroxidation. The isoenzymes of alcohol dehydrogenase also participate in the metabolism of retinol and serotonin. The total alcohol dehydrogenase activity is significantly higher in cancer tissues than in healthy organs (e.g. liver, stomach, colorectum. The changes in activity of particular ADH isoenzymes in the sera of patients with different cancers (especially of the digestive system seem to be caused by release of these isoenzymes from cancer cells, and may play a potential role as markers of this cancer. The particular isoenzymes of ADH present in the serum may indicate the cancer localization. Alcohol dehydrogenase may also be useful for diagnostics of non-cancerous liver diseases (e.g. viral hepatitis, non-alcoholic cirrhosis.

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  9. Dehydrogenase isoenzyme polymorphism in genus Prunus, subgenus Cerasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolić Slavica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dehydrogenase polymorphism was studied in 36 sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L., sweet cherry (Prunus avuim L., mahaleb (Prunus mahaleb L., ground cherry (Prunus fruticosa Pall., duke cherry (Prunus gondounii Redh., Japanese flowering cherry (Prunus serrulata Lindl. and four iterspecific hybrids (standard cherry rootstocks ‘Gisela 5’, ‘Gisela 6’, ‘Max Ma’ and ‘Colt’. Inner bark of one-year-old shoots, in dormant stage, was used for enzyme extraction. Vertical PAGE was used for isoenzyme analysis: alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, formate dehydrogenase (FDH, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, isocitrate dehydrogenaze (IDH, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD, and shikimate dehydrogenase (SDH. All studied systems were polymorphic at 10 loci: Adh -1 (3 genotypes and Adh-2 (5 genotypes, Fdh-1 (2 genotypes, Gdh-1 (3 genotypes, Idh-1 (4 genotypes i Idh -2 (5 genotypes, Mdh-1 (3 genotypes, Pgd-1 (4 genotypes, Sdh-1 (1 genotype i Sdh-2 (3 genotypes. Cluster analysis was used to construct dendrogram on which four groups of similar genotypes were separated. Obtained results indicate that studied enzyme systems can be used for determination of genus Prunus, subgenus Cerasus. Among studied enzyme systems ADH, IDH and SDH were the most polymorphic and most useful to identify genetic variability. Polymorphism of FDH and GDH in genus Prunus, subgenus Cerasus was described first time in this work. First results for dehydrogenase variability of Oblačinska indicate that polymorphism of loci Idh-2 and Sdh-2 can be useful for discrimination of different clones.

  10. Purification and properties of thiosulfate dehydrogenase from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans JCM7814.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Nakamura, M; Yoshikawa, H; Amano, Y

    2001-01-01

    A key enzyme of the thiosulfate oxidation pathway in Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans JCM7814 was investigated. As a result of assaying the enzymatic activities of thiosulfate dehydrogenase, rhodanese, and thiosulfate reductase at 5.5 of intracellular pH, the activity of thiosulfate dehydrogenase was measured as the key enzyme. The thiosulfate dehydrogenase of A. thiooxidans JCM7814 was purified using three chromatographies. The purified sample was electrophoretically homogeneous. The molecular mass of the enzyme was 27.9 kDa and it was a monomer. This enzyme had cytochrome c. The optimum pH and temperature of this enzyme were 3.5 and 35 degrees C. The enzyme was stable in the pH range from 5 to 7, and it was stable up to 45 degrees C. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 8.9. This enzyme reacted with thiosulfate as a substrate. The Km was 0.81 mM.

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S; Diplas, Bill H; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg(132) of IDH1 and Arg(172) of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy.

  12. Immobilized enzymes in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbach, K

    1985-01-01

    The immobilization of enzymes and cells by different methods and the possible stabilization of immobilized preparations are discussed. An outlook on 'second generation enzyme technology', which involves immobilized multi-enzyme systems and coenzymes, is given with examples: the immobilization of dehydrogenases with their active sites facing one another, and systems containing NAD(H) coenzymes immobilized by coupling to dextran (in an enzyme electrode), to polyethylene glycol (in a membrane reactor), or to enzymes themselves. The use of immobilized enzymes to synthesize peptides and disaccharides is described.

  13. Hybridizability of gamma-irradiated lactic dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, M.

    1976-03-01

    The hybridizabilities of the gamma-irradiated chicken heart and pig muscle lactic dehydrogenases were estimated by hybridizing the irradiated enzymes with the unirradiated pig heart lactic dehydrogenase. The disc gel electrophoretic patterns of the inter- and intraspecific hybrids showed that the LDH activity of the pig heart isozyme band increased as a function of dose. This observation was analyzed upon the binomial redistribution pattern of the recombined subunits. The result shows that the hybridizabilities of both the chicken heart and pig muscle isozymes decreased along with the loss of catalytic activity and the release from substrate inhibition. The titration of free SH groups of the irradiated chicken isozyme suggested that the unfolding of the peptide chain destroyed the specific tertiary structure needed for the binding of subunits. (auth)

  14. A novel glutamate dehydrogenase from bovine brain: purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Kim, S W; Cho, S W

    1995-08-01

    A soluble form of novel glutamate dehydrogenase has been purified from bovine brain. The preparation was homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and composed of six identical subunits having a subunit size of 57,500 Da. The biochemical properties of glutamate dehydrogenase such as N-terminal amino acids sequences, kinetic parameters, amino acids analysis, and optimum pH were examined in both reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxidative deamination of glutamate. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the bovine brain enzyme showed the significant differences in the first 5 amino acids compared to other glutamate dehydrogenases from various sources. These results indicate that glutamate dehydrogenase isolated from bovine brain is a novel polypeptide.

  15. P450BM3 fused to phosphite dehydrogenase allows phosphite-driven selective oxidations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Nina; Kulig, Justyna K; Bartsch, Anette; Hayes, Martin A; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    To facilitate the wider application of the NADPH-dependent P450BM3, we fused the monooxygenase with a phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH). The resulting monooxygenase-dehydrogenase fusion enzyme acts as a self-sufficient bifunctional catalyst, accepting phosphite as a cheap electron donor for the regener

  16. Malate dehydrogenase activity in human seminal plasma and spermatozoa homogenates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Leventerler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Malate Dehydrogenase is an important enzyme of the Krebs cycle, most cells require this enzyme for their metabolic activity. We evaluated the Malate Dehydrogenase (NAD/NADP activity in human seminal plasma and sperm homogenates in normozoospermic, fertile and infertile males. Also glucose and fructose concentrations were determined in the seminal plasma samples. Material and Methods: Malate Dehydrogenase (NAD/NADP activity in human seminal plasma and sperm homogenates of normozoospermic and infertile males was determined by spectrophotometric method. Semen analysis was considered according to the WHO Criteria. Results: Malat Dehydrogenase-NAD value in seminal plasma (the mean ± SD, mU/ml of asthenoteratospermic (40.0±25.7 and azospermic (38.0±43.6 groups were significantly lower than normozoospermic, (93.9±52.1 males. Malat Dehydrogenase-NAD value in sperm homogenates (the mean ± SD, mU/ 20x106 sperm of teratospermic group (136.8±61.8 was significantly higher compared to the normozoospermic (87.3±26.5 males. Glucose concentration (mg/dl in asthenoteratospermic (4.0±1.4 and azospermic (15.4±6.4 groups were significantly higher than fertile (2.0±2.1 males. Also fructose concentration (mg/dl in asthenoteratospermic (706.6±143.3 and azospermic (338.1±228.2 groups were significantly high compared to the normozoospermic (184.7±124.8 group. Conclusion: Sperm may be some part of the source of Malat Dehydrogenase activity in semen. Malat Dehydrogenase activity in seminal plasma has an important role on energy metabolism of sperm. Intermediate substrates of Krebs cycle might have been produced under the control of Malat Dehydrogenase and these substrates may be important for sperm motility and male infertility. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 648-658

  17. Identification and Overexpression of a Bifunctional Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Ethanol Production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Just Mikkelsen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    aldehyde dehydrogenase in the cell and functions predominantly in the acetyl-CoA reduction to acetaldehyde in the ethanol formation pathway. Finally, AdhE was conditionally expressed from a xylose-induced promoter in a recombinant strain (BG1E1) with a concomitant deletion of a lactate dehydrogenase......Thermoanaerobacter mathranii contains four genes, adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE, predicted to code for alcohol dehydrogenases involved in ethanol metabolism. These alcohol dehydrogenases were characterized as NADP(H)-dependent primary alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA), secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh......B), butanol dehydrogenase (BdhA) and NAD(H)-dependent bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE), respectively. Here we observed that AdhE is an important enzyme responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii based on the constructed adh knockout strains. An adhE knockout strain fails to produce...

  18. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (UCSF)

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  19. Glycolate oxidation in A. thaliana chloroplasts improves biomass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eMaier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A complete glycolate catabolic cycle was established in chloroplasts of the C3-model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by which one molecule of glycolate is completely oxidized within the chloroplast to two molecules of CO2. Genes coding for glycolate oxidase, malate synthase, and catalase were introduced into the nuclear genome of A. thaliana by step-wise transformation. Other genes required for a fully operational pathway are the endogenous NADP-malic enzyme and pyruvate dehydrogenase. Transgenic lines expressing the complete novel pathway produced rossettes with more leaves and higher fresh and dry weight but individual leaves were flatter and thinner than the wild type. The photosynthetic rates of the transgenic plants were higher on a dry weight and chlorophyll basis, but there were no differences in the compensation point. In addition, transgenic plants showed a lower glycine/serine ratio than the wild type indicating a reduction of the flux through the photorespiratory pathway. In this way, due to the increased oxidation of glycolate inside the chloroplasts, a photorespiratory bypass was created, which resulted in higher CO2 assimilation and enhanced biomass production.

  20. Cofactor engineering of Lactobacillus brevis alcohol dehydrogenase by computational design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Looger, L.L.; Raedts, J.G.J.; Dijkhuizen, S.; Hummel, W.; Henneman, H.G.; Daussmann, T.; Oost, van der J.

    2009-01-01

    The R-specific alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (Lb-ADH) catalyzes the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols. It is stable and has broad substrate specificity. These features make this enzyme an attractive candidate for biotechnologica

  1. Purification and characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Kekos, D.; Macris, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) from Fusarium oxysporum, a key enzyme in the conversion of xylose to ethanol, was purified to homogeneity and characterised. It was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 48 000, and pI 3.6. It was optimally active at 45degreesC and pH 9-10. It was fully...

  2. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Effect of macromolecula r crowding upon the st ructure and funct ion of an enzyme: Glycera ldehyde-3-phospha te dehydrogenase. Biochem- istry 20:4821...Leit ing B, Ruel R, Nicholson DW, and Thornber ry NA (1998) Inhibit ion of human caspases by pept ide-based and macromolecula r inh ib- itors. J Biol

  3. Alcohol consumption, alcohol dehydrogenase 3 polymorphism, and colorectal adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemersma, E.W.; Wark, P.A.; Ocké, M.C.; Bunschoten, A.; Otten, M.H.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is a probable risk factor with regard to colorectal neoplasm and is metabolized to the carcinogen acetaldehyde by the genetically polymorphic alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) enzyme. We evaluated whether the association between alcohol and colorectal adenomas is modified by ADH3 polymorphism.

  4. Mutations associated with succinate dehydrogenase D-related malignant paragangliomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Pacak, K.; Bertherat, J.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Duet, M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Stratakis, C.A.; Niccoli-Sire, P.; Tran, B.H.; Burnichon, N.; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) syndromes result from germline mutations in genes encoding subunits B, C and D of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, SDHC and SDHD). SDHB-related PGLs are known in particular for their high malignant potential. Recently, however, maligna

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase in the cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moezelaar, R.; Teixeira, de M.J.; Stal, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806 was found to possess an NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) which catalyzes the reduction of pyruvate to l-lactate. The enzyme required fructose 1,6-bisphosphate for activity and displayed positive cooperativity towards pyruvate. Lactate was not

  6. Encapsulation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Mannitol by Spray Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Hirokazu Shiga; Hiromi Joreau; Tze Loon Neoh; Takeshi Furuta; Hidefumi Yoshii

    2014-01-01

    The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably...

  7. Dietary modulation of erythrocyte insulin receptor interaction and the regulation of adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in growing rats; a mechanism of action of dietary fiber in metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunwole, J.O.A.

    1984-01-01

    The metabolic effects of graded cellulose (a dietary fiber) intake were studied at minimal (10%) and maximal (20%) protein levels in male weanling Sprague Dawley rats. The hypothesis was tested that the hypoglycemic effect of high fiber diets is partly mediated through increased tissue sensitivity to insulin at the cell receptor level. Erythrocyte insulin receptor interaction (IRI) and percent insulin stimulation of adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity (PDS) were used as indices of tissue sensitivity to insulin. IRI was determined by a standardized radioceptor assay PDS by the rate of oxidation of 1-/sup 14/C-pyruvate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in epidymal fat pads and serum insulin levels by radioimmunoassay. In both protein groups, the addition of fiber in the diet resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in food intake (FI) for calorie compensation. Fiber and protein intake had a significant (P < 0.01) effect on IRI and both basal (PDB) and PDS activities of PDH. At all fiber levels, specific percent /sup 125/I-insulin binding (SIB) was higher in the 20% protein groups while in the fiber-free group, a higher SIB was observed in the 10% protein group.

  8. Overproduction and substrate specificity of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, H; Kawaguchi, H; Inagaki, K; Eguchi, T; Kakinuma, K; Tanaka, H

    1998-02-01

    We constructed an overexpression system in Escherichia coli of the leuB gene coding for 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. E. coli harboring the plasmid we constructed, pKK leuB1, produced 17-fold the enzyme protein of the expression system previously used for purification. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was analyzed with synthetic (2R, 3S)-3-alkylmalates. The 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans had broad specificity toward the alkylmalates.

  9. [Palmitoyl-CoA-dehydrogenase from rabbit adrenals, liver and myocardium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshkevich, N A; Mandrik, K A; Vinogradov, V V

    1988-01-01

    Partially purified preparations of palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase from rabbit adrenal glands, liver and heart tissues exhibited similar kinetic parameters. Km value constituted 6.58, 5.26 and 6.67 microM for the enzyme from adrenal glands, liver and heart tissues, respectively. At the same time, palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase possessed lower catalytic capacity in adrenal glands due to the decreased amount of the enzyme as compared with that of liver or heart tissues.

  10. Effect of palm oil (Elaeis guineensis) tocotrienols on mesenteric adipose tissue deposition and the expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 enzyme (11β-HSD1) in adrenalectomized rats treated with dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azwan, K; Farihah, H S; Fairus, A; Elvy, M R

    2015-01-01

    A study was done to investigate the effect of palm oil (Elaeis guineensis) tocotrienols on (1) rats mesenteric adipose tissue deposition (2) and 11β-HSD1 enzyme expression in mesenteric adipocyte. There is a necessity to find an inhibitor for the 11β-HSD1 enzyme which enhances the proliferation of mesenteric adipocyte tissue therefore curbing the onset of metabolic syndrome. A total of 35 male Spraque Dawley rats were divided into 5 different groups, i.e., a baseline control group (n=7), a sham operated group (n=7) and three experimental adrenalectomised groups (ADR) (n=21). Each of the experimental ADR group was given intramuscular dexamethasone (Dexa) with a dose of 120 μg/kg after 2 weeks post adrenalectomy and were divided into adrenalectomised control (n=7), Glycyrrhizic acid (GCA) treated (dose=120 mg/kg/day; n=7) and Palm Tocotrienol treated (dose=60 mg/kg/day; n=7) groups. These various treatments were given 6 days a week for 8 weeks via gastric gavage (following 2 weeks of adrenalectomy). Data is expressed as mean ± standard error mean (SEM), compared to each other using one-way analysis-of-variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's post hoc test and then a t-test. The results show that palm tocotrienol tend to slightly increase mesenteric adipose tissue deposition in rats. However, palm tocotrienol was also found to have potential in inhibiting the expression of 11β-HSD1 enzyme in mesenteric adipocytes. This study suggests palm tocotrienol inhibits 11β-HSD1 enzyme expression and activity.

  11. 酮古龙酸菌山梨醇脱氢酶的原核表达及活性检测%Prokaryotic Expression and Enzyme Activity Analysis of a D-Sorbi-tol Dehydrogenase of Ketogulonigenium vulgare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵楠; 熊向华; 葛欣; 汪建华; 夏焕章; 张惟材

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To clone a D-sorbitol dehydrogenase(SLDH) gene sldh from Ketogulonigenium vulgare Y25 and investigate its expression and biological activity in E.coli. Methods: The sldh gene was amplified from K.vul-gare Y25 genome, then constructed into the pTIG vector. After the expression bacteria strain E.coli BL21(DE3) transformed with the recombinant plasmid was induced by IPTG, the whole cell, the supernatant and pellet of the cellular lysate were examined by SDS-PAGE. Using D-sorbitol as a substrate, the biological activity of the expres-sion product was analyzed by Native-PAGE, the bioconversion in vitro and resting cells assay. Results: The length of amplified fragment was 1740 bp as expected and the expression plasmid pTIG-sldh was successfully con-structed. It was revealed that the molecular weight of soluble expression protein band was about 58 kD by SDS-PAGE analysis. The result of Native-PAGE demonstrated that the expression product possesses dehydrogenase activity. In the bioconversion in vitro and resting cell experiment, L-sorbose was detected through the TLC assay. Conclusion: SLDH from K.vulgare was successfully solubly expressed in E.coli BL21(DE3) and transform D-sorbi-tol to L-sorbose by dehydrogenation.%目的:克隆酮古龙酸菌Y25的山梨醇脱氢酶基因sldh,在大肠杆菌中进行表达并检测表达产物的活性。方法:以酮古龙酸菌Y25基因组DNA为模板,PCR扩增sldh基因,连接到表达载体pTIG,转入大肠杆菌BL21(DE3), IPTG诱导表达;取表达菌体、菌体裂解上清和沉淀进行SDS-PAGE分析;以山梨醇为底物,通过活性电泳、体外转化及休止细胞转化进行sldh基因表达产物的活性检测。结果:扩增得到1740 bp的山梨醇脱氢酶基因,构建了表达质粒pTIG-sldh并在大肠杆菌中获得表达,SDS-PAGE结果显示表达产物为可溶性形式,相对分子质量约58×103;活性电泳结果说明表达产物在以山

  12. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  13. Application of NAD-dependent polyol dehydrogenases for enzymatic mannitol/sorbitol production with coenzyme regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, S; Arnaut, F; Soetaert, W; Vandamme, E J

    2003-01-01

    D-Mannitol and D-sorbitol were produced enzymatically from D-fructose using NAD-dependent polyol dehydrogenases. For the production of D-mannitol the Leuconostoc mesenteroides mannitol dehydrogenase could be used. Gluconobacter oxydans cell extract contained however both mannitol and sorbitol dehydrogenase. When this cell extract was used, the reduction of D-fructose resulted in a mixture of D-sorbitol and D-mannitol. To determine the optimal bioconversion conditions the polyol dehydrogenases were characterized towards pH- and temperature-optimum and -stability. As a compromise between enzyme activity and stability, the bioconversion reactions were performed at pH 6.5 and 25 degrees C. Since the polyol dehydrogenases are NADH-dependent, an efficient coenzyme regeneration was needed. Regeneration of NADH was accomplished by formate dehydrogenase-mediated oxidation of formate into CO2.

  14. [Enzyme activity in the subcellular fractions of the liver of rats following a flight on board the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigranian, R A; Vetrova, E G; Abraham, S; Lin, C; Klein, H

    1983-01-01

    The activities of malate, isocitrate, and lactate dehydrogenases were measured in the liver mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic fractions of rats flown for 18.5 days onboard Cosmos-1129. The activities of the oxidative enzymes, malate and isocitrate dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial fraction and those of the glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, in the cytoplasmatic fraction were found to decrease.

  15. An NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase from cyanobacteria. Identification and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, S; Candau, P

    1991-07-08

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 presents a hexameric NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase with a molecular mass of 295 kDa. The enzyme differs from the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase found in the same strain and is coded by a different gene. NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase shows a high coenzyme specificity, catalyzes preferentially glutamate formation and presents Km values for ammonium, NADH and 2-oxoglutarate of 4.5 mM, 50 microM and 1.8 mM respectively. An animating role for the enzyme is discussed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions lactate dehydrogenase deficiency lactate dehydrogenase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency is a condition that affects how the ...

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase is the regulator of respiration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Hartman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In chronic infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli are thought to enter a metabolic program that provides sufficient energy for maintenance of the protonmotive force, but is insufficient to meet the demands of cellular growth. We sought to understand this metabolic downshift genetically by targeting succinate dehydrogenase, the enzyme which couples the growth processes controlled by the TCA cycle with the energy production resulting from the electron transport chain. M. tuberculosis contains two operons which are predicted to encode succinate dehydrogenase enzymes (sdh-1 and sdh-2; we found that deletion of Sdh1 contributes to an inability to survive long term stationary phase. Stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry revealed that Sdh1 functions as a succinate dehydrogenase during aerobic growth, and that Sdh2 is dispensable for this catalysis, but partially overlapping activities ensure that the loss of one enzyme can incompletely compensate for loss of the other. Deletion of Sdh1 disturbs the rate of respiration via the mycobacterial electron transport chain, resulting in an increased proportion of reduced electron carrier (menaquinol which leads to increased oxygen consumption. The loss of respiratory control leads to an inability to recover from stationary phase. We propose a model in which succinate dehydrogenase is a governor of cellular respiration in the adaptation to low oxygen environments.

  18. 三硝基甲苯对斑马鱼组织ATP酶·乳酸脱氢酶和谷胱甘肽活性的影响%Effects of Trinitrotoluene on Activities of ATP Enzyme, Lactate Dehydrogenase and Glutathione from Zebra Fish Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢松; 付兴亮; 曲瑾; 王佳; 卢胜涛; 柳峰松

    2013-01-01

    [目的]探讨三硝基甲苯(TNT)对斑马鱼(Danio rerio)组织中酶活性的影响,为评价TNT的毒性效应提供参考.[方法]采用毒性试验方法研究了不同浓度(0.5、1.0、2.0、4.0mg/L)的TNT对斑马鱼肝和鳃中ATP酶、头中乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)和肝中谷胱甘肽(GSH)活性的影响.[结果]肝和腮组织中的ATP酶活性随浓度的升高而降低;肝中GSH的活性随浓度的升高而升高;头中LDH活性随浓度的升高而降低.酶活随时间的变化规律和随不同浓度的变化规律相同,但变化缓慢.[结论]用斑马鱼肝和腮组织中酶活性作为毒理学指标能较好地评价TNT的毒性效应.%[Objective] The aim was to explore effects of Trinitrotoluene ( TNT) on activities of ATP enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutathione (GSH ) of Danio rerio tissue so as to provide reference for evaluation on toxicity effect of TNT. [Method] Effects of TNT of different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/L) on activities of ATP enzyme from liver and gill tissues, LDH from head tissue and GSH from liver tissue of D. rerio were determined by using toxicity test method. [Result] The activity of ATP enzyme from liver and gill tissues decreased with the increase of TNT mass concentration; the activity of GSH from liver tissue increased with the increase of TNT mass concentration ; the activity of LDH from head tissue decreased with the increase of TNT mass concentration. The variation of enzyme activity over time was the same as different concentration but changed slowly. [Conclusion] It can better evaluate the toxic effects of TNT to use the activities of enzymes from D. rerio liver and gills as loxicological indicators.

  19. Simultaneous overexpression of enzymes of the lower part of glycolysis can enhance the fermentative capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smits, H. P.; Hauf, J.; Muller, S.

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains, with elevated levels of the enzymes of lower glycolysis (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate mutase, phosphoglycerate kinase, enolase, pyruvate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase) were physiologically characterized...

  20. Fabricating polystyrene fiber-dehydrogenase assemble as a functional biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of the enzymes on nano-structured materials is a promising approach to enhance enzyme stabilization, activation and reusability. This study aimed to develop polystyrene fiber-enzyme assembles to catalyze model formaldehyde to methanol dehydrogenation reaction, which is an essential step for bioconversion of CO2 to a renewable bioenergy. We fabricated and modified electrospun polystyrene fibers, which showed high capability to immobilize dehydrogenase for the fiber-enzyme assembles. Results from evaluation of biochemical activities of the fiber-enzyme assemble showed that nitriation with the nitric/sulfuric acid ratio (v/v, 10:1) and silanization treatment delivered desirable enzyme activity and long-term storage stability, showing great promising toward future large-scale applications.

  1. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms, alcohol intake and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, P.; McKay, J. D.; Jenab, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian...... (fast metabolizers) showed an average daily alcohol intake of 4.3 g per day lower than subjects with two copies of the rs1229984(G) allele (slow metabolizers) (P-diff...

  2. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor.

  3. Glutamate dehydrogenase from pumpkin cotyledons: characterization and isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K H; Splittstoesser, W E

    1972-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase from pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Pior. cultivar Dickinson Field) cotyledons was found in both soluble and particulate fractions with the bulk of the activity in the soluble fraction. Both enzymes used NAD(H) and NADP(H) but NAD(H) was favored. The enzymes were classified as glutamate-NAD oxidoreductase, deaminating (EC 1.4.1.3). Both enzymes were heat stable, had a pH optimum for reductive amination of 8.0, and were inhibited by high concentrations of NH(4) (+) or alpha-ketoglutarate. The soluble enzyme was more sensitive to NH(4) (+) inhibition and was activated by metal ions after ammonium sulfate fractionation while the solubilized particulate enzyme was not. Inhibition by ethylenediaminetetraacetate was restored by several divalent ions and inhibition by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate was reversed by glutathione. Particulate glutamate dehydrogenase showed a greater activity with NADP. The molecular weights of the enzymes are 250,000. Separation of the enzymes by disc gel electrophoresis showed that during germination the soluble isoenzymes increased from 1 to 7 in number, while only one particulate isoenzyme was found at any time. This particulate isoenzyme was identical with one of the soluble isoenzymes. A number of methods indicated that the soluble isoenzymes were not simply removed from the particulate fraction and that true isoenzymes were found.

  4. A quantitative histochemical study of lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the membrana granulosa of the ovulatory follicle of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, L C; Enelow, R

    1983-11-01

    Using a microdensitometer, lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities were measured in the membrana granulosa of the rat ovulatory follicle. Ovaries were removed on each day of the oestrous cycle; oestrus, dioestrus-1, dioestrus-2, and proestrus; and enzyme activities measured in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in four regions within it: peripheral (PR), antral (AR), cumulus oophorus (CO) and corona radiata (CR). Throughout the cycle, lactate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR. On oestrus, lactate dehydrogenase activity was progressively less in AR, CO and CR. On dioestrus-1, activity was identical in AR and CO and less in CR. On dioestrus-2, activity was greater in AR than in CO or CR. By proestrus, activity was equal in AR, CO and CR. In the membrana granulosa as a whole, and in each region, lactate dehydrogenase activity declined as ovulation approached. In contrast, succinate dehydrogenase activity in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in PR was constant throughout the cycle. Activity fluctuated in the other regions. Succinate dehydrogenase activity on oestrus was greatest in PR, less in AR and CO and least in CR. On the remaining days, succinate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR and less but equal in the remainder of the membrana granulosa.

  5. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of l-Phenylserine Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuko Ueshima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding d-phenylserine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15 was identified, and a 9,246-bp nucleotide sequence containing the gene was sequenced. Six ORFs were confirmed in the sequenced region, four of which were predicted to form an operon. A homology search of each ORF predicted that orf3 encoded l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. Hence, orf3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and recombinant ORF3 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The purified ORF3 enzyme showed l-phenylserine dehydrogenase activity. The enzymological properties and primary structure of l-phenylserine dehydrogenase (ORF3 were quite different from those of d-phenylserine dehydrogenase previously reported. l-Phenylserine dehydrogenase catalyzed the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the β-hydroxyl group of l-β-phenylserine. l-Phenylserine and l-threo-(2-thienylserine were good substrates for l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. The genes encoding l-phenylserine dehydrogenase and d-phenylserine dehydrogenase, which is induced by phenylserine, are located in a single operon. The reaction products of both enzymatic reactions were 2-aminoacetophenone and CO2.

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  8. Crystal structure of quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from Comamonas testosteroni - Structural basis for substrate oxidation and electron transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oubrie, A; Rozeboom, HJ; Kalk, KH; Huizinga, EG; Dijkstra, BW; Huizinga, Eric G.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2002-01-01

    Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases are redox enzymes that participate in distinctive catabolic pathways that enable bacteria to grow on various alcohols as the sole source of carbon and energy. The x-ray structure of the quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from Comamonas testosteroni has been

  9. [Enzyme activity of an actinomycete producer of carotenes and macrotetrolides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefelova, M V; Sverdlova, A N

    1982-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase and dehydrogenases of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was assayed in the mycelium of Streptomyces chrysomallus var. Carotenoides growing under different conditions of the medium. The activity of the enzymes increased when acetic, citric and succinic acids were added at different periods of the growth. Moreover, addition of the acids increased the time of intensive functioning of the dehydrogenases whose activity abruptly decreased after 60 h of the growth under the control conditions.

  10. Purification, characterization, and cloning of a bifunctional molybdoenzyme with hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Hanefeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    A bifunctional hydratase/alcohol dehydrogenase was isolated from the cyclohexanol degrading bacterium Alicycliphilus denitrificans DSMZ 14773. The enzyme catalyzes the addition of water to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and the subsequent alcohol oxidation. The purified enzyme showed three

  11. Purification, characterization, and cloning of a bifunctional molybdoenzyme with hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Hanefeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    A bifunctional hydratase/alcohol dehydrogenase was isolated from the cyclohexanol degrading bacterium Alicycliphilus denitrificans DSMZ 14773. The enzyme catalyzes the addition of water to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and the subsequent alcohol oxidation. The purified enzyme showed three subun

  12. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the sera of patients with brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelski, Wojciech; Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    Human brain tissue contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and possess also aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. In our last experiments we have shown that ADH and ALDH are present also in the brain tumour cells. Moreover the activities of total ADH and class I isoenzymes were significantly higher in cancer tissue than healthy cells. It can suggests that these changes may be reflected by enzyme activity in the serum of patients with brain cancer. Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 62 patients suffering from brain cancer (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. A statistically significant increase of class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes was found in the sera of patients with brain cancer. The median activity of this class isoenzyme in the patients group increased about 24 % in the comparison to the control level. The total alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also significantly higher (26 %) among patients with brain tumour than healthy ones. The activities of other tested ADH isoenzymes and total ALDH were unchanged. The increase of the activity of total ADH and class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme in the sera of patients with brain cancer seems to be caused by the release of this isoenzyme from tumour's cells.

  13. Isolation, characterization and evaluation of the Pichia pastoris sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter for expression of heterologous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, Sankar; Govindappa, Nagaraj; Sreenivas, Suma; Sastry, Kedarnath

    2013-11-01

    Sorbitol is used as a non-repressive carbon source to develop fermentation process for Mut(s) recombinant clones obtained using the AOX1 promoter in Pichia pastoris. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is an enzyme in the carbohydrate metabolism that catalyzes reduction of D-fructose into D-sorbitol in the presence of NADH. The small stretch of 211bps upstream region of sorbitol dehydrogenase coding gene has all the promoter elements like CAAT box, GC box, etc. It is able to promote protein production under repressive as well as non-repressive carbon sources. In this study, the strength of the sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter was evaluated by expression of two heterologous proteins: human serum albumin and erythrina trypsin inhibitor. Sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter allowed constitutive expression of recombinant proteins in all carbon sources that were tested to grow P. pastoris and showed activity similar to GAP promoter. The sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter was active in all the growth phases of the P. pastoris.

  14. [Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase as tumour markers and factors intensifying carcinogenesis in colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kedra, Bogusław; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-06-01

    Numerous experiments have shown that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in cells of various cancers and play role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, between colorectal cancer and normal colonic mucosa. We have also investigated the serum activity of these enzymes in colorectal cancer patients as potential tumour markers. The activities of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH were measured in the: cancer tissue, healthy colonic mucosa and serum of 42 patients with colorectal cancer. For the measurement of the activity of class I ADH isoenzyme and ALDH activity the fluorometric methods was employed. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes was measured by the photometric method. The activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase and class I of ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH had higher activities in cancer tissue but the differences were not statistically significant. The activity of ALDH was significantly lower in the cancer cells. The activities of all tested enzymes and isoenzymes in colorectal cancer tissue were not significantly higher in drinkers than in non-drinkers. Additionally we observed statistically significant increasing activity of class I ADH isoenzymes in the sera of patients with colorectal cancer. For this reason the total ADH activity was also significantly increased. The activities of ADH III and ADH IV isoenzymes and ALDH were unchanged in the sera of patients. There were no marked differences in activities of all tested enzymes and isoenzymes between drinkers and non-drinkers (with colorectal cancer). The differences in activities of total ADH and class I ADH isoenzymes between colorectal cancer tissues and healthy mucosa might be a factor of ethanol metabolism disorders, which can intensify carcinogenesis. The increased total

  15. GLUTAMATE DEHYDROGENASE 1 AND SIRT4 REGULATE GLIAL DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Komlos, Daniel; Mann, Kara D.; Zhuo, Yue; Ricupero, Christopher L.; Hart, Ronald P.; Liu, Alice Y.-C.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome is caused by an activation mutation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the reversible interconversion between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. The syndrome presents clinically with hyperammonemia, significant episodic hypoglycemia, seizures, and a frequent incidences of developmental and learning defects. Clinical research has implicated that although some of the developmental and neurological de...

  16. Formaldehyde degradation in Corynebacterium glutamicum involves acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmeier, Lennart; Hoefener, Michael; Wendisch, Volker F

    2013-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive soil bacterium belonging to the actinomycetes, is able to degrade formaldehyde but the enzyme(s) involved in this detoxification process were not known. Acetaldehyde dehydrogenase Ald, which is essential for ethanol utilization, and FadH, characterized here as NAD-linked mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase, were shown to be responsible for formaldehyde oxidation since a mutant lacking ald and fadH could not oxidize formaldehyde resulting in the inability to grow when formaldehyde was added to the medium. Moreover, C. glutamicum ΔaldΔfadH did not grow with vanillate, a carbon source giving rise to intracellular formaldehyde. FadH from C. glutamicum was purified from recombinant Escherichia coli and shown to be active as a homotetramer. Mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde oxidation revealed Km values of 0.6 mM for mycothiol and 4.3 mM for formaldehyde and a Vmax of 7.7 U mg(-1). FadH from C. glutamicum also possesses zinc-dependent, but mycothiol-independent alcohol dehydrogenase activity with a preference for short chain primary alcohols such as ethanol (Km = 330 mM, Vmax = 9.6 U mg(-1)), 1-propanol (Km = 150 mM, Vmax = 5 U mg(-1)) and 1-butanol (Km = 50 mM, Vmax = 0.8 U mg(-1)). Formaldehyde detoxification system by Ald and mycothiol-dependent FadH is essential for tolerance of C. glutamicum to external stress by free formaldehyde in its habitat and for growth with natural substrates like vanillate, which are metabolized with concomitant release of formaldehyde.

  17. Construction of Mutant Glucose Oxidases with Increased Dye-Mediated Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sode

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenesis studies on glucose oxidases (GOxs were conducted to construct GOxs with reduced oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity. We focused on two representative GOxs, of which crystal structures have already been reported—Penicillium amagasakiense GOx (PDB ID; 1gpe and Aspergillus niger GOx (PDB ID; 1cf3. We constructed oxygen-interacting structural models for GOxs, and predicted the residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen on the basis of the crystal structure of cholesterol oxidase as well as on the fact that both enzymes are members of the glucose/methanol/choline (GMC oxidoreductase family. Rational amino acid substitution resulted in the construction of an engineered GOx with drastically decreased oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity, which was higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase ratio of the engineered enzyme was more than 11-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that alteration of the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of GOxs is possible by introducing a mutation into the putative functional residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen of these enzymes, resulting in a further increased dehydrogenase activity. This is the first study reporting the alteration of GOx electron acceptor preference from oxygen to an artificial electron acceptor.

  18. Isolation and biochemical characterization of a glucose dehydrogenase from a hay infusion metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Alexander; Antranikian, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P) as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P), the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein.

  19. Isolation and biochemical characterization of a glucose dehydrogenase from a hay infusion metagenome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Basner

    Full Text Available Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate exhibited an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding for a peptide of 328 amino acids. The isolated enzyme showed typical sequence motifs of short-chain-dehydrogenases using NAD(P as a co-factor and had a sequence similarity between 33 and 35% to characterized glucose dehydrogenases from different Bacillus species. The identified glucose dehydrogenase gene was expressed in E. coli, purified and subsequently characterized. The enzyme, belonging to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases, shows a broad substrate range with a high affinity to glucose, xylose and glucose-6-phosphate. Due to its ability to be strongly associated with its cofactor NAD(P, the enzyme is able to directly transfer electrons from glucose oxidation to external electron acceptors by regenerating the cofactor while being still associated to the protein.

  20. Untangling the glutamate dehydrogenase allosteric nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is found in all living organisms, but only animal GDH is regulated by a large repertoire of metabolites. More than 50 years of research to better understand the mechanism and role of this allosteric network has been frustrated by its sheer complexity. However, recent studies have begun to tease out how and why this complex behavior evolved. Much of GDH regulation probably occurs by controlling a complex ballet of motion necessary for catalytic turnover and has evolved concomitantly with a long antenna-like feature of the structure of the enzyme. Ciliates, the 'missing link' in GDH evolution, might have created the antenna to accommodate changing organelle functions and was refined in humans to, at least in part, link amino acid catabolism with insulin secretion.

  1. 实验小鼠肾匀浆中苹果酸酶-1和异柠檬酸脱氢酶-1实验室检测能力验证结果评价%Laboratory proficiency evaluation of the detection ability of malic enzyme 1 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 in mouse kidneys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪; 魏杰; 于鹏丽; 巩薇; 岳秉飞

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过实验小鼠肾匀浆中苹果酸酶-1和异柠檬酸脱氢酶-1检测能力验证计划,了解实验动物检测机构检验能力,提高实验动物质量检测水平。方法按照CNAS批准的能力验证方案,通过样品制备,经过稳定性和均匀性检验合格,作为能力验证样品。采用随机编号,发样给参加单位,并附作业指导书。在规定时限提交检验报告和原始记录复印件,其结果与样品预检结果一致的判为满意结果,不一致或未能提交结果的判为不满意结果。结果共有10个实验室参加本次能力验证项目,其中满意结果的实验室8个,占总参加机构的80%,不满意的实验室有2个,占20%。结论实验动物质量检测机构在实验小鼠肾匀浆中苹果酸酶-1和异柠檬酸脱氢酶-1的检测能力较高,实施能力验证计划能够反映实验室的检测水平。%Objective To investigate the detection capacity of malic enzyme 1 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 ( Mod1&Idh1) in the laboratory animal monitoring laboratories in China in order to understand the detection capacity of la-boratories and to improve the detection level of laboratory animals’ quality.Methods Based on the program approved by CNAS, samples preparing, homogeneity test and stability test of malic enzyme 1 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 in the mouse kidneys were carried out.Standard operation procedure and samples with random numbers were distributed to the la-boratories.The laboratories should submit the result reports before the time limit expires.If the laboratory reports were the same with the standard results, the laboratories will receive satisfactory remark.If laboratory reports were not the same with the standard results, the laboratories will receive unsatisfactory remark.If a laboratory did not submit report, the laboratory will also receive unsatisfactory result.Results Eight laboratories out of 10 (80%) enrolled laboratories

  2. Adaptation responses in C4 photosynthesis of maize under salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Eiji; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The effect of salinity on C(4) photosynthesis was examined in leaves of maize, a NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) type C(4) species. Potted plants with the fourth leaf blade fully developed were treated with 3% NaCl solution for 5d. Under salt treatment, the activities of pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) and NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH), which are derived mainly from mesophyll cells, increased, whereas those of NADP-ME and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, which are derived mainly from bundle sheath cells (BSCs), decreased. Immunocytochemical studies by electron microscopy revealed that PPDK protein increased, while the content of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein decreased under salinity. In salt-treated plants, the photosynthetic metabolites malate, pyruvate and starch decreased by 40, 89 and 81%, respectively. Gas-exchange analysis revealed that the net photosynthetic rate, the transpiration rate, stomatal conductance (g(s)) and the intercellular CO(2) concentration decreased strongly in salt-treated plants. The carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C) in these plants was significantly lower than that in control. These findings suggest that the decrease in photosynthetic metabolites under salinity was induced by a reduction in gas-exchange. Moreover, in addition to the decrease in g(s), the decrease in enzyme activities in BSCs was responsible for the decline of C(4) photosynthesis. The increase of PPDK, PEPCase, NADP-MDH, and NAD-MDH activities and the decrease of NADP-ME activity are interpreted as adaptation responses to salinity.

  3. Deracemization of Secondary Alcohols by using a Single Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    KAUST Repository

    Karume, Ibrahim

    2016-03-01

    © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. We developed a single-enzyme-mediated two-step approach for deracemization of secondary alcohols. A single mutant of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase enables the nonstereoselective oxidation of racemic alcohols to ketones, followed by a stereoselective reduction process. Varying the amounts of acetone and 2-propanol cosubstrates controls the stereoselectivities of the consecutive oxidation and reduction reactions, respectively. We used one enzyme to accomplish the deracemization of secondary alcohols with up to >99% ee and >99.5% recovery in one pot and without the need to isolate the prochiral ketone intermediate.

  4. Purification of methanol dehydrogenase from mouth methylotrophic bacteria of tropical region

    OpenAIRE

    Waturangi, D.; Marko, N.; M. T. Suhartono2)

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Purification of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) from methylotrophic bacteria was conducted to obtain pure enzyme for further research and industrial applications due to the enzyme’s unique activity that catalyzes oxidation of methanol as an important carbon source in methylotrophic bacteria.Methodology and Results: The enzyme was screened from methylotrophic bacteria isolated from human mouth. Purification of this enzyme was conducted using ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by catio...

  5. Identification and overexpression of a bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase responsible for ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuo; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2010-01-01

    Thermoanaerobacter mathranii contains four genes, adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE, predicted to code for alcohol dehydrogenases involved in ethanol metabolism. These alcohol dehydrogenases were characterized as NADP(H)-dependent primary alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA), secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB), butanol dehydrogenase (BdhA) and NAD(H)-dependent bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE), respectively. Here we observed that AdhE is an important enzyme responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii based on the constructed adh knockout strains. An adhE knockout strain fails to produce ethanol as a fermentation product, while other adh knockout strains showed no significant difference from the wild type. Further analysis revealed that the ΔadhE strain was defective in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, but still maintained alcohol dehydrogenase activity. This showed that AdhE is the major aldehyde dehydrogenase in the cell and functions predominantly in the acetyl-CoA reduction to acetaldehyde in the ethanol formation pathway. Finally, AdhE was conditionally expressed from a xylose-induced promoter in a recombinant strain (BG1E1) with a concomitant deletion of a lactate dehydrogenase. Overexpressions of AdhE in strain BG1E1 with xylose as a substrate facilitate the production of ethanol at an increased yield. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  7. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of human pyruvate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, E.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Hong, Y. S.; Joachimiak, A.; Patel, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. E1 is an alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer ( approximately 154 kDa). Crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown in polyethylene glycol 3350 using a vapor-diffusion method at 295 K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 126.9, c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric E1 assembly; self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two alphabeta dimers.

  8. Cascade catalysis in membranes with enzyme immobilization for multienzymatic conversion of CO2 to methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S.; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2015-01-01

    .e. by directing membrane fouling formation), without any addition of organic solvent. Such coimmobilization and sequential immobilization systems were examined for the production of methanol from CO2 with formate dehydrogenase (FDH), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FaldDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Enzyme...

  9. Nondecarboxylating and decarboxylating isocitrate dehydrogenases: oxalosuccinate reductase as an ancestral form of isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshima, Miho; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2008-03-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus catalyzes the reduction of oxalosuccinate, which corresponds to the second step of the reductive carboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate in the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. In this study, the oxidation reaction catalyzed by H. thermophilus ICDH was kinetically analyzed. As a result, a rapid equilibrium random-order mechanism was suggested. The affinities of both substrates (isocitrate and NAD+) toward the enzyme were extremely low compared to other known ICDHs. The binding activities of isocitrate and NAD+ were not independent; rather, the binding of one substrate considerably promoted the binding of the other. A product inhibition assay demonstrated that NADH is a potent inhibitor, although 2-oxoglutarate did not exhibit an inhibitory effect. Further chromatographic analysis demonstrated that oxalosuccinate, rather than 2-oxoglutarate, is the reaction product. Thus, it was shown that H. thermophilus ICDH is a nondecarboxylating ICDH that catalyzes the conversion between isocitrate and oxalosuccinate by oxidation and reduction. This nondecarboxylating ICDH is distinct from well-known decarboxylating ICDHs and should be categorized as a new enzyme. Oxalosuccinate-reducing enzyme may be the ancestral form of ICDH, which evolved to the extant isocitrate oxidative decarboxylating enzyme by acquiring higher substrate affinities.

  10. CHANGES IN SERUM ENZYMES LEVELS ASSOCIATED WITH LIVER FUNCTIONS IN STRESSED MARWARI GOAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataria N.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum enzyme levels were determined in goats of Marwari breed belonging to farmers’ stock of arid tract of Rajasthan state, India. The animals were grouped into healthy and stressed comprising of gastrointestinal parasiticised, pneumonia affected, and drought affected. The serum enzymes determined were sorbitol dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase, gamma-glutamayl transferase, 5’nucleotidase, glucose-6-phosphatase, arginase, and aldolase. In stressed group the mean values of all the enzymes increased significantly (p≤0.05 as compared to respective healthy mean value. All the enzymes showed highest values in the gastrointestinal parasiticised animals and least values in the animals having pneumonia. In gastrointestinal parasiticised animals maximum change was observed in G-6-Pase activity and minimum change was observed in malate dehydrogenase mean value. It was concluded that Increased activity of all the serum enzymes was due to modulation of liver functions directly or indirectly.

  11. Purification and properties of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro-Pastor, M I; Florencio, F J

    1992-01-15

    NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity has been screened in several cyanobacteria grown on different nitrogen sources; in all the strains tested isocitrate dehydrogenase activity levels were similar in cells grown either on ammonium or nitrate. The enzyme from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that includes Reactive-Red-120-agarose affinity chromatography and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography as main steps. The enzyme was purified about 600-fold, with a yield of 38% and a specific activity of 15.7 U/mg protein. The native enzyme (108 kDa) is composed of two identical subunits with an apparent molecular mass of 57 kDa. Synechocystis isocitrate dehydrogenase was absolutely specific for NADP as electron acceptor. Apparent Km values were 125, 59 and 12 microM for Mg2+, D,L-isocitrate and NADP, respectively, using Mg2+ as divalent cation and 4, 5.7 and 6 microM for Mn2+, D,L-isocitrate and NADP, respectively, using Mn2+ as a cofactor. The enzyme was inhibited non-competitively by ADP (Ki, 6.4 mM) and 2-oxoglutarate, (Ki, 6 mM) with respect to isocitrate and in a competitive manner by NADPH (Ki, 0.6 mM). The circular-dichroism spectrum showed a protein with a secondary structure consisting of about 30% alpha-helix and 36% beta-pleated sheet. The enzyme is an acidic protein with an isoelectric point of 4.4 and analysis of the NH2-terminal sequence revealed 45% identity with the same region of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase. The aforementioned data indicate that NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase from Synechocystis resembles isocitrate dehydrogenase from prokaryotes and shows similar molecular and structural properties to the well-known E. coli enzyme.

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase has no control on lactate production but has a strong negative control on formate production in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.W.; Pedersen, M.B.; Hammer, Karin;

    2001-01-01

    a homolactic pattern of fermentation. Only after lactate dehydrogenase activity was reduced ninefold compared to the wild-type was the growth rate significantly affected, and the ldh mutants started to produce mixed-acid products (formate, acetate, and ethanol in addition to lactate). Flux control coefficients...... were determined and it was found that lactate dehydrogenase exerted virtually no control on the glycolytic flux at the wild-type enzyme level and also not on the flux catalyzed by the enzyme itself, i.e. on the lactate production. As expected, the flux towards the mixed-acid products was strongly...... enhanced in the strain deleted for lactate dehydrogenase. What is more surprising is that the enzyme had a strong negative control (C- LDH(F1)J=-1.3) on the flux to formate at the wild-type level of lactate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, we showed that L. lactis has limited excess of capacity of lactate...

  13. Activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comim, Clarissa M; Hoepers, Andreza; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Dominguini, Diogo; Mina, Francielle; Mendonça, Bruna P; Scaini, Giselli; Vainzof, Mariz; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disease of skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscles caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. More recently, brain involvement has been verified. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may underlie the pathophysiology of DMD. In this study we evaluate Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the cerebral cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps muscles of mdx mice. Cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps tissues from male dystrophic mdx and control mice were used. We observed increased malate dehydrogenase activity in the cortex; increased malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the diaphragm; and increased citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase activities in the quadriceps of mdx mice. This study showed increased activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in cortex, quadriceps, and diaphragm in mdx mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mechanistic studies on the dehydrogenases of methylotrophic bacteria. 2. Kinetic studies on the intramolecular electron transfer in trimethylamine and dimethylamine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, D J; Beinert, H

    1982-01-01

    E.p.r. spectroscopy of the trimethylamine and dimethylamine dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium X indicates that the substrate-reduced forms of these enzymes exist in the triplet state, which arise through interaction of a reduced [4Fe-4S] cluster and flavosemiquinone, with e.p.r. signals which differ in detail from those of the trimethylamine dehydrogenase of bacterium W3A1. Under certain conditions the intramolecular electron transfer between the flavoquinol form of 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and the [4Fe-4S] cluster in all three dehydrogenases was much slower than the preceding reduction of the flavin to the flavoquinol form. Trimethylamine dehydrogenases from both organisms show a time-dependent broadening of the e.p.r. signals centred around g = 2 after mixing with trimethylamine. The broadening of the e.p.r. signals could be correlated with an unexpected dependence of the rate of formation of the triplet state on substrate concentration. A model which accounts in a qualitative manner for the substrate dependence of the formation of the triplet state in the trimethylamine dehydrogenase of Hyphomicrobium X is proposed. The binding of the substrate to the reduced form of the enzyme seems to result in a conformational change of the enzyme to a form in which the rate of intramolecular electron transfer is decreased. This finding may be correlated with the observation of hyperbolic substrate inhibition for both trimethylamine dehydrogenases. The results indicate the transfer of an electron to the [4Fe-4S] cluster to be an obligatory step in catalysis and suggest that the transfer of electrons from these enzymes to electron acceptors is mediated solely through the [4Fe-4S] cluster. PMID:6297456

  15. Liver alcohol dehydrogenase immobilized on polyvinylidene difluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, M G; Bello, J F; Moreno de Vega, M A; Cachaza, J M; Kennedy, J F

    1990-01-01

    A physical method for immobilization of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) by hydrophobic adsorption onto a supporting membrane of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) was performed. Simultaneously, a physicochemical characterization of the immobilized enzyme regarding its kinetic behaviour was performed. The activity/pH profile observed points to an effect of pH on activity that is completely different from the case of ADH in solution. The disturbance in the typical bell-shaped profile owing to the fact that the enzyme was immobilized is explained on the basis of a potent limitation to the diffusion of the protons in the support. The findings of the present work also reveal the existence of an effect that limits free external diffusion of the substrate towards and/or the product from the support; this effect seems to be the determinant of the overall rate of the enzymatic reaction and is thus of great importance in the effective kinetic behaviour (v([S])) of immobilized ADH, whose kinetic behaviour is complex (non-Michaelian), as may be seen from the lack of linearity observed in the corresponding double reciprocal and Eadie-Hofstee plots. By non-linear regression numerical analysis of the v([S]) data and application of the F-test for model discrimination, the minimum rate equation necessary to describe the intrinsic kinetic behaviour of PVDF-immobilized ADH proved to be one of the polynomial quotient type of degree 2:2 (in substrate concentration).

  16. Quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases: structure, function, and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hirohide; Mathews, F Scott; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2004-08-01

    Quino(hemo)protein alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) that have pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as the prosthetic group are classified into 3 groups, types I, II, and III. Type I ADH is a simple quinoprotein having PQQ as the only prosthetic group, while type II and type III ADHs are quinohemoprotein having heme c as well as PQQ in the catalytic polypeptide. Type II ADH is a soluble periplasmic enzyme and is widely distributed in Proteobacteria such as Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Comamonas, etc. In contrast, type III ADH is a membrane-bound enzyme working on the periplasmic surface solely in acetic acid bacteria. It consists of three subunits that comprise a quinohemoprotein catalytic subunit, a triheme cytochrome c subunit, and a third subunit of unknown function. The catalytic subunits of all the quino(hemo)protein ADHs have a common structural motif, a quinoprotein-specific superbarrel domain, where PQQ is deeply embedded in the center. In addition, in the type II and type III ADHs this subunit contains a unique heme c domain. Various type II ADHs each have a unique substrate specificity, accepting a wide variety of alcohols, as is discussed on the basis of recent X-ray crystallographic analyses. Electron transfer within both type II and III ADHs is discussed in terms of the intramolecular reaction from PQQ to heme c and also from heme to heme, and in terms of the intermolecular reaction with azurin and ubiquinone, respectively. Unique physiological functions of both types of quinohemoprotein ADHs are also discussed.

  17. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2015-12-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The recombinant protein, expressed in Pichia pastoris, was crystallized, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the native form, with PQQ and a Ca(2+) ion, and of the enzyme in complex with a Zn(2+) ion and a bound substrate mimic were determined at 1.72 Å and 1.84 Å resolution, respectively. PQQ-ADH displays an eight-bladed β-propeller fold, characteristic of Type I quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenases. However, three of the four ligands of the Ca(2+) ion differ from those of related dehydrogenases and they come from different parts of the polypeptide chain. These differences result in a more open, easily accessible active site, which explains why PQQ-ADH can oxidize a broad range of substrates. The bound substrate mimic suggests Asp333 as the catalytic base. Remarkably, no vicinal disulfide bridge is present near the PQQ, which in other PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases has been proposed to be necessary for electron transfer. Instead an associated cytochrome c can approach the PQQ for direct electron transfer. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  18. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Valnês

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1 is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1. There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM. The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4 μM and 134 (± 21, respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs.

  19. [Physicochemical, catalytic, and regulatory properties of malate dehydrogenase from Rhodovulum steppense bacteria, strain A-20s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eprintsev, A T; Falaleeva, M I; Parfenova, I V; Liashchenko, M S; Kompantseva, E I; Tret'iakova, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The physicochemical, regulatory, and kinetic properties of malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) from haloalkaliphilic purple nonsulfur Rhodovulum steppense bacteria, strain A-20s, were studied. The malate dehydrogenase (MDH) preparation with a specific activity of 0.775 ± 0.113 U/mg protein was obtained in an electrophoretically homogeneous state using multistep purification. Using homogenous preparations, the molecular weight and the Michaelis constant of the enzyme were determined; the effects of metal ions, the temperature effect, and the thermal stability of the MDH were studied. The dimer structure of the enzyme was demonstrated by DS-Na-electrophoresis.

  20. Long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency: a molecular and biochemical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Bennett, Michael J; Rogers, Beverly B

    2002-07-01

    Since the first report of long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency a little more than a decade ago, its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity in individuals homozygous for the enzyme defect has become more and more evident. Even more interesting is its association with pregnancy-specific disorders, including preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets), hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and maternal floor infarct of the placenta. In this review we discuss the biochemical and molecular basis, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.

  1. Interaction of thiamin diphosphate with phosphorylated and dephosphorylated mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Bisswanger, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic and binding studies were carried out on substrate and cofactor interaction with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from bovine heart. Fluoropyruvate and pyruvamide, previously described as irreversible and allosteric inhibitors, respectively, are strong competitive inhibitors with respect to pyruvate. Binding of thiamin diphosphate was used to study differences between the active dephosphorylated and inactive phosphorylated enzyme states by spectroscopic methods. The change in both the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and the fluorescence of the 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene-labelled enzyme complex produced on addition of the cofactor showed similar binding behaviour for both enzyme forms, with slightly higher affinity for the phosphorylated form. Changes in the CD spectrum, especially the negative Cotton effect at 330 nm as a function of cofactor concentration, both in the absence and presence of pyruvate, also revealed no drastic differences between the two enzyme forms. Thus, inactivation of the enzyme activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is not caused by impeding the binding of substrate or cofactor.

  2. An efficient ribitol-specific dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan; Kim, In-Won; Sigdel, Sujan; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-05-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190 (EaRDH) was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete 729-bp gene was amplified, cloned, expressed, and subsequently purified in an active soluble form using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 11.0 and 45°C, respectively. Among various polyols, EaRDH exhibited activity only toward ribitol, with Km, Vmax, and kcat/Km values of 10.3mM, 185Umg(-1), and 30.9s(-1)mM(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed strong preference for NAD(+) and displayed no detectable activity with NADP(+). Homology modeling and sequence analysis of EaRDH, along with its biochemical properties, confirmed that EaRDH belongs to the family of NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenases, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SCOR) family. EaRDH showed the highest activity and unique substrate specificity among all known RDHs. Homology modeling and docking analysis shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity and substrate specificity.

  3. Characterization of two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenases from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kento; Nakanishi, Fumika; Tomita, Takeo; Akiyama, Nagisa; Lassak, Kerstin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon, possesses two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase genes, saci_0600 and saci_2375, in its genome, which suggests that it uses these enzymes for three similar reactions in lysine biosynthesis through 2-aminoadipate, leucine biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate their roles, these two genes were expressed in Escherichia coli in the present study and their gene products were characterized. Saci_0600 recognized 3-isopropylmalate as a substrate, but exhibited slight and no activity for homoisocitrate and isocitrate, respectively. Saci_2375 exhibited distinct and similar activities for isocitrate and homoisocitrate, but no detectable activity for 3-isopropylmalate. These results suggest that Saci_0600 is a 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase for leucine biosynthesis and Saci_2375 is a dual function enzyme serving as isocitrate-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase. The crystal structure of Saci_0600 was determined as a closed-form complex that binds 3-isopropylmalate and Mg(2+), thereby revealing the structural basis for the extreme thermostability and novel-type recognition of the 3-isopropyl moiety of the substrate.

  4. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  5. New insight into the molecular basis of 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency: identification of eight mutations in the HSD3B2 gene eleven patients from seven new families and comparison of the functional properties of twenty-five mutant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, A M; Ricketts, M L; Tardy, V; Desrochers, M; Mébarki, F; Chaussain, J L; Cabrol, S; Raux-Demay, M C; Forest, M G; Sippell, W G; Peter, M; Morel, Y; Simard, J

    1999-12-01

    Classical 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta5-delta4 isomerase (3betaHSD) deficiency is a form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia that impairs steroidogenesis in both the adrenals and gonads resulting from mutations in the HSD3B2 gene and causing various degrees of salt-wasting in both sexes and incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia in genetic males. To identify the molecular lesion(s) in the HSD3B2 gene in the 11 patients from the seven new families suffering from classical 3betaHSD deficiency, the complete nucleotide sequence of the whole coding region and exon-intron splicing boundaries of this gene was determined by direct sequencing. Five of these families were referred to Morel's molecular diagnostics laboratory in France, whereas the two other families were investigated by Peter's group in Germany. Functional characterization studies were performed by Simard's group in Canada. Following transient expression in 293 cells of each of the mutant recombinant proteins generated by site-directed mutagenesis, the effect of the 25 mutations on enzyme activity was assessed by incubating intact cells in culture with 10 nM [14C]-DHEA as substrate. The stability of the mutant proteins has been investigated using a combination of Northern and Western blot analyses, as well as an in vitro transcription/translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysates. The present report describes the identification of 8 mutations, in seven new families with individuals suffering from classical 3betaHSD deficiency, thus increasing the number of known HSD3B2 mutations involved in this autosomal recessive disorder to 31 (1 splicing, 1 in-frame deletion, 3 nonsense, 4 frameshift and 22 missense mutations). In addition to the mutations reported here in these new families, we have also investigated for the first time the functional significance of previously reported missense mutations and or sequence variants namely, A82T, A167V, L173R, L205P, S213G and K216E, P222H, T259

  6. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  7. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  8. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  9. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  10. Metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis by inhibiting mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madiraju, Anila K; Erion, Derek M; Rahimi, Yasmeen

    2014-01-01

    prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide, yet the underlying mechanism by which metformin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that metformin non-competitively inhibits the redox shuttle enzyme mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, resulting in an altered...... hepatocellular redox state, reduced conversion of lactate and glycerol to glucose, and decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Acute and chronic low-dose metformin treatment effectively reduced endogenous glucose production, while increasing cytosolic redox and decreasing mitochondrial redox states. Antisense...... oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in rats resulted in a phenotype akin to chronic metformin treatment, and abrogated metformin-mediated increases in cytosolic redox state, decreases in plasma glucose concentrations, and inhibition of endogenous glucose production...

  11. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  12. Isolation and characterization of an inducible NAD-dependent butyraldehyde dehydrogenase from clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, W.; Duerre, P. [Universitaet Ulm (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    A NAD-dependent butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (BAD) has been purified from C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 and DSM 173 1. This key enzyme of butanol production, catalyzing the conversion of butyryl-CoA to butyraldehyde, was induced shortly before the onset of butanol production and proved to be oxygen-sensitive. A one step purification procedure on reactive green 19 allowed to purify the enzyme to homogeneity. The purified protein was found to be extremely unstable and could only partially be stabilized by addition of mercaptoethanol and storage below -20{degrees}C. The enzyme subunit had a molecular mass of 39.5 kDa. In the reverse reaction (butyryl-CoA-forming) the apparent pH optimum was 9.75 and Vmax was significantly higher with butyraldehyde and propionaldehyde than with acetaldehyde. BAD could also use NADP+, but NAD+ was the preferred coenzyme for the reverse reaction. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the C. acetobutylicurn DSM 792 protein showed high homology to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAP), especially to the protein of C. pasteurianum. Genomic libraries of C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 were screened by hybridization using PCR-generated heterologous probes encoding the gap gene of C. pasteurianum. Sequence analysis of the positive clones revealed high homology, but no identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the butyraldehyde dehydrogenase. Thus, BAD from C. acetobutylicum is distinctly different from other reported aldehyde dehydrogenases with butyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  13. Activation of thiamin diphosphate in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, G; Tittmann, K; Killenberg-Jabs, M; Schäffner, J; Spinka, M; Neef, H; Kern, D; Kern, G; Schneider, G; Wikner, C; Ghisla, S

    1998-06-29

    Activation of the coenzyme ThDP was studied by measuring the kinetics of deprotonation at the C2 carbon of thiamin diphosphate in the enzymes pyruvate decarboxylase, transketolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, pyruvate oxidase, in site-specific mutant enzymes and in enzyme complexes containing coenzyme analogues by proton/deuterium exchange detected by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The respective deprotonation rate constant is above the catalytic constant in all enzymes investigated. The fast deprotonation requires the presence of an activator in pyruvate decarboxylase from yeast, showing the allosteric regulation of this enzyme to be accomplished by an increase in the C2-H dissociation rate of the enzyme-bound thiamin diphosphate. The data of the thiamin diphosphate analogues and of the mutant enzymes show the N1' atom and the 4'-NH2 group to be essential for the activation of the coenzyme and a conserved glutamate involved in the proton abstraction mechanism of the enzyme-bound thiamin diphosphate.

  14. A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Fu, Jinglin; Hejesen, Christian; Yang, Yuhe; Woodbury, Neal W; Gothelf, Kurt; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The functions of regulatory enzymes are essential to modulating cellular pathways. Here we report a tweezer-like DNA nanodevice to actuate the activity of an enzyme/cofactor pair. A dehydrogenase and NAD(+) cofactor are attached to different arms of the DNA tweezer structure and actuation of enzymatic function is achieved by switching the tweezers between open and closed states. The enzyme/cofactor pair is spatially separated in the open state with inhibited enzyme function, whereas in the closed state, enzyme is activated by the close proximity of the two molecules. The conformational state of the DNA tweezer is controlled by the addition of specific oligonucleotides that serve as the thermodynamic driver (fuel) to trigger the change. Using this approach, several cycles of externally controlled enzyme inhibition and activation are successfully demonstrated. This principle of responsive enzyme nanodevices may be used to regulate other types of enzymes and to introduce feedback or feed-forward control loops.

  15. Encapsulation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Mannitol by Spray Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Shiga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably due to the quick crystallization of mannitol during spray drying that resulted in the impairment of enzyme protection ability in comparison to its amorphous form. Maltodextin (dextrose equivalent = 11 was used to reduce the crystallization of mannitol. The addition of maltodextrin increased ADH activity and drastically changed the powder X-ray diffractogram of the spray-dried powders.

  16. Encapsulation of alcohol dehydrogenase in mannitol by spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Hirokazu; Joreau, Hiromi; Neoh, Tze Loon; Furuta, Takeshi; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2014-03-24

    The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably due to the quick crystallization of mannitol during spray drying that resulted in the impairment of enzyme protection ability in comparison to its amorphous form. Maltodextin (dextrose equivalent = 11) was used to reduce the crystallization of mannitol. The addition of maltodextrin increased ADH activity and drastically changed the powder X-ray diffractogram of the spray-dried powders.

  17. Conserved and Divergent Rhythms of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism-Related and Core Clock Gene Expression in the Cactus Opuntia ficus-indica1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  18. Conserved and divergent rhythms of crassulacean acid metabolism-related and core clock gene expression in the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-08-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  19. Aluminum decreases the glutathione regeneration by the inhibition of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Yoshino, Masataka

    2004-12-15

    Effect of aluminum on the NADPH supply and glutathione regeneration in mitochondria was analyzed. Reduced glutathione acted as a principal scavenger of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. Aluminum inhibited the regeneration of glutathione from the oxidized form, and the effect was due to the inhibition of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase the only enzyme supplying NADPH in mitochondria. In cytosol, aluminum inhibited the glutathione regeneration dependent on NADPH supply by malic enzyme and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, but did not affect the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase dependent glutathione formation. Aluminum can cause oxidative damage on cellular biological processes by inhibiting glutathione regeneration through the inhibition of NADPH supply in mitochondria, but only a little inhibitory effect on the glutathione generation in cytosol.

  20. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on...

  1. Structural analysis of fungus-derived FAD glucose dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakai, Genki; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-08-27

    We report the first three-dimensional structure of fungus-derived glucose dehydrogenase using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as the cofactor. This is currently the most advanced and popular enzyme used in glucose sensor strips manufactured for glycemic control by diabetic patients. We prepared recombinant nonglycosylated FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) derived from Aspergillus flavus (AfGDH) and obtained the X-ray structures of the binary complex of enzyme and reduced FAD at a resolution of 1.78 Å and the ternary complex with reduced FAD and D-glucono-1,5-lactone (LGC) at a resolution of 1.57 Å. The overall structure is similar to that of fungal glucose oxidases (GOxs) reported till date. The ternary complex with reduced FAD and LGC revealed the residues recognizing the substrate. His505 and His548 were subjected for site-directed mutagenesis studies, and these two residues were revealed to form the catalytic pair, as those conserved in GOxs. The absence of residues that recognize the sixth hydroxyl group of the glucose of AfGDH, and the presence of significant cavity around the active site may account for this enzyme activity toward xylose. The structural information will contribute to the further engineering of FADGDH for use in more reliable and economical biosensing technology for diabetes management.

  2. Cloning, overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-ketosteroid Delta(4)-(5 alpha)-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterwijk, Niels; Knol, Jan; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Geize, Robert; Dijkstra, Bauke

    2011-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid dehydrogenases are flavoproteins which play key roles in steroid ring degradation. The enzymes are abundantly present in actinobacteria, including the catabolic powerhouse Rhodococcus jostii and the pathogenic species R. equi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene for 3-ketosteroid

  3. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of (-)-isopiperitenol/(-)-carveol dehydrogenase of peppermint and spearmint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Kerry L; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (-)-trans-isopiperitenol to (-)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (-)-trans-carveol to (-)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (-)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (-)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (-)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5'-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (-)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5'-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (-)-trans-isopiperitenol and (-)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13% identity) to the monoterpene

  4. Lactate dehydrogenase has no control on lactate production but has a strong negative control on formate production in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.W.; Pedersen, M.B.; Hammer, Karin

    2001-01-01

    A series of mutant strains of Lactococcus lactis were constructed with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities ranging from below 1% to 133% of the wild-type activity level. The mutants with 59% to 133% of lactate dehydrogenase activity had growth rates similar to the wild-type and showed...... a homolactic pattern of fermentation. Only after lactate dehydrogenase activity was reduced ninefold compared to the wild-type was the growth rate significantly affected, and the ldh mutants started to produce mixed-acid products (formate, acetate, and ethanol in addition to lactate). Flux control coefficients...... were determined and it was found that lactate dehydrogenase exerted virtually no control on the glycolytic flux at the wild-type enzyme level and also not on the flux catalyzed by the enzyme itself, i.e. on the lactate production. As expected, the flux towards the mixed-acid products was strongly...

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16451-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pringlei putative cytosol... 290 e-125 AB016804_1( AB016804 |pid:none) Aloe arbor...-307... 280 e-122 AB005808_1( AB005808 |pid:none) Aloe arborescens mRNA for NADP-mal... 277 e-122 BC171259_1..._1( AY179511 |pid:none) Aloe vera NADP-malic enzyme mRNA, ... 153 2e-35 EF576449_1( EF576449 |pid:none) Oryz...7_1( DQ901647 |pid:none) Tigriopus californicus haplotype S... 154 1e-35 AY179511

  6. Purification and characterization of an alcohol dehydrogenase from 1,2-propanediol-grown Desulfovibriostrain HDv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, Charles M.H.; Jansen, Michael; Nienhuis-Kuiper, Manny E.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Breemen, Jan F.L. van; Hansen, Theo A.

    1995-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio strain HDv (DSM 6830) grew faster on (S)- and on (R, S)-1,2-propanediol (µmax 0.053 h–1) than on (R)-propanediol (0.017 h–1) and ethanol (0.027 h–1). From (R, S)-1,2-propanediol-grown cells, an alcohol dehydrogenase was purified. The enzyme was

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-derived NADPH fuels superoxide production in the failing heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the failing heart, NADPH oxidase and uncoupled NO synthase utilize cytosolic NADPH to form superoxide. NADPH is supplied principally by the pentose phosphate pathway, whose rate-limiting enzyme is glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Therefore, we hypothesized that cardiac G6PD activation dr...

  8. The role of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase in proline degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deuschle, Karen; Funck, Dietmar; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    In response to stress, plants accumulate Pro, requiring degradation after release from adverse conditions. Delta1-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH), the second enzyme for Pro degradation, is encoded by a single gene expressed ubiquitously. To study the physiological function of P5CDH,...

  9. Watermelon glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase is sorted to peroxisomes of the methylotrophic yeast, Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, I.J. van der; Faber, K.N.; Keizer-Gunnink, I.; Gietl, C.; Harder, W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the fate of the watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris Schrad.) glyoxysomal enzyme, malate dehydrogenase (gMDH), after synthesis in the methylotrophic yeast, Hansenula polymorpha. The gene encoding the precursor form of gMDH (pre-gMDH) was cloned in an H. polymorpha expression vector downstr

  10. Statistical Measure of a Gene Evolution The Case of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Chakrabarti, J; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sahoo, Satyabrata; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2000-01-01

    The enzyme Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyses the decomposition of glucose. The gene that produces the GAPDH is therefore present in a wide class of organisms. We show that for this gene the average value of the fluctuations in nucleotide distribution in the codons, normalized to strand bias, provides a reasonable measure of how the gene has evolved in time.

  11. Separation and Purification of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Wild Suaeda liaotungensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    High active betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8) is found in wild Suaeda liaotungensis. The enzyme is purified 206-fold with recovery of 1.5%. It have a specific activity of 2363 nmol/min*mg protein and the molecular mass of each subunit is 64.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE.

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase type 3 (ADH3) and the risk of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, B. van; Houwelingen, K.P. van; Witjes, J.A.; Schalken, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The polymorphic enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyses the conversion of ethanol into the carcinogenic metabolite acetaldehyde which is partly excreted into the urine. Objectives of this pilot study are to determine whether this polymorphism may be related to bladder cancer and

  13. Theoretical kinetic isotope effects for the hydride-transfer step in lactate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, J.; Moliner, V.; Safont, V.S. (Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain). Dept. die Ciencies Experimentals)

    1994-06-21

    The transition-state (TS) structure for the hydride transfer in lactate dehydrogenase (LHD) enzyme has been calculated with analytical gradients at MNDO, AM1 and PM3 semiempirical levels. The TS is a first-order saddle point on the hypersurface. (Author).

  14. Production and characterization of a thermostable L-threonine dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding a threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) has been identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The Pf-TDH protein has been functionally produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme has a tetrameric conformation with a molecular mass of ¿ 155 kDa.

  15. 5FU and oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy in two dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase-deficient patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reerink, O; Mulder, NH; Szabo, BG; Hospers, GAP

    2004-01-01

    Patients with a germline mutation leading to a deficiency of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme are at risk from developing severe toxicity on the administration of 5FU-containing chemotherapy. We report on the implications of this inborn genetic error in two patients who received 5FU

  16. Enantioselective oxidation of secondary alcohols at a quinohaemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somers, W.A.C.; Stigter, E.C.A.; Hartingsveldt, W. van; Lugt, J.P. van der

    1998-01-01

    Quinohaemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from Comamonas testosteroni was co-immobilized with a redox polymer (a poly(vinylpyridine) complex functionalized with osmium bis(bipyridine) chloride) on an electrode. The enzyme electrode readily oxidizes primary alcohols and secondary alcohols with maximum

  17. Electron transfer between a quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase and an electrode via a redox polymer network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, E.C.A.; Jong, G.A.H. de; Jongejan, J.A.; Duine, J.A.; Lugt, J.P. van der; Somers, W.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (QH-EDH) from Comamonas testosteroni was immobilized on an electrode in a redox polymer network consisting of a polyvinylpyridine partially N-complexed with osmiumbis-(bipyridine)chloride. The enzyme effectively transfers electrons to the electrode via the

  18. Often Ignored Facts about the Control of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumilo, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Information about the control of the activity of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key enzyme in the citric acid cycle, is not well covered in the biochemical education literature, especially as it concerns the allosteric regulation of OGDHC by adenine nucleotide and ortophosphate. From experimental work published during the last…

  19. Electron transfer between a quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase and an electrode via a redox polymer network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, E.C.A.; Jong, G.A.H. de; Jongejan, J.A.; Duine, J.A.; Lugt, J.P. van der; Somers, W.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (QH-EDH) from Comamonas testosteroni was immobilized on an electrode in a redox polymer network consisting of a polyvinylpyridine partially N-complexed with osmiumbis-(bipyridine)chloride. The enzyme effectively transfers electrons to the electrode via the po

  20. Modification of Rhizopus lactate dehydrogenase for improved resistance to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus oryzae is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid. We determined that one of the key enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), involved in synthesis of lactic acid by R. oryzae was significantly inhibited by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) at physiological concentrations. Thi...

  1. Often Ignored Facts about the Control of the 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumilo, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Information about the control of the activity of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key enzyme in the citric acid cycle, is not well covered in the biochemical education literature, especially as it concerns the allosteric regulation of OGDHC by adenine nucleotide and ortophosphate. From experimental work published during the last…

  2. [Alanine dehydrogenase of the cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum in the early period of cyanophage LPP-3 development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelitsa, S I; Koltukova, N V; Mendzhul, M I

    1995-01-01

    It has been studied how reproduction of LPP-3 in Plectonema boryanum cells influences the alanine dehydrogenase activity. It has been found that immediately after the virus adsorption the enzyme activity falls by 50% and the anabolic reaction is blocked. Physicochemical properties of the enzyme vary as well. An infected cell has one isoenzyme-octamer with pl 9.1-9.2, pH-optimum by action 9-10, molecular weight about 27 kDa.

  3. Marked and variable inhibition by chemical fixation of cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in single motoneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of tissue fixation on succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activity in single motoneurons of the rat was demonstrated using a computer image processing system. Inhibition of enzyme activity by chemical fixation was variable, with some motoneurons being affected more than others. It was concluded that quantification of enzymatic activity in chemically fixed tissue provides an imprecise estimate of enzyme activities found in fresh-frozen tissues.

  4. Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of a Glucose Dehydrogenase from a Hay Infusion Metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Basner; Garabed Antranikian

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hydrolyzing enzymes are essential to determine blood glucose level. A high-throughput screening approach was established to identify NAD(P)-dependent glucose dehydrogenases for the application in test stripes and the respective blood glucose meters. In the current report a glucose hydrolyzing enzyme, derived from a metagenomic library by expressing recombinant DNA fragments isolated from hay infusion, was characterized. The recombinant clone showing activity on glucose as substrate ex...

  5. Structures of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2015-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway of all aerobic organisms and is responsible for the synthesis of many important precursors and molecules. TCA cycle plays a key role in the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is involved in the adaptation process of the bacteria to the host immune response. We present here the first crystal structures of M. tuberculosis malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two consecutive enzymes of the TCA, at 2.6 Å and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. General analogies and local differences with the previously reported homologous protein structures are described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate...... synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle...

  7. Essential histidine residue in 3-ketosteroid-Δ1-dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, Hiroyuki; Itagaki, Eiji; 板垣, 英治

    1992-01-01

    The variation with pH of kinetic parameters was examined for 3-ketosteroid-Δ1-dehydrogenase from Nocardia corallina. The V(max)/K(m) profile for 4-androstenedione indicates that activity is lost upon protonation of a cationic acid-type group with a pK value of 7.7. The enzyme was inactivated by diethylpyrocarbonate at pH 7.4 and the inactivation was substantially prevented by androstadienedione. Analyses of reactivation with neutral hydroxylamine, pH variation, and spectral changes of the ina...

  8. Resurrecting ancestral alcohol dehydrogenases from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, J Michael; Gaucher, Eric A; Burgan, Michelle F; De Kee, Danny W; Li, Tang; Aris, John P; Benner, Steven A

    2005-06-01

    Modern yeast living in fleshy fruits rapidly convert sugars into bulk ethanol through pyruvate. Pyruvate loses carbon dioxide to produce acetaldehyde, which is reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) to ethanol, which accumulates. Yeast later consumes the accumulated ethanol, exploiting Adh2, an Adh1 homolog differing by 24 (of 348) amino acids. As many microorganisms cannot grow in ethanol, accumulated ethanol may help yeast defend resources in the fruit. We report here the resurrection of the last common ancestor of Adh1 and Adh2, called Adh(A). The kinetic behavior of Adh(A) suggests that the ancestor was optimized to make (not consume) ethanol. This is consistent with the hypothesis that before the Adh1-Adh2 duplication, yeast did not accumulate ethanol for later consumption but rather used Adh(A) to recycle NADH generated in the glycolytic pathway. Silent nucleotide dating suggests that the Adh1-Adh2 duplication occurred near the time of duplication of several other proteins involved in the accumulation of ethanol, possibly in the Cretaceous age when fleshy fruits arose. These results help to connect the chemical behavior of these enzymes through systems analysis to a time of global ecosystem change, a small but useful step towards a planetary systems biology.

  9. Lactic dehydrogenase and cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Monica; Sapio, Luigi; Spina, Annamaria; Naviglio, Daniele; Calogero, Armando; Naviglio, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Despite the intense scientific efforts made, there are still many tumors that are difficult to treat and the percentage of patient survival in the long-term is still too low. Thus, new approaches to the treatment of cancer are needed. Cancer is a highly heterogeneous and complex disease, whose development requires a reorganization of cell metabolism. Most tumor cells downregulate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increase the rate of glucose consumption and lactate release, independently of oxygen availability (Warburg effect). This metabolic rewiring is largely believed to favour tumor growth and survival, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. Importantly, the correlation between the aerobic glycolysis and cancer is widely regarded as a useful biochemical basis for the development of novel anticancer strategies. Among the enzymes involved in glycolysis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is emerging as a very attractive target for possible pharmacological approaches in cancer therapy. This review addresses the state of the art and the perspectives concerning LDH both as a useful diagnostic marker and a relevant molecular target in cancer therapy and management.

  10. Direct Enzymatic Assay for Alcohol Oxidase, Alcohol Dehydrogenase, and Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase in Colonies of Hansenula polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    Eggeling, L; Sahm, H

    1980-01-01

    A procedure is described for the qualitative direct identification of alcohol oxidase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and formaldehyde dehydrogenase in yeast colonies. The method has been applied successfully to isolate mutants of Hansenula polymorpha with altered glucose repression of alcohol oxidase.

  11. Physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and the role of 2-oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; López-Lozano, Antonio; Diez, Jesús; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol Alberto; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus.

  12. Physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and the role of 2-oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Agustina Domínguez-Martín

    Full Text Available The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42 catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus.

  13. P450BM3 fused to phosphite dehydrogenase allows phosphite-driven selective oxidations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Nina; Kulig, Justyna K; Bartsch, Anette; Hayes, Martin A; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2017-03-01

    To facilitate the wider application of the NADPH-dependent P450BM3, we fused the monooxygenase with a phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH). The resulting monooxygenase-dehydrogenase fusion enzyme acts as a self-sufficient bifunctional catalyst, accepting phosphite as a cheap electron donor for the regeneration of NADPH.The well-expressed fusion enzyme was purified and analyzed in comparison to the parent enzymes. Using lauric acid as substrate for P450BM3, it was found that the fusion enzyme had similar substrate affinity and hydroxylation selectivity while it displayed a significantly higher activity than the non-fused monooxygenase. Phosphite-driven conversions of lauric acid at restricted NADPH concentrations confirmed multiple turnovers of the cofactor. Interestingly, both the fusion enzyme and the native P450BM3 displayed enzyme concentration dependent activity and the fused enzyme reached optimal activity at a lower enzyme concentration. This suggests that the fusion enzyme has an improved tendency to form functional oligomers.To explore the constructed phosphite-driven P450BM3 as a biocatalyst, conversions of the drug compounds omeprazole and rosiglitazone were performed. PTDH-P450BM3 driven by phosphite was found to be more efficient in terms of total turnover when compared with P450BM3 driven by NADPH. The results suggest that PTDH-P450BM3 is an attractive system for use in biocatalytic and drug metabolism studies.

  14. Decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase is related to skin pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, Mitsuo; Murakami, Yuhko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru

    2012-03-01

    Skin pigmentation is caused by various physical and chemical factors. It might also be influenced by changes in the physiological function of skin with aging. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is an enzyme related to the mitochondrial electron transport system and plays a key role in cellular energy production. It has been reported that the functional decrease in this system causes Parkinson's disease. Another study reports that the amount of NADH dehydrogenase in heart and skeletal muscle decreases with aging. A similar decrease in the skin would probably affect its physiological function. However, no reports have examined the age-related change in levels of NADH dehydrogenase in human skin. In this study, we investigated this change and its effect on skin pigmentation using cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. The mRNA expression of NDUFA1, NDUFB7, and NDUFS2, subunits of NADH dehydrogenase, and its activity were significantly decreased in late passage keratinocytes compared to early passage cells. Conversely, the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha and endothelin 1, was increased in late passage cells. On the other hand, the inhibition of NADH dehydrogenase upregulated the mRNA expression of melanocyte-stimulating cytokines. Moreover, the level of NDUFB7 mRNA was lower in pigmented than in nonpigmented regions of skin in vivo. These results suggest the decrease in NADH dehydrogenase with aging to be involved in skin pigmentation.

  15. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (-)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (-)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (-)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (-)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition.

  16. Characterization of Flavin-Containing Opine Dehydrogenase from Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Watanabe

    Full Text Available Opines, in particular nopaline and octopine, are specific compounds found in crown gall tumor tissues induced by infections with Agrobacterium species, and are synthesized by well-studied NAD(PH-dependent dehydrogenases (synthases, which catalyze the reductive condensation of α-ketoglutarate or pyruvate with L-arginine. The corresponding genes are transferred into plant cells via a tumor-inducing (Ti plasmid. In addition to the reverse oxidative reaction(s, the genes noxB-noxA and ooxB-ooxA are considered to be involved in opine catabolism as (membrane-associated oxidases; however, their properties have not yet been elucidated in detail due to the difficulties associated with purification (and preservation. We herein successfully expressed Nox/Oox-like genes from Pseudomonas putida in P. putida cells. The purified protein consisted of different α-, β-, and γ-subunits encoded by the OdhA, OdhB, and OdhC genes, which were arranged in tandem on the chromosome (OdhB-C-A, and exhibited dehydrogenase (but not oxidase activity toward nopaline in the presence of artificial electron acceptors such as 2,6-dichloroindophenol. The enzyme contained FAD, FMN, and [2Fe-2S]-iron sulfur as prosthetic groups. On the other hand, the gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium japonicum consisted of OdhB1-C-A-B2, from which two proteins, OdhAB1C and OdhAB2C, appeared through the assembly of each β-subunit together with common α- and γ-subunits. A poor phylogenetic relationship was detected between OdhB1 and OdhB2 in spite of them both functioning as octopine dehydrogenases, which provided clear evidence for the acquisition of novel functions by "subunit-exchange". To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to have examined flavin-containing opine dehydrogenase.

  17. Regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis: effect of glucose on activities of various glycolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, R L; Lewis, D F

    1984-08-01

    Catabolism of carbohydrates has been implicated in the regulation of aflatoxin synthesis. To characterize this effect further, the activities of various enzymes associated with glucose catabolism were determined in Aspergillus parasiticus organisms that were initially cultured in peptone-mineral salts medium and then transferred to glucose-mineral salts and peptone-mineral salts media. After an initial increase in activity, the levels of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, mannitol dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase were lowered in the presence of glucose. Phosphofructokinase activity was greater in the peptone-grown mycelium, but fructose diphosphatase was largely unaffected by carbon source. Likewise, carbon source had relatively little effect on the activities of pyruvate kinase, malic enzyme, isocitrate-NADP dehydrogenase, and isocitrate-NAD dehydrogenase. The results suggest that glucose may, in part, regulate aflatoxin synthesis via a carbon catabolite repression of NADPH-generating and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes.

  18. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura Frendrup;

    2016-01-01

    The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate–glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back...... oxidative degradation; thus, quantitative formation of glutamine from the glutamate taken up is not possible. Oxidation of glutamate is initiated by transamination catalyzed by an aminotransferase, or oxidative deamination catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). We discuss methods available to elucidate...... the enzymes that mediate this conversion. Methods include pharmacological tools such as the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid, studies using GDH knockout mice, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GDH in astrocytes. Studies in brain slices incubated with [15N]glutamate demonstrated activity of GDH...

  19. IMP Dehydrogenase: Structural Schizophrenia and an Unusual Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstrom,L.; Gan, L.

    2006-01-01

    Textbooks describe enzymes as relatively rigid templates for the transition state of a chemical reaction, and indeed an enzyme such as chymotrypsin, which catalyzes a relatively simple hydrolysis reaction, is reasonably well described by this model. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) undergoes a remarkable array of conformational transitions in the course of a complicated catalytic cycle, offering a dramatic counterexample to this view. IMPDH displays several other unusual mechanistic features, including an Arg residue that may act as a general base catalyst and a dynamic monovalent cation site. Further, IMPDH appears to be involved in 'moon-lighting' functions that may require additional conformational states. How the balance between conformational states is maintained and how the various conformational states interconvert is only beginning to be understood.

  20. Virtual fragment screening for novel inhibitors of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, Gian Filippo; Campbell, Gordon; Alibu, Vincent P; Barrett, Michael P; Brenk, Ruth; Gilbert, Ian H

    2010-07-15

    The enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is a potential drug target for the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of human African trypanosomiasis. This enzyme has a polar active site to accommodate the phosphate, hydroxyl and carboxylate groups of the substrate, 6-phosphogluconate. A virtual fragment screen was undertaken of the enzyme to discover starting points for the development of inhibitors which are likely to have appropriate physicochemical properties for an orally bioavailable compound. A virtual screening library was developed, consisting of compounds with functional groups that could mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, but which have a higher pKa. Following docking, hits were clustered and appropriate compounds purchased and assayed against the enzyme. Three fragments were identified that had IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good ligand efficiencies. Based on these initial hits, analogues were procured and further active compounds were identified. Some of the fragments identified represent potential starting points for a medicinal chemistry programme to develop potent drug-like inhibitors of the enzyme. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Isoformes of Malate Dehydrogenase from Rhodovulum Steppense A-20s Grown Chemotrophically under Aerobic Condtions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eprintsev, A T; Falaleeva, M I; Lyashchenko, M S; Gataullinaa, M O; Kompantseva, E I

    2016-01-01

    Three malate dehydrogenase isoforms (65-, 60-, and 71-fold purifications) with specific activities of 4.23, 3.88, and 4.56 U/mg protein were obtained in an electrophoretically homogenous state from Rhodovulum steppense bacteria strain A-20s chemotropically grown under aerobic conditions. The physicochemical and kinetic properties of malate dehydrogenase isoforms were determined. The molecular weight and the Michaelis constants were determined; the effect of hydrogen ions on the forward and reverse MDH reaction was studied. The results of the study demonstrated that the enzyme consists of subunits; the molecular weight of subunits was determined by SDS-PAGE.

  2. Inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by peptide and protein peroxides generated by singlet oxygen attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    the active-site thiol of the enzyme and the peroxide. A number of low-molecular-mass compounds including thiols and ascorbate, but not Trolox C, can prevent inhibition by removing the initial peroxide, or species derived from it. In contrast, glutathione reductase and lactate dehydrogenase are poorly......Reaction of certain peptides and proteins with singlet oxygen (generated by visible light in the presence of rose bengal dye) yields long-lived peptide and protein peroxides. Incubation of these peroxides with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in the absence of added metal ions, results...

  3. Enzymatic urea adaptation: lactate and malate dehydrogenase in elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, G; Bellocco, E; Mannucci, C; Leuzzi, U; Tellone, E; Kotyk, A; Galtieri, A

    2006-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) electrophoretic tissue patterns of two different orders of Elasmobranchii: Carchariniformes (Galeus melanostomus and Prionace glauca) and Squaliformes (Etmopterus spinax and Scymnorinus licha) were studied. The number of loci expressed for these enzymes was the same of other elasmobranch species. Differences in tissue distribution were noted in LDH from G. melanostomus due to the presence of an additional heterotetramer in the eye tissue. There were also differences in MDH. In fact, all the tissues of E. spinax and G. melanostomus showed two mitochondrial bands. Major differences were noted in the number of isozymes detected in the four compared elasmobranchs. The highest polymorphism was observed in E. spinax and G. melanostomus, two species that live in changeable environmental conditions. The resistance of isozymes after urea treatment was examined; the resulting patterns showed a quite good resistance of the enzymes, higher for LDH than MDH, also at urea concentration much greater than physiological one. These results indicated that the total isozyme resistance can be considered higher in urea accumulators (such as elasmobranchs) than in the non-accumulators (such as teleosts).

  4. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enzyme Activities in Oleaginous Yeasts Accumulating and Utilizing Exogenous or Endogenous Lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdsworth, Jane E.; Veenhuis, Marten; Ratledge, Colin

    1988-01-01

    The activities of ATP:citrate lyase (ACL; EC 4.1.3.8), carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT; EC 2.3.1.7), NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42), isocitrate lyase (ICL; EC 4.1.3.1) and malic enzyme (malate dehydrogenase; EC 1.1.1.40) were measured in four oleaginous yeasts, Candida

  6. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    dehydrogenase (GAPDH), glutathione reductase, and lactate dehydrogenase, both in isolation and in cell lysates. In contrast to glucose (1M, both fresh and aged for 8 weeks), which had no effect, marked inhibition of all three enzymes was observed with methylglyoxal and glyoxal. GAPDH was also inhibited...

  7. Characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lacking a cytosolic non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2006-08-01

    Non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde- 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NP-GAPDH) is a conserved cytosolic protein found in higher plants. In photosynthetic cells, the enzyme is involved in a shuttle transfer mechanism to export NADPH from the chloroplast to the cytosol. To investigate the role of this enzyme in plant tissues, we characterized a mutant from Arabidopsis thaliana having an insertion at the NP-GAPDH gene locus. The homozygous mutant was determined to be null respect to NP-GAPDH, as it exhibited undetectable levels of both transcription of NP-GAPDH mRNA, protein expression and enzyme activity. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that the insertion mutant plant shows altered expression of several enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Significantly, cytosolic phosphorylating (NAD-dependent) glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels are induced in the mutant, which correlates with an increase in enzyme activity. mRNA levels and enzymatic activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were also elevated, correlating with an increase in NADPH concentration. Moreover, increased ROS levels were measured in the mutant plants. Down-regulation of several glycolytic and photosynthetic genes suggests that NP-GAPDH is important for the efficiency of both metabolic processes. The results presented demonstrate that NP-GAPDH has a relevant role in plant growth and development.

  8. Isolation and characterization of an apple cytosolic malate dehydrogenase gene reveal its function in malate synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu-Xin; Li, Ming; Zhai, Heng; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2011-03-15

    Cytosolic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyMDH) is an enzyme crucial for malate synthesis in the cytosol. The apple MdcyMDH gene (GenBank Accession No. DQ221207) encoding the cyMDH enzyme in apple was cloned and functionally characterized. The protein was subcellularly localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. Based on kinetic parameters, it mainly catalyzes the reaction from oxalacetic acid (OAA) to malate in vitro. The expression level of MdcyMDH was positively correlated with malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity throughout fruit development, but not with malate content, especially in the ripening apple fruit. MdcyMDH overexpression contributed to malate accumulation in the apple callus and tomato. Taken together, our results support the involvement of MdcyMDH directly in malate synthesis and indirectly in malate accumulation through the regulation of genes/enzymes associated with malate degradation and transportation, gluconeogenesis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  9. Proline dehydrogenase is a positive regulator of cell death in different kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Nicolás M; Monteoliva, Mariela I; Alvarez, María E

    2011-08-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidation of Pro into Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C). This is the first of the two enzymatic reactions that convert proline (Pro) into glutamic acid (Glu). The P5C thus produced is non-enzymatically transformed into glutamate semialdehyde (GSA), which acts as a substrate of P5C dehydrogenase (P5CDH) to generate Glu. Activation of ProDH can generate different effects depending on the behaviour of other enzymes of this metabolism. Under different conditions it can generate toxic levels of P5C, alter the cellular redox homeostasis and even produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies indicate that in Arabidopsis, the enzyme potentiates the oxidative burst and cell death associated to the Hypersensitive Responses (HR). Interestingly, activation of ProDH can also produce harmful effects in other organisms, suggesting that the enzyme may play a conserved role in the control of cell death.

  10. Purification and characterization of NADP(+)-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Peptostreptococcus productus marburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, G; Geerligs, G; Diekert, G

    1991-01-01

    The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase of heterotrophically grown Peptostreptococcus productus Marburg was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme catalyzed the reversible oxidation of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADP+ as the electron acceptor at a specific activity of 627 U/mg of protein. The Km values for methylenetetrahydrofolate and for NADP+ were 27 and 113 microM, respectively. The enzyme, which lacked 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase activity, was insensitive to oxygen and was thermolabile at temperatures above 40 degrees C. The apparent molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated by gel filtration to be 66 kDa. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a single subunit of 34 kDa, accounting for a dimeric alpha 2 structure of the enzyme. Kinetic studies on the initial reaction velocities with different concentrations of both substrates in the absence and presence of NADPH as the reaction product were interpreted to indicate that the enzyme followed a sequential reaction mechanism. After gentle ultracentrifugation of crude extracts, the enzyme was recovered to greater than 95% in the soluble (supernatant) fraction. Sodium (10 microM to 10 mM) had no effect on enzymatic activity. The data were taken to indicate that the enzyme was similar to the methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenases of other homoacetogenic bacteria and that the enzyme is not involved in energy conservation of P. productus. PMID:1899860

  11. Stabilized enzymes in continuous gas phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fangxiao; LeJeune, K.; Yang, Zhen [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We are assessing the utility of enzymes to catalyze reactions in a continuous gas phase reactor. First, alcohol dehydrogenase has been used to oxidize an unsaturated alcohol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol (UOL), to the corresponding unsaturated aldehyde, 3-methyl-2-butenal (UAL). Cofactor NAD{sup +} was regenerated by concomitant acetone reduction to isopropyl alcohol. Second, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) has been used to hydrolyze pesticide vapors. In order to control enzyme hydration level, enzyme water adsorption isotherms at different temperature have been studied. Huttig`s isotherm model has been found suitable to describe adsorption behavior. The influence of enzyme hydration level, enzyme loading on glass beads, reaction temperature and flow rate on enzymatic reaction rate and biocatalyst stability were investigated. Reaction kinetics were studied and a kinetic model was proposed. We will also report our attempts to further stabilize enzymes for use in gas reactions by incorporating them into polymer matrices.

  12. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Laniewska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in gastric cancer cells (GC). Moreover, the activity of total ADH and class IV isoenzymes is significantly higher in cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as tumor markers for gastric cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value for positive and negative results, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 168 patients with gastric cancer before treatment and from 168 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH IV isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of gastric cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 73%, specificity 79%, positive and negative predictive values were 81 and 72% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.67. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as marker of gastric cancer.

  14. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelski, Wojciech; Mroczko, Barbara; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-10-01

    The activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and class I isoenzymes is significantly higher in colorectal cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnosing colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) as tumor markers for colorectal cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 182 patients with colorectal cancer before treatment and from 160 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric, but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH I isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of colorectal cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH I was 76%, specificity 82%, AND positive and negative predictive values were 85 and 74%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ADH I increased with the stage of the carcinoma. The area under ROC curve for ADH I was 0.72. The results suggest a potential role for ADH I as marker for colorectal cancer.

  15. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  16. Fusion of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka, Aleksandra J; Lyczakowski, Jan J; Blackhurst, Gavin; Pashkuleva, Christiana; Rothschild-Mancinelli, Kyle; Tautvaišas, Dainius; Thornton, Harry; Villanueva, Hugo; Xiao, Weike; Slikas, Justinas; Horsfall, Louise; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher

    2014-12-19

    Ethanol is an important biofuel. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli. A fusion of PDC and ADH was generated and expressed in E. coli. The fusion enzyme was demonstrated to possess both activities. AdhB activity was significantly lower when fused to PDC than when the two enzymes were expressed separately. However, cells expressing the fusion protein generated ethanol more rapidly and to higher levels than cells coexpressing Pdc and AdhB, suggesting a specific rate enhancement due to the fusion of the two enzymes.

  17. Isolation of an aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in the oxidation of fluoroacetaldehyde to fluoroacetate in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C D; Moss, S J; O'Hagan, D

    2001-10-01

    Streptomyces cattleya is unusual in that it produces fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites. We now report the isolation of an NAD(+)-dependent fluoroacetaldehyde dehydrogenase from S. cattleya that mediates the oxidation of fluoroacetaldehyde to fluoroacetate. This is the first enzyme to be identified that is directly involved in fluorometabolite biosynthesis. Production of the enzyme begins in late exponential growth and continues into the stationary phase. Measurement of kinetic parameters shows that the enzyme has a high affinity for fluoroacetaldehyde and glycoaldehyde, but not acetaldehyde.

  18. 13C–Metabolic enrichment of glutamate in glutamate dehydrogenase mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yijin; Sieg, Alex; Trotter, Pamela J.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH) interconvert α-ketoglutarate and glutamate. In yeast, NADP-dependent enzymes, encoded by GDH1 and GDH3, are reported to synthesize glutamate from α-ketoglutarate, while an NAD-dependent enzyme, encoded by GDH2, catalyzes the reverse. Cells were grown in acetate/raffinose (YNAceRaf) to examine the role(s) of these enzymes during aerobic metabolism. In YNAceRaf the doubling time of wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ cells was comparable at ~ 4 hours. NADP-dependent GDH a...

  19. Activity of formaldehyde dehydrogenase on titanium dioxide films with different crystallinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Kato, Katsuya; Masuda, Yoshitake; Kato, Kazumi

    2015-02-01

    Many biosensors have been developed and used in recent years, and to enhance the sensitivity and stability of enzyme biosensors, immobilization of the enzymes on material surfaces is a necessary and important step. Therefore, there has been considerable interest in understanding how material interfaces affect enzyme adsorption. In this study, the influence of the crystallinity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) films on the quantity and activity of the immobilized enzyme, i.e., formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH), was investigated. It was found that TiO2 films with high crystallinity, which were annealed at 550 °C, showed higher enzyme immobilization and activity compared with the non-annealed TiO2 film. These results suggest that the activity of enzymes could be affected by the crystallinity of surface materials.

  20. Purification and properties of an unusual UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, NADPH-dependent, from Xanthomonas albilineans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, María; Legaz, María-Estrella; Vicente, C

    2008-01-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans produces a UDP-glucose dehydrogenase growing on sucrose. The enzyme oxidizes UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronic acid by using molecular oxygen and NADPH. Kinetics of enzymatic oxydation of NADPH is linearly dependent on the amount of oxygen supplied. The enzyme has been purified at homogeneity. The value of pI of the purified enzyme is 8.98 and its molecular mass has been estimated as about 14 kDa. The enzyme shows a michaelian kinetics for UDP-glucose concentrations. The value of K(m) for UDP-glucose is 0.87 mM and 0.26 mM for NADPH, although the enzyme has three different sites to interact with NADPH. The enzyme is inhibited by UDP-glucose concentrations higher than 1.3 mM. N-Terminal sequence has been determined as IQPYNH.

  1. Enzyme activities in mitochondria isolated from ripening tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, D; Goodenough, P W; Weitzman, P D

    1986-09-01

    Mitochondria were isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruit at the mature green, orange-green and red stages and from fruit artificially suspended in their ripening stage. The specific activities of citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), NAD-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.41) and NAD-linked malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.38) were determined. The specific activities of all these enzymes fell during ipening, although the mitochondria were fully functional as demonstrated by the uptake of oxygen. The fall in activity of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase was accompanied by a similar fall in the activity of the cytosolic isoenzyme. Percoll-purified mitochondria isolated from mature green fruit remained intact for more than one week and at least one enzyme, citrate synthase, did not exhibit the fall in specific activity found in normal ripening fruit.

  2. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Kangiella koreensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Hong, Seung-Hye; Hong, Myoung-Ki; Pham, Tan-Viet; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) are a group of dehydrogenase enzymes that facilitate the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes or ketones with the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. In bacteria, some alcohol dehydrogenases catalyze the opposite reaction as part of fermentation to ensure a constant supply of NAD(+). The adh gene from Kangiella koreensis was cloned and the protein (KkADH) was expressed, purified and crystallized. A KkADH crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 94.1, b = 80.9, c = 115.6 Å, β = 111.9°. Four monomers were present in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.55 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 51.8%.

  3. Enzymes useful for chiral compound synthesis: structural biology, directed evolution, and protein engineering for industrial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Michihiko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalysts (enzymes) have many advantages as catalysts for the production of useful compounds as compared to chemical catalysts. The stereoselectivity of the enzymes is one advantage, and thus the stereoselective production of chiral compounds using enzymes is a promising approach. Importantly, industrial application of the enzymes for chiral compound production requires the discovery of a novel useful enzyme or enzyme function; furthermore, improving the enzyme properties through protein engineering and directed evolution approaches is significant. In this review, the significance of several enzymes showing stereoselectivity (quinuclidinone reductase, aminoalcohol dehydrogenase, old yellow enzyme, and threonine aldolase) in chiral compound production is described, and the improvement of these enzymes using protein engineering and directed evolution approaches for further usability is discussed. Currently, enzymes are widely used as catalysts for the production of chiral compounds; however, for further use of enzymes in chiral compound production, improvement of enzymes should be more essential, as well as discovery of novel enzymes and enzyme functions.

  4. Refolding of a thermostable glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase for application in synthetic cascade biomanufacturing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Steffler

    Full Text Available The production of chemicals from renewable resources is gaining importance in the light of limited fossil resources. One promising alternative to widespread fermentation based methods used here is Synthetic Cascade Biomanufacturing, the application of minimized biocatalytic reaction cascades in cell free processes. One recent example is the development of the phosphorylation independent conversion of glucose to ethanol and isobutanol using only 6 and 8 enzymes, respectively. A key enzyme for this pathway is aldehyde dehydrogenase from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which catalyzes the highly substrate specific oxidation of d-glyceraldehyde to d-glycerate. In this work the enzyme was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. Using matrix-assisted refolding of inclusion bodies the yield of enzyme production was enhanced 43-fold and thus for the first time the enzyme was provided in substantial amounts. Characterization of structural stability verified correct refolding of the protein. The stability of the enzyme was determined by guanidinium chloride as well as isobutanol induced denaturation to be ca. -8 kJ/mol both at 25°C and 40°C. The aldehyde dehydrogenase is active at high temperatures and in the presence of small amounts of organic solvents. In contrast to previous publications, the enzyme was found to accept NAD(+ as cofactor making it suitable for application in the artificial glycolysis.

  5. Purification of methanol dehydrogenase from mouth methylotrophic bacteria of tropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waturangi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Purification of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH from methylotrophic bacteria was conducted to obtain pure enzyme for further research and industrial applications due to the enzyme’s unique activity that catalyzes oxidation of methanol as an important carbon source in methylotrophic bacteria.Methodology and Results: The enzyme was screened from methylotrophic bacteria isolated from human mouth. Purification of this enzyme was conducted using ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by cation exchange chromatography. Two types of media were used to produce the enzymes: luria broth and standard mineral salts media (MSM. MSM produced MDH with higher specific activity than LB. Specific activity was also increased along with the purification steps. Application of ammonium sulphate increased the purity of enzyme and was more effective for the enzyme produced in LB. Using sepharose increased the enzyme activity 10 -57 folds.Conclusion, significant and impact of this study: With this, ammonium sulphate precipitation coupled with single cation exchange chromatographic system has been proved to provide sufficient purified of methanol dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacteria origin of human mouth with high specific activity for further application.

  6. Surviving environmental stress: the role of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in marine crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NA Stephens-Camacho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH family, an ancestral group of enzymes responsible for aldehyde detoxification in several organisms. The BADH enzyme catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine (GB an important osmoptrotector and osmoregulator accumulated in response to cellular osmotic stress. The BADH enzymes have been extensively described in terrestrial organisms, but information in marine crustaceans remains scarce. Research on crustacean stress-adaptive capacity to environmental stressors relates GB accumulation in response to salinity variations. Although GB de novo synthesis is confirmed on crustaceans, its metabolic pathways and regulation mechanism are unexplored. In this work, the state of the knowledge of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in marine crustaceans is summarized, as a mechanism to overcome the deleterious effects of changes in temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration in seawater. The purpose of this review is to provide a more comprehensive overview to set the basis for exploring novel functions and properties of BADHs on the response of crustaceans to environmental stress.

  7. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of superoxide/hydrogen peroxide by the mitochondrial 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Renata L S; Bunik, Victoria I; Brand, Martin D

    2016-02-01

    In humans, mutations in dehydrogenase E1 and transketolase domain containing 1 (DHTKD1) are associated with neurological abnormalities and accumulation of 2-oxoadipate, 2-aminoadipate, and reactive oxygen species. The protein encoded by DHTKD1 has sequence and structural similarities to 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, and the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex can produce superoxide/H2O2 at high rates. The DHTKD1 enzyme is hypothesized to catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoadipate, a shared intermediate of the degradative pathways for tryptophan, lysine and hydroxylysine. Here, we show that rat skeletal muscle mitochondria can produce superoxide/H2O2 at high rates when given 2-oxoadipate. We identify the putative mitochondrial 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex as one of the sources and characterize the conditions that favor its superoxide/H2O2 production. Rates increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios and were higher at each NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio when 2-oxoadipate was present, showing that superoxide/H2O2 was produced during the forward reaction from 2-oxoadipate, but not in the reverse reaction from NADH in the absence of 2-oxoadipate. The maximum capacity of the 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex for production of superoxide/H2O2 is comparable to that of site IF of complex I, and seven, four and almost two-fold lower than the capacities of the 2-oxoglutarate, pyruvate and branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes, respectively. Regulation by ADP and ATP of H2O2 production driven by 2-oxoadipate was very different from that driven by 2-oxoglutarate, suggesting that site AF of the 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase complex is a new source of superoxide/H2O2 associated with the NADH isopotential pool in mitochondria.

  9. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants.

  10. Fusion of phospholipid vesicles induced by muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the absence of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morero, R D; Viñals, A L; Bloj, B; Farías, R N

    1985-04-01

    Ca2+-induced fusion of phospholipid vesicles (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidic acid, 9:1 mol/mol) prepared by ethanolic injection was followed by five different procedures: resonance energy transfer, light scattering, electron microscopy, intermixing of aqueous content, and gel filtration through Sepharose 4-B. The five methods gave concordant results, showing that vesicles containing only 10% phosphatidic acid can be induced to fuse by millimolar concentrations of Ca2+. When the fusing capability of several soluble proteins was assayed, it was found that concanavalin A, bovine serum albumin, ribonuclease, and protease were inactive. On the other hand, lysozyme, L-lactic dehydrogenase, and muscle and yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were capable of inducing vesicle fusion. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle, the most extensively studied protein, proved to be very effective: 0.1 microM was enough to induce complete intermixing of bilayer phospholipid vesicles. Under conditions used in this work, fusion was accompanied by leakage of internal contents. The fusing capability of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was not affected by 5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The Ca2+ concentration in the medium, as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was 5 ppm. Heat-denatured enzyme was incapable of inducing fusion. We conclude that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a soluble protein inherently endowed with the capability of fusing phospholipid vesicles.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. (a) Identification. A lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase...

  12. Microbial alcohol dehydrogenases: identification, characterization and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: alcohol dehydrogenase, laboratory evolution, rational protein engineering, Pyrococcus furiosus, biocatalysis, characterization, computational design, thermostability.   Alcohol dehydrogeases (ADHs) catalyze the interconversion of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. They display a wide variety

  13. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  14. Cloning and characterization of human very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase cDNA, chromosomal assignment of the gene and identification in four patients of nine different mutations within the VLCAD gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Bross, P; Vianey-Saban, C

    1996-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is one of four straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACD) enzymes, which are all nuclear encoded mitochondrial flavoproteins catalyzing the initial step in fatty acid beta-oxidation. We have used the very fast, Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE...

  15. Improved production of propionic acid in Propionibacterium jensenii via combinational overexpression of glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Zhuge, Xin; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Chen, Rachel R; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Microbial production of propionic acid (PA), an important chemical building block used as a preservative and chemical intermediate, has gained increasing attention for its environmental friendliness over traditional petrochemical processes. In previous studies, we constructed a shuttle vector as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, a potential candidate for efficient PA synthesis. In this study, we identified the key metabolites for PA synthesis in P. jensenii by examining the influence of metabolic intermediate addition on PA synthesis with glycerol as a carbon source under anaerobic conditions. We also further improved PA production via the overexpression of the identified corresponding enzymes, namely, glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarate hydratase (FUM). Compared to those in wild-type P. jensenii, the activities of these enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.91- ± 0.17- to 8.12- ± 0.37-fold higher. The transcription levels of the corresponding enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.85- ± 0.19- to 8.07- ± 0.63-fold higher than those in the wild type. The coexpression of GDH and MDH increased the PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g/liter in wild-type P. jensenii to 39.43 ± 1.90 g/liter in the engineered strains. This study identified the key metabolic nodes limiting PA overproduction in P. jensenii and further improved PA titers via the coexpression of GDH and MDH, making the engineered P. jensenii strain a potential industrial producer of PA.

  16. Heteroexpression and characterization of a monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ao; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Peng; Liu, Ai-Min; Pan, Wei; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2011-08-01

    A monomeric NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 (SaIDH) was heteroexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the His-tagged enzyme was further purified to homogeneity. The molecular weight of SaIDH was about 80 kDa which is typical for monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the deduced amino acid sequence of SaIDH shows high sequence identity with known momomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase, and the coenzyme, substrate and metal ion binding sites are completely conserved. The optimal pH and temperature of SaIDH were found to be pH 9.4 and 45°C, respectively. Heat-inactivation studies showed that heating for 20 min at 50°C caused a 50% loss in enzymatic activity. In addition, SaIDH was absolutely specific for NADP+ as electron acceptor. Apparent Km values were 4.98 μM for NADP+ and 6,620 μM for NAD+, respectively, using Mn2+ as divalent cation. The enzyme performed a 33,000-fold greater specificity (kcat/Km) for NADP+ than NAD+. Moreover, SaIDH activity was entirely dependent on the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+, but was strongly inhibited by Ca2+ and Zn2+. Taken together, our findings implicate the recombinant SaIDH is a divalent cation-dependent monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase which presents a remarkably high cofactor preference for NADP+.

  17. Coccolithophores: Functional Biodiversity, Enzymes and Bioprospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Allen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an ‘in house‘ enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  18. Coccolithophores: functional biodiversity, enzymes and bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Emma L; Worthy, Charlotte A; Probert, Ian; Ali, Sohail T; Love, John; Napier, Johnathan; Littlechild, Jenny A; Somerfield, Paul J; Allen, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an 'in house' enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  19. Inactivation of Bakers' yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sungwoo; Joshi, J.G. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

    1989-04-18

    Preincubation of yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) with Al(III) produced an inactive enzyme containing 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. None of the enzyme-bound Al(III) was dissociated by dialysis against 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.0, containing 0.2 mM EDTA at 4{degree}C for 24 h. Citrate, NADP{sup +}, EDTA, or NaF protected the enzyme against the Al(III) inactivation. The Al(III)-inactivated enzyme, however, was completely reactivated only by citrate and NaF. The dissociation constant for the enzyme-aluminum complex was calculated to be 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M with NaF, a known reversible chelator for aluminum. Modification of histidine and lysine residues of the enzyme with diethyl pyrocarbonate and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively, inactivated the enzyme. However, the modified enzyme still bound 1 mol of Al(III)/mol of enzyme subunit. Circular dichroism studies showed that the binding of Al(III) to the enzyme induced a decrease in {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet and an increase in random coil. Therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of G6PD by Al(III) is due to the conformational change induced by Al(III) binding.

  20. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  1. Methods for demonstration of enzyme activity in muscle fibres at the muscle/bone interface in demineralized tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Vilmann, H

    1981-01-01

    A method for demonstration of activity for ATPase and various oxidative enzymes (succinic dehydrogenase, alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, and lactic dehydrogenase) in muscle/bone sections of fixed and demineralized tissue has been developed. It was found that it is possible to preserve...... with the aid of a mapping of presence of phosphomonoesterases on bone surfaces, the method may be used to study possible biochemical interactions between bone and muscle tissue at the muscle/bone interface....

  2. [Purification and properties of two chloridazondihydrodiol dehydrogenases from chloridazon degrading bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1978-10-01

    A cell-free extract of Chloridazon-degrading soil bacteria catalyzes the conversion of the dihydrodiol derivative of chloridazon to the corresponding catechol derivative. NAD is required as hydrogen acceptor. Chromatography of the crude extract on DEAE-cellulose results in the elution of two different enzymes (enzyme A and enzyme B, respectively) with the same catalytic capacity. Both enzymes were purified to homogeneity in disc-gel electrophoresis and their properties were compared. The molecular weight was found to be 220 000 for both enzymes. Dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated subunits of molecular weight 50 000 in both cases. The synthesis of the enzymes does not seem to be under inductive control. The two dehydrogenases differ in heat-stability, pH-optimum, Km-values for the substrate and in their sensitivity to inhibitors. Enzyme A shows relatively high heat lability, a pH-optimum at pH 9.5, and a Km-value of 0.25 mM for the dihydrodiol derivative of chloridazon. The catalytic activity of enzyme A is not influenced by p-chloromercuribenzoate or by N-bromosuccinimide. In contrast enzyme B is relatively stable at high temperatures, showing a pH-optimum of 7.0, and a Km for the dihydrodiol derivative of chloridazon of 1.0 mM. Enzyme B can be completely inhibited by even small amounts of p-chloromercuribenzoate and by N-bromosuccinimide. Striking differences were found in the substrate specificities of the two dehydrogenases. Whereas enzyme A exhibits a high specificity towards dihydrodiols derived from aromates of the chloridazon or phenazon type, enzyme B is much less specific and is also able to convert the dihydrodiols of benzene, toluene or chlorobenzene into the corresponding catechols. Both enzymes are competitively inhibited by the reaction product, the catechol of chloridazon. Other catechols differed in their inhibitory effect on the two dehydrogenases. These differences are correlated with the different substrate

  3. [Mechanism of malate dehydrogenase isoform formation in Sphaerotilus natans D-507 under different cultivation conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eprintsev, A T; Falaleeva, M I; Arabtseva, M A; Lavrinenko, I A; Parfenova, I V; Grechkina, M V; Abud, F S

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretically homogenous preparations of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) isoforms of the bacteria Sphaerotilus natans D-507 with specific activity 7.46 U/mg and 5.74 U/mg with respect to protein concentration have been obtained. The dimeric isoform of the enzyme was shown to function under organotrophic growth conditions, whereas the tetrameric isoform was induced under mixotrophic cultivation conditions. PCR-analysis revealed a single gene encoding the malate dehydrogenase molecule. The topography of the MDH isoform surface was studied by atomic-force microscopy, and a 3D-structure of the enzyme was obtained. Spectraphotometric analysis data allowed us to suggest that stabilization of the tetrameric form of MDH is due to additional bounds implicated in the quaternary structure formation.

  4. Expression in Escherichia coli of active human alcohol dehydrogenase lacking N-terminal acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höög, J O; Weis, M; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H; von Bahr-Lindström, H

    1987-12-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, beta beta isozyme of class I) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized regarding N-terminal processing. The expression system was obtained by ligation of a cDNA fragment corresponding to the beta-subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase into the vector pKK 223-3 containing the tac promoter. The enzyme, detected by Western-blot analysis and ethanol oxidizing activity, constituted up to 3% of the total amount of protein. Recombinant ADH was separated from E. coli ADH by ion-exchange chromatography and the isolated enzyme was essentially pure as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. The N-terminal sequence was identical to that of the authentic beta-subunit except that the N-terminus was non-acetylated, indicating a correct removal of the initiator methionine, but lack of further processing.

  5. The effect of heparin and pentosan polysulfate on the thermal stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulíková, H; Molnárová, M; Podhradský, D

    1998-12-01

    Heparin and pentosan polysulfate as organic polyanions inhibit yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of heparin and pentosan polysulfate on the thermostability of alcohol dehydrogenase. Spectral and kinetic analyses showed that these compounds increase the thermal stability of the enzyme and eliminate entirely thermal aggregation. The thermostabilizing effect of unfractionated heparin and pentosan polysulfate was accelerated in the presence of NAD+. The addition of NAD+ (11 microM) to the incubation medium decreased the inhibition of the YADH activity in the presence of pentosan polysulfate (1.32 microM). Moreover, 38% of the residual activity of YADH was found after a 5-min incubation at 70 degrees C. These findings indicate that heparinoids not only modulate the enzyme activity but also can prevent the protein's thermal denaturation.

  6. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the chemolithotroph Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Takashi; Ehara, Nagisa; Nishito, Akira; Nakayama, Yumi; Maekawa, Makiko; Imada, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hidehiko; Inagaki, Kenji

    2002-08-27

    An isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) with an unique coenzyme specificity from Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned. The native enzyme was homodimeric with a subunit of M(r) 45000 and showed a 78-fold preference for NAD(+) over NADP(+). The cloned ICDH gene (icd) was expressed in an icd-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EB106; the activity was found in the cell extract. The gene encodes a 429-amino acid polypeptide and is located between open reading frames encoding a putative aconitase gene (upstream of icd) and a putative succinyl-CoA synthase beta-subunit gene (downstream of icd). A. thiooxidans ICDH showed high sequence similarity to bacterial NADP(+)-dependent ICDH rather than eukaryotic NAD(+)-dependent ICDH, but the NAD(+)-preference of the enzyme was suggested due to residues conserved in the coenzyme binding site of the NAD(+)-dependent decarboxylating dehydrogenase.

  7. In Silico Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro D. Fernández-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH, whose regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways, is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis. Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles with a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling and stress processes by molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO. NADPH is required by several peroxisomal enzymes involved in β-oxidation, NO, and glutathione (GSH generation. Plants have various NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, one of which is 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH. Arabidopsis contains three 6PGDH genes that probably are encoded for cytosolic, chloroplastic/mitochondrial, and peroxisomal isozymes, although their specific functions remain largely unknown. This study focuses on the in silico analysis of the biochemical characteristics and gene expression of peroxisomal 6PGDH (p6PGDH with the aim of understanding its potential function in the peroxisomal NADPH-recycling system. The data show that a group of plant 6PGDHs contains an archetypal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS, while in silico gene expression analysis using affymetrix microarray data suggests that Arabidopsis p6PGDH appears to be mainly involved in xenobiotic response, growth, and developmental processes.

  8. Monoterpene Metabolism. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of (−)-Isopiperitenol/(−)-Carveol Dehydrogenase of Peppermint and Spearmint1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Kerry L.; Davis, Edward M.; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (−)-trans-isopiperitenol to (−)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (−)-trans-carveol to (−)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (−)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (−)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (−)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5′-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (−)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5′-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (−)-trans-isopiperitenol and (−)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13

  9. Isolation of protease-free alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Drosophila simulans and several homozygous and heterozygous Drosophila melanogaster variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilda, T; Lamme, DA; Collu, G; Jekel, PA; Reinders, P; Beintema, JJ

    The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from several naturally occurring ADH variants of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans Lc,as isolated. Affinity chromatography with the ligand Cibacron Blue and elution with NAD(+) showed similar behavior for D. melanogaster ADH-FF, ADH-71k, and D.

  10. A Nonsense Mutation in a Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Gene is Responsible for the Sorghum Brown Midrib-6 Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown midrib 6 (bmr-6) affects phenylpropanoid metabolism resulting in reduced lignin concentrations and altered lignin composition in Sorghum bicolor. Recently, bmr-6 plants were shown to have very limited cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195), the enzyme that catalyzes the c...

  11. [Selective inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver and heart of mice by triphosphate esters of thiochrome and tetrahydrothiamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M; Zabrodskaia, S V; Zimatkina, T I; Oparin, D A

    1983-06-01

    In experiments with white mice it was shown that in contrast to hydroxythiamine and other known vitamin B1 antagonists, triphosphate esters of thiochrome and tetrahydrothiamine possess a selective anticoenzyme activity with respect to the only one of the thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes, i.e. pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  12. Structural insights into substrate specificity and solvent tolerance in alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber DSM 44541.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabec, Martin; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Tauber, Katharina C; Steinkellner, Georg; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Grogan, Gideon; Gruber, Karl

    2010-09-14

    The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase ADH-'A' from Rhodococcus ruber reveals possible reasons for its remarkable tolerance to organic co-solvents and suggests new directions for structure-informed mutagenesis to produce enzymes of altered substrate specificity or improved selectivity.

  13. Isolation of protease-free alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Drosophila simulans and several homozygous and heterozygous Drosophila melanogaster variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilda, T; Lamme, DA; Collu, G; Jekel, PA; Reinders, P; Beintema, JJ

    1998-01-01

    The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from several naturally occurring ADH variants of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans Lc,as isolated. Affinity chromatography with the ligand Cibacron Blue and elution with NAD(+) showed similar behavior for D. melanogaster ADH-FF, ADH-71k, and D. si

  14. Purification, characterization and regulation of a monomeric L-phenylalanine dehydrogenase from the facultative methylotroph Nocardia sp. 239

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Rijssel, M. van; Euverink, G.J.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1989-01-01

    In Nocardia sp. 239 D-phenylalanine is converted into L-phenylalanine by an inducible amino acid racemase. The further catabolism of this amino acid involves an NAD-dependent L-phenylalanine dehydrogenase. This enzyme was detected only in cells grown on L- or D-phenylalanine and in batch cultures hi

  15. Purification and Electrophoretic Characterization of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Mammalian Blood: A Different Twist on a Classic Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunauer, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    A multiweek protein purification suite, suitable for upper-division biochemistry or biotechnology undergraduate students, is described. Students work in small teams to isolate the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from a nontraditional tissue source, mammalian blood, using a sequence of three column chromatographic procedures: ion-exchange, size…

  16. Exercise training induces similar elevations in the activity of oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and peak oxygen uptake in the human quadriceps muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrand, Eva; Krustrup, Peter; Søndergaard, Hans

    2011-01-01

    During exercise involving a small muscle mass, peak oxygen uptake is thought to be limited by peripheral factors, such as the degree of oxygen extraction from the blood and/or mitochondrial oxidative capacity. Previously, the maximal activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme oxoglutarate dehydrogenase has...

  17. Choline dehydrogenase interacts with SQSTM1/p62 to recruit LC3 and stimulate mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sungwoo; Choi, Seon-Guk; Yoo, Seung-Min; Son, Jin H.; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-01-01

    CHDH (choline dehydrogenase) is an enzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of choline to betaine aldehyde in mitochondria. Apart from this well-known activity, we report here a pivotal role of CHDH in mitophagy. Knockdown of CHDH expression impairs CCCP-induced mitophagy and PARK2/parkin-mediated clearance of mitochondria in mammalian cells, including HeLa cells and SN4741 dopaminergic neuronal cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHDH accelerates PARK2-mediated mitophagy. CHDH is found on both...

  18. Role of Alanine Dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Recovery from Hypoxic Nonreplicating Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Giffin

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis can maintain a nonreplicating persistent state in the host for decades, but must maintain the ability to efficiently reactivate and produce active disease to survive and spread in a population. Among the enzymes expressed during this dormancy is alanine dehydrogenase, which converts pyruvate to alanine, and glyoxylate to glycine concurrent with the oxidation of NADH to NAD. It is involved in the metabolic remodeling of M. tuberculosis through its possible interactions with both the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycle. Both mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, and alanine dehydrogenase increased during entry into nonreplicating persistence, while the gene and activity for the second enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, malate synthase were not. This could suggest a shift in carbon flow away from the glyoxylate cycle and instead through alanine dehydrogenase. Expression of ald was also induced in vitro by other persistence-inducing stresses such as nitric oxide, and was expressed at high levels in vivo during the initial lung infection in mice. Enzyme activity was maintained during extended hypoxia even after transcription levels decreased. An ald knockout mutant of M. tuberculosis showed no reduction in anaerobic survival in vitro, but resulted in a significant lag in the resumption of growth after reoxygenation. During reactivation the ald mutant had an altered NADH/NAD ratio, and alanine dehydrogenase is proposed to maintain the optimal NADH/NAD ratio during anaerobiosis in preparation of eventual regrowth, and during the initial response during reoxygenation.

  19. Differential pulse voltammetric studies on the effects of Al(Ⅲ) on the lactate dehydrogenase activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was applied to study the effects of aluminum Al(Ⅲ) on the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Michaelis-Menten constant (KNADHm) and maximum velocity (vmax) in the enzyme promoting catalytic reaction of "pyruvate(Pyr) + NADH + H+ LDH(=) lactate + NAD+" under different conditions by monitoring DPV reduction current of NAD+ were reported.(C) 2007 Shu Ping Bi. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. 5FU and oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy in two dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reerink, O; Mulder, N H; Szabo, B G; Hospers, G A P

    2004-01-01

    Patients with a germline mutation leading to a deficiency of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme are at risk from developing severe toxicity on the administration of 5FU-containing chemotherapy. We report on the implications of this inborn genetic error in two patients who received 5FU and oxaliplatin. A possible co-medication effect of oxaliplatin is considered, as are the consequences of screening for DPD deficiency.

  1. Apparent role of dynein in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase trafficking in neutrophils from pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji-Biao; Espinoza, Jimmy; Romero, Roberto; Petty, Howard R

    2006-03-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of metabolic microcompartmentalization associated with neutrophil hexose monophosphate shunt activity during pregnancy, we have studied the intracellular trafficking of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDase). Microtubule motor proteins colocalize with G6PDase. Dynein inhibitors block G6PDase accumulation at the microtubule-organizing center in pregnancy cells. On this basis, we conclude that microtubule motor proteins participate in hexose monophosphate shunt enzyme transport within leukocytes.

  2. Changes in short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase during rat cardiac development and stress

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jinxian; Xu, Lipeng; Huang, Qiuju; Luo, Jiani; Liu, Peiqing; Chen, Shaorui; Yuan, Xi; Lu, Yao; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Sigui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the expression of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), a key enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, during rat heart development and the difference of SCAD between pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. The expression of SCAD was lowest in the foetal and neonatal heart, which had time-dependent increase during normal heart development. In contrast, a significant decrease in SCAD expression was observed in different ages of spontaneously hyp...

  3. The activity of class I, II, III and IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2013-07-01

    The brain being highly sensitive to the action of alcohol is potentially susceptible to its carcinogenic effects. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the main enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism, which leads to the generation of carcinogenic acetaldehyde. Human brain tissue contains various ADH isoenzymes and possess also ALDH activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity in cancer tissues and healthy brain cells. The samples were taken from 62 brain cancer patients (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. The total activity of ADH, and activity of class I ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH and ALDH did not show statistically significant differences of activity in cancer and in normal cells. Analysis of the enzymes activity did not show significant differences depending on the location of the tumor. The differences in the activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase, and class I isoenzyme between cancer tissues and healthy brain cells might be a factor for metabolic changes and disturbances in low mature cancer cells and additionally might be a reason for higher level of acetaldehyde which can intensify the carcinogenesis.

  4. Alternative splicing regulates targeting of malate dehydrogenase in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabran, Philomène; Rossignol, Tristan; Gaillardin, Claude; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2012-06-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major mechanism contributing to the proteome complexity of most eukaryotes, especially mammals. In less complex organisms, such as yeasts, the numbers of genes that contain introns are low and cases of alternative splicing (AS) with functional implications are rare. We report the first case of AS with functional consequences in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. The splicing pattern was found to govern the cellular localization of malate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the central carbon metabolism. This ubiquitous enzyme is involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle in mitochondria and in the glyoxylate cycle, which takes place in peroxisomes and the cytosol. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three genes encode three compartment-specific enzymes. In contrast, only two genes exist in Y. lipolytica. One gene (YlMDH1, YALI0D16753g) encodes a predicted mitochondrial protein, whereas the second gene (YlMDH2, YALI0E14190g) generates the cytosolic and peroxisomal forms through the alternative use of two 3'-splice sites in the second intron. Both splicing variants were detected in cDNA libraries obtained from cells grown under different conditions. Mutants expressing the individual YlMdh2p isoforms tagged with fluorescent proteins confirmed that they localized to either the cytosolic or the peroxisomal compartment.

  5. Human choline dehydrogenase: medical promises and biochemical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Francesca; Gadda, Giovanni

    2013-09-15

    Human choline dehydrogenase (CHD) is located in the inner membrane of mitochondria primarily in liver and kidney and catalyzes the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. Its physiological role is to regulate the concentrations of choline and glycine betaine in the blood and cells. Choline is important for regulation of gene expression, the biosynthesis of lipoproteins and membrane phospholipids and for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; glycine betaine plays important roles as a primary intracellular osmoprotectant and as methyl donor for the biosynthesis of methionine from homocysteine, a required step for the synthesis of the ubiquitous methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine. Recently, CHD has generated considerable medical attention due to its association with various human pathologies, including male infertility, homocysteinuria, breast cancer and metabolic syndrome. Despite the renewed interest, the biochemical characterization of the enzyme has lagged behind due to difficulties in the obtainment of purified, active and stable enzyme. This review article summarizes the medical relevance and the physiological roles of human CHD, highlights the biochemical knowledge on the enzyme, and provides an analysis based on the comparison of the protein sequence with that of bacterial choline oxidase, for which structural and biochemical information is available.

  6. Functional characterization of a vanillin dehydrogenase in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhang, Yaoling; Chen, Can; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shaolin; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-27

    Vanillin dehydrogenase (VDH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the degradation of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Herein, the VDH from Corynebacterium glutamicum was characterized. The relative molecular mass (Mr) determined by SDS-PAGE was ~51 kDa, whereas the apparent native Mr values revealed by gel filtration chromatography were 49.5, 92.3, 159.0 and 199.2 kDa, indicating the presence of dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric forms. Moreover, the enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 7.0 and 30°C, and interestingly, it could utilize NAD(+) and NADP(+) as coenzymes with similar efficiency and showed no obvious difference toward NAD(+) and NADP(+). In addition to vanillin, this enzyme exhibited catalytic activity toward a broad range of substrates, including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, o-phthaldialdehyde, cinnamaldehyde, syringaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Conserved catalytic residues or putative cofactor interactive sites were identified based on sequence alignment and comparison with previous studies, and the function of selected residues were verified by site-directed mutagenesis analysis. Finally, the vdh deletion mutant partially lost its ability to grow on vanillin, indicating the presence of alternative VDH(s) in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Taken together, this study contributes to understanding the VDH diversity from bacteria and the aromatic metabolism pathways in C. glutamicum.

  7. Undetected Toxicity Risk in Pharmacogenetic Testing for Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Stefania Falvella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoropyrimidines, the mainstay agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer, alone or as a part of combination therapies, cause severe adverse reactions in about 10%–30% of patients. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD, a key enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil, has been intensively investigated in relation to fluoropyrimidine toxicity, and several DPD gene (DPYD polymorphisms are associated with decreased enzyme activity and increased risk of fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity. In patients carrying non-functional DPYD variants (c.1905+1G>A, c.1679T>G, c.2846A>T, fluoropyrimidines should be avoided or reduced according to the patients’ homozygous or heterozygous status, respectively. For other common DPYD variants (c.496A>G, c.1129-5923C>G, c.1896T>C, conflicting data are reported and their use in clinical practice still needs to be validated. The high frequency of DPYD polymorphism and the lack of large prospective trials may explain differences in studies’ results. The epigenetic regulation of DPD expression has been recently investigated to explain the variable activity of the enzyme. DPYD promoter methylation and its regulation by microRNAs may affect the toxicity risk of fluoropyrimidines. The studies we reviewed indicate that pharmacogenetic testing is promising to direct personalised dosing of fluoropyrimidines, although further investigations are needed to establish the role of DPD in severe toxicity in patients treated for colorectal cancer.

  8. Leucaena sp. recombinant cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase: purification and physicochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parth; Gupta, Neha; Gaikwad, Sushama; Agrawal, Dinesh C; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-02-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase is a broad substrate specificity enzyme catalyzing the final step in monolignol biosynthesis, leading to lignin formation in plants. Here, we report characterization of a recombinant CAD homologue (LlCAD2) isolated from Leucaena leucocephala. LlCAD2 is 80 kDa homo-dimer associated with non-covalent interactions, having substrate preference toward sinapaldehyde with Kcat/Km of 11.6×10(6) (M(-1) s(-1)), and a possible involvement of histidine at the active site. The enzyme remains stable up to 40 °C, with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) and half-life (t1/2) of 0.002 and 5h, respectively. LlCAD2 showed optimal activity at pH 6.5 and 9 for reduction and oxidation reactions, respectively, and was stable between pH 7 and 9, with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) and half-life (t1/2) of 7.5×10(-4) and 15 h, respectively. It is a Zn-metalloenzyme with 4 Zn(2+) per dimer, however, was inhibited in presence of externally supplemented Zn(2+) ions. The enzyme was resistant to osmolytes, reducing agents and non-ionic detergents.

  9. Glutamate dehydrogenase: structure, allosteric regulation, and role in insulin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine and inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds blocked the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  10. The structure and allosteric regulation of mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2012-03-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine, while the most important inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Recently, spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds were found to block the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  11. Alcohol Dehydrogenase of Bacillus strain for Measuring Alcohol Electrochemically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswantini, D.; Nurhidayat, N.; Ferit, H.

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was applied to produce alcohol biosensor. The enzyme was collected from cultured Bacillus sp. in solid media. From 6 tested isolates, bacteria from fermented rice grain (TST.A) showed the highest oxidation current which was further applied as the bioreceptor. Various ethanol concentrations was measured based on the increase of maximum oxidation current value. However, a reduction value was happened when the ethanol concentration was higher than 5%. Comparing the result of spectrophotometry measurement, R2 value obtained from the biosensor measurement method was higher. The new proposed method resulted a wider detection range, from 0.1-5% of ethanol concentration. The result showed that biosensor method has big potency to be used as alcohol detector in foods or bevearages.

  12. Mechanistic enzymology of CO dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The final steps in acetyl-CoA biosynthesis by anaerobic bacteria are performed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), a nickel/iron-sulfur protein. An important achievement was to establish conditions under which acetyl-CoA synthesis by purified enzymes equals the in vivo rate of acetate synthesis. Under these optimized conditions we established that the rate limiting step in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from methyl-H[sub 4]folate, CO and CoA is likely to be the methylation of CODH by the methylated corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein. We then focused on stopped flow studies of this rate limiting transmethylation reaction and established its mechanism. We have studied the carbonylation of CODH by infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy and determined that the [Ni-Fe[sup 3-4]S[sub 4

  13. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Thibodeau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH complex is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that serves a critical role in the conversion of anaerobic to aerobic cerebral energy. The regulatory complexity of PDH, coupled with its significant influence in brain metabolism, underscores its susceptibility to, and significance in, ischemia-reperfusion injury. Here, we evaluate proposed mechanisms of PDH-mediated neurodysfunction in stroke, including oxidative stress, altered regulatory enzymatic control, and loss of PDH activity. We also describe the neuroprotective influence of antioxidants, dichloroacetate, acetyl-L-carnitine, and combined therapy with ethanol and normobaric oxygen, explained in relation to PDH modulation. Our review highlights the significance of PDH impairment in stroke injury through an understanding of the mechanisms by which it is modulated, as well as an exploration of neuroprotective strategies available to limit its impairment.

  14. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  15. Screening and Characterization of Proline Dehydrogenase Flavoenzyme Producing Pseudomonas Entomophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Shahbaz- Mohammadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH; 1.5.99.8 plays an important role in specific determination of plasma proline level in biosensor and diagnostic kits. The goal of this research was to isolate and characterize ProDH enzyme from Iranian soil microorganisms.Materials and Methods: Screening of L-proline degradative enzymes from soil samples was carried out employing enrichment culture techniques. The isolate was characterized by biochemical reactions and specific PCR amplification. The target ProDH was purified and the effects of pH and temperature on the activity and stability were also tested.Results: Among the 250 isolates recovered from 40 soil samples, only one strain characterized as Pseudomonas entomophila displayed the highest enzyme activity toward L-proline (350 U/l than others. The enzyme of interest was identified as a ProDH and had Km value of 32 mM for L-proline. ProDH exhibited its best activity at temperature range of 25 to 35°C and its highest activity was achieved at 30°C. It was almost stable at temperatures between 25-30°C for 2 hours. The optimum pH activity of ProDH reaction was 8.5 and its activity was stable in pH range of 8.0-9.0 upto 24 hours. The enzyme was purified with a yield of 8.5% and a purification factor of 37.7. The molecular mass of the purified ProDH was about 40 kDa, and determined to be a monomeric protein."nConclusion: This is the first report concerning the ProDH production by a P. entomophila bacterium isolated from soil sample.

  16. Pcal_1699, an extremely thermostable malate dehydrogenase from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Ghazaleh; Rashid, Naeem; Bashir, Qamar; Gardner, Qura-Tul Ann Afza; Akhtar, Muhammad; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Two malate dehydrogenase homologs, Pcal_0564 and Pcal_1699, have been found in the genome of Pyrobaculum calidifontis. The gene encoding Pcal_1699 consisted of 927 nucleotides corresponding to a polypeptide of 309 amino acids. To examine the properties of Pcal_1699, the structural gene was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified gene product was characterized. Pcal_1699 was NADH specific enzyme exhibiting a high malate dehydrogenase activity (886 U/mg) at optimal pH (10) and temperature (90 °C). Unfolding studies suggested that urea could not induce complete unfolding and inactivation of Pcal_1699 even at a final concentration of 8 M; however, in the presence of 4 M guanidine hydrochloride enzyme structure was unfolded with complete loss of enzyme activity. Thermostability experiments revealed that Pcal_1699 is the most thermostable malate dehydrogenase, reported to date, retaining more than 90 % residual activity even after heating for 6 h in boiling water.

  17. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath eSutendra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Current drug development in oncology is non-selective as it typically focuses on pathways essential for the survival of all dividing cells. The unique metabolic profile of cancer, which is characterized by increased glycolysis and suppressed mitochondrial glucose oxidation provides cancer cells with a proliferative advantage, conducive with apoptosis resistance and even increased angiogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that targeting the cancer-specific metabolic and mitochondrial remodeling may offer selectivity in cancer treatment. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK is a mitochondrial enzyme that is activated in a variety of cancers and results in the selective inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, a complex of enzymes that converts cytosolic pyruvate to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, the substrate for the Krebs’ cycle. Inhibition of PDK with either small interfering RNAs or the orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA shifts the metabolism of cancer cells from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and reverses the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, this therapeutic strategy increases the production of diffusible Krebs’ cycle intermediates and mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS, activating p53 or inhibiting pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic transcription factors like nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α. These effects result in decreased tumor growth and angiogenesis in a variety of cancers with high selectivity. In a small but mechanistic clinical trial in patients with glioblastoma, a highly aggressive and vascular form of brain cancer, DCA decreased tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that metabolic targeting therapies can be translated directly to patients. Therefore, reversing the mitochondrial suppression with metabolic-modulating drugs, like PDK inhibitors holds promise in the rapidly expanding field of metabolic oncology.

  18. 5年生人参出苗期几种脱氢酶活力比较%Comparison of Dehydrogenase Activity in 5-year Ginseng during Seedling Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏; 赵雨; 邢楠楠; 张惠; 刘海龙

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the activities of malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and α-Glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPD) in 5-year Ginseng Radix in seedling stage. METHODS Adopt neutral buffer solution to extract the coarse enzyme. Use spectrophotometry to test the activities of MDH, LDH, ADH, G6PDH, α-GPD. RESULTS In seedling stage of Ginseng Radix, there were different changes trends of these five dehydrogenase in root and sprout. And there were peak values in different stages. CONCLUSION The activities of MDH, LDH, ADH, G6PDH, a-GPD can be used as the evaluation indicators of quality of Ginseng Radix.%目的 对5年生人参出苗期参根和参苗中苹果酸脱氢酶(malate dehydrogenase,MDH)、乳酸脱氢酶(lactate dehydrogenase,LDH)、乙醇脱氢酶(Alcohol dehydrogenase,ADH)、葡萄糖-6-磷酸脱氢酶(glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase,G6PDH)、α-磷酸甘油脱氢酶(α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase,α-GPD)5种脱氢酶的活力进行比较.方法 采用中性缓冲液提取粗酶液,应用分光光度法测定MDH,LDH,ADH,G6PDH,α-GPD的活力.结果 在人参出苗期,参根和参苗中的5种脱氢酶活力变化趋势有所不同,并在不同时期出现峰值.结论 MDH,LDH,ADH,G6PDH,α-GPD的活力可以作为人参生长过程中长势优劣的评价指标.

  19. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth (BWH); (Brandeis)

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  20. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 signals through antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 to regulate redox homeostasis and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lingtao; Li, Dan; Alesi, Gina N; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Lu, Zhou; Boggon, Titus J; Jin, Peng; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Duong, Duc; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Egnatchik, Robert; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Magliocca, Kelly R; He, Chuan; Arellano, Martha L; Khoury, Hanna J; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Kang, Sumin

    2015-02-09

    How mitochondrial glutaminolysis contributes to redox homeostasis in cancer cells remains unclear. Here we report that the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) is commonly upregulated in human cancers. GDH1 is important for redox homeostasis in cancer cells by controlling the intracellular levels of its product alpha-ketoglutarate and subsequent metabolite fumarate. Mechanistically, fumarate binds to and activates a reactive oxygen species scavenging enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1. Targeting GDH1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor R162 resulted in imbalanced redox homeostasis, leading to attenuated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  1. A severe genotype with favourable outcome in very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma, E; Rashed, M; Vianey-Saban, C; Sakr, A; Divry, P; Gregersen, N; Andresen, B

    2001-01-01

    A patient with very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is reported. He had a severe neonatal presentation and cardiomyopathy. He was found to be homozygous for a severe mutation with no residual enzyme activity. Tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots revealed increased long chain acylcarnitines. VLCAD enzyme activity was severely decreased to 2% of control levels. Dietary management consisted of skimmed milk supplemented with medium chain triglycerides and L-carnitine. Outcome was good and there was no acute recurrence.

 PMID:11124787

  2. [Effective method of isolating M4-lactate dehydrogenase from rat liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Z V; Maglysh, S S; Konovalenko, O V

    1984-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase M4-isoform in the homogeneous state was isolated from the rat liver by successive application of sulphate-ammonium fractionation, phosphocellulose ion-exchange chromatography with high-affinity elution of 1 mM NADH and subsequent hydroxyl apatite fractionation. The method permits obtaining the preparation amounts of the enzymic protein with yield 37.5%, specific activity 386.8 units per 1 mg of protein. It is established that 1 mM NAD+, 10 mM pyruvate and 100 mM lactate are also effective as agents of the selective enzyme elution.

  3. A severe genotype with favourable outcome in very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touma, E H; Rashed, M S; Vianey-Saban, C

    2001-01-01

    A patient with very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is reported. He had a severe neonatal presentation and cardiomyopathy. He was found to be homozygous for a severe mutation with no residual enzyme activity. Tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots revealed increased lo...... chain acylcarnitines. VLCAD enzyme activity was severely decreased to 2% of control levels. Dietary management consisted of skimmed milk supplemented with medium chain triglycerides and L-carnitine. Outcome was good and there was no acute recurrence....

  4. Molecular diagnosis and characterization of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Bross, P; Jensen, T G

    1995-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most common defect in mitochondrial beta-oxidation in humans. It is an autosomal recessive disorder which usually presents in infancy. The disease manifests itself in periods of metabolic stress to the beta-oxidation system and may...... of correct enzyme structure, and does not directly affect the catalytically active regions of the enzyme. We find that our diagnostic set up, consisting of an initial testing by the G985 assay, followed by semi-automated sequencing of DNA from those patients who were indicated to be compound heterozygous...

  5. Effect of the allelic variants of aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2*2 and alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B*2 on blood acetaldehyde concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Giia-Sheun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcoholism is a complex behavioural disorder. Molecular genetics studies have identified numerous candidate genes associated with alcoholism. It is crucial to verify the disease susceptibility genes by correlating the pinpointed allelic variations to the causal phenotypes. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Both ADH and ALDH exhibit functional polymorphisms among racial populations; these polymorphisms have been shown to be the important genetic determinants in ethanol metabolism and alcoholism. Here, we briefly review recent advances in genomic studies of human ADH/ALDH families and alcoholism, with an emphasis on the pharmacogenetic consequences of venous blood acetaldehyde in the different ALDH2 genotypes following the intake of various doses of ethanol. This paper illustrates a paradigmatic example of phenotypic verifications in a protective disease gene for substance abuse.

  6. Structural Insights into l-Tryptophan Dehydrogenase from a Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium, Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, Taisuke; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Megumi; Hakumai, Yuichi; Fukui, Kenji; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Ashiuchi, Makoto; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2017-01-15

    l-Tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme NIES-2108 (NpTrpDH), despite exhibiting high amino acid sequence identity (>30%)/homology (>50%) with NAD(P)(+)-dependent l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe/l-Val dehydrogenases, exclusively catalyzes reversible oxidative deamination of l-Trp to 3-indolepyruvate in the presence of NAD(+) Here, we determined the crystal structure of the apo form of NpTrpDH. The structure of the NpTrpDH monomer, which exhibited high similarity to that of l-Glu/l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases, consisted of a substrate-binding domain (domain I, residues 3 to 133 and 328 to 343) and an NAD(+)/NADH-binding domain (domain II, residues 142 to 327) separated by a deep cleft. The apo-NpTrpDH existed in an open conformation, where domains I and II were apart from each other. The subunits dimerized themselves mainly through interactions between amino acid residues around the β-1 strand of each subunit, as was observed in the case of l-Phe dehydrogenase. The binding site for the substrate l-Trp was predicted by a molecular docking simulation and validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Several hydrophobic residues, which were located in the active site of NpTrpDH and possibly interacted with the side chain of the substrate l-Trp, were arranged similarly to that found in l-Leu/l-Phe dehydrogenases but fairly different from that of an l-Glu dehydrogenase. Our crystal structure revealed that Met-40, Ala-69, Ile-74, Ile-110, Leu-288, Ile-289, and Tyr-292 formed a hydrophobic cluster around the active site. The results of the site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggested that the hydrophobic cluster plays critical roles in protein folding, l-Trp recognition, and catalysis. Our results provide critical information for further characterization and engineering of this enzyme.

  7. Artificial and natural thermostabilization of subunit enzymes. Do they have similar mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit skeletal muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was stabilized by intramolecular intersubunit crosslinking with diimidoesters. Half-inactivation temperature for optimal cross-linker-treated enzyme preparation increased by 11 degrees C. Stabilization effect correlated with the content of crosslinked fractions in enzyme preparation, as proved by SDS gel-electrophoresis. It is proposed that artificial crosslinks stabilize the enzyme in a similar fashion to salt bridges in the thermophilic bacteria enzymes, i.e. preventing dissociation into inactive subunits.

  8. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase contributes to skeletal muscle homeostasis independent of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semjonous, Nina M

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) metabolism by the enzyme hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) within the sarcoplasmic reticulum lumen generates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) to provide the redox potential for the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to activate glucocorticoid (GC). H6PDH knockout (KO) mice have a switch in 11β-HSD1 activity, resulting in GC inactivation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. Importantly, H6PDHKO mice develop a type II fiber myopathy with abnormalities in glucose metabolism and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). GCs play important roles in muscle physiology, and therefore, we have examined the importance of 11β-HSD1 and GC metabolism in mediating aspects of the H6PDHKO myopathy. To achieve this, we examined 11β-HSD1\\/H6PDH double-KO (DKO) mice, in which 11β-HSD1 mediated GC inactivation is negated. In contrast to H6PDHKO mice, DKO mice GC metabolism and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis set point is similar to that observed in 11β-HSD1KO mice. Critically, in contrast to 11β-HSD1KO mice, DKO mice phenocopy the salient features of the H6PDHKO, displaying reduced body mass, muscle atrophy, and vacuolation of type II fiber-rich muscle, fasting hypoglycemia, increased muscle glycogen deposition, and elevated expression of UPR genes. We propose that muscle G6P metabolism through H6PDH may be as important as changes in the redox environment when considering the mechanism underlying the activation of the UPR and the ensuing myopathy in H6PDHKO and DKO mice. These data are consistent with an 11β-HSD1-independent function for H6PDH in which sarcoplasmic reticulum G6P metabolism and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-(oxidized)\\/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) redox status are important for maintaining muscle homeostasis.

  9. Oxidation Catalysis by Enzymes in Microemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Mitsou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Microemulsions are regarded as “the ultimate enzyme microreactors” for liquid oxidations. Their structure, composed of water nanodroplets dispersed in a non-polar medium, provides several benefits for their use as media for enzymatic transformations. They have the ability to overcome the solubility limitations of hydrophobic substrates, enhance the enzymatic activity (superactivity phenomenon and stability, while providing an interface for surface-active enzymes. Of particular interest is the use of such systems to study biotransformations catalyzed by oxidative enzymes. Nanodispersed biocatalytic media are perfect hosts for liquid oxidation reactions catalyzed by many enzymes such as heme peroxidases, phenoloxidases, cholesterol oxidase, and dehydrogenases. The system’s composition and structural properties are important for better understanding of nanodispersion-biocatalyst interactions.

  10. Food Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  11. Food Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  12. Enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Dinesen, B; Deckert, M

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay for urinary albumin using commercially available reagents is described. The assay range is 2.5-120 micrograms/l. When samples are analysed in two standard dilutions, the assayable albumin concentration range is 2.5-240 mg/l, covering the clinical range from...

  13. Biossensor enzimático para detecção de fungicidas ditiocarbamatos: estudo cinético da enzima aldeído desidrogenase e otimização do biossensor Enzymatic biosensor for the detection of dithiocarbamate fungicides: kinetic study of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and biosensor optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberval Soares Lima

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Initially, all major factors that affect the rate of the AldH-catalyzed reaction (enzyme concentration, substrate concentration, temperature and pH were investigated. Optimal activity was observed between pH values of 7.5 and 9.5 in the temperature range of 25 to 50 ºC. Kinetic parameters, such as Km (2.92 µmol L-1 and Vmax (1.33 10-2 µmol min-1 demonstrate a strong enzyme-substrate affinity. The sensors were based on screen-printed electrodes modified with the Meldola Blue-Reinecke salt (MBRS combination. Operational conditions (NAD+ and substrate contents, enzyme loading and response time were optimized. Also, two enzyme immobilization procedures were tested: entrapment in poly(vinyl alcohol bearing styrylpyridinium groups (PVA-SbQ and crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Chronoamperometry was employed to observe the biosensor responses during enzymatic hydrolysis of propionaldehyde and also to construct inhibition curves with maneb and zineb fungicides. Best results were found with the following conditions: [NAD+] = 0.25 mmol L-1; [propionaldehyde] = 80 µmol L-1; enzyme loading = 0.8 U per electrode; response time = 10 min, and inhibition time = 10 min. Current intensities around 103 ± 13 nA with the sensors and good stability was obtained for both immobilization procedures. Detection limits, calculated using 10% inhibition were 31.5 µg L-1 and 35 µg L-1 for maneb and zineb, respectively. Results obtained with other MBRS-modified electrodes consisting of mono and bi-enzymic sensors were compared. The ability to catalyze NADH oxidation by MB was also highlighted.

  14. Effect of dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease activity in cotton soil after applying thiamethoxam as seed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyot, Gagan; Mandal, Kousik; Singh, Balwinder

    2015-05-01

    Soil enzymes are indicators of microbial activities in soil and are often considered as an indicator of soil health and fertility. They are very sensitive to the agricultural practices, pH of the soil, nutrients, inhibitors and weather conditions. To understand the effect of an insecticide, thiamethoxam, on different soil enzyme activities, the experiments were conducted at cotton experimental fields of Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana. The results here were presented to understand the impact of thiamethoxam on soil enzyme activities. Thiamethoxam was applied as seed treatment to control the pest. Soil from three localities, i.e. soil in which seed was treated with recommended dose at 2.1 g a.i. kg(-1), soil in which seed was treated with four times recommended dose at 8.4 g a.i. kg(-1) and from the control field, were tested for different enzyme activities. Phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities were high in control soil in comparison to control soil while no effect of this insecticide on urease activity. Thiamethoxam had inhibitory effects on dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities. Therefore, it can be attributed that agricultural practices, weather conditions and use of thiamethoxam might be responsible for the different level of enzyme activities in soil.

  15. 棉花 GhMDH 基因的克隆及其蛋白诱导和酶活性分析%Cloning and Protein Expression of Malate Dehydrogenase Gene of Gossypium hirsuturm L.and Its Enzyme Activity Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青; 张宁; 司怀军; 吴家和

    2013-01-01

    According to the salt stress-related EST sequences of Gossypium hirsuturm L.,a malate dehydrogen-ase ( MDH) gene was isolated by the 3′,5′-RACE technology ,named GhMDH.The full-length cDNA of GhMDH is 1 130 bp,containing a 1 014 bp ORF which encodes 338 amino acids.The relative molecular weight of GhMDH protein is 35.495 kDa,and its isoelectric point (pI) is 8.94.The GhMDH ORF had been subcloned into pET23b vector for generating a His-tag fusion recombinant protein .The inducible conditions of recombinant protein expres-sion was optimized ,including IPTG contend ,temperature and time .The results showed that the target protein was packaged in inclusion body expressed under 37 ℃,1 mmol/L IPTG and 4 hrs induction conditions .The soluble re-combinant protein can only receive in less than 28 ℃and 12 hrs induction .The urea denatured protein from inclu-sion body had been purified by Ni +column .The purified protein was then renatured through ladder contend dialysis from high to low.The recombinant protein ,GhMDH,exhibited high malate dehydrogenase activates via enzymatic as-say .The results is pivotal to investigate GhMDH fuction in cell redox homeostasis and biotic and abiotic stress resist -ance in cotton .%分析棉花盐胁迫相关的EST文库,设计特异性引物,利用RACE技术从棉花中克隆出苹果酸脱氢酶( Malate dehydrogenase ,MDH)基因,命名为GhMDH。基因全长1130 bp,最大开放阅读框1014 bp,编码338个氨基酸,分子量为35.495 kDa,等电点pI=8.94。将该基因编码区插入到原核表达载体pET23b中,获得pET23b-GhMDH重组载体。利用IPTG诱导表达目标蛋白,发现通常条件下获得的重组蛋白以包涵体的形式存在。对诱导时间、IPTG浓度和温度等条件进行优化,结果表明,除了在28℃低温以下诱导的蛋白有少量为可溶,其他条件诱导的蛋白均以包涵体形式存在。为了得到足够的重组蛋白,对GhMDH包涵体蛋

  16. Glusoce-6-phosphate dehydrogenase- History and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gautam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is the most common enzymatic defect of red blood cells, which increases the vulnerability of erythrocytes to oxidative stress leading to hemolytic anemia. Since its identification more than 60 years ago, much has been done with respect to its clinical diagnosis, laboratory diagnosis and treatment. Association of G6PD is not just limited to anti malarial drugs, but a vast number of other diseases. In this article, we aimed to review the history of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the diagnostic methods available along with its association with other noncommunicable diseases. 

  17. An L-glucitol oxidizing dehydrogenase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 for production of D-sorbose with enzymatic or electrochemical cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Sabrina; Wang, Zhijie; Otten, Harm; Etienne, Mathieu; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik; Lo Leggio, Leila; Walcarius, Alain; Giffhorn, Friedrich; Kohring, Gert-Wieland

    2014-04-01

    A gene in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110, annotated as a ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH), had 87 % sequence identity (97 % positives) to the N-terminal 31 amino acids of an L-glucitol dehydrogenase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DSMZ 14322. The 729-bp long RDH gene coded for a protein consisting of 242 amino acids with a molecular mass of 26.1 kDa. The heterologously expressed protein not only exhibited the main enantio selective activity with D-glucitol oxidation to D-fructose but also converted L-glucitol to D-sorbose with enzymatic cofactor regeneration and a yield of 90 %. The temperature stability and the apparent K m value for L-glucitol oxidation let the enzyme appear as a promising subject for further improvement by enzyme evolution. We propose to rename the enzyme from the annotated RDH gene (locus tag bll6662) from B. japonicum USDA as a D-sorbitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.14).

  18. Serum lactic dehydrogenase isoenzymes and serum hydroxy butyric dehydrogenase in myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanekar D

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Total serum lactate dehydrogenase activity in cases of myocar-dial infarct is difficult to interpret as abnormal values can occur in diseases of liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. The estimation of its isoenzymes is of better diagnostic help because of its tissue specificity. Serum LDH isoenzymes were studied in patients o f myocardial infarction and results are quantitated by densitometry. As LDH 1 represents serum hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase when 2-oxylbutyrate is used as substrate, serum hydroxybutyric dehydro-genase was also estimated in above patients. Greater specificity in diagnosis is achieved with SHBDH because of its myocardial nature and lower incidence of false positive results.

  19. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barretto O.C. de O.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a comparative study of erythrocyte metabolism of vertebrates, the specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD of the Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis in a hemolysate was shown to be high, 207 ± 38 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37ºC, compared to the human erythrocyte activity of 12 ± 2 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37ºC. The apparent high specific activity of the mixture led us to investigate the physicochemical properties of the opossum enzyme. We report that reduced glutathione (GSH in the erythrocytes was only 50% higher than in human erythrocytes, a value lower than expected from the high G6PD activity since GSH is maintained in a reduced state by G6PD activity. The molecular mass, determined by G-200 Sephadex column chromatography at pH 8.0, was 265 kDa, which is essentially the same as that of human G6PD (260 kDa. The Michaelis-Menten constants (Km: 55 µM for glucose-6-phosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km: 3.3 µM were similar to those of the human enzyme (Km: 50-70 and Km: 2.9-4.4, respectively. A 450-fold purification of the opossum enzyme was achieved and the specific activity of the purified enzyme, 90 IU/mg protein, was actually lower than the 150 IU/mg protein observed for human G6PD. We conclude that G6PD after purification from the hemolysate of D. marsupialis does not have a high specific activity. Thus, it is quite probable that the red cell hyperactivity reported may be explained by increased synthesis of G6PD molecules per unit of hemoglobin or to reduced inactivation in the RBC hemolysate.

  20. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-01

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  1. Use of the anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Leifsonia and Pseudomonas for producing chiral alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuya

    2014-05-01

    The asymmetric reduction of ketones is one of the most promising processes for producing chiral alcohols. However, dehydrogenases or reductases that can catalyze the reduction of ketones to give anti-Prelog chiral alcohols have been limited to some NADP(+)/NADPH-dependent enzymes. Recently, we reported a novel NAD(+)/NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Leifsonia sp. and Pseudomonas ADH homologs from soil metagenomes. Moreover, we have established an efficient hydrogen-transfer bioreduction process with 2-propanol as a hydrogen donor using Leifsonia ADH. This review focuses on the recent development of novel ADHs for producing industrially useful anti-Prelog chiral alcohols from various ketones.

  2. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yennawar, Hemant; Møller, Magda; Gillilan, Richard;

    2011-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer...... the substrate-binding pocket together with the acetate designed by nature to fit large polyol substrates. The substrate-binding pocket is seen to be in close proximity to the tetramer interface, which explains the need for the structural integrity of the tetramer for enzyme activity. Small-angle X...

  3. Potentiation of insulin release in response to amino acid methyl esters correlates to activation of islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A; Hedeskov, C J

    1986-01-01

    Column perifusion of mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the ability of amino acids and their methyl esters to influence insulin release and activate islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In the absence of L-glutamine, L-serine and the methyl ester of L-phenylalanine, but neither L...... glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed that only the two methyl esters of L-phenylalanine and L-serine activated the enzyme. It is concluded that the mechanism by which methyl esters of amino acids potentiate insulin release is most likely to be mediated by the activation of pancreatic beta-cell glutamate...

  4. Histochemical investigations on the in vivo effects of fluoride on tricarboxylic acid cycle dehydrogenases from Pelargonium zonale. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, C.J.; Miller, G.W.

    1967-01-01

    In vivo effects of fluoride on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle dehydrogenase enzymes of Pelargonium zonale were studied using p-nitro blue tetrazoleum chloride. Plants were exposed to 17 ppb HF, and enzyme activities in treated plants were compared to those in controls. Leaves of control plants were incubated in 5 x 10/sup -3/ M sodium fluoride. Injuries observed in fumigation and solution experiments were similar. Leaf tissue subjected to HF or sodium fluoride evidenced less succinic p-nitro blue tetrazoleum reductase activity than did control tissue. Other TCA cycle dehydrogenase enzymes were not observably affected by the fluoride concentrations used in these experiments. Excised leaves cultured in 5 x 10/sup -3/ M sodium fluoride exhibited less succinic p-nitro blue tetrazoleum reductase activity after 24 hr than did leaves cultured in 5 x 10/sup -3/ M sodium chloride. 8 references, 8 figures.

  5. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  6. Directing filtration to optimize enzyme immobilization in reactive membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Marpani, Fauziah; Brites, Rita

    2014-01-01

    In this work, fouling principles in force in ultrafiltration were deployed to understand the role of selected variables-applied pressure (1-3bar), enzyme concentration (0.05-0.2gL-1), pH (5-9) and membrane properties-on fouling-induced enzyme immobilization. The immobilization and subsequent...... enzymatic reaction efficiency were evaluated in terms of enzyme loading, conversion rate and biocatalytic stability. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was selected as a model enzyme. Lower pressure, higher enzyme concentration and lower pH resulted in higher irreversible fouling resistance and lower permeate flux....... High pH during immobilization produced increased permeate flux but declines in conversion rates, likely because of the weak immobilization resulting from strong electrostatic repulsion between enzymes and membrane. The results showed that pore blocking as a fouling mechanism permitted a higher enzyme...

  7. Pleurotus ostreatus, an edible mushroom, enhances glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, ascorbate peroxidase and reduces xanthine dehydrogenase in major organs of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran

    2014-05-01

    Aging is now considered to be associated with an elevation in oxidative damage to macromolecules and enhanced levels of inflammation. Therefore, inhibition of age-related oxidative stress by natural supplement is an important study. To investigate whether the treatment with Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr) Kumm, (Pleurotaceae) can ameliorate oxidative damage in aged rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of six each: group 1, normal young rats; group 2, normal aged untreated rats; group 3, normal aged rats treated with P. ostreatus (200 mg/kg body wt administered intraperitoneally for 21 days). On the 22nd day, rats were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver, kidneys, heart and brain were removed from each rat for the biochemical and isozyme analyses of the antioxidant enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), ascorbate peroxidase (Apx) and xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). An elevated activity of XDH was observed in the liver (G2:13.72 ± 4.1 versus G1: 7.57 ± 1.15; p ostreatus to aged rats resulted in decreased XDH and increased G6PDH and Apx activities in liver, kidneys, heart and brain. Interestingly, analyses of isozyme pattern of these enzymes are support the results obtained from the spectrophotometric determinations. These results suggest that an extract of P. ostreatus can protect the age-related oxidative damage in major organs of Wistar rats by enhancing the antioxidant enzymes G6PDH and Apx and by reducing XDH.

  8. Effects of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Gan, Li-Qin; Li, Shu-Ke; Zheng, Jie-Cong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Various alcoholic beverages containing different concentrations of ethanol are widely consumed, and excessive alcohol consumption may result in serious health problems. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is often accompanied by non-alcoholic beverages, such as herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages to relieve drunk symptoms. The aim of this study was to supply new information on the effects of these beverages on alcohol metabolism for nutritionists and the general public, in order to reduce problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The effects of 57 kinds of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity were evaluated. Generally, the effects of these beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity are very different. The results suggested that some beverages should not be drank after excessive alcohol consumption, and several beverages may be potential dietary supplements for the prevention and treatment of problems related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  9. Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase: Potential Therapeutic Target and Putative Metabolic Oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl K. Zogg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exemplified by cancer cells’ preference for glycolysis, for example, the Warburg effect, altered metabolism in tumorigenesis has emerged as an important aspect of cancer in the past 10–20 years. Whether due to changes in regulatory tumor suppressors/oncogenes or by acting as metabolic oncogenes themselves, enzymes involved in the complex network of metabolic pathways are being studied to understand their role and assess their utility as therapeutic targets. Conversion of glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxypyruvate by the enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH—a rate-limiting step in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine—represents one such mechanism. Forgotten since classic animal studies in the 1980s, the role of PHGDH as a potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene has recently reemerged following publication of two prominent papers near-simultaneously in 2011. Since that time, numerous studies and a host of metabolic explanations have been put forward in an attempt to understand the results observed. In this paper, I review the historic progression of our understanding of the role of PHGDH in cancer from the early work by Snell through its reemergence and rise to prominence, culminating in an assessment of subsequent work and what it means for the future of PHGDH.

  10. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  11. The PQQ-alcohol dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; González-Valdez, Alejandra; Sosa-Torres, Martha; Arreguín-Espinoza, Roberto; Escamilla-Marván, Edgardo

    2008-06-30

    The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid is the most characteristic process in acetic acid bacteria. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is rather unique among the acetic acid bacteria as it carries out nitrogen fixation and is a true endophyte, originally isolated from sugar cane. Aside its peculiar life style, Ga. diazotrophicus, possesses a constitutive membrane-bound oxidase system for ethanol. The Alcohol dehydrogenase complex (ADH) of Ga. diazotrophicus was purified to homogeneity from the membrane fraction. It-exhibited two subunits with molecular masses of 71.4 kDa and 43.5 kDa. A positive peroxidase reaction confirmed the presence of cytochrome c in both subunits. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) of ADH was identified by UV-visible light and fluorescence spectroscopy. The enzyme was purified in its full reduced state; potassium ferricyanide induced its oxidation. Ethanol or acetaldehyde restored the full reduced state. The enzyme showed an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.1 and its optimal pH was 6.0. Both ethanol and acetaldehyde were oxidized at almost the same rate, thus suggesting that the ADH complex of Ga. diazotrophicus could be kinetically competent to catalyze, at least in vitro, the double oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid.

  12. Metabolism of the novel IMP dehydrogenase inhibitor benzamide riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Walter; Salamon, Alexandra; Szekeres, Thomas

    2002-04-01

    Benzamide riboside (BR) is a novel anticancer agent exhibiting pronounced activity against several human tumor cell lines via the inhibition of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that catalyzes the formation of xanthine 5'-monophosphate from inosine 5'-monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, thereby restricting the biosynthesis of guanylates. Phosphorylation of BR to its 5'-monophosphate derivative appears to be ubiquitous in most cells catalyzed by the enzymes, adenosine kinase, nicotinamide nucleoside kinase and 5' nucleotidase. BR 5'-monophosphate is then converted to the active metabolite benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) by NMN adenylyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD. As BAD is more potent in the inhibition of IMPDH than BR and BR 5'-monophosphate, cytotoxicity of BR is closely connected with intercellular metabolism to BAD. However, intracellular BAD level is also affected by BADase activity, a phosphodiesterase which hydrolyzes BAD to BR-5'-monophosphate and AMP. A recent study demonstrates enzymatic deamination of BR to non-cytotoxic benzene carboxylic acid (BR-COOH) as the main hepatic BR biotransformation product in rat liver. As the IMPDH inhibitors tiazofurin and ribavirin exhibit predominant accumulation and biotransformation in liver, hepatic metabolism may be an important factor also for BR activation and inactivation and should be considered in human liver during cancer therapy when BR is used as a single drug or in combination with other anticancer agents.

  13. Novel inhibitors of mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Orr

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH is a ubiquinone-linked enzyme in the mitochondrial inner membrane best characterized as part of the glycerol phosphate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH into the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Despite the widespread expression of mGPDH and the availability of mGPDH-null mice, the physiological role of this enzyme remains poorly defined in many tissues, likely because of compensatory pathways for cytosolic regeneration of NAD⁺ and mechanisms for glycerol phosphate metabolism. Here we describe a novel class of cell-permeant small-molecule inhibitors of mGPDH (iGP discovered through small-molecule screening. Structure-activity analysis identified a core benzimidazole-phenyl-succinamide structure as being essential to inhibition of mGPDH while modifications to the benzimidazole ring system modulated both potency and off-target effects. Live-cell imaging provided evidence that iGPs penetrate cellular membranes. Two compounds (iGP-1 and iGP-5 were characterized further to determine potency and selectivity and found to be mixed inhibitors with IC₅₀ and K(i values between ∼1-15 µM. These novel mGPDH inhibitors are unique tools to investigate the role of glycerol 3-phosphate metabolism in both isolated and intact systems.

  14. Novel Inhibitors of Mitochondrial sn-Glycerol 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Adam L.; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R.; Ng, Ryan; Shi, Tong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Hughes, Robert E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) is a ubiquinone-linked enzyme in the mitochondrial inner membrane best characterized as part of the glycerol phosphate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH into the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Despite the widespread expression of mGPDH and the availability of mGPDH-null mice, the physiological role of this enzyme remains poorly defined in many tissues, likely because of compensatory pathways for cytosolic regeneration of NAD+ and mechanisms for glycerol phosphate metabolism. Here we describe a novel class of cell-permeant small-molecule inhibitors of mGPDH (iGP) discovered through small-molecule screening. Structure-activity analysis identified a core benzimidazole-phenyl-succinamide structure as being essential to inhibition of mGPDH while modifications to the benzimidazole ring system modulated both potency and off-target effects. Live-cell imaging provided evidence that iGPs penetrate cellular membranes. Two compounds (iGP-1 and iGP-5) were characterized further to determine potency and selectivity and found to be mixed inhibitors with IC50 and Ki values between ∼1–15 µM. These novel mGPDH inhibitors are unique tools to investigate the role of glycerol 3-phosphate metabolism in both isolated and intact systems. PMID:24587137

  15. The structure and allosteric regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been extensively studied for more than 50 years. Of particular interest is the fact that, while considered by most to be a 'housekeeping' enzyme, the animal form of GDH is heavily regulated by a wide array of allosteric effectors and exhibits extensive inter-subunit communication. While the chemical mechanism for GDH has remained unchanged through epochs of evolution, it was not clear how or why animals needed to evolve such a finely tuned form of this enzyme. As reviewed here, recent studies have begun to elucidate these issues. Allosteric regulation first appears in the Ciliates and may have arisen to accommodate evolutionary changes in organelle function. The occurrence of allosteric regulation appears to be coincident with the formation of an 'antenna' like feature rising off the tops of the subunits that may be necessary to facilitate regulation. In animals, this regulation further evolved as GDH became integrated into a number of other regulatory pathways. In particular, mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition result in dangerously high serum levels of insulin and ammonium. Therefore, allosteric regulation of GDH plays an important role in insulin homeostasis. Finally, several compounds have been identified that block GDH-mediated insulin secretion that may be to not only find use in treating these insulin disorders but to kill tumors that require glutamine metabolism for cellular energy.

  16. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D., E-mail: vappanna@laurentian.ca

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  17. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  18. Methods for demonstration of enzyme activity in muscle fibres at the muscle/bone interface in demineralized tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Vilmann, H

    1981-01-01

    A method for demonstration of activity for ATPase and various oxidative enzymes (succinic dehydrogenase, alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, and lactic dehydrogenase) in muscle/bone sections of fixed and demineralized tissue has been developed. It was found that it is possible to preserve...... considerable amounts of the above mentioned enzymes in the muscle fibres at the muscle/bone interfaces. The best results were obtained after 20 min fixation, and 2-3 weeks of storage in MgNa2EDTA containing media. As the same technique previously has been used to describe patterns of resorption and deposition...

  19. How are ‘atypical’ sulfite dehydrogenases linked to cell metabolism? – Interactions between the SorT sulfite deydrogenase and small redox proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louie eLow

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulfite dehydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of the toxic and mutagenic compound sulfite to sulfate, thereby protecting cells from adverse effects associated with sulfite exposure. While some bacterial sulfite dehydrogenases that have been characterized to date are able to use cytochrome c as an electron acceptor, the majority of these enzymes prefer ferricyanide as an electron acceptor and have therefore been termed ‘atypical’ sulfite dehydrogenases. Identifying the natural electron acceptor of these enzymes, however, is crucial for understanding how the ‘atypical’ sulfite dehydrogenases are integrated into cell metabolism.The SorT sulfite dehydrogenase from Sinorhizobium meliloti is a representative of this enzyme type and we have investigated the interactions of SorT with two small redox proteins, a cytochrome c and a Cu containing pseudoazurin, that are encoded in the same operon and are co-transcribed with the sorT gene. Both potential acceptor proteins have been purified and characterized in terms of their biochemical and electrochemical properties, and interactions and enzymatic studies with both the purified SorT sulfite dehydrogenase and components of the respiratory chain have been carried out.We were able to show for the first time that an ‘atypical’ sulfite dehydrogenase can couple efficiently to a cytochrome c isolated from the same organism despite being unable to efficiently reduce horse heart cytochrome c, however, at present the role of the pseudoazurin in SorT electron transfer is unclear, but it is possible that it acts as an intermediate electron shuttle between. The SorT system appears to couple directly to the respiratory chain, most likely to a cytochrome oxidase.

  20. Comparison between medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mutant proteins overexpressed in bacterial and mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Bross, P; Andresen, B S

    1995-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a potentially lethal inherited defect in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. By comparing the behaviour of five missense MCAD mutant proteins expressed in COS cells and in Escherichia coli, we can define some of these as "pure folding mutants......." Upon expression in E. coli, these mutant proteins produce activity levels in the range of the wild-type enzyme only if the chaperonins GroESL are co-overproduced. When overexpressed in COS cells, the pure folding mutants display enzyme activities comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The results suggest...

  1. Cytochemical localization of sorbitol dehydrogenase in kidney and liver from Myiopsitta m. monachus (Boddaert, 1783), during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Speroni, N B; de Fabro, S P

    1992-01-01

    A histochemical study to determine the localization of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) in kidney and liver from embryionic, young and adult Myiopsitta m. monachus was performed. The enzyme activity increased with age in both organs. In the kidney, the enzyme appeared at the proximal convoluted tubules, and increased in the basal cytoplasm of the tubular cells. In the liver the localization was diffuse in the lobule but more intense in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, especially in the perinuclear areas. These studies indicate that the cytochemical enzyme localization differs in this species, which is more evolutioned than Gallus gallus, and would be related to ontogenetic and phylogenetic differentiation.

  2. Duplication of Locus Coding of Malate Dehydrogenase in Populus tomentosa Carr.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis was used to study crude enzyme extraction from young leaves of 234 clones of Populus tomentosa Carr. selected from nine provenances in North China. Ten enzyme systems were resolved. One hundred and fifty-six clones showing unusual allozyme band patterns at locus Mdh-1 were found. Three allozyme bands at locus Mdh-1 were 9:6:1 in concentration. Further studies on the electrophoretic patterns of ground mixed pollen extraction of 30 male clones selected at random from the 156 clones were conducted and it was found that allozyme bands at locus Mdh-1 were composed of two dark-stained bands and a weak band. Only one group of the malate dehydrogenase (MDH) zymogram composed of two bands was obtained from the electrophoretic segregation of pollen leachate of the same clones. A comparison of the electrophoretic patterns one another suggested that the locus Mdh-1 coding malate dehydrogenase in diploid species of P. tomentosa was duplicated. The duplicate gene locus possessed three same alleles and was located in mitochondria. The locus duplication of alleles coding malate dehydrogenase in P. tomentosa was discovered and reported for the first time.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halavaty, Andrei S; Rich, Rebecca L; Chen, Chao; Joo, Jeong Chan; Minasov, George; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James R; Myszka, David G; Duban, Mark; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Yakunin, Alexander F; Anderson, Wayne F

    2015-05-01

    When exposed to high osmolarity, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) restores its growth and establishes a new steady state by accumulating the osmoprotectant metabolite betaine. Effective osmoregulation has also been implicated in the acquirement of a profound antibiotic resistance by MRSA. Betaine can be obtained from the bacterial habitat or produced intracellularly from choline via the toxic betaine aldehyde (BA) employing the choline dehydrogenase and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) enzymes. Here, it is shown that the putative betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase SACOL2628 from the early MRSA isolate COL (SaBADH) utilizes betaine aldehyde as the primary substrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) as the cofactor. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that the affinity of NAD(+), NADH and BA for SaBADH is affected by temperature, pH and buffer composition. Five crystal structures of the wild type and three structures of the Gly234Ser mutant of SaBADH in the apo and holo forms provide details of the molecular mechanisms of activity and substrate specificity/inhibition of this enzyme.

  4. Effects of some drugs on human erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkemik, Ebru; Budak, Harun; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2010-12-01

    Inhibitory effects of some drugs on glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the erythrocytes of human have been investigated. For this purpose, at the beginning, erythrocyte glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was purified 2256 times in a yield of 44.22% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation and 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel. Temperature of +4°C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was determined with the Beutler method by using a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. This method was utilized for all kinetic studies. Ketotifen, dacarbazine, thiocolchicoside, meloxicam, methotrexate, furosemide, olanzapine, methylprednizolone acetate, paricalcitol, ritodrine hydrochloride, and gadobenate-dimeglumine were used as drugs. All the drugs indicated the inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Ki constants for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were found by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs. While methylprednizolone acetate showed competitive inhibition, the others displayed non-competitive inhibition. In addition, IC(50) values of the drugs were determined by plotting Activity% vs [I].

  5. Substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Kinetic evaluation of binding and activation parameters controlling the catalytic cycles of unbranched, acyclic secondary alcohols and ketones as substrates of the native and active-site-specific Co(II)-substituted enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, H W; Maurer, P; Schneider-Bernlöhr, H; Sartorius, C; Zeppezauer, M

    1991-11-01

    1. The steady-state parameters kcat and Km and the rate constants of hydride transfer for the substrates isopropanol/acetone; (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone; (S)-2-pentanol, (R)-2-pentanol/2-pentanone; 3-pentanol/3-pentanone; (S)-2-octanol and (R)-2-octanol have been determined for the native Zn(II)-containing horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) and the specific active-site-substituted Co(II)LADH. 2. A combined evaluation of steady-state kinetic data and rate constants obtained from stopped-flow measurements, allowed the determination of all rate constants of the following ordered bi-bi mechanism: E in equilibrium E.NAD in equilibrium E.NAD.R1R2 CHOH in equilibrium E.NADH.R1R2CO in equilibrium E.NADH in equilibrium E. 3. On the basis of the different substrate specificities of LADH and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), a procedure has been developed to evaluate the enantiomeric product composition of ketone reductions. 2-Butanone and 2-pentanone reductions revealed (S)-2-butanol (86%) and (S)-2-pentanol (95%) as the major products. 4. The observed enantioselectivity implies the existence of two productive ternary complexes; E.NADH.(pro-S) 2-butanone and E.NADH.(pro-R) 2-butanone. All rate constants describing the kinetic pathways of the system (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone have been determined. These data have been used to estimate the expected enantiomer product composition of 2-butanone reductions using apparent kcat/Km values for the two different ternary-complex configurations of 2-butanone. Additionally, these data have been used for computer simulations of the corresponding reaction cycles. Calculated, simulated and experimental data were found to be in good agreement. Thus, the system (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone is the first example of a LADH-catalyzed reaction for which the stereochemical course could be described in terms of rate constants of the underlying mechanism. 5. The effects of Co(II) substitution on the

  6. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  7. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  8. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  9. Complex formation between malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis is regulated by tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomae, Maike; Meyer, Frederik M; Commichau, Fabian M; Burkovski, Andreas; Hillen, Wolfgang; Seidel, Gerald

    2014-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, recent in vivo studies revealed that particular enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle form complexes that allow an efficient transfer of metabolites. Remarkably, a complex of the malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) (EC 1.1.1.37) with isocitrate dehydrogenase (Icd) (EC 1.1.1.42) was identified, although both enzymes do not catalyze subsequent reactions. In the present study, the interactions between these enzymes were characterized in vitro by surface plasmon resonance in the absence and presence of their substrates and cofactors. These analyses revealed a weak but specific interaction between Mdh and Icd, which was specifically stimulated by a mixture of substrates and cofactors of Icd: isocitrate, NADP(+) and Mg(2+). Wild-type Icd converted these substrates too fast, preventing any valid quantitative analysis of the interaction with Mdh. Therefore, binding of the IcdS104P mutant to Mdh was quantified because the mutation reduced the enzymatic activity by 174-fold but did not affect the stimulatory effect of substrates and cofactors on Icd-Mdh complex formation. The analysis of the unstimulated Mdh-IcdS104P interaction revealed kinetic constants of k(a) = 2.0 ± 0.2 × 10(2) m(-1) ·s(-1) and k(d) = 1.0 ± 0.1 × 10(-3) ·s(-1) and a K(D) value of 5.0 ± 0.1 μm. Addition of isocitrate, NADP(+) and Mg(2+) stimulated the affinity of IcdS104P to Mdh by 33-fold (K(D) = 0.15 ± 0.01 μm, k(a) = 1.7 ± 0.7 × 10(3) m(-1) ·s(-1), k(d) = 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10(-4) ·s(-1)). Analyses of the enzymatic activities of wild-type Icd and Mdh showed that Icd activity doubles in the presence of Mdh, whereas Mdh activity was slightly reduced by Icd. In summary, these data indicate substrate control of complex formation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolon assembly and maintenance of the α-ketoglutarate supply for amino acid anabolism in vivo.

  10. Evaluation of Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.T. Trindade

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactate dehydrogenase is a citosolic enzyme involved in reversible transformation of pyruvate to lactate. It participates in anaerobic glycolysis of skeletal muscle and red blood cells, in liver gluconeogenesis and in aerobic metabolism of heart muscle. The determination of its activity helps in the diagnosis of various diseases, because it is increased in serum of patients suffering from myocardial infarction, acute hepatitis, muscular dystrophy and cancer. This paper presents a learning object, mediated by computer, which contains the simulation of the laboratory determination serum lactate dehydrogenase activity measured by the spectrophotometric method, based in the decrease of absorbance at 340 nm. Materials and Methods: Initially, pictures and videos were obtained recording the procedure of the methodology. The most representative images were selected, edited and inserted into an animation developed with the aid of the tool Adobe ® Flash ® CS3. The validation of the object was performed by the students of Biochemistry I (Pharmacy-UFRGS from the second semester of 2009 and both of 2010. Results and Discussion: The analysis of students' answers revealed that 80% attributed the excellence of the navigation program, the display format and to aid in learning. Conclusion: Therefore, this software can be considered an adequate teaching resource as well as an innovative support in the construction of theoretical and practical knowledge of Biochemistry. Available at: http://www6.ufrgs.br/gcoeb/LDH

  11. Biochemical and structural characterization of Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocher, Kathleen; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Kehr, Sebastian; Fischer, Marina; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs) play key roles in cellular redox, amino acid, and energy metabolism, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological interventions. Here we studied the functional network provided by the three known glutamate dehydrogenases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The recombinant production of the previously described PfGDH1 as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins was optimized. Additionally, PfGDH2 was cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized. Like PfGDH1, PfGDH2 is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme with a specific activity comparable to PfGDH1 but with slightly higher K(m) values for its substrates. The three-dimensional structure of hexameric PfGDH2 was solved to 3.1 Å resolution. The overall structure shows high similarity with PfGDH1 but with significant differences occurring at the subunit interface. As in mammalian GDH1, in PfGDH2 the subunit-subunit interactions are mainly assisted by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas in PfGDH1 these contacts are mediated by networks of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In accordance with this, the known bovine GDH inhibitors hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol were more effective on PfGDH2 than on PfGDH1. Subcellular localization was determined for all three plasmodial GDHs by fusion with the green fluorescent protein. Based on our data, PfGDH1 and PfGDH3 are cytosolic proteins whereas PfGDH2 clearly localizes to the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle specific for apicomplexan parasites. This study provides new insights into the structure and function of GDH isoenzymes of P. falciparum, which represent potential targets for the development of novel antimalarial drugs.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of L-threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, A; Mikolajek, H; Wright, J N; Coker, A; Erskine, P T; Cooper, J B; Bashir, Q; Rashid, N; Jamil, F; Akhtar, M

    2008-09-01

    The enzyme L-threonine dehydrogenase catalyses the NAD(+)-dependent conversion of L-threonine to 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate, which is the first reaction of a two-step biochemical pathway involved in the metabolism of threonine to glycine. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of L-threonine dehydrogenase (Tk-TDH) from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 is reported. This threonine dehydrogenase consists of 350 amino acids, with a molecular weight of 38 kDa, and was prepared using an Escherichia coli expression system. The purified native protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and crystals grew in the tetragonal space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 124.5, c = 271.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 A resolution and preliminary analysis indicates that there are four molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal.

  13. Characterization of a Zinc-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase with Stereoselectivity from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiangxian; Ma, Kesen

    2011-01-01

    An alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis was purified to homogeneity and was found to be a homotetramer with a subunit size of 40 ± 1 kDa. The gene encoding the enzyme was cloned and sequenced; this gene had 1,095 bp, corresponding to 365 amino acids, and showed high sequence homology to zinc-containing ADHs and l-threonine dehydrogenases with binding motifs of catalytic zinc and NADP+. Metal analyses revealed that this NADP+-dependent enzyme contained 0.9 ± 0.03 g-atoms of zinc per subunit. It was a primary-secondary ADH and exhibited a substrate preference for secondary alcohols and corresponding ketones. Particularly, the enzyme with unusual stereoselectivity catalyzed an anti-Prelog reduction of racemic (R/S)-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol. The optimal pH values for the oxidation and formation of alcohols were 10.5 and 7.5, respectively. Besides being hyperthermostable, the enzyme activity increased as the temperature was elevated up to 95°C. The enzyme was active in the presence of methanol up to 40% (vol/vol) in the assay mixture. The reduction of ketones underwent high efficiency by coupling with excess isopropanol to regenerate NADPH. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme showed that the apparent Km values and catalytic efficiency for NADPH were 40 times lower and 5 times higher than those for NADP+, respectively. The physiological roles of the enzyme were proposed to be in the formation of alcohols such as ethanol or acetoin concomitant to the NADPH oxidation. PMID:21515780

  14. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  15. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of patients with brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) exist in the brain. Alcohol dehydrogenase and ALDH are also present in brain tumor cells. Moreover, the activity of class I isoenzymes was significantly higher in cancer than healthy brain cells. The activity of these enzymes in tumor tissue is reflected in the serum and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of brain neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of ADH and ALDH as markers for brain tumors. Material and methods Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 115 patients suffering from brain tumors (65 glioblastomas, 50 meningiomas). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. Results There was a significant increase in the activity of ADH I isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of brain tumor patients compared to the controls. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH I was 78%, specificity 85%, and positive and negative predictive values were 86% and 76% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ADH I increased with the stage of the carcinoma. Area under receiver-operating characteristic curve for ADH I was 0.71. Conclusions The results suggest a potential role for ADH I as a marker for brain tumor. PMID:28261287

  16. Enzyme Activities in Waste Water and Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, Ole; Jørgensen, Per Elberg; Henze, Mogens

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of selected enzyme activity assays to determine microbial abundance and heterotrophic activity in waste water and activated sludge. In waste water, esterase and dehydrogenase activities were found to correlate with microbial abundance...... measured as colony forming units of heterotrophic bacteria. A panel of four enzyme activity assays, α-glucosidase, alanine-aminopeptidase, esterase and dehydrogenase were used to characterize activated sludge and anaerobic hydrolysis sludge from a pilot scale plant. The enzymatic activity profiles were...... distinctly different, suggesting that microbial populations were different, or had different physiological properties, in the two types of sludge. Enzyme activity profiles in activated sludge from four full-scale plants seemed to be highly influenced by the composition of the inlet. Addition of hydrolysed...

  17. Soil enzyme activities and their indication for fertility of urban forest soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To reveal the biological characteristics of urban forest soil and the effects of soil enzyme on soil fertility as well as the correlation between physicochemical properties and enzyme activities,44 urban forest soil profiles in Nanjing were investigated.Basic soil physicochemical properties and enzyme activities were analyzed in the laboratory.Hydrogen peroxidase,dehydrogenase,alkaline phosphatase,and cellulase were determined by potassium permanphosphate dinatrium colorimetry,and anthrone colorimetry,respectively.The result showed that soil pH,organic carbon (C),and total nitrogen (N) had great effects on hydrogen peroxidase,dehydrogenase,and alkaline phosphatase activities in 0-20 cm thick soil.However,pH only had great effect on hydrogen peroxidase,dehydrogenase,and alkaline phosphatase activities in 20-40 cm thick soil.Hydrogen peroxidase,dehydrogenase,and alkaline phosphatase were important biological indicators for the fertility of urban forest soil.Both in 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm soil,soil enzyme system (hydrogen peroxidase,dehydrogenase,alkaline phosphatase,and cellulase) had a close relationship with a combination of physicochemical indicators (pH,organic C,total N,available K,available P,cation exchange capacity (CEC),and microbial biomass carbon(Cmic)).The more soil enzyme activities there were,the higher the fertility of urban forest soil.

  18. Active site of Zn2+-dependent sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Suk Han

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gro1PDH, EC 1.1.1.261 is key to the formation of the enantiomeric configuration of the glycerophosphate backbone (sn-glycerol-1-phosphate of archaeal ether lipids. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible conversion between dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycerol-1-phosphate. To date, no information about the active site and catalytic mechanism of this enzyme has been reported. Using the sequence and structural information for glycerol dehydrogenase, we constructed six mutants (D144N, D144A, D191N, H271A, H287A and D191N/H271A of Gro1PDH from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and examined their characteristics to clarify the active site of this enzyme. The enzyme was found to be a zinc-dependent metalloenzyme, containing one zinc ion for every monomer protein that was essential for activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of D144 increased the activity of the enzyme. Mutants D144N and D144A exhibited low affinity for the substrates and higher activity than the wild type, but their affinity for the zinc ion was the same as that of the wild type. Mutants D191N, H271A and H287A had a low affinity for the zinc ion and a low activity compared with the wild type. The double mutation, D191N/ H271A, had no enzyme activity and bound no zinc. From these results, it was clarified that residues D191, H271 and H287 participate in the catalytic activity of the enzyme by binding the zinc ion, and that D144 has an effect on substrate binding. The structure of the active site of Gro1PDH from A. pernix K1 seems to be similar to that of glycerol dehydrogenase, despite the differences in substrate specificity and biological role.

  19. Cloning, characterization and functional expression of Taenia solium 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-Ramos, A; de la Torre, P; Hinojosa, L; Ponce, A; García-Villegas, R; Laclette, J P; Bobes, R J; Romano, M C

    2014-07-01

    The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17β-HSD) are key enzymes involved in the formation (reduction) and inactivation (oxidation) of sex steroids. Several types have been found in vertebrates including fish, as well as in invertebrates like Caenorhabditis elegans, Ciona intestinalis and Haliotis diversicolor supertexta. To date limited information is available about this enzyme in parasites. We showed previously that Taenia solium cysticerci are able to synthesize sex steroid hormones in vitro when precursors are provided in the culture medium. Here, we identified a T. solium 17β-HSD through in silico blast searches in the T. solium genome database. This coding sequence was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the pcDNA 3.1(+) expression vector. The full length cDNA contains 957bp, corresponding to an open reading frame coding for 319 aa. The highest identity (84%) at the protein level was found with the Echinococcus multilocularis 17β-HSD although significant similarities were also found with other invertebrate and vertebrate 17β-HSD sequences. The T. solium Tsol-17βHSD belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) protein superfamily. HEK293T cells transiently transfected with Tsol17β-HSD induced expression of Tsol17β-HSD that transformed 3H-androstenedione into testosterone. In contrast, 3H-estrone was not significantly transformed into estradiol. In conclusion, T. solium cysticerci express a 17β-HSD that catalyzes the androgen reduction. The enzyme belongs to the short chain dehydrogenases/reductase family and shares motifs and activity with the type 3 enzyme of some other species.

  20. 3 Beta-hydroxy-delta 5-steroid dehydrogenase/3-keto-delta 5-steroid isomerase from bovine adrenals: mechanism of inhibition by 3-oxo-4-aza steroids and kinetic mechanism of the dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, M; Levy, M A

    1989-01-10

    Several 3-oxo-4-aza steroids (1) have been identified as inhibitors of the 3 beta-hydroxy-delta 5-steroid dehydrogenase/3-keto-delta 5-steroid isomerase catalyzed conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone. By kinetically decoupling the two enzyme activities isolated from bovine adrenal cortex, it has been demonstrated that inhibition by 1 occurs through interference of both activities. A preferred ordered association of substrates to the 3 beta-hydroxy-delta 5-steroid dehydrogenase in which the cofactor binds prior to steroid was determined by isotope exchange at equilibrium. With this result, the dead-end inhibition patterns of 1 with the dehydrogenase were interpreted to originate from a preferred association of inhibitor within an enzyme ternate containing NADH; this proposal is supported by data from multiple inhibition analysis indicating synergistic binding of NADH and 1. Similarly, inhibition of the 3-keto-delta 5-steroid isomerase by the 3-oxo-4-aza steroids was enhanced in the presence of the positive effector NADH. On the basis of pH profiles upon Vm, Vm/Km, and 1/Ki for both enzyme activities, inhibition is proposed to result from the structural similarity of 1 to intermediate states formed upon enzyme catalysis.

  1. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of Histamine Dehydrogenase From Nocardioides Simplex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.M.; Hirakawa, H.; Mure, M.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-21

    Histamine dehydrogenase (HADH) from Nocardioides simplex catalyzes the oxidative deamination of histamine to produce imidazole acetaldehyde and an ammonium ion. HADH is functionally related to trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), but HADH has strict substrate specificity towards histamine. HADH is a homodimer, with each 76 kDa subunit containing two redox cofactors: a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an unusual covalently bound flavin mononucleotide, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN. In order to understand the substrate specificity of HADH, it was sought to determine its structure by X-ray crystallography. This enzyme has been expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and successfully crystallized in two forms. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 {angstrom} resolution at the SSRL synchrotron with 99.7% completeness. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 101.14, b = 107.03, c = 153.35 {angstrom}.

  2. Peroxisomal NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase is required for Arabidopsis stomatal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B; Valderrama, Raquel; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Luque, Francisco; Viñegla, Benjamin; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-03-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles characterized by a simple morphological structure but have a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling processes through molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis, and its regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. Plants have several NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, with NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) being one of these enzymes. Arabidopsis contains three genes that encode for cytosolic, mitochondrial/chloroplastic, and peroxisomal NADP-ICDH isozymes although the specific function of each of these remains largely unknown. Using two T-DNA insertion lines of the peroxisomal NADP-ICDH designated as picdh-1 and picdh-2, the data show that the peroxisomal NADP-ICDH is involved in stomatal movements, suggesting that peroxisomes are a new element in the signaling network of guard cells.

  3. A α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is present in Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Concepcion

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPDH-EC.1.1.1.8 has been considered absent in Trypanosoma cruzi in contradiction with all other studied trypanosomatids. After observing that the sole malate dehydrogenase can not maintain the intraglycosomal redox balance, GPDH activity was looked for and found, although in very variable levels, in epimastigotes extracts. GPDH was shown to be exclusively located in the glycosome of T. cruzi by digitonin treatment and isopycnic centrifugation. Antibody against T. brucei GPDH showed that this enzyme seemed to be present in an essentially inactive form at the beginning of the epimastigotes growth. GPDH is apparently linked to a salicylhydroxmic-sensitive glycerophosphate reoxidizing system and plays an essential role in the glycosome redox balance.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  5. Alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity in sex-linked muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, H A; Wilkinson, J H; Withycombe, W A; Raymond, S

    1966-05-01

    In two families with severe sex-linked muscular dystrophy, high levels of alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBD), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate transaminase (AspT), aldolase, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were found in the sera of three young affected males. In both families the mother had a raised level of HBD activity. Four sisters of the three affected boys had raised serum enzyme levels, and they are regarded as presumptive carriers of the disease. Biopsy specimens of dystrophic muscle had LD and HBD contents which were significantly lower than those of control specimens, while the HBD/LD ratios were markedly greater. Muscle from two unaffected members of the same family also exhibited high ratios, indicating the presence of the electrophoretically fast LD isoenzymes, and this was confirmed by acrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  6. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-06-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  7. Studies on thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeper, F J; Hawksley, D; Mann, S; Perez Melero, C; Wood, M D H

    2005-08-01

    The 3-deaza analogue of TPP (thiamine diphosphate), a close mimic of the ylid intermediate, has been synthesized and is an extremely potent inhibitor of a variety of TPP-dependent enzymes, binding much more tightly than TPP itself. Results using deazaTPP complexed with the E1 subunit of PDH (pyruvate dehydrogenase) have led to a novel proposal about the mechanism of this enzyme. The 2-substituted forms of deazaTPP, which mimic other intermediates in the catalytic mechanism, can also be synthesized and 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)deazaTPP is also an extremely potent inhibitor of PDC (pyruvate decarboxylase). Attachment of such 2-substituents is expected to be a way to introduce selectivity in the inhibition of various TPP-dependent enzymes.

  8. Enzyme-based multiplexer and demultiplexer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arugula, Mary A; Bocharova, Vera; Halámek, Jan; Pita, Marcos; Katz, Evgeny

    2010-04-22

    A digital 2-to-1 multiplexer and a 1-to-2 demultiplexer were mimicked by biocatalytic reactions involving concerted operation of several enzymes. Using glucose oxidase (GOx) and laccase (Lac) as the data input signals and variable pH as the addressing signal, ferrocyanide oxidation in the output channel was selectively activated by one from two inputs, thus mimicking the multiplexer operation. A demultiplexer based on the enzyme system composed of GOx, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) allowed selective activation of different output channels (oxidation of ferrocyanide or reduction of NAD(+)) by the glucose input. The selection of the output channel was controlled by the addressing input of NAD(+). The designed systems represent important novel components of future branched enzyme networks processing biochemical signals for biosensing and bioactuating.

  9. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: ganesan.v@duke.edu; Song, Haijing; Affleck, Donna; McDougald, Darryl L. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Storms, Robert W. [Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chin, Bennett B. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [{sup 125}I]FMIC and [{sup 125}I]DEIBA were 70{+-}5% and 47{+-}14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  10. Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Zinc Coordination and Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plapp, Bryce V; Savarimuthu, Baskar Raj; Ferraro, Daniel J; Rubach, Jon K; Brown, Eric N; Ramaswamy, S

    2017-07-18

    During catalysis by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), a water bound to the catalytic zinc is replaced by the oxygen of the substrates. The mechanism might involve a pentacoordinated zinc or a double-displacement reaction with participation by a nearby glutamate residue, as suggested by studies of human ADH3, yeast ADH1, and some other tetrameric ADHs. Zinc coordination and participation of water in the enzyme mechanism were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The apoenzyme and its complex with adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose have an open protein conformation with the catalytic zinc in one position, tetracoordinated by Cys-46, His-67, Cys-174, and a water molecule. The bidentate chelators 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline displace the water and form a pentacoordinated zinc. The enzyme-NADH complex has a closed conformation similar to that of ternary complexes with coenzyme and substrate analogues; the coordination of the catalytic zinc is similar to that found in the apoenzyme, except that a minor, alternative position for the catalytic zinc is ∼1.3 Å from the major position and closer to Glu-68, which could form the alternative coordination to the catalytic zinc. Complexes with NADH and N-1-methylhexylformamide or N-benzylformamide (or with NAD(+) and fluoro alcohols) have the classical tetracoordinated zinc, and no water is bound to the zinc or the nicotinamide rings. The major forms of the enzyme in the mechanism have a tetracoordinated zinc, where the carboxylate group of Glu-68 could participate in the exchange of water and substrates on the zinc. Hydride transfer in the Michaelis complexes does not involve a nearby water.

  11. Structural basis of cooperativity in human UDP-glucose dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Rajakannan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH is the sole enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronic acid. The product is used in xenobiotic glucuronidation in hepatocytes and in the production of proteoglycans that are involved in promoting normal cellular growth and migration. Overproduction of proteoglycans has been implicated in the progression of certain epithelial cancers, while inhibition of UGDH diminished tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A better understanding of the conformational changes occurring during the UGDH reaction cycle will pave the way for inhibitor design and potential cancer therapeutics. METHODOLOGY: Previously, the substrate-bound of UGDH was determined to be a symmetrical hexamer and this regular symmetry is disrupted on binding the inhibitor, UDP-α-D-xylose. Here, we have solved an alternate crystal structure of human UGDH (hUGDH in complex with UDP-glucose at 2.8 Å resolution. Surprisingly, the quaternary structure of this substrate-bound protein complex consists of the open homohexamer that was previously observed for inhibitor-bound hUGDH, indicating that this conformation is relevant for deciphering elements of the normal reaction cycle. CONCLUSION: In all subunits of the present open structure, Thr131 has translocated into the active site occupying the volume vacated by the absent active water and partially disordered NAD+ molecule. This conformation suggests a mechanism by which the enzyme may exchange NADH for NAD+ and repolarize the catalytic water bound to Asp280 while protecting the reaction intermediates. The structure also indicates how the subunits may communicate with each other through two reaction state sensors in this highly cooperative enzyme.

  12. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

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    Kristan Katja

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor.

  13. Unexpected properties of NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) in Trichomonas vaginalis and other microaerophilic parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitsch, David; Williams, Catrin F; Lloyd, David; Duchêne, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Our previous observation that NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1) is down-regulated in metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates prompted us to further characterise the enzyme. In addition to its canonical enzyme activity as a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, a pronounced, so far unknown, background NADPH-oxidising activity in absence of any added substrate was observed when the recombinant enzyme or T. vaginalis extract were used. This activity was strongly enhanced at low oxygen concentrations. Unexpectedly, all functions of ADH-1 were efficiently inhibited by coenzyme A which is a cofactor of a number of key enzymes in T. vaginalis metabolism, i.e. pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These observations could be extended to Entamoeba histolytica and Tritrichomonas foetus, both of which have a homologue of ADH-1, but not to Giardia lamblia which lacks an NADP-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase. Although we could not identify the substrate of the observed background activity, we propose that ADH-1 functions as a major sink for NADPH in microaerophilic parasites at low oxygen tension.

  14. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor, proline dehydrogenase, and NADPH oxidase in apoptosis and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker DF

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sathish Kumar Natarajan, Donald F BeckerDepartment of Biochemistry and Redox Biology Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NEAbstract: Flavoproteins catalyze a variety of reactions utilizing flavin mononucleotide or flavin adenine dinucleotide as cofactors. The oxidoreductase properties of flavoenzymes implicate them in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress, and various cellular processes, including programmed cell death. Here we explore three critical flavoproteins involved in apoptosis and redox signaling, ie, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, proline dehydrogenase, and NADPH oxidase. These proteins have diverse biochemical functions and influence apoptotic signaling by unique mechanisms. The role of AIF in apoptotic signaling is two-fold, with AIF changing intracellular location from the inner mitochondrial membrane space to the nucleus upon exposure of cells to apoptotic stimuli. In the mitochondria, AIF enhances mitochondrial bioenergetics and complex I activity/assembly to help maintain proper cellular redox homeostasis. After translocating to the nucleus, AIF forms a chromatin degrading complex with other proteins, such as cyclophilin A. AIF translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus is triggered by oxidative stress, implicating AIF as a mitochondrial redox sensor. Proline dehydrogenase is a membrane-associated flavoenzyme in the mitochondrion that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of proline oxidation. Upregulation of proline dehydrogenase by the tumor suppressor, p53, leads to enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species that induce the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. NADPH oxidases are a group of enzymes that generate reactive oxygen species for oxidative stress and signaling purposes. Upon activation, NADPH oxidase 2 generates a burst of superoxide in neutrophils that leads to killing of microbes during phagocytosis. NADPH oxidases also participate in redox signaling that involves hydrogen peroxide-mediated activation of

  15. Cloning and Expression of a Xylitol-4-Dehydrogenase Gene from Pantoea ananatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnikunnas, J. S.; Pihlajaniemi, A.; Palva, A.; Leisola, M.; Nyyssölä, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Pantoea ananatis ATCC 43072 mutant strain is capable of growing with xylitol as the sole carbon source. The xylitol-4-dehydrogenase (XDH) catalyzing the oxidation of xylitol to l-xylulose was isolated from the cell extract of this strain. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein was determined, and an oligonucleotide deduced from this peptide sequence was used to isolate the xylitol-4-dehydrogenase gene (xdh) from a P. ananatis gene library. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 795 bp, encoding the xylitol-4-dehydrogenase, followed by a 5′ region of another open reading frame encoding an unknown protein. Results from a Northern analysis of total RNA isolated from P. ananatis ATCC 43072 suggested that xdh is transcribed as part of a polycistronic mRNA. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the transcript confirmed the operon structure and suggested that xdh was the first gene of the operon. Homology searches revealed that the predicted amino acid sequence of the P. ananatis XDH shared significant identity (38 to 51%) with members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The P. ananatis xdh gene was successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli, XDH was purified to homogeneity, and some of its enzymatic properties were determined. The enzyme had a preference for NAD+ as the cosubstrate, and in contrast to previous reports, the enzyme also showed a side activity for the d-form of xylulose. Xylitol was converted to l-xylulose with a high yield (>80%) by the resting recombinant cells, and the l-xylulose was secreted into the medium. No evidence of d-xylulose being synthesized by the recombinant cells was found. PMID:16391066

  16. Characterization of Arabidopsis lines deficient in GAPC-1, a cytosolic NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2008-11-01

    Phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (GAPC-1) is a highly conserved cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-P to 1,3-bis-phosphoglycerate; besides its participation in glycolysis, it is thought to be involved in additional cellular functions. To reach an integrative view on the many roles played by this enzyme, we characterized a homozygous gapc-1 null mutant and an as-GAPC1 line of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both mutant plant lines show a delay in growth, morphological alterations in siliques, and low seed number. Embryo development was altered, showing abortions and empty embryonic sacs in basal and apical siliques, respectively. The gapc-1 line shows a decrease in ATP levels and reduced respiratory rate. Furthermore, both lines exhibit a decrease in the expression and activity of aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase and reduced levels of pyruvate and several Krebs cycle intermediates, as well as increased reactive oxygen species levels. Transcriptome analysis of the gapc-1 mutants unveils a differential accumulation of transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in carbon partitioning. According to these studies, some enzymes involved in carbon flux decreased (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, NAD-malic enzyme, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase) or increased (NAD-malate dehydrogenase) their activities compared to the wild-type line. Taken together, our data indicate that a deficiency in the cytosolic GAPC activity results in modifications of carbon flux and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to an alteration of plant and embryo development with decreased number of seeds, indicating that GAPC-1 is essential for normal fertility in Arabidopsis plants.

  17. Characterization of Arabidopsis Lines Deficient in GAPC-1, a Cytosolic NAD-Dependent Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase1[C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Sebastián P.; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Gomez-Casati, Diego F.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (GAPC-1) is a highly conserved cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-P to 1,3-bis-phosphoglycerate; besides its participation in glycolysis, it is thought to be involved in additional cellular functions. To reach an integrative view on the many roles played by this enzyme, we characterized a homozygous gapc-1 null mutant and an as-GAPC1 line of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both mutant plant lines show a delay in growth, morphological alterations in siliques, and low seed number. Embryo development was altered, showing abortions and empty embryonic sacs in basal and apical siliques, respectively. The gapc-1 line shows a decrease in ATP levels and reduced respiratory rate. Furthermore, both lines exhibit a decrease in the expression and activity of aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase and reduced levels of pyruvate and several Krebs cycle intermediates, as well as increased reactive oxygen species levels. Transcriptome analysis of the gapc-1 mutants unveils a differential accumulation of transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in carbon partitioning. According to these studies, some enzymes involved in carbon flux decreased (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, NAD-malic enzyme, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase) or increased (NAD-malate dehydrogenase) their activities compared to the wild-type line. Taken together, our data indicate that a deficiency in the cytosolic GAPC activity results in modifications of carbon flux and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to an alteration of plant and embryo development with decreased number of seeds, indicating that GAPC-1 is essential for normal fertility in Arabidopsis plants. PMID:18820081

  18. Effects of lead nitrate on the activity of metabolic enzymes during early developmental stages of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, A.G.M.; Mekkawy, Imam A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Kirschbaum, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) are key metabolic enzymes. G6PDH has been used as a biomarker of pollution-induced carcinogenesis in fish. LDH has been used as marker of lesions in toxicology and clinical chemistry, and PK catalyses the

  19. The structure of retinal dehydrogenase type II at 2.7 A resolution: implications for retinal specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, A L; Newcomer, M E

    1999-05-11

    Retinoic acid, a hormonally active form of vitamin A, is produced in vivo in a two step process: retinol is oxidized to retinal and retinal is oxidized to retinoic acid. Retinal dehydrogenase type II (RalDH2) catalyzes this last step in the production of retinoic acid in the early embryo, possibly producing this putative morphogen to initiate pattern formation. The enzyme is also found in the adult animal, where it is expressed in the testis, lung, and brain among other tissues. The crystal structure of retinal dehydrogenase type II cocrystallized with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) has been determined at 2.7 A resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structure of a mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) as a model. Unlike what has been described for the structures of two aldehyde dehydrogenases involved in the metabolism of acetaldehyde, the substrate access channel is not a preformed cavity into which acetaldehyde can readily diffuse. Retinal dehydrogenase appears to utilize a disordered loop in the substrate access channel to discriminate between retinaldehyde and short-chain aldehydes.

  20. Coordinated response of renal medullary enzymes regulating net sorbitol production in diuresis and antidiuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, J M; Schrader, D C

    1990-07-01

    The renal response to changes in hydration includes variation in intracellular sorbitol, a major inner medullary osmolyte. To examine the mechanism for changes in net sorbitol production, we measured activities of enzymes regulating sorbitol production (aldose reductase) and degradation (sorbitol dehydrogenase) in untreated, water diuretic, and antidiuretic (water restriction and/or vasopressin administration) rats. Collecting duct segments dissected from collagenase-treated kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into outer medullary and three distinct inner medullary regions. Aldose reductase activity increased during antidiuresis and decreased during diuresis. In contrast, sorbitol dehydrogenase activity was very low during antidiuresis and increased during diuresis. These changes in enzyme activity were found after 3 days, but not after 1 day, of water diuresis/antidiuresis. Enzyme activity changed only in the deepest 50% of the inner medullary collecting duct. Thus, there is coordinated regulation of aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities so that (a) during water diuresis, aldose reductase activity decreases while sorbitol dehydrogenase activity increases; and (b) during antidiuresis (water restriction and/or vasopressin administration), aldose reductase activity increases while sorbitol dehydrogenase activity remains low. We conclude that long-term osmoregulation in response to physiologic stimuli involves both aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities in rat terminal inner medullary collecting duct segments.

  1. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Fabien [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Stines-Chaumeil, Claire [Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS, Institut de Biochimie et de Genetique Cellulaires, 1 rue Camille Saint Saens, 33077 Bordeaux Cedex (France); Flexer, Victoria [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Andre, Isabelle [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792 Ingenierie des Systemes Biologiques et des Procedes, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Mano, Nicolas, E-mail: mano@crpp-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (CRPP), UPR 8641, Avenue Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} A new mutant of PQQ-GDH designed for glucose biosensors application. {yields} First mutant of PQQ-GDH with higher activity for D-glucose than the Wild type. {yields} Position N428 is a key point to increase the enzyme activity. {yields} Molecular modeling shows that the N428 C mutant displays a better interaction for PQQ than the WT. -- Abstract: We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

  2. L(+) lactate dehydrogenase activity from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-da Matta, J; Nery da Matta, A; Hassón-Voloch, A

    1976-01-01

    Properties of L(+) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of Electrophorus electricus (L.) electric organ were studied, comparing the substrates pyruvate and lactate. Electric organ LDH is a soluble enzyme with a pH optimum of 7.4 for pyruvate and 9.0 for lactate. The apparent Km was lower for pyruvate (Km = 2.5 X 10(-4) M) than for lactate (Km = 1.5 X 10(-2) M). With lactate as a substrate at pH 7.4, malonate, oxalate and pyruvate inhibited competitively. For pyruvate as substrate at pH 9.0 malonate inhibited non-competitively and oxalate shiwed uncompetitive inhibition. The different effects of the carboxylic acids on LDH activity suggest different stereospecificities of the two enzyme-coenzyme complexes in the forward and reserve reactions. The reactions of electric organ LDH with substrates and inhibitors are consistent with electrophoretic analysis suggesting that the enzyme is of the M-type.

  3. Inhibition effects of some metal ions on the rat liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adem, Şevki; Kayhan, Naciye

    2016-04-01

    6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is an enzyme in the pentose phosphate path. The main functions of the pathway are the manufacture of the reduced coenzyme NADPH and the formation of ribose 5-phosphate for nucleic acid synthesis and nucleotide. Both NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate involve a critical biochemical process. Metals have been recognized as important toxic agents for living for a long time. It has been considered that they lead to in the emergence of many diseases. To evaluate whether metals is effect towards rat liver 6PGD, we apply various concentrations of metals and enzyme inhibition was analyzed using enzyme activity assays. The IC50 values of Pb+2, Cr+3, Co+2, Ni+2, Cd+2, and Va+2, metals on rat liver 6PGD were calculated as 138,138, 169, 214, 280, and 350 µM, respectively.

  4. Expansion of the aspartate [beta]-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family: the first structure of a fungal ortholog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arachea, B.T.; Liu, X.; Pavlovsky, A.G.; Viola, R.E. (Toledo)

    2010-08-13

    The enzyme aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes a critical transformation that produces the first branch-point intermediate in an essential microbial amino-acid biosynthetic pathway. The first structure of an ASADH isolated from a fungal species (Candida albicans) has been determined as a complex with its pyridine nucleotide cofactor. This enzyme is a functional dimer, with a similar overall fold and domain organization to the structurally characterized bacterial ASADHs. However, there are differences in the secondary-structural elements and in cofactor binding that are likely to cause the lower catalytic efficiency of this fungal enzyme. Alterations in the dimer interface, through deletion of a helical subdomain and replacement of amino acids that participate in a hydrogen-bonding network, interrupt the intersubunit-communication channels required to support an alternating-site catalytic mechanism. The detailed functional information derived from this new structure will allow an assessment of ASADH as a possible target for antifungal drug development.

  5. Purification and Properties of Malate Dehydrogenase from the Extreme Thermophile Bacillus Caldolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-06-01

    The enzyme malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) from an extreme thermophileB. Caldolyticus was purified to about 91% homogeneity. The molar mass of the enzyme was determined as 73 000 daltons and it is composed of two subunits, each with a molar mass of 37 000. Initial velocity studies with oxaloacetic acid and NADH as substrates at pH 8.1, over a range of temperatures, indicate that the enzyme operates via a sequential type mechanism. Van't Hoff plots of the kinetic parameters displayed sharp changes in slope at characteristic temperatures, whereas the Arrhenius plot exhibited no such breaks over the temperature interval investigated. The enzyme was found to be stable at 41°C and lower temperatures. At 51°C and 59°C an almost immediate 20% reduction in activity was obtained, but no further inactivation occurred during the 60 min of incubation. At 59°C the enzyme lost 50% of its initial activity in about 38 s. High concentration of NADH was observed to greatly stabilize the enzyme at that temperature. It is suggested that the slope changes in the Van't Hoff plots and the stability profies at 51°C and 59°C are representative of a temperature induced conformational change in the enzyme.

  6. Inhibition of 3(17)beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas testosteroni by steroidal A ring fused pyrazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M A; Holt, D A; Brandt, M; Metcalf, B W

    1987-04-21

    Several 2,3- and 3,4-steroidal fused pyrazoles have been investigated as potential inhibitors of NAD(P)H-dependent steroid oxidoreductases. These compounds are proven to be potent, specific inhibitors for 3(17) beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas testosteroni with Ki values of 6-100 nM. In contrast, the activities of 3 alpha,20 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Streptomyces hydrogenans, steroid 5 alpha-reductase from rat prostate, and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from rat liver were unaffected by micromolar concentrations of these compounds. Product and dead-end inhibition studies indicate an ordered association to the beta-dehydrogenase with the cofactor binding prior to substrate or inhibitor. From the results of double inhibition experiments, it is proposed that inhibition occurs through formation of an enzyme-NAD+-inhibitor ternate. On the basis of pH profiles of Vm/Km, Vm, and 1/Ki and of absorbance difference spectra, a hypothetical mechanism of inhibition by the steroidal pyrazoles, drawn by analogy from the inhibition of liver alcohol dehydrogenase by alkylpyrazoles [Theorell, H., & Yonetani, T. (1963) Biochem. Z. 338, 537-553; Andersson, P., Kvassman, J. K., Lindström, A., Oldén, B., & Pettersson, G. (1981) Eur. J. Biochem. 113, 549-554], is reconsidered. The pH studies and enzyme modification experiments by diethyl pyrocarbonate suggest the involvement of histidine in binding of the inhibitor. A modified proposal for the structure of the enzyme-NAD+-steroidal pyrazole complex is proposed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase Gnd1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Cong-Zhao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the third enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH is the main generator of cellular NADPH. Both thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase require NADPH as the electron donor to reduce oxidized thioredoxin or glutathione (GSSG. Since thioredoxin and GSH are important antioxidants, it is not surprising that 6PGDH plays a critical role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Furthermore the activity of 6PGDH is associated with several human disorders including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The 3D structural investigation would be very valuable in designing small molecules that target this enzyme for potential therapeutic applications. Results The crystal structure of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH/Gnd1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined at 2.37 Å resolution by molecular replacement. The overall structure of Gnd1 is a homodimer with three domains for each monomer, a Rossmann fold NADP+ binding domain, an all-α helical domain contributing the majority to hydrophobic interaction between the two subunits and a small C-terminal domain penetrating the other subunit. In addition, two citrate molecules occupied the 6PG binding pocket of each monomer. The intact Gnd1 had a Km of 50 ± 9 μM for 6-phosphogluconate and of 35 ± 6 μM for NADP+ at pH 7.5. But the truncated mutants without the C-terminal 35, 39 or 53 residues of Gnd1 completely lost their 6PGDH activity, despite remaining the homodimer in solution. Conclusion The overall tertiary structure of Gnd1 is similar to those of 6PGDH from other species. The substrate and coenzyme binding sites are well conserved, either from the primary sequence alignment, or from the 3D structural superposition. Enzymatic activity assays suggest a sequential mechanism of catalysis, which is in agreement with previous studies. The C-terminal domain of Gnd1 functions as a hook to further tighten the dimer, but it is not

  8. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensors

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    Xiaodi Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is defined as a kind of analytical device incorporating a biological material, a biologically derived material or a biomimic intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. Electrochemical biosensors incorporating enzymes with nanomaterials, which combine the recognition and catalytic properties of enzymes with the electronic properties of various nanomaterials, are new materials with synergistic properties originating from the components of the hybrid composites. Therefore, these systems have excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events through electronic signal transduction so as to design a new generation of bioelectronic devices with high sensitivity and stability. In this review, we describe approaches that involve nanomaterials in direct electrochemistry of redox proteins, especially our work on biosensor design immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6, hemoglobin (Hb, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The topics of the present review are the different functions of nanomaterials based on modification of electrode materials, as well as applications of electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

  9. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  10. Determination of dehydrogenase activities involved in D-glucose oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Sainz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane bound dehydrogenases (membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH, D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains. Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites (GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the A. malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h, which coincided with glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of G. oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition.Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter were

  11. Enantioselective Synthesis of Vicinal (R,R)-Diols by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Butanediol Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calam, Eduard; González-Roca, Eva; Fernández, M. Rosario; Dequin, Sylvie; Parés, Xavier; Virgili, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Butanediol dehydrogenase (Bdh1p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the superfamily of the medium-chain dehydrogenases and reductases and converts reversibly R-acetoin and S-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, respectively. It is specific for NAD(H) as a coenzyme, and it is the main enzyme involved in the last metabolic step leading to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol in yeast. In this study, we have used the activity of Bdh1p in different forms—purified enzyme, yeast extracts, permeabilized yeast cells, and as a fusion protein (with yeast formate dehydrogenase, Fdh1p)—to transform several vicinal diketones to the corresponding diols. We have also developed a new variant of the delitto perfetto methodology to place BDH1 under the control of the GAL1 promoter, resulting in a yeast strain that overexpresses butanediol dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase activities in the presence of galactose and regenerates NADH in the presence of formate. While the use of purified Bdh1p allows the synthesis of enantiopure (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol, and (3R,4R)-3,4-hexanediol, the use of the engineered strain (as an extract or as permeabilized cells) yields mixtures of the diols. The production of pure diol stereoisomers has also been achieved by means of a chimeric fusion protein combining Fdh1p and Bdh1p. Finally, we have determined the selectivity of Bdh1p toward the oxidation/reduction of the hydroxyl/ketone groups from (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol/2,3-pentanedione and (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol/2,3-hexanedione. In conclusion, Bdh1p is an enzyme with biotechnological interest that can be used to synthesize chiral building blocks. A scheme of the favored pathway with the corresponding intermediates is proposed for the Bdh1p reaction. PMID:26729717

  12. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  13. Mutational Analyses of Glucose Dehydrogenase and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveal Their Effects on Growth and Alginate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of alginate has been studied extensively due to the importance of this polymer in medicine and industry. Alginate is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate and thus competes with the central carbon metabolism for this metabolite. The alginate-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens relies on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways for glucose metabolism, and these pathways are also important for the metabolism of fructose and glycerol. In the present study, the impact of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes on growth and alginate synthesis was investigated in P. fluorescens. Mutants defective in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (Zwf-1 and Zwf-2) or glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) were evaluated using media containing glucose, fructose, or glycerol. Zwf-1 was shown to be the most important glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for catabolism. Both Zwf enzymes preferred NADP as a coenzyme, although NAD was also accepted. Only Zwf-2 was active in the presence of 3 mM ATP, and then only with NADP as a coenzyme, indicating an anabolic role for this isoenzyme. Disruption of zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as the carbon source, possibly due to decreased flux through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rendering more fructose-6-phosphate available for alginate biosynthesis. In alginate-producing cells grown on glucose, disruption of gcd increased both cell numbers and alginate production levels, while this mutation had no positive effect on growth in a non-alginate-producing strain. A possible explanation is that alginate synthesis might function as a sink for surplus hexose phosphates that could otherwise be detrimental to the cell.

  14. Differentially expressed genes between drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive barley genotypes in response to drought stress during the reproductive stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peiguo; Baum, Michael; Grando, Stefania; Ceccarelli, Salvatore; Bai, Guihua; Li, Ronghua; von Korff, Maria; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Graner, Andreas; Valkoun, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Drought tolerance is a key trait for increasing and stabilizing barley productivity in dry areas worldwide. Identification of the genes responsible for drought tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) will facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance, and also facilitate the genetic improvement of barley through marker-assisted selection or gene transformation. To monitor the changes in gene expression at the transcriptional level in barley leaves during the reproductive stage under drought conditions, the 22K Affymetrix Barley 1 microarray was used to screen two drought-tolerant barley genotypes, Martin and Hordeum spontaneum 41-1 (HS41-1), and one drought-sensitive genotype Moroc9-75. Seventeen genes were expressed exclusively in the two drought-tolerant genotypes under drought stress, and their encoded proteins may play significant roles in enhancing drought tolerance through controlling stomatal closure via carbon metabolism (NADP malic enzyme, NADP-ME, and pyruvate dehydrogenase, PDH), synthesizing the osmoprotectant glycine-betaine (C-4 sterol methyl oxidase, CSMO), generating protectants against reactive-oxygen-species scavenging (aldehyde dehydrogenase,ALDH, ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase, ADOR), and stabilizing membranes and proteins (heat-shock protein 17.8, HSP17.8, and dehydrin 3, DHN3). Moreover, 17 genes were abundantly expressed in Martin and HS41-1 compared with Moroc9-75 under both drought and control conditions. These genes were possibly constitutively expressed in drought-tolerant genotypes. Among them, seven known annotated genes might enhance drought tolerance through signalling [such as calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and membrane steroid binding protein (MSBP)], anti-senescence (G2 pea dark accumulated protein, GDA2), and detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST) pathways. In addition, 18 genes, including those encoding Δl-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), protein phosphatase 2C

  15. Purification and characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase with l-arabitol dehydrogenase activity from the newly isolated pentose-fermenting yeast Meyerozyma caribbica 5XY2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukpipat, Wiphat; Komeda, Hidenobu; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Meyerozyma caribbica strain 5XY2, which was isolated from an alcohol fermentation starter in Thailand, was found to catabolize l-arabinose as well as d-glucose and d-xylose. The highest production amounts of ethanol from d-glucose, xylitol from d-xylose, and l-arabitol from l-arabinose were 0.45 g/g d-glucose, 0.60 g/g d-xylose, and 0.61 g/g l-arabinose with 21.7 g/L ethanol, 20.2 g/L xylitol, and 30.3 g/l l-arabitol, respectively. The enzyme with l-arabitol dehydrogenase (LAD) activity was purified from the strain and found to exhibit broad specificity to polyols, such as xylitol, d-sorbitol, ribitol, and l-arabitol. Xylitol was the preferred substrate with Km=16.1 mM and kcat/Km=67.0 min(-1)mM(-1), while l-arabitol was also a substrate for the enzyme with Km=31.1 mM and kcat/Km=6.5 min(-1) mM(-1). Therefore, this enzyme from M. caribbica was named xylitol dehydrogenase (McXDH). McXDH had an optimum temperature and pH at 40°C and 9.5, respectively. The McXDH gene included a coding sequence of 1086 bp encoding a putative 362 amino acid protein of 39 kDa with an apparent homopentamer structure. Native McXDH and recombinant McXDH exhibited relative activities toward l-arabitol of approximately 20% that toward xylitol, suggesting the applicability of this enzyme with the functions of XDH and LAD to the development of pentose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  16. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Kerr, Sarah E; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Graham, Rondell P; Zhang, Lizhi; Highsmith, W Edward; Zhang, Jun; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Halling, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are common in gliomas and help stratify patients with brain cancer into histologic and molecular subtypes. However, these mutations are considered rare in other solid tumors. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma and to assess histopathologic differences between specimens with and without an isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation. We sequenced 94 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cholangiocarcinoma (67 intrahepatic and 27 extrahepatic) assessing for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (codon 132) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (codons 140 and 172) mutations. Multiple histopathologic characteristics were also evaluated and compared with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutation status. Of the 94 evaluated specimens, 21 (22%) had a mutation including 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma than in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (28% versus 7%, respectively; P = .030). The 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations were R132C (n = 9), R132S (n = 2), R132G (n = 2), and R132L (n = 1). The 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations were R172K (n = 5), R172M (n = 1), and R172G (n = 1). Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in tumors with clear cell change (P < .001) and poorly differentiated histology (P = .012). The results of this study show for the first time that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are mutated in cholangiocarcinoma. The results of this study are encouraging because it identifies a new potential target for genotype-directed therapeutic trials and may represent a potential biomarker for earlier detection of cholangiocarcinoma in a subset of cases.

  17. ACTIVITIES OF AMMONIA ASSIMILATION ENZYMES AS INDICATORS OF THE RELATIVE SUPPLY OF NITROGEN SUBSTRATES FOR MARINE BACTERIOPLANKTON IN SUB-TROPICAL COASTAL WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The supply of nitrogen substrates available for bacterial production in seawater was determined using the activities of ammonia assimilation enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Expression of GS and GDH by bacteria in pure culture is generally ind...

  18. Following Enzyme Activity with Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy provides a direct, "on-line" monitor of enzymatic reactions. Measurement of enzymatic activity is based on the fact that the infrared spectra of reactants and products of an enzymatic reaction are usually different. Several examples are given using the enzymes pyruvate kinase, fumarase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The main advantage of the infrared method is that it observes the reaction of interest directly, i.e.,no activity assay is required to convert the progress of the reaction into an observable quantity.

  19. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Dudchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on the biosensor performance are given. The fructose biosensor is characterized by high signal reproducibility and selectivity to fructose. The developed conductometric biosensor can be successfully used for fructose monitoring in the procedures of food and clinical diagnostic.

  20. Identification of biotransformation enzymes in the antennae of codling moth Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinglong; Liu, Lu; Su, Xiaoji; Feng, Jinian

    2016-04-10

    Biotransformation enzymes are found in insect antennae and play a critical role in degrading xenobiotics and odorants. In Cydia pomonella, we identified 26 biotransformation enzymes. Among these enzymes, twelve carboxylesterases (CXEs), two aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) and six alcohol dehydrogenases (ADs) were predominantly expressed in antennae. Each of the CpomCXEs presents a conserved catalytic triad "Ser-His-Glu", which is the structural characteristic of known insect CXEs. CpomAOXs present two redox centers, a FAD-binding domain and a molybdenum cofactor/substrate-binding domain. The antennal CpomADs are from two protein families, short-chain dehydrogenases/reducetases (SDRs) and medium-chain dehydrogenases/reducetases (MDRs). Putative catalytic active domain and cofactor binding domain were found in these CpomADs. Potential functions of these enzymes were determined by phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that these enzymes share close relationship with odorant degrading enzymes (ODEs) and resistance-associated enzymes of other insect species. Because of commonly observed roles of insect antennal biotransformation enzymes, we suggest antennal biotransformation enzymes presented here are candidate that involved in degradation of odorants and xenobiotics within antennae of C. pomonella.