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Sample records for dehydratase deficiency porphyria

  1. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  2. Human hereditary hepatic porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Yves; Puy, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    The human hereditary hepatic porphyrias are diseases due to marked deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias can be classified as either hepatic or erythroid, depending on the major production site of porphyrins or their precursors. The pathogenesis of inherited hepatic porphyrias has now been defined at the molecular level. Some gene carriers are vulnerable to a range of exogenous and endogenous factors, which may trigger neuropsychiatric and/or cutaneous symptoms. Early diagnosis is of prime importance since it makes way for counselling. In this article we present an overview of recent advances on hepatic porphyrias: 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), hereditary coproporphyria (HC), and variegate porphyria (VP).

  3. Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of their skin when it is exposed to sunlight. The nervous system type is called acute porphyria. Symptoms include pain in the chest, abdomen, limbs, or back; muscle numbness, tingling, paralysis, or cramping; vomiting; constipation; ...

  4. Clinically important features of porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Wehong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-11-03

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther's disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria.

  5. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Weihong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria. PMID:25372274

  6. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

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    Siddesh Besur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, porphobilinogen and porphyrins are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow. We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria.

  7. Disease: H00202 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oietic porphyria; Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); Variegate porphyria (VP); ALA-dehydratase deficiency p...H00202 Hepatic porphyria, including: Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT); VHepatoerythrop

  8. Feline congenital erythropoietic porphyria: two homozygous UROS missense mutations cause the enzyme deficiency and porphyrin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Giger, Urs; Haskins, Mark E; Desnick, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    The first feline model of human congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) due to deficient uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) activity was identified by its characteristic clinical phenotype, and confirmed by biochemical and molecular genetic studies. The proband, an adult domestic shorthair cat, had dark-red urine and brownish discolored teeth with red fluorescence under ultraviolet light. Biochemical studies demonstrated markedly increased uroporphyrinogen I in urine and plasma (2,650- and 10,700-fold greater than wild type, respectively), whereas urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen were lower than normal. Erythrocytic URO-synthase activity was UROS gene revealed two missense mutations, c.140C>T (p.S47F) in exon 3 and c.331G>A (p.G111S) in exon 6, both of which were homozygous, presumably owing to parental consanguinity. Neither was present in 100 normal cat alleles. Prokaryotic expression and thermostability studies of the purified monomeric wild-type, p.S47F, p.G111S, and p.S47F/G111S enzymes showed that the p.S47F enzyme had 100% of wild-type specific activity but ~50% decreased thermostability, whereas the p.G111S and p.S47F/G111S enzymes had about 60% and 20% of wild-type specific activity, respectively, and both were markedly thermolabile. Molecular modeling results indicated that the less active/less stable p.G111S enzyme was further functionally impaired by a structural interaction induced by the presence of the S47F substitution. Thus, the synergistic interaction of two rare amino acid substitutions in the URO-synthase polypeptide caused the feline model of human CEP.

  9. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria

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    Wen-Hao Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP, or “Günther disease”, is a rare variant of porphyria. It is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficient uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-III-synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. We herein report a case of a man with the typical clinical presentations of hyper- and hypo-pigmentation and blister formation over sun-exposed areas, mutilation of the fingers, dark-purple urine, and erythrodontia with pinkish fluorescence under a Wood’s lamp. The diagnosis was confirmed by decreased activity of URO-III-synthase in red blood cells (RBC and a porphyrin profile compatible with CEP.

  10. Correction of deficient CD34+ cells from peripheral blood after mobilization in a patient with congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurier, F; Géronimi, F; Lamrissi-Garcia, I; Morel, C; Richard, E; Ged, C; Fontanellas, A; Moreau-Gaudry, F; Morey, M; de Verneuil, H

    2001-03-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an inherited disease due to a deficiency in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme of the heme pathway. It is characterized by accumulation of uroporphyrin I in the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and other organs. The onset of most cases occurs in infancy and the main symptoms are cutaneous photosensitivity and hemolysis. For severe transfusion-dependent cases, when allogeneic cell transplantation cannot be performed, autografting of genetically modified primitive/stem cells is the only alternative. In the present study, efficient mobilization of peripheral blood primitive CD34(+) cells was performed on a young adult CEP patient. Retroviral transduction of this cell population with the therapeutic human UROS (hUS) gene resulted in both enzymatic and metabolic correction of CD34(+)-derived cells, as demonstrated by the increase in UROS activity and by a 53% drop in porphyrin accumulation. A 10-24% gene transfer efficiency was achieved in the most primitive cells, as demonstrated by the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC). Furthermore, gene expression remained stable during in vitro erythroid differentiation. Therefore, these results are promising for the future treatment of CEP patients by gene therapy.

  11. Acute intermittent porphyria.

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    Herrick, Ariane L; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2005-04-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is characterised by neurovisceral crises the most common clinical presentation of which is abdominal pain. It is an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and is potentially life-threatening. The key point in management is to suspect and confirm the diagnosis as early as possible in order to treat the attack and to avoid inappropriate treatments which may exacerbate the crisis. In this chapter we briefly outline the haem biosynthetic pathway and how deficiencies in individual enzymes give rise to the different porphyrias. We then describe the clinical features and diagnosis of AIP, followed by a discussion of pathogenesis, highlighting advances in the molecular biology of AIP and introducing the debate as to whether neurovisceral crises might result from porphyrin precursor neurotoxicity or from haem deficiency. Finally we discuss management, including family screening, avoidance of triggering factors, analgesia, maintenance of a high calorie intake, and administration of haem derivatives.

  12. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  13. Learning about Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine for Patients and the Public Specific Genetic Disorders Learning About Porphyria Specific Genetic Disorders Specific Genetic Disorders Learning About Prostate Cancer See Also: Talking Glossary of ...

  14. Porphyria cutanea tarda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Brandrup, F; Christiansen, L

    2000-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), the most common porphyria disease, is characterized by blistering and skin fragility of sun-exposed skin. The symptoms are caused by lowered activity of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) resulting in accumulation of water-soluble porphyrins in the skin. Most PCT...

  15. HAART: a risk factor for development of porphyria cutanea tarda?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Bernardes Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT is caused by inherited or acquired partial deficiency of the uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (Uro-D enzyme activity. It is the most common form of porphyria. The main triggering factors to the development of porphyria cutanea tarda are alcohol, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus. There are several reports of PCT associated with drugs, among them, antiretroviral therapy. We describe three HIV-positive patients, which showed photosensitivity as well as the emergence of tense blisters on sun-exposed areas during the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and discuss the possibility of PCT after the use of these drugs by those patients.

  16. Rapid screening test for porphyria diagnosis using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Stepp, H.; Homann, C.; Hennig, G.; Brittenham, G. M.; Vogeser, M.

    2015-07-01

    Porphyrias are rare genetic metabolic disorders, which result from deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the enzyme defect, different types of porphyrins and heme precursors accumulate for the different porphyria diseases in erythrocytes, liver, blood plasma, urine and stool. Patients with acute hepatic porphyrias can suffer from acute neuropathic attacks, which can lead to death when undiagnosed, but show only unspecific clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain. Therefore, in addition to chromatographic methods, a rapid screening test is required to allow for immediate identification and treatment of these patients. In this study, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were conducted on blood plasma and phantom material, mimicking the composition of blood plasma of porphyria patients. Hydrochloric acid was used to differentiate the occurring porphyrins (uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III) spectroscopically despite their initially overlapping excitation spectra. Plasma phantom mixtures were measured using dual wavelength excitation and the corresponding concentrations of uroporphyrin-III and coproporphyrin-III were determined. Additionally, three plasma samples of porphyria patients were examined and traces of coproporphyrin-III and uroporphyrin-III were identified. This study may therefore help to establish a rapid screening test method with spectroscopic differentiation of the occurring porphyrins, which consequently allows for the distinction of different porphyrias. This may be a valuable tool for clinical porphyria diagnosis and rapid or immediate treatment.

  17. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

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    ... overweight patients with Porphyria are at a distinct disadvantage, because it is unsafe for them to enter ... content on this Web site are protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. Users are prohibited from ...

  18. Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attacks, but are usually not chronic. Wearing a Medic Alert bracelet is advisable for patients who have ... Week is ONE Month Away! Mar 17, 2017 Access to Care Toolkit for the Acute Porphyrias is ...

  19. American Porphyria Foundation

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    ... Caretaker Support Forum Find an Expert Gary Eyster Art Sale Featured Items Support the APF Porphyria Research " ... 9-5-17 Woodway parkway directly across the street from the Apf office ♦ Volunteer for Research ♦ Alnylam ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALAD , ALAS2 , CPOX , FECH , HMBS , PPOX , UROD , or UROS . The genes related to porphyria provide instructions for ... ALAD ALAS2 CPOX FECH HFE HMBS PPOX UROD UROS Related Information What is a gene? What is ...

  1. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

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    Rania Elkhatib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP.

  2. Delta aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D) activity in human and experimental diabetes mellitus.

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    Fernández-Cuartero, B; Rebollar, J L; Batlle, A; Enriquez de Salamanca, R

    1999-01-01

    The haem pathway is impaired in porphyrias and a frequent coexistence of diabetes mellitus and porphyria disease has been reported. We have therefore decided to investigate delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase, one of the more sensitive enzymes in the haem pathway, in both human diabetic patients and diabetic rats. We have studied 131 diabetes mellitus patients, 32 insulin dependent and 99 non-insulin dependent. The latter group was further subdivided according to treatment: diet alone (n = 24), diet plus oral hypoglycemic agents (n = 28) and diet plus insulin (n = 47). We have also performed similar studies in the rat model of diabetes mellitus, induced in 11 Wistar rats by streptozotocin. Control groups of both humans and animals were used. Erythrocytic aminolevulinate dehydratase activity was reduced in both insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetic patients as compared to their controls (p glycosilated hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.05) and in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus to the glycemia (p < 0.01). In the diabetic rat, aminolevulinate dehydratase activity was diminished on both erythrocytes (p < 0.01) and hepatic tissue (p < 0.01) when compared to the control group. The decrease in activity of erythrocyte aminolevulinate dehydratase observed in diabetic patients, may represent an additional and useful parameter for the assessment of the severity of carbohydrate metabolism impairment.

  3. Porphyria cutanea tarda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Brandrup, F; Christiansen, L

    2000-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), the most common porphyria disease, is characterized by blistering and skin fragility of sun-exposed skin. The symptoms are caused by lowered activity of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) resulting in accumulation of water-soluble porphyrins in the skin. Most PCT...... cases are sporadic but can be familiar due to mutations in the URO-D gene located on chromosome number 1. The disease may be exacerbated by environmental factors. Iron accumulation is a characteristic finding and there is an association to hereditary haemochromatosis. Therapeutic venesection reduces...

  4. Acute Intermittent Porphyria in Argentina: An Update

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    Gabriela Nora Cerbino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP; the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP. Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43% followed by splice defects (26% and small deletions (20%. An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R, increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death.

  5. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria (CEP)

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    ... gov Website: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/ References JOURNAL ARTICLES Christiansen AL, Aagaard L, Krag A, Rasmussen ... homeostasis of human uroporphyrinogen III synthase by enzyme engineering at a single hotspot of congenital erythropoietic ... a Doctor Clinical Studies Porphyria featured Television and Other Media AIP ...

  6. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria: neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, J; Blasco, J; Cardenal, C; Pujol, T; Cruces Prado, M J; Herrero, C; Mascaró, J M; de la Torre, C; Mercader, J M

    1997-09-01

    CT and MR findings in two patients with hepatoerythropoietic porphyria are presented. CT scans showed atrophy and cortical mineralization at the same level. MR examination performed in one of the two patients showed mainly frontal cortical atrophy and punctate bright signal on T1- and T2-weighted sequences.

  7. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

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    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  8. New developments in erythropoietic porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, E; Herrero, C

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, important advances have been made in our understanding of the genetics of porphyrias, particularly with respect to erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) and congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), 2 forms of erythropoietic porphyria no longer considered to be monogenic. The identification of mutations in genes not previously associated with these disorders as causative factors or modulators of severity has helped to explain the presence of genotypic and phenotypic differences between patients carrying the same mutations. These advances have also led to the identification of causative genetic defects in patients who, based on molecular studies, had no mutations in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene UROS (in CEP) or in the ferrochelatase gene FECH (in EPP). Better understanding and characterization of the genetics of porphyrias will allow us to determine genotypic and phenotypic correlations and improve the molecular classification of these diseases, which will have both practical and prognostic implications.

  9. Diet and Nutrition in Porphyria

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    ... Art Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition A proper diet is important to all individuals, ... alter food intake. Therefore, attention to diet and nutrition is important in almost any disease. Porphyrias are ...

  10. Porphyria cutanea tarda responding to spirulina

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithran K; Nair P

    1992-01-01

    A male patient of porphyria cutanea tarda responded to oral spirulina - an alga rich in beta - carotene. The beta - carotene in the spirulina quenches the singlet oxygen which is responsible for the tissue damage in porphyria-associated photosensitivity.

  11. [Successful gene therapy of mice with congenital erythropoietic porphyria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Verneuil, Hubert; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Ged, Cécile; Mazurier, Frédéric; Richard, Emmanuel; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2008-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of disorders due to a genetic deficiency in one of the heme biosynthetic pathway enzymes. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is the most severe type characterized by a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity. Bone marrow transplantation represents a curative treatment for patients, as long as human leucocyte antigen-compatible donor is available. We used a recently obtained murine model to check the feasibility of gene therapy in this disease. Lentivirus-mediated transfer of the human UROS cDNA into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from Uros(mut 248) mice resulted in a complete and long-term enzymatic, metabolic and phenotypic correction of the disease, favored by a survival advantage of corrected red blood cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that the cure of this mouse model of CEP at moderate transduction level supports the proof of concept of a gene therapy in this disease by transplantation of genetically modified HSCs.

  12. Role of genetic testing in the management of patients with inherited porphyria and their families.

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    Whatley, S D; Badminton, M N

    2013-05-01

    The porphyrias are a group of mainly inherited metabolic conditions that result from partial deficiency of individual enzymes in the haem biosynthesis pathway. Clinical presentation is either with acute neurovisceral attacks, skin photosensitivity or both, and is due to overproduction of pathway intermediates. The primary diagnosis in the proband is based on biochemical testing of appropriate samples, preferably during or soon after onset of symptoms. The role of genetic testing in the autosomal dominant acute porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria) is to identify presymptomatic carriers of the family specific pathogenic mutation so that they can be counselled on how to minimize their risk of suffering an acute attack. At present the additional genetic factors that influence penetrance are not known, and all patients are treated as equally at risk. Genetic testing in the erythropoietic porphyrias (erythropoietic protoporphyria, congenital erythropoietic porphyria and X-linked dominant protoporphyria) is focused on predictive and preconceptual counselling, prenatal testing and genotype-phenotype correlation. Recent advances in analytical technology have resulted in increased sensitivity of mutation detection with success rates of greater than 90% for most of the genes. The ethical and consent issues are discussed. Current research into genetic factors that affect penetrance is likely to lead to a more refined approach to counselling for presymptomatic gene carriers.

  13. Past and future: porphyria and porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Porphyria is a compelling disease--disrupted enzyme pathways, heightened sensitivities, and a fascinating history tied in with tales of Dracula. This review discusses the history, pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of porphyria. It further discusses the way in which research on the etiologies of the various porphyrias has led to the development of porphyrin-based photodynamic therapy, which shows great promise in targeted therapy for a variety of serious pathologies.

  14. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pischik E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Elena Pischik,1,2 Raili Kauppinen,11Porphyria Research Unit, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Central Hospital of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; 2Department of Neurology, Consultative and Diagnostic Centre with Polyclinics, St Petersburg, Russia Abstract: Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1 treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2 symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3 exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4 adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1 exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors, 2 information about on-line drug lists, and 3 mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in

  15. Porphyria cutanea tarda responding to spirulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran K

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A male patient of porphyria cutanea tarda responded to oral spirulina - an alga rich in beta - carotene. The beta - carotene in the spirulina quenches the singlet oxygen which is responsible for the tissue damage in porphyria-associated photosensitivity.

  16. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar) intake to suppress disease activity. When the Atkins Diet, which was a high protein/low carbohydrate ... exacerbated their Porphyria. In fact, complying with the Atkins plan precipitated attacks in some previously undiagnosed and ...

  17. Rifampicin-induced porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, J W

    1980-10-01

    A patient who developed porphyria cutanea tarda and disturbed liver function tests following treatment with rifampicin and isoniazid for a tuberculous psoas abscess is reported. The patient had normal liver function tests prior to receiving anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy, but was subsequently demonstrated to have cholelithiasis. Challenge testing with both drugs incriminated rifampicin as the agent precipitating porphyria cutanea tarda and disturbance of the liver function tests particularly the serum bilirubin. The association between rifampicin and porphyria cutanea tarda has not previously been described but might be expected because of the ability of rifampicin to induce various liver enzyme systems including delta aminolevulinic acid synthetase activity. This further illustration of rifampicin hepatotoxicity emphasizes the need for regular monitoring of liver function when rifampicin is prescribed. Rifampicin should be used with extreme caution in any patient with a previous history of porphyria cutanea tarda.

  18. Cardiac calcification in acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Ghatak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aetiology of pericardial calcifications can be multifactorial. Tuberculosis has been reported as the most common cause. Other known causes include uraemia, asbestosis, post-traumatic or postoperative. We report a rare case of pericardial calcification seen in a patient with established acute intermittent porphyria. A direct causal relationship cannot be established between porphyria and pericardial calcification, but it may be due to deposition of the porphyrin in the pericardium.

  19. Pharm GKB: Porphyria, Acute Intermittent [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: PharmGKB Accession Id: PA166048717 External Vocabularies NDFRT: Porphyria, Acute... Intermittent (N0000003536) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Porphyria, Acute Intermittent ...

  20. Acute intermittent porphyria: clinicopathologic correlation. Report of a case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, J I; Cohen, M L; Larkin, J; Kernich, C A; Hricik, D E; Daroff, R B

    1997-06-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant disorder, results from a deficiency of the enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase. Despite important advances in the characterization of AIP, the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations is not clearly understood. We present a patient with AIP followed for 31 years with multiple episodes of hyponatremia during AIP exacerbations. We discuss the clinicopathologic correlation and possible explanations for the morphologic findings, including discrete hypothalamic changes.

  1. Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax: 713–840–9552 Email: porphyrus@aol.com Internet: www.porphyriafoundation.com Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ... or 864–292–1175 Email: cgarrison@irondisorders.org Internet: www.irondisorders.org National Institutes of Health Office ...

  2. Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Disease & NASH Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis) Hepatitis ...

  3. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Elena; Brancaleoni, Valentina; Granata, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a rare genetic disease resulting from the remarkable deficient activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme of the haem biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme defect results in overproduction of the non-physiological and pathogenic porphyrin isomers, uroporphyrin I and coproporphyrin I. The predominant clinical characteristics of CEP include bullous cutaneous photosensitivity to visible light from early infancy, progressive photomutilation and chronic haemolytic anaemia. The severity of clinical manifestations is markedly heterogeneous among patients; and interdependence between disease severity and porphyrin amount in the tissues has been pointed out. A more pronounced endogenous production of porphyrins concomitant to activation of ALAS2, the first and rate-limiting of the haem synthesis enzymes in erythroid cells, has also been reported. CEP is inherited as autosomal recessive or X-linked trait due to mutations in UROS or GATA1 genes; however an involvement of other causative or modifier genes cannot be ruled out.

  4. A molecular study of congenital erythropoietic porphyria in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerholm, J S; Thulstrup, P W; Bjerrum, M J; Bendixen, C; Jørgensen, C B; Fredholm, M

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) in cattle is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) encoded by the UROS gene. In this study, we have established the pedigree of an extended Holstein family in which the disease is segregating in a manner consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Biochemical analyses demonstrated accumulation of uroporphyrin, thus confirming that it is indeed insufficient activity of UROS which is the cause of the disease. We have therefore sequenced all nine exons of UROS in affected and non-affected individuals without detecting any potential causative mutations. However, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within the spliceosome attachment region in intron 8 of UROS is shown to segregate with the disease allele. Our study supports the hypothesis that CEP in cattle is caused by a mutation affecting UROS; however, additional functional studies are needed to identify the causative mutation.

  5. A molecular study of congenital erythropoietic porphyria in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) in cattle is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) encoded by the UROS gene. In this study, we have established the pedigree of an extended Holstein family in which the disease...... is segregating in a manner consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Biochemical analyses demonstrated accumulation of uroporphyrin, thus confirming that it is indeed insufficient activity of UROS which is the cause of the disease. We have therefore sequenced all nine exons of UROS in affected and non......-affected individuals without detecting any potential causative mutations. However, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within the spliceosome attachment region in intron 8 of UROS is shown to segregate with the disease allele. Our study supports the hypothesis that CEP in cattle is caused by a mutation...

  6. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria due to a mutation in GATA1: the first trans-acting mutation causative for a human porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John D; Steensma, David P; Pulsipher, Michael A; Spangrude, Gerald J; Kushner, James P

    2007-03-15

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder, is due to mutations of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). Deficiency of UROS results in excess uroporphyrin I, which causes photosensitization. We evaluated a 3-year-old boy with CEP. A hypochromic, microcytic anemia was present from birth, and platelet counts averaged 70 x 10(9)/L (70,000/microL). Erythrocyte UROS activity was 21% of controls. Red cell morphology and globin chain labeling studies were compatible with beta-thalassemia. Hb electrophoresis revealed 36.3% A, 2.4% A(2), 59.5% F, and 1.8% of an unidentified peak. No UROS or alpha- and beta-globin mutations were found in the child or the parents. The molecular basis of the phenotype proved to be a mutation of GATA1, an X-linked transcription factor common to globin genes and heme biosynthetic enzymes in erythrocytes. A mutation at codon 216 in the child and on one allele of his mother changed arginine to tryptophan (R216W). This is the first report of a human porphyria due to a mutation in a trans-acting factor and the first association of CEP with thalassemia and thrombocytopenia. The Hb F level of 59.5% suggests a role for GATA-1 in globin switching. A bone marrow allograft corrected both the porphyria and the thalassemia.

  7. An odd case of heteroallelic acute intermittent porphyria in the Argentinean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Pauwels, M B; Gerez, E N; Martinez, M C; Melito, V A; Parera, V E; Batlle, A; Rossetti, M V

    2013-03-12

    AIP is an acute liver disorder caused by a deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) characterized by neuroabdominal symptoms. It is an autosomal dominant disease. However, homozygous dominant AIP (HD-AIP) have been described. In some cases erythrodontia was observed. CEP is an autosomal recessive disease produced by mutations in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS), characterized by severe cutaneous lesions and erythrodontia. The aim of the work was to establish the differential diagnosis of porphyria in a patient with abdominal pain, neurological attacks, skin symptoms and erythrodontia. The PBGD activity was reduced 50% and the genetic analysis indicated the presence of two genetic variants in the PBGD gene, p.G111R and p.E258G, a new genetic variant, revealing a case of heteroallelic HD-AIP. The patient, first diagnosed as a carrier of a dual porphyria: AIP / CEP based on the excretion profile of porphyrins, precursors and her clinical symptoms, would be an atypical case of human HD-AIP. These results would also suggest the presence of a phenocopy of the CEP, induced by an endogenous or exogenous factor. Our findings highlight the importance of genetic studies for a proper diagnosis of porphyria, prevention of its manifestation and its treatment.

  8. Mutational analysis of uroporphyrinogen III cosynthase gene in Iranian families with congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghbeli, Meysam; Maleknejad, Mahmood; Arabi, Azadeh; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2012-06-01

    Porphyrias are rare metabolic hereditary diseases originating from defects in specific enzymes involved in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is the rarest autosomal recessive porphyria resulting from a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen III cosynthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme in heme biosynthesis. CEP leads to an excessive production and accumulation of type Ι porphyrins in bone marrow, skin and several other tissues. Clinical manifestations are presented in childhood with severe cutaneous photosensitivity, blistering, scarring and deformation of the hands and the loss of eyebrows and eyelashes. Less than 200 cases of CEP have been reported to date. Four CEP patients and their family members were studied for the first time in Iran. A missense mutation in the UROS gene was identified in this family. A, T to C change at nucleotide 34313, leading to a substitution of Leucine by Proline at codon 237, was observed in the homozygous state in these 4 patients and heterozygous state in their parents. Our data from the Iranian population emphasizes the importance of codon 237 alone, given the rarity of this disease. This fact can be taken into consideration in the mutational analysis of UROS. This work emphasizes the advantages of molecular genetic techniques as diagnostic tools for the detection of clinically asymptomatic heterozygous mutation carriers as well as CEP within families.

  9. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria with undescended testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys. The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting.

  10. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria with Undescended Testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sandeep; Harith, Arun Kumar; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS) resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys). The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting.

  11. DENATURING GRADIENT GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS FOR RAPID DETECTION OF LATENT CARRIERS OF A SUBTYPE OF ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA WITH NORMAL ERYTHROCYTE PORPHOBILINOGEN DEAMINASE ACTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOURGEOIS, F; GU, XF; DEYBACH, JC; VELDE, MPT; DEROOIJ, F; NORDMANN, Y; GRANDCHAMP, B

    1992-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria is an autosomal dominant disorder defined by a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (EC 4.3.1.8). Clinical manifestations of the disease are characterized by acute attacks of neurological dysfunction often linked to environmental factors. Early diagnosis of ge

  12. Acute intermittent porphyria in the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute intermittent porphyria emerges as a result of partial defect of porphobilinogen deaminase and is manifested by repeated episodes of somatic, psychiatric and neurological disorders. The disease is conducted via the autosomaldominant gene of variable penetration, so most of the carriers never experience seizures. Timely making of diagnosis, screening of blood relatives of the patient and education of patients on avoidance of provoking factors are the key to adequate treatment. Case Outline. A 23-year-old patient having born the third child was hospitalized due to pains in the abdomen and convulsive seizures nine days after the vaginal delivery. At admittance, she suffered a generalized convulsive seizure of clonic-tonic type. The patient immediately underwent a complete clinical, laboratory, bacteriological and ultrasound examination. Bearing in mind the fact that the patient had several convulsive seizures even after the given neurological therapy, haem-arginate was introduced into therapy during four days. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The patient was treated by a team of doctors, in the intensive care ward, with the use of medicaments, which are allowed in the case of acute porphyria. Sixteen days after the admittance, with clean neurological status and gynaecological and ultra-sound findings, she was released for ambulatory treatment. Conclusion. The presented case exhibits the gravity of making a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria in puerperium and the necessity of multi-disciplinary approach in treating this disease. Acute intermittent porphyria should be considered in cases of ambiguous abdominal pain, as well as in patients having abdominal pains followed by neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  13. Leishmania spp: Delta-aminolevulinate-inducible neogenesis of porphyria by genetic complementation of incomplete heme biosynthesis pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sujoy; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru; Chang, Kwang-Poo Chang

    2008-01-01

    To further develop the Leishmania model for porphyria based on their deficiencies in heme biosynthesis, three Old World species were doubly transfected as before for Leishmania amazonensis with cDNAs, encoding the 2nd and 3rd enzymes in the pathway. Expression of the transgenes was verified immunologically at the protein level and functionally by uroporphyrin neogenesis that occurs only after exposure of the double-transfectants to delta-aminolevulinate. All species examined were equally deficient in heme biosynthesis, as indicated by the accumulation of uroporphyrin as the sole porphyrin and the production of coproporphyrin upon further transfection of one representative species with the downstream gene. The results obtained thus demonstrate that at least the first five enzymes for heme biosynthesis are absent in all species examined, rendering their transfectants inducible with aminolevulinate to accumulate porphyrins and thus useful as cellular models for human porphyrias. PMID:18164705

  14. A knock-in mouse model of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ged, C; Mendez, M; Robert, E; Lalanne, M; Lamrissi-Garcia, I; Costet, P; Daniel, J Y; Dubus, P; Mazurier, F; Moreau-Gaudry, F; de Verneuil, H

    2006-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a recessive autosomal disorder characterized by a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. The severity of the disease, the lack of specific treatment except for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and the knowledge of the molecular lesions are strong arguments for gene therapy. An animal model of CEP has been designed to evaluate the feasibility of retroviral gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells. We have previously demonstrated that the knockout of the Uros gene is lethal in mice (Uros(del) model). This work describes the achievement of a knock-in model, which reproduces a mutation of the UROS gene responsible for a severe UROS deficiency in humans (P248Q missense mutant). Homozygous mice display erythrodontia, moderate photosensitivity, hepatosplenomegaly, and hemolytic anemia. Uroporphyrin (99% type I isomer) accumulates in urine. Total porphyrins are increased in erythrocytes and feces, while Uros enzymatic activity is below 1% of the normal level in the different tissues analyzed. These pathological findings closely mimic the CEP disease in humans and demonstrate that the Uros(mut248) mouse represents a suitable model of the human disease for pathophysiological, pharmaceutical, and therapeutic purposes.

  15. Covalent structure of biodegradative threonine dehydratase of Escherichia coli: homology with other dehydratases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, P; Goss, T J; Omnaas, J R; Patil, R V

    1987-01-01

    The 987-base-pair coding region of the tdc gene of Escherichia coli K-12 encoding biodegradative threonine dehydratase [Tdc; L-threonine hydro-lyase (deaminating), EC 4.2.1.16], previously cloned in this laboratory, was sequenced. The deduced polypeptide consists of 329 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 35,238. Although the purified enzyme was shown to contain tryptophan, no tryptophan codon was found in the tdc reading frame. Incubation of purified Tdc with [14C]tryptophan revealed apparent "covalent" binding of tryptophan, indicating posttranslational modification of the enzyme. A heptapeptide, 54Thr-55Gly-56Ser-57Phe-58Lys-59Ile- 60Arg, was found to contain Lys-58, which binds pyridoxal phosphate coenzyme. A comparison of amino acid sequences between the Tdc polypeptide and the biosynthetic threonine dehydratases of yeast (encoded by ILV1) and E. coli (encoded by ilvA) and the E. coli D-serine dehydratase (DsdA, encoded by dsdA) revealed various extents of homology: five domains of the Tdc polypeptide were 63-93% homologous with the yeast enzyme, and three of these same regions were 80% homologous with the biosynthetic E. coli dehydratase; two different domains showed 67% and 83% homology with DsdA. In addition, two other sequences were highly conserved in all four proteins, one of which was shown to contain the conserved lysine residue that binds pyridoxal phosphate in the Tdc and DsdA polypeptides. These observations suggest that, despite their diverse origin and metabolic significance, these enzymes may have evolved from a common ancestral protein.

  16. Porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Guo, Jun-Tao; Hou, Weihong; Li, Ting; Narang, Tarun; Thapar, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins are the key pigments of life on earth as we know it, because they include chlorophyll (a magnesium-containing metalloporphyrin) and heme (iron protoporphyrin). In eukaryotes, porphyrins and heme are synthesized by a multistep pathway that involves eight enzymes. The first and rate-controlling step is the formation of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from glycine plus succinyl CoA, catalyzed by ALA synthase. Intermediate steps occur in the cytoplasm, with formation of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen and the tetrapyrroles hydroxymethylbilane and a series of porphyrinogens, which are serially decarboxylated. Heme is utilized chiefly for the formation of hemoglobin in erythrocytes, myoglobin in muscle cells, cytochromes P-450 and mitochondrial cytochromes, and other hemoproteins in hepatocytes. The rate-controlling step of heme breakdown is catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HMOX), of which there are two isoforms, called HMOX1 and HMOX2. HMOX breaks down heme to form biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and iron. The porphyrias are a group of disorders, mainly inherited, in which there are defects in normal porphyrin and heme synthesis. The cardinal clinical features are cutaneous (due to the skin-damaging effects of excess deposited porphyrins) or neurovisceral attacks of pain, sometimes with weakness, delirium, seizures, and the like (probably due mainly to neurotoxic effects of ALA). The treatment of choice for the acute hepatic porphyrias is intravenous heme therapy, which repletes a critical regulatory heme pool in hepatocytes and leads to downregulation of hepatic ALA synthase, which is a biochemical hallmark of all forms of acute porphyria in relapse.

  17. [Acute intermittent porphyria and inappropriate ADH syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tébar, M T; Aguilera, L

    2010-05-01

    A 44-year-old woman complained of abdominal pain of 4 days' duration accompanied by vomiting and painful urination. The admitting physician noted neurologic signs consistent with axonal polyneuropathy and hyponatremia. In the absence of other explanations for the syndrome, SIADH was diagnosed. Because of the nonspecific nature of the observations, the patient was assessed by various specialists and admitted to the anesthetic recovery unit due to worsening of neurologic signs and suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. The diagnosis was confirmed by laboratory findings of elevated d-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen levels and normal stool porphyrins. The patient improved with intravenous hematin infused over 4 days.

  18. Acute Porphyria Presenting as Epilepsia Partialis Continua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Phuoc Yen Tran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The porphyrias are a defect in the biosynthesis of heme which can be associated with different neurological symptoms during acute attacks such as peripheral neuropathy, mental disturbance and seizures. So far, there have only been a few case reports of status epilepticus, none of which were of epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. We present here two cases of hereditary coproporphyria (HCP manifesting EPC as part of the clinical presentation. Method: The patients' medical charts, EEG and imaging studies were carefully reviewed. Results: Case 1 is a 49-year-old male who first presented a tonic-clonic seizure. Case 2 is a 30-year-old male who came to the emergency room for a convulsive status epilepticus. Both evolved to EPC over the next days. EPC persisted despite several antiepileptic drug trials. Diagnosis of HCP was confirmed by a high level of urine, fecal and serum porphyrins in both cases and by genetic testing in one. Over the last 3 years, the first patient has continued to present non-disabling EPC and has had four tonic-clonic seizures associated with alcohol consumption. The second patient died from brain edema one month and half after admission. Conclusion: Acute porphyrias should be included in the differential diagnosis of new onset status epilepticus, including EPC. Their recognition is important as it modifies significantly patient management, since many anticonvulsants are porphyrogenic.

  19. High prevalence of and potential mechanisms for chronic kidney disease in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallet, Nicolas; Mami, Iadh; Schmitt, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; François, Arnaud; Rabant, Marion; Nochy, Dominique; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Xu-Dubois, Yichum; Thervet, Eric; Puy, Hervé; Karras, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder of the synthesis of heme caused by a deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), leading to the overproduction of the porphyrin precursors δ-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biological characteristics, the renal pathology, and the cellular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP. A total of 415 patients with HMBS deficiency followed up in the French Porphyria Center were enrolled in 2003 in a population-based study. A follow-up study was conducted in 2013, assessing patients for clinical, biological, and histological parameters. In vitro models were used to determine whether porphyrin precursors promote tubular and endothelial cytotoxicity. Chronic kidney disease occurred in up to 59% of the symptomatic AIP patients, with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate of ~1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) annually. Proteinuria was absent in the vast majority of the cases. The renal pathology was a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, associated with a fibrous intimal hyperplasia and focal cortical atrophy. Our experimental data provide evidence that porphyrin precursors promote endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and epithelial phenotypic changes in proximal tubular cells. In conclusion, the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP should be considered in cases of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy and/or focal cortical atrophy with severe proliferative arteriosclerosis.

  20. Metabolic correction of congenital erythropoietic porphyria with iPSCs free of reprogramming factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedel, Aurélie; Taillepierre, Miguel; Guyonnet-Duperat, Véronique; Lippert, Eric; Dubus, Pierre; Dabernat, Sandrine; Mautuit, Thibaud; Cardinaud, Bruno; Pain, Catherine; Rousseau, Benoît; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Duchartre, Yann; Richard, Emmanuel; de Verneuil, Hubert; Moreau-Gaudry, François

    2012-07-13

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is due to a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS); such a deficiency leads to porphyrin accumulation and results in skin lesions and hemolytic anemia. CEP is a candidate for retrolentivirus-mediated gene therapy, but recent reports of insertional leukemogenesis underscore the need for safer methods. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has opened up new horizons in gene therapy because it might overcome the difficulty of obtaining sufficient amounts of autologous hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation and the risk of genotoxicity. In this study, we isolated keratinocytes from a CEP-affected individual and generated iPSCs with two excisable lentiviral vectors. Gene correction of CEP-derived iPSCs was obtained by lentiviral transduction of a therapeutic vector containing UROS cDNA under the control of an erythroid-specific promoter shielded by insulators. One iPSC clone, free of reprogramming genes, was obtained with a single proviral integration of the therapeutic vector in a genomic safe region. Metabolic correction of erythroblasts derived from iPSC clones was demonstrated by the disappearance of fluorocytes. This study reports the feasibility of porphyria gene therapy with the use of iPSCs.

  1. Covalent structure of biodegradative threonine dehydratase of Escherichia coli: homology with other dehydratases.

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, P; Goss, T J; Omnaas, J R; Patil, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    The 987-base-pair coding region of the tdc gene of Escherichia coli K-12 encoding biodegradative threonine dehydratase [Tdc; L-threonine hydro-lyase (deaminating), EC 4.2.1.16], previously cloned in this laboratory, was sequenced. The deduced polypeptide consists of 329 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 35,238. Although the purified enzyme was shown to contain tryptophan, no tryptophan codon was found in the tdc reading frame. Incubation of purified Tdc with [14C]tryptophan revealed...

  2. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  3. Therapeutic potential of proteasome inhibitors in congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Duchartre, Yann; Costet, Pierre; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Lain, Ana; Millet, Oscar; de Verneuil, Hubert; Richard, Emmanuel

    2013-11-05

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in massive porphyrin accumulation in blood cells, which is responsible for hemolytic anemia and skin photosensitivity. Among the missense mutations actually described up to now in CEP patients, the C73R and the P248Q mutations lead to a profound UROS deficiency and are usually associated with a severe clinical phenotype. We previously demonstrated that the UROS(C73R) mutant protein conserves intrinsic enzymatic activity but triggers premature degradation in cellular systems that could be prevented by proteasome inhibitors. We show evidence that the reduced kinetic stability of the UROS(P248Q) mutant is also responsible for increased protein turnover in human erythroid cells. Through the analysis of EGFP-tagged versions of UROS enzyme, we demonstrate that both UROS(C73R) and UROS(P248Q) are equally destabilized in mammalian cells and targeted to the proteasomal pathway for degradation. We show that a treatment with proteasomal inhibitors, but not with lysosomal inhibitors, could rescue the expression of both EGFP-UROS mutants. Finally, in CEP mice (Uros(P248Q/P248Q)) treated with bortezomib (Velcade), a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor, we observed reduced porphyrin accumulation in circulating RBCs and urine, as well as reversion of skin photosensitivity on bortezomib treatment. These results of medical importance pave the way for pharmacologic treatment of CEP disease by preventing certain enzymatically active UROS mutants from early degradation by using proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones.

  4. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    OpenAIRE

    Siddesh Besur; Wehong Hou; Paul Schmeltzer; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute p...

  5. Melatonin modulates drug-induced acute porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Lelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the modulation by melatonin (Mel of the effects of the porphyrinogenic drugs 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-collidine (DDC on oxidative environment, glucose biosynthesis and heme pathway parameters. Administration of Mel before rat intoxication with AIA/DDC showed a clear beneficial effect in all cases. Mel induced decreases of 42% and 35% in the excretion of the hemeprecursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG, respectively, and a 33% decrease in the induction of the heme regulatory enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S. The activity of the glucose metabolism enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, which had been diminished by the porphyrinogenic treatment, was restored by 45% when animals were pre-treated with Mel. Mel abolished the modest decrease in glucose 6-phospatase (G6Pase activity caused by AIA/DDC treatment. The oxidative status of lipids was attenuated by Mel treatment in homogenates by 47%, whereas no statistically significant AIA/DDC-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was observed in microsomes after Mel pre-treatment. We hypothesize that Mel may be scavenging reactive species of oxygen (ROS that could be damaging lipids, PEPCK, G6Pase and ferrochelatase (FQ. Additionally, Mel administration resulted in the repression of the key enzyme ALA-S, and this could be due to an increase in glucose levels, which is known to inhibit ALA-S induction. The consequent decrease in levels of the heme precursors ALA and PBG had a beneficial effect on the drug-induced porphyria. The results obtained open the possibility of further research on the use of melatonin as a co-treatment option in acute porphyria.

  6. Markers for vulnerability in acute porphyria. A hypothesis paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunell, S; Andersson, C; Carlmark, B; Floderus, Y; Grönqvist, S O; Harper, P; Henrichson, A; Lindh, U

    1995-04-01

    Previously symptomatic and permanently asymptomatic carriers of a gene mutation for acute intermittent porphyria as well as matched controls were screened with regard to a series of variables of possible relevance to the development of porphyric symptoms. The basis for the study was a concept of acute porphyria as a condition of a permanent system overload of oxidative stress, with long term effects on hepatic and renal tissue, and with instances of periodic overload of free radicals giving rise to acute neurologic involvement. Leukocyte concentrations of manganese, calcium, iron and zinc, as well as erythrocyte calcium differed between the groups, acute intermittent porphyria gene carriers, irrespective of previous porphyric illness, showing significantly higher levels than the controls. Manganese was found to be the most discriminative component of all the 78 variables investigated, accounting for about 98 per cent of the variance between the groups. An increment, by a factor of four, in cellular manganese is suggestive of an increase, in acute intermittent porphyria, of a manganese associated enzyme, e.g. glutamine synthetase, pyruvate carboxylase or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. The best fit into the model considered is provided by a theory focused on superoxide dismutase, induced in response to superoxide anion radical produced from aminolaevulinic acid. In porphyria gene carriers seemingly resistant to porphyric manifestations, an increase in potentially prooxidant cellular iron is matched by a proportional increment in manganese, i.e. presumably by a corresponding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase induction. This mechanism is not operative in porphyric individuals prone to development of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In acute intermittent porphyria with a history of porphyric illness there is a positive correlation between erythrocyte manganese and serum folate and a negative correlation between leukocyte ferrochelatase activity and serum cobalamin

  7. Insulin resistance in porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcinaro, F; Basta, G; Lisi, P; Cruciani, C; Pietropaolo, M; Santeusanio, F; Falorni, A; Calafiore, R

    1989-06-01

    It has been reported that patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) develop carbohydrate (CHO) intolerance and manifest diabetes melitus (DM) more frequently than the normal population. In order to verify whether this is due to insulin resistance we studied 5 patients with PCT and 5 normal subjects matched for age, sex and weight. In all the patients an evaluation consisted of the glycemic curve and insulin response to an iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT: 0.33 g/kg) as well as of an evaluation of the circulating monocyte insulin receptors. Blood samples were drawn in the basal state to measure plasma levels of NEFA, glycerol, and intermediate metabolites. The patients with PCT showed normal glucose tolerance which was obtained, however, at the expense of the elevated insulin levels: therefore a condition of insulin resistance was demonstrated in these subjects. An involvement of the lipid metabolism, observed by the raised levels of plasma NEFA and glycerol, was also evident. The insulin binding to circulating monocytes was reduced but not enough to justify the degree of insulin resistance observed. Therefore, it could be hypothesized, in agreement with similar studies, that a postreceptor defect is responsible for the insulin-resistance observed in patients with PCT and that the reduction of insulin receptors is determined by the down regulation in response to elevated insulinemic levels. An alteration of the porphyrin metabolism might be responsible for this disorder.

  8. Genetic and biochemical studies in Argentinean patients with variegate porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giudice Jimena

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A partial deficiency in Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX produces the mixed disorder Variegate Porphyria (VP, the second acute porphyria more frequent in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt VP is absolutely important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death. Methods We have studied at molecular level 18 new Argentinean patients biochemically diagnosed as VP. PPOX gene was amplified in one or in twelve PCR reactions. All coding exons, flanking intronic and promoter regions were manual or automatically sequenced. For RT-PCR studies RNA was retrotranscripted, amplified and sequenced. PPOX activity in those families carrying a new and uncharacterized mutation was performed. Results All affected individuals harboured mutations in heterozygous state. Nine novel mutations and 3 already reported mutations were identified. Six of the novel mutations were single nucleotide substitutions, 2 were small deletions and one a small insertion. Three single nucleotide substitutions and the insertion were at exon-intron boundaries. Two of the single nucleotide substitutions, c.471G>A and c.807G>A and the insertion (c.388+3insT were close to the splice donor sites in exons 5, 7 and intron 4 respectively. The other single nucleotide substitution was a transversion in the last base of intron 7, g.3912G>C (c.808-1G>C so altering the consensus acceptor splice site. However, only in the first case the abnormal band showing the skipping of exon 5 was detected. The other single nucleotide substitutions were transversions: c.101A>T, c.995G>C and c.670 T>G that result in p.E34V, p.G332A and W224G aminoacid substitutions in exons 3, 10 and 7 respectively. Activity measurements indicate that these mutations reduced about 50% PPOX activity and also that they co-segregate with this reduced activity value. Two

  9. (Far) Outside the box: genomic approach to acute porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunell, S

    2006-01-01

    If I were living in Caucasus I would be writing fairy tales there Chekov, 1888 The question of the reasons for the extreme variation in morbidity among the gene carriers of acute porphyria and the great diversity of the precipitating factors are approached by the aid of a model of interacting genomic circuits. It is based on the current paradigm of the acute porphyric attack as a result of a toxic proximal overload of the enzyme-deficient heme-biosynthetic patway. Porphyrogenic influx of precursors is seen as a consequence of uncontrolled induction of its gate-keeping enzyme, ubiquitous 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS1), due to attenuated post-translational control of the enzyme combined with activated gene transcription. Focus is directed on the genomic control of the master-regulator of ALAS1-transcription, the nuclear receptor pair constitutively active receptor (CAR) and pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR). On activation by their ligands, i.e. lipophilic drugs, solvents, alcohols, hormonal steroids and biocides, these DNA-binding proteins transform xenobiotic or steroid stimuli to coordinated activations of gene transcription-programs for ALAS1 and apo-cytochromes P450 (apo-CYPs), thus effecting the formation of xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes. The potency of the CAR/PXR-transduction axis is enhanced by co-activators generated in at least four other genomic circuits, each triggered by different external and internal stimuli clinically experienced to be porphyrogenic, and each controlled by co-activating and co-repressing modulators. The expressions of the genes for CAR and PXR are thus augmented by binding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activated by a steroid hormone, e.g, cortisol generated in fasting, infection or different forms of stress. The promotor regions of ALAS1 and apoCYPs contain binding sites for at least three co-activating transcription factors enhancing CAR/PXR transduction: i.e. the ligand-independent growth hormone (GH

  10. Variegate porphyria in South Africa, 1688 - 1996 - new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the skin disease to the totaJ disease burden of patients with variegate ... porphyria seen in Cape Town documented unambiguously ... important advances in the understanding, diagnosis and ...... doctors and their pharmacists which is sent to aJl newly ... this, a computerised drug safety database was established.

  11. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur [University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, PO Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, PO Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT Espoo (Finland); Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina, E-mail: nina.hakulinen@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, PO Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2016-07-13

    l-Arabinonate dehydratase and d-xylonate dehydratase from the IlvD/EDD family were crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data sets were collected to resolutions of 2.40 and 2.66 Å from crystals of l-arabinonate dehydratase and d-xylonate dehydratase, respectively. l-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and d-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. l-Arabinonate dehydratase converts l-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-l-arabinonate, and d-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of d-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-d-xylonate. l-Arabinonate and d-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any l-arabinonate or d-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a V{sub M} value of 3.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a V{sub M

  12. Clinical and genetic features of variegate porphyria in a Chinese patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Acute porphyria is rare in orientals. We describe a Chinese woman with recurrent generalised tonic-clonic seizures and abdominal pain. Genomic DNA studies identified a heterozygous base substitution from guanine to adenine at nucleotide position 503, resulting in substitution of arginine by histidine at position 168 of the protein (R168H). This genetic abnormality is similar to the mutation reported in Caucasians with variegate porphyria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature a Chinese patient with variegate porphyria with an identifiable mutation. A brief review of porphyria is presented.

  13. Late-onset cutaneous porphyria in a patient heterozygous for a uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, P; Badenas, C; Whatley, S D; To-Figueras, J

    2016-12-01

    Deficiency of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) causes congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). The disease, originating from the inheritance of mutations within the UROS gene, presents a recessive form of transmission. In a few patients, a late-onset CEP-like phenotype without UROS mutations appears to be associated with a myelodysplastic syndrome. We report a 60-year-old man with late-onset signs of cutaneous porphyria and accumulation in urine, plasma and faeces of type I porphyrin isomers characteristic of CEP. Analysis of DNA from peripheral leucocytes, skin and bone marrow aspirate showed that he was a heterozygous carrier of a Cys73Arg (c.217 T>C) mutation within UROS. Sequencing of cDNA from peripheral blood confirmed heterozygosity and expression of the normal allele. Measurement of UROS enzymatic activity in erythrocytes showed values ~70% of normal, indirectly indicating expression of the normal allele. Differently from other cases of late-onset uroporphyria, the patient did not present thrombocytopenia or any evidence of a myelodysplastic syndrome. Five years of clinical follow-up showed persistence of skin signs and increased excretion of porphyrins, independently of lifestyle factors or changes in medication regimes. We hypothesize acquired mosaicism (in the bone marrow) affecting the UROS gene. Thus, unstable cellular clones initiated overproduction of isomer I porphyrins leading to a CEP phenotype. This could be explained either by a clonal expansion of the porphyric (Cys73Arg) allele or by loss of function of the normal allele. Cellular turnover would facilitate release of uroporphyrins into circulation and subsequent skin lesions. This is the first case of a CEP heterozygous carrier presenting clinical manifestations.

  14. 38 CFR 3.813 - Interim benefits for disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disability or death due to chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda. 3.813 Section 3.813 Pensions, Bonuses, and... porphyria cutanea tarda. (a) Disability benefits. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a... Vietnam era, and who suffers from chloracne or porphyria cutanea tarda which became manifest within...

  15. Liver transplantation for acute intermittent porphyria:a viable treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faisal S Dar; Koji Asai; Ali Raza Haque; Thomas Cherian; Mohamed Rela; Nigel Heaton

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the most common hepatic porphyria. Its clinical presentation includes severe disabling and life-threatening neurovisceral symptoms and acute psychiatric symptoms. These symptoms result from the overproduction and accumulation of porphyrin precursors, 5-aminoleuvulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG). The effect of medical treatment is transient and is not effective once irreversible neurological damage has occurred. Liver transplantation (LT) replaces hepatic enzymes and can restore normal excretion of ALA and PBG and prevent acute attacks. METHOD:Two cases of LT for AIP were identiifed retro-spectively from a prospectively maintained LT database. RESULT:LT was successful with resolution of AIP in two patients who suffered from repeated acute attacks. CONCLUSION:LT can correct the underlying metabolic abnormality in AIP and improves quality of life signiifcantly.

  16. Acute intermittent porphyria and pregnancy: an obstetric challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Meena

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by a mutation in the gene coding for the porphobillinogen deaminase enzymes in heam biosynthesis. The disease manifests as acute attacks of neuropsychiatric dysfunction and neurovisceral manifestations presenting as acute abdomen. In pregnancy, 54% patient has exacerbation of attacks in the form of seizures and acute abdomen occurs due to hormonal changes. Prevalence of acute intermittent porphyria is 1-2/200000 in general. Here we report a case of 36 year old women, G4P1L2A2 presenting at 10+4 weeks of gestation requesting pregnancy termination. Patient was diagnosed as case of acute intermittent porphyria with porphyic polyneuropathy 6 months back. At that time her main symptoms were acute pain abdomen with numbness and weakness in all four limbs. Her urinary porphobillinogen and 5 ALA raised. Her CECT of brain and nerve conduction studies were normal. Since then she is on Tablet Gabapentin 300 mg H.S. She underwent successful pregnancy termination by suction and evacuation under spinal anesthesia and she refused for copper-T insertion. Only safe drugs were used for procedure and she was discharged with advice of barrier contraception. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(2.000: 542-544

  17. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2016-01-01

    l-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and d-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. l-Arabinonate dehydratase converts l-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-l-arabinonate, and d-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of d-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-d-xylonate. l-Arabinonate and d-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any l-arabinonate or d-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant l-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and d-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a V M value of 3.2 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a V M value of 4.0 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 69%. PMID:27487924

  18. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of an L-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii and a D-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mubinur; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2016-08-01

    L-Arabinonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.25) and D-xylonate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.82) are two enzymes that are involved in a nonphosphorylative oxidation pathway of pentose sugars. L-Arabinonate dehydratase converts L-arabinonate into 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate, and D-xylonate dehydratase catalyzes the dehydration of D-xylonate to 2-dehydro-3-deoxy-D-xylonate. L-Arabinonate and D-xylonate dehydratases belong to the IlvD/EDD family, together with 6-phosphogluconate dehydratases and dihydroxyacid dehydratases. No crystal structure of any L-arabinonate or D-xylonate dehydratase is available in the PDB. In this study, recombinant L-arabinonate dehydratase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (RlArDHT) and D-xylonate dehydratase from Caulobacter crescentus (CcXyDHT) were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by the use of affinity chromatography followed by gel-filtration chromatography. The purified proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. Crystals of RlArDHT that diffracted to 2.40 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate as a precipitating agent. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 106.07, b = 208.61, c = 147.09 Å, β = 90.43°. Eight RlArDHT molecules (two tetramers) in the asymmetric unit give a VM value of 3.2 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 62%. Crystals of CcXyDHT that diffracted to 2.66 Å resolution were obtained using sodium formate and polyethylene glycol 3350. They belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 270.42, b = 236.13, c = 65.17 Å, β = 97.38°. Four CcXyDHT molecules (a tetramer) in the asymmetric unit give a VM value of 4.0 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 69%.

  19. Rational design of glycerol dehydratase: Swapping the genes encoding the subunits of glycerol dehydratase to improve enzymatic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xianghui; SUN Liang; LUO Zhaofei; WU Jiequn; MENG Xiaolei; TANG Yue; WEI Yutuo; HUANG Ribo

    2006-01-01

    1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) is an important material for chemical industry, and there has been always much interest in the production of 1,3-PD using all possible routes. The genes encoding glycerol dehydratase (GDHt) from Citrobacter freundii,Klebsiella pneumoniae and metagenome were cloned and expressed in E. coli. All glycerol dehydratases but the one from metagenome could be detected to show enzyme activities. In order to improve the enzymatic properties of GDHts, the genes encoding α and β-γ subunits were cloned, and the enzyme characteristics were evolved by rational design based on their 3D structures which were constructed by homology modeling. Six heteroenzymes were obtained by swapping the α subunit genes of these three different-source-derived GDHts. The pH,thermal stability and Vmax of some heteroenzymes were dramatically improved by 2-5 times compared with the wild one (GDHtKP). The GDHt cloned from metagenome, originally proved to be with no enzyme activity, was converted into active enzyme by swapping its subunits with other different GDHts. In addition, the effect of subtle 3D structural changes on the properties of the enzyme was also observed.

  20. Melatonin formation in pineal gland from rats with hexachlorobenzene experimental porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llambías, Elena B C; Mazzetti, Marta B; Lelli, Sandra M; Aldonatti, Carmen; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C

    2007-01-01

    Hexachlorobenzene produces an experimental hepatic porphyria in rats, which is similar to human porphyria cutanea tarda, with hyperpigmentation as one of its characteristic features. Alterations in tryptophan metabolism have been previously observed in this chronic porphyria. Melatonin formation from tryptophan via serotonin shows diurnal rhythmicity in the pineal gland, and higher values are observed during the dark phase of an imposed light-dark cycle. The purpose of this study was to determine the contents of tryptophan and its metabolites in pineal gland of normal and hexachlorobenzene-treated rats in order to find alterations potentially related to porphyria cutanea tarda. Results show that in animals with this experimental porphyria some tryptophan metabolite levels (serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) increase only during the light period, whereas tryptophan content remained equal to the controls. Hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase activity also increases by light in pineal gland from hexachlorobenzene-treated rats. On the other hand, tryptophan is converted to melatonin in the dark period, but this route is not exacerbated in hexachlorobenzene porphyria. The relevance of these alterations is discussed in relation to hyperpigmentation, neoplastic and oxidative stress processes associated with this porphyria.

  1. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria with two mutations of the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (Cys73Arg, Thr228Met).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucev, Zoran; Slavevska, Nevenka; Tasic, Velibor; Laban, Nevenka; Pop-Jordanova, Nada; Danilovski, Dragan; Woolf, Jacqueline; Cole, Duncan

    2011-05-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism that results from the markedly deficient activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). We describe a 14-year-old girl with red urine since infancy, progressive blistering and scarring of the skin, and moderate hemolytic anemia. After years of skin damage, her face is mutilated; she has a bald patch on the scalp, hypertrichosis of the neck, areas of skin darkening, and limited joint movements of the hands. Total urine excretion and fecal total porphyrin were both markedly raised above normal levels. Sequencing of the UROS gene identified two mutations causing CEP (Cys73Arg, Thr228Met). The patient lesions are progressing. Bone marrow transplantation and/or gene therapy are proposed as the next steps in her treatment. In brief, we describe a CEP with confirmed two pathogenic mutations, severe phenotype and discuss the various treatment options available.

  2. Novel point mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene causes congenital erythropoietic porphyria of a Japanese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, N; Hombrados, I; Tanigawa, K; Namba, H; Nagayama, Y; de Verneuil, H; Yamashita, S

    1997-06-13

    The molecular basis of the uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROIIIS) deficiency was investigated in a member of a Japanese family. This defect in heme biosynthesis is responsible for a rare autosomal recessive disease: congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) or Günther's disease. The patient was homozygous for a novel missense mutation: a G to T transition of nucleotide 7 that predicted a valine to phenylalanine substitution at residue 3 (V3F). The parents were heterozygous for the same mutation. The loss of UROIIIS activity was verified by an in vitro assay system. The corresponding mutated protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and no residual activity was observed. Further studies are needed to determine whether the mutations of the UROIIIS gene (UROS) have a specific profile in Japan compared to European or American countries.

  3. Effective gene therapy of mice with congenital erythropoietic porphyria is facilitated by a survival advantage of corrected erythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Richard, Elodie; Moreau-Gaudry, François; Lalanne, Magalie; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Cario-André, Muriel; Guyonnet-Dupérat, Véronique; Taine, Laurence; Ged, Cécile; de Verneuil, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    Achieving long-term expression of a therapeutic gene in a given hematopoietic lineage remains an important goal of gene therapy. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a severe autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. We used a recently obtained murine model to check the feasibility of gene therapy in this disease. Lentivirus-mediated transfer of the human UROS cDNA into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from Uros(mut248) mice resulted in a complete and long-term enzymatic, metabolic, and phenotypic correction of the disease, favored by a survival advantage of corrected red blood cells. These results demonstrate that the cure of this mouse model of CEP at a moderate transduction level supports the proof of concept of a gene therapy in this disease by transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells.

  4. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria with two mutations of the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (Cys73Arg, Thr228Met

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gucev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism that results from the markedly deficient activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS. We describe a 14-year-old girl with red urine since infancy, progressive blistering and scarring of the skin, and moderate hemolytic anemia. After years of skin damage, her face is mutilated; she has a bald patch on the scalp, hypertrichosis of the neck, areas of skin darkening, and limited joint movements of the hands. Total urine excretion and fecal total porphyrin were both markedly raised above normal levels. Sequencing of the UROS gene identified two mutations causing CEP (Cys73Arg, Thr228Met. The patient lesions are progressing. Bone marrow transplantation and/or gene therapy are proposed as the next steps in her treatment. In brief, we describe a CEP with confirmed two pathogenic mutations, severe phenotype and discuss the various treatment options available.

  5. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria: report of a novel mutation with absence of clinical manifestations in a homozygous mutant sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ged, Cécile; Mégarbané, Hala; Chouery, Eliane; Lalanne, Magalie; Mégarbané, André; de Verneuil, Hubert

    2004-09-01

    In a Palestinian family, four siblings were shown to express typical and severe congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). A new mutation of the uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene was evidenced by systematic sequencing of the UROS gene: the substitution of serine by proline at the amino acid residue 47 (S47P) was present at the homozygous state in the four patients. The mother was heterozygous, the father was not examined. Surprisingly, in one unaffected sister, UROS activity was markedly deficient and UROS gene analysis showed a homozygous mutant profile. The deleterious role of the mutant S47P protein on UROS activity was demonstrated by prokaryotic expression. This observation is the first report of a healthy status associated with homozygosity for a mutation of UROS gene in a severely affected family. We then draw hypotheses to explain the protective phenotype in the homozygous healthy subject.

  6. Porfiria cutânea tardia Porphyria cutanea tarda

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Trata-se de revisão sobre a porfiria cutânea tardia em que são abordados a fisiopatogenia, as características clínicas, as doenças associadas, os fatores desencadeantes, a bioquímica, a histopatologia, a microscopia eletrônica, a microscopia de imunofluorescência e o tratamento da doença.This is a review article of porphyria cutanea tarda addressing pathophysiology, clinical features, associated conditions, triggering factors, biochemistry, histopathology, electronic microscopy, immunofluores...

  7. Porfiria cutânea tardia Porphyria cutanea tarda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Mendonça Jorge Vieira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de revisão sobre a porfiria cutânea tardia em que são abordados a fisiopatogenia, as características clínicas, as doenças associadas, os fatores desencadeantes, a bioquímica, a histopatologia, a microscopia eletrônica, a microscopia de imunofluorescência e o tratamento da doença.This is a review article of porphyria cutanea tarda addressing pathophysiology, clinical features, associated conditions, triggering factors, biochemistry, histopathology, electronic microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy and treatment of the disease.

  8. Successful treatment of congenital erythropoietic porphyria using matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Peinado, Carmen; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; To-Figueras, Jordi; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Nogueras, Paloma; Elorza, Izaskun; Olivé, Teresa; Bádenas, Célia; Moreno, M José; Tercedor, Jesús; Herrero, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), or Günther's disease, is an inborn error of metabolism produced by a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS), the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthesis pathway. This enzymatic defect induces the accumulation of isomer I porphyrins in erythrocytes, skin, and tissues, producing various clinical manifestations. Severe cases are characterized by extreme photosensitivity, causing scarring and mutilations, and by hemolytic anemia, reducing life expectancy. CEP is caused by mutations in the UROS gene, and one of the most severe forms of the disease is associated with a cysteine to arginine substitution at residue 73 of the protein (C73R). CEP has been successfully treated only by the transplantation of hematopoietic precursors. We report the case of a male infant with severe postdelivery symptoms diagnosed with CEP and found to be homozygous for the C73R mutation. He underwent successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from a matched unrelated donor at 7 months of age. The hemolytic anemia was corrected and the porphyrin overproduction was significantly reduced. The patient remained asymptomatic after 1 year. This new case confirms that patients with severe CEP can benefit from early postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  9. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria: Mutation of the Uroporphyrinogen III Cosynthase Gene in a Vietnamese Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Hoang Thien Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP arises from an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of the porphyrin metabolism, which leads to the accumulation of uroporphyrinogen I in bone marrow, skin and several other tissues by a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen III cosynthase (UROS. We studied a Vietnamese patient and her family suffering from severe cutaneous photosensitivity with skin fragility, bullous lesions and hypertrichosis on light-exposed areas. A missense mutation in the UROS gene was identified as a transversion of G to T at nucleotide 11,776, resulting in a substitution of valine by phenylalanine at codon 3 of exon 2. The patient showed a homozygous mutant profile, and the heterozygous state was observed in the parents. The activity of mutated UROS expressed in Escherichia coli was less than 16.1% that of the control, indicating that the markedly reduced activity of UROS is responsible for CEP. We described for the first time a mutation in the UROS gene in a Southeast Asian patient and a molecular diagnosis for the identification of clinically asymptomatic heterozygous mutation carriers and families with CEP.

  10. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria: Mutation of the Uroporphyrinogen III Cosynthase Gene in a Vietnamese Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien Kim, Dao Hoang; Kawazoe, Asako; Bang, Pham Dang; Thanh, Nguyen Tien; Taketani, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) arises from an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of the porphyrin metabolism, which leads to the accumulation of uroporphyrinogen I in bone marrow, skin and several other tissues by a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen III cosynthase (UROS). We studied a Vietnamese patient and her family suffering from severe cutaneous photosensitivity with skin fragility, bullous lesions and hypertrichosis on light-exposed areas. A missense mutation in the UROS gene was identified as a transversion of G to T at nucleotide 11,776, resulting in a substitution of valine by phenylalanine at codon 3 of exon 2. The patient showed a homozygous mutant profile, and the heterozygous state was observed in the parents. The activity of mutated UROS expressed in Escherichia coli was less than 16.1% that of the control, indicating that the markedly reduced activity of UROS is responsible for CEP. We described for the first time a mutation in the UROS gene in a Southeast Asian patient and a molecular diagnosis for the identification of clinically asymptomatic heterozygous mutation carriers and families with CEP.

  11. Real-time PCR detection of aldoxime dehydratase genes in nitrile-degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley-Cullinane, Tríona Marie; O'Reilly, Catherine; Coffey, Lee

    2017-02-01

    Aldoxime dehydratase catalyses the conversion of aldoximes to their corresponding nitriles. Utilization of the aldoxime-nitrile metabolising enzyme pathway can facilitate the move towards a greener chemistry. In this work, a real-time PCR assay was developed for the detection of aldoxime dehydratase genes in aldoxime/nitrile metabolising microorganisms which have been purified from environmental sources. A conventional PCR assay was also designed allowing gene confirmation via sequencing. Aldoxime dehydratase genes were identified in 30 microorganisms across 11 genera including some not previously shown to harbour the gene. The assay displayed a limit of detection of 1 pg/μL DNA or 7 CFU/reaction. This real-time PCR assay should prove valuable in the high-throughput screening of micro-organisms for novel aldoxime dehydratase genes towards pharmaceutical and industrial applications.

  12. Acute intermittent porphyria: psychosis as the only clinical manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellencweig, Natalie; Schoenfeld, Nili; Zemishlany, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the most common of the four forms of neuroporphyria. AIP mimics a variety of disorders and thus poses a diagnostic quagmire. Abdominal pain occurs in 90-95% of the attacks. Some patients develop psychiatric symptoms such as psychosis similar to schizophrenia. The diagnostic difficulty may lead to under-diagnosis of patients who present with strictly psychiatric symptoms. This assumption is supported by a high prevalence of AIP in psychiatric hospitals. Therefore, we encourage a high index of suspicion for AIP in psychiatric patients in order to prevent false psychiatric diagnosis. In addition we discuss psychotropic drugs that may exacerbate acute attacks in undiagnosed patients. We report a case in which the diagnosis of AIP was clouded by the presence of only psychiatric symptoms. The clue for diagnosis was an anamnestic detail of the use of a porphyrogenic drug prior to the admission. The diagnosis of AIP was supported by excess of alpha aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in urine concomitantly with a decrease in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) activity in erythrocytes. The diagnosis was further strengthened by the fact that the patient's father was identified as an AIP carrier. However, in the absence of typical organic symptoms of porphyria, one cannot definitely rule out the presence of schizophrenia in this patient in addition to AIR

  13. Anthropometric and Quality-of-Life Parameters in Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M.; Murcia, MAntonia; Gómez-Murcia, Victoria; Bibiloni, Maria del Mar; Pons, Antoni; Josep A. Tur; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The porphyrias are a group of rare metabolic disorders. The incidence and prevalence are low because the acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is rare. Our aim was to assess the use of anthropometric and quality-of-life parameters in porphyric patients in order to identify predictor factors that might help in characterizing AIP patients. Sixteen AIP patients from Murcia (Spain) were recruited from local health centers in 2008 and 2009. A control group of 16 healthy people was establishe...

  14. Missense UROS mutations causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria reduce UROS homeostasis that can be rescued by proteasome inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Sasso, Emma; Esteve, Julie; Ged, Cécile; Lalanne, Magalie; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Urquiza, Pedro; de Verneuil, Hubert; Millet, Oscar; Richard, Emmanuel

    2017-02-21

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an inborn error of heme biosynthesis characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in deleterious porphyrin accumulation in blood cells responsible for hemolytic anemia and cutaneous photosensitivity. We analyzed here the molecular basis of UROS impairment associated with twenty nine UROS missense mutations actually described in CEP patients. Using a computational and biophysical joint approach we predicted that most disease-causing mutations would affect UROS folding and stability. Through the analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged versions of UROS enzyme we experimentally confirmed these data and showed that thermodynamic instability and premature protein degradation is a major mechanism accounting for the enzymatic deficiency associated with twenty UROS mutants in human cells. Since the intracellular loss in protein homeostasis is in excellent agreement with the in vitro destabilization, we used molecular dynamic simulation to rely structural 3D modification with UROS disability. We found that destabilizing mutations could be clustered within three types of mechanism according to side chain rearrangements or contact alterations within the pathogenic UROS enzyme so that the severity degree correlated with cellular protein instability. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition using bortezomib, a clinically available drug, significantly enhanced proteostasis of each unstable UROS mutant. Finally, we show evidence that abnormal protein homeostasis is a prevalent mechanism responsible for UROS deficiency and that modulators of UROS proteolysis such as proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones may represent an attractive therapeutic option to reduce porphyrin accumulation and prevent skin photosensitivity in CEP patients when the genotype includes a missense variant.

  15. Fluorescence microscopy test in porphyrias, photodermatoses and lead exposed persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, A

    1975-07-18

    Fluorescence microscopy tests were carried out in different groups of patients Peripheral blood diluted with saline was used and 200 high power fields were inspected in every case. The results were presented as the number of fluorescing erythrocytes (FE) per 100000 red blood cells (or 200 fields). In the controls, porphyria cutanea tarda patients and patients with photodermatoses other than erythopoietic protoporphyria and pellagra almost no FE were detected. In erythropoietic protoporphyria the mean value was 10600, in lead poisoning 1032, in patients exposed to lead 48.2, in sideropenic anaemia 123 and in patients with pellagra 8.1 FE/100000 red blood cells. The conclusion is made that one has to take care, when using this test for detection of latent carriers in genetic studies of the relatives of patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria. The test is useful for the confirmation of the diagnosis of erythropoietic protoporphyria.

  16. Renal failure affects the enzymatic activities of the three first steps in hepatic heme biosynthesis in the acute intermittent porphyria mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Unzu

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is a long-term complication in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP. The pathophysiological significance of hepatic overproduction of the porphyrin precursors aminolevulinate acid (ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG in chronic kidney disease is unclear. We have investigated the effect of repetitive acute attacks on renal function and the effect of total or five-sixth nephrectomy causing renal insufficiency on hepatic heme synthesis in the porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD-deficient (AIP mouse. Phenobarbital challenge in the AIP-mice increased urinary porphyrin precursor excretion. Successive attacks throughout 14 weeks led to minor renal lesions with no impact on renal function. In the liver of wild type and AIP mice, 5/6 nephrectomy enhanced transcription of the first and rate-limiting ALA synthase. As a consequence, urinary PBG excretion increased in AIP mice. The PBG/ALA ratio increased from 1 in sham operated AIP animals to over 5 (males and over 13 (females in the 5/6 nephrectomized mice. Total nephrectomy caused a rapid decrease in PBGD activity without changes in enzyme protein level in the AIP mice but not in the wild type animals. In conclusion, high concentration of porphyrin precursors had little impact on renal function. However, progressive renal insufficiency aggravates porphyria attacks and increases the PBG/ALA ratio, which should be considered a warning sign for potentially life-threatening impairment in AIP patients with signs of renal failure.

  17. The severity of hereditary porphyria is modulated by the porphyrin exporter and Lan antigen ABCB6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yu; Cheong, Pak Leng; Lynch, John; Brighton, Cheryl; Frase, Sharon; Kargas, Vasileios; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Wang, Yao; Sankaran, Vijay G; Yu, Bing; Ney, Paul A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Vogel, Peter; Bond, Peter J; Ford, Robert C; Trent, Ronald J; Schuetz, John D

    2016-08-10

    Hereditary porphyrias are caused by mutations in genes that encode haem biosynthetic enzymes with resultant buildup of cytotoxic metabolic porphyrin intermediates. A long-standing open question is why the same causal porphyria mutations exhibit widely variable penetrance and expressivity in different individuals. Here we show that severely affected porphyria patients harbour variant alleles in the ABCB6 gene, also known as Lan, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Plasma membrane ABCB6 exports a variety of disease-related porphyrins. Functional studies show that most of these ABCB6 variants are expressed poorly and/or have impaired function. Accordingly, homozygous disruption of the Abcb6 gene in mice exacerbates porphyria phenotypes in the Fech(m1Pas) mouse model, as evidenced by increased porphyrin accumulation, and marked liver injury. Collectively, these studies support ABCB6 role as a genetic modifier of porphyria and suggest that porphyrin-inducing drugs may produce excessive toxicities in individuals with the rare Lan(-) blood type.

  18. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting as progressive muscular atrophy in a young black man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertyn, C H; Sonderup, M; Bryer, A; Corrigall, A; Meissner, P; Heckmann, J M

    2014-04-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria, the most common porphyria affecting the nervous system, typically presents with neurovisceral crises followed by a motor neuropathy. We describe a 23-year-old black South African man presenting with a progressive stuttering, lower motor neuron syndrome developing over months. He had not experienced pain or neuropsychiatric symptoms. One year after symptom onset he was bed-bound with a flaccid quadriparesis. There was marked amyotrophy, but without fasciculations. Sensation was intact apart from a hypo-aesthetic patch over the thigh. Electrophysiological investigations showed an active motor axonopathy. Urinary porphyrins, delta-aminolaevulinic acid and porphobilinogen were elevated. Mutation analysis revealed the c445C>T (R149X) mutation in the porphobilinogen deaminase gene. The patient responded dramatically to haem arginate and could walk with assistance 2 weeks later. We identified the first molecularly confirmed acute intermittent porphyria in a black South African. The clinical presentation mimicked a progressive lower motor neuron syndrome.

  19. [Pansclerotic porphyria cutanea tarda after chronic exposure to organic solvents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamfilov, T; Buslau, M; Dürr, C; Weyers, W

    2003-05-01

    A 63 year old man developed generalized scleroderma with massive sclerotic areas, particularly in the abdominal region, four years after being diagnosed with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). He had almost daily exposure to organic solvents (benzene, trichlorethylene) for many years. The cutaneous fibrosis progressed dramatically leading to a pansclerosis, even though the uroporphyrin levels were borderline and the liver enzyme values were normal. Organic solvents are among those substances which can cause a cutaneous fibrosis. The unusually complicated clinical development in our patient was a combination of the two initial factors, the PCT and the long term exposure to organic solvents. The pansclerotic PCT was differentiated from a systemic sclerosis, a disabling pansclerotic morphea and a generalized morphea by means of histological examinations, the absence of a Raynaud phenomenon and the non-involvement of additional organs. Auto-antibodies typical for systemic sclerosis were negative. Using a medium dosage of UVA1 phototherapy and intensive physiotherapy, the progression of the skin disease was stopped and the sclerosis improved.

  20. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a chronic hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labidi Jannet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage renal failure and long-term hemodialysis (HD treatment promote the development of genetically conditioned porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT. Iron overload is often asso-ciated with this disease and is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We report a case of HD-related PCT, which improved with deferoxamine treatment. A 33-year-old woman, with end-stage renal failure on HD since 1998, presented with a history of blisters on the face and dorsum of the hands, of several months duration. Laboratory analysis showed: hemoglobin 10.4 g/dL; a moderate hepatic cytolysis; ferritin 1300 μg/L (Nl: 8-120 μg/L and negative serology for HIV, HBV and HCV. Porphyrin analyses showed a PCT pattern. Skin biopsy findings and direct immunofluo-rescence were consistent with PCT. The patient received deferoxamine (40 mg/kg intravenously every week for 6 weeks which led to dramatic improvement of the symptoms. Several treatments are proposed in the management of dialysis-related PCT. This case confirms that deferoxamine can induce rapid and prolonged remission.

  1. Biochemical and hematological analysis in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNA R.R. DOS SANTOS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is the most common acute porphyria caused by a decrease in hepatic porphobilinogen deaminase activity, resulting in an accumulation of delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. This disease shows nonspecific signs and symptoms that can be confused with other diseases, thereby making the diagnosis difficult. We report a case of acute intermittent porphyria, reviewing clinical and laboratory aspects, highlighting the hematological and biochemical parameters during and after the crisis. A female patient, aged 28 years, suffered two crises, both presenting gastrointestinal disorders. The second presented neuropsychiatric symptoms. The analysis of hematological and biochemical parameters during the second crisis showed anemia, leukocytosis, hyponatremia, mild hypokalemia, uremia and elevated C-reactive protein. The initial treatment included glucose infusion, a diet rich in carbohydrates and interruption of porphyrinogenic drugs. Subsequently, treatment was maintained with oral contraceptive use. According to the observed data, signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal, neurological and psychiatric disorders, associated with laboratory results presented in this paper can be applied to screen acute porphyria, contributing to early diagnosis.

  2. Uroporphyrinogen III synthase erythroid promoter mutations in adjacent GATA1 and CP2 elements cause congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, C; Aizencang, G I; Astrin, K H; Bishop, D F; Desnick, R J

    2001-03-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria, an autosomal recessive inborn error of heme biosynthesis, results from the markedly deficient activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase. Extensive mutation analyses of 40 unrelated patients only identified approximately 90% of mutant alleles. Sequencing the recently discovered erythroid-specific promoter in six patients with a single undefined allele identified four novel mutations clustered in a 20-bp region: (a) a -70T to C transition in a putative GATA-1 consensus binding element, (b) a -76G to A transition, (c) a -86C to A transversion in three unrelated patients, and (d) a -90C to A transversion in a putative CP2 binding motif. Also, a -224T to C polymorphism was present in approximately 4% of 200 unrelated Caucasian alleles. We inserted these mutant sequences into luciferase reporter constructs. When transfected into K562 erythroid cells, these constructs yielded 3 +/- 1, 54 +/- 3, 43 +/- 6, and 8 +/- 1%, respectively, of the reporter activity conferred by the wild-type promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that the -70C mutation altered GATA1 binding, whereas the adjacent -76A mutation did not. Similarly, the -90C mutation altered CP2 binding, whereas the -86A mutation did not. Thus, these four pathogenic erythroid promoter mutations impaired erythroid-specific transcription, caused CEP, and identified functionally important GATA1 and CP2 transcriptional binding elements for erythroid-specific heme biosynthesis.

  3. Tuning intracellular homeostasis of human uroporphyrinogen III synthase by enzyme engineering at a single hotspot of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ben Bdira, Fredj; González, Esperanza; Pluta, Paula; Laín, Ana; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Falcon-Perez, Juan Manuel; Millet, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) results from a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase enzyme (UROIIIS) activity that ultimately stems from deleterious mutations in the uroS gene. C73 is a hotspot for these mutations and a C73R substitution, which drastically reduces the enzyme activity and stability, is found in almost one-third of all reported CEP cases. Here, we have studied the structural basis, by which mutations in this hotspot lead to UROIIIS destabilization. First, a strong interdependency is observed between the volume of the side chain at position 73 and the folded protein. Moreover, there is a correlation between the in vitro half-life of the mutated proteins and their expression levels in eukaryotic cell lines. Molecular modelling was used to rationalize the results, showing that the mutation site is coupled to the hinge region separating the two domains. Namely, mutations at position 73 modulate the inter-domain closure and ultimately affect protein stability. By incorporating residues capable of interacting with R73 to stabilize the hinge region, catalytic activity was fully restored and a moderate increase in the kinetic stability of the enzyme was observed. These results provide an unprecedented rationale for a destabilizing missense mutation and pave the way for the effective design of molecular chaperones as a therapy against CEP.

  4. Porfiria cutánea tardía: Reporte de 5 casos Porphyria cutanea tarda: Five cases report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J L Iribas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La PCT es la más común de las porfirias. Es una fotodermatosis que resulta de la deficiencia de la UPD, enzima perteneciente a la vía de síntesis del hemo. Presentamos la evolución de cinco casos de PCT; cuatro de PCT familiar y uno de PCT esporádica. En dos de los pacientes pertenecientes al grupo de PCT tipo II, encontramos como factor de riesgo, el consumo de alcohol, y en la paciente con PCT tipo I se detectó serología positiva para VHC. Todos los pacientes fueron tratados con cloroquina y flebotomías repetidas. Rápidamente se detectó mejoría clínica y bioquímica. Se observó que la porfirinuria continuó en descenso aún luego de suspendida la terapéutica. Tres de los pacientes con PCT familiar persisten en remisión clínica y con ausenciade recaídas tras más de 10 años de seguimiento. Aconsejamos en pacientes que padecen PCT la búsqueda de factores asociados (VHC, HIV, genes de HH y desencadenantes exógenos (consumo excesivo de alcohol, hierro en la dieta e ingesta de estrógenos que de ser controlados o evitados, junto con el tratamiento oportuno, contribuyen a un satisfactorio control de la enfermedad.The porphyria cutanea tarda is the most frequent porphyria, it is a photodermatosis secondary to uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase deficiency; this enzyme belongs to the haem synthesis pathway. We present on this paper the evolution of five cases of PCT, four of them with familiar type and one of them sporadic type. In two patients belonging to PCT type II, we found alcohol addiction as a serious risk, while on the other patients PCT type I we found HCV positive serology. All patients were treated with chloroquine and phlebotomies. We could observe a good response not only clinical but biochemical. We could also see that the porphyrins urinary level continued descending once the drug was withdrew. Three of the patients with familiar PCT remains in clinical remission without any relapses in ten years of control. We advice

  5. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry (Dupont)

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  6. Phenylalanine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification and characterization of arogenate dehydratases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Man-Ho; Corea, Oliver R A; Yang, Hong; Bedgar, Diana L; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D; Anterola, Aldwin M; Moog-Anterola, Frances Anne; Hood, Rebecca L; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Bernards, Mark A; Kang, ChulHee; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2007-10-19

    There is much uncertainty as to whether plants use arogenate, phenylpyruvate, or both as obligatory intermediates in Phe biosynthesis, an essential dietary amino acid for humans. This is because both prephenate and arogenate have been reported to undergo decarboxylative dehydration in plants via the action of either arogenate (ADT) or prephenate (PDT) dehydratases; however, neither enzyme(s) nor encoding gene(s) have been isolated and/or functionally characterized. An in silico data mining approach was thus undertaken to attempt to identify the dehydratase(s) involved in Phe formation in Arabidopsis, based on sequence similarity of PDT-like and ACT-like domains in bacteria. This data mining approach suggested that there are six PDT-like homologues in Arabidopsis, whose phylogenetic analyses separated them into three distinct subgroups. All six genes were cloned and subsequently established to be expressed in all tissues examined. Each was then expressed as a Nus fusion recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, with their substrate specificities measured in vitro. Three of the resulting recombinant proteins, encoded by ADT1 (At1g11790), ADT2 (At3g07630), and ADT6 (At1g08250), more efficiently utilized arogenate than prephenate, whereas the remaining three, ADT3 (At2g27820), ADT4 (At3g44720), and ADT5 (At5g22630) essentially only employed arogenate. ADT1, ADT2, and ADT6 had k(cat)/Km values of 1050, 7650, and 1560 M(-1) S(-1) for arogenate versus 38, 240, and 16 M(-1) S(-1) for prephenate, respectively. By contrast, the remaining three, ADT3, ADT4, and ADT5, had k(cat)/Km values of 1140, 490, and 620 M(-1) S(-1), with prephenate not serving as a substrate unless excess recombinant protein (>150 microg/assay) was used. All six genes, and their corresponding proteins, are thus provisionally classified as arogenate dehydratases and designated ADT1-ADT6.

  7. Oxidative Profile and δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity in Healthy Pregnant Women with Iron Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Leidiane De Lucca; Fabiane Rodrigues; Letícia B. Jantsch; Neme, Walter S.; Gallarreta, Francisco M. P.; Gonçalves, Thissiane L.

    2016-01-01

    An oxidative burst occurs during pregnancy due to the large consumption of oxygen in the tissues and an increase in metabolic demands in response to maternal physiological changes and fetal growth. This study aimed to determine the oxidative profile and activity of δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) in pregnant women who received iron supplementation. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated in 25 pregnant women with iron supplementation, 25 pregnant women without supplementation and 2...

  8. Allosteric activation and contrasting properties of L-serine dehydratase types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shawei; Xu, Xiao Lan; Grant, Gregory A

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial L-serine dehydratases differ from mammalian L- and D-serine dehydratases and bacterial D-serine dehydratases by the presence of an iron-sulfur center rather than a pyridoxyl phosphate prosthetic group. They exist in two forms, types 1 and 2, distinguished by their sequence and oligomeric configuration. Both types contain an ASB domain, and the type 1 enzymes also contain an ACT domain in a tandem arrangement with the ASB domain like that in type 1 D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases (PGDHs). This investigation reveals striking kinetic differences between L-serine dehydratases from Bacillus subtilis (bsLSD, type 1) and Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD, type 2). lpLSD is activated by monovalent cations and inhibited by monovalent anions. bsLSD is strongly activated by cations, particularly potassium, and shows a mixed response to anions. Flouride is a competitive inhibitor for lpLSD but an apparent activator for bsLSD at low concentrations and an inhibitor at high concentrations. The reaction products, pyruvate and ammonia, also act as activators but to different extents for each type. Pyruvate activation is competitive with L-serine, but activation of the enzyme is not compatible with it simply competing for binding at the active site and suggests the presence of a second, allosteric site. Because activation can be eliminated by higher levels of L-serine, it may be that this second site is actually a second serine binding site. This is consistent with type 1 PGDH in which the ASB domain functions as a second site for substrate binding and activation.

  9. Synthesis of complex intermediates for the study of a dehydratase from borrelidin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hahn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe the syntheses of a complex biosynthesis-intermediate analogue of the potent antitumor polyketide borrelidin and of reference molecules to determine the stereoselectivity of the dehydratase of borrelidin polyketide synthase module 3. The target molecules were obtained from a common precursor aldehyde in the form of N-acetylcysteamine (SNAc thioesters and methyl esters in 13 to 15 steps. Key steps for the assembly of the polyketide backbone of the dehydratase substrate analogue were a Yamamoto asymmetric carbocyclisation and a Sakurai allylation as well as an anti-selective aldol reaction. Reference compounds representing the E- and Z-configured double bond isomers as potential products of the dehydratase reaction were obtained from a common precursor aldehyde by Wittig olefination and Still–Gennari olefination. The final deprotection of TBS ethers and methyl esters was performed under mildly acidic conditions followed by pig liver esterase-mediated chemoselective hydrolysis. These conditions are compatible with the presence of a coenzyme A or a SNAc thioester, suggesting that they are generally applicable to the synthesis of complex polyketide-derived thioesters suited for biosynthesis studies.

  10. Transient Worsening of Photosensitivity due to Cholelithiasis in a Variegate Porphyria Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Shinji; Sato-Monma, Fumiko; Ishii, Kouta; Hada, Yurika; Takase, Kaoru; Tada, Kyoko; Wada, Kiriko; Kameda, Wataru; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oizumi, Toshihide; Suzuki, Tamio; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    Variegate porphyria (VP) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene. This porphyria has unique characteristics which can induce acute neurovisceral attacks and cutaneous lesions that may occur separately or together. We herin report a 58-years-old VP patient complicated with cholelithiasis. A sequencing analysis indicated a novel c.40G>C mutation (p.G14R) in the PPOX gene. His cutaneous photosensitivity had been worsening for 3 years before the emergence of cholecystitis and it then gradually improved after cholecystectomy and ursodeoxycholic acid treatment with a slight decline in the porphyrin levels in his blood, urine and stool. In VP patients, a worsening of photosensitivity can thus be induced due to complications associated with some other disease, thereby affecting their porphyrin-heme biosynthesis.

  11. Chronic Elevation of Liver Enzymes in Acute Intermittent Porphyria Initially Misdiagnosed as Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González Estrada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease characterized by an elevation of liver enzymes, as well as specific autoantibodies. It is more common in women than men. We describe a 32-year-old woman with elevated transaminases, autoantibodies, and a liver biopsy result suggestive of autoimmune hepatitis. The indicated treatment was administered without showing a satisfactory response. The patient had a family history of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP so we decided to begin treatment with hematin, achieving a complete remission of the symptoms. Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare condition characterized by neurovisceral symptoms, abdominal pain being the most common of them. The disease has a higher prevalence among young women and certain European countries such as Sweden, Great Britain, and Spain. A correct diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential because patients affected by AIP must have a strict followup due to the fatal outcome of the outbreaks.

  12. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. The arogenate dehydratase gene family: towards understanding differential regulation of carbon flux through phenylalanine into primary versus secondary metabolic pathways.

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    Corea, Oliver R A; Bedgar, Diana L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    Phe is formed from arogenate in planta through the action of arogenate dehydratase (ADT), and there are six ADT isoenzymes in the "model" vascular plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. This raised the possibility that specific ADTs may be differentially regulated so as to control Phe biosynthesis for protein synthesis vs its much more massive deployment for phenylpropanoid metabolism. In our previous reverse genetics study using 25 single/multiple ADT knockout (KO) lines, a subset of these knockouts was differentially reduced in their lignin contents. In the current investigation, it was hypothesized that Phe pool sizes might correlate well with reduction in lignin contents in the affected KO lines. The free amino acid contents of these KO lines were thus comprehensively analyzed in stem, leaf and root tissues, over a growth/developmental time course from 3 to 8 weeks until senescence. The data obtained were then compared to, and contrasted with, the differential extent of lignin deposition occurring in the various lines. Relative changes in pool sizes were also analyzed by performing a pairwise confirmatory factor analysis for Phe:Tyr, Phe:Trp and Tyr:Trp, following determination of the deviation from the mean for Phe, Tyr and Trp in each plant line. It was found that the Phe pool sizes measured were differentially reduced only in lignin-deficient lines, and in tissues and at time points where lignin biosynthesis was constitutively highly active (in wild type lines) under the growth conditions employed. In contrast, this trend was not evident across all ADT KO lines, possibly due to maintenance of Phe pools by non-targeted isoenzymes, or by feedback mechanisms known to be in place.

  14. Structural insight into substrate binding and catalysis of a novel 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinonate dehydratase illustrates common mechanistic features of the FAH superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, S.J.J.; Barends, T.R.M.; Worm, P.; Akerboom, J.; Turnbull, A.P.; Salmon, L.; Oost, van der J.

    2008-01-01

    The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus converts d-arabinose to 2-oxoglutarate by an enzyme set consisting of two dehydrogenases and two dehydratases. The third step of the pathway is catalyzed by a novel 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinonate dehydratase (KdaD). In this study, the crystal structure of the enzym

  15. Complementation of the pha2 yeast mutant suggests functional differences for arogenate dehydratases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, Crystal D; Corea, Oliver R A; Kaldis, Angelo; Menassa, Rima; Bernards, Mark A; Kohalmi, Susanne E

    2011-08-01

    The final steps of phenylalanine (Phe) biosynthesis in bacteria, fungi and plants can occur via phenylpyruvate or arogenate intermediates. These routes are determined by the presence of prephenate dehydratase (PDT, EC4.2.1.51), which forms phenylpyruvate from prephenate, or arogenate dehydratase (ADT, EC4.2.1.91), which forms phenylalanine directly from arogenate. We compared sequences from select yeast species to those of Arabidopsis thaliana. The in silico analysis showed that plant ADTs and yeast PDTs share many common features allowing them to act as dehydratase/decarboxylases. However, plant and yeast sequences clearly group independently conferring distinct substrate specificities. Complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pha2 mutant, which lacks PDT activity and cannot grow in the absence of exogenous Phe, was used to test the PDT activity of A. thaliana ADTs in vivo. Previous biochemical characterization showed that all six AtADTs had high catalytic activity with arogenate as a substrate, while AtADT1, AtADT2 and AtADT6 also had limited activity with prephenate. Consistent with these results, the complementation test showed AtADT2 readily recovered the pha2 phenotype after ∼6 days growth at 30 °C, while AtADT1 required ∼13 days to show visible growth. By contrast, AtADT6 (lowest PDT activity) and AtADT3-5 (no PDT activity) were unable to recover the phenotype. These results suggest that only AtADT1 and AtADT2, but not the other four ADTs from Arabidopsis, have functional PDT activity in vivo, showing that there are two functional distinct groups. We hypothesize that plant ADTs have evolved to use the arogenate route for Phe synthesis while keeping some residual PDT activity.

  16. A Variant of Peptide Transporter 2 Predicts the Severity of Porphyria-Associated Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernitchko, Dimitri; Tavernier, Quentin; Lamoril, Jérôme; Schmitt, Caroline; Talbi, Neila; Lyoumi, Said; Robreau, Anne-Marie; Karim, Zoubida; Gouya, Laurent; Thervet, Eric; Karras, Alexandre; Puy, Hervé; Pallet, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    CKD occurs in most patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). During AIP, δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) accumulates and promotes tubular cell death and tubulointerstitial damage. The human peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) expressed by proximal tubular cells mediates the reabsorption of ALA, and variants of PEPT2 have different affinities for ALA. We tested the hypothesis that PEPT2 genotypes affect the severity and prognosis of porphyria-associated kidney disease. We analyzed data from 122 individuals with AIP who were followed from 2003 to 2013 and genotyped for PEPT2 At last follow-up, carriers of the PEPT2*1*1 genotype (higher affinity variant) exhibited worse renal function than carriers of the lower affinity variants PEPT2*1/*2 and PEPT2*2/*2 (mean±SD eGFR: 54.4±19.1, 66.6±23.8, and 78.1±19.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), respectively). Change in eGFR (mean±SD) over the 10-year period was -11.0±3.3, -2.4±1.9, and 3.4±2.6 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) for PEPT2*1/*1, PEPT2*1*2, and PEPT*2*2*2 carriers, respectively. At the end of follow-up, 68% of PEPT2*1*1 carriers had an eGFR1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (odds ratio, 3.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.37 to 9.91). Thus, a gene variant is predictive of the severity of a chronic complication of AIP. The therapeutic value of PEPT2 inhibitors in preventing porphyria-associated kidney disease warrants investigation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Haem Biosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzymes in Circulating Cells of Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Miguel D.; Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena; Carrera-Quintanar, Lucrecia; Capó, Xavier; Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M.; García-Diz, Luis; Roche, Enrique; Murcia, María A.; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the expression pattern of haem biosynthesis enzymes in circulating cells of patients affected by two types of porphyria (acute intermittent, AIP, and variegate porphyria, VP), together with the antioxidant enzyme pattern in AIP in order to identify a possible situation of oxidative stress. Sixteen and twelve patients affected by AIP and VP, respectively, were analysed with the same numbers of healthy matched controls. Erythrocytes, neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were purified from blood, and RNA and proteins were extracted for quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot analysis, respectively. Porhobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene and protein expression was analysed. Antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression were additionally determined in blood cells, together with protein carbonyl content in plasma. PBMCs isolated from AIP patients presented low mRNA levels of PBGD when compared to controls, while PBMCs isolated from VP patients presented a decrease in PPOX mRNA. PPOX protein content was higher in AIP patients and lower in VP patients, compared to healthy controls. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, PBMCs and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) presented statistically significant higher activity in AIP patients compared to controls, while catalase activity tended to be lower in these patients. No differences were observed regarding antioxidant gene expression in white blood cells. Circulating cells in AIP and VP patients present altered expression of haem biosynthetic enzymes, which could be useful for the differential diagnosis of these two types of porphyria in certain difficult cases. AIP patients present a condition of potential oxidative stress similar to VP patients, evidenced by the post-transcriptional activation of SOD and possible catalase impairment. PMID:27788171

  18. Anesthetic management of vaginal tear repair during early puerperium in a patient with acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ghazanwy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A 26 year old female with history of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP was scheduled for vaginal tear repair after delivering her first baby. Raised blood pressure during her antenatal period was safely treated with α-methyl dopa. Her preoperative examination revealed no symptoms suggestive of acute exacerbation of AIP. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl and propofol, and a proseal laryngeal mask airway (LMA was inserted and maintained with intermittent propofol and inhalation of isoflurane in nitrous oxide and oxygen. Her intraoperative and postoperative period remained uneventful.

  19. Desferrioxamine treatment of porphyria cutanea tarda in a patient with HIV and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Pedro; Luz-Rodrigues, H; Santos, Carla; Filipe, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) can occur in HIV patients. Current evidence suggests that HIV infection may interfere with the hepatic cytochrome oxidase system, leading to porphyrin metabolism impairment. Moreover, chronic hemodialysis in renal failure may be a risk factor for PCT. In addition to the contributory factors for PCT associated to HIV infection, it is possible that porphyrin accumulation secondary to renal failure may play a role in the expression of this disease. We report a case of PCT in an HIV-1 infected patient under blood dialysis, refractory to antimalarials and controlled with desferrioxamine.

  20. Advances in the treatment of porphyria cutanea tarda. Effectiveness of slow subcutaneous desferrioxamine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibertini, P; Rocchi, E; Cassanelli, M; Pietrangelo, A; Ventura, E

    1984-08-01

    The authors present the results of long-term subcutaneous desferrioxamine (DFX) infusion in 16 porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) patients who cannot undergo repeated phlebotomies because of severe liver damage, haemolytic anemia, cardiovascular impairment or pulmonary and bone tuberculosis. They employed an automatic, portable syringe pump for subcutaneous infusion (8-10 h) to overcome the short half-life of the drug. Photodynamic cutaneous lesions and hyperpigmentation quickly disappeared (2-3 months). Uroporphyrin excretion sharply decreased and normalized within 3-12 months. Also, serum iron and ferritin, as well as liver function, showed a significant improvement. The authors therefore propose subcutaneous DFX therapy in PCT treatment when phlebotomy is contraindicated.

  1. Purification and characterization of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase, an enzyme in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway of Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøman, P; Reinert, W R; Giles, N H

    1978-07-10

    3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase catalyzes the third reaction in the inducible quinic acid catabolic pathway of Neurospora crassa and is encoded in the qa-4 gene of the qa gene cluster. As part of continuing genetic and biochemical studies concerning the organization and regulation of this gene cluster, 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase has been purified and characterized biochemically. The enzyme was purified 1650-fold using the following techniques: 1) (NH4)2SO4 fractionation; 2) ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose; 3) gel filtration on Sephadex G-100; 4) ion exchange chromatography on Cellex QAE (quaternary aminoethyl); and 5) hydroxylapatite chromatography. 3-Dehydroshikimate dehydratase is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 37,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of 3.27 S. It has a Km value of 5.9 X 10(-4) and an average isoelectric point of 4.92. The purified enzyme is extremely sensitive to thermal denaturation but can be significantly stabilized by Mg2+ ions. The purified enzyme also exhibits maximal catalytic activity only when assayed in the presence of certain divalent cations, e.g. magnesium. The NH2-terminal residue of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase is proline, and its alpha-amino group is unblocked.

  2. PREPHENATE DEHYDRATASE OF THE ACTINOMYCETE AMYCOLATOPSIS-METHANOLICA - PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD-TYPE AND DEREGULATED MUTANT PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EUVERINK, GJW; WOLTERS, DJ; DIJKHUIZEN, L

    1995-01-01

    Prephenate dehydratase (PDT) is a key regulatory enzyme in L-phenylalanine biosynthesis in the Gram-positive bacterium Amycolatopsis methanolica. The PDT protein was purified to homogeneity (1957-fold) from wild-type cells with a final yield of 6.5%. It was characterized as a 150 kDa homotetrameric

  3. Acute intermittent porphyria with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH and neurological crisis, successfully treated with haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a 35 years old male, a case of Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP with Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone secretion (SIADH and neurological crisis for its rarity. Since specific parenteral medication (hemin was not available, patient was empirically treated with haemodialysis with satisfactory outcome. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 795-797

  4. The role and properties of the iron-sulfur cluster in Escherichia coli dihydroxy-acid dehydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, D H; Emptage, M H; Finnegan, M G; Fu, W; Johnson, M K

    1993-07-15

    Dihydroxy-acid dehydratase has been purified from Escherichia coli and characterized as a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of 66,000. The combination of UV visible absorption, EPR, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectroscopies indicates that the native enzyme contains a [4Fe-4S]2+,+ cluster, in contrast to spinach dihydroxy-acid dehydratase which contains a [2Fe-2S]2+,+ cluster (Flint, D. H., and Emptage, M. H. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 3558-3564). In frozen solution, the reduced [4Fe-4S]+ cluster has a S = 3/2 ground state with minor contributions from forms with S = 1/2 and possibly S = 5/2 ground states. Resonance Raman studies of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster in E. coli dihydroxy-acid dehydratase indicate non-cysteinyl coordination of a specific iron, which suggests that it is likely to be directly involved in catalysis as is the case with aconitase (Emptage, M. H., Kent, T. A., Kennedy, M. C., Beinert, H., and Münck, E. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 4674-4678). Dihydroxy-acid dehydratase from E. coli is inactivated by O2 in vitro and in vivo as a result of oxidative degradation of the [4Fe-4S]cluster. Compared to aconitase, the oxidized cluster of E. coli dihydroxy-acid dehydratase appears to be less stable as either a cubic or linear [3Fe-4S] cluster or a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Oxidative degradation appears to lead to a complete breakdown of the Fe-S cluster, and the resulting protein cannot be reactivated with Fe2+ and thiol reducing agents.

  5. Chromosomal location of two human genes encoding tetrahydrobiopterin-metabolizing enzymes: 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase maps to 11q22. 3-q23. 3, and pterin-4[alpha]-carbinolamine dehydratase maps to 10q22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoeny, B.; Heizmann, C.W. (Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)); Mattei, M.G. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Marseille (France))

    1994-01-15

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH[sub 4]) is the redox cofactor for the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases such as phenylalanine hydroxylase. At least five enzymes are known to be involved in BH[sub 4] biosynthesis and regeneration. A deficiency in several of the BH[sub 4] metabolic enzymes causes variant types of hyperphenylalaninemias in man. Recently, the authors cloned and expressed the human cDNAs for two of the BH[sub 4] enzymes, the 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase and the pterin-4[alpha]-carbinolamine dehydratase (gene symbols PTS and PCD/DCOH, respectively). In this report, they localized the two genes on the human chromsomes by in situ hybridization. The PTS gene was mapped to the chromosomal region 11q22.3-q23.3, and the PCD/DCOH gene was mapped to the 10q22 band of the genome. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria: characterization of murine models of the severe common (C73R/C73R) and later-onset genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David F; Clavero, Sonia; Mohandas, Narla; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an autosomal recessive disorder due to the deficient activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). Knock-in mouse models were generated for the common, hematologically severe human genotype, C73R/C73R, and milder genotypes (C73R/V99L and V99L/V99L). The specific activities of the UROS enzyme in the livers and erythrocytes of these mice averaged approximately 1.2%, 11% and 19% of normal, respectively. C73R/C73R mice that survived fetal life to weaning age (~12%) had a severe microcytic hypochromic anemia (hemoglobin 7.9 g/dL, mean cellular volume 26.6 fL, mean cellular hemoglobin content 27.4 g/dL, red cell distribution width 37.7%, reticulocytes 19%) and massively accumulated isomer I porphyrins (95, 183 and 44 μmol/L in erythrocytes, spleen and liver, respectively), but a nearly normal lifespan. In adult C73R/C73R mice, spleen and liver weights were 8.2- and 1.5-fold increased, respectively. C73R/V99L mice were mildly anemic (hemoglobin was 14.0 g/dL and mean cellular hemoglobin was 13.3), with minimally accumulated porphyrins (0.10, 5.54 and 0.58 μmol/L in erythrocytes, spleen and liver, respectively), whereas adult V99L/V99L mice were normal. Of note, even the mildest genotype, V99L/V99L, exhibited porphyria in utero, which disappeared by 2 months of age. These severe and mild mouse models inform therapeutic interventions and permit further investigation of the porphyrin-induced hematopathology, which leads to photo-induced cutaneous lesions. Of significance for therapeutic intervention, these mouse models suggest that only 11% of wild-type activity might be needed to reverse the pathology in CEP patients.

  7. Terpene-induced porphyria and the illness of Vincent van Gogh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, R.; Cable, E.; Cable, J.; Clements, E.; Donohue, S.; Greene, Y.; Srivastava, K.; Arnold, W.; Bonkovsky, H. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (United States) Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Vincent van Gogh suffered from recurrent bouts of an illness that may have been acute porphyria and abused camphor and alcohol, the latter particularly in the form of absinthe, a liqueur distilled from wormwood that was popular in 19th C France. To learn whether camphor or terpenes found in absinthe are porphyrogenic, the authors studied them in cultures of chick embryo liver cells. All were found to be porphyrogenic, especially in the presence of deferoxamine. The terpenes also induced the activity and protein amount of 5-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase, and induced activities of benzphetamine demethylase. The degree of porphyrin and enzyme induction produced by 1mM camphor was similar to that produced by 50uM glutethimide, a potent porphyrogen. Potency of pinene and thujone were lower. Camphor and glutethimide both produced accumulations of 8- and 7-COOH porphyrins, whereas pinene and thujone produced 4- and 2-COOH porphyrin accumulation. The authors conclude that camphor, pinen and thujone are porphyrogenic, cable of exacerbating acute porphyria, and may have done so in van Gogh.

  8. [Clinical and neuroimaging features of central nervous system impairments in acute intermittent porphyria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Peng, Bin; You, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2011-10-25

    To analyze the clinical and neuroimaging features of central nervous system impairments in acute intermittent porphyria, and explore the possible mechanisms. Six cases with intracranial lesions at our hospital from 1991 to 2011 and 13 cases reported in literatures were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical manifestations of central nervous system impairments included seizures, unconsciousness and cortical blindness, etc. EEG (electroencephalogram) showed slow wave or normal. CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) test indicated slightly higher or normal level of CSF protein. Neuroimaging studies showed two types of intracranial lesions. One type (n = 4) mainly affected the cortex and subcortical white matter, especially involving white matter. Another type (n = 2) affected the deep nuclei such as caudate, putamen and thalamus symmetrically. The symptoms of 13 cases reported in literature with central nervous system impairments included unconsciousness, hallucinations, seizures and cortical blindness. Their neuroimaging manifestations were similar with those of the patients at our hospital. Two additional cases showed predominantly cerebral cortex lesions with no involvement of white matter. Acute intermittent porphyria can affect central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system. The neuroimaging features of brain may be lesions located in cortex, subcortical white matter and deep nuclei with different mechanisms. A correct diagnosis and a treatment decision should be made during an early stage.

  9. Iron removal therapy in porphyria cutanea tarda: phlebotomy versus slow subcutaneous desferrioxamine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, E; Gibertini, P; Cassanelli, M; Pietrangelo, A; Borghi, A; Pantaleoni, M; Jensen, J; Ventura, E

    1986-05-01

    Twenty-five patients with overt clinical and biochemical findings of porphyria cutanea tarda took part in a study comparing intensive phlebotomy with slow subcutaneous desferrioxamine treatment. Fifteen male patients (Group A) had intensive venesection therapy. Ten patients (Group B) with associated diseases (minor thalassemia, cardiovascular impairment, pulmonary tuberculosis or severe liver cirrhosis) received 1.5 g of desferrioxamine by slow subcutaneous infusion using an automatic syringe pump 5 days a week. No patient complained of appreciable side effects. Serum iron, ferritin and uroporphyrins were normalized in all subjects by the end of treatment. The mean time necessary for complete recovery was 13.8 months (range 9-19) and 11.2 months (range 6-14) in Groups A and B, respectively. Liver function significantly improved during and after the treatments in both groups. We conclude that recovery from porphyria cutanea tarda can be achieved equally well using phlebotomy or desferrioxamine subcutaneous infusion. Phlebotomy is easily performed and remains the treatment of choice; slow subcutaneous desferrioxamine treatment, although expensive, is recommended when severe associated diseases contra-indicate venesection.

  10. Porphyria cutanea tarda. Clinical features and laboratory findings in 40 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, M E; Bickers, D R; Poh-Fitzpatrick, M B; Deleo, V A; Harber, L C

    1979-08-01

    Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common disorder of porphyrin metabolism in the United States and Europe. This report presents the clinical, laboratory and pathologic features of 40 patients with porphyria cutanea tarda. Each patient was followed up for variable times during 1960-76 at the Clinical Research Center and the Dermatology Service of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center; at the New York University Medical Center; or at the Rockefeller University Hospital. Earlier age at onset; diminution of alcohol ingestion as the major etiologic factor; and, an increased incidence in females indicate new environmental influences. The most frequently associated etiologic factor, aside from alcohol intake, was use of estrogens for contraception; postmenopausal syndrome; or treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Cutaneous findings in the patients included bullae (85%); increased skin fragility (75%); facial hypertrichosis (63%); hyperpigmentation (55%); sclerodermoid changes (18%); and, dystrophic calcification with ulceration (8%). Diabetes mellitus was found in 15%; systemic lupus erythematosus in 5%; elevated serum iron level in 62%; and, abnormal liver function test results in 60%. Histologic abnormalities were seen in liver biopsies of 34 patients. Phlebotomy is the treatment of choice. In 32 patients so treated, clinical remissions averaged 30.9 months. 31% (10 patients) had a relapse but additional phlebotomies resulted in 2nd remissions. Chloroquine and plasmaphoresis treatments were also briefly discussed.

  11. ALAS2 acts as a modifier gene in patients with congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To-Figueras, Jordi; Ducamp, Sarah; Clayton, Jerome; Badenas, Celia; Delaby, Constance; Ged, Cecile; Lyoumi, Said; Gouya, Laurent; de Verneuil, Hubert; Beaumont, Carole; Ferreira, Gloria C; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Herrero, Carmen; Puy, Herve

    2011-08-11

    Mutations in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene cause congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal-recessive inborn error of erythroid heme biosynthesis. Clinical features of CEP include dermatologic and hematologic abnormalities of variable severity. The discovery of a new type of erythroid porphyria, X-linked dominant protoporphyria (XLDPP), which results from increased activity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (ALAS2), the rate-controlling enzyme of erythroid heme synthesis, led us to hypothesize that the CEP phenotype may be modulated by sequence variations in the ALAS2 gene. We genotyped ALAS2 in 4 unrelated CEP patients exhibiting the same C73R/P248Q UROS genotype. The most severe of the CEP patients, a young girl, proved to be heterozygous for a novel ALAS2 mutation: c.1757 A > T in exon 11. This mutation is predicted to affect the highly conserved and penultimate C-terminal amino acid of ALAS2 (Y586). The rate of 5-aminolevulinate release from Y586F was significantly increased over that of wild-type ALAS2. The contribution of the ALAS2 gain-of-function mutation to the CEP phenotype underscores the importance of modifier genes underlying CEP. We propose that ALAS2 gene mutations should be considered not only as causative of X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) and XLDPP but may also modulate gene function in other erythropoietic disorders.

  12. [Certain properties of "biosynthetic" L-threonine dehydratase from subcellular structures of brewers' yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, S V; Korozhko, A I; Beliaeva, N F; Kagan, Z S

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with kinetic properties of the "biosynthetic" L-threonine dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.16) solubilized from subcellular structures of brewers' yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis in the absence and presence of the allosteric inhibitor, L-isoleucine, at three pH-values (pH 6.5, 7.8 and 9.5). The curve of the initial reaction rate versus initial substrate concentration in the absence of L-isoleucine at pH 6.5 was of hyperbolic character (Km = 5.5.10(-2) M), and at pH 7.8 and 9.5 the kinetic curve had a weakly sigmoidal pattern with a sharp going into the saturation plateaux; the values of [S] 0.5 are 1.10(-2) and 8.7.10(-3) M, respectively. An addition of L-isoleucine to the reaction mixture led to the appearance (at pH 6.5) or to an increase (at pH 7.8 and 9.5) of the sigmoidality of these kinetic curves and to a decrease in values of the maximum reaction rate V. The enzyme sensibility to the inhibitory effect of L-isoleucine decreased with an increase in pH values. Low L-isoleucine concentrations at low substrate concentrations activated the enzyme. The pH optimum for L-threonine dehydratase under study was 9.5-10.0. The enzyme molecular weight is about 300 000.

  13. Substrate-induced radical formation in 4-hydroxybutyryl coenzyme A dehydratase from Clostridium aminobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Friedrich, Peter; Pierik, Antonio J; Martins, Berta M; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    4-Hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydratase (4HBD) from Clostridium aminobutyricum catalyzes the reversible dehydration of 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA and the irreversible isomerization of vinylacetyl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA. 4HBD is an oxygen-sensitive homotetrameric enzyme with one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster and one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in each subunit. Upon the addition of crotonyl-CoA or the analogues butyryl-CoA, acetyl-CoA, and CoA, UV-visible light and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed an internal one-electron transfer to FAD and the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster prior to hydration. We describe an active recombinant 4HBD and variants produced in Escherichia coli. The variants of the cluster ligands (H292C [histidine at position 292 is replaced by cysteine], H292E, C99A, C103A, and C299A) had no measurable dehydratase activity and were composed of monomers, dimers, and tetramers. Variants of other potential catalytic residues were composed only of tetramers and exhibited either no measurable (E257Q, E455Q, and Y296W) hydratase activity or FADH·, aided by protonation from E257 via T190. In contrast to FADH·, the tyrosyl radical could not be detected by EPR spectroscopy. FADH· appears to initiate the radical dehydration via an allylic ketyl radical that was proposed 19 years ago. The mode of radical generation in 4HBD is without precedent in anaerobic radical chemistry. It differs largely from that in enzymes, which use coenzyme B12, S-adenosylmethionine, ATP-driven electron transfer, or flavin-based electron bifurcation for this purpose.

  14. Lead in Missouri Streams: Monitoring Pollution from Mining with an Assay for Erythrocyte [delta]-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALA-D) in Fish Blood

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The activity of the erythrocyte enzyme d-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) has long been used as a biomarker of lead exposure in humans and waterfowl and, more...

  15. Molecular cloning, co-expression, and characterization of glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase from Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianghui; Deng, Wenying; Wang, Fei; Guo, Qi; Chen, Huayou; Wang, Liang; He, Xiang; Huang, Ribo

    2013-06-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PD), an important material for chemical industry, is biologically synthesized by glycerol dehydratase (GDHt) and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase (PDOR). In present study, the dhaBCE and dhaT genes encoding glycerol dehydratase and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase respectively were cloned from Citrobacter freundii and co-expressed in E. coli. Sequence analysis revealed that the cloned genes were 85 and 77 % identical to corresponding gene of C. freundii DSM 30040 (GenBank No. U09771), respectively. The over-expressed recombinant enzymes were purified by nickel-chelate chromatography combined with gel filtration, and recombinant GDHt and PDOR were characterized by activity assay, kinetic analysis, pH, and temperature optimization. This research may form a basis for the future work on biological synthesis of 1,3-PD.

  16. Mutation in the 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase gene leads to mild hyperphenylalaninemia with defective cofactor metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, B.A.; Kaufman, S.; Milstien, S.; Naylor, E.W. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Greene, C.L. (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Hyperphenylalaninemias represent a major class of inherited metabolic disorders. They are most often caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene and, less frequently but with usually more serious consequences, in genes necessary for the synthesis and regeneration of the cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin. This cofactor is absolutely required for all aromatic amino acid hydroxylations, and, recently, nitric oxide production from L-arginine has also been found to be dependent on tetrahydrobiopterin. Phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes a coupled reaction in which phenylalanine is converted to tyrosine and in which tetrahydrobiopterin is converted to the unstable carbinolamine, 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin. The enzyme, carbinolamine dehydratase, catalyzes the dehydration of the carbinolamine to quinonoid dihydropterin. A decreased rate of dehydration of this compound has been hypothesized to be responsible for the production of 7-biopterin found in certain mildly hyperphenylalaninemic individuals. The authors have now identified nonsense and missense mutations in the 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase gene in a hyperphenylalaninemic child who excretes large amounts of 7-biopterin. This finding is consistent with the role of the carbinolamine dehydratase in the phenylalanine hydroxylation reaction. Together with previously identified inherited disorders in phenylalanine hydroxylase and dihydropteridine reductase, there are now identified mutations in the three enzymes involved in the phenylalanine hydroxylation system. In addition, the genetics of this system may have broader implications, since the product of the dehydratase gene has previously been shown to play an additional role (as dimerization cofactor for hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha]) in the regulation of transcription, through interaction with hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha].

  17. MR imaging of acute intermittent porphyria mimicking reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utz, N.; Kinkel, B.; Hedde, J.P.; Bewermeyer, H. [Staedtisches Krankenhaus Koeln-Merheim, Koeln (Germany). Neurologische Klinik

    2001-12-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PLS) is characterized by headache, altered mental function, visual disturbances and seizures. Neuroimaging studies suggest a white-matter oedema, predominantly in the posterior parietal-temporal-occipital regions of the brain. We present the case of a 30-year-old woman who had suffered her first attack of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). Following 1 week of abdominal pain she developed several generalized seizures, and hallucinations, and exhibited a progressive deterioration of the consciousness. T2-weighted images, especially fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences showed bilateral lesions in the posterior frontal, parietal and occipital cortex and subcortical white matter. Following treatment with haematin and a high carbohydrate diet the patient's condition improved. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed complete resolution of the lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report concerning a completely reversible PLS in AIP. (orig.)

  18. Porphyria cutanea tarda as a complication of therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James Azim; Heather McCurdy; Richard H Moseley

    2008-01-01

    There is a strong association between porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and chronic viral hepatitis C. Therapy for chronic viral hepatitis C may improve PCT. However, there are only a few reports of the de novo development of PCT during therapy for chronic viral hepatitis C. We describe the development of PCT in a 56-year-old patient with chronic viral hepatitis C after 12 wk of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. In addition, the patient was homozygous for the H63D hereditary hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutation. The association of PCT with chronic viral hepatitis C and the possible role of hepatic iron overload and ribavirin-induced hemolytic anemia in the development of PCT during therapy for chronic viral hepatitis C are discussed.

  19. A rare case of puberty onset congenital erythropoietic porphyria with ophthalmological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjani Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old male patient was presented with foreign body sensation in both the eyes for 2 years duration and blisters followed by scarring and pigmentation in the photo-exposed areas of the body over the previous 12 years. His urine was reddish colored for the previous year. On examination, there was scarring, hyper-pigmentation of photo-exposed parts of the body along with resorption of the distal phalanges of fingers in both hands except the smallest digit which had onycholysis. Ocular examination indicated scleral necrosis in the interpalpebral areas in both eyes and bilateral dry eye. Hematological examination indicated a picture suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Abdominal ultrasonography indicated an enlarged spleen. These clinical features are suggestive of puberty onset congenital erythropoietic porphyria with ophthalmological manifestations.

  20. Butafenacil: A positive control for identifying anemia- and variegate porphyria-inducing chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Leet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX, an enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of protoporphyrinogen IX to protoporphyrin IX during chlorophyll and heme biosynthesis. Based on a high-content screen, we previously identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia in zebrafish embryos. Therefore, the objective of this study was to begin investigating the utility of butafenacil as a positive control for identifying anemia- and variegate porphyria-inducing chemicals. Static exposure to butafenacil from 5 to 72 h post-fertilization (hpf in glass beakers resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in arterial circulation at low micromolar concentrations. At 72 hpf, the magnitude of butafenacil-induced anemia was similar when embryos were exposed in the presence or absence of light, whereas protoporphyrin accumulation and acute toxicity were significantly lower or absent when embryos were exposed under dark conditions. To identify sensitive developmental windows, we treated embryos to butafenacil from 5, 10, 24, or 48 hpf to 72 hpf in the presence of light, and found that anemia and protoporphyrin accumulation were present at 72 hpf following initiation of exposure at 5 and 10 hpf. On the contrary, protoporphyrin accumulation – but not anemia – was present following initiation of exposure at 24 hpf. Lastly, protoporphyrin accumulation at 72 hpf after exposure from 24 to 48 hpf suggests that protoporphyrin was not eliminated over a 24-h recovery period. Collectively, our data suggests that butafenacil may be a reliable positive control for identifying anemia- and variegate porphyria-inducing chemicals.

  1. Seven Novel Mutations in Bulgarian Patients with Acute Hepatic Porphyrias (AHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragneva, Sonya; Szyszka-Niagolov, Monika; Ivanova, Aneta; Mateva, Lyudmila; Izumi, Rumiko; Aoki, Yoko; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegate porphyria (VP), and hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) are caused by mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), and coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) genes, respectively. This study aimed to identify mutations in seven Bulgarian families with AIP, six with VP, and one with HCP. A total of 33 subjects, both symptomatic (n = 21) and asymptomatic (n = 12), were included in this study. The identification of mutations was performed by direct sequencing of all the coding exons of the corresponding enzymes in the probands. The available relatives were screened for the possible mutations. A total of six different mutations in HMBS were detected in all seven families with AIP, three of which were previously described: c.76C>T [p.R26C] in exon 3, c.287C>T [p.S96F] in exon 7, and c.445C>T [p.R149X] in exon 9. The following three novel HMBS mutations were found: c.345-2A>C in intron 7-8, c.279-280insAT in exon 7, and c.887delC in exon 15. A total of three different novel mutations were identified in the PPOX gene in the VP families: c.441-442delCA in exon 5, c.917T>C [p.L306P] in exon 9, and c.1252T>C [p.C418R] in exon 12. A novel nonsense mutation, c.364G>T [p.E122X], in exon 1 of the CPOX gene was identified in the HCP family. This study, which identified mutations in Bulgarian families with AHP for the first time, established seven novel mutation sites. Seven latent carriers were also diagnosed and, therefore, were able to receive crucial counseling to prevent attacks.

  2. Anthropometric and Quality-of-Life Parameters in Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M; Murcia, M Antonia; Gómez-Murcia, Victoria; Bibiloni, Maria Del Mar; Pons, Antoni; Tur, Josep A; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena

    2015-07-01

    The porphyrias are a group of rare metabolic disorders. The incidence and prevalence are low because the acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is rare. Our aim was to assess the use of anthropometric and quality-of-life parameters in porphyric patients in order to identify predictor factors that might help in characterizing AIP patients.Sixteen AIP patients from Murcia (Spain) were recruited from local health centers in 2008 and 2009. A control group of 16 healthy people was established. Body composition was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometric measurements: body weight; height; knee-heel height; waist, hip, upper arm and calf circumferences (CCs); biacromion and biiliac diameters; bicondylar and biepicondylar width; and triceps, subscapular, supraspinale, and calf skinfold thickness. Anthropometric indicators were obtained from anthropometric measurements. A quality-of-life evaluation was carried out using the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) questionnaire and Barthel and Katz indexes. Significant differences in means were tested by unpaired Student t test. Group differences in anthropometric measurements were tested with a 2-way analysis of variance (group × condition: age group, overweight, and adiposity degree). Relative frequencies were obtained for noncontinuous variables. Significant differences in prevalence were calculated by means of χ.AIP patients showed statistically significant differences in terms of knee-heel height, biiliac diameter, CC, triceps skinfold thickness, BIA, ponderal index, endomorphy, and ectomorphy. Only 1 quality-of-life indicator, visual analog scale, in the EQ-5D questionnaire showed significant differences between porphyric and control groups.Some anthropometric parameters and the EQ-5D questionnaire could be used to appreciate the presence or follow the evolution of the disease in AIP patients.

  3. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L. (TAM); (Cambridge)

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  4. Insights into the Mechanism of Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases from Structures of Reaction Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon (NWU); (UIC)

    2012-02-27

    The biosynthetic shikimate pathway consists of seven enzymes that catalyze sequential reactions to generate chorismate, a critical branch point in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids. The third enzyme in the pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD), catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate to 3-dehydroshikimate. We present three crystal structures of the type I DHQD from the intestinal pathogens Clostridium difficile and Salmonella enterica. Structures of the enzyme with substrate and covalent pre- and post-dehydration reaction intermediates provide snapshots of successive steps along the type I DHQD-catalyzed reaction coordinate. These structures reveal that the position of the substrate within the active site does not appreciably change upon Schiff base formation. The intermediate state structures reveal a reaction state-dependent behavior of His-143 in which the residue adopts a conformation proximal to the site of catalytic dehydration only when the leaving group is present. We speculate that His-143 is likely to assume differing catalytic roles in each of its observed conformations. One conformation of His-143 positions the residue for the formation/hydrolysis of the covalent Schiff base intermediates, whereas the other conformation positions the residue for a role in the catalytic dehydration event. The fact that the shikimate pathway is absent from humans makes the enzymes of the pathway potential targets for the development of non-toxic antimicrobials. The structures and mechanistic insight presented here may inform the design of type I DHQD enzyme inhibitors.

  5. Association between Blood Lead Levels and Delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La-Llave-León, Osmel; Méndez-Hernández, Edna M; Castellanos-Juárez, Francisco X; Esquivel-Rodríguez, Eloísa; Vázquez-Alaniz, Fernando; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Duarte-Sustaita, Jaime; Candelas-Rangel, Jorge L; Salas-Pacheco, José M

    2017-04-18

    Blood lead levels (BLLs) and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity are considered biomarkers of lead exposure and lead toxicity, respectively. The present study was designed to investigate the association between BLLs and ALAD activity in pregnant women from Durango, Mexico. A total of 633 pregnant women aged 13-43 years participated in this study. Blood lead was measured by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. ALAD activity was measured spectrophotometrically. Mean blood lead was 2.09 ± 2.34 µg/dL; and 26 women (4.1%) crossed the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommended level of 5 µg/dL. ALAD activity was significantly lower in women with levels of lead ≥5 µg/dL compared to those with BLLs lead and ALAD activity was observed in the fourth quartile of BLLs (r = -0.113; p lead concentrations ≥2.2 µg/dL ALAD activity was negatively correlated with BLLs (r = -0.413; p lead in blood above 2.2 µg/dL.

  6. Oxidative Profile and δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity in Healthy Pregnant Women with Iron Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucca, Leidiane; Rodrigues, Fabiane; Jantsch, Letícia B; Neme, Walter S; Gallarreta, Francisco M P; Gonçalves, Thissiane L

    2016-05-03

    An oxidative burst occurs during pregnancy due to the large consumption of oxygen in the tissues and an increase in metabolic demands in response to maternal physiological changes and fetal growth. This study aimed to determine the oxidative profile and activity of δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) in pregnant women who received iron supplementation. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated in 25 pregnant women with iron supplementation, 25 pregnant women without supplementation and 25 non-pregnant women. The following oxidative stress parameters were evaluated: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein thiol groups (P-SH), non-protein thiol levels (NP-SH), vitamin C levels, catalase and δ-ALA-D activity. Markers of oxidative stress and cell damage, such as TBARS in plasma were significantly higher in pregnant women without supplementation. Levels of P-SH, NP-SH and δ-ALA-D activity were significantly lower in pregnant women without supplementation compared to non-pregnant and pregnant women with supplementation, while vitamin C levels were significantly lower in pregnant women without supplementation when compared to non-pregnant women. The increase in the generation of oxidative species and decrease of antioxidants suggest the loss of physiological oxidative balance during normal pregnancy, which was not observed in pregnant women with iron supplementation, suggesting a protective effect of iron against oxidative damage.

  7. Understanding the mechanism of B(12)-dependent diol dehydratase: a synergistic retro-push--pull proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D M; Golding, B T; Radom, L

    2001-02-28

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory is used to investigate the coenzyme B(12)-dependent reactions catalyzed by diol dehydratase. The key step in such reactions is believed to be a 1,2-hydroxyl migration, which occurs within free-radical intermediates. The barrier for this migration, if unassisted, is calculated to be too high to be consistent with the observed reaction rate. However, we find that "pushing" the migrating hydroxyl, through interaction with a suitable acid, is able to provide significant catalysis. This is denoted retro-push catalysis, the retro prefix signifying that the motion of the migrating group is in the direction opposite to the electron motion. Similarly, the "pulling" of the migrating group, through interaction of the spectator hydroxyl with an appropriate base, is found to substantially reduce the rearrangement barrier. Importantly, the combination of these two effects results in a barrier reduction that is notably greater than additive. This synergistic interplay of the push and the pull provides an attractive means of catalysis. Our proposed retro-push--pull mechanism leads to results that are consistent with isotope-labeling experiments, with experimental rate data, and with the crystal structure of the enzyme.

  8. Association between Blood Lead Levels and Delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmel La-Llave-León

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Blood lead levels (BLLs and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD activity are considered biomarkers of lead exposure and lead toxicity, respectively. The present study was designed to investigate the association between BLLs and ALAD activity in pregnant women from Durango, Mexico. A total of 633 pregnant women aged 13–43 years participated in this study. Blood lead was measured by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. ALAD activity was measured spectrophotometrically. Mean blood lead was 2.09 ± 2.34 µg/dL; and 26 women (4.1% crossed the Centers for Disease Control (CDC recommended level of 5 µg/dL. ALAD activity was significantly lower in women with levels of lead ≥5 µg/dL compared to those with BLLs < 5 µg/dL (p = 0.002. To reduce the influence of extreme values on the statistical analysis, BLLs were analyzed by quartiles. A significant negative correlation between blood lead and ALAD activity was observed in the fourth quartile of BLLs (r = −0.113; p < 0.01. Among women with blood lead concentrations ≥2.2 µg/dL ALAD activity was negatively correlated with BLLs (r = −0.413; p < 0.01. Multiple linear regression demonstrated that inhibition of ALAD in pregnant women may occur at levels of lead in blood above 2.2 µg/dL.

  9. Liver δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity is Inhibited by Neonicotinoids and Restored by Antioxidant Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Sauer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids represent the most used class of insecticides worldwide, and their precursor, imidacloprid, is the most widely marketed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of imidacloprid on the activity of hepatic δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D, protective effect of potential antioxidants against this potential effect and presence of chemical elements in the constitution of this pesticide. We observed that δ-ALA-D activity was significantly inhibited by imidacloprid at all concentrations tested in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50 value was obtained and used to evaluate the restoration of the enzymatic activity. δ-ALA-D inhibition was completely restored by addition of dithiotreitol (DTT and partly by ZnCl2, demonstrating that the inhibition occurs by oxidation of thiol groups and by displacement of the Zn (II, which can be explained by the presence of chemical elements found in the constitution of pesticides. Reduced glutathione (GSH had the best antioxidant effect against to δ-ALA-D inhibition caused by imidacloprid, followed by curcumin and resveratrol. It is well known that inhibition of the enzyme δ-ALA-D may result in accumulation of its neurotoxic substrate (δ-ALA, in this line, our results suggest that further studies are needed to investigate the possible neurotoxicity induced by neonicotinoids and the involvement of antioxidants in cases of poisoning by neonicotinoids.

  10. Hexachlorobenzene impairs glucose metabolism in a rat model of porphyria cutanea tarda: a mechanistic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzetti, Marta Blanca; Taira, Maria Cristina; Lelli, Sandra Marcela; Viale, Leonor Carmen San Martin de [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428BGA, Ciudad Autonoma Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dascal, Eduardo; Basabe, Juan Carlos [Centro de Investigaciones Endocrinologicas (CEDIE). Hospital de Ninos, Dr. Ricardo Gutierrez, C1425EDF, Ciudad Autonoma Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-01-01

    Hexachlobenzene (HCB), one of the most persistent environmental pollutants, induces porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of HCB on some aspects of glucose metabolism, particularly those related to its neosynthesis in vivo. For this purpose, a time-course study on gluconeogenic enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) and on pyruvate kinase (PK), a glycolytic enzyme, was carried out. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, hepatic glycogen, tryptophan contents, and the pancreatic insulin secretion pattern stimulated by glucose were investigated. Oxidative stress and heme pathway parameters were also evaluated. HCB treatment decreased PC, PEPCK, and G-6-Pase activities. The effect was observed at an early time point and grew as the treatment progressed. Loss of 60, 56, and 37%, respectively, was noted at the end of the treatment when a considerable amount of porphyrins had accumulated in the liver as a result of drastic blockage of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) (95% inhibition). The plasma glucose level was reduced (one-third loss), while storage of hepatic glucose was stimulated in a time-dependent way by HCB treatment. A decay in the normal plasma insulin level was observed as fungicide intoxication progressed (twice to four times lower). However, normal insulin secretion of perifused pancreatic Langerhans islets stimulated by glucose during the 3rd and 6th weeks of treatment did not prove to be significantly affected. HCB promoted a time-dependent increase in urinary chemiluminiscence (fourfold) and hepatic malondialdehide (MDA) content (fivefold), while the liver tryptophan level was only raised at the longest intoxication times. These results would suggest that HCB treatment does not cause a primary alteration in the mechanism of pancreatic insulin secretion and that the changes induced by the fungicide on insulin levels would be an adaptative

  11. Arogenate dehydratase isoenzymes profoundly and differentially modulate carbon flux into lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Oliver R A; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Kim, Sung-Jin; Brewer, Sarah E; Patten, Ann M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-03-30

    How carbon flux differentially occurs in vascular plants following photosynthesis for protein formation, phenylpropanoid metabolism (i.e. lignins), and other metabolic processes is not well understood. Our previous discovery/deduction that a six-membered arogenate dehydratase (ADT1-6) gene family encodes the final step in Phe biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana raised the fascinating question whether individual ADT isoenzymes (or combinations thereof) differentially modulated carbon flux to lignins, proteins, etc. If so, unlike all other lignin pathway manipulations that target cell wall/cytosolic processes, this would be the first example of a plastid (chloroplast)-associated metabolic process influencing cell wall formation. Homozygous T-DNA insertion lines were thus obtained for five of the six ADTs and used to generate double, triple, and quadruple knockouts (KOs) in different combinations. The various mutants so obtained gave phenotypes with profound but distinct reductions in lignin amounts, encompassing a range spanning from near wild type levels to reductions of up to ∼68%. In the various KOs, there were also marked changes in guaiacyl:syringyl ratios ranging from ∼3:1 to 1:1, respectively; these changes were attributed to differential carbon flux into vascular bundles versus that into fiber cells. Laser microscope dissection/pyrolysis GC/MS, histochemical staining/lignin analyses, and pADT::GUS localization indicated that ADT5 preferentially affects carbon flux into the vascular bundles, whereas the adt3456 knock-out additionally greatly reduced carbon flux into fiber cells. This plastid-localized metabolic step can thus profoundly differentially affect carbon flux into lignins in distinct anatomical regions and provides incisive new insight into different factors affecting guaiacyl:syringyl ratios and lignin primary structure.

  12. Preliminary data concerning association of porphyria cutanea tarda and adrenocortical insufficiency. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereţianu, D; Giurcăneanu, C; Deleanu, A

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents two cases in which clinical and laboratory investigations have revealed the simultaneous presence of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and adrenocortical insufficiency (ACI). Whether this association is a coincidence, whether there is a common cause, or a "cause to effect" type relationship between the two entities is a question of debate. Without ignoring other possible causes (tuberculosis, hemochromatosis, autoimmunity, drugs) it is suggested that heme deficit consequent to inefficient protoporphyrin synthesis results in impaired steroidogenesis, due to decreased levels of adrenocortical hemoprotein enzymes, especially cytochrome P-450 dependent hydroxylases. Cytochrome P-450 has a well known sine-qua-non activity in steroid hydroxylations within steroid tissues, and a decrease in the levels of this heme-enzyme might be expected to result in impaired steroidogenesis. However, the association between PCT and ACI (whether pathogenic or not) is pathophysiologically characterized by the coexistence of a disease (PCT) in which the anatomo-clinical manifestations are determined by oxygen derived free radicals ( ODFR ), and a disease (ACI) which, among other consequences, presents a marked reduction in ODFR -scavenge capacity. The authors consider this supposition an attractive working hypothesis, suitable to further clinical laboratory direct testing.

  13. Biochemical characterization of an isoform of GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase from Mortierella alpina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchao; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Haiqin; Yang, Qin; Zhou, Xin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the molecular mechanism of GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis in Mortierella alpina. Analysis of the M. alpina genome suggests that there were two isofunctional GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase genes (GMD1 and GMD2) that have never been found in a microorganism before. GMD2 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The addition of exogenous NAD(+) or NADP(+) was not essential for GMD2 activity. GMD2 may have considerable importance for GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis under nitrogen starvation. The transcriptional regulation of GMD1 may be more susceptible to GDP and GTP than that of GMD2. Significant changes were observed in the concentration of GDP-L-fucose (30 and 36 % inhibition respectively) and total fatty acids (18 and 12 % inhibition respectively) in M. alpina grown on GMD inhibitors medium, which suggests that GDP-L-fucose is functionally significant in lipid metabolism. This is the first time that an isofunctional GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase has been characterized in a microorganism.

  14. Delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity and oxidative stress markers in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucca, Leidiane; Rodrigues, Fabiane; Jantsch, Letícia B; Kober, Helena; Neme, Walter S; Gallarreta, Francisco M P; Gonçalves, Thissiane L

    2016-12-01

    Preeclampsia is an important pregnancy-specific multisystem disorder characterized by the onset of hypertension and proteinuria. It is of unknown etiology and involves serious risks for the pregnant women and fetus. One of the main factors involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia is oxidative stress, where excess free radicals produce harmful effects, including damage to macromolecules such as lipids, proteins and DNA. In addition, the sulfhydryl delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase enzyme (δ-ALA-D) that is part of the heme biosynthetic pathway in pro-oxidant conditions can be inhibited, which may result in the accumulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), associated with the overproduction of free radicals, suggesting it to be an indirect marker of oxidative stress. As hypertensive pregnancy complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality maternal and fetal where oxidative stress appears to be an important factor involved in preeclampsia, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of δ-ALA-D and classic oxidative stress markers in the blood of pregnant women with mild and severe preeclampsia. The analysis and quantification of the following oxidative stress markers were performed: thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS); presence of protein and non-protein thiol group; quantification of vitamin C; Catalase and δ-ALA--D activities in samples of blood of pregnant women with mild preeclampsia (n=25), with severe preeclampsia (n=30) and in a control group of healthy pregnant women (n=30). TBARS was significantly higher in women with preeclampsia, while the presence of thiol groups, levels of vitamin C, catalase and δ-ALA-D activity were significantly lower in groups of pregnant women with preeclampsia compared with healthy women. In addition, the results showed no significant difference between groups of pregnant women with mild and severe preeclampsia. The data suggest a state of increased oxidative stress in pregnant women with

  15. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  16. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Rhamnonate Dehydratase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glaner, M.; Hubbard, B.; Delli, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    The l-rhamnonate dehydratase (RhamD) function was assigned to a previously uncharacterized family in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily that is encoded by the genome of Escherichia coli K-12. We screened a library of acid sugars to discover that the enzyme displays a promiscuous substrate specificity: l-rhamnonate (6-deoxy-l-mannonate) has the 'best' kinetic constants, with l-mannonate, l-lyxonate, and d-gulonate dehydrated less efficiently. Crystal structures of the RhamDs from both E. coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 (95% sequence identity) were obtained in the presence of Mg2+; the structure of the RhamD from S. typhimurium was also obtained in the presence of 3-deoxy-l-rhamnonate (obtained by reduction of the product with NaBH4). Like other members of the enolase superfamily, RhamD contains an N-terminal a + {beta} capping domain and a C-terminal ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel (modified TIM-barrel) catalytic domain with the active site located at the interface between the two domains. In contrast to other members, the specificity-determining '20s loop' in the capping domain is extended in length and the '50s loop' is truncated. The ligands for the Mg2+ are Asp 226, Glu 252 and Glu 280 located at the ends of the third, fourth and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. The active site of RhamD contains a His 329-Asp 302 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, with His 329 positioned to function as the general base responsible for abstraction of the C2 proton of l-rhamnonate to form a Mg2+-stabilized enediolate intermediate. However, the active site does not contain other acid/base catalysts that have been implicated in the reactions catalyzed by other members of the MR subgroup of the enolase superfamily. Based on the structure of the liganded complex, His 329 also is expected to function as the general acid that both facilitates departure of the 3-OH group in a syn-dehydration reaction and

  17. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver.

  18. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – February 2017 VOLUME ... 2016 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – November 2015 (PDF ...

  19. Identification and characterization of two novel mutations that produce acute intermittent porphyria: A 3-base deletion (841-843delGGA) and a missense mutation (T35M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siervi, A; Weiss Cádiz, D E; Parera, V E; del C Batlle, A M; Rossetti, M V

    2000-10-01

    A partial deficiency of Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) is responsible for acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). AIP is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and the prevalence in the Argentinean population is about 1:125,000. Here, two new mutations and two previously reported were found in the PBGD gene in 22 Argentinean AIP patients corresponding to 8 different families. To screen for AIP mutations in symptomatic patients, genomic DNA isolated was amplified in 6 PCR reactions, then all coding exons and flanking intronic regions were sequenced. The novel mutations are 841-843delGGA in exon 14, which results in the loss of glycine-281 (G281del), and one 104C>T point mutation in the exon 4 (T35M). To further characterize both novel mutations, the pKK-PBGD construct for the mutant alleles were expressed in E. coli, the enzymatic activity of the recombinant proteins were 1% and 4% of the mean level expressed by the normal allele for 841-843delGGA and T35M, respectively. Hum Mutat 16:373, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. An unhappy triad: Hemochromatosis, porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatocellular carcinoma-A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martina T Mogl; Andreas Pascher; Sabine J Presser; Michael Schwabe; Peter Neuhaus; Natascha C Nuessler

    2007-01-01

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis are predisposing factors for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hemosiderosis has also been described to trigger carcinogenesis. A significant iron overload, as found in hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC), is a risk factor for HCC and may also promote the symptoms of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). A 68-year old male patient presented to our clinic with a suspected HCC,elevated alpha-fetoprotein but normal liver function tests. He reported a 25 year-old history of vitiligo upon exposure to sunlight. The patient underwent an extended left hemihepatectomy, and the recovery was uneventful, with the exception of a persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Perfusion problems and extrahepatic cholestasis were ruled out by CT-scan with angiography and MR-cholangiopancreatography. However, MRI showed an iron overload. Histology confirmed the HCC (pT3, pN0, G3, R0) and revealed a portal fibrosis and hemosiderosis. Based on the skin lesions we suspected a PCT that was confirmed by laboratory tests showing elevated porphyrin, uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin and porphobilinogen. Concurrently, molecular diagnostics revealed homozygosity for the C282Y mutation within the hemochromatosis HFE gene. After phlebotomy and normalization of liver function tests the patient was discharged. This is the first case ever showing the unusual combination of HCC in a fibrotic liver with HHC and PCT. This diagnosis not only warrants oncological follow-up but also symptomatic therapy to normalize iron metabolism and thereby improve liver function and alleviate the symptoms of HHC and PCT. Thus progression of fibrosis may be prevented and liver regeneration supported.

  1. Characterization of the wild-type form of 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase and two naturally occurring mutants associated with hyperphenylalaninemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnen, G; Kowlessur, D; Citron, B A; Kaufman, S

    1995-01-01

    The characterization of 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase with the enzymatically synthesized natural substrate revealed non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics. A Hill coefficient of 1.8 indicates that the dehydratase exists as a multisubunit enzyme that shows cooperativity. A mild form of hyperphenylalaninemia with high 7-biopterin levels has been linked to mutations in the human 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase gene. We have now cloned and expressed two mutant forms of the protein based on a patient's DNA sequences. The kinetic parameters of the mutant C82R reveal a 60% decrease in Vmax but no change in Km (approximately 5 microM), suggesting that the cysteine residue is not involved in substrate binding. Its replacement by arginine possibly causes a conformational change in the active center. Like the wild-type enzyme, this mutant is heat stable and forms a tetramer. The susceptibility to proteolysis of C82R, however, is markedly increased in vitro compared with the wild-type protein. We have also observed a decrease in the expression levels of C82R protein in transfected mammalian cells, which could be due to proteolytic instability. The 18-amino acid-truncated mutant GLu-87--> termination could not be completely purified and characterized due to minute levels of expression and its extremely low solubility as a fusion protein. No dehydratase activity was detected in crude extracts from transformed bacteria or transfected mammalian cells. Considering the decrease in specific activity and stability of the mutants, we conclude that the patient probably has less than 10% residual dehydratase activity, which could be responsible for the mild hyperphenylalaninemia and the high 7-biopterin levels. PMID:8618906

  2. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; (Houston)

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  3. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria: prolonged high-level expression and correction of the heme biosynthetic defect by retroviral-mediated gene transfer into porphyric and erythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, R; Glass, I A; Aizencang, G; Astrin, K H; Atweh, G F; Desnick, R J

    1998-09-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from the deficient activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS). Severely affected patients are transfusion dependent and have mutilating cutaneous manifestations. Successful bone marrow transplantation has proven curative, providing the rationale for stem cell gene therapy. Toward this goal, two retroviral MFG vectors containing the UROS cDNA were constructed, one with the wild-type sequence (MFG-UROS-wt) and a second with an optimized Kozak consensus sequence (MFG-UROS-K). Following transduction of CEP fibroblasts, the MFG-UROS-wt and MFG-UROS-K vectors increased the endogenous activity without selection to levels that were 18- and 5-fold greater, respectively, than the mean activity in normal fibroblasts. Notably, the MFG-UROS-wt vector expressed UROS activity in CEP fibroblasts at these high levels for over 6 months without cell toxicity. Addition of either delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or ferric chloride did not affect expression of the transduced UROS gene nor did the increased concentrations of uroporphyrin isomers or porphyrin intermediates affect cell viability. Similarly, transduction of CEP lymphoblasts with the MFG-UROS-wt vector without G418 selection increased the endogenous UROS activity by 7-fold or almost 2-fold greater than that in normal lymphoblasts. Transduction of K562 erythroleukemia cells by cocultivation with the MFG-UROS-wt producer cells increased their high endogenous UROS activity by 1.6-fold without selection. Clonally isolated K562 cells expressed UROS for over 4 months at mean levels 4.7-fold greater than the endogenous activity without cell toxicity. Thus, the prolonged, high-level expression of UROS in transduced CEP fibroblasts and lymphoblasts, as well as in transduced K562 erythroid cells, demonstrated that the enzymatic defect in CEP cells could be corrected by retroviral-mediated gene therapy without

  4. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution.

  5. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  6. Cobalamin deficiency results in severe metabolic disorder of serine and threonine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebara, S; Toyoshima, S; Matsumura, T; Adachi, S; Takenaka, S; Yamaji, R; Watanabe, F; Miyatake, K; Inui, H; Nakano, Y

    2001-12-05

    Dietary cobalamin (vitamin B12; Cbl) deficiency caused significant increases in plasma serine, threonine, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, lysine and histidine levels in rats. In particular, the serine and threonine levels were over five and eight times, respectively, higher in the Cbl-deficient rats than those in the sufficient controls. In addition, some amino acids, including serine and threonine, were excreted into urine at significantly higher levels in the deficient rats. When Cbl was supplemented into the deficient rats for 2 weeks, in coincidence with the disappearance of the urinary excretion of methylmalonic acid (an index of Cbl deficiency), the plasma serine and threonine levels were normalized. These results indicate that Cbl deficiency results in metabolic disorder of certain amino acids, including serine and threonine. The expression level of hepatic serine dehydratase (SDH), which catalyzes the conversion of serine and threonine to pyruvate and 2-oxobutyrate, respectively, was significantly lowered by Cbl deficiency, even though Cbl does not participate directly in the enzyme reaction. The SDH activity in the deficient rats was less than 20% of that in the sufficient controls, and was normalized 2 weeks after the Cbl supplementation. It is thus suggested that the decrease of the SDH expression relates closely with the abnormalities in the plasma and urinary levels of serine and threonine in the Cbl-deficient rats.

  7. Prolidase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Qazi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolidase deficiency is a rare inborn disorder of collagen metabolism characterized by chronic recurrent skin ulceration. A seven-year-old girl and her younger sibling with clinical features and laboratory criteria fulfilling the diagnosis of prolidase deficiency are presented in view of rarity of the condition.

  8. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  9. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  10. Evaluation of mutation screening by heteroduplex analysis in acute intermittent porphyria: comparison with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernitchko, D; Lamoril, J; Puy, H; Robreau, A M; Bogard, C; Rosipal, R; Gouya, L; Deybach, J C; Nordmann, Y

    1999-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria is the major autosomal dominant form of acute hepatic porphyrias. The disease is due to mutations in the gene encoding for porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). Many different strategies have been developed to screen for mutations. However the high prevalence (0.6 per thousand) of PBGD gene defect, the large allelic heterogeneity of mutations (n = 130), and the limitations of the PBGD enzymatic assay for asymptomatic patients' detection, require for diagnosis an efficient and easy to handle strategy for locating mutations within the PBGD gene. In a recent study the sensitivity of the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique was 100%. However DGGE requires the preparation of gradient gels and the use of primers with long GC-clamps; thus alternative methods should be preferable in the clinical laboratory. We have compared the detection rate of DGGE with heteroduplex analysis (HA) using 16 characterized PBGD gene mutations. Six different HA conditions were used to determine the efficiency of the method, including: (1) MDE (mutation detection enhancement) gel concentration; (2) addition of urea and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS); (3) radioactive labelling. The sensitivity of each HA condition varied from 31 to 81% vs. 100% in DGGE analysis. HA using 1 x MDE with 15% urea with or without 0.55% SDS was the most sensitive condition. This first comparative study of DGGE and HA mutation screening methods suggests that DGGE is a more sensitive screening assay than optimized HA. However, because of its simplicity HA should be considered as an efficient alternative mutation screening method.

  11. Enzymatic production of microthecin by aldos-2-ulose dehydratase from 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose and stability studies of microthecin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Shukun; Andreassen, Mikkel; Lundt, Inge

    2008-01-01

    .2.2.13) from glycogen and starch by aldos-2-ulose dehydratase (AUDH; EC 4. 2.1.110). In the current study, the yield and purity of microthecin was examined with respect to pH and buffers using AUDH purified from the fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. It was found that AUDH had a Km of 5.4 and 4.9 mM towards...

  12. Haplotype Analysis of Norwegian and Swedish Patients with Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP: Extreme Haplotype Heterogeneity for the Mutation R116W

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti Tjensvoll

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, the most common of the acute porphyrias, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS also called porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD. The mutation spectrum in the HMBS gene is characterized by a majority of family specific mutations. Among the exceptions are R116W and W198X, with high prevalence in both the Dutch and Swedish populations. These two mutations were also detected in unrelated Norwegian patients. Thus, Norwegian and Swedish patients were haplotyped using closely linked flanking microsatellites and intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to see if the high frequency of these two mutations is due to a founder effect. Twelve intragenic SNPs were determined by a method based on fluorescent restriction enzyme fingerprinting single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-REF-SSCP.

  13. Flavonoid inhibitors as novel antimycobacterial agents targeting Rv0636, a putative dehydratase enzyme involved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid synthase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alistair K; Papaemmanouil, Athina; Bhowruth, Veemal; Bhatt, Apoorva; Dover, Lynn G; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2007-10-01

    Flavonoids comprise a large group of bioactive polyphenolic plant secondary metabolites. Several of these possess potent in vivo activity against Escherichia coli and Plasmodium falciparum, targeting enzymes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, such as enoyl-ACP-reductase, beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase and beta-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase. Herein, we report that butein, isoliquirtigenin, 2,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone and fisetin inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Furthermore, in vitro inhibition of the mycolic-acid-producing fatty acid synthase II (FAS-II) of Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests a mode of action related to those observed in E. coli and P. falciparum. Through a bioinformatic approach, we have established the product of Rv0636 as a candidate for the unknown mycobacterial dehydratase, and its overexpression in M. bovis BCG conferred resistance to growth inhibition by butein and isoliquirtigenin, and relieved inhibition of fatty acid and mycolic acid biosynthesis in vivo. Furthermore, after overexpression of Rv0636 in M. smegmatis, FAS-II was less sensitive to these inhibitors in vitro. Overall, the data suggest that these flavonoids are inhibitors of mycobacterial FAS-II and in particular Rv0636, which represents a strong candidate for the beta-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase enzyme of M. tuberculosis FAS-II.

  14. Expression of dehydratase domains from a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase increases the production of fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Robles, Delise; Rullán-Lind, Carlos; Carballeira, Néstor M; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-02-05

    Increasing the production of fatty acids by microbial fermentation remains an important step toward the generation of biodiesel and other portable liquid fuels. In this work, we report an Escherichia coli strain engineered to overexpress a fragment consisting of four dehydratase domains from the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase enzyme complex from the deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. The DH1-DH2-UMA enzyme fragment was excised from its natural context within a multi-enzyme PKS and expressed as a stand-alone protein. Fatty acids were extracted from the cell pellet, esterified with methanol and quantified by GC-MS analysis. Results show that the E. coli strain expressing the DH tetradomain fragment was capable of producing up to a 5-fold increase (80.31 mg total FA/L culture) in total fatty acids over the negative control strain lacking the recombinant enzyme. The enhancement in production was observed across the board for all the fatty acids that are typically made by E. coli. The overexpression of the DH tetradomain did not affect E. coli cell growth, thus showing that the observed enhancement in fatty acid production was not a result of effects associated with cell density. The observed enhancement was more pronounced at lower temperatures (3.8-fold at 16 °C, 3.5-fold at 22 °C and 1.5-fold at 30 °C) and supplementation of the media with 0.4% glycerol did not result in an increase in fatty acid production. All these results taken together suggest that either the dehydration of fatty acid intermediates are a limiting step in the E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis machinery, or that the recombinant dehydratase domains used in this study are also capable of catalyzing thioester hydrolysis of the final products. The enzyme in this report is a new tool which could be incorporated into other existing strategies aimed at improving fatty acid production in bacterial fermentations toward accessible biodiesel precursors.

  15. Expression of dehydratase domains from a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase increases the production of fatty acids in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Robles, Delise; Rullán-Lind, Carlos; Carballeira, Néstor M.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the production of fatty acids by microbial fermentation remains an important step towards the generation of biodiesel and other portable liquid fuels. In this work, we report an Escherichia coli strain engineered to overexpress a fragment consisting of four dehydratase domains from the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase enzyme complex from the deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. The DH1-DH2-UMA enzyme fragment was excised from its natural context within a multi-enzyme PKS and expressed as a stand-alone protein. Fatty acids were extracted from the cell pellet, esterified with methanol and quantified by GC-MS analysis. Results show that the E. coli strain expressing the DH tetradomain fragment was capable of producing up to a 5-fold increase (80.31 mg total FA/L culture) in total fatty acids over the negative control strain lacking the recombinant enzyme. The enhancement in production was observed across the board for all the fatty acids that are typically made by E. coli. The overexpression of the DH tetradomain did not affect E. coli cell growth, thus showing that the observed enhancement in fatty acid production was not a result of effects associated with cell density. The observed enhancement was more pronounced at lower temperatures (3.8-fold at 16 °C, 3.5-fold at 22 °C and 1.5-fold at 30 °C) and supplementation of the media with 0.4% glycerol did not result in an increase in fatty acid production. All these results taken together suggest that either the dehydration of fatty acid intermediates are a limiting step in the E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis machinery, or that the recombinant dehydratase domains used in this study are also capable of catalyzing thioester hydrolysis of the final products. The enzyme in this report is a new tool which could be incorporated into other existing strategies aimed at improving fatty acid production in bacterial fermentations towards accessible biodiesel precursors. PMID:24411456

  16. Effects of aluminum sulfate on delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase from kidney, brain, and liver of adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schetinger M.R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo effects of aluminum sulfate on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D activity from the brain, liver and kidney of adult mice (Swiss albine. In vitro experiments showed that the aluminum sulfate concentration needed to inhibit the enzyme activity was 1.0-5.0 mM (N = 3 in brain, 4.0-5.0 mM (N = 3 in liver and 0.0-5.0 mM (N = 3 in kidney. The in vivo experiments were performed on three groups for one month: 1 control animals (N = 8; 2 animals treated with 1 g% (34 mM sodium citrate (N = 8 and 3 animals treated with 1 g% (34 mM sodium citrate plus 3.3 g% (49.5 mM aluminum sulfate (N = 8. Exposure to aluminum sulfate in drinking water inhibited ALA-D activity in kidney (23.3 ± 3.7%, mean ± SEM, P<0.05 compared to control, but enhanced it in liver (31.2 ± 15.0%, mean ± SEM, P<0.05. The concentrations of aluminum in the brain, liver and kidney of adult mice were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminum concentrations increased significantly in the liver (527 ± 3.9%, mean ± SEM, P<0.05 and kidney (283 ± 1.7%, mean ± SEM, P<0.05 but did not change in the brain of aluminum-exposed mice. One of the most important and striking observations was the increase in hepatic aluminum concentration in the mice treated only with 1 g% sodium citrate (34 mM (217 ± 1.5%, mean ± SEM, P<0.05 compared to control. These results show that aluminum interferes with delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity in vitro and in vivo. The accumulation of this element was in the order: liver > kidney > brain. Furthermore, aluminum had only inhibitory properties in vitro, while in vivo it inhibited or stimulated the enzyme depending on the organ studied.

  17. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 0 Iodine Daily Serving now recommended in Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements for Pregnant and Lactating Women By ATA | 2015 News Releases , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Thyroid Disease and Pregnancy | No Comments Falls Church, February 10, 2015 —The ...

  18. Porfiria cutânea tarda e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico Porphyria cutanea tarda and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Haendchen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A associação de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico e porfiria, embora rara, é conhecida de longa data. Ela obriga o médico a realizar um cuidadoso diagnóstico diferencial das lesões bolhosas nesses pacientes e tomar cuidados com a prescrição de certas drogas, como a cloroquina. Esta, nas doses habituais para tratamento do lúpus, pode causar hepatotoxicidade em pacientes com porfiria. Descreve-se o caso de uma paciente com lúpus que desenvolveu lesões bolhosas compatíveis com porfiria cutânea tardia.The co-existence of systemic lupus erythematosus and porphyria although rare has been known for a long time. This association forces the physician to make a careful differential diagnosis of the bullous lesions that might appear in such patients and to be careful when prescribing certain drugs such as chloroquine. This drug, when used in the regular doses for treating lupus, may cause hepatotoxicity in patients.suffering from porphyria. It is described here the case of a patient with lupus who developed bullous lesions compatible with porphyria cutanea tarda.

  19. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  20. Crystal Structures Reveal that the Reaction Mechanism of Imidazoleglycerol-Phosphate Dehydratase Is Controlled by Switching Mn(II) Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Claudine; Britton, K. Linda; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Rodgers, H. Fiona; Eadsforth, Thomas C.; Viner, Russell C.; Hawkes, Tim R.; Baker, Patrick J.; Rice, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (IGPD) catalyzes the Mn(II)-dependent dehydration of imidazoleglycerol phosphate (IGP) to 3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)-2-oxopropyl dihydrogen phosphate during biosynthesis of histidine. As part of a program of herbicide design, we have determined a series of high-resolution crystal structures of an inactive mutant of IGPD2 from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with IGP. The structures represent snapshots of the enzyme trapped at different stages of the catalytic cycle and show how substrate binding triggers a switch in the coordination state of an active site Mn(II) between six- and five-coordinate species. This switch is critical to prime the active site for catalysis, by facilitating the formation of a high-energy imidazolate intermediate. This work not only provides evidence for the molecular processes that dominate catalysis in IGPD, but also describes how the manipulation of metal coordination can be linked to discrete steps in catalysis, demonstrating one way that metalloenzymes exploit the unique properties of metal ions to diversify their chemistry. PMID:26095028

  1. Characterization of Three Homoeologous cDNAs Encoding Chloroplast-targeted Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase in Common Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Takenouchi; Haruka Nakajima; Kengo Kanamaru; Shigeo Takumi

    2011-01-01

    In the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway of higher plants,5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is metabolized by ALA dehydratase (ALAD).Here,we isolated ALAD1 cDNA from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its diploid progenitors,and produced transgenic tobacco plants expressing the wheat ALAD1 gene.The ALAD1 genes were highly conserved among wheat relatives,and three homoeologous loci of wheat ALAD1 (TaALAD1) were equally transcribed in common wheat.A transient expression assay of a TaALAD1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein suggested that TaALAD1 is localized in chloroplasts.Overexpression of TaALAD1 in transgenic tobacco resulted in a significant increase in ALAD activity in leaves.Moreover,the transgenic tobacco showed vigorous growth and increased survival rate on medium containing ALA at herbicidal concentrations.These results indicate that wheat ALAD1 has catalytic activity in metabolizing ALA in plastids,and that ectopic expression of TaALAD1 in transgenic plants increases their tolerance to ALA application at high concentrations.

  2. Structural Studies of FlaA1 from Helicobacter Pylori Reveal the Mechanism for Inverting 4,6-dehydratase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama,N.; Creuzenet, C.; Miller, W.; Demendi, M.; Anderson, E.; Harauz, G.; Lam, J.; Berghuis, A.

    2006-01-01

    FlaA1 from the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is an enzyme involved in saccharide biosynthesis that has been shown to be essential for pathogenicity. Here we present five crystal structures of FlaA1 in the presence of substrate, inhibitors, and bound cofactor, with resolutions ranging from 2.8 to 1.9 {angstrom}. These structures reveal that the enzyme is a novel member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Additional electron microscopy studies show the enzyme to possess a hexameric doughnut-shaped quaternary structure. NMR analyses of 'real time' enzyme-substrate reactions indicate that FlaA1 is a UDP-GlcNAc-inverting 4,6-dehydratase, suggesting that the enzyme catalyzes the first step in the biosynthetic pathway of a pseudaminic acid derivative, which is implicated in protein glycosylation. Guided by evidence from site-directed mutagenesis and computational simulations, a three-step reaction mechanism is proposed that involves Lys-133 functioning as both a catalytic acid and base.

  3. Cobalamin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) consists of a corrinoid structure with cobalt in the centre of the molecule. Neither humans nor animals are able to synthesize this vitamin. Foods of animal source are the only natural source of cobalamin in human diet. There are only two enzymatic reactions in mammalian cells that require cobalamin as cofactor. Methylcobolamin is a cofactor for methionine synthase. The enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA-mutase requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Therefore, serum concentrations of homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) will increase in cobalamin deficiency. The cobalamin absorption from diet is a complex process that involves different proteins: haptocorrin, intrinsic factor and transcobalamin (TC). Cobalamin that is bound to TC is called holotranscobalamin (holoTC) which is the metabolically active vitamin B12 fraction. HoloTC consists 6 and 20% of total cobalamin whereas 80% of total serum cobalamin is bound to another binding protein, haptocorrin. Cobalamin deficiency is common worldwide. Cobalamin malabsorption is common in elderly subjects which might explain low vitamin status. Subjects who ingest low amount of cobalamin like vegetarians develop vitamin deficiency. No single parameter can be used to diagnose cobalamin deficiency. Total serum cobalamin is neither sensitive nor it is specific for cobalamin deficiency. This might explain why many deficient subjects would be overlooked by utilizing total cobalamin as status marker. Concentration of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) in serum is an earlier marker that becomes decreased before total serum cobalamin. Concentrations of MMA and tHcy increase in blood of cobalamin deficient subjects. Despite limitations of these markers in patients with renal dysfunction, concentrations of MMA and tHcy are useful functional markers of cobalamin status. The combined use of holoTC and MMA assays may better indicate cobalamin status than either of them. Because Cbl deficiency is a risk factor

  4. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...

  5. Reaction of diphenyl diselenide with hydrogen peroxide and inhibition of delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase from rat liver and cucumber leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farina

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the product of H2O2 and (PhSe2 with delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (delta-ALA-D from mammals and plants was investigated. (PhSe2 inhibited rat hepatic delta-ALA-D with an IC50 of 10 µM but not the enzyme from cucumber leaves. The reaction of (PhSe2 with H2O2 for 1 h increased the inhibitory potency of the original compound and the IC50 for animal delta-ALA-D inhibition was decreased from 10 to 2 µM. delta-ALA-D from cucumber leaves was also inhibited by the products of reaction of (PhSe2 with H2O2 with an IC50 of 4 µM. The major product of reaction of (PhSe2 with H2O2 was identified as seleninic acid and produced an intermediate with a lambdamax at 265 nm after reaction with t-BuSH. These results suggest that the interaction of (PhSe2 with mammal delta-ALA-D requires the presence of cysteinyl residues in close proximity. Two cysteine residues in spatial proximity have been recently described for the mammalian enzyme. Analysis of the primary structure of plant delta-ALA-D did not reveal an analogous site. In contrast to (PhSe2, seleninic acid, as a result of the higher electrophilic nature of its selenium atom, may react with additional cysteinyl residue(s in mammalian delta-ALA-D and also with cysteinyl residues from cucumber leaves located at a site distinct from that found at the B and A sites in mammals. Although the interaction of organochalcogens with H2O2 may have some antioxidant properties, the formation of seleninic acid as a product of this reaction may increase the toxicity of organic chalcogens such as (PhSe2.

  6. NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase- a metabolic repair enzyme and its role in Bacillus subtilis stress adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Petrovova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the strategies for survival stress conditions in bacteria is a regulatory adaptive system called general stress response (GSR, which is dependent on the SigB transcription factor in Bacillus sp. The GSR is one of the largest regulon in Bacillus sp., including about 100 genes; however, most of the genes that show changes in expression during various stresses have not yet been characterized or assigned a biochemical function for the encoded proteins. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis168 osmosensitive mutant, defective in the yxkO gene (encoding a putative ribokinase, which was recently assigned in vitro as an ADP/ATP-dependent NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase and was demonstrated to belong to the SigB operon. METHODS AND RESULTS: We show the impact of YxkO on the activity of SigB-dependent Pctc promoter and adaptation to osmotic and ethanol stress and potassium limitation respectively. Using a 2DE approach, we compare the proteomes of WT and mutant strains grown under conditions of osmotic and ethanol stress. Both stresses led to changes in the protein level of enzymes that are involved in motility (flagellin, citrate cycle (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase, and decomposition of Amadori products (fructosamine-6-phosphate deglycase. Glutamine synthetase revealed a different pattern after osmotic stress. The patterns of enzymes for branched amino acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis (L-alanine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ketol-acid reductoisomerase were altered after ethanol stress. CONCLUSION: We performed the first characterization of a Bacillus subtilis168 knock-out mutant in the yxkO gene that encodes a metabolite repair enzyme. We show that such enzymes could play a significant role in the survival of stressed cells.

  7. In Silico Structure Prediction of Human Fatty Acid Synthase-Dehydratase: A Plausible Model for Understanding Active Site Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Arun; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Samdani, A; Sangeetha, Manoharan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN, UniProt ID: P49327) is a multienzyme dimer complex that plays a critical role in lipogenesis. Consequently, this lipogenic enzyme has gained tremendous biomedical importance. The role of FASN and its inhibition is being extensively researched in several clinical conditions, such as cancers, obesity, and diabetes. X-ray crystallographic structures of some of its domains, such as β-ketoacyl synthase, acetyl transacylase, malonyl transacylase, enoyl reductase, β-ketoacyl reductase, and thioesterase, (TE) are already reported. Here, we have attempted an in silico elucidation of the uncrystallized dehydratase (DH) catalytic domain of human FASN. This theoretical model for DH domain was predicted using comparative modeling methods. Different stand-alone tools and servers were used to validate and check the reliability of the predicted models, which suggested it to be a highly plausible model. The stereochemical analysis showed 92.0% residues in favorable region of Ramachandran plot. The initial physiological substrate β-hydroxybutyryl group was docked into active site of DH domain using Glide. The molecular dynamics simulations carried out for 20 ns in apo and holo states indicated the stability and accuracy of the predicted structure in solvated condition. The predicted model provided useful biochemical insights into the substrate-active site binding mechanisms. This model was then used for identifying potential FASN inhibitors using high-throughput virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database of chemical ligands. The inhibitory efficacy of the top hit ligands was validated by performing molecular dynamics simulation for 20 ns, where in the ligand NSC71039 exhibited good enzyme inhibition characteristics and exhibited dose-dependent anticancer cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cancer cells in vitro.

  8. Effects of Delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase Polymorphisms on Susceptibility to Lead in Han Subjects from Southwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Sun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is to determine the distribution of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD polymorphism among Han subjects of the Chinese population and to study whether the polymorphism in the ALAD gene modifies the toxicity of lead in lead-exposed workers. For this purpose we conducted a cross-sectional study on 156 Chinese workers who were exposed to lead in lead-acid battery and electric-flex manufacturing plants. The authors found that the allele frequencies of ALAD1 and ALAD2 were 0.9679 and 0.0321, respectively. Workers with the ALAD 1-1 genotype were associated with higher blood lead levels than those with the ALAD 1-2 genotype. Blood and urine lead levels were much higher in storage battery workers than in cable workers. The self-conscious symptom survey showed that the incidences of debilitation, amnesia and dreaminess were much higher in those had more than five years of tenure or contact with lead on the job within the ALAD 1-1 genotype subgroup. Laboratory examinations showed that serum iron and zinc levels in workers’ with the ALAD 1-2 genotype were higher than those with the ALAD 1-1 genotype, especially in storage-battery workers. Correlation analysis indicated that the blood lead level negatively correlated with serum calcium, iron and zinc level. The data of this study suggest that the ALAD gene polymorphism and serum ion levels may modify the kinetics of lead in blood. Therefore, the authors recommend that an adequate intake of dietary calcium, iron, and zinc or the calcium, iron, and zinc supplementation should be prescribed to Chinese lead exposed workers.

  9. Blood Lead Level and Δ-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase Activity in Pre-Menopausal and Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R Elezaj

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To describe the relationship of blood lead levels (BLL and blood, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase(ALAD activity and haematocrit value(Hct to menopause , were examined 17 pre-or perimenopausal (PreM and 17 postmenopausal women (PosMfrom Prishtina City, the capital ofRepublic Kosovo. The mean age of the PreM women was 28.8 years (21-46, with a mean blood lead level of 1.2 μg/dL (SD=0.583 μg/dL , the mean blood ALAD activity53.2 U/LE (SD= 2.8 U/LE and haematocrit value42.1 % (SD= 4.3 %. The mean age of the PosM women was 53.6 years (43-67, with a mean blood lead level1.9 μg/dL (SD=0.94 μg/dL, the mean blood ALAD activity 44.4 U/LE(SD=7.2 U/LE and haematocrit value 42.1 % ( SD= 4.3 % and 42.2 % (SD=4.4 %. The BPb level of PosM women was significantly higher (P<0.001 in comparison with the BPb level in PreM women. The blood ALAD activity of PosM was significantly inhibited (P<0.002 in comparison with blood ALAD activity in PreM women. The haematocrit values were relatively unchanged. There was established significantly negative correlation between BPb and blood ALAD activity (r=- 0.605; P<0.01 in the PreM women.These results support the hypothesis that release of bone lead stores increases during menopause and constitutes an internal source of exposure possibly associated with adverse health effects on women in menopause transition.

  10. Inhibition of erythrocytes δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity in fish from waters affected by lead smelters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Colleen A.; Olsen, Bill; Serdar, Dave; Coffey, Mike

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effects on fish of lead (Pb) released to streamsby smelters located in Trail, BC (Canada), E. Helena, MT, Herculaneum, MO, and Glover, MO. Fish were collected by electrofishing from sites located downstream of smelters and from reference sites. Blood from each fish was analyzed for δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and hemoglobin (Hb), and samples of blood, liver, or carcass were analyzed for Pb, zinc (Zn), or both. Fish collected downstreamof all four smelters sites had elevated Pb concentrations, decreased ALAD activity, or both relative to their respectivereference sites. At E. Helena, fish from the downstream site also had lower Hb concentrations than fish from upstream. Differences among taxa were also apparent. Consistent with previous studies, ALAD activity in catostomids (Pisces: Catostomidae-northern hog sucker,Hypentelium nigricans;river carpsucker, Carpiodes carpio; largescale sucker, Catostomus macrocheilus; and mountain sucker, C. platyrhynchus) seemed more sensitive to Pb-induced ALADinhibition than the salmonids (Pisces: Salmonidae-rainbow trout,Oncorhynchus mykiss; brook trout,Salvelinus fontinalis) or common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Some of these differences may have resulted from differential accumulation of Zn, which was not measured at all sites. We detected noALAD activity in channel catfish (Ictaluruspunctatus) from either site on the Mississippi River at Herculaneum, MO. Our findings confirmed that Pb is releasedto aquatic ecosystems by smelters and accumulated by fish, andwe documented potentially adverse effects of Pb in fish. We recommend that Zn be measured along with Pb when ALAD activityis used as a biomarker and the collection of at least 10 fish ofa species at each site to facilitate statistical analysis.

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues as potential inhibitors of the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme Rv0636.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2008-07-01

    The identification of potential new anti-tubercular chemotherapeutics is paramount due to the recent emergence of extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB). Libraries of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their whole-cell activity against Mycobacterium bovis BCG. NAS-21 analogues 1 and 2 demonstrated enhanced whole-cell activity in comparison to the parental compound, and an M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing the dehydratase enzyme Rv0636 was resistant to these analogues. NAS-91 analogues with ortho-modifications gave enhanced whole-cell activity. However, extension with biphenyl modifications compromised the whole-cell activities of both NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues. Interestingly, both libraries demonstrated in vitro activity against fatty acid synthase II (FAS-II) but not FAS-I in cell-free extracts. In in vitro assays of FAS-II inhibition, NAS-21 analogues 4 and 5 had IC(50) values of 28 and 19 mug ml(-1), respectively, for the control M. bovis strain, and the M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing Rv0636 showed a marked increase in resistance. In contrast, NAS-91 analogues demonstrated moderate in vitro activity, although increased resistance was again observed in FAS-II activity assays with the Rv0636-overexpressing strain. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and mycolic acid methyl ester (MAME) analysis of M. bovis BCG and the Rv0636-overexpressing strain revealed that the effect of the drug was relieved in the overexpressing strain, further implicating and potentially identifying Rv0636 as the target for these known FabZ dehydratase inhibitors. This study has identified candidates for further development as drug therapeutics against the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme.

  12. The interactions of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin(TCDD) and 6-methyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (MCDF) in TCDD-induced porphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Cheng Catsby.

    1989-01-01

    Halogenated aryl hydrocarbon(HAH)-induced porphyria is caused by alteration of porphyrin metabolism and results in the accumulation of hepatic and urinary porphyrins. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (75 {mu}/kg) caused significant increases of hepatic porphyrin levels in C57BL/6 male, female and ovariectomized female, and C57BL/10 male mice 3 weeks after treatment. In contrast, 6-methyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (MCDF) was inactive at a dose of 750 {mu}mol/kg. Cotreatment with MCDF (750 {mu}mol/kg) and 2,3,7,8-TCDD (75 {mu}g/kg) resulted in partial antagonism of 2,3,7,8-TCDD-induced porphyrin accumulation in female but not in male mice. In female C57BL/6 mice, 2,3,7,8-TCDD-induced porphyria was accompanied by the induction of hepatic microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities and the inhibition of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) activity. MCDF (750 {mu}mol/kg) did not significantly affect these enzyme activities. In coadministration studies, MCDF partially antagonized 2,3,7,8-TCDD-induced hepatic porphyrin accumulation but did not affect the activities of hepatic AHH, EROD or UROD. These results demonstrate that the induction of the monooxygenase enzyme activities and the inhibition of UROD activity by 2,3,7,8-TCDD and the development of porphyria are not coordinately regulated in C57BL/6 female mice. In cultured chick embryo hepatocytes, 2,3,7,8-TCDD caused a significant increase in porphyrin levels and induced AHH and EROD activities. MCDF and Aroclor 1254 partially antagonized the 2,3,7,8-TCDD induced AHH and EROD activities but not the porphyrin accumulation.

  13. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  14. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism in lead exposed Bangladeshi children and its effect on urinary aminolevulinic acid (ALA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasmin, Saira, E-mail: rimzim1612@yahoo.com [Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Furusawa, Hana [Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ahmad, Sk. Akhtar [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Bangladesh Institute of Health Sciences, 125/1, Darus Salam, Mirpur, Dhaka 1216 (Bangladesh); Faruquee, M.H. [Department of Public Health, State University of Bangladesh, 77 Satmasjid Road, Dhanmondi, Dhaka 1205 (Bangladesh); Watanabe, Chiho [Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Background and objective: Lead has long been recognized as a harmful environmental pollutant. People in developing countries like Bangladesh still have a higher risk of lead exposure. Previous research has suggested that the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) genotype can modify lead toxicity and individual susceptibility. As children are more susceptible to lead-induced toxicity, this study investigated whether the ALAD genotype influenced urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA) among children exposed to environmental lead in Bangladesh. Methods: Subjects were elementary schoolchildren from a semi-urban industrialized area in Bangladesh. A total of 222 children were studied. Blood and urine were collected to determine ALAD genotypes, blood lead levels and urinary aminolevulinic acid (U-ALA). Results: The mean BPb level was 9.7 µg/dl for the study children. BPb was significantly positively correlated with hemoglobin (p<0.01). In total, allele frequency for ALAD 1 and 2 was 0.83 and 0.17 respectively. The mean U-ALA concentration was lower in ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers than ALAD1-1 carriers for boys (p=0.001). But for girls, U-ALA did not differ significantly by genotype (p=0.26). When U-ALA was compared by genotype at the same exposure level in a multiple linear regression analysis, boys who were ALAD1-2/2-2 carriers still had a lower level of U-ALA compared to ALAD1-1carriers. Conclusion: This study provides information about the influence of ALAD polymorphism and its association with U-ALA in Bangladeshi children. Our results indicate that the ALAD1-2/2-2 genotype may have a protective effect in terms of U-ALA for environmentally lead exposed boys. - Highlights: • High blood lead level for the environmentally exposed schoolchildren. • BPb was significantly correlated with U-ALA and Hb. • Effect of ALAD genotype on U-ALA is differed by sex. • Lower U-ALA in ALAD2 than ALAD1 carriers only for boys at same exposure.

  15. The D519G Polymorphism of Glyceronephosphate O-Acyltransferase Is a Risk Factor for Familial Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Colin P.; Overbey, Jessica R.; Naik, Hetanshi; Nance, Danielle; McLaren, Gordon D.; McLaren, Christine E.; Zhou, Luming; Desnick, Robert J.; Parker, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Both familial and sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) are iron dependent diseases. Symptoms of PCT resolve when iron stores are depleted by phlebotomy, and a sequence variant of HFE (C282Y, c.843G>A, rs1800562) that enhances iron aborption by reducing hepcidin expression is a risk factor for PCT. Recently, a polymorphic variant (D519G, c.1556A>G, rs11558492) of glyceronephosphate O-acyltransferase (GNPAT) was shown to be enriched in male patients with type I hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE C282Y homozygotes) who presented with a high iron phenotype, suggesting that GNPAT D519G, like HFE C282Y, is a modifier of iron homeostasis that favors iron absorption. To challenge this hypothesis, we investigated the frequency of GNPAT D519G in patients with both familial and sporadic PCT. Patients were screened for GNPAT D519G and allelic variants of HFE (both C282Y and H63D). Nucleotide sequencing of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) identified mutant alleles. Patients with low erythrocyte URO-D activity or a damaging URO-D variant were classified as familial PCT (fPCT) and those with wild-type URO-D were classified as sporadic PCT (sPCT). GNPAT D519G was significantly enriched in the fPCT patient population (p = 0.0014) but not in the sPCT population (p = 0.4477). Both HFE C282Y and H63D (c.187C>G, rs1799945) were enriched in both PCT patient populations (p<0.0001) but showed no greater association with fPCT than with sPCT. Conclusion: GNPAT D519G is a risk factor for fPCT, but not for sPCT. PMID:27661980

  16. Biochemical Characterization of Porphobilinogen Deaminase–Deficient Mice During Phenobarbital Induction of Heme Synthesis and the Effect of Enzyme Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Annika; Möller, Christer; Fogh, Jens; Harper, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder caused by a deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), the 3rd enzyme in heme synthesis. It is clinically characterized by acute attacks of neuropsychiatric symptoms and biochemically by increased urinary excretion of the porphyrin precursors porphobilinogen (PBG) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). A mouse model that is partially deficient in PBGD and biochemically mimics AIP after induction of the hepatic ALA synthase by phenobarbital was used in this study to identify the site of formation of the presumably toxic porphyrin precursors and study the effect of enzyme-replacement therapy by using recombinant human PBGD (rhPBGD). After 4 d of phenobarbital administration, high levels of PBG and ALA were found in liver, kidney, plasma, and urine of the PBGD-deficient mice. The administration of rhPBGD intravenously or subcutaneously after a 4-d phenobarbital induction was shown to lower the PBG level in plasma in a dose-dependent manner with maximal effect seen after 30 min and 2 h, respectively. Injection of rhPBGD subcutaneously twice daily during a 4-d phenobarbital induction reduced urinary PBG excretion to 25% of the levels found in PBGD-deficient mice administered with only phenobarbital. This study points to the liver as the main producer of PBG and ALA in the phenobarbital-induced PBGD-deficient mice and demonstrates efficient removal of accumulated PBG in plasma and urine by enzyme-replacement therapy. PMID:15208740

  17. Partial protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX gene deletions, due to different Alu-mediated mechanisms, identified by MLPA analysis in patients with variegate porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaro Michela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Variegate porphyria (VP is an autosomal dominantly inherited hepatic porphyria. The genetic defect in the PPOX gene leads to a partial defect of protoporphyrinogen oxidase, the penultimate enzyme of heme biosynthesis. Affected individuals can develop cutaneous symptoms in sun-exposed areas of the skin and/or neuropsychiatric acute attacks. The identification of the genetic defect in VP families is of crucial importance to detect the carrier status which allows counseling to prevent potentially life threatening neurovisceral attacks, usually triggered by factors such as certain drugs, alcohol or fasting. In a total of 31 Swedish VP families sequence analysis had identified a genetic defect in 26. In the remaining five families an extended genetic investigation was necessary. After the development of a synthetic probe set, MLPA analysis to screen for single exon deletions/duplications was performed. We describe here, for the first time, two partial deletions within the PPOX gene detected by MLPA analysis. One deletion affects exon 5 and 6 (c.339-197_616+320del1099 and has been identified in four families, most probably after a founder effect. The other extends from exon 5 to exon 9 (c.339-350_987+229del2609 and was found in one family. We show that both deletions are mediated by Alu repeats. Our findings emphasize the usefulness of MLPA analysis as a complement to PPOX gene sequencing analysis for comprehensive genetic diagnostics in patients with VP.

  18. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan got ...

  20. Identification of the in vivo function of the high-efficiency D-mannonate dehydratase in Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 from the enolase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Graff, Dylan C; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-07-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) subgroup of the enolase superfamily contains members with varying catalytic activities (high-efficiency, low-efficiency, or no activity) that dehydrate d-mannonate and/or d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2722-2731]. Despite extensive in vitro characterization, the in vivo physiological role of a ManD has yet to be established. In this study, we report the in vivo functional characterization of a high-efficiency ManD from Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 (UniProt entry B8GZZ7) by in vivo discovery of its essential role in d-glucuronate metabolism. This in vivo functional annotation may be extended to ~50 additional proteins.

  1. 罗伊氏乳杆菌中甘油脱水酶的催化特性及原位再激活%Characteristics and in situ Reactivation of Glycerol Dehydratase in Lactobacillus reuteri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马会亮; 陈国; 赵珺

    2013-01-01

    For understanding the catalysis properties and in situ reactivation of glycerol dehydratase in Lactobacillus reuteri, the conversions of glycerol and 1,2-propanediol by whole cell of I. reuteri and crude enzyme supernatant were compared to analyze substrate inhibition characteristics of dehydratase. Some organic solvents were used to improve the cell permeability, which did little harm to cells and dehydratase. Coenzyme B12 and ATP were added to treated cell to explore the in vivo reactivation mechanism of dehydratase in L. reuteri. The glycerol dehydratase in L. reuteri was coenzyme B12 dependent, which would be inactivated by glycerol rather than 1,2-propanediol. Its optimal temperature and pH were 37 ℃ and 6.2, respectively. The conditions for improving the cell permeability were obtained. The glycerol conversion was increased by adding coenzyme B12 and ATP. The coenzyme B12 was combined with apoenzyme to form holoenzyme which had catalysis activity, but the ATP can assist the detachment of inactive coenzyme B12 from the holoenzyme and transformation of inactive coenzyme B12 to an active one. The reactivation mechanism of glycerol dehydratase existed in L. reuteri like K. pneumonia, but their sequence homology was low. The glycerol dehydratase from L. reuteri is a typical coenzyme B12 dependent enzyme. There is reactivation mechanism of glycerol dehydratase in vivo, though it shares low similarities in sequences with C.freundii and K. pneumonia. This mechanism can be used to achieve the reusing of glycerol dehydratase in vivo. Fig 9, Ref 23%对罗伊氏乳杆菌(Lactobacillus reuteri)全细胞和粗酶液催化转化甘油和1,2-丙二醇进行比较,分析其底物转化特性;使用有机溶剂制备通透细胞,外源添加辅酶B12和ATP,探索L.reuteri胞内甘油脱水酶再激活机制.L.reuteri胞内存在依赖于辅酶B12的甘油脱水酶,1,2-丙二醇不会使甘油脱水酶全酶失活,而甘油会使全酶失活;其最适

  2. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  3. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000408.htm Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency is a group of rare genetic ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  6. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don' ... from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers ...

  16. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HCV), HIV, estrogens (used, for example, in oral contraceptives and prostate cancer treatment) and possibly smoking, combine ... Populations PCT is a rare disorder that affects males and females. The disorder usually develops after the ...

  17. Porphyrins and Porphyria Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... open Tuesday, September 6, 2017 Aug 30, 2017 Hurricane Harvey and Office Closure Update Aug 28, 2017 Office Closed due to Hurricane Harvey Aug 24, 2017 Research Volunteers Needed » More recent ...

  18. Porphyria Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... open Tuesday, September 6, 2017 Aug 30, 2017 Hurricane Harvey and Office Closure Update Aug 28, 2017 Office Closed due to Hurricane Harvey Aug 24, 2017 Research Volunteers Needed » More recent ...

  19. 2-Butanol and butanone production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through combination of a B12 dependent dehydratase and a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase using a TEV-based expression system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Ghiaci

    Full Text Available 2-Butanol and its chemical precursor butanone (methyl ethyl ketone--MEK are chemicals with potential uses as biofuels and biocommodity chemicals. In order to produce 2-butanol, we have demonstrated the utility of using a TEV-protease based expression system to achieve equimolar expression of the individual subunits of the two protein complexes involved in the B12-dependent dehydratase step (from the pdu-operon of Lactobacillus reuteri, which catalyze the conversion of meso-2,3-butanediol to butanone. We have furthermore identified a NADH dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Sadh from Gordonia sp. able to catalyze the subsequent conversion of butanone to 2-butanol. A final concentration of 4±0.2 mg/L 2-butanol and 2±0.1 mg/L of butanone was found. A key factor for the production of 2-butanol was the availability of NADH, which was achieved by growing cells lacking the GPD1 and GPD2 isogenes under anaerobic conditions.

  20. Crystal structures of type I dehydroquinate dehydratase in complex with quinate and shikimate suggest a novel mechanism of Schiff base formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Samuel H; Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Krishna, Sankar N; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F; Lavie, Arnon

    2014-02-11

    A component of the shikimate biosynthetic pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquniate (DHQ) to 3-dehydroshikimate. In the type I DHQD reaction mechanism a lysine forms a Schiff base intermediate with DHQ. The Schiff base acts as an electron sink to facilitate the catalytic dehydration. To address the mechanism of Schiff base formation, we determined structures of the Salmonella enterica wild-type DHQD in complex with the substrate analogue quinate and the product analogue shikimate. In addition, we determined the structure of the K170M mutant (Lys170 being the Schiff base forming residue) in complex with quinate. Combined with nuclear magnetic resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry data that revealed altered binding of the analogue to the K170M mutant, these structures suggest a model of Schiff base formation characterized by the dynamic interplay of opposing forces acting on either side of the substrate. On the side distant from the substrate 3-carbonyl group, closure of the enzyme's β8-α8 loop is proposed to guide DHQ into the proximity of the Schiff base-forming Lys170. On the 3-carbonyl side of the substrate, Lys170 sterically alters the position of DHQ's reactive ketone, aligning it at an angle conducive for nucleophilic attack. This study of a type I DHQD reveals the interplay between the enzyme and substrate required for the correct orientation of a functional group constrained within a cyclic substrate.

  1. Lack of association of delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase polymorphisms with blood lead levels and hemoglobin in Romanian women from a lead-contaminated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabstein, Sylvia; Unfried, Klaus; Ranft, Ulrich; Illig, Thomas; Kolz, Melanie; Mambetova, Chinara; Vlad, Mariana; Roman, Cecilia; Weiss, Tobias; Becker, Doreen; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2008-01-01

    As part of a project on environmental pollution, this study aimed to evaluate associations between blood lead (BPb) levels, hemoglobin (Hb) content, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) gene in 129 unrelated women from Romania. Five SNPs (rs1805313, rs2228083, rs1805312, rs1800435, rs1139488) were analyzed with respect to haplotype structure and impact on BPb levels and Hb content with proportional odds and analysis of covariance models. Combinations of SNPs were rare (16%). Low haplotype diversity was found with seven haplotypes. One rare haplotype implied the C allele of rs1800435, often referred to as the ALAD2 allele (frequency 8.6%). The putative risk genotype (CC) occurred in only one woman with BPb below 0.5 microg/dl. Median BPb was 4.8 microg/dl and differed markedly by community with a level of 12.5 microg/dl near a mining-spill region. Hb was regular (interquartile range 12.3-13.7 g/dl) and not correlated with BPb, although quantitatively lower in women living near the spill region. No significant associations were found for BPb or Hb with SNPs, haplotypes, or diplotypes. BPb levels were higher in this region than in populations from industrialized countries but without hematotoxic effects. An impact of ALAD2 on BPb or Hb was not seen in these women.

  2. A 96-well microtiter plate assay for high-throughput screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Sha, Shanshan; Liu, Likun; Li, Xin; Ma, Yufang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB) is the second enzyme for the biosynthesis of dTDP-l-rhamnose, which is a sugar donor to the synthesis of the cell wall linker, d-N-acetylglucosamine-l-rhamnose. RmlB is essential to mycobacterial growth and is not found in humans; therefore, it is a potential target for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. So far, there has been no suitable method for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. Here, the recombinant M. tuberculosis RmlB was purified and an absorbance-based microtiter plate assay was developed for RmlB activity. It could be used for high-throughput screening of RmlB inhibitors. The kinetic properties of M. tuberculosis RmlB, including optimal pH, optimal temperature, the effect of metal ions, and the kinetic parameters, were determined with this assay. The inhibitory effects of dTTP and dTDP on M. tuberculosis RmlB were also studied with the assay.

  3. Reaction mechanism of Zn2+-dependent d-serine dehydratase: role of a conserved tyrosine residue interacting with pyridine ring nitrogen of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomokazu; Matsuoka, Mai; Koga, Kazushi; Hemmi, Hisashi; Yoshimura, Tohru

    2014-09-01

    d-Serine dehydratase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Dsd1p) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)- and Zn(2+)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the dehydration of d-serine to yield pyruvate and ammonia. Dsd1p uses the Tyr residue (Y203) to interact with the pyridine nitrogen of PLP, which is a unique feature of PLP enzymes. To investigate the role of Y203 in catalysis, a series of Y203 mutants was constructed and studied. Mutant enzymes possessing a non-polar or a basic residue instead of Y203 (Y203F, A, S and R) exhibited substantial levels of catalytic activity, and among these, the Y203F mutant had the least impact on catalytic activity. The Y203D exhibited a 10(5)-fold decrease in enzyme activity, and unlike wild-type enzyme, the mutant enzyme favoured the Cα reprotonation before hydroxyl group protonation. Our data show that the Y203 does not participate in the protonation of the pyridine nitrogen (N1) of PLP, and Dsd1p uses the cofactor in an N1-unprotonated state. The unprotonated N1 promotes elimination of the leaving group and evades Cα reprotonation before hydroxyl group protonation.

  4. Antenatal diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency by quantification of pterins in amniotic fluid and enzyme activity in fetal and extrafetal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, N; Kierat, L; Matasovic, A; Leimbacher, W; Heizmann, C W; Guardamagna, O; Ponzone, A

    1994-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiency was undertaken by evaluating the pterin patterns in amniotic fluid and the specific enzyme activities in fetal or extrafetal tissues. This allowed the prenatal diagnosis in 19 pregnancies at risk. In 8 families with a child already affected by dihydropteridine reductase deficiency 4 fetuses were diagnosed as homozygotes and 4 as heterozygotes for the defect. In 11 families with a child affected by 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase deficiency 4 fetuses were homozygous, 4 heterozygous and 3 normal. This study also advanced our knowledge of tetrahydrobiopterin metabolism during fetal development. The key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of BH4 are expressed early and allow the fetus to be autotrophous for its cofactor requirement. In a twin pregnancy, both fetuses were diagnosed to be heterozygotes for dihydropteridine reductase deficiency and primapterin (7-biopterin) in amniotic fluid was increased. This indicates that pterin-4 alpha-carbinolamine dehydratase activity seems to be differently expressed during fetal life. As a consequence, pterins detected in amniotic fluid are of fetal origin and 6- and 7-substituted pterins can be present in amniotic fluid in higher proportions when compared with other body fluids.

  5. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  6. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  7. [Inhibition rate of gamma-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in erythrocytes as a reliable index for individual workers of low lead exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, H; Omichi, M; Ohishi, H; Ishikawa, K; Hirashima, N

    1983-09-01

    As the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity in erythrocytes is decreased by lead exposure, we considered that a net reduction of ALAD activity by lead in blood should be the difference between the activity fully activated with zinc (Zn2+) and dithiothreitol (DTT) and that without activation. The optimal condition of activation of ALAD was found by addition of 0.25 mM of Zn2+ and 10 mM of DTT in the reaction mixture. Judging from our previous results that the amount of inhibition of ALAD activity can be represented as the rate of inhibition and is closely correlated with the dose of lead administered to rabbits, the inhibition rate of ALAD activity and lead content in blood (Pb-B) of lead workers were measured. The scatter diagram obtained from the inhibition rate and lead content in blood has two groups being divided at 50 micrograms/ml of Pb-B. In one group less than 50 micrograms/100 ml of Pb-B, the inhibition rate has been closely related to Pb-B., the regression equation being Y = 1.82 X + 11.7, and the correlation coefficient + 0.926. In another group more than 50 micrograms/100 ml of Pb-B the inhibition rate remained constant at the 90% level. Measurement of the inhibition rate suggests to have practical validity for monitoring lead exposure in workers, and by means of a nomograph lead content in blood can be estimated from the inhibition rate.

  8. Biochemical and functional studies on the Burkholderia cepacia complex bceN gene, encoding a GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia A Sousa

    Full Text Available This work reports the biochemical and functional analysis of the Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 bceN gene, encoding a protein with GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase enzyme activity (E.C.4.2.1.47. Data presented indicate that the protein is active when in the tetrameric form, catalyzing the conversion of GDP-D-mannose into GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose. This sugar nucleotide is the intermediary necessary for the biosynthesis of GDP-D-rhamnose, one of the sugar residues of cepacian, the major exopolysaccharide produced by environmental and human, animal and plant pathogenic isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex species. Vmax and Km values of 1.5±0.2 µmol.min(-1.mg(-1 and 1024±123 µM, respectively, were obtained from the kinetic characterization of the B. cenocepacia J2315 BceN protein by NMR spectroscopy, at 25°C and in the presence of 1 mol MgCl2 per mol of protein. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by the substrate, with an estimated Ki of 2913±350 µM. The lack of a functional bceN gene in a mutant derived from B. cepacia IST408 slightly reduced cepacian production. However, in the B. multivorans ATCC17616 with bceN as the single gene in its genome with predicted GMD activity, a bceN mutant did not produce cepacian, indicating that this gene product is required for cepacian biosynthesis.

  9. Biochemical and Functional Studies on the Burkholderia cepacia Complex bceN Gene, Encoding a GDP-D-Mannose 4,6-Dehydratase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Pedro F.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the biochemical and functional analysis of the Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 bceN gene, encoding a protein with GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase enzyme activity (E.C.4.2.1.47). Data presented indicate that the protein is active when in the tetrameric form, catalyzing the conversion of GDP-D-mannose into GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose. This sugar nucleotide is the intermediary necessary for the biosynthesis of GDP-D-rhamnose, one of the sugar residues of cepacian, the major exopolysaccharide produced by environmental and human, animal and plant pathogenic isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex species. Vmax and Km values of 1.5±0.2 µmol.min−1.mg−1 and 1024±123 µM, respectively, were obtained from the kinetic characterization of the B. cenocepacia J2315 BceN protein by NMR spectroscopy, at 25°C and in the presence of 1 mol MgCl2 per mol of protein. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by the substrate, with an estimated Ki of 2913±350 µM. The lack of a functional bceN gene in a mutant derived from B. cepacia IST408 slightly reduced cepacian production. However, in the B. multivorans ATCC17616 with bceN as the single gene in its genome with predicted GMD activity, a bceN mutant did not produce cepacian, indicating that this gene product is required for cepacian biosynthesis. PMID:23460819

  10. Fatty acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: cloning and characterization of the fabAB operon encoding beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabA) and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I (FabB).

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, T.T.; Schweizer, H P

    1997-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa fabA and fabB genes, encoding beta-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase and beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase I, respectively, were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Northern analysis demonstrated that fabA and fabB are cotranscribed and most probably form a fabAB operon. The FabA and FabB proteins were similar in size and amino acid composition to their counterparts from Escherichia coli and to the putative homologs from Haemop...

  11. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  13. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  14. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  15. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  16. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics Iron-Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, ...

  18. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  19. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  20. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  2. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  3. Characterization of recombinantly expressed dihydroxy-acid dehydratase from Sulfobus solfataricus-A key enzyme for the conversion of carbohydrates into chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsten, Jörg M; Schmidt, Anja; Sieber, Volker

    2015-10-10

    Dihydroxyacid dehydratases (DHADs) are excellent biocatalysts for the defunctionalization of biomass. Here, we report on the recombinant production of DHAD from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsDHAD) in E. coli and its characterization with special focus on activity toward non-natural substrates, thermo-stability, thermo-inactivation kinetics and activation capabilities and its application within multi-step cascades for chemicals production. Using a simple heat treatment of cell lysate as major purification step we achieved a specific activity of 4.4 units per gram cell mass toward the substrate d-gluconate. The optimal temperature and pH value for this reaction are 77°C and pH 6.2. The inhibitory concentration (IC50, 50% residual activity) of different alcohols was determined to be 15% (v/v) for ethanol, 4.5% (v/v) for butanol and 4% (v/v) for isobutanol. Besides d-gluconate and the natural substrate 2,3-dihydroxyisovalerate (DHIV) SsDHAD is able to convert the C3-sugar-acid d-glycerate to pyruvate, a reaction, which does not occur in natural metabolic pathways, with a specific activity of 10.7±0.4mU/mg. The specific activity of the enzyme can be increased 3-fold by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol. The activation has no impact on temperature dependence, but modulates the thermo-inactivation tolerance at 50°C. The total turnover numbers for all of the three reactions was found to be 35.5×10(3)±1.0×10(3) for the conversion of d-gluconate to 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate (KDG), 28.2×10(3)±0.8×10(3) for DHIV to 2-ketovalerate (KIV) and 943±0.28×10(2) for d-glycerate to pyruvate. With activated SsDHAD these values could be further increased 5- and 4-fold for the d-gluconate and d-glycerate conversion, respectively.

  4. Rapid Thermostabilization of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar Konkukian 97-27 Dehydroshikimate Dehydratase through a Structure-Based Enzyme Design and Whole Cell Activity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Lucas B; Jha, Ramesh K; Kern, Theresa L; Schmidt, Emily N; Canales, Gustavo M; Finney, Kellan B; Koppisch, Andrew T; Strauss, Charlie E M; Fox, David T

    2017-01-20

    Thermostabilization of an enzyme with complete retention of catalytic efficiency was demonstrated on recombinant 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase (DHSase or wtAsbF) from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar konkukian 97-27 (hereafter, B. thuringiensis 97-27). The wtAsbF is relatively unstable at 37 °C, in vitro (t1/2(37) = 15 min), in the absence of divalent metal. We adopted a structure-based design to identify stabilizing mutations and created a combinatorial library based upon predicted mutations at specific locations on the enzyme surface. A diversified asbF library (∼2000 variants) was expressed in E. coli harboring a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system linked to the product of wtAsbF activity (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, DHB). Mutations detrimental to DHSase function were rapidly eliminated using a high throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) approach. After a single sorting round and heat screen at 50 °C, a triple AsbF mutant (Mut1), T61N, H135Y, and H257P, was isolated and characterized. The half-life of Mut1 at 37 °C was >10-fold higher than the wtAsbF (t1/2(37) = 169 min). Further, the second-order rate constants for both wtAsbF and Mut1 were approximately equal (9.9 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), 7.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively), thus demonstrating protein thermostability did not come at the expense of enzyme thermophilicity. In addition, in vivo overexpression of Mut1 in E. coli resulted in a ∼60-fold increase in functional enzyme when compared to the wild-type enzyme under the identical expression conditions. Finally, overexpression of the thermostable AsbF resulted in an approximate 80-120% increase in DHB accumulation in the media relative to the wild-type enzyme.

  5. Arsenic Induced Inhibition of δ-aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity in Rat Blood and its Response To Meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic Acid and Monoisoamyl DMSA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SMRATI BHADAURIA; SWARAN J.S.FLORA

    2004-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate arsenic induced changes in blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) after in vitro and in vivo exposure to this element and its response to co-administration of meso 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA) either individually or in combination. Methods Rat whole blood was exposed to varying concentrations (0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mmol/L) of arsenic (Ⅲ) or arsenic (V), to assess their effects on blood ALAD activity. Varying concentrations of MiADMSA and DMSA (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/L) were also tried in combination to determine its ability to mask the effect of arsenic induced (0.5 mmol/L) inhibition of blood ALAD in vitro. In vitro and in vivo experiments were also conducted to determine the effects of DMSA and MiADMSA either individually or in combination with arsenic, on blood ALAD activity and blood arsenic concentration. Results In vitro experiments showed significant inhibition of the enzyme activity when 0.1-0.5 mmol/L of arsenic (Ⅲ and V) was used. Treatment with MiADMSA increased ALAD activity when blood was incubated at the concentration of 0.1 mmol/L arsenic (Ⅲ) and 0.1 mmol/L MiADMSA. No effect of 0.1 mmol/L MiADMSA on ALAD activity was noticed when the arsenic concentration was increased to 0.2 and 0.5 mmol/L. Similarly, MiADMSA at a lower concentration (0.1 mmol/L) was partially effective in the turnover of ALAD activity against 0.5 mmol/L arsenic (Ⅲ), but at two higher concentrations (0.5and 1.0 mmol/L) a complete restoration of ALAD activity was observed. DMSA at all the three concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mmol/L) was effective in restoring ALAD activity to the normal value.Conclusions The results thus suggest that arsenic has a distinct effect on ALAD activity. Another important toxicological finding of the present study, based on in vivo experiments further suggests that combined administration of DMSA and MiADMSA could be more beneficial for reducing blood

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  7. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  8. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This ... video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ... to stop her monthly periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ...

  18. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA- ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  6. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  7. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  8. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  9. Estudo da imunofluorescência direta, imunomapeamento e microscopia ótica na porfiria cutânea tardia Study of direct immunofluorescence, immunofluorescence mapping and light microscopy in porphyria cutanea tarda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Mendonça Jorge Vieira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Apesar de a porfiria cutânea tardia ser a mais frequente das porfirias, há poucos estudos que abordam sua fisiopatologia cutânea. OBJETIVO: Avaliar as alterações cutâneas na porfiria cutânea tardia utilizando a microscopia ótica e a imunofluorescência direta, antes e depois do tratamento com cloroquina. Realizar o imunomapeamento antigênico da bolha para estudo do seu nível de clivagem. MÉTODOS: Relata-se a microscopia ótica e imunofluorescência direta de 28 pacientes em três fases diferentes: 23 pacientes com porfiria ativa antes do tratamento (Fase A, sete pacientes com remissão clínica durante o tratamento (Fase B e oito pacientes com remissão bioquímica (Fase C. O imunomapeamento foi realizado em sete pacientes. RESULTADOS: Na porfiria ativa, a imunofluorescência direta demonstrou fluorescência homogênea e intensa no interior e na parede dos vasos e na junção dermoepidérmica. Na remissão clínica (Fase B e na remissão bioquímica (Fase C, o depósito de imunoglobulinas se manteve, mas o depósito de complemento apresentou diminuição na maioria. O imunomapeamento não demonstrou plano de clivagem fixo. CONCLUSÃO: Não houve correlação entre a resposta clínica e os depósitos de imunoglobulinas. A diminuição do complemento favorece a hipótese de que a ativação da cascata do complemento representa uma via adicional que leva à lesão endotelial.BACKGROUND: Even though porphyria cutanea tarda is the most frequent type of porphyria, there are few studies about its cutaneous physiopathology. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate skin changes in porphyria cutanea tarda using light microscopy and direct immunofluorescence before and after treatment with chloroquine. To perform antigen immunomapping of bullae to study their level of cleavage. METHODS: Light microscopy and direct immunofluorescence of 28 patients are reported in three different phases: 23 patients with active porphyria before treatment (Phase A, 7

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Robert; Brown, David L

    2003-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of macrocytic anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The role of B12 deficiency in hyperhomocysteinemia and the promotion of atherosclerosis is only now being explored. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is typically based on measurement of serum vitamin B12 levels; however, about 50 percent of patients with subclinical disease have normal B12 levels. A more sensitive method of screening for vitamin B12 deficiency is measurement of serum methylmalonic acid and homocysteine levels, which are increased early in vitamin B12 deficiency. Use of the Schilling test for detection of pernicious anemia has been supplanted for the most part by serologic testing for parietal cell and intrinsic factor antibodies. Contrary to prevailing medical practice, studies show that supplementation with oral vitamin B12 is a safe and effective treatment for the B12 deficiency state. Even when intrinsic factor is not present to aid in the absorption of vitamin B12 (pernicious anemia) or in other diseases that affect the usual absorption sites in the terminal ileum, oral therapy remains effective.

  11. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  12. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  13. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  14. Source and impact of lead contamination on {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in several marine bivalve species along the Gulf of Cadiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Company, R.; Serafim, A.; Lopes, B.; Cravo, A. [CIMA, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Kalman, J.; Riba, I.; DelValls, T.A. [Catedra UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop, Department of Physical-Chemistry, Faculty Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Blasco, J. [Instituto Ciencias Marinas Andalucia (CSIC), Campus Rio San Pedro, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Delgado, J. [Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Avda Fuerzas Armadas s/n, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Sarmiento, A.M. [Catedra UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop, Department of Physical-Chemistry, Faculty Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Avda Fuerzas Armadas s/n, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Nieto, J.M. [Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Avda Fuerzas Armadas s/n, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Shepherd, T.J.; Nowell, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Science Laboratories, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bebianno, M.J., E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt [CIMA, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2011-01-17

    Coastal areas and estuaries are particularly sensitive to metal contamination from anthropogenic sources and in the last few decades the study of space-time distribution and variation of metals has been extensively researched. The Gulf of Cadiz is no exception, with several rivers draining one of the largest concentrations of sulphide deposits in the world, the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Of these rivers, the Guadiana, one of the most important in the Iberian Peninsula, together with smaller rivers like the Tinto and Odiel, delivers a very high metal load to the adjacent coastal areas. The purpose of this work was to study the source and impact of lead (Pb) drained from historical or active mining areas in the IPB on the activity of a Pb inhibited enzyme ({delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, ALAD) in several bivalve species along the Gulf of Cadiz. Seven marine species (Chamelea gallina, Mactra corallina, Donax trunculus, Cerastoderma edule, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Scrobicularia plana and Crassostrea angulata) were collected at 12 sites from Mazagon, near the mouth of the rivers Tinto and Odiel (Spain), to Cacela Velha (Ria Formosa lagoon system, Portugal). Lead concentrations, ALAD activity and lead isotope ratios ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) were determined in the whole soft tissues. The highest Pb concentrations were determined in S. plana (3.50 {+-} 1.09 {mu}g g{sup -1} Pb d.w.) and D. trunculus (1.95 {+-} 0.10 {mu}g g{sup -1} Pb d.w.), while M. galloprovincialis and C. angulata showed the lowest Pb levels (<0.38 {mu}g g{sup -1} Pb d.w.). In general, ALAD activity is negatively correlated with total Pb concentration. However this relationship is species dependent (e.g. linear for C. gallina ALAD = -0.36[Pb] + 0.79; r = 0.837; or exponential for M. galloprovincialis ALAD = 2.48e{sup -8.3[Pb]}; r = 0.911). This indicates that ALAD activity has considerable potential as a biomarker of Pb and moreover, in

  15. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...

  16. Gene cloning and expression of glycerol dehydratase from Citrobacter freundii in Escherichia coli%弗氏柠檬酸菌甘油脱水酶基因在大肠杆菌中的克隆和表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐向辉; 朱绮霞; 韦宇拓; 黄鲲; 黄日波

    2005-01-01

    以弗氏柠檬酸菌(Citrobacter freundii)基因组DNA为模板,通过PCR得到甘油脱水酶(glycerol dehydratase)基因dhaB、dhaC、dhaE,克隆到表达载体pSE380上,得到重组质粒pSE-dhaBCE.将此重组质粒转化到E.coliJM109中,重组菌株SDS-PAGE结果显示有明显的61kD、22kD、16kD三条特异性蛋白条带出现.重组菌株经诱导表达,酶活力为11.59U/mL.

  17. First aminoacetone chelate: [Co(tren){NH2CH2C(O)CH3}]3+-a substrate binding and activation model for zinc(II)-dependent 5-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumm, Andreas; Hammershøi, Anders; Kofod-Hansen, Mikael; Mønsted, Ole; Osholm Sørensen, Henning

    2007-08-14

    The complex p-[Co(tren){NH(2)CH(2)C(O)CH(3)}](ClO(4))(3).H(2)O was produced stereoselectively from [Co(tren)(O(3)SCF(3))(2)]O(3)SCF(3) () and 2-(aminomethyl)-2-methyl-1,3-dioxolane. The structure of was determined by X-ray crystallography. The complex is the first aminoacetone chelate to be reported and the first structurally characterized example of a non-conjugated ketone moiety coordinated to cobalt(iii). The robust complex was stable to aquation in strong acid and behaved as an acid with pK(a) = 4.99(1) indicative of a strong activation of the aminoacetone ligand towards deprotonation. The complex constitutes a structural model for a proposed substrate binding mode relevant for substrate activation of the zinc(ii)-dependent enzyme 5-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase.

  18. Identification and characterization of trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline dehydratase and Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate reductase involved in trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline metabolism of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available trans-4-Hydroxy-l-proline (T4LHyp and trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline (T3LHyp occur mainly in collagen. A few bacteria can convert T4LHyp to α-ketoglutarate, and we previously revealed a hypothetical pathway consisting of four enzymes at the molecular level (J Biol Chem (2007 282, 6685–6695; J Biol Chem (2012 287, 32674–32688. Here, we first found that Azospirillum brasilense has the ability to grow not only on T4LHyp but also T3LHyp as a sole carbon source. In A. brasilense cells, T3LHyp dehydratase and NAD(PH-dependent Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (Pyr2C reductase activities were induced by T3LHyp (and d-proline and d-lysine but not T4LHyp, and no effect of T3LHyp was observed on the expression of T4LHyp metabolizing enzymes: a hypothetical pathway of T3LHyp → Pyr2C → l-proline was proposed. Bacterial T3LHyp dehydratase, encoded to LhpH gene, was homologous with the mammalian enzyme. On the other hand, Pyr2C reductase encoded to LhpI gene was a novel member of ornithine cyclodeaminase/μ-crystallin superfamily, differing from known bacterial protein. Furthermore, the LhpI enzymes of A. brasilense and another bacterium showed several different properties, including substrate and coenzyme specificities. T3LHyp was converted to proline by the purified LhpH and LhpI proteins. Furthermore, disruption of LhpI gene from A. brasilense led to loss of growth on T3LHyp, d-proline and d-lysine, indicating that this gene has dual metabolic functions as a reductase for Pyr2C and Δ1-piperidine-2-carboxylate in these pathways, and that the T3LHyp pathway is not linked to T4LHyp and l-proline metabolism.

  19. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  20. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does not clot properly. Factor V deficiency is rare. It may be caused by: A defective Factor V gene passed down through families (inherited) An antibody that interferes with normal Factor ...

  1. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  2. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  4. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  6. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  7. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  8. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperammonemia due to carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase va deficiency Related Information How are ...

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  12. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Werder, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    ...) What is to be expected from treatment? (7) How is B12 deficiency treated? On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia...

  13. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Growth Defici H e o n r c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary ...

  14. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  15. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  16. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relinque, B; Bardallo, L; Granero, M; Jiménez, P J; Luna, S

    2015-03-10

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is an uncommon metabolic disease. Only few cases of its isolated form have been reported in the literature. We report a case of severe neonatal onset. A newborn baby of 41 weeks gestational age, weighted at birth of 3240 grams and had an Apgar score of 6-10-10. Fifty-three hours after being born, the baby started with seizures that were refractory to antiepileptic treatment. Brain function was monitored using a-EEG. Laboratory and imaging tests were performed. All of them were consistent with sulfite oxidase deficiency. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic testing. We highlight the importance of this disease as part of the differential diagnosis of seizures during the neonatal period, as well as the importance of the therapeutic support based on dietary restrictions. It's also remarkable the possibility of prenatal diagnosis by quantifying enzyme activity and it's also possible carrying out DNA mutational analysis.

  17. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  18. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  19. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel thera...

  20. [Iron deficiency, thrombocytosis and thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstatiev, Rayko

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency, the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide, is often associated with reactive thrombocytosis. Although secondary thrombocytosis is commonly considered to be harmless, there is accumulating evidence that elevated platelet counts, especially in the setting of iron deficiency, can lead to an increased thromboembolic risk in both arterial and venous systems. Here we present the mechanisms of iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis and summarize its clinical consequences especially in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, chronic kidney disease or cancer. We hypothesize that iron deficiency is an underestimated thromboembolic risk factor, and that iron replacement therapy can become an effective preventive strategy in a variety of clinical settings.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  2. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia A A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  4. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  5. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  6. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  7. Phosphorus Deficiency in Ducklins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiHengmin; LuoLingping

    1995-01-01

    20 one-day-old Tianfu ducklings were fed on a natural diet deficient in phosphorus(Ca 0.80%,P 0.366%)for three weeks and examined for signs and lesions.Signs began to appear at the age of one week,and became serous at two weeks.13 ducklings died during the experiment.Morbidity was 100% and mortality was 65%.The affected ducklings mainly showed leg weakness,severe lamencess,deprssion,lack of appetite and stunted growth,The serum alkaline phosphatase activities increased markedly.The serum phosphorus concentration,tibial ash,ash calcium and phosphorus content decreased obviously.At necropsy,maxillae and ribe were soft,and the latter was crooked.Long ones were soft and broke easily.The hypertrophic zone of the growth-plate in the epiphysis of long ones was lengthened and osteoid tissue increased in the metaphyseal spongiosa histopathologically.The above mentioned symptoms and lesions could be prevented by adding phosphorus to the natural deficient diet(up to 0.65%),The relationship between lesions and signs,pathomorphological characterisation and pathogensis were also discussed in this paper.

  8. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  9. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  10. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  11. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  13. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  14. Iodine deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delange, F

    1995-01-18

    Iodine is a trace element present in the human body in minute amounts (15-20 mg in adults, i.e. 0.0285 x 10(-3)% of body weight). The only confirmed function of iodine is to constitute an essential substrate for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, tetraiodothyronine, thyroxine or T4 and triiodothyronine, T3 (1). In thyroxine, iodine is 60% by weight. Thyroid hormones, in turn, play a decisive role in the metabolism of all cells of the organism (2) and in the process of early growth and development of most organs, especially of the brain (3). Brain development in humans occurs from fetal life up to the third postnatal year (4). Consequently, a deficit in iodine and/or in thyroid hormones occurring during this critical period of life will result not only in the slowing down of the metabolic activities of all the cells of the organism but also in irreversible alterations in the development of the brain. The clinical consequence will be mental retardation (5). When the physiological requirements of iodine are not met in a given population, a series of functional and developmental abnormalities occur (Table 1), including thyroid function abnormalities and, when iodine deficiency is severe, endemic goiter and cretinism, endemic mental retardation, decreased fertility rate, increased perinatal death, and infant mortality. These complications, which constitute an hindrance to the development of the affected population, are grouped under the general heading of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, IDD (6). Broad geographic areas exist in which the population is affected by IDD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis : Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGillick, Brian E.; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-02-23

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. This, coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. Additionally, we have discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. These results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pochinok, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.Key words: children, iron deficiency anemia, treatment.

  17. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of card

  18. Newborn screening for MCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Davidson, A G F; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia G

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medium Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (MCAD) Deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation, with potential fatal outcome. MCAD deficiency is diagnosed by acylcarnitine analysis on newborn screening blood spot cards by tandem mass spectrometry. Early diagnosis of ...

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Thrombophilia, hereditary, due to protein C deficiency, autosomal dominant ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein C deficiency PROC deficiency Related ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a disorder that prevents the ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions GLUT1 deficiency syndrome GLUT1 deficiency syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is a disorder affecting the nervous ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial HDL deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial HDL deficiency familial HDL deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Familial HDL deficiency is a condition characterized by low levels ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing (4 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Ateleiotic dwarfism Genetic Testing Registry: Autosomal dominant isolated somatotropin deficiency ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition dwarfism, growth hormone deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions lactate dehydrogenase deficiency lactate dehydrogenase deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency is a condition that affects how the ...

  6. Iron deficiency and thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbro, A; Volken, T; Buser, A; Sigle, J P; Halter, J P; Passweg, J R; Tichelli, A; Infanti, L

    2017-01-01

    According to many textbooks, iron deficiency (ID) is associated with reactive thrombocytosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between serum ferritin levels and platelet counts in a large cohort of healthy blood donors. We included all whole blood and apheresis donors aged 18 years or older with at least one ferritin measurement and one platelet count performed at the same visit between 1996 and 2014. A total of 130 345 blood counts and ferritin measurements obtained from 22 046 healthy donors were analysed. Overall, no correlation between serum ferritin and platelet count was observed (r = -0.03, ρ = 0.04 for males, and r = 0.01, ρ = -0.02 for females, respectively). Associations remained clinically negligible after adjusting for age, time since previous blood donation, number of donations and restricting the analysis to ferritin deciles. In this large, retrospective single-centre study, correlations between low ferritin and platelet count in a large and homogeneous cohort of healthy donors were negligible. Further studies in patients with more severe anaemia and patients with inflammation are warranted. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  7. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  8. Fotossensibilidade amplificada? Relato de porfiria cutânea tarda associada a lúpus eritematoso sistêmico Increased photosensitivity? Case report of porphyria cutanea tarda associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheila Fritsch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A associação de porfiria cutânea tarda (PCT e lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES é rara. O LES, de fisiopatologia complexa e manifestações clínicas pleomórficas, assemelha-se à PCT pela fotossensibilidade. Um achado que pode diferenciar as duas doenças são as lesões cutâneas bolhosas, raras no LES, mas características da PCT. Descrevemos um caso de associação de PCT e LES e revisamos a literatura, enfatizando questões fisiopatológicas, clínicas e terapêuticas. Um dado relevante para a prática clínica concerne ao tratamento do lúpus com antimaláricos, o que pode oferecer riscos para a PCT.The association of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is rare. Systemic lupus erythematosus, of complex pathophysiology and pleomorphic clinical manifestations, is similar to PCT regarding photosensitivity. One finding that can differentiate both diseases is the presence of cutaneous blisters, which are rare in SLE, but characteristic of PCT. We report one case of the association of PCT and SLE and revise the literature, emphasizing pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects. One relevant information for clinical practice relates to the treatment of SLE with antimalarials, which is a risk for PCT.

  9. Acute Intermittent Porphyrias Misdiagnosed as Intestinal Obstruction:Two Cases Report%急性间歇性血卟啉病误诊为肠梗阻二例报道

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡义亭; 侯洪涛; 王玉珍

    2013-01-01

    血卟啉病极为罕见,为常染色体显性遗传,临床表现多样化,不仅诊断困难,而且极易误诊.我院曾收治2例年轻女性患者,因其间断腹痛误诊为肠梗阻,后经查血卟啉、尿卟啉均确诊为急性间歇性血卟啉病.应用精氨酸血红素治疗效果较好.本病例提示,目前尚无根治方法,急性发作时可静脉滴注高糖及静脉应用血红素.原因不明腹痛要想到本病的可能.%The hematoporphyrin disease, an autosomal dominant inheritance, is very rare. Its clinical performances are diversified, difficult to diagnose and easy to misdiagnose. The 2 young female patients were misdiagnosed as intestinal obstruction due to intermittent abdominal pains, but confirmed as acute intermittent porphyrias after examinations of hematoporphyrin and uroporphyrin. Heme arginate have good effect on it, but no radical cure approaches have been found yet. When attacking acutely, intravenous high sugar and heme can be used. Unexplained abdominal pains remind the possibility of this disease.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  11. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: transcobalamin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency often develop a blood disorder called megaloblastic anemia . Megaloblastic anemia results in a shortage of red blood cells, ... and Prevention: Intellectual Disability (PDF) Children's Hospital Boston: Megaloblastic Pernicious Anemia Children's Hospital Boston: White Blood Cell Disorders CLIMB: ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: prolidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cetta G, Forlino A. Human prolidase and prolidase deficiency: an overview on the characterization of the enzyme involved in proline recycling and on the effects of its mutations. Amino Acids. 2008 Nov;35(4):739-52. doi: 10. ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... energy from food taken into the body and energy spent by the body. The correct balance is important to control eating and weight. POMC gene mutations that cause POMC deficiency result in production ...

  15. Helicobacterpy loriinfection and micronutrient deficiencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javed Yakoob; Wasim Jafri; Shahab Abid

    2003-01-01

    It is known that deficiencies of micronutrients due to infections increase morbidity and mortality. This phenomenon depicts itself conspicuously in developing countries.Deficiencies of iron, vitamins A, E, C, B12, etc are widely prevalent among populations living in the third world countries. Helicobacterpylori (Hpylori) infection has a high prevalence throughout the world. Deficiencies of several micronutrients due to Hpylori infection may be concomitantly present and vary from subtle sub-clinical states to severe clinical disorders. These essential trace elementsl micronutrients are involved in host defense mechanisms,maintaining epithelial cell integrity, glycoprotein synthesis,transport mechanisms, myocardial contractility, brain development, cholesterol and glucose metabolism. In this paper Hpyloriinfection in associaed with various micronutrients deficiencies is briefly reviewed.

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf T Soliman; Vincenzo De Sanctis; Rania Elalaily; Said Bedair; Islam Kassem

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical ...

  17. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  18. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  19. Investigating the physiological roles of low-efficiency D-mannonate and D-gluconate dehydratases in the enolase superfamily: pathways for the catabolism of L-gulonate and L-idonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelecki, Daniel J; Vendiola, Jean Alyxa Ferolin; Jones, Amy M; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2014-09-09

    The sequence/function space in the D-mannonate dehydratase subgroup (ManD) of the enolase superfamily was investigated to determine how enzymatic function diverges as sequence identity decreases [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2722-2731]. That study revealed that members of the ManD subgroup vary in substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency: high-efficiency (kcat/KM = 10(3)-10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) for dehydration of D-mannonate, low-efficiency (kcat/KM = 10-10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) for dehydration of D-mannonate and/or D-gluconate, and no activity. Characterization of high-efficiency members revealed that these are ManDs in the D-glucuronate catabolic pathway {analogues of UxuA [Wichelecki, D. J., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 4087-4089]}. However, the genomes of organisms that encode low-efficiency members of the ManDs subgroup encode UxuAs; therefore, these must have divergent physiological functions. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of three low-efficiency members of the ManD subgroup and identified a novel physiologically relevant pathway for L-gulonate catabolism in Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM3043 as well as cryptic pathways for L-gulonate catabolism in Escherichia coli CFT073 and L-idonate catabolism in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis str. P125109. However, we could not identify physiological roles for the low-efficiency members of the ManD subgroup, allowing the suggestion that these pathways may be either evolutionary relics or the starting points for new metabolic potential.

  20. Metal Accumulation, Blood δ-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase Activity and Micronucleated Erythrocytes of Feral pigeons (Columba Livia Living Near Former Lead-Zinc Smelter “ Trepça” – Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elezaj I. R.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of lead in blood and tibia (Pb, zinc (Zn and cupper (Cu in tibia, blood δ- aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D; EC: 4.2.1.24 activity, hematocrit value (Hct and micronuclei frequency (MN of peripheral erythrocytes have been determinated in three different populations of feral pigeons (Columba livia; forma urbana and forma domestica, collected in Mitrovica town (situated close to smelter “Trepça”, down closed in 2000 year and in rural area (Koshare willage . The blood lead level in feral pigeons from Mitrovica (forma urbana was 3 times higher (149.6; 50.5 μg% in comparison with that in feral pigeons from Mitrovica (forma domestica and 27.7 times higher (5.4 μg% in comparison with pigeons from rural area. The Pb concentration of tibia of feral pigeons (froma urbana and forma domestica, from Mitrovica town was significantly higher (P<0.001 in comparison with control. The concentration of Zn in tibia of feral pigeons from Mitrovica town (forma urbana, was significantly higher (P<0.006 in comparison with control. The blood ALA-D activity of feral pigeons from Mitrovica town (forma urbana and froma domestica, was significantly inhibited in comparison with control. The blood ALA-D activity of feral pigeons –forma urbana from Mitrovica town was significantly inhibited (P<0.001 in comparison with the blood ALA-D activity of feral pigeons-forma domestica from Mitrovica town. The erythrocyte MN frequency of feral pigeons from Mitrovica was significantly higher (P <0.001 in comparison with controls. The smelter “Trepça” ten year after closed down pose a threat to the local environment, biota and people’s health.

  1. Deletion of fucose residues in plant N-glycans by repression of the GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase gene using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kouki; Matsumura, Takeshi

    2011-02-01

    Production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants has many advantages in terms of safety and reduced costs. However, plant-produced glycoproteins have N-glycans with plant-specific sugar residues (core β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose) and a Lewis a (Le(a) ) epitope, i.e., Galβ(1-3)[Fucα(1-4)]GlcNAc. Because these sugar residues and glycan structures seemed to be immunogenic, several attempts have been made to delete them by repressing their respective glycosyltransferase genes. However, until date, such deletions have not been successful in completely eliminating the fucose residues. In this study, we simultaneously reduced the plant-specific core α-1,3-fucose and α-1,4-fucose residues in the Le(a) epitopes by repressing the Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) gene, which is associated with GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis, in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Repression of GMD was achieved using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and RNA interference (RNAi). The proportion of fucose-free N-glycans found in total soluble protein from GMD gene-repressed plants increased by 80% and 95% following VIGS and RNAi, respectively, compared to wild-type plants. A small amount of putative galactose substitution in N-glycans from the NbGMD gene-repressed plants was observed, similar to what has been previously reported GMD-knockout Arabidopsis mutant. On the other hand, the recombinant mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with fucose-deleted N-glycans was successfully produced in NbGMD-RNAi transgenic N. benthamiana plants. Thus, repression of the GMD gene is thus very useful for deleting immunogenic total fucose residues and facilitating the production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants.

  2. Deletion of plant-specific sugar residues in plant N-glycans by repression of GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and β-1,2-xylosyltransferase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kouki; Kagaya, Uiko; Itchoda, Noriko; Tabayashi, Noriko; Matsumura, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins, such as therapeutic antibodies and cytokines, in plants has many advantages in safety and reduced costs. However, plant-made glycoproteins have N-glycans with plant-specific sugar residues (core β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose) and a Lewis a (Le(a)) epitope, Galβ(1-3)[Fucα(1-4)]GlcNAc. Because it is likely that these sugar residues and glycan structures are immunogenic, many attempts have been made to delete them. Previously, we reported the simultaneous deletion of the plant-specific core α-1,3-fucose and α-1,4-fucose residues in Le(a) epitopes by repressing the GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) gene, which is associated with GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis, in Nicotiana benthamiana plants (rGMD plants, renamed to ΔGMD plants) (Matsuo and Matsumura, Plant Biotechnol. J., 9, 264-281, 2011). In the present study, we generated a core β-1,2-xylose residue-repressed transgenic N. benthamiana plant by co-suppression of β-1,2-xylosyltransferase (ΔXylT plant). By crossing ΔGMD and ΔXylT plants, we successfully generated plants in which plant-specific sugar residues were repressed (ΔGMDΔXylT plants). The proportion of N-glycans with deleted plant-specific sugar residues found in total soluble protein from ΔGMDΔXylT plants increased by 82.41%. Recombinant mouse granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) and human monoclonal immunoglobulin G (hIgG) harboring N-glycans with deleted plant-specific sugar residues were successfully produced in ΔGMDΔXylT plants. Simultaneous repression of the GMD and XylT genes in N. benthamiana is thus very useful for deleting plant-specific sugar residues.

  3. Clinical manifestation of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    1998-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an iron-containing heme protein localized in the azurophilic granules of neutrophil granulocytes and in the lysosomes of monocytes, is involved in the killing of several micro-organisms and foreign cells, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, red cells, and malignant and nonmalignant nucleated cells. Despite the primary role of the oxygen-dependent MPO system in the destruction of certain phagocytosed microbes, subjects with total or partial MPO deficiency generally do not have an increased frequency of infections, probably because other MPO-independent mechanism(s) for microbicidal activity compensate for the lack of MPO. Infectious diseases, especially with species of Candida, have been observed predominantly in MPO-deficient patients who also have diabetes mellitus, but the frequency of such cases is very low, less than 5% of reported MPO-deficient subjects. Evidence from a number of investigators indicates that individuals with total MPO deficiency show a high incidence of malignant tumors. Since MPO-deficient PMNs exhibit in vitro a depressed lytic action against malignant human cells, it can be speculated that the neutrophil MPO system plays a central role in the tumor surveillance of the host. However, any definitive conclusion on the association between MPO deficiency and the occurrence of cancers needs to be confirmed in further clinical studies. Clinical manifestations of this disorder depend on the nature of the defect; an acquired abnormality associated with other hematological or nonhematological diseases has been occasionally described, but the primary deficiency is the form more commonly reported. Another area of interest pertinent to MPO expression is related to the use of anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies for the lineage assignment of acute leukemic cells, the definition of FAB MO acute myeloid leukemia, the identification of biphenotypic acute leukemias, and their distinction from acute leukemia with minimal phenotypic deviation

  4. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  5. Iron deficiency in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cortés

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Blood donation results in a substantial loss of iron (200 to 250 mg at each bleeding procedure (425 to 475 ml and subsequent mobilization of iron from body stores. Recent reports have shown that body iron reserves generally are small and iron depletion is more frequent in blood donors than in non-donors. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors and to establish the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors according to sex, whether they were first-time or multi-time donors. Design: From march 20 to April 5, 2004, three hundred potential blood donors from Hemocentro del Café y Tolima Grande were studied. Diagnostic tests: Using a combination of biochemical measurements of iron status: serum ferritin (RIA, ANNAR and the hemoglobin pre and post-donation (HEMOCUE Vital technology medical . Results: The frequency of iron deficiency in potential blood donors was 5%, and blood donors accepted was 5.1%; in blood donors rejected for low hemoglobin the frequency of iron deficiency was 3.7% and accepted blood donors was 1.7% in male and 12.6% in female. The frequency of iron deficiency was higher in multi-time blood donors than in first-time blood donors, but not stadistic significative. Increase nivel accepted hemoglobina in 1 g/dl no incidence in male; in female increase of 0.5 g/dl low in 25% blood donors accepted with iron deficiency, but increased rejected innecesary in 16.6% and increased is 1 g/dl low blood donors female accepted in 58% (7/12, but increased the rejected innecesary in 35.6%. Conclusions: We conclude that blood donation not is a important factor for iron deficiency in blood donors. The high frequency of blood donors with iron deficiency found in this study suggests a need for a more accurate laboratory trial, as hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement alone is not sufficient for detecting and excluding blood donors with iron deficiency without anemia, and ajustes hacia

  6. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  7. [Vitamin A deficiency and xerophtalmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, A da S; Santos, L M

    2000-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review cases of vitamin A deficiency and the effects of vitamin A supplementation on child morbidity and mortality. METHODS: Articles published in scientific journals, technical and scientific books, and also publications by international organizations were used as source of information. RESULTS: Clinical manifestations of xerophthalmia affect the retina (night blindness), the conjunctiva (conjunctival xerosis, with or without Bitot spots), and the cornea (corneal xerosis). Corneal xerosis may lead to corneal ulceration and liquefactive necrosis (keratomalacia). A priori, these signs and symptoms are the best indicators of vitamin A deficiency; they are, however, extremely rare. Laboratory indicators include Conjunctival Impression Cytology and serum retinol concentrations. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the use of two biological markers in order to characterize vitamin A deficiency in a given population. If only one biological marker is used, this marker has to be backed up by a set of at least four additional risk factors. Corneal xerophthalmia should be treated as a medical emergency; In the event of suspected vitamin A deficiency, a 200,000 IU vitamin A dose should be administered orally, repeating the dose after 24 hours (half the dose for infants younger than one year). Vitamin A supplementation in endemic areas may cause a 23 to 30% reduction in the mortality rate of children aged between 6 months and five years, and attenuate the severity of diarrhea. The methods for the control of vitamin A deficiency are available in the short (supplementation with megadoses), medium (food fortification), and long run (diet diversification). CONCLUSION: There is evidence of vitamin A deficiency among Brazilian children. Pediatricians must be aware of the signs and symptoms of this disease, however sporadic they might be. It is of paramount importance that vitamin A be included in public policy plans so that we can ensure the survival of

  8. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  9. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  10. Differential diagnosis of iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A deficiência de ferro é considerada a patologia hematológica mais prevalente no homem. Assim, é fundamental a adequada identificação de suas causas, bem como a diferenciação com outras patologias distintas para adequada abordagem da deficiência de ferro. Neste artigo são brevemente descritas outras condições que podem cursar com anemia microcítica, tais como: talassemias, anemia de doença crônica, anemia sideroblástica e envenenamento por chumbo, patologias estas que devem ser afastadas dura...

  11. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2013-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1-5 muM, normal 20-55 muM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of

  12. Genetics Home Reference: CLPB deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Med Genet. 2015 May;52(5):303-11. doi: 10.1136/jmedgenet-2014-102952. Citation on PubMed GeneReview: CLPB Deficiency Kanabus M, Shahni R, Saldanha JW, Murphy E, ... 2015 Mar;38(2):211-9. doi: 10.1007/s10545-015-9813-0. Citation on ...

  13. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA a

  14. Deficiencies in Indian Joint Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    compartmentalization, and bureaucratic inefficiencies. Indian regional hegemony in South Asia faces significant risks without critically needed reforms to enable...illustrates India’s limited capability to conduct joint operations. Specifically, India demonstrated critical planning deficiencies in joint...society, and this has influenced its understanding of theory and concepts, and its application of those ideas in the development of its own joint

  15. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  16. Deferasirox in pyruvate kinase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Deeren, Dries

    2008-01-01

    Deferasirox in pyruvate kinase deficiency phone: +32-51-237437 (Deeren, Dries) (Deeren, Dries) Department of Haematology, Heilig-Hartziekenhuis Roeselare-Menen vzw - Wilgenstraat 2 - B-8800 - Roeselare - BELGIUM (Deeren, Dries) BELGIUM Registration: 2008-09-10 Received: 2008-09-05 Accepted: 2008-09-10 ePublished: 2008-09-23

  17. Epigenetic Deficiencies and Replicative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell-specific synthetic lethal interactions entail promising therapeutic possibilities. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Pfister et al. describe a synthetic lethal interaction where cancer cells deficient in H3K36me3 owing to SETD2 loss-of-function mutation are strongly sensitized to inhibiti...

  18. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  19. Congenital β-lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchem, F.S.P. van; Pol, G.; Gier, J. de; Böttcher, C.J.F.; Pries, C.

    1966-01-01

    There are several degrees of β-lipoprotein deficiency. If there is no β-lipoprotein present, or if there are only traces of it, the Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome develops. A constant feature of this syndrome is disturbed fat absorption with accumulation of fat in the epithelium of intestinal mucosa and

  20. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency Related Information How are ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital protein S deficiency ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity? National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Active at Any Size! Educational Resources (6 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Obesity and Genetics MalaCards: congenital leptin deficiency Orphanet: Obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency ...

  2. Identifying Causes of Job Performance Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herem, Maynard A.

    1979-01-01

    A model to guide the search for types of performance deficiencies is set forth within the general framework of systems theory. Five types of problems, singly or in combination, are discussed as causes of deficiencies. (Author)

  3. Iron deficiency--facts and fallacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oski, F A

    1985-04-01

    Iron deficiency occurs in all strata of society, is primarily a result of postnatal feeding practices and not due to congenital deficiencies of iron, can be prevented by appropriate dietary guidance, and, when present, produces important nonhematologic manifestations.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VII deficiency , is caused by mutations in the F7 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein ... about the gene associated with factor VII deficiency F7 Related Information What is a gene? What is ...

  5. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Recommend on Facebook ... deficiency and VKDB? Protect Your Baby from Bleeds Fact Sheet   Download and print this fact ...

  6. IRON DEFICIENCY IN RURAL GHANAIAN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-05-05

    May 5, 2001 ... School of Medical Sciences, University of Science and Technology, ... as controls and newly diagnosed iron-deficient children entering as in-patients. ..... WalterT., Kovacisky J. and Stekel A. Effect of mild iron deficiency.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: primary carnitine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Filippo CA, Pasquali M, Berry SA, Longo N. Expanded newborn screening identifies maternal primary carnitine deficiency. Mol ... deficiency disorders in children. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Nov;1033:42-51. Review. Citation on ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of potassium in the blood (hyponatremia and hyperkalemia, respectively). Individuals with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency can also ... acid in the blood (metabolic acidosis). The hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis associated with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency ...

  9. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  10. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  11. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  12. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  13. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... deficiency in Europe. DESIGN: The VDSP protocols were applied in 14 population studies [reanalysis of subsets of serum 25(OH)D in 11 studies and complete analysis of all samples from 3 studies that had not previously measured it] by using certified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on biobanked...

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity.

  15. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  16. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  17. Molecular Genetics of Lactase Deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Mikko

    2006-01-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) (MIM 223000) is a rare autosomal recessive gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. The CLD locus was previously assigned by linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. In this study, the molecular background of this disorder is reported. The CLD locus was refined in 32 CLD patients in 24 families by using microsatellite and single nucleot...

  18. Carnitine deficiency disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Mitochondrial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids provides an important source of energy for the heart as well as for skeletal muscle during prolonged aerobic work and for hepatic ketogenesis during long-term fasting. The carnitine shuttle is responsible for transferring long-chain fatty acids across the barrier of the inner mitochondrial membrane to gain access to the enzymes of beta-oxidation. The shuttle consists of three enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, carnitine acylcarnitine translocase, carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 2) and a small, soluble molecule, carnitine, to transport fatty acids as their long-chain fatty acylcarnitine esters. Carnitine is provided in the diet (animal protein) and also synthesized at low rates from trimethyl-lysine residues generated during protein catabolism. Carnitine turnover rates (300-500 micromol/day) are deficiency have been described. There is speculation that carnitine supplements might be beneficial in other settings (such as genetic acyl-CoA oxidation defects--"secondary carnitine deficiency", chronic ischemia, hyperalimentation, nutritional carnitine deficiency), but efficacy has not been documented. The formation of abnormal acylcarnitines has been helpful in expanded newborn screening programs using tandem mass-spectrometry of blood spot acylcarnitine profiles to detect genetic fatty acid oxidation defects in neonates. Carnitine-deficient diets (vegetarian) do not have much effect on carnitine pools in adults. A modest 50% reduction in carnitine levels is associated with hyperalimentation in newborn infants, but is of doubtful significance. The above considerations indicate that carnitine does not become rate-limiting unless extremely low; testing the benefits of nutritional supplements may require invasive endurance studies of fasting ketogenesis or muscle and cardiovascular work.

  19. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  20. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance of studying different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy.

  1. [Iodine deficiency in cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, I; Magyari, M; Stief, L

    1998-08-30

    The thyroid hormone deficiency on cardiovascular function can be characterized with decreased myocardial contractility and increased peripheral vascular resistance as well as with the changes in lipid metabolism. 42 patients with cardiovascular disease (mean age 65 +/- 13 yr, 16 males) were investigated if iodine insufficiency can play a role as a risk factor for the cardiovascular diseases. The patients were divided in 5 subgroups on the ground of the presence of hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, coronary disfunction and arrhythmia. Urine iodine concentration (5.29 +/- 4.52 micrograms/dl) was detected with Sandell-Kolthoff colorimetric reaction. The most decreased urine iodine concentration was detected in the subgroups with arrhythmia and congestive heart failure (4.7 +/- 4.94 micrograms/dl and 4.9 +/- 4.81 micrograms/dl, respectively). An elevated TSH level was found by 3 patients (5.3 +/- 1.4 mlU/l). An elevation in lipid metabolism (cholesterol, triglyceride) associated with all subgroups without arrhythmia. In conclusion, the occurrence of iodine deficiency in cardiovascular disease is frequent. Iodine supplementation might prevent the worsing effect of iodine deficiency on cardiovascular disease.

  2. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  3. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA.

  4. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, L.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1–5 μM, normal 20–55 μM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of 1 year, after interruption of carnitine supplementation for a 4-week period the carnitine profile was assessed and the free carnitine level had dropped to 10.4 μmol/l (normal: 20–55 μM) and total car...

  5. Skin wound healing in MMP2-deficient and MMP2 / plasminogen double-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøssing, Signe; Rønø, Birgitte; Hald, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    -sensitive MMPs during wound healing. To address whether MMP2 is accountable for the galardin-induced healing deficiency in wildtype and Plg-deficient mice, incisional skin wounds were generated in MMP2 single-deficient mice and in MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice and followed until healed. Alternatively, tissue...... was isolated 7 days post wounding for histological and biochemical analyses. No difference was found in the time from wounding to overt gross restoration of the epidermal surface between MMP2-deficient and wildtype control littermate mice. MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice were viable and fertile, and displayed...... an unchallenged general phenotype resembling that of Plg-deficient mice, including development of rectal prolapses. MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice displayed a slight increase in the wound length throughout the healing period compared with Plg-deficient mice. However, the overall time to complete healing...

  6. Toward reassessing data-deficient species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Lucie M; Bielby, Jon; Kearney, Stephen; Orme, C David L; Watson, James E M; Collen, Ben

    2017-06-01

    One in 6 species (13,465 species) on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List is classified as data deficient due to lack of information on their taxonomy, population status, or impact of threats. Despite the chance that many are at high risk of extinction, data-deficient species are typically excluded from global and local conservation priorities, as well as funding schemes. The number of data-deficient species will greatly increase as the IUCN Red List becomes more inclusive of poorly known and speciose groups. A strategic approach is urgently needed to enhance the conservation value of data-deficient assessments. To develop this, we reviewed 2879 data-deficient assessments in 6 animal groups and identified 8 main justifications for assigning data-deficient status (type series, few records, old records, uncertain provenance, uncertain population status or distribution, uncertain threats, taxonomic uncertainty, and new species). Assigning a consistent set of justification tags (i.e., consistent assignment to assessment justifications) to species classified as data deficient is a simple way to achieve more strategic assessments. Such tags would clarify the causes of data deficiency; facilitate the prediction of extinction risk; facilitate comparisons of data deficiency among taxonomic groups; and help prioritize species for reassessment. With renewed efforts, it could be straightforward to prevent thousands of data-deficient species slipping unnoticed toward extinction. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Alcoholic Myelopathy and Nutritional Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Haruki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Shohei; Takahashi, Mie; Kawagashira, Yuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2017-01-01

    A patient with chronic alcoholism presented with myelopathy and low serum folate and cobalamin levels. A 42-year-old alcoholic man had gait disturbance for 4 months. A neurological examination revealed marked spasticity with increased deep tendon reflexes and extensor plantar responses of the lower limbs. His cobalamin level was decreased and his serum folate level was particularly low. His plasma ammonia level was not increased. Abstinence and folic acid and cobalamin supplementation stopped the progression of his neurological deficits. This case indicates that nutritional deficiency should be monitored closely in patients with chronic alcoholism who present with myelopathy. PMID:28049986

  8. Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naini, Ali; Toscano, Antonio; Musumeci, Olimpia;

    2009-01-01

    storage disease type X and novel mutations in the gene encoding the muscle subunit of PGAM (PGAM2). DESIGN: Clinical, pathological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospitals and academic institutions. Patients A 37-year-old Danish man of Pakistani origin who had...... PGAM deficiency, and molecular studies revealed 2 novel homozygous mutations, a nonsense mutation and a single nucleotide deletion. Pathological studies of muscle showed mild glycogen accumulation but prominent tubular aggregates in both patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found that glycogen storage disease...

  9. Danos ao DNA promovidos por ácido 5-aminolevulínico: possível associação com o desenvolvimento de carcinoma hepatocelular em portadores de porfiria aguda intermitente DNA damage induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid: a possible association with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in acute intermittent porphyria patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Onuki

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA is a heme precursor accumulated in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, which might be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in symptomatic patients. Under metal catalyzed oxidation, ALA and its cyclic dimerization product, 3,6-dihydropyrazine-2,5-dipropanoic acid, produce reactive oxygen species that damage plasmid and calf thymus DNA bases, increase the steady state level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2´-deoxyguanosine in liver DNA and promote mitochondrial DNA damage. The final product of ALA, 4,5-dioxovaleric acid (DOVA, is able to alkylate guanine moieties, producing adducts. ALA and DOVA are mutagenic in bacteria. This review shows an up-to-date literature data that reinforce the hypothesis that the DNA damage induced by ALA may be associated with the development of HCC in AIP patients.

  10. Pen and Pal are nucleotide-sugar dehydratases that convert UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-6-deoxy-D-GlcNAc-5,6-ene and then to UDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-L-AltNAc for CMP-pseudaminic acid synthesis in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Hwang, Soyoun; Ericson, Jaime; Bowler, Kyle; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2015-01-09

    CMP-pseudaminic acid is a precursor required for the O-glycosylation of flagellin in some pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, a process known to be critical in bacterial motility and infection. However, little is known about flagellin glycosylation in Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we identified and functionally characterized an operon, named Bti_pse, in Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis ATCC 35646, which encodes seven different enzymes that together convert UDP-GlcNAc to CMP-pseudaminic acid. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria complete this reaction with six enzymes. The first enzyme, which we named Pen, converts UDP-d-GlcNAc to an uncommon UDP-sugar, UDP-6-deoxy-D-GlcNAc-5,6-ene. Pen contains strongly bound NADP(+) and has distinct UDP-GlcNAc 4-oxidase, 5,6-dehydratase, and 4-reductase activities. The second enzyme, which we named Pal, converts UDP-6-deoxy-D-GlcNAc-5,6-ene to UDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-L-AltNAc. Pal is NAD(+)-dependent and has distinct UDP-6-deoxy-d-GlcNAc-5,6-ene 4-oxidase, 5,6-reductase, and 5-epimerase activities. We also show here using NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry that in B. thuringiensis, the enzymatic product of Pen and Pal, UDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-L-AltNAc, is converted to CMP-pseudaminic acid by the sequential activities of a C4″-transaminase (Pam), a 4-N-acetyltransferase (Pdi), a UDP-hydrolase (Phy), an enzyme (Ppa) that adds phosphoenolpyruvate to form pseudaminic acid, and finally a cytidylyltransferase that condenses CTP to generate CMP-pseudaminic acid. Knowledge of the distinct dehydratase-like enzymes Pen and Pal and their role in CMP-pseudaminic acid biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria provides a foundation to investigate the role of pseudaminic acid and flagellin glycosylation in Bacillus and their involvement in bacterial motility and pathogenicity.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D comprises a group of fat-soluble pro-hormones, obtained from sun exposure, food, and supplements, and it must undergo two hydroxylation reactions to be activated in the body. Several studies have shown the role of vitamin D in mineral metabolism regulation, especially calcium, phosphorus, and bone metabolism. Some factors such as inadequate vitamin intake and liver or kidney disorders can lead to vitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, vitamin D malnutrition may also be linked to susceptibility to chronic diseases such as heart failure, peripheral artery disease, high blood pressure, cognitive impairment including foggy brain and memory loss, and autoimmune diseases including diabetes type I. Recent research has revealed that low levels of vitamin D increase the risk of cardiovascular-related morbidity (Sato et al., 2004 and mortality (Pilz et al., 2008. Also, hypertension contributes to a reduction in bone mineral density and increase in the incidence of stroke and death. This article reviews the function and physiology of vitamin D and examines the effects of vitamin D deficiency on susceptibility to stroke, as a cardiovascular event, and its morbidity and subsequent mortality.

  12. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Collado-Vazquez, Susana

    2010-07-16

    Disability is a complex phenomenon, and the ways it has been conceived, explained and treated have varied notably throughout history. As the years go by, human beings have evolved and, at the same time, so have medicine and art. And therein lies the extraordinary value, from the ontological point of view, of many works of art, which would never have been produced without the intervention of disease and the practice of the medical art. The aim of this work is to address the study of some deficiencies, disabilities and neurological pathologies that have been represented in paintings at different times in history. This article begins with the study of pictures that deal with dwarves and other misnamed freaks of nature that have been represented by painters from Velazquez to Titian or Rubens. The study looks at paintings of cripples, pictures containing the mentally disabled, with examples by Bruegel the Elder or Munch, as well as certain neurological disorders that have been portrayed in paintings, such as Escaping criticism by Pere Borrell or Sad inheritance by Sorolla. Likewise, we also reflect on the trite concept of disease and artistic creativity. The artistic representation of deficiency and disability has evolved in parallel to the feelings of men and women in each period of history and, at the same time, their social evolution. Nowadays, this concept continues to advance and some artists no longer represent the sick person, but instead the illness itself.

  13. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  14. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  15. Vitamin C deficiency in weanling guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Trueba, Gilberto Perez; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to their limited reserves of micronutrients and their rapid growth. In the present study, we examined the effect of vitamin C deficiency on markers of oxidative stress in plasma, liver and brain of weanling guinea pigs. Vitamin C deficiency...... increased, while protein oxidation decreased (P¼0003). The results show that the selective preservation of brain ascorbate and induction of DNA repair in vitamin C-deficient weanling guinea pigs is not sufficient to prevent oxidative damage. Vitamin C deficiency may therefore be particularly adverse during...

  16. Mannose Binding Lectin Deficiency and Clinical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Erken

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity consists of macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer cells, mucosal immunuglobulins and the comlement system. Mannose binding lectin (MBL takes part in innate immunity through opsonisation and complement activation. MBL deficiency is associated with some infections and autoimmune disorders. However some studies indicate that MBL deficiency alone is not essential for immunity but it may intensify the clinic picture of an immune deficiency that already exists. This article refers to clincal studies related to MBL and brings up the clinical importance of MBL deficiency. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 565-574

  17. Generalised hyperpigmentation in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Ghosh, Sumit Kr; Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Das, Shubhabrata; Pradhan, Sourav; Das, Abhishek

    2014-08-01

    In developing countries like India, nutritional deficiencies are prevalent and hyperpigmentation due to protein energy malnutrition, zinc deficiency and pellagra are common. Indian women, especially vegetarian are prone to vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present as anaemia, neurological defect, gastrointestinal symptoms or dementia. Hyperpigmentation as the first presentation of Vitamin B12 deficiency is rare. Our patient, a 45 year-old Hindu vegetarian female presented to us with generalized hyperpigmentation. Examination revealed associated anaemia and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory investigation confirmed vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical features along with hyperpigmentation improved with vitamin B12 supplementation. We report this case to highlight this rare manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A high index of clinical suspicion is warranted to diagnose the case. Since India is a country with a large number of potential vitamin B12 deficiency cases, the physicians need to be aware of all the varied manifestations of this vitamin deficiency. In case of hyperpigmentation, nutritional aspect must be ruled out as it is reversible. Early replacement therapy may also help to prevent morbidities like dementia and neuropathy.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: factor X deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency occurs in approximately 1 per million individuals worldwide. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  20. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Mohammed M. Jan

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron def...

  1. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron def...

  2. Photodissociation of neutron deficient nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnabend, K.; Babilon, M.; Hasper, J.; Mueller, S.; Zarza, M.; Zilges, A. [TU Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    The knowledge of the cross sections for photodissociation reactions like e.g. ({gamma}, n) of neutron deficient nuclei is of crucial interest for network calculations predicting the abundances of the so-called p nuclei. However, only single cross sections have been measured up to now, i.e., one has to rely nearly fully on theoretical predictions. While the cross sections of stable isotopes are accessible by experiments using real photons, the bulk of the involved reactions starts from unstable nuclei. Coulomb dissociation (CD) experiments in inverse kinematics might be a key to expand the experimental database for p-process network calculations. The approach to test the accuracy of the CD method is explained. (orig.)

  3. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient.

  4. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Hilary Denis

    2012-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important public health problem, with major implications in patients with a pre-existing liver pathology of viral origin. Hepatitis C, for example, is one of the diseases in which alcohol consumption can lead to the transition from a fairly benign outline to a potentially life-threatening liver disease. Alcohol abuse is usually identified on the basis of clinical judgment, alcoholism related questionnaires, laboratory tests and, more recently, biomarkers. Also on this list of tests, carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) is widely available and useful for determining recent alcohol consumption, particularly when corroborated with elevation of other liver-associated enzymes. Clinicians should be aware of the indications and limitations of this test in order to better evaluate alcohol consumption in their patients.

  5. Genetic causes for iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Saad,Sara Teresinha O.

    2010-01-01

    As causas genéticas de deficiência de ferro, real ou funcional, ocorrem por defeitos em muitas proteínas envolvidas na absorção e metabolismo de ferro. Neste capítulo descreveremos sucintamente causas genéticas de carência de ferro para a síntese de hemoglobina, que cursa então com anemia microcítica e hipocrômica. Ressalto que estas são alterações raras, com poucas descrições na literatura. Em alguns casos, o ferro funcional não está disponível para os eritroblastos sintetizarem hemoglobina,...

  6. B12 Deficiency with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: to rewieved the clinical and laboratory properties of seven cases with megaloblastic anemia. Clinical and laboratory findings of seven cases with megaloblastic anemia are described. İt is determined that all of the patients received little or no animal products by nutritional history. Clinically apatite, malasia, headeche, otism, and parestheia in the lower extremities and foods were present in patients. On physical examination; four patients had glossit, four had hyporeflexia, one had ataxia. Folat level was normal and B12 vitamin level was low in all patients. The MCV (mean corpuscular volume was normal in three patients. Hypersegmentation of neutrophil was observed in all patients, leukopenia in two, and trombocytopenia was observed in one patient.Conclusion: it is suggested B12 vitamin deficiency in the patients that received little or no animal products by nutritional history. However, hypersegmentation of neutrophil in peripheral blood sample is an important finding for diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia.

  7. Vitamin A deficiency in quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, R.B.; Bailey, W.W.

    1943-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the symptoms of avitaminosis A in growing and adolescent bobwhites. Chicks from parents that have received a diet rich in vitamin A may have enough stored to carry them a week or ten days on a growing diet deficient in vitamin A before symptoms of deficiency occur. The first sign is ruffled feathering, with the wing primaries standing out from the body and drooping. Ophthalmia in one or both eyes occurs and may close the eyes completely, but this condition is not severe in all cases and may not even be noticeable. Birds show poor growth, loss of appetite, and weakness before death. Under the conditions of the experiments discussed herein, death may occur in the fourth or fifth week, and mortality is high......Postmortem examination may reveal visceral gout with thick deposits of urates on the kidneys, in the ureters, on the heart, in the proventriculus, and occasionally covering all the viscera. There may also be hemorrhage of the heart and other organs....Adolescent quail reared on a diet rich in vitamin A may be able to live through the winter on a maintenance diet low in this vitamin without showing symptoms of avitaminosis, but some individuals whose storage of vitamin A in the liver is not as great as that of others may succumb to visceral gout.....A growing mash for quail which contains sufficient vitamin A when fresh may, after a period of storage, lose enough of the vitamin to cause the characteristic symptoms of avitaminosis A to appear.

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Elalaily, Rania; Bedair, Said; Kassem, Islam

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH) and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH) 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products), encouraging adequate exposure

  9. Mutaciones del gen de la Hemocromatosis en donantes de sangre voluntarios y en pacientes con Porfiria cutánea tarda en Chile Mutations of hemochromatosis gene in volunteer blood donors and Chilean porphyria cutanea tarda patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Wolff F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La acumulación de hierro hepático asociada a mutaciones en el gen HFE de la hemocromatosis hereditaria (HH en los pacientes con porfiria cutánea tarda (PCT podría tener un papel en la etiología y en la expresión clínica de esta enfermedad. Se estudió la frecuencia de las mutaciones H63D y C282Y en un grupo de pacientes con PCT y se la comparó con la observada en un grupo de donantes voluntarios de sangre. Los pacientes con PCT fueron catalogados como portadores de la forma hereditaria o adquirida de la enfermedad, según presentaran o no mutaciones en el gen uroporfirinógeno decarboxilasa (UROD. El 50% de los pacientes con PCT eran portadores de la forma genética de la enfermedad, porcentaje significativamente mayor que lo informado en otras series. El 23% de los donantes voluntarios de sangre eran portadores de la mutación H63D y 2.4% lo era de la mutación C282Y. Frecuencias similares a lo encontrado por otros autores en población chilena de etnia blanca, en población argentina y española, pero significativamente más alta que lo encontrado en estudios en población aborigen araucana. Esto tiene, probablemente, relación con el predominio de ascendencia española en la población blanca chilena. La frecuencia de mutación en el gen HFE en pacientes con PCT no fue significativamente diferente que la observada en donantes voluntarios de sangre. Tampoco hubo diferencias significativas en la frecuencia de estas mutaciones entre los casos con PCT adquirida respecto de aquellos en que ésta era de origen genético. Los resultados obtenidos no permiten afirmar que exista asociación entre la PCT y la condición de portador de mutaciones del gen HFE de la hemocromatosis hereditaria.In patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT, hepatic iron accumulation associated to hereditary hemochromatosis (HH could play a role in the etiology and in the clinical expression of the disease. The H63D and C282Y mutations of the HFE gene frequency were

  10. How common is vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In considering the vitamin B-12 fortification of flour, it is important to know who is at risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency and whether those individuals would benefit from flour fortification.This article reviews current knowledge of the prevalence and causes of vitamin B-12 deficiency and considers ...

  11. Growth Hormone Deficiency, Brain Development, and Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: American Medical Association, 535 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. In order to determine what effect, if any, growth hormone (GH) has on human brain development, 29 patients (mean age 11.7 years) with GH deficiency were selected according to the following criteria: no evidence of reversible GH deficiency, onset of…

  12. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  13. Dietary recommendations in patients with deficiency anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Santoyo-Sánchez

    2015-07-01

    Nutritionists should understand deficiency anaemia, and physicians, particularly general practitioners, should be aware of dietary requirements. In this article, therefore, both health care professionals have come together to briefly explain, with examples, the type of diet that should be recommended to patients with deficiency anaemia.

  14. An update on serine deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, S. N.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.; Brilstra, E. H.; Van Maldergem, L.; Coskun, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, E.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive

  15. Psychomotor development in children with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Emin; Erguven, Muferet; Guven, Sirin; Erdogan, Makbule; Balta, Tulin

    2010-09-01

    Iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia are the most common nutritional deficiencies in children, especially in developing countries. Iron-deficiency anemia in infancy is associated with impaired neurodevelopment. Studies have shown an association between iron deficiency without anemia and adverse effects on psychomotor development. To determine the effects of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia on psychomotor development in childhood. . We evaluated psychomotor development in healthy children with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia with the use of the Denver II Developmental Screening Test (DDST-II). If the child score was more than 90th percentile compared to children in the same age group, the test was scored as "delay" it was scored as a "caution" if the child score was between the 75th and 90th percentiles. The test result was interpreted as "normal," if there was no delay and only one "caution" for any item. If the child had one or more "delays" or more than two "cautions," the result was classified as "abnormal." DDST-II scores were abnormal in 67.3% of subjects with iron-deficiency anemia, 21.6% of those with iron deficiency, and 15.0% of control subjects. The difference from the control group in the percentage of abnormal scores was significant for subjects with iron-deficiency anemia (p iron deficiency (p = 0.203); p > .05. (p-value, post-hoc comparison of 2 groups.) Iron-deficiency anemia impaired psychomotor development during childhood. However, the evidence on the adverse effects of iron deficiency remains controversial. The Denver II Developmental Screening Test is a valuable test to detect early developmental delays, especially in infants with risk factors.

  16. Prevalence of Color Vision Deficiency in Qazvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad khalaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Color vision deficiency (CVD is an X chromosome-linked recessive autosomal dominant. Determine the prevalence of color blindness in Qazvin population. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study color vision deficiency examined in 1853 individuals with age 10-25 years old who participated in private clinics and eye clinic of Bu-Ali hospital in Qazvin in 2010. The screening of color vision deficiency was performed using Ishihara test. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 with χP2P test with p<0.05. Results: Mean age of participant was 17.86±4.48 years. 59.5% of them were female. 3.49% of the total population had color vision deficiency that 0.93% and 2.56% were female and male respectively. Conclusion: color vision deficiency must be noticed by decision makers in health field for screen planning.

  17. Molecular diagnosis of coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubero, Delia; Montero, Raquel; Armstrong, Judith; Espinós, Carmen; Palau, Francesc; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Salviati, Leonardo; Navas, Placido; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) deficiency syndromes comprise a growing number of neurological and extraneurological disorders. Primary-genetic but also secondary CoQ deficiencies have been reported. The biochemical determination of CoQ is a good tool for the rapid identification of CoQ deficiencies but does not allow the selection of candidate genes for molecular diagnosis. Moreover, the metabolic pathway for CoQ synthesis is an intricate and not well-understood process, where a large number of genes are implicated. Thus, only next-generation sequencing techniques (either genetic panels of whole-exome and -genome sequencing) are at present appropriate for a rapid and realistic molecular diagnosis of these syndromes. The potential treatability of CoQ deficiency strongly supports the necessity of a rapid molecular characterization of patients, since primary CoQ deficiencies may respond well to CoQ treatment.

  18. [Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischker, A H; Kolb, G F

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency increases with age. Patients with dementia and spouses of patients with dementia are at special risk for the development of vitamin B12 deficiency. In a normal diet this vitamin is present only in animal source foods; therefore, vegans frequently develop vitamin B12 deficiency if not using supplements or foods fortified with cobalamin. Apart from dementia, most of these manifestations are completely reversible under correct therapy; therefore it is crucial to identify and to treat even atypical presentations of vitamin B12 deficiency as early as possible. This article deals with the physiology and pathophysiology of vitamin B12 metabolism. A practice-oriented algorithm which also considers health economic aspects for a rational laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is presented. In cases with severe neurological symptoms, therapy should be parenteral, especially initially. For parenteral treatment, hydroxocobalamin is the drug of choice.

  19. [Trial of indirect screening of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, S; Guardamagna, O; Bracco, G; Ponzone, A

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of an early diagnosis of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency among hyperphenylalaninemic infants, when specific screening tests cannot be performed, was evaluated. Three tetrahydrobiopterin deficient patients, two with dihydropteridine reductase deficiency and one with dihydrobiopterin synthetase deficiency were examined together with their parents and compared with twelve phenylketonuric patients, their parents and sixteen normal subjects. The parameters considered in the hyperphenylalaninemic patients (degree of neonatal hyperphenylalaninemia, phenylalanine lowering speed in response to a restricted diet, dietary tolerance to phenylalanine, oral phenylalanine load) were found to be insufficiently or lately indicative. By contrast, heterozygosity tests (molar ratio (Phe)2/Tyr and sigma discriminant function) performed on the parents allowed a suspicion of tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency, the definite diagnosis being of course based upon specific investigations.

  20. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf T Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical presentations may be subtle and go unnoticed, thus making true prevalence studies difficult. Adolescents with severe VDD may present with vague manifestations including pain in weight-bearing joints, back, thighs and/or calves, difficulty in walking and/or climbing stairs, or running and muscle cramps. Adaptation includes increased parathormone (PTH and deceased insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I secretion. PTH enhances the tubular reabsorption of Ca and stimulates the kidneys to produce 1, 25-(OH 2D3 that increases intestinal calcium absorption and dissolves the mineralized collagen matrix in bone, causing osteopenia and osteoporosis to provide enough Ca to prevent hypocalcaemia. Decreased insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I delays bone growth to economize calcium consumption. Radiological changes are not uncommon and include osteoporosis/osteopenia affecting long bones as well as vertebrae and ribs, bone cysts, decalcification of the metaphysis of the long bones and pseudo fractures. In severe cases pathological fractures and deformities may occur. Vitamin D treatment of adolescents with VDD differs considerably in different studies and proved to be effective in treating all clinical, biochemical, and radiological manifestations. Different treatment regiments for VDD have been discussed and presented in this mini-review for practical use. Adequate vitamin D replacement after treating VDD, improving calcium intake (milk and dairy products, encouraging

  1. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  2. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions AMACR deficiency alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) deficiency is a disorder ...

  5. Genetic, molecular and functional analyses of complement factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, S.C.; Trouw, L.A.; Renault, N.;

    2009-01-01

    Complete deficiency of complement inhibitor factor I (FI) results in secondary complement deficiency due to uncontrolled spontaneous alternative pathway activation leading to susceptibility to infections. Current genetic examination of two patients with near complete FI deficiency and three...

  6. Seventeen Alpha-hydroxylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew-Lee Wong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen a-hydroxylase deficiency (17OHD is a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in which defects in the biosynthesis of cortisol and sex steroid result in mineralocorticoid excess, hypokalemic hypertension and sexual abnormalities such as pseudohermaphroditism in males, and sexual infantilism in females. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and is caused by mutations in the gene encoding cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17, which is the single polypeptide that mediates both 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities. We report the case of a 15-year-old patient with 17OHD who had a female phenotype but male karyotype (46,XY. The diagnosis was made based on classical clinical features, biochemical data and molecular genetic study. Two mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing, including a S106P point mutation in exon 2 and a 9-bp (GACTCTTTC deletion from nucleotide position 1519 in exon 8 of CYP17. The first of these mutations was found in the father and the second in the mother, and both have been previously reported in Asia. The patient's hypertension and hypokalemia resolved after glucocorticoid replacement and treatment with potassium-sparing diuretics. Sex hormone replacement was prescribed for induction of sexual development and reduction of the final height. Prophylactic gonadectomy was scheduled. In summary, 17OHD should be suspected in patients with hypokalemic hypertension and lack of secondary sexual development so that appropriate therapy can be implemented.

  7. Deficient Approaches to Human Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eStelzer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is the workhorse of imaging-based human cognitive neuroscience. The use of fMRI is ever-increasing; within the last 4 years more fMRI studies have been published than in the previous 17 years. This large body of research has mainly focused on the functional localization of condition- or stimulus-dependent changes in the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD signal.In recent years, however, many aspects of the commonly practiced analysis frameworks and methodologies have been critically reassessed. Here we summarize these critiques, providing an overview of the major conceptual and practical deficiencies in widely used brain-mapping approaches, and exemplify some of these issues by the use of imaging data and simulations. In particular, we discuss the inherent pitfalls and shortcomings of methodologies for statistical parametric mapping. Our critique emphasizes recent reports of excessively high numbers of both false positive and false negative findings in fMRI brain mapping. We outline our view regarding the broader scientific implications of these methodological considerations and briefly discuss possible solutions.

  8. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T‑treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T‑deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  10. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  11. Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Clare Radlowski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is the most common form of nutrient deficiency worldwide. It is highly prevalent due to the limited availability of high quality food in developing countries, and poor dietary habits in industrialized countries. According to the World Health Organization, it affects nearly 2 billion people and up to 50% of women who are pregnant. Maternal anemia during pregnancy is especially burdensome to healthy neurodevelopment in the fetus because iron is needed for proper neurogenesis, development, and myelination. Maternal anemia also increases the risk of low birth weight, either due to premature birth or fetal growth restriction, which is associated with delayed neurocognitive development and even psychiatric illness. As rapid neurodevelopment continues after birth infants that received sufficient iron in utero, but that receive a low iron diet after 6 months of age, also show deficits in neurocognitive development, including impairments in learning and memory. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive complications of iron deficiency during critical pre- and postnatal periods of brain development are difficult to remedy, persisting into adulthood. Thus, preventing iron deficiency in the pre- and postnatal periods is critical as is devising new means to recapture cognitive function in individuals who experienced early iron deficiency. This review will discuss the prevalence of pre- and postnatal iron deficiency, the mechanism, and effects of iron deficiency on brain and cognitive development.

  12. Treatment of zinc deficiency without zinc fortification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald OBERLEAS; Barbara F. HARLAND

    2008-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in animals became of interest until the 1950s. In this paper, progresses in researches on physi-ology of Zn deficiency in animals, phytate effect on bioavailability of Zn, and role of phytase in healing Zn deficiency of animals were reviewed. Several studies demonstrated that Zn is recycled via the pancreas; the problem of Zn deficiency was controlled by Zn homeostasis. The endogenous secretion of Zn is considered as an important factor influencing Zn deficiency, and the critical molar ratio is 10. Phytate (inositol hexaphosphate) constituted up to 90% of the organically bound phosphorus in seeds. Great improvement has been made in recent years on isolating and measuring phytate, and its structure is clear. Phytate is considered to reduce Zn bioavailability in animal. Phytase is the enzyme that hydrolyzes phytate and is present in yeast, rye bran, wheat bran, barley, triticale, and many bacteria and fungi. Zinc nutrition and bioavailability can be enhanced by addition of phytase to animal feeds. Therefore, using phytase as supplements, the most prevalent Zn deficiency in animals may be effectively corrected without the mining and smelting of several tons of zinc daily needed to correct this deficiency by fortification worldwide.

  13. Wound healing in Mac-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Nagaraja, Sridevi; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Fine, David; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y; Reifman, Jaques; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2017-05-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) is a macrophage receptor that plays several critical roles in macrophage recruitment and activation. Because macrophages are essential for proper wound healing, the impact of Mac-1 deficiency on wound healing is of significant interest. Prior studies have shown that Mac-1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in healing, including delayed wound closure in scalp and ear wounds. This study examined whether Mac-1 deficiency influences wound healing in small excisional and incisional skin wounds. Three millimeter diameter full thickness excisional wounds and incisional wounds were prepared on the dorsal skin of Mac-1 deficient (Mac-1(-/-) ) and wild type (WT) mice, and wound healing outcomes were examined. Mac-1 deficient mice exhibited a normal rate of wound closure, generally normal levels of total collagen, and nearly normal synthesis and distribution of collagens I and III. In incisional wounds, wound breaking strength was similar for Mac-1(-/-) and WT mice. Wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice displayed normal total macrophage content, although macrophage phenotype markers were skewed as compared to WT. Interestingly, amounts of TGF-β1 and its downstream signaling molecules, SMAD2 and SMAD3, were significantly decreased in the wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice compared to WT. The results suggest that Mac-1 deficiency has little impact on the healing of small excisional and incisional wounds. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the effect of single genetic deficiencies on wound healing may markedly differ among wound models. These conclusions have implications for the interpretation of the many prior studies that utilize a single model system to examine wound healing outcomes in genetically deficient mice. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed.

  15. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ......Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH...

  16. Molecular genetics of human lactase deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Irma; Torniainen, Suvi; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2009-01-01

    Lactase non-persistence (adult-type hypolactasia) is present in more than half of the human population and is caused by the down-regulation of lactase enzyme activity during childhood. Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a rare severe gastrointestinal disorder of new-borns enriched in the Finnish population. Both lactase deficiencies are autosomal recessive traits and characterized by diminished expression of lactase activity in the intestine. Genetic variants underlying both forms have been identified. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular defects of human lactase deficiencies and their phenotype-genotype correlation, the implications on clinical practice, and the understanding of their function and role in human evolution.

  17. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Andreas M

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicle cells have a high turnover. A caloric deprivation or deficiency of several components, such as proteins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and vitamins, caused by inborn errors or reduced uptake, can lead to structural abnormalities, pigmentation changes, or hair loss, although exact data are often lacking. The diagnosis is established through a careful history, clinical examination of hair loss activity, and hair quality and confirmed through targeted laboratory tests. Examples of genetic hair disorders caused by reduced nutritional components are zinc deficiency in acrodermatitis enteropathica and copper deficiency in Menkes kinky hair syndrome.

  18. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been misdiagnosed as musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, polymyalgia rheumatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Here, we report two cases presented with kyphoscoliosis, diagnosed to have severe vitamin D deficiency.

  19. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH-deficiency ......Sweat secretion is often disturbed in patients with GH secretory disorders. Hyperhidrosis is a classic feature of acromegaly, and it has recently been shown that GH-deficient patients exhibit decreased sweating capacity after pilocarpine stimulation of the skin. Thus, patients with GH...

  20. Responses of Legumes to Phosphorus Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency is a universal problem in most world soils. Furthermore, of all nutrients, shortage of phosphorus has the biggest impact on legumes, therefore, lots of studies were carried out for identifying responses of legumes to shortage of phosphorus. They concluded that to maintain improved growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions plants develop two major mechanisms: (i) Phosphorus acquisition (root morphology, root exudation and phosphorus uptake mechanisms), (ii) Phosphorus utilization (internal mechanisms associated with better use of absorbed phosphorus at cellular level). The aim of this brief review is to elucidate root morphological changes and rhizophere acidification to phosphorus deficiency.

  1. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A.S.S. Bachega

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available We determined the frequency of large rearrangements and point mutations in 130 Brazilian patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and correlated genotype with phenotype. The frequency of CYP21 deletions was lower (4.4% than in most of the previous series described, whereas the frequency of large gene conversions was similar to the frequency reported in the literature (6.6%. The most frequent point mutations were I2 splice (41.8% in salt wasting - SW, I172N (32.6% in simple virilizing - SV and V281L (40.2% in the late onset form - LO. The frequency of the nine most common point mutations was similar to that reported for other countries. The 93 fully genotyped patients were classified into 3 mutation groups based on the degree of enzymatic activity (A@ 2%, C>20%. In group A, 62% of cases presented the SW form; in group B, 96% the SV form, and in group C, 88% the LO form. We diagnosed 80% of the affected alleles after screening for large rearrangements and 15 point mutations. To diagnose these remaining alleles we sequenced the CYP21 gene of one patient with the SV form and identified a heterozygous G->A transition in codon 424. This mutation leads to a substitution of glycine by serine in a conserved region and was also found in a compound heterozygous state in 4 other patients. The mutation G424S presented a linkage disequilibrium with CYP21P and C4A gene deletions and HLA DR17, suggesting a probable founder effect. Search for the G424S mutation in other populations will reveal if it is restricted to the Brazilian patients or if it has a wider ethnic distribution.

  2. Screening and Expression of the Gene Encoding Coenzyme B12-Independent Glycerol Dehydratase from Metagenome%宏基因组中不依赖辅酶B12甘油脱水酶基因的筛选和表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦旭钦; 陈云来; 吴杰群; 韦宇拓; 杜丽琴; 黄日波

    2013-01-01

    With a given primer pair, a DNA segment of 3.3 kb was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a metagenomic DNA of a soil sample as template, and then cloned in vector pSE380, forming recombinant plasmids pSE380-dhaB12 for sequencing and expression. Sequence analysis indicated that the amino acid sequences encoded by this segment was 99%identical to that reported for coenzyme B12-independent glycerol dehydratase of Clostridium butyricum. The dhaB12 genes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli by induction of iso-propyl-beta-D-thiogalatopyranoside (IPTG), and synthesis of two proteins at 88 kD and 34 kD were determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The expressed enzyme showed significant glycerol dehydratase activity in the absence of coenzyme B12.%通过特定的引物,以土壤宏基因组DNA为模板,采用PCR技术扩增获得3.3 kb的DNA片段,该片段连接于pSE380载体构建重组质粒pSE380-dhaB12用于测序和表达。序列分析表明,该DNA片段编码的氨基酸序列与已报导的丁酸梭菌不依赖辅酶B12甘油脱水酶的相似性达99%。通过IPTG诱导,dhaB12基因在大肠杆菌中表达成功,SDS-PAGE分析表明有88 kD和34 kD两条蛋白质条带,在没有辅酶B12存在的情况下,所表达的酶具有明显的甘油脱水酶活性。

  3. PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF IODINE DEFICIENCY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... that severe iodine deficiency in Ethiopian women leads to 50,000 ... there will be hypothyroidism that causes low metabolic ... high in pregnant mothers and in school children as evidenced by research articles. Especially in.

  4. Vitamin D deficiency in pediatric critical illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran B. Hebbar, MD, FCCM

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in the pediatric critical care population. Significant seasonal differences were noted even in the critically ill. The role of vitamin D in certain diseases like asthma in critically ill children merit further study.

  5. Isoprenoid biosynthesis and mevalonate kinase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Mevalonaat Kinase Deficiëntie (MKD) is een aangeboren ziekte geassocieerd met heftige koortsaanvallen die drie tot vier dagen aanhouden en gepaard gaan met koude rillingen, gewrichtsklachten, huiduitslag, hoofdpijn, duizeligheid, buikpijn, braken en diarree. De koortsaanvallen treden gemiddeld eens

  6. PREVALENCE AND SEVERITY OF IODINE DEFICIENCY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... BACKGROUND: Iodine deficiency disorder is a major problem worldwide, .... method involves the titration of a solution of salt ..... blocks the thyroid peroxidase enzyme (29, 34). .... Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, Lea.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link) ACT Sheet: Elevated C16-OH +/- C18:1-OH and Other Long Chain Acylcarnitines (PDF) Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency guanidinoacetate methyltransferase ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GM3 synthase deficiency GM3 synthase ...

  10. Impulsivity: A deficiency of inhibitory control?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansbergen, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Impulsivity has been defined as acting without thinking. Impulsivity can be quantified by impulsivity questionnaires, but also by behavioral paradigms which tax inhibitory control. Previous research has repeatedly demonstrated deficient inhibitory control in psychopathological samples characterized

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rare Disorders (NORD) RareConnect GeneReviews (1 link) Familial Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  12. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia and Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in young children at the time of stroke and in age-matched healthy controls was compared in a case-control study conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: glutamate formiminotransferase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... glutamate formiminotransferase deficiency is also characterized by megaloblastic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia occurs when a person has a low number ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (4 ... Encyclopedia: Megaloblastic Anemia (image) Health Topic: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders Health ...

  15. VITAMIN A DEFICIENCY IN NIGERIAN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Keywords: Vitamin A deficiency, Nigeria, Children. INTRODUCTION. Vitamin A ... related illness when the diet is supplemented with. Vitamin A. This .... rates of 49.6% and 48.6% respectively. The prevalence .... Bangladesh. J. Trop. Paediatr.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production in these cells. This defect underlies the muscle cramping and myoglobinuria that occur after strenuous exercise in ... phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency , including episodes of exercise-induced muscle cramping and myoglobinuria. Related Information What does it mean ...

  18. Iron Deficiency, Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin Deficiencies in Crohn's Disease: Substitute or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Phuong Nguyen, G

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by inflammatory reactions, complications, extraintestinal manifestations and a loss of intestinal functions, for example, failures of absorption and secretion. According to intestinal dysfunction, a wide array of pathogenetic pathways is existing leading to iron deficiency and numerous vitamins as well as trace element deficiencies. Complications, symptoms and signs of those deficiencies are common in IBD with varying degrees of clinical significance. This review focuses on selected micronutrients including iron, zinc, magnesium and some vitamins. Epidemiology with respect to IBD, pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical aspects are addressed. Finally, some suggestions for treatment of deficient situations are discussed. In conclusion, some micronutrients have significant impact on complications and quality of life in IBD. Deficiencies may even influence the course of the disease. Those deficiencies should be thoroughly supplemented.

  19. Dietary restriction causing iodine-deficient goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Tim; Plumb, Emma; Callaghan, James; Jackson, Michael; Michaelis, Louise

    2015-08-01

    Iodine-deficient goitre was common in some parts of the UK prior to the introduction of salt iodisation. Many contemporary salt preparations do not contain much iodine, and there are renewed concerns about the iodine status of the population. We present a boy with severe allergy who developed goitre and significant thyroid dysfunction in association with an iodine-deficient 'food-restricted' diet. The case highlights the importance of a comprehensive nutritional assessment in all children on multiple food restrictions.

  20. [Nutritive correction and iodine deficiency in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilina, N M; Pozdniakov, A L

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that deficiency of calcium and iodine--essential food components needed for children's valuable growth and development--is observed presently in children of different age. Considering this fact, the "Danone" company together with Institute of Nutrition (Russia) has developed a special formula, including calcium, iodine and vitamin D, for dairy products "Rastishka". The use of these products facilitates both reducing the risk of the above mentioned microelement deficiency and children's growth and development.

  1. Environmental controls on iodine deficiency disorders (IDD)

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C C; Fordyce, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    It is estimated that in excess of one billion people world-wide are at risk from iodine deficiency disorders (IDD), the most obvious manifestation of which is goitre (see Fordyce, 2000). Iodine deficiency is the world’s most common cause of mental retardation and brain damage, and the negative effects of impaired mental function have a significant impact on the social and economic development of communities. Although IDD can be caused by a number of factors, goitrogens fo...

  2. Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Causing Kyphoscoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Singhai, Abhishek; Banzal, Subodh

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among Indian population. Women are especially at risk for severe vitamin D deficiency. The risk is higher for those who are multiparous and postmenopausal. Poor exposure to sunlight, higher latitude, winter season, inadequate diet, older age, obesity and malabsorption are also important risk factors. Symptoms of hypovitaminosis D, including diffuse or migratory pain affecting several sites (especially the shoulder, pelvis, ribcage and lower back) have also been ...

  3. Colour vision deficiency and physics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maule, Louise; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    1 in 12 males suffer from some form of colour vision deficiency (CVD) which in the present colour dominated world of education presentation can be a severe disadvantage. Although aware of ‘colourblindness’ most teachers make little or no adjustment for these pupils for whom tasks may be more difficult. This article examines colour vision deficiency and looks at ways in which we can help the many students who have this problem.

  4. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Ashley G; Zhao, Fujun; Lee, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of ...

  5. Cushing, acromegaly, GH deficiency and tendons

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cushing’s syndrome, induced by an endogenous or exogenous cortisol excess, and acromegaly, the clinical syndrome caused by growth hormone (GH) excess in adulthood, as well as the disease induced by GH deficiency (GHD), represent perfect models for the evaluation of the effects induced by chronic exposure in vivo, respectively, to cortisol and GH/IGF-1 excess or deficiency on the complex structure of the tendons as well as on the related post-traumatic repair mechanism. Although the literature...

  6. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  7. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  8. Deficiently Extremal Cohen-Macaulay Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chanchal Kumar; Pavinder Singh

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study homological properties of deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay algebras. Eagon–Reiner showed that the Stanley–Reisner ring of a simplicial complex has a linear resolution if and only if the Alexander dual of the simplicial complex is Cohen–Macaulay. An extension of a special case of Eagon–Reiner theorem is obtained for deficiently extremal Cohen–Macaulay Stanley–Reisner rings.

  9. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body’s iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear ph...

  10. Tob deficiency superenhances osteoblastic activity after ovariectomy to block estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Usui, Michihiko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Tsuji, Kunikazu; OIKAWA, kaoru; Miyazono, Kohei; Ishikawa, Isao; YAMAMOTO, Tadashi; Nifuji, Akira; Noda, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Tob (transducer of erbB2) is a member of antiproliferative family proteins and acts as a bone morphogenic protein inhibitor as well as a suppressor of proliferation in T cells, which have been implicated in postmenopausal bone loss. To determine the effect of Tob deficiency on estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss, we analyzed bone metabolism after ovariectomy or sham operation in Tob-deficient mice. Ovariectomy in WT mice decreased trabecular bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) as exp...

  11. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  12. Recognition and management of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Paula; Ghetu, Maria V; Langan, Robert C

    2009-10-15

    Vitamin D deficiency affects persons of all ages. Common manifestations of vitamin D deficiency are symmetric low back pain, proximal muscle weakness, muscle aches, and throbbing bone pain elicited with pressure over the sternum or tibia. A 25-hydroxyvitamin D level should be obtained in patients with suspected vitamin D deficiency. Deficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of less than 20 ng per mL (50 nmol per L), and insufficiency is defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 20 to 30 ng per mL (50 to 75 nmol per L). The goal of treatment is to normalize vitamin D levels to relieve symptoms and decrease the risk of fractures, falls, and other adverse health outcomes. To prevent vitamin D deficiency, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants and children receive at least 400 IU per day from diet and supplements. Evidence shows that vitamin D supplementation of at least 700 to 800 IU per day reduces fracture and fall rates in adults. In persons with vitamin D deficiency, treatment may include oral ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) at 50,000 IU per week for eight weeks. After vitamin D levels normalize, experts recommend maintenance dosages of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) at 800 to 1,000 IU per day from dietary and supplemental sources.

  13. An Approach to Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Rasul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia is a common reason for referral to a gastroenterologist. In adult men and postmenopausal women, gastrointestinal tract pathology is often the cause of iron-deficiency anemia, so patients are frequently referred for endoscopic evaluation. Endoscopy may be costly and at times difficult for the patient. Therefore, physicians need to know what lesions can be identified reliably and, more importantly, the importance of ruling out life-threatening conditions such as occult malignancy. Over the past decade, a number of prospective studies have been completed that examined the yield of endoscopy in the investigation of iron-deficiency anemia. The present article provides a broad overview of iron-deficiency anemia, with particular emphasis on hematological diagnosis, etiology, the use of endoscopy in identifying lesions and iron-repletion therapy. Other clinical scenarios, including assessment of patients on anti-inflammatory or anticoagulation therapy and patients with bleeding of obscure origin, are also addressed. The present article provides a diagnostic algorithm to iron-deficiency anemia, which describes a more systematic manner in which to approach iron-deficiency anemia.

  14. Lower limb deficient children in the Netherlands : epidemiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, LJM; Boonstra, AM; Groothoff, JW; Cornel, MC; Eisma, WH

    2000-01-01

    information on the characteristics of children with limb deficiencies and amputations in the Netherlands is largely lacking. The present study aimed to collect data about the prevalence of congenital deficiencies, the ratio of congenital to acquired limb deficiencies, types of lower leg deficiency o

  15. In HepG2 cells, coexisting carnitine deficiency masks important indicators of marginal biotin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusiewicz, Anna; Boysen, Gunnar; Mock, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    A large number of birth defects are related to nutrient deficiencies; concern that biotin deficiency is teratogenic in humans is reasonable. Surprisingly, studies indicate that increased urinary 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (3HIAc), a previously validated marker of biotin deficiency, is not a valid biomarker in pregnancy. In this study we hypothesized that coexisting carnitine deficiency can prevent the increase in 3HIAc due to biotin deficiency. We used a 2-factor nutrient depletion design to induce isolated and combined biotin and carnitine deficiency in HepG2 cells and then repleted cells with carnitine. To elucidate the metabolic pathogenesis, we quantitated intracellular and extracellular free carnitine, acylcarnitines, and acylcarnitine ratios using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Relative to biotin-sufficient, carnitine-sufficient cells, intracellular acetylcarnitine increased by 90%, propionylcarnitine more than doubled, and 3HIAc increased by >10-fold in biotin-deficient, carnitine-sufficient (BDCS) cells, consistent with a defensive mechanism in which biotin-deficient cells transesterify the acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates of the biotin-dependent carboxylases to the related acylcarnitines. Likewise, in BDCS cells, the ratio of acetylcarnitine to malonylcarnitine and the ratio of propionylcarnitine to methylmalonylcarnitine both more than tripled, and the ratio of 3HIAc to 3-methylglutarylcarnitine (MGc) increased by >10-fold. In biotin-deficient, carnitine-deficient (BDCD) cells, the 3 substrate-derived acylcarnitines changed little, but the substrate:product ratios were masked to a lesser extent. Moreover, carnitine repletion unmasked biotin deficiency in BDCD cells as shown by increases in acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, and 3HIAc (each increased by >50-fold). Likewise, ratios of acetylcarnitine:malonylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine:methylmalonylcarnitine, and 3HIAc:MGc all increased by >8-fold. Our findings provide strong

  16. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P iron deficiency anemia group (165 ± 103 and 138 ± 39 U/L, respectively; P iron deficiency anemia and control groups (P > .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P deficiency anemia causes important reductions in paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  17. Complement genetics, deficiencies, and disease associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayilyan, Karine R

    2012-07-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity. More than 45 genes encoding the proteins of complement components or their isotypes and subunits, receptors, and regulators have been discovered. These genes are distributed throughout different chromosomes, with 19 genes comprising three significant complement gene clusters in the human genome. Genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4, and C3) is associated with autoimmune diseases due to the failure of clearance of immune complexes (IC) and apoptotic materials, and the impairment of normal humoral response. Deficiencies of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the early components of the alternative (factor D, properdin) and terminal pathways (from C3 onward components: C5, C6, C7, C8, C9) increase susceptibility to infections and their recurrence. While the association of MBL deficiency with a number of autoimmune and infectious disorders has been well established, the effects of the deficiency of other lectin pathway components (ficolins, MASPs) have been less extensively investigated due to our incomplete knowledge of the genetic background of such deficiencies and the functional activity of those components. For complement regulators and receptors, the consequences of their genetic deficiency vary depending on their specific involvement in the regulatory or signalling steps within the complement cascade and beyond. This article reviews current knowledge and concepts about the genetic load of complement component deficiencies and their association with diseases. An integrative presentation of genetic data with the latest updates provides a background to further investigations of the disease association investigations of the complement system from the perspective of systems biology and systems genetics.

  18. Escherichia coli contains a protein that is homologous in function and N-terminal sequence to the protein encoded by the nifS gene of Azotobacter vinelandii and that can participate in the synthesis of the Fe-S cluster of dihydroxy-acid dehydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, D H

    1996-07-05

    In this paper, I report the purification of a protein from Escherichia coli that is very similar in sequence, molecular weight, and the reactions it can catalyze to the protein encoded by the Azotobacter vinelandii nifS gene. This E. coli protein contains pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor and catalyzes the removal of sulfur from cysteine to form alanine and S0. When dithiothreitol is present along with cysteine, the S0 formed is reduced to S2-. This protein has a reactive sulfhydryl group that is essential for activity. As isolated, this sulfhydryl group appears to be in a disulfide linkage with the sulfhydryl group from the phosphopantetheine moiety of the acyl carrier protein. The purified E. coli protein can mobilize the sulfur from cysteine and contribute it to the formation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster on the apoprotein of E. coli dihydroxy-acid dehydratase. A mechanism is proposed for the early stages of the synthesis of Fe-S clusters using this protein and sulfur in the S0 oxidation state.

  19. [Diagnostic criteria for vitamin D-deficient rickets and hypocalcemia-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets or osteomalacia, which is associated with hypomineralization of bone and chondrocytes, and/or hypocalcemia. Accumulating evidence indicates increase in frequency of vitamin D deficiency due to insufficient intake of vitamin D and calcium and decrease in sunshine. It is necessary for clinician to diagnose vitamin D deficiency accurately and treat patients with vitamin D deficiency adequately. For the purpose, clinical guideline or expert opinion on vitamin D deficiency has been reported.

  20. Dietary iodine deficiency in the Gippsland region of Victoria, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Mohammad Ashequr

    2017-01-01

    Background Iodine is an essential micronutrient for the production of thyroid hormones and normal neurodevelopment. A deficiency in iodine causes a number of defects collectively known as Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD). Even mild iodine deficiency in pregnancy is a risk factor for babies as it may result in impaired intellectual development; this is the most serious consequence of mild to moderate dietary iodine deficiency. Australia overall is iodine deficient. However, in the Nationa...

  1. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake toge...

  2. Experimental Copper Deficiency, Chromium Deficiency and Additional Molybdenum Supplementation in Goats – Pathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary copper (Cu deficiency, chromium (Cr deficiency and molybdenosis (Mo has been suggested to cause the "mysterious" moose disease in the southwest of Sweden. The present experiment was performed on goats to investigate the clinical, chemical, and pathological alterations after 20 months feeding of a semi-synthetic diet deficient in Cu and Cr. Four groups were included in the study: control group (n = 4, Cu-deficient group (group 1, n = 4, Cr-deficient group (group 2, n = 2 and Cu+Cr-deficient group (group 3, n = 3. Group 3 was additionally supplemented with tetrathiomolybdate during the last 2 months of the experiment. Main histopathological findings in groups 1 and 3 were the lesions in the liver, characterised by a severe active fibrosis, bile duct proliferation, haemosiderosis and mild necroses. Additionally, degenerative alterations of the exocrine pancreas were prominent in groups 1 and 3. Lesions in group 3 were more pronounced than in group 1. In group 3, the skin showed an atrophic dermatosis, while in group 2 a crusty dermatitis caused by Candida spp. was observed. This study shows that liver, pancreas and skin are mainly affected by a long term deficiency of copper and the findings are complicated by molybdenum application while chromium deficiency produced no histomorphological effects in our study.

  3. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding in cholestatic infants with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselt, P.M. van; Kok, K.F.; Vorselaars, A.D.; Vlerken, L. van; Nieuwenhuys, E.; Koning, T.J. de; Vries, R.A. de; Houwen, R.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exclusively breastfed infants with unrecognised cholestatic jaundice are at high risk of a vitamin K deficiency (VKD) bleeding. It is presently unknown whether (the size of) this risk depends on the degree of cholestasis. Since alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1AD) induces a variable degr

  4. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding in cholestatic infants with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, P. M.; Kok, K.; Vorselaars, A. D. M.; van Vlerken, L.; Nieuwenhuys, E.; de Koning, T. J.; de Vries, Rindert; Houwen, R. H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Exclusively breastfed infants with unrecognised cholestatic jaundice are at high risk of a vitamin K deficiency (VKD) bleeding. It is presently unknown whether (the size of) this risk depends on the degree of cholestasis. Since alpha-l-antitrypsin deficiency (A1AD) induces a variable degr

  5. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in blood does not decrease in proportion of the Zn deficiency. Adverse effects of Zn deficiency vary with age: low weight gain, diarrhoea, aneroxia and neurobehavioral disturbances are observed in infants, while skin changes and dwarfism are frequent in toddlers and adolescents. Common manifestations of Zn deficiency among elderly include hypogeusia, chronic non-healing ulcers and recurrent infections.Ameliorative measures of Zn deficiency in humans can be classified in two groups, namely, nutraceutical and biofortification of food grains. Nutraceutical interventions include pharmaceutical supplements, dietary supplements and dietary diversification, while biofortification of food grains can be achieved by genetic modification (GM of crops or by agronomic techniques that include soil or/and foliar fertilization of crops.The major disadvantage of nutraceutical approaches is that the major beneficiaries are urban people and the poor rural masses that need adequate Zn nutrition most are left out. Genetic biofortification of food grains requires large amounts of funds and a fairly long-period of time. Further, a large number of countries have not yet accepted genetically modified (GM foods. On the other hand agronomic biofortification of food grains yields immediate effects and rural and urban people are equally benefitted. Our studies have shown that Zn concentration in cereals (rice, wheat etc and pulses can be considerably increased by soil or/and foliar

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Matthew P; Lombardo, Stephen J; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (32 ng/mL). After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D-sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly differ depending on vitamin D status (P = .15 and .77, respectively). There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency

  7. [Control of iron deficiency in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jacques; Dillon, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder worldwide, especially in developing countries. It occurs when iron absorption cannot compensate iron requirements and losses. Requirements are especially high in pregnant women, infants, young children and adolescents who run a higher risk of being iron-deficient. In developing countries, the main cause of iron deficiency is the low iron bioavailability of the diet. The consequences of iron deficiency are many and serious, affecting not only individuals' health but also the development of societies and countries. The prevention and the control of iron deficiency and anemia in all groups of a population with different iron requirements imply to coordinate different interventions. Iron fortification of staple foods or condiments directed to the whole population is a sustainable and low cost-effective approach. However, at some periods of life, especially during pregnancy and in children from the age of 6 months, iron requirements are high. For pregnant women, the current approach favours the daily iron-folate supplementation during pregnancy but the results in terms of public health are disappointing. The preventive weekly iron-folate supplementation of women during their reproductive life, whose efficacy is recognized, offers a promising alternative; its impact in terms of public health is under current evaluation. For infants and young children, iron fortification of complementary food is effective but this food is generally imported and economically inaccessible to populations with limited resources. The production, by small private units from local products, of complementary foods of low viscosity, good nutritional quality, fortified with vitamins and minerals, and of low cost is at hand in several countries. When complementary foods are not available, the preventive iron supplementation from 6 to 18 months of age has to be advised. This approach should be strengthened by the advantages of the weekly

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency in Medical Inpatients: A Retrospective Study of Implications of Untreated Versus Treated Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Asher Hussain; Singh, Gurjit; Owojori, Olukolade; Kela, Ram; Spoors, Shirley; Abbas, Mohamed; Barton, Florence; Rogers, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency may further increase fracture risk in patients with decreased bone mineral density. A cross-sectional study on serum vitamin D concentrations in medical inpatients was conducted at Bassetlaw District General Hospital between April 2014 and January 2015 (10 months), and the relationship of serum vitamin D concentrations with calcium and alkaline phosphatase was evaluated. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D immunoassays were used and analyzed in the local laboratory. The total number of patients analyzed was 200, age range 18–99 years, with mean age of 76 years. The most common presentation was found to be fall/collapse. The following cutoff points for serum vitamin D were used: levels ≤30 nmol/L for severe deficiency, >30–50 nmol/L for moderate deficiency, >50–75 nmol/L for mild deficiency, and anything above 75 nmol/L as normal. Of the 209 participants examined, 78 (37.3%) participants had mild vitamin D deficiency, 54 (25.8%) participants had moderate vitamin D deficiency, 68 (32.5%) participants had severe vitamin D deficiency, and 9 (4.3%) participants with low vitamin D levels died during their admission. Of the 122 moderate/severe patients, 70 (57.4%) patients had their vitamin D deficiency treated, according to local Trust guidelines. The study found no relationship between serum calcium levels and vitamin D deficiency, whereas patients’ alkaline phosphatase levels were found to be higher with increased severity of vitamin D deficiency. The study examined the implications of untreated severe/moderate vitamin D deficiency compared to treated deficiency, in terms of the frequency of readmission with similar complaints. It was found that the rate of readmission within one year in patients who were not treated was 57%, compared to 48% in patients whose vitamin D deficiency was treated. Presenting after falls was a recurring theme. It was concluded that even if moderate vitamin D deficiency can be asymptomatic, it is important to

  9. Thyroid disorders in mild iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurberg, P; Nøhr, S B; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A B; Andersen, S; Bülow Pedersen, I; Knudsen, N; Perrild, H; Jørgensen, T; Ovesen, L

    2000-11-01

    Comparative epidemiologic studies in areas with low and high iodine intake and controlled studies of iodine supplementation have demonstrated that the major consequence of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency for the health of the population is an extraordinarily high occurrence of hyperthyroidism in elderly subjects, especially women, with risk of cardiac arrhythmias, osteoporosis, and muscle wasting. The hyperthyroidism is caused by autonomous nodular growth and function of the thyroid gland and it is accompanied by a high frequency of goiter. Pregnant women and small children are not immediately endangered but the consequences of severe iodine deficiency for brain development are grave and a considerable safety margin is advisable. Moreover, a shift toward less malignant types of thyroid cancer and a lower radiation dose to the thyroid in case of nuclear fallout support that mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency should be corrected. However, there is evidence that a high iodine intake may be associated with more autoimmune hypothyroidism, and that Graves' disease may manifest at a younger age and be more difficult to treat. Hence, the iodine intake should be brought to a level at which iodine deficiency disorders are avoided but not higher. Iodine supplementation programs should aim at relatively uniform iodine intake, avoiding deficient or excessive iodine intake in subpopulations. To adopt such a strategy, surveillance programs are needed.

  10. Clinical implications of vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Matyjaszek-Matuszek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a common medical problem worldwide and its prevalence rises along with latitude, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, limited sunlight exposure and aging. A great body of evidence has shown that patients with vitamin D deficiency have increased cardiovascular risks and total mortality. Conversely, the presence of comorbidities progressive with age such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and hypertension places the patients at an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. The multidirectional effect of vitamin D deficiency is present in different phases of the aging process. Based on the literature review, the risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency most often found in post-menopausal women include limited sun exposure and time spent outdoors, inadequate dietary vitamin D intake, winter season and increased age. Vitamin D supplementation in this group might offer prevention of falls and fractures and may be beneficial for cardiovascular health, what may be especially important in osteoporotic and elderly populations. Prevention and treatment processes involve education regarding sunlight exposure and pharmacological cholecalciferol supplementation according to the recommendations for Central Europe. This manuscript reviews the role of vitamin D and its deficiency and considers their clinical implications, with particular regard to peri- and postmenopausal women.

  11. Caspase 12 in calnexin-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendyk, Jody; Zuppini, Anna; Shore, Gordon; Opas, Michal; Bleackley, R Chris; Michalak, Marek

    2006-11-07

    We investigated a role for calnexin, caspase 12, and Bap31 in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in calnexin-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a calnexin-deficient human T cell line (NKR). We showed that calnexin-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts are relatively resistant to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Western blot analysis demonstrated that both wild-type and calnexin-deficient cells contained a caspase 12 protein. Caspase 12 expression was slightly inhibited in calnexin-deficient cells, and the protein carried out specific cleavage in the presence of thapsigargin. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that in the endoplasmic reticulum, caspase 12 forms complexes with Bap31 and calnexin. Treatment of wild-type cells with thapsigargin induced apoptosis and cleavage of Bap31. However, in the absence of calnexin, there was no significant cleavage of Bap31. There was also a negligible processing of caspase 8 in these cells. This work indicates that calnexin may play a role in modulating the sensitivity of a cell to apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress, in conjunction with caspase 12 and Bap31.

  12. Biochemical Assessment of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez-Aguilera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 deficiency syndrome includes clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases that show a variety of severe and debilitating symptoms. A multiprotein complex encoded by nuclear genes carries out CoQ10 biosynthesis. Mutations in any of these genes are responsible for the primary CoQ10 deficiency, but there are also different conditions that induce secondary CoQ10 deficiency including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion and mutations in genes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The diagnosis of CoQ10 deficiencies is determined by the decrease of its content in skeletal muscle and/or dermal skin fibroblasts. Dietary CoQ10 supplementation is the only available treatment for these deficiencies that require a rapid and distinct diagnosis. Here we review methods for determining CoQ10 content by HPLC separation and identification using alternative approaches including electrochemical detection and mass spectrometry. Also, we review procedures to determine the CoQ10 biosynthesis rate using labeled precursors.

  13. Overview: recognizing the problem of magnesium deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelig, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The magnesium content of the usual American diet is less than the recommended dietary allowance. Excesses of some macro- and micro-nutrients interact with Mg, increasing its requirements. Marginal deficiency of Mg is not associated with hypomagnesemia, is not characterized by typical manifestations, as is thus difficult to diagnose. Serum or plasma Mg levels are held within narrow limits unless tissue levels are very low, or renal function is poor. Vulnerability to Mg deficiency increases during growth and development, pregnancy, when under physical or psychological stress, and during illness or its treatment that interferes with absorption or causes loss of Mg. Evidence of biochemical changes of early Mg deficiency is rarely sought, although the roles of Mg in many enzyme systems are recognized. The effects of Mg deficiency on metabolism, even in disorders caused by vitamin dependencies in which Mg is a co-factor, are largely unexplored. Deficiency of Mg is diagnosed confidently when the laboratory reports hypomagnesemia in patients with convulsions or arrhythmias. Without these signs, Mg levels are not often ordered, even in the presence of neuromuscular irritability such as respond to Mg repletion. Because Mg supplementation or Mg-sparing drugs protect against premature or ectopic heart beats and sudden death, to which diuretic-treated hypertensive patients are at risk, it is increasingly being advised that their Mg status be determined.

  14. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the global level is still needed. Understanding the epidemiology of MNDs is critical to understand what intervention strategies will work best under different conditions.

  15. Sneddon syndrome associated with Protein S deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Refah; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Tombul, Temel

    2012-01-01

    Sneddon syndrome (SS) is rare, arterio-occlusive disorder characterized by generalized livedo racemosa of the skin and various central nervous symptoms due to occlusion of medium-sized arteries of unknown. Seizure, cognitive impairment, hypertension, and history of repetitive miscarriages are the other symptoms seen in this disease. Livedo racemosa involves persisting irreversible skin lesions red or blue in color with irregular margins. Usually, SS occurs in women of childbearing age. Protein S deficiency is an inherited or acquired disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We present a 33-year-old woman with SS with diffuse livedo racemosa, recurrent cerebrovascular diseases, migraine-type headache, sinus vein thrombosis, and protein S deficiency. Protein S deficiency and with Sneddon syndrome rarely encountered in the literature.

  16. MRI findings of complete growth hormone deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiba, Yozo [National Hospital of Okayama (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on the pituitary gland of 20 children (age range, 2-11 years) with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. Sixteen patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency showed disappearance of the pituitary stalk, disappearance of high signal area of the posterior pituitary, presence of ectopic pituitary, and decreased volume of the anterior pituitary. Many of them had a history of perinatal abnormalities such as asphyxia at delivery, breech delivery, and bradytocia. On the contrary, patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency presented no abnormal findings on MR images, and had no history of perinatal abnormalities. The findings of pituitary stalk separation syndrome suggested the presence of multiple hypopituitarism. (S.Y.).

  17. Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events in Glut1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Eltze, Christin; Heussinger, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    View Supplementary Video Movement disorders are a major feature of Glut1 deficiency. As recently identified in adults with paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia, similar events were reported in pediatric Glut1 deficiency. In a case series, parent videos of regular motor state and paroxysmal events were requested from children with Glut1 deficiency on clinical follow-up. A questionnaire was sent out to 60 families. Videos of nonparoxysmal/paroxysmal states in 3 children illustrated the ataxic-dystonic, choreatiform, and dyskinetic-dystonic nature of paroxysmal events. Fifty-six evaluated questionnaires confirmed this observation in 73% of patients. Events appeared to increase with age, were triggered by low ketosis, sleep deprivation, and physical exercise, and unrelated to sex, hypoglycorrhachia, SLC2A1 mutations, or type of ketogenic diet. We conclude that paroxysmal events are a major clinical feature in Glut1 deficieny, linking the pediatric disease to adult Glut1D-associated exercise-induced paroxysmal dyskinesias.

  18. Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HR Joshaghani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a toxic material for mammalians. It is detoxificated and converted to urea in the urea cycle in liver. Each defect in the urea cycle cause increase in blood ammonia level. Ornithine transcarbamylase enzyme (OTC is the second enzyme in the urea cycle that exists in mitochondria. OTC deficiency is the most common hereditary disorder in the urea cycle. In this study, 45 hyper ammonia patients were selected (2-13 years old and assayed for serum OTC, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT. Four patients (n=45, 8.9% suffered from OTC deficiency. One patient was male (n=29, 3.4% and the others were female (n=16, 18.8%. About half of children (53.3 with hyper ammonia have liver disease. Further studies on OTC deficiency and OTC gene mutations in Iran are recommended.

  19. Multispectral Analysis of Color Vision Deficiency Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergejs FOMINS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Color deficiency tests are usually produced by means of polygraphy technologies and help to diagnose the type and severity of the color deficiencies. Due to different factors, as lighting conditions or age of the test, standard characteristics of these tests fail, thus not allowing diagnosing unambiguously the degree of different color deficiency. Multispectral camera was used to acquire the spectral images of the Ishihara and Rabkin pseudoisochromatic plates in the visible spectrum. Spectral data was converted to cone signals, and successive mathematics applied to provide a simple simulation of the test performance. Colorimetric data of the each pixel of the test image can be calculated and distribution of color coordinates is presented.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.259

  20. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assuncao, Ana G.L.; Persson, Daniel Olof; Husted, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    to develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency....... They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we propose...... in this review a putative model of how plants sense zinc deficiency....