WorldWideScience

Sample records for degrees full width

  1. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis for resolution of asymmetrically apodized optical systems with slit apertures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andra Naresh Kumar Reddy; Dasari Karuna Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Resolution for the modified point spread function (PSF) of asymmetrically apodized optical systems has been analysed by a new parameter half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) in addition to the well-defined parameter full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The distribution of half-maximum energy in the centroid of modified PSF has been investigated in terms of HWHM on good side and HWHM on bad side. We observed that as the asymmetry in PSF increases, FWHM of the main peak increases and then decreases and is being aided by the degree of amplitude apodization in the central region of slit functions. In the present study, HWHM (half-width at half-maximum) of the resultant PSF has been defined to characterize the resolution of the detection system. It is essentially a line of projection, which measures the width of the main lobe at its half-maximum position from the diffraction centre and has been computed for various amplitudes and antiphase apodizations of the slit aperture. We have noticed that HWHM on the good side decreases at the cost of the increased HWHM on the bad side in the presence of asymmetric apodization.

  2. Effects of strip and full-width tillage on soil carbon IV oxide-carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Highest CO2-C fluxes, bacteria ... Key words: Carbon IV oxide-carbon flux, soil bacteria and fungi, strip tillage, full-width tillage, sunflower. .... Urea fertilizer (50 kg N ha-1) and triple ..... mulch on soil physical properties and growth of maize.

  3. On the Secrecy Degrees of Freedom with Full Duplex Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Nurul Huda; Mogensen, Preben Elgaard

    2017-01-01

    and the delay reduction of full duplex communication are somewhat limited in realistic network settings, leading researchers to study other possible applications of full duplex communication which can provide significantly higher gains over half duplex communication. Physical layer security is an example...... of such an application. The potential of full duplex nodes in improving the physical layer security of a communication link is investigated in this contribution. We specifically derive the information theoretic secrecy degrees of freedom measure for a pair of nodes communicating in full duplex mode. Moreover, closed...

  4. Medical students’ approaches to learning over a full degree programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Reid

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Students take three approaches to learning and studying: deep, surface and strategic, influenced by the learning environment. Following the General Medical Council's report "Tomorrow's Doctors," a deep approach was cultivated in Years 1 and 2 of a university undergraduate medical programme by introducing explicit written learning objectives constructed according to Biggs' SOLO taxonomy, problem-based learning and constructively aligned in-course assignments and examinations. The effect of these changes was measured with the Approaches to Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST. Scores were highest for a deep approach and lowest for a surface approach and showed relatively little change during the degree programme, apart from a slight fall in the scores for a surface approach, particularly for students undertaking an intercalated science degree. Possible explanations include: students' approaches may be established prior to university entry; deep scores were already high at the beginning of the programme and may be difficult to increase further; the changes in learning environment may not be strong enough to alter approaches which students perceive as having been successful.

  5. Correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width against mesiodistal width of central upper incisor in Buginese tribe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahruddin Thalib

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Various types of anatomical landmarks of the face should match its proportions with the size of the teeth which is the interalar width, intercomissural width, interpupillary width, Intercanthal width, and byzigomatic width. Some of face landmarks can be used as a guide in the selection of anterior teeth in complete denture, especially if the pre extraction record such as radiography image, extracted teeth, model study, the remaining teeth, face shape, and the shape of the curved jaw have been lost. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width against mesiodistal incisivus centralis width in a group of Buginese tribe. Ninety nine Buginese tribe subjects aged 17-25 were selected. The interalar width, intercommisural width, and mesiodistal incisor centralis teeth were measured using caliper about three times for accuracy and precision. Mean of interalar width and mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width in males more width than females (p0.05. The degree of correlation between interalar width against mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width was 0.030, -0.246, 0,225 in Buginese tribe, males, and females (p>0.05. : The degree of correlation between intercommisural width against  mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width in Buginese tribe was 0,054, 0,013, 0,153 in Buginese tribe, males, and females (p>0.05. The degree of correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width was 0.301 and 0.356 in Buginese tribe and males (p0.05. In conclusion, there is no significant correlation between interalar width and intercommisural width against mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla width in a group of Buginese tribe. Interalar width and intercommisural width  directly proportional to mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla in a group of Buginese tribe. Interalar width and intercommisural width  inversely proportional to mesiodistal incisor centralis maxilla in males and directly

  6. Interference minima effect of high-order harmonic generation from H2+ with different full width at half maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Jun; Du, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Dan; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of the interference minima of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in H2+ molecule with varying the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the laser field by solving the one-dimensional (1D) time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) within the non-Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The numerical results show that the probability of the electron recombined with the two nuclei is different with the variation of the FWHM. The HHG spectrum of H2+ molecule is separated into two parts according to the electronic coordinate z (z > 0 and z < 0), which illustrate the contributions of the two nuclei to the harmonic generation. In addition, we investigate the time-evolution electron wave packet distributions to illustrate the underlying physical mechanism.

  7. Retinal Arteriolar Morphometry Based on Full Width at Half Maximum Analysis of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hua Tong

    Full Text Available In this study, we develop a microdensitometry method using full width at half maximum (FWHM analysis of the retinal vascular structure in a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT image and present the application of this method in the morphometry of arteriolar changes during hypertension.Two raters using manual and FWHM methods measured retinal vessel outer and lumen diameters in SD-OCT images. Inter-rater reproducibility was measured using coefficients of variation (CV, intraclass correlation coefficient and a Bland-Altman plot. OCT images from forty-three eyes of 43 hypertensive patients and 40 eyes of 40 controls were analyzed using an FWHM approach; wall thickness, wall cross-sectional area (WCSA and wall to lumen ratio (WLR were subsequently calculated.Mean difference in inter-rater agreement ranged from -2.713 to 2.658 μm when using a manual method, and ranged from -0.008 to 0.131 μm when using a FWHM approach. The inter-rater CVs were significantly less for the FWHM approach versus the manual method (P < 0.05. Compared with controls, the wall thickness, WCSA and WLR of retinal arterioles were increased in the hypertensive patients, particular in diabetic hypertensive patients.The microdensitometry method using a FWHM algorithm markedly improved inter-rater reproducibility of arteriolar morphometric analysis, and SD-OCT may represent a promising noninvasive method for in vivo arteriolar morphometry.

  8. Precision tests of the J/psi from full lattice QCD: mass, leptonic width and radiative decay rate to eta_c

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, C T H; Dowdall, R J; Koponen, J; Follana, E; Hornbostel, K; Lepage, G P; McNeile, C

    2013-01-01

    We show results from calculations in full lattice QCD of the mass, leptonic width and radiative decay rate to eta_c of the J/psi meson. These provide few % tests of QCD. Another (1.5%) test comes from comparison of time-moments of the vector charmonium correlator with results derived from the experimental values of R(e+e- to hadrons) in the charm region.

  9. Transient analysis and control of bias magnetic state in the transformer of on-line pulse-width-modulation switching full bridge direct current-direct current converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaxin; Guo, Youguang; Zhu, Jianguo; Wei Lin, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis (FEA) based method for analyzing and controlling the bias magnetic state of the transformer of a pulse-width-modulation (PWM) switching full bridge dc-dc converter. A field-circuit indirect coupling method for predicting the transient bias magnetic state is introduced first. To increase flexibility of the proposed method, a novel transformer model which can address not only its basic input-output characteristic, but also the nonlinear magnetizing inductance, is proposed. Both the asymmetric characteristic and the variable laws of the current flowing through the two secondary windings during the period of PWM switching-off state are highlighted. Finally, the peak magnetizing current controlled method based on the on-line magnetizing current computation is introduced. Analysis results show that this method can address the magnetic saturation at winding ends, and hence many previous difficulties, such as the start-up process and asymmetry of power electronics, can be easily controlled.

  10. Exploring the Value of MBA Degrees: Students' Experiences in Full-Time, Part-Time, and Executive MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Grady D.

    2010-01-01

    Critics of the overall value of the MBA have not systematically considered the attitudes of MBA students about the value of their degree. The author used data from a large sample of graduates (N = 16,268) to do so, and to explore predictors of overall degree value. The author developed separate regression models for full-time, part-time, and…

  11. Reproducibility of joint space width and the intermargin distance measurements in patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee in various degrees of flexion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bone and Joint Surgery, Toon, Ehime (Japan); Yamanaka, Norio; Ikeuchi, Masahiko [Kochi University, Department of Orthopaedics, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    This study tested the variability and reproducibility of measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and intermargin distance (IMD) of the medial tibial plateau in specific positions of knee flexion in osteoarthritic knees in order to evaluate the most useful knee angle for radiographic measurements. Radiographs from 56 knees with osteoarthritis from 46 patients were taken with the knees in conventional full extension and 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with weight bearing. Three orthopedic surgeons independently measured the JSW and IMD at the narrowest point and the midpoint of medial tibial plateau using a computer-assisted method. The JSW and IMD were smallest at 15 flexion, both measured at the narrowest point and the midpoint of the medial compartment. Reproducibility of the IMD at the midpoint was better than at the narrowest point for all four flexion angles. Measurements of the medial JSW and IMD are smallest at 15 of knee flexion indicating that radiographs should be obtained at this angle in order to best demonstrate the extent of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  12. A Transmission Power Optimization with a Minimum Node Degree for Energy-Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks with Full-Reachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Yih Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transmission power optimization is the most significant factor in prolonging the lifetime and maintaining the connection quality of wireless sensor networks. Un-optimized transmission power of nodes either interferes with or fails to link neighboring nodes. The optimization of transmission power depends on the expected node degree and node distribution. In this study, an optimization approach to an energy-efficient and full reachability wireless sensor network is proposed. In the proposed approach, an adjustment model of the transmission range with a minimum node degree is proposed that focuses on topology control and optimization of the transmission range according to node degree and node density. The model adjusts the tradeoff between energy efficiency and full reachability to obtain an ideal transmission range. In addition, connectivity and reachability are used as performance indices to evaluate the connection quality of a network. The two indices are compared to demonstrate the practicability of framework through simulation results. Furthermore, the relationship between the indices under the conditions of various node degrees is analyzed to generalize the characteristics of node densities. The research results on the reliability and feasibility of the proposed approach will benefit the future real deployments.

  13. A transmission power optimization with a minimum node degree for energy-efficient wireless sensor networks with full-reachability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Horng, Mong-Fong; Lo, Chih-Cheng; Chu, Shu-Chuan; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Liao, Bin-Yih

    2013-03-20

    Transmission power optimization is the most significant factor in prolonging the lifetime and maintaining the connection quality of wireless sensor networks. Un-optimized transmission power of nodes either interferes with or fails to link neighboring nodes. The optimization of transmission power depends on the expected node degree and node distribution. In this study, an optimization approach to an energy-efficient and full reachability wireless sensor network is proposed. In the proposed approach, an adjustment model of the transmission range with a minimum node degree is proposed that focuses on topology control and optimization of the transmission range according to node degree and node density. The model adjusts the tradeoff between energy efficiency and full reachability to obtain an ideal transmission range. In addition, connectivity and reachability are used as performance indices to evaluate the connection quality of a network. The two indices are compared to demonstrate the practicability of framework through simulation results. Furthermore, the relationship between the indices under the conditions of various node degrees is analyzed to generalize the characteristics of node densities. The research results on the reliability and feasibility of the proposed approach will benefit the future real deployments.

  14. Flexibility, compromise and opportunity: Students' perceptions of balancing part-time work with a full-time business degree.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, C.; Gbadamosi, Gbola; Richardson, M

    2014-01-01

    Amidst the growing importance of employability in higher education, this study explores and identifies the motivations behind full-time university students engaging in part-time employment during term time, how students cope with simultaneously managing the two activities and how part-time working influences their career aspirations. Semi-structured interviews are used to obtain data from a sample of 30 business degree students at a UK university. The findings confirm previous studies, that f...

  15. On the Degrees of Freedom Regions of Two-User MIMO Z and Full Interference Channels with Reconfigurable Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We study the degrees of freedom (DoF) regions of two-user multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Z and full interference channels in this paper. We assume that the receivers always have perfect channel state information. We derive the DoF region of Z interference channel with channel state information at transmitter (CSIT). For full interference channel without CSIT, the DoF region has been obtained in previous work except for a special case M1< N1full interference channels are the same. We establish the achievability based on the assumption of transmitter antenna mode switching. A systematic way of constructing the DoF-achieving nulling and beamforming matrices is presented in this paper.

  16. Information Width

    CERN Document Server

    Ratsaby, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Kolmogorov argued that the concept of information exists also in problems with no underlying stochastic model (as Shannon's information representation) for instance, the information contained in an algorithm or in the genome. He introduced a combinatorial notion of entropy and information $I(x:\\sy)$ conveyed by a binary string $x$ about the unknown value of a variable $\\sy$. The current paper poses the following questions: what is the relationship between the information conveyed by $x$ about $\\sy$ to the description complexity of $x$ ? is there a notion of cost of information ? are there limits on how efficient $x$ conveys information ? To answer these questions Kolmogorov's definition is extended and a new concept termed {\\em information width} which is similar to $n$-widths in approximation theory is introduced. Information of any input source, e.g., sample-based, general side-information or a hybrid of both can be evaluated by a single common formula. An application to the space of binary functions is con...

  17. WIDTHS AND AVERAGE WIDTHS OF SOBOLEV CLASSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永平; 许贵桥

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of the Kolmogorov n-width, the linear n-width, the Gel'fand n-width and the Bernstein n-width of Sobolev classes of the periodicmultivariate functions in the space Lp(Td) and the average Bernstein σ-width, averageKolmogorov σ-widths, the average linear σ-widths of Sobolev classes of the multivariatequantities.

  18. Degrees of Freedom Regions of Two-User MIMO Z and Full Interference Channels: The Benefit of Reconfigurable Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We study the degrees of freedom (DoF) regions of two-user multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) Z and full interference channels in this paper. We assume that the receivers always have perfect channel state information. We first derive the DoF region of Z interference channel with channel state information at transmitter (CSIT). For full interference channel without CSIT, the DoF region has been fully characterized recently and it is shown that the previously known outer bound is not achievable. In this work, we investigate the no-CSIT case further by assuming that the transmitter has the ability of antenna mode switching. We obtain the DoF region as a function of the number of available antenna modes and reveal the incremental gain in DoF that each extra antenna mode can bring. It is shown that in certain cases the reconfigurable antennas can bring extra DoF gains. In these cases, the DoF region is maximized when the number of modes is at least equal to the number of receive antennas at the corresponding rec...

  19. Tests of Two Full-Scale Propellers with Different Pitch Distributions, at Blade Angles up to 60 Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, David; HARTMAN EDWIN P

    1939-01-01

    Two 3-blade 10-foot propellers were operated in front of a liquid-cooled engine nacelle. The propellers differed only in pitch distribution; one had normal distribution (nearly constant pitch for a blade angle of 15 degrees at 0.75 radius), and the other had the pitch of the tip sections decreased with respect to that for the shank sections (blade angle of 35 degrees for nearly constant pitch distribution). Propeller blade angles at 0.75r from 15 degrees to sixty degrees, corresponding to design speeds up to 500 miles per hour, were investigated. Propeller blade angles at 0.75r from 15 degrees to 60 degrees, corresponding to design speeds up to 500 miles per hour, were investigated. The results indicated that the propulsive efficiency at a blade angle of 60 degrees was about 9 percent less than the maximum value of 86 percent, which occurred at blade angle of about 30 degrees. The efficiency at a blade angle of 60 degrees was increased about 7 percent by correcting for the effect of a spinner and, at a blade angle of 30 degrees about 3 percent. The peak efficiencies for the propeller having the washed-out pitch distribution were slightly less than for the normal propeller but the take-off efficiency was generally higher.

  20. An Exploration of the Transition to the Full-Time Faculty Role among Associate Degree Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the nursing and faculty shortages, recommendations have been made to increase the number of highly educated nurses who are qualified to teach. A lack of nursing faculty has been reported at all levels of education. Because the majority of nurses enter into practice with an associate degree, the professoriate at the associate…

  1. Academic Plate Spinning: the Difficulties of Balancing Full Time Degree Study With a Part-Time Job

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2013-01-01

    The study examined full-time students engaged in part-time work during term time. A qualitative approach was used to examine how students cope with simultaneously managing the two activities, and how part-time working affects their academic study. Semi-structured interviews were used to obtain data from a sample of 30 undergraduate business students. The findings confirm that students merely satisfice many aspects of their lives, with reading time and assignment preparation being key areas th...

  2. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  3. A deterministic width function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Puente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of a deterministic fractal-multifractal (FM geometric method to model width functions of natural river networks, as derived distributions of simple multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions, is reported. It is first demonstrated that the FM procedure may be used to simulate natural width functions, preserving their most relevant features like their overall shape and texture and their observed power-law scaling on their power spectra. It is then shown, via two natural river networks (Racoon and Brushy creeks in the United States, that the FM approach may also be used to closely approximate existing width functions.

  4. A Methodology to Assess the Accuracy with which Remote Data Characterize a Specific Surface, as a Function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM: Application to Three Italian Coastal Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Cavalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This methodology assesses the accuracy with which remote data characterizes a surface, as a function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM. The purpose is to identify the best remote data that improves the characterization of a surface, evaluating the number of bands in the spectral range. The first step creates an accurate dataset of remote simulated data, using in situ hyperspectral reflectances. The second step evaluates the capability of remote simulated data to characterize this surface. The spectral similarity measurements, which are obtained using classifiers, provide this capability. The third step examines the precision of this capability. The assumption is that in situ hyperspectral reflectances are considered the “real” reflectances. They are resized with the same spectral range of the remote data. The spectral similarity measurements which are obtained from “real” resized reflectances, are considered “real” measurements. Therefore, the quantity and magnitude of “errors” (i.e., differences between spectral similarity measurements obtained from “real” resized reflectances and from remote data provide the accuracy as a function of FWHM. This methodology was applied to evaluate the accuracy with which CHRIS-mode1, CHRIS-mode2, Landsat5-TM, MIVIS and PRISMA data characterize three coastal waters. Their mean values of uncertainty are 1.59%, 3.79%, 7.75%, 3.15% and 1.18%, respectively.

  5. A Methodology to Assess the Accuracy with which Remote Data Characterize a Specific Surface, as a Function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM): Application to Three Italian Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Betti, Mattia; Campanelli, Alessandra; Di Cicco, Annalisa; Guglietta, Daniela; Penna, Pierluigi; Piermattei, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    This methodology assesses the accuracy with which remote data characterizes a surface, as a function of Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM). The purpose is to identify the best remote data that improves the characterization of a surface, evaluating the number of bands in the spectral range. The first step creates an accurate dataset of remote simulated data, using in situ hyperspectral reflectances. The second step evaluates the capability of remote simulated data to characterize this surface. The spectral similarity measurements, which are obtained using classifiers, provide this capability. The third step examines the precision of this capability. The assumption is that in situ hyperspectral reflectances are considered the “real” reflectances. They are resized with the same spectral range of the remote data. The spectral similarity measurements which are obtained from “real” resized reflectances, are considered “real” measurements. Therefore, the quantity and magnitude of “errors” (i.e., differences between spectral similarity measurements obtained from “real” resized reflectances and from remote data) provide the accuracy as a function of FWHM. This methodology was applied to evaluate the accuracy with which CHRIS-mode1, CHRIS-mode2, Landsat5-TM, MIVIS and PRISMA data characterize three coastal waters. Their mean values of uncertainty are 1.59%, 3.79%, 7.75%, 3.15% and 1.18%, respectively. PMID:24434875

  6. 全日制专业学位硕士培养模式探析%Discussion of full-time professional degree master's training model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐焱; 侯原亮

    2012-01-01

      通过分析全日制专业学位硕士应具备的专业知识构成及现行培养体系普遍存在的问题,借鉴发达国家同类教育的成功经验,阐明了构建和完善适合地区发展的全日制专业学位硕士培养模式的根本途径。%  Through the analysis of a widespread existed problem that full-time professional degree master should possess the professional knowledge and the training system, mirrored the successful experience of similar education of the developed countries, the full-time professional degree master's training model basic way which constructed and perfected suitable regional development was expounded.

  7. Factors that influence full-time MPH Students' willingness in China: would You apply again for an MPH graduate degree if you had another opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Jia, Jinzhong; Wu, Ke; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Wei; Duan, Liping; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-02-14

    Current and emerging challenges to public health in the 21st century are vastly different from those faced in previous centuries. And the shortage of health personnel and their low level of educational qualifications hindered the development of Chinese public health services. In order to fulfill this requirement, the Ministry of Education initiated a full-time, Master of Public Health (MPH) graduate programme in 2009. This study aimed to evaluate the level of graduate students' satisfaction with full-time Master of Public Health (MPH) education in China, and whether they would apply again for an MPH graduate degree if they had another opportunity to do so, as well as to identify the factors influencing their decision-making process. An anonymous, web-based survey questionnaire containing 61 items was distributed to 702 MPH students in 35 universities or colleges. The questions covered the categories of student admission, training goals, lecture courses, practical training, research activities and mentorship. Levels of satisfaction were compared between MPH students who would choose MPH again as their graduate degree if they had another opportunity to do so and those who would not. Key influencing factors of training satisfaction were identified using logistic regression models. A total of 65.10% of the participants would apply again for MPH education if they had another opportunity to do so. The factors influencing students' willingness included their university type, the time since admission and their initial willingness. In addition, the four common factors (admissions & lecture courses, research activities & mentorship, practical training and training goals) emerging from factor analysis were all significantly positively correlated with student willingness (p < 0.001). Most MPH students surveyed were highly satisfied with their MPH education and, although they advocated for improvements and reforms in some aspects, they would still choose MPH as their

  8. Biological width: No violation zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of gingival health is one of the keys for the longevity of teeth, as well as for the longevity of restorations. The concept of Biologic width has been widely described by periodontists and restorative dentists. An adequate understanding of relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function and esthetics, and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width and indications and applications of surgical crown lengthening. These violations lead to complications like gingival inflammation, alveolar bone loss and improper fit of the restorative component. This review gives the wide aspect of the complex question of biologic width and represents an attempt to answer some of the demands in relation to it. The article also discusses the possible methods to assess biologic width, problems that occur after improper margin placement in the periodontium and the alternative procedures for prevention of biological width violation.

  9. Modelling the widths of fission observables in GEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The widths of the mass distributions of the different fission channels are traced back to the probability distributions of the corresponding quantum oscillators that are coupled to the heat bath, which is formed by the intrinsic degrees of freedom of the fissioning system under the influence of pairing correlations and shell effects. Following conclusion from stochastic calculations of Adeev and Pashkevich, an early freezing due to dynamical effects is assumed. It is shown that the mass width of the fission channels in low-energy fission is strongly influenced by the zero-point motion of the corresponding quantum oscillator. The observed variation of the mass widths of the asymmetric fission channels with excitation energy is attributed to the energy-dependent properties of the heat bath and not to the population of excited states of the corresponding quantum oscillator.

  10. The results of percutaneous release of trigger digits by using full handle knife 15 degrees: an anatomical hand surface landmark and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongjirasiri, Yolchai

    2007-07-01

    Know the results of percutaneous release of trigger digits by using full handle knife 15 degrees. The author identified 510 cadaveric digits to find the anatomical landmark of Al pulley that relates to the knuckle and measurements of A1 pulley lengths. The proximal margin of the Al pulleys on the perpendicular line from the knuckle to the palm was in the same line in 327 (64.1%) digits, while 464 (91.0%) digits were finger; 6.32, middle finger; 6.58, ring finger; 6.32, and little finger 5.30 mm. The average lengths of all fingers were 6.13 mm. A further 338 digits of trigger digit in 248 patients were treated by percutaneous release by using full handle knife 15 degrees with these landmarks. Three hundred and thirty-eight trigger digits were treated. There was a complete resolution of symptoms in 314 digits (92.90%) when followed up 6 weeks after operation. One digit, an index finger had residual grade 1 after 3 weeks and complete resolution in 8 weeks. Three digits (0.89%), which were one thumb and two index fingers, underwent local steroid injection because of painful scar. Nineteen digits (5.62%) were stiff at proximal interphalangeal joint because of grade 4 triggering and osteoarthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joint but they increased the range of motion after 6 months. A case (0.30%) had numbness of the radial tip of the thumb, which may have been caused by injury to the radial digital nerve ofthe thumb. No one had open release of A1 pulley. This technique was a safe and effective out patient procedure on 248 patients and had a complete resolution of symptoms 92.90%.

  11. On the Spectrum Width of Wind Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李陆平; 黄培基

    2001-01-01

    Based on the universal expression of wind wave spectra, four commonly used definitions of the spectrum width arere-examined. The results show that the non-dimensional spectrum width can measure the width of non-dimensionalspectra but it does not reflect the developing state of the spectra. The dimensional spectrum width expresses the degree ofconcentration of wave energy of the spectrum in the process of wind wave growth. Tests show that the spectrum widthpresented by Wen et al. can objectively measure the degree of concentration of wave energy of the spectrum, reflect thestate of wind wave growth, and provides a better result for practical application. The rules for definition of the spectrumwidth are discussed.

  12. Relative equilibria of full dynamics of a rigid body with gravitational orbit-attitude coupling in a uniformly rotating second degree and order gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Shijie

    2014-12-01

    The motion of a rigid body in a uniformly rotating second degree and order gravity field is a good model for the gravitationally coupled orbit-attitude motion of a spacecraft in the close proximity of an asteroid. The relative equilibria of this full dynamics model are investigated using geometric mechanics from a global point of view. Two types of relative equilibria are found based on the equilibrium conditions: one is the Lagrangian relative equilibria, at which the circular orbit of the rigid body is in the equatorial plane of the central body; the other is the non-Lagrangian relative equilibria, at which the circular orbit is parallel to but not in the equatorial plane of central body. The existences of the Lagrangian and non-Lagrangian relative equilibria are discussed numerically with respect to the parameters of the gravity field and the rigid body. The effect of the gravitational orbit-attitude coupling is especially assessed. The existence region of the Lagrangian relative equilibria is given on the plane of the system parameters. Numerical results suggest that the negative C 20 with a small absolute value and a negative C 22 with a large absolute value favor the existence of the non-Lagrangian relative equilibria. The effect of the gravitational orbit-attitude coupling of the rigid body on the existence of the non-Lagrangian relative equilibria can be positive or negative, which depends on the harmonics C 20 and C 22, and the angular velocity of the rotation of the gravity field.

  13. Level Width Broaden Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Shang

    2004-01-01

    In fitting the double-differential measurements thelevelwidth broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg uncertainty.Besides level width broadening effect the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in this procedure.In general,the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed.However,the research indicates that to do so in this way the energy balance could not hold.For this reason,the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced,with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could hold exactly in the analytical form.

  14. Spin gated GDR widths at moderate temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Ish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the evolution of giant dipole resonance (GDR width as a function of angular momentum in the compound nucleus 144Sm in the temperature range of 1.5-2.0 MeV. The high energy γ rays emitted from the decay of excited 144Sm were measured using large NaI detector in coincidence with 4π sum spin spectrometer. GDR widths were found to comply with thermal shape fluctuation model in this temperature range over a wide range of spin. Experimental widths tend to increase rapidly at high angular momentum values.

  15. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Full-time and Part-time Associate Degree Nursing Faculty, Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Allison-Jones, Lisa L.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of full-time and part-time faculty is an area of major interest in education, especially in light of the dramatic rise of part-time faculty on the nation's campuses. In the period between 1976 and 1994, the use of full-time faculty increased by 21% while the use of part-time faculty increased by 91% (Clery, 1998). The quality of instruction is the primary concern surrounding the use of part-time faculty (Clery, 1998; Fedler, 1989; Gappa & Leslie, 1997; Leslie, 1998; Mell...

  16. The Work-Study Nexus: The Challenges of Balancing Full-Time Business Degree Study with a Part-Time Job

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; Evans, Carl; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how full-time university students cope with part-time working during term time. A qualitative approach was used to examine how students simultaneously manage the two activities, and how part-time working affects their academic study. Semi-structured interviews were used to obtain data from a sample of 30 undergraduate business…

  17. Saturation of the width of the strength function

    CERN Document Server

    Sargeant, A J; Pato, M P; Ueda, M

    2000-01-01

    The strength function of a single state $|d>$ is studied using the deformed Gaussian orthogonal ensemble. In particular we study the dependence of the spreading width of $|d>$ on the degree of mixing.

  18. High degree of realism in teaching percutaneous coronary interventions by combining a virtual reality trainer with a full scale patient simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Michael; Moenk, Stefan; Vollmer, Jochen; Kurz, Sandra; Mollnau, Hanke; Post, Felix; Heinrichs, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The virtual reality coronary angiography simulator "CATHI" (Catheter Instruction System, Mannheim, Germany) simulates coronary arteries with implemented vessel lesions in virtual patients. Like similar systems the software model runs on common PC systems, which are linked to the mechanical device for manual training. We combined the advantages of this skill trainer with the near to reality assembly of a cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath-lab) by connecting it to a full scale simulator (HPS, METI, Sarasota, FL). We present two methods of synchronizing the heartbeat between both simulation devices. Method A-the hardware solution-uses the electrocardiogram-synchronization signal of the HPS as a pacemaker for CATHI's heartbeat. Method B, a more sophisticated software solution, uses a communication protocol between the HPS software and the CATHI system to realize bi-directional data exchange. In 14 identical courses we performed four different scenarios using the above described setup, all of which had to be undergone by the 143 participants (including nursing staff, experienced- and inexperienced cardiologists). The synchronization of the two systems contributed to a close to reality situation. Scenario control was accomplished via commercially available HPS-software. Tachycardic and bradycardic arrhythmias were predetermined by predefined scenarios of the HPS-software, the trainee's intervention resulting in realistic treatment outcomes. Using either method, the transmitted signals resulted in the same heartbeat in the CATHI-system, making the cardiologic interventions more difficult but more realistic.

  19. Minimal forbidden induced subgraphs of graphs of bounded clique-width and bounded linear clique-width

    OpenAIRE

    Meister, Daniel; Rotics, Udi

    2013-01-01

    In the study of full bubble model graphs of bounded clique-width and bounded linear clique-width, we determined complete sets of forbidden induced subgraphs, that are minimal in the class of full bubble model graphs. In this note, we show that (almost all of) these graphs are minimal in the class of all graphs. As a corollary, we can give sets of minimal forbidden induced subgraphs for graphs of bounded clique-width and for graphs of bounded linear clique-width for arbitrary bounds.

  20. Probing eigenfunction nonorthogonality by parametric shifts of resonance widths

    CERN Document Server

    Savin, D V

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the change of resonance widths in an open system under a perturbation of its interior is a sensitive indicator of the nonorthogonality of resonance states. We apply this measure to quantify parametric motion of the resonances. In particular, a strong redistribution of the widths is linked with the maximal degree of nonorthogonality. Then for weakly open chaotic systems we discuss the role of spectral rigidity on the statistical properties of the parametric width shifts, and derive the distribution of the latter in a picket-fence model with equidistant spectrum.

  1. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitha Nugala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry.

  2. 对我国全日制体育硕士专业学位教育的思考%The Thinking of The Professional Degree Education for Full-time Sports Master in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于浩毅; 汪晓赞

    2012-01-01

    In view of the professional degree education for full-time sports master carried out from 2009 in china, by using the method of literature, investigation interview method, and logic analysis analyses the primary characteristics and training status quo of the professional degree education for full-time sports master. Toward the professional degree education for full-time sports master in china, its Waining goal is to cultivate high-level applied and practical sports talents, most of the recruiting objects are fresh graduates without work experience and the huge gap between recruit "antrance" and cultivating target "export" brings challenge~to the actual work. The professional degree education for full-time sports master in china, on the whole, in line with the national training goal, there are differences in the specific implementation operation among the institutions, and training mode is not perfect. The author suggest to update the concept of graduate education, give the professional degree education for full-time sports master with reasonable location, at the same time the various institutions improve continually their own job in the later actual work, use the foreign graduate training mode for reference, pay attention to the cultivation of the innovative ability and spirit, improve the training quality of full-time sports for the master degree graduate student to adapt the needs of the society further.%针对我国2009年推行的全日制体育硕士专业学位教育,采用文献资料法、调查访谈法、逻辑分析法对我国全日制体育硕士专业学位教育的主要特征、培养状况进行分析。我国全日制体育硕士专业学位教育以培养高层次的应用型、实践性体育专门人才为培养目标,招收对象以无工作经验的应届本科生为主,招收“入口”与培育目标“出口”之间的巨大落差给实际作带来挑战。我国的全日制体育硕士专业学位教育状况整体上与

  3. Construct the Professional Applicability Education Support System of Full-time Professional Degree Graduate Students%全日制专业学位研究生职业应用性教育支持体系构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙粤文

    2012-01-01

    Professional applicability is the fundamental difference between the professional degree and the academic degree graduate educations. Constructing the professional applied education support system is a significant and urgent task in the education of China's current full-time professional degree graduate students, which involves the vocational education concept, professional applicability syllabus, teachers' professional quality of applied education, students' vocational application development platform and comprehensive and scientific quality appraisal system.%职业应用性是专业学位研究生教育与学术性学位研究生教育的根本区别所在。构建职业应用性教育支持体系、加强职业性教育是当前我国全日制专业学位研究生教育中的重大而迫切的任务。全日制专业学位研究生职业应用性教育支持体系是由职业应用性教育理念、职业应用性课程教学框架结构、教师职业实践教育素质和能力、学生职业应用性发展平台和全面科学的质量评估体系组成。

  4. CD(4) has bounded width

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Catarina; Marković, Petar; Maróti, Miklós

    2007-01-01

    We prove that the constraint languages invariant under a short sequence of J\\'onsson terms (containing at most three non-trivial ternary terms) are tractable by showing that they have bounded width. This improves the previous result by Kiss and Valeriote and presents some evidence that the Larose-Zadori conjecture holds in the congruence-distributive case.

  5. A Statistical Approach for Obtaining the Controlled Woven Fabric Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Khubab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A common problem faced in fabric manufacturing is the production of inconsistent fabric width on shuttleless looms in spite of the same fabric specifications. Weft-wise crimp controls the fabric width and it depends on a number of factors, including warp tension, temple type, fabric take-up pressing tension and loom working width. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of these parameters on the fabric width produced. Taguchi’s orthogonal design was used to optimise the weaving parameters for obtaining controlled fabric width. On the basis of signal to noise ratios, it could be concluded that controlled fabric width could be produced using medium temple type and intense take-up pressing tension at relatively lower warp tension and smaller loom working width. The analysis of variance revealed that temple needle size was the most significant factor affecting the fabric width, followed by loom working width and warp tension, whereas take-up pressing tension was least significant of all the factors investigated in the study.

  6. The significance of biometric parameters in determining anterior teeth width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. An important element of prosthetic treatment of edentulous patients is selecting the size of anterior artificial teeth that will restore the natural harmony of one’s dentolabial structure as well as the whole face. The main objective of this study was to determine the correlation between the inner canthal distance (ICD and interalar width (IAW on one side and the width of both central incisors (CIW, the width of central and lateral incisors (CLIW, the width of anterior teeth (ATW, the width between the canine cusps (CCW, which may be useful in clinical practice. Methods. A total of 89 subjects comprising 23 male and 66 female were studied. Their age ranged from 19 to 34 years with the mean of 25 years. Only the subjects with the preserved natural dentition were included in the sample. All facial and intraoral tooth measurements were made with a Boley Gauge (Buffalo Dental Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn NY, USA having a resolution of 0.1mm. Results. A moderate correlation was established between the interalar width and combined width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.439, r = 0.374. A low correlation was established between the inner canthal distance and the width of anterior teeth and canine cusp width (r = 0.335, r = 0.303. The differences between the two genders were highly significant for all the parameters (p < 0.01. The measured facial distances and width of anterior teeth were higher in men than in women. Conclusion. The results of this study suggest that the examined interalar width and inner canthal distance cannot be considered reliable guidelines in the selection of artificial upper anterior teeth. However, they may be used as a useful additional factor combined with other methods for objective tooth selection. The final decision should be made while working on dentures fitting models with the patient’s consent.

  7. Average radiation widths and the giant dipole resonance width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M.; Thielemann, F.K.

    1982-11-01

    The average E1 radiation width can be calculated in terms of the energy Esub(G) and width GAMMAsub(G) of the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR). While various models can predict Esub(G) quite reliably, the theoretical situation regarding ..lambda..sub(G) is much less satisfactory. We propose a simple phenomenological model which is able to provide GAMMAsub(G) values in good agreement with experimental data for spherical or deformed intermediate and heavy nuclei. In particular, this model can account for shell effects in GAMMAsub(G), and can be used in conjunction with the droplet model. The GAMMAsub(G) values derived in such a way are used to compute average E1 radiation widths which are quite close to the experimental values. The method proposed for the calculation of GAMMAsub(G) also appears to be well suited when the GDR characteristics of extended sets of nuclei are required, as is namely the case in nuclear astrophysics.

  8. 烤烟烟叶理化指标与浓香型风格程度的关系%Relationship Between Physical-chemical Indexes and Full Flavor Style Degree of Flue-cured Tobacco Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛超群; 王建伟; 奚家勤; 杨立均

    2012-01-01

    检测评价了河南省驻马店烟区60个C3F烟叶样品的理化指标与浓香型风格程度,并采用相关分析、逐步回归分析等方法研究了烟叶理化指标与浓香型风格程度的关系.结果表明:①烟叶厚度、钾、巨豆三烯酮A,巨豆三烯酮B,巨豆三烯酮C与浓香型风格程度显著正相关,挥发性碱、山奈酚糖苷、糠醛、糠醇、5-甲基糠醛、巨豆三烯酮D与浓香型风格程度极显著正相关,还原糖与浓香型风格程度显著负相关,芳樟醇、金合欢基丙酮、香叶基丙酮、β-紫罗兰酮、2-乙酰呋喃与浓香型风格程度极显著负相关;②糠醛、5-甲基糠醛、2-乙酰呋喃、香叶基丙酮与烟叶浓香型风格程度存在极显著回归关系,共同决定了烟叶浓香型风格程度变化的88.7%,是影响烟叶浓香型风格程度的主要指标.%Sixty C3F samples of flue-cured tobacco leaves were collected from Zhumadian to analyze the relationship between physical-chemical indexes and full flavor style degree of leaves with correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis. The results showed that: 1) the full flavor style degree of leaves significantly positively correlated with leaf thickness, potassium, megastigmatrienone A, megastigmatrienone B, and megastigmatrienone C; extremely significantly positively correlated with volatile base, kaempferol-3-rutinoside, furfural, furfural alcohol, 5-methyl furfural, and megastigmatrienone D; while significantly negatively correlated with reducing sugar; extremely significantly negatively correlated with linalool, farnesylacetone, geranyl acetone, p-ionone, 2-acetyl furan; 2) there was an extremely significant regression relationship between full flavor style degree of leaves and furfural, 5-methyl furfural, 2-acetyl furan, geranyl acetone, which were the major components affecting the full flavor style degree of leaves, and determined about 88.7% of the changes of full flavor style degree of leaves.

  9. Hybrid Exotic Meson Decay Width

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, M S

    2005-01-01

    We present results of a decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson(h, JPC=1-+) in the decay channel h to pi+a1. This calculation uses quenched lattice QCD and Luescher's finite box method. Operators for the h and pi+a1 states are used in a correlation matrix which was expanded by varying the smearing and fuzzing levels at source and sink points. Scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative pi+a1 momenta are determined using eigenvalues of the correlation matrix and formulae derived by Luescher. The phase shift data is very sparse, but fits to a Breit-Wigner model are made, resulting in a decay width of about 80 MeV.

  10. On the maximal diphoton width

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into $\\gamma\\gamma$ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  11. Statistical characteristics of Doppler spectral width as observed by the conjugate SuperDARN radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hosokawa

    Full Text Available We performed a statistical analysis of the occurrence distribution of Doppler spectral width around the day-side high-latitude ionosphere using data from the conjugate radar pair composed of the CUTLASS Iceland-East radar in the Northern Hemisphere and the SENSU Syowa-East radar in the Southern Hemisphere. Three types of spectral width distribution were identified: (1 an exponential-like distribution in the lower magnetic latitudes (below 72°, (2 a Gaussian-like distribution around a few degrees magnetic latitude, centered on 78°, and (3 another type of distribution in the higher magnetic latitudes (above 80°. The first two are considered to represent the geophysical regimes such as the LLBL and the cusp, respectively, because they are similar to the spectral width distributions within the LLBL and the cusp, as classified by Baker et al. (1995. The distribution found above 80° magnetic latitude has been clarified for the first time in this study. This distribution has similarities to the exponential-like distribution in the lower latitude part, although clear differences also exist in their characteristics. These three spectral width distributions are commonly identified in conjugate hemispheres. The latitudinal transition from one distribution to another exhibits basically the same trend between two hemispheres. There is, however, an interhemispheric difference in the form of the distribution around the cusp latitudes, such that spectral width values obtained from Syowa-East are larger than those from Iceland-East. On the basis of the spectral width characteristics, the average locations of the cusp and the open/closed field line boundary are estimated statistically.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere inter-actions; plasma convection – Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers

  12. Masses, widths, and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D.M.J.; Horstkotte, J.E.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Romero, L.; Schamberger, R.D.; Youssef, S.; Franzini, P.; Son, D.; Tuts, P.M.

    1985-02-04

    The masses, total widths, and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb-bar states UPSILON(4S), UPSILON(5S), and UPSILON(6S) are determined from measurements of the e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation cross section into hadrons for 10.55

  13. Effective degrees of freedom in QCD thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turko L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An effective model reproducing the equation of state of hadronic matter as obtained in recent lattice QCD simulations and from hadron resonance gas data is presented. The hadronic phase is described by means of an extended Mott-Hagedorn resonance gas while the QGP phase is described by the extended PNJL model. The dissociation of hadrons is obtained by including the state dependent hadron resonance width. The model gives a quantitative estimate for partial fractions of hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom above Tc.

  14. Spreading widths of doorway states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pace, A., E-mail: depace@to.infn.i [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Molinari, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica dell' Universita di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Weidenmueller, H.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-01-01

    As a function of energy E, the average doorway strength function S(E)-bar of a doorway state is commonly assumed to be Lorentzian in shape and characterized by two parameters, the peak energy E{sub 0} and the spreading width {Gamma}{sup {down_arrow}}. The simple picture is modified when the density of background states that couple to the doorway state changes significantly in an energy interval of size {Gamma}{sup {down_arrow}}. For that case we derive an approximate analytical expression for S(E)-bar. We test our result successfully against numerical simulations. Our result may have important implications for shell-model calculations.

  15. N-Widths and Average Widths of Besov Classes in Sobolev Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Qiao XU; Yong Sheng SUN; Yong Ping LIU

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the n-widths and average widths of Besov classes in the usual Sobolev spaces. The weak asymptotic results concerning the Kolmogorov n-widths, the linear n-widths,the Gel'fand n-widths, in the Sobolev spaces on Td, and the infinite-dimensional widths and the average widths in the Sobolev spaces on Rd are obtained, respectively.

  16. Performance influence in submersible pump with different diffuser inlet widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshun Wei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuser inlet width is a key geometric parameter that affects submersible pump performance. On the basis of diffuser characteristic curve analyses, diffusers with different inlet widths and the same impeller were equipped to construct a submersible pump model through the use of AutoCAD software. The performance curves of the submersible pump, with six diffuser inlet widths, were obtained using computational fluid dynamics method. Simultaneously, the simulation results were tested with the experimental method presented in this article. The results show that the optimum value of the inlet width (b3 = 50 mm is larger than the experience-based one. With an increase in the inlet width, the optimum operating point of a submersible pump offsets to a larger flow rate. When the guide blade inlet width is approximately 40–55 mm, the submersible pump efficiency is relatively high, approximately 75.9%–83.7% capacity, and the flow rate is approximately 105–135 m3/h. The numerical results of submersible pump performance are higher than those of the test results; however, their change trends have an acceptable agreement with each other. The practical significance is supplied by changing the inlet width of the diffuser to expand the scope of use.

  17. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  18. Clique-width of unit interval graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Lozin, Vadim V.

    2007-01-01

    The clique-width is known to be unbounded in the class of unit interval graphs. In this paper, we show that this is a minimal hereditary class of unbounded clique-width, i.e., in every hereditary subclass of unit interval graphs the clique-width is bounded by a constant.

  19. Palindromic widths of nilpotent and wreath products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valeriy G Bardakov; Oleg V Bryukhanov; Krishnendu Gongopadhyay

    2017-02-01

    We prove that the nilpotent product of a set of groups $A_1, \\ldots , A_s$ has finite palindromic width if and only if the palindromic widths of $A_i$, $i = 1, \\ldots , s$, are finite. We give a new proof that the commutator width of $F_n \\wr K$ is infinite, where $F_n$ is a free group of rank $n\\geq 2$ and $K$ is a finite group. This result, combining with a result of Fink [9] gives examples of groups with infinite commutator width but finite palindromic width with respect to some generating set.

  20. Analysis on Longitudinal Dose according to Change of Field Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Seok; Shin, Ryung Mi; Oh, Byung Cheon; Jo, Jun Young; Kim, Gi Chul; Choi, Tae Gu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Back, Jong Geal [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yensei Caner Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    To analyze the accuracy of tumor volume dose following field width change, to check the difference of dose change by using self-made moving car, and to evaluate practical delivery tumor dose when tomotherapy in the treatment of organ influenced by breathing. By using self-made moving car, the difference of longitudinal movement (0.0 cm, 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, 2.0 cm) was applied and compared calculated dose with measured dose according to change of field width (1.05 cm, 2.50 cm, 5.02 cm) and apprehended margin of error. Then done comparative analysis in degree of photosensitivity of DQA film measured by using Gafchromic EBT film. Dose profile and Gamma histogram were used to measure degree of photosensitivity of DQA film. When field width were 1.05 cm, 2.50 cm, 5.02 cm, margin of error of dose delivery coefficient was -2.00%, -0.39%, -2.55%. In dose profile of Gafchromic EBT film's analysis, the movement of moving car had greater motion toward longitudinal direction and as field width was narrower, big error increased considerably at high dose part compared to calculated dose. The more field width was narrowed, gamma index had a large considerable influence of moving at gamma histogram. We could check the difference of longitudinal dose of moving organ. In order to small field width and minimize organ moving due to breathing, it is thought to be needed to develop breathing control unit and fixation tool.

  1. Nightside studies of coherent HF Radar spectral width behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    Full Text Available A previous case study found a relationship between high spectral width measured by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar and elevated electron temperatures observed by the EISCAT and ESR incoherent scatter radars in the post-midnight sector of magnetic local time. This paper expands that work by briefly re-examining that interval and looking in depth at two further case studies. In all three cases a region of high HF spectral width (>200 ms-1 exists poleward of a region of low HF spectral width (<200 ms-1. Each case, however, occurs under quite different geomagnetic conditions. The original case study occurred during an interval with no observed electrojet activity, the second study during a transition from quiet to active conditions with a clear band of ion frictional heating indicating the location of the flow reversal boundary, and the third during an isolated sub-storm. These case studies indicate that the relationship between elevated electron temperature and high HF radar spectral width appears on closed field lines after 03:00 magnetic local time (MLT on the nightside. It is not clear whether the same relationship would hold on open field lines, since our analysis of this relationship is restricted in latitude. We find two important properties of high spectral width data on the nightside. Firstly the high spectral width values occur on both open and closed field lines, and secondly that the power spectra which exhibit high widths are both single-peak and multiple-peak. In general the regions of high spectral width (>200 ms-1 have more multiple-peak spectra than the regions of low spectral widths whilst still maintaining a majority of single-peak spectra. We also find that the region of ion frictional heating is collocated with many multiple-peak HF spectra. Several mechanisms for the generation of high spectral width have been proposed which would produce multiple-peak spectra, these are discussed in relation to

  2. Reduced neutron widths in the nuclear data ensemble: Experiment and theory do not agree

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, P E

    2010-01-01

    I have analyzed reduced neutron widths ($\\Gamma_{n}^{0}$) for the subset of 1245 resonances in the nuclear data ensemble (NDE) for which they have been reported. Random matrix theory (RMT) predicts for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) that these widths should follow a $\\chi ^{2}$ distribution having one degree of freedom ($\

  3. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalka, A. M.

    1986-04-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the dc input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  4. Approximation Algorithms for Directed Width Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kintali, Shiva; Kumar, Akash

    2011-01-01

    Treewidth of an undirected graph measures how close the graph is to being a tree. Several problems that are NP-hard on general graphs are solvable in polynomial time on graphs with bounded treewidth. Motivated by the success of treewidth, several directed analogues of treewidth have been introduced to measure the similarity of a directed graph to a directed acyclic graph (DAG). Directed treewidth, D-width, DAG-width, Kelly-width and directed pathwidth are some such parameters. In this paper, we present the first approximation algorithms for all these five directed width parameters. For directed treewidth and D-width we achieve an approximation factor of O(sqrt{logn}). For DAG-width, Kelly-width and directed pathwidth we achieve an O({\\log}^{3/2}{n}) approximation factor. Our algorithms are constructive, i.e., they construct the decompositions associated with these parameters. The width of these decompositions are within the above mentioned factor of the corresponding optimal width.

  5. Width Distributions for Convex Regular Polyhedra

    CERN Document Server

    Finch, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    The mean width is a measure on three-dimensional convex bodies that enjoys equal status with volume and surface area [Rota]. As the phrase suggests, it is the mean of a probability density f. We verify formulas for mean widths of the regular tetrahedron and the cube. Higher-order moments of f_tetra and f_cube have not been examined until now. Assume that each polyhedron has edges of unit length. We deduce that the mean square width of the regular tetrahedron is 1/3+(3+sqrt(3))/(3*pi) and the mean square width of the cube is 1+4/pi.

  6. The width of 5-dimensional prismatoids

    CERN Document Server

    Matschke, Benjamin; Weibel, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Santos' construction of counter-examples to the Hirsch conjecture is based on the existence of prismatoids of dimension d of width greater than d. The case d=5 being the smallest one in which this can possibly occur, we here study the width of 5-dimensional prismatoids, obtaining the following results: - There are 5-prismatoids of width six with only 25 vertices, versus the 48 vertices in Santos' original construction. This leads to lowering the dimension of the non-Hirsch polytopes from 43 to only 20. - There are 5-prismatoids with n vertices and width \\Omega(n^(1/2)) for arbitrarily large n.

  7. DYNAMICS OF WIDTH OF PROXIMAL FEMORAL GROWING ZONE IN PATIENTS WITH PERTHES DISEASE AFTER SURGICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Teplenky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to study the effect of tunnelization and apparatus hip decompression on the state of proximal femur growing plate. Material and methods. A pattern of changes in proximal femur growing plate of the affected and intact extremities was investigated in 46 children with III degree Perthes disease. The follow-up was 3 years. To unload the affected joint, an external fixator (most often, the Ilizarov apparatus was placed on pelvic and femoral bones, which was used in a mode of non-articulating arthrodiastasis. The measurements of width of proximal femur growing zone were performed on pelvic bones rentgenograms in anteroposterior projection with internal hip rotation achieved with 1 meter focal length and their subsequent transfer to a digital format. Results. In the study group wire tunneling and apparatus fixation were shown not to result in growing plate locking, providing conditions for recovery of the shape and structure of the femoral head, which was accompanied by a slowdown in its width decrease in the affected extremity and led to the compliance of this parameter between the intact and affected extremities. No correlation was revealed between the degree of structural metaphyseal damage and the state of proximal growing zone.

  8. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  9. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  10. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  11. A Niche Width Model of Optimal Specialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeman, Jeroen; Ó Nualláin, Breanndán

    2000-01-01

    Niche width theory, a part of organizational ecology, predicts whether “specialist” or “generalist” forms of organizations have higher “fitness,” in a continually changing environment. To this end, niche width theory uses a mathematical model borrowed from biology. In this paper, we first loosen th

  12. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Width. 29.1085 Section 29.1085 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep. Width...

  13. Cost analysis of Residential Building Green Degree Based on Full Life Cycle%基于全寿命周期的住宅建筑绿色度成本分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉山; 李娟

    2016-01-01

    提高住宅建筑的绿色度能够节约能源、保护环境,但是对其产生的增量成本的认识和控制不足是影响绿色度提高的关键因素。明确住宅建筑绿色度增量成本的内涵和构成,从全寿命周期的角度出发,通过对全寿命周期内住宅建筑的增量成本进行重要度排序,然后根据排序的大小对其主要的增量成本因素进行分析,提出控制住宅建筑绿色度增量成本的措施。%It can save energy and protect environment to improve the green degree of residential buildings, but the insufficient understanding and controlling of the produced incremental cost is the key factor affecting its implementation. The incremental cost of residential building green degree is clarified, starting from the viewpoint of whole life cycle, and ranked by importance. According to the size of the or-der, the main incremental cost is analyzed, with further measures for controlling the incremental cost of residential building green degree.

  14. Measurement of effective sheath width around the cutoff probe based on electromagnetic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y., E-mail: sjyou@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: woh1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@cnu.ac.kr, E-mail: woh1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. H. [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H. Y. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.-S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    We inferred the effective sheath width using the cutoff probe and incorporating a full-wave three-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) simulation. The EM simulation reproduced the experimentally obtained plasma-sheath resonance (PSR) on the microwave transmission (S{sub 21}) spectrum well. The PSR frequency has a one-to-one correspondence with the width of the vacuum layer assumed to be the effective sheath in the EM simulation model. The sheath width was estimated by matching the S{sub 21} spectra of the experiment and the EM simulation for different widths of the sheath. We found that the inferred sheath widths quantitatively and qualitatively agree with the sheath width measured by incorporating an equivalent circuit model. These results demonstrate the excellent potential of the cutoff probe for inferring the effective sheath width from its experimental spectrum data.

  15. Lithologic controls on valley width and strath terrace formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, Sarah A.; Montgomery, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Valley width and the degree of bedrock river terrace development vary with lithology in the Willapa and Nehalem river basins, Pacific Northwest, USA. Here, we present field-based evidence for the mechanisms by which lithology controls floodplain width and bedrock terrace formation in erosion-resistant and easily friable lithologies. We mapped valley surfaces in both basins, dated straths using radiocarbon, compared valley width versus drainage area for basalt and sedimentary bedrock valleys, and constructed slope-area plots. In the friable sedimentary bedrock, valleys are 2 to 3 times wider, host flights of strath terraces, and have concavity values near 1; whereas the erosion-resistant basalt bedrock forms narrow valleys with poorly developed, localized, or no bedrock terraces and a channel steepness index half that of the friable bedrock and an average channel concavity of about 0.5. The oldest dated strath terrace on the Willapa River, T2, was active for nearly 10,000 years, from 11,265 to 2862 calibrated years before present (cal YBP), whereas the youngest terrace, T1, is Anthropocene in age and recently abandoned. Incision rates derived from terrace ages average 0.32 mm y- 1 for T2 and 11.47 mm y- 1 for T1. Our results indicate bedrock weathering properties influence valley width through the creation of a dense fracture network in the friable bedrock that results in high rates of lateral erosion of exposed bedrock banks. Conversely, the erosion-resistant bedrock has concavity values more typical of detachment-limited streams, exhibits a sparse fracture network, and displays evidence for infrequent episodic block erosion and plucking. Lithology thereby plays a direct role on the rates of lateral erosion, influencing valley width and the potential for strath terrace planation and preservation.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of a novel five-degrees-of-freedom user command controller in people with spinal cord injury and non-injured for full upper extremity neuroprosthesis, wearable powered orthoses and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Timothy R D; Vare, Veronica A

    2015-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis for a user command controller monitoring head position for artificial control of the proximal upper limb was performed. The controller was evaluated by having subjects complete target matching tasks manipulating a simulated on-screen hand representation to investigate the effects of target location and target speed on performance. Sixteen subjects took part in the study, 11 of whom had sustained cervical spinal cord injuries. The subjects were able to control the on-screen hand with overall low sensitivity of performance with the controller to target position in its five-degrees-of-freedom. The optimal speed was found to be a compromise between low speed and high accuracy but longer completion time and fast speed for short completion time with lower accuracy. The results demonstrated the robustness of the controller across a population of non-injured subjects and those with tetraplegia.

  17. Assessment of correlation between knee notch width index and the three-dimensional notch volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, C.F.; Martins, C.A.Q.; Lorenz, S.G.F.; Fu, F.H.; Smolinski, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to determine whether there is a correlation between the notch volume and the notch width index (NWI) as measured on the three most frequently used radiographic views: the Holmblad 45A degrees, Holmblad 70A degrees, and Rosenberg view. The notch volume of 20 cadaveric knees was me

  18. Bipartite Graphs of Large Clique-Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpelainen, Nicholas; Lozin, Vadim V.

    Recently, several constructions of bipartite graphs of large clique-width have been discovered in the literature. In the present paper, we propose a general framework for developing such constructions and use it to obtain new results on this topic.

  19. A Comparative Study on the Relationship Between Inter Alar Width, and Inter Commissural Width on Circumferential Arc Width of Maxillary Anterior Teeth in Different Age Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurien, Anjana; Cherian, K P; Mhatre, Shirley; Tharakan, Renji George

    2014-01-01

    This study was done to determine the relationship between interalar width and inter commissural width on circumferential arc width of maxillary anterior teeth in dentulous subjects between the age groups of 20–50 years...

  20. Quality of pedestrian flow and crosswalk width at signalized intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael K.M. Alhajyaseen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Among various pedestrian facilities, signalized crosswalks are the most complex and critical ones. Their geometry and configuration including width, position and angle directly affect the safety, cycle length and resulting delays for all users. Existing manuals do not provide clear and rational specifications for the required crosswalk width under different pedestrian demand combinations and properties. Furthermore, they do not consider the bi-directional flow effects on crossing speed and time when addressing pedestrian flow at signalized crosswalks. However, quantifying the effects of such interactions on the behavior of pedestrian flow is a prerequisite for improving the geometric design and configuration of signalized crosswalks. The objective of this paper is to develop a methodology for estimating the required crosswalk width at different pedestrian demand combinations and a pre-defined LOS. The developed methodology is based on theoretical modeling for total pedestrian platoon crossing time, which consists of discharge and crossing times. The developed models are utilized to generate the fundamental diagrams of pedestrian flow at signalized crosswalks. A comprehensive discussion about the effects of bi-directional flow and various pedestrian age groups on the characteristics of pedestrian flow and the capacity of signalized crosswalks is presented. It is found that the maximum reduction in the capacity of signalized crosswalks occurs at roughly equal pedestrian flows from both sides of the crosswalk. By utilizing existing LOS thresholds for pedestrian flow at signalized crosswalks, the required crosswalk widths for various pedestrian demand combinations are proposed for implementation.

  1. DIFFUSE DBD IN ATMOSPHERIC AIR AT DIFFERENT APPLIED PULSE WIDTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Alexandrovna Shershunova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the realization and the diagnostics of the volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in 1-mm air gap when applying high voltage rectangular pulses to the electrodes. The effect of the applied pulse width on the discharge dissipated energy was studied in detail. It was found experimentally, the energy stayed nearly constant with the pulse elongation from 600 ns to 1 ms.

  2. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure of the aluminum surface.

  3. Measured Stark widths and shifts in the O IV spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đeniže Stevan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark widths (W and shifts (d of 5 prominent triply ionized oxygen (O IV spectral lines in 3 multiplets have been measured in oxygen plasma at 42 000 K electron temperature using a linear, low-pressure, pulsed arc discharge as an optically thin plasma source. Obtained W and d values have been compared to available experimental and theoretical data. We found a good agreement among our experimental W and d values and theoretical expectations.

  4. Constraints on widths of mixed pentaquark multiplets

    CERN Document Server

    Mohta, V

    2004-01-01

    We determine constraints on the partial widths of mixed pentaquark multiplets in the framework of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB$\\chi$PT). The partial widths satisfy a GMO-type relation at leading order in HB$\\chi$PT, for arbitrary mixing. The widths of N(1440), N(1710), and $\\Theta(1540)$ are not consistent with ideal mixing, $\\theta_{N} = 35.3^{\\circ}$, but are consistent with $\\theta_{N} \\lesssim 25^{\\circ}$. Furthermore, there are parameter values in HB$\\chi$PT that produce such a mixing angle while allowing the identification of the mass spectrum above. As an alternative to non-ideal mixing, we also suggest reasons for giving up on N(1440) as a pure pentaquark state.

  5. The Variable Line Width of Achernar

    CERN Document Server

    Rivinius, Th; Baade, D; Carciofi, A C; Leister, N; Štefl, S

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Achernar over the past decades, have shown the photospheric line width, as measured by the rotational parameter $v \\sin i$, to vary in correlation with the emission activity. Here we present new observations, covering the most recent activity phase, and further archival data collected from the archives. The $v \\sin i$ variation is confirmed. On the basis of the available data it cannot be decided with certainty whether the increased line width precedes the emission activity, i.e. is a signature of the ejection mechanism, or postdates is, which would make it a signature of re-accretion of some of the disk-material. However, the observed evidence leans towards the re-accretion hypothesis. Two further stars showing the effect of variable line width in correlation with emission activity, namely 66 Oph and $\\pi$ Aqr, are presented as well.

  6. Graph Operations on Clique-Width Bounded Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Gurski, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Clique-width is a well-known graph parameter. Many NP-hard graph problems admit polynomial-time solutions when restricted to graphs of bounded clique-width. The same holds for NLC-width. In this paper we study the behavior of clique-width and NLC-width under various graph operations and graph transformations. We give upper and lower bounds for the clique-width and NLC-width of the modified graphs in terms of the clique-width and NLC-width of the involved graphs.

  7. Determination of level widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szücs T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Level widths in 15N have been measured with the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF technique. Solid nitrogen compounds, bremsstrahlung, and HPGe detectors have been used as target, beam, and detectors, respectively. The preliminarily level widths are in agreement with the literature values, but more precise.

  8. Reduced neutron widths in the nuclear data ensemble: Experiment andtheory do not agree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koehler P.E.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available I have analyzed reduced neutron widths (Γ0n for the subset of 1245 resonances in the nuclear data ensemble (NDE for which they have been reported. Random matrix theory (RMT predicts for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE that these widths should follow a χ2 distribution having one degree of freedom (ν = 1 - the Porter Thomas (PT distribution. Using the maximum-likelihood (ML technique, I have determined that the Γ0n values in the NDE are best described by a χ2 distribution having ν = 0.80 ± 0.052, which is 3.8 standard deviations smaller than predicted by RMT. I show that this striking disagreement is most likely due to the inclusion of significant p-wave contamination to the supposedly pure s-wave NDE. Furthermore, when an energy-dependent threshold is used to remove the p-wave contamination, ML analysis yields ν = 1.217 ± 0.092 for the remaining data, still in poor agreement with the RMT prediction for the GOE. These results cast very serious doubt on claims that the NDE represents a striking confirmation of RMT.

  9. Line width of Josephson flux flow oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V.P.; Dmitriev, P.N.; Sobolev, A.S.;

    2002-01-01

    to be proven before one initiates real FFO applications. To achieve this goal a comprehensive set of line width measurements of the FFO operating in different regimes has been performed. FFOs with tapered shape have been successfully implemented in order to avoid the superfine resonant structure with voltage...... spacing of about 20 nV and extremely low differential resistance, recently observed in the IVC of the standard rectangular geometry. The obtained results have been compared with existing theories and FFO models in order to understand and possibly eliminate excess noise in the FFO. The intrinsic line width...

  10. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  11. Correlation Widths in Quantum--Chaotic Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, B.; Richter, A; WeidenmÜller, H.

    2011-01-01

    An important parameter to characterize the scattering matrix S for quantum-chaotic scattering is the width Gamma_{corr} of the S-matrix autocorrelation function. We show that the "Weisskopf estimate" d/(2pi) sum_c T_c (where d is the mean resonance spacing, T_c with 0

  12. Wireline equalization using pulse-width modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, J.H.R.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Visschers, J.L.; Nauta, Bram

    2006-01-01

    Abstract-High-speed data links over copper cables can be effectively equalized using pulse-width modulation (PWM) pre-emphasis. This provides an alternative to the usual 2-tap FIR filters. The use of PWM pre-emphasis allows a channel loss at the Nyquist frequency of ~30dB, compared to ~20dB for a

  13. Measurements of the Mass, Total Width and Two-Photon Partial Width of the $\\eta_{c}$ Meson

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, G; Gao, Y S; Kim, D Y J; Wilson, R; Browder, T E; Li, Y; Rodríguez, J L; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Gladding, G E; Gollin, G D; Hans, R M; Johnson, E; Karliner, I; Marsh, M A; Palmer, M; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Janicek, R; Patel, P M; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Bean, A; Besson, D; Davis, R; Kwak, N; Zhao, X; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Kubota, Y; Lee, S J; Mahapatra, R; O'Neill, J J; Poling, R A; Riehle, T; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Athar, S B; Jian, L; Ling, L; Saleem, M; Timm, S; Wappler, F; Anastassov, A; Duboscq, J E; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Hart, T; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Schwarthoff, H; Thayer, J B; Von Törne, E; Zoeller, M M; Richichi, S J; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Undrus, A; Chen, S; Fast, J; Hinson, J W; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Pavlunin, V; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Lyon, A L; Thorndike, E H; Jessop, C P; Marsiske, H; Perl, Martin Lewis; Savinov, V; Ugolini, D W; Zhou, X; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Maravin, Y; Narsky, I; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J; Wlodek, T; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Boulahouache, C; Bukin, K; Dambasuren, E; Karamov, S; Majumder, G; Moneti, G C; Mountain, R; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Wolf, A; Wu, J; Kopp, S E; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; McLean, K W; Marka, S; Xu, Z; Godang, R; Kinoshita, K; Lai, I C; Schrenk, S; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; McGee, S; Perera, L P; Zhou, G J; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Schmidtler, M; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Würthwein, F; Jaffe, D E; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Potter, E M; Prell, S; Sharma, V; Asner, D M; Eppich, A; Hill, T S; Morrison, R J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Vogel, H; Behrens, B H; Ford, W T; Gritsan, A; Roy, J D; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Baker, R; Bebek, C; Berger, B E; Berkelman, K; Blanc, F; Boisvert, V; Cassel, David G; Dickson, M; Drell, P S; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Foland, A D; Gaidarev, P B; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L K; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hopman, P I; Jones, C D; Kreinick, D L; Lohner, M; Magerkurth, A; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Thayer, J G; Thies, P G; Urner, D; Valant-Spaight, B L; Warburton, A; Avery, P; Prescott, C; Rubiera, A I; Yelton, J; Zheng, J

    2000-01-01

    Using 13.4 $fb^{-1}$ of data collected with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have observed 300 events for the two-photon production of ground-state pseudo-scalar charmonium in the decay $\\eta_c$ -> $K_S K^{\\mp} \\pi^{\\pm}$. We have measured the $\\eta_c$ mass to be (2980.4 +- 2.3 (stat) +- 0.6 (sys)) MeV and its full width as (27.0 +- 5.8 (stat) +- 1.4 (sys)) MeV. We have determined the two-photon partial width of the $\\eta_c$ meson to be (7.6 +- 0.8 (stat) +- 0.4 (sys) +- 2.3 (br)) keV, with the last uncertainty associated with the decay branching fraction.

  14. K- nuclear states: Binding energies and widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrtánková, J.; Mareš, J.

    2017-07-01

    K- optical potentials relevant to calculations of K- nuclear quasibound states were developed within several chiral meson-baryon coupled-channels interaction models. The applied models yield quite different K- binding energies and widths. Then the K- multinucleon interactions were incorporated by a phenomenological optical potential fitted recently to kaonic atom data. Though the applied K- interaction models differ significantly in the K-N subthreshold region, our self-consistent calculations of kaonic nuclei across the periodic table lead to conclusions valid quite generally. Due to K- multinucleon absorption in the nuclear medium, the calculated widths of K- nuclear states are sizable, ΓK-≥90 MeV, and exceed substantially their binding energies in all considered nuclei.

  15. Radiative widths of neutral kaon excitations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil V Somalwar; KTeV Collaboration

    2004-03-01

    We observe 147 events of the axial vector pair $K_{1} (1270) - K_{1} (1400)$ produced in the Coulomb field of a Pb target and measure the radiative widths $ (K_{1} (1400) → K^{0} + ) = 280.8 ± 23.2$ (stat.) $± (40.4)$ (syst.) keV and $ (K_{1} (1270) → K^{0} + ) = 73.2 ± 6.1$ (stat.) $± 28.3$ (syst.) keV. These first measurements are lower than the quark-model predictions. We also place upper limits on the radiative widths for $K^{*} (1410)$ and $K_{2}^{*} (1430)$ and find that the letter is very small in accord with $SU(3)$ invariance in the naive quark model.

  16. Exotic Meson Decay Widths using Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, M S

    2006-01-01

    A decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson h, with JPC=1-+, is presented for the channel h->pi+a1. This quenched lattice QCD simulation employs Luescher's finite box method. Operators coupling to the h and pi+a1 states are used at various levels of smearing and fuzzing, and at four quark masses. Eigenvalues of the corresponding correlation matrices yield energy spectra that determine scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative pi+a1 momenta. Although the phase shift data is sparse, fits to a Breit-Wigner model are attempted, resulting in a decay width of about 60 MeV when averaged over two lattice sizes.

  17. W mass and width at the LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Malberti, Martina

    2006-01-01

    The precision measurement of the W boson properties, such as its mass and width, constitutes an important consistency check of the Standard Model. This paper, in particular, describes methods to measure the W mass with improved precision at the Large Hadron Collider, exploiting the large number of Z bosons produced. The precision on the W boson mass achievable with an integrated luminosisty of 10~fb^-1 is discussed.

  18. 全日制专业学位硕士研究生职业能力培训质量分析与改进措施%Analysis and Improvement on professional ability training quality for Full-time Professional Degree Master

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文廷; 张蓬涛; 张利; 安丽娜

    2016-01-01

    随着全日制专业学位研究生教育的引入与快速发展,如何贯彻落实专业学位研究生的教育方针,为社会培养高质量的高层次应用型、复合型专门人才,便成了我国研究生教育研究的核心问题之一。本文通过专业学位硕士研究生职业能力培训质量的影响因素及其成因分析,针对存在的主要问题或因素,结合河北农业大学全日制专业学位硕士研究生培养实践,提出了提升全日制专业学位硕士研究生职业能力培训质量的一些方案或措施,供同行参考与借鉴。%With full-time professional degree graduate education introduction and rapid development, how to carry out the professional degree graduate education policy, training high quality high level for the society, compound talents, became the one of the birth of the core issue of education research study in our country. This paper through the professional degree graduate students professional ability training quality influence factor and origin cause of formation analysis, aiming at the main prob-lems or factors, combining the training practice of Hebei Agricultural University full-time professional degree graduate stu-dents proposed to enhance professional ability training quality of some programs or measures of full-time professional degree graduate students and provide reference for peers.

  19. Are there any good digraph width measures?

    CERN Document Server

    Ganian, Robert; Kneis, Joachim; Meister, Daniel; Obdržálek, Jan; Rossmanith, Peter; Sikdar, Somnath

    2010-01-01

    Several different measures for digraph width have appeared in the last few years. However, none of them shares all the "nice" properties of treewidth: First, being \\emph{algorithmically useful} i.e. admitting polynomial-time algorithms for all $\\MS1$-definable problems on digraphs of bounded width. And, second, having nice \\emph{structural properties} i.e. being monotone under taking subdigraphs and some form of arc contractions. As for the former, (undirected) $\\MS1$ seems to be the least common denominator of all reasonably expressive logical languages on digraphs that can speak about the edge/arc relation on the vertex set.The latter property is a necessary condition for a width measure to be characterizable by some version of the cops-and-robber game characterizing the ordinary treewidth. Our main result is that \\emph{any reasonable} algorithmically useful and structurally nice digraph measure cannot be substantially different from the treewidth of the underlying undirected graph. Moreover, we introduce \\...

  20. Pulse width control loop as a duty cycle corrector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Goran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The clock distribution and generation circuitry forms a critical component of current synchronous digital systems. A digital system’s clocks must have not only low jitter, low skew, but also well-controlled duty cycle in order to facilitate versatile clocking techniques. In high-speed CMOS clock buffer design, the duty cycle of a clock is liable to be changed when the clock passes through a multistage buffer because the circuit is not pure digital [8]. In this paper, we propose a pulse width control loop referred as MPWCL (modified pulse width control loop that adopts the same architecture as the conventional PWCL, but with a new pulse generator and new charge pump circuit as a constituent of the duty cycle detector. Thanks to using new building blocks the proposed pulse width control loop can control the duty cycle in a wide range, and what is more important it becomes operative in saturation region too, what provides conditional for fast locking time. For 1.2 µm double-metal double-poly CMOS process with Vdd = 5 V and operating frequency of 133 MHz, results of SPICE simulation show that the duty cycle can be well controlled in the range from 20 % up to 80 % if the loop parameters are properly chosen.

  1. Determination of non-mesonic weak decay widths of 5ΛHe and 11ΛB Hypernuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Botta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent determination of the partial decay widths for the one-proton and the two-nucleon induced Non-Mesonic Weak Decay of Λ-Hypernuclei in the A=5–16 range permitted to reconstruct the full pattern of decay widths for 5ΛHe and 11ΛB. A consistency check on 12ΛC decay widths confirms the validity of the adopted method.

  2. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes. These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  3. Development of compatibility assessments for full-width and offset frontal impact test procedures in FIMCAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adolph, T.; Schwedhelm, H.; Lazaro, I.; Versmissen, A.C.M.; Edwards, M.; Thomson, R.; Johannsen, H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the project FIMCAR (Frontal Impact and Compatibility Assessment Research) was to define an integrated set of test procedures and associated metrics to assess a vehicle's frontal impact protection, which includes self-And partner-protection. For the development of the set, two different f

  4. Development of compatibility assessments for full-width and offset frontal impact test procedures in FIMCAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adolph, T.; Schwedhelm, H.; Lazaro, I.; Versmissen, A.C.M.; Edwards, M.; Thomson, R.; Johannsen, H.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the project FIMCAR (Frontal Impact and Compatibility Assessment Research) was to define an integrated set of test procedures and associated metrics to assess a vehicle's frontal impact protection, which includes self-And partner-protection. For the development of the set, two different

  5. CGC beyond eikonal accuracy: finite width target effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altinoluk Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to systematically include the corrections to the eikonal approximation that are associated with the finite width of the target. The retarded gluon propagator in background field is calculated at next-to-next-to-eikonal (NNE accuracy by using this method. The corrections to the strict eikonal limit of the gluon propagator are found to be Wilson lines decorated by gradients of the background field of the target. The result is then applied to single inclusive gluon production and to single transverse spin asymmetry for a polarized target in pA collisions.

  6. Energy detection UWB system based on pulse width modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new energy detection ultra-wideband system based on pulse width modulation is proposed. The bit error rate (BER performance of this new system is slightly worst than that of a pulse position modulation (PPM system in additive white Gaussian noise channels. In multipath channels, this system does not suffer from cross-modulation interference as PPM, so it can achieve better BER performance than PPM when cross-modulation interference occurs. In addition, when synchronisation errors occur, this system is more robust than PPM.

  7. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  8. Effect of stance width on multidirectional postural responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    for a change in stance width. Nevertheless, the magnitude of the trunk displacement, as well as of CoP displacement, was modified based on the degree of passive stiffness in the musculoskeletal system, which increased with stance width. The change from a more passive to an active horizontal force constraint, to larger EMG magnitudes especially in the trunk muscles and larger trunk and CoP excursions in narrow stance are consistent with a more effortful response for equilibrium control in narrow stance to perturbations in all directions.

  9. Clique Cover Width and Clique Sum

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrokhi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    For a clique cover $C$ in the undirected graph $G$, the clique cover graph of $C$ is the graph obtained by contracting the vertices of each clique in $C$ into a single vertex. The clique cover width of G, denoted by $CCW(G)$, is the minimum value of the bandwidth of all clique cover graphs of $G$. When $G$ is the clique sum of $G_1$ and $G_2$, we prove that $CCW(G) \\le 3/2(CCW(G_1) + CCW(G_2))$.

  10. Resonance trapping and saturation of decay widths

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, E; Rotter, I

    1998-01-01

    Resonance trapping appears in open many-particle quantum systems at high level density when the coupling to the continuum of decay channels reaches a critical strength. Here a reorganization of the system takes place and a separation of different time scales appears. We investigate it under the influence of additional weakly coupled channels as well as by taking into account the real part of the coupling term between system and continuum. We observe a saturation of the mean width of the trapped states. Also the decay rates saturate as a function of the coupling strength. The mechanism of the saturation is studied in detail. In any case, the critical region of reorganization is enlarged. When the transmission coefficients for the different channels are different, the width distribution is broadened as compared to a chi_K^2 distribution where K is the number of channels. Resonance trapping takes place before the broad state overlaps regions beyond the extension of the spectrum of the closed system.

  11. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-08

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping.

  12. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  13. Device-width dependence of plateau width in quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaji, S.; Hirakawa, K.; Nagata, M.

    1993-02-01

    Hall bar type devices having a total length of 2900 μm, a source and drain electrode width of 400 μm and different widths w ranging from 10 to 120 μm in its central 600 μm long part are fabricated from a GaAs/AlGaAs wafer with electron mobility of 21 m 2V -1s -1. The current at which the quantum Hall plateau for i=2 at B=9.7T at T=1.2K disappears is proportional to w. The average critical current density is Jcr=(1.6±0.2) A m -1

  14. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  15. Direct measurement of the W boson width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-12-04

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W --> enu candidate events. Data from approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded at square root of s = 1.96 TeV by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are analyzed. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 +/- 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model.

  16. Mesiodistal width and proximal enamel thickness of maxillary first bicuspids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélio de Carvalho Macha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating measurements relative to the mesiodistal crown width and enamel thickness of maxillary first bicuspids. The sample consisted of 40 extracted sound bicuspids (20 right and 20 left, selected from white patients (mean age: 23.7 ± 4.2 years, who were treated orthodontically with tooth extraction at a private clinic in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. All teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axis through the proximal surfaces, parallel to the buccal side, to obtain 0.6-mm central sections. The mesiodistal crown width and proximal enamel thickness were measured using a stereoscopic microscope connected to a computer. Measurements for right and left teeth, as well as the mesial and distal enamel thicknesses in the total sample, were compared by the Wilcoxon test (α = 0.05. The mesiodistal crown width mean values found were 7.51 mm (± 0.54 on the right side and 7.53 mm (± 0.35 on the left side. The mean enamel thickness on the distal surfaces for both sides was 1.29 mm (right: s.d. = 0.12 and left: s.d. = 0.18. The mean values for the mesial surfaces were 1.08 mm (± 0.14 and 1.19 mm (± 0.25, on the right and the left sides, respectively. No significant differences were found between the crown measurements and enamel thicknesses on the left and right sides. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces. Reliable measurements of enamel thickness are useful to guide stripping, which may be an attractive alternative to tooth extraction because it allows the transverse arch dimension to be maintained.

  17. Relationship between width and length ratios of upper anterior teeth in young Chilean population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Troncoso-Pazos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge about the size and proportion of upper anterior teeth allows dental rehabilitation taking into consideration the local parameters of a population. The aim of this research is to determine the width, length and the relationship between width and length of central incisor, lateral incisor and canine teeth in both sexes in young Chilean population. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was performed. Study subjects included 187 dentistry students from two Chilean cities (mean age 21.35±2.7 years, 52.9% men. The teeth width and height were measured and the width/height ratio was calculated. Differences in measurements according to sex was analyzed (p<0.05; STATA v.10.0. Results: The width and height of the teeth were statistically and proportionally larger in men (p<0.05. The width/height ratio of lateral and canine incisors was significantly higher in women (p<0.05. Conclusion: In a sample of young Chileans, upper anterior teeth were longer and wider in men. However, the width/height ratio of teeth was found to be significantly higher in women.

  18. Pulse-Width Jitter Measurement for Laser Diode Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun-Hua; WANG Yun-Cai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of pulse-width jitter of diode laser pulses are presented. The expression of pulse power spectra with all amplitude jitter, timing jitter and pulse-width jitter is deduced.

  19. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  20. A statistical analysis of the location and width of Saturn's southern auroras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Badman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A selection of twenty-two Hubble Space Telescope images of Saturn's ultraviolet auroras obtained during 1997–2004 has been analysed to determine the median location and width of the auroral oval, and their variability. Limitations of coverage restrict the analysis to the southern hemisphere, and to local times from the post-midnight sector to just past dusk, via dawn and noon. It is found that the overall median location of the poleward and equatorward boundaries of the oval with respect to the southern pole are at ~14° and ~16° co-latitude, respectively, with a median latitudinal width of ~2°. These median values vary only modestly with local time around the oval, though the poleward boundary moves closer to the pole near noon (~12.5° such that the oval is wider in that sector (median width ~3.5° than it is at both dawn and dusk (~1.5°. It is also shown that the position of the auroral boundaries at Saturn are extremely variable, the poleward boundary being located between 2° and 20° co-latitude, and the equatorward boundary between 6° and 23°, this variability contrasting sharply with the essentially fixed location of the main oval at Jupiter. Comparison with Voyager plasma angular velocity data mapped magnetically from the equatorial magnetosphere into the southern ionosphere indicates that the dayside aurora lie poleward of the main upward-directed field-aligned current region associated with corotation enforcement, which maps to ~20°–24° co-latitude, while agreeing reasonably with the position of the open-closed field line boundary based on estimates of the open flux in Saturn's tail, located between ~11° and ~15°. In this case, the variability in location can be understood in terms of changes in the open flux present in the system, the changes implied by the Saturn data then matching those observed at Earth as fractions of the total planetary flux. We infer that the broad (few degrees diffuse auroral emissions

  1. Changing step width alters lower extremity biomechanics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindle, Richard A; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2014-01-01

    Step width is a spatiotemporal parameter that may influence lower extremity biomechanics at the hip and knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical response of the lower extremity joints to step width changes during running. Lower extremity data from 30 healthy runners, half of them male, were collected during running in three step width conditions: preferred, wide, and narrow. Dependent variables and step width were analyzed using a mixed model ANOVA and pairwise t-tests for post hoc comparisons. Step width was successfully altered in the wide and narrow conditions. Generally, frontal plane peak values decreased as step width increased from narrow to preferred to wide. Peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Peak knee abduction moment and knee abduction impulse also decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Although men and women ran differently, gender only influenced the effect of step width on peak rearfoot inversion moment. In conclusion, step width influences lower extremity biomechanics in healthy runners. When step width increased from narrow to wide, peak values of frontal plane variables decreased. In addition to previously reported changes at the rearfoot, the hip and knee joint biomechanics were also influenced by changes in step width.

  2. 农业院校全日制专业学位研究生教育存在的问题探讨%Study on the Existing Problems of Full-time Professional Degree Graduate Education in Agricultural Univer-sities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康若祎; 刘川宁; 叶敏

    2012-01-01

      In recent years,with adjusting in structure of postgraduate education by he Ministry of Education,full-time professional degree post graduate education has been a very important part of university talents training. In the process of educational administration, these aspects need to fur ther strengthen in agricultural universities, such as the quality of students,the university students' receptivity,the acceptance of our society,the tutors conception,the construction of practice base. The educating units further improve the quality of full-time professional degree postgraduate education by aggrandizing propaganda,strengthening cooperation between universities and enterprises,perfecting degree standards and management regulations.%  近年来随着教育部对研究生培养结构的调整,全日制专业学位硕士研究生已成为高校人才培养的一个重要组成部分。在教育管理过程中,农业院校全日制专业学位研究生的生源质量、学生认同感、社会的认可度、导师指导定位和实践基地建设还需进一步加强。培养单位要加大宣传力度、加强校企合作、完善学位标准和管理条例,进一步提高全日制专业学位研究生教育质量。

  3. The Average Widths and Non-linear Widths of the Classes of Multivariate Functions with Bounded Moduli of Smoothness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-ping Liu; Gui-qiao Xu

    2002-01-01

    The classes of the multivariate functions with bounded moduli on Rd and Td are given and their average a-widths and non-linear n-widths are discussed. The weak asymptotic behaviors are established for the corresponding quantities.

  4. Is biologic width of anterior and posterior teeth similar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Alireza Rasouli Ghahroudi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The biologic width (BW includes attached epithelial cells and connective tissue attachment complex being very important in the periodontal health during prosthetic treatments as invading this zone can cause bone resorption and gingival recession. The present study investigated biologic width values in the normal periodontium in anterior and posterior teeth. 30 patients that referred from restorative department to periodontics department of Tehran University of medical sciences who need crown lengthening procedure on their teeth with no history of orthodontic, prosthodontic and periodontal treatment were randomly enrolled in this cross-sectional trial. Sulcus depths (SD as well as the distance between free gingival margin and the bone crest (FB of anterior and posterior teeth were measured by UNC-15 probe and compared. periodontium thickness was also assessed. The data were subjected to Student t test. Mean BW in the 43 anterior and 47 posterior teeth was measured and not significantly different (1.4651±0.39 mm vs. 1.6312±0.49 mm was observed; however, BW was significantly more in the teeth with thick periodontium compared to those with thin periodontium (1.703±0.5 vs. 1.408±0.35; P=0.002. BW not only is different in individuals but also could be dissimilar in different teeth and should be calculated independently prior to restorative treatments.

  5. Fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of 2D boron nitride nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report studies of the surface fringe structures and tunable bandgap width of atomic-thin boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs. BNNSs are synthesized by using digitally controlled pulse deposition techniques. The nanoscale morphologies of BNNSs are characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In general, the BNNSs appear microscopically flat in the case of low temperature synthesis, whereas at high temperature conditions, it yields various curved structures. Experimental data reveal the evolutions of fringe structures. Functionalization of the BNNSs is completed with hydrogen plasma beam source in order to efficiently control bandgap width. The characterizations are based on Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and FTIR transmittance spectra. Red shifts of spectral lines are clearly visible after the functionalization, indicating the bandgap width of the BNNSs has been changed. However, simple treatments with hydrogen gas do not affect the bandgap width of the BNNSs.

  6. The mappings of degree 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The maps of the form f( x = ∑ i=1 n a i ⋅x⋅ b i , called 1-degree maps, are introduced and investigated. For noncommutative algebras and modules over them 1-degree maps give an analogy of linear maps and differentials. Under some conditions on the algebra 𝒜 , contractibility of the group of 1-degree isomorphisms is proved for the module l 2 ( 𝒜 . It is shown that these conditions are fulfilled for the algebra of linear maps of a finite-dimensional linear space. The notion of 1-degree map gives a possibility to define a nonlinear Fredholm map of l 2 ( 𝒜 and a Fredholm manifold modelled by l 2 ( 𝒜 . 1-degree maps are also applied to some problems of Markov chains.

  7. The External Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book examines the external degree in relation to the extremes of attitudes, myths, and data. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the American external degree, foreign external-degree programs, the purpose of the external degree, the current scene, institutional issues, and problems of general policy. (MJM)

  8. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  9. SOL Width Scaling in the MAST Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Counsell, Glenn; Connor, Jack; Kirk, Andrew

    2002-11-01

    Target heat loads are determined in large part by the upstream SOL heat flux width, Δ_h. Considerable effort has been made in the past to develop analytical and empirical scalings for Δh to allow reliable estimates to be made for the next-step device. The development of scalings for a large spherical tokamak (ST) such as MAST is particularly important both for development of the ST concept and for improving the robustness of scalings derived for conventional tokamaks. A first such scaling has been developed in MAST DND plasmas. The scaling was developed by flux-mapping data from the target Langmuir probe arrays to the mid-plane and fitting to key upstream parameters such as P_SOL, bar ne and q_95. In order to minimise the effects of co-linearity, dedicated campaigns were undertaken to explore the widest possible range of each parameter while keeping the remainder as fixed as possible. Initial results indicate a weak inverse dependence on P_SOL and approximately linear dependence on bar n_e. Scalings derived from consideration of theoretical edge transport models and integration with data from conventional devices is under way. The established scaling laws could be used for the extrapolations to the future machine such as Spherical Tokamak Power Plant (STPP). This work is jointly funded by Euratom and UK Department of Trade and Industry. J-W. Ahn would like to recognise the support of a grant from the British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

  10. Opposite Degree Algorithm and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Guang Yue

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The opposite (Opposite Degree, referred to as OD algorithm is an intelligent algorithm proposed by Yue Xiaoguang et al. Opposite degree algorithm is mainly based on the concept of opposite degree, combined with the idea of design of neural network and genetic algorithm and clustering analysis algorithm. The OD algorithm is divided into two sub algorithms, namely: opposite degree - numerical computation (OD-NC algorithm and opposite degree - Classification computation (OD-CC algorithm.

  11. GAP WIDTH STUDY IN LASER BUTT-WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    In this paper the maximum allowable gap width in laser butt-welding is intensively studied. The gap width study (GWS) is performed on the material of SST of W1.4401 (AISI 316) under various welding conditions, which are the gap width : 0.00-0.50 mm, the welding speed : 0.5-2.0 m/min, the laser...... to the welding speed, (2) the larger laser power leads to the bigger maximum allowable gap width and (3) the focal point position has very little influence on the maximum gap width....... power : 2 and 2.6 kW and the focal point position : 0 and -1.2 mm. Quality of all the butt welds are destructively tested according to ISO 13919-1.Influences of the variable process parameters to the maximum allowable gap width are observed as (1) the maximum gap width is inversely related...

  12. Reliability of permanent mandibular first molars and incisors widths as predictor for the width of permanent mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Mittar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Preventive measures are necessary to prevent a potential irregularity from progressing into a more severe malocclusion. The determination of the tooth size-arch length discrepancy in mixed dentition requires an accurate prediction of the mesiodistal widths of the unerupted permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study, 200 subjects in the age group of 16-25 years were selected from various colleges of M. M. University. The mesiodistal width of permanent mandibular incisors, first molars, canines and premolars of both arches were measured on the subject cast using an electronic digital caliper. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between mesiodistal tooth widths of males and females. Linear regression equation was determined to predict the sum of mandibular and maxillary permanent canines and premolars using mandibular first molars plus the four mandibular incisors as predictors. Results: There was no significant difference between the actual and predicted width of sum of permanent canines and premolars using regression equations. The predicted widths of both arches using Tanaka and Johnston equations showed significant differences. Determined regression equations for males were accurate in male samples and determined regression equation for females were accurate in female samples for both arches.

  13. Effect of serial extraction alone on crowding: relationships between tooth width, arch length, and crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, T; Matsumoto, Y; Suzuki, J; Sato, N; Oguchi, H

    1999-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of serial extraction alone on crowding. We also investigated the relationships between tooth width, arch length, and irregularity index. Maxillary dental casts from 32 subjects who had undergone only serial extraction were analyzed at 3 stages: before deciduous canines extraction, after first premolars extraction, and at the end of the observation period. The mean of the irregularity index decreased significantly as serial extraction proceeded and further decreased during the observation period. In cases where the width of the incisor was more than 2 standard deviations above the means for the control subjects, there was a significant correlation between tooth width of the lateral incisors and irregularity index before extraction as well as a significant correlation between the summation of tooth widths of the central and lateral incisors and irregularity index at that time. There was a significant negative correlation between arch length discrepancy and irregularity index before extraction and also a significant correlation between arch length discrepancy and correction of the irregularity index from before deciduous canines extraction to after first premolars extraction. These results suggest that tooth width and arch length discrepancy might preferentially affect the degree of anterior crowding in cases of severe crowding. There was no aggravation of the average crowding level during the observation period in the present study. The present study quantitatively suggested that serial extraction was useful for the purpose of correcting crowding in most cases.

  14. Fixed Width Booth Multiplier Based on PEB Circuit [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Vidya Devi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this brief, a probabilistic estimation bias (PEB circuit for a fixed-width two’s complement Boothmultiplier is proposed. The proposed PEB circuit is derived from theoretical computation, instead ofexhaustive simulations and heuristic compensation strategies that tend to introduce curve-fitting errors andexponential-grown simulation time. Consequently, the proposed PEB circuit provides a smaller area and alower truncation error compared with existing works. Implemented in an 8 × 8 2-D discrete cosinetransform (DCT core, the DCT core using the proposed PEB Booth multiplier improves the peak signalto-noise ratio by 17 dB with only a 2% area penalty compared with the direct-truncated method.

  15. The Masses of Distant Galaxies from Optical Emission Line Widths

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, E B; Gillespie, Elizabeth Barton; Zee, Liese van

    2002-01-01

    Promising methods for studying galaxy evolution rely on optical emission line width measurements to compare intermediate-redshift objects to galaxies with equivalent masses at the present epoch. However, emission lines can be misleading. We show empirical examples of galaxies with concentrated central star formation from a survey of galaxies in pairs; HI observations of these galaxies indicate that the optical line emission fails to sample their full gravitational potentials. We use simple models of bulge-forming bursts of star formation to demonstrate that compact optical morphologies and small half-light radii can accompany these anomalously narrow emission lines; thus late-type bulges forming on rapid (0.5-1 Gyr) timescales at intermediate redshift would exhibit properties similar to those of heavily bursting dwarfs. We conclude that some of the luminous compact objects observed at intermediate and high redshift may be starbursts in the centers of massive galaxies and/or bulges in formation.

  16. Gait analysis of slope walking: a study on step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamura,Kenji

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination was made of step length, stride width, time factors and deviation in the center of pressure during up- and downslope walking in 17 healthy men between the ages of 19 and 34 using a force plate. Slope inclinations were set at 3, 6, 9 and 12 degrees. At 12 degrees, walking speed, the product of step length and cadence, decreased significantly (p less than 0.01 in both up- and downslope walking. The most conspicuous phenomenon in upslope walking was in cadence. The steeper the slope, the smaller was the cadence. The most conspicuous phenomenon in downslope walking was in step length. The steeper the slope, the shorter was the step length.

  17. Anomalous width variation of rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves in the context of auroral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Ghosh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dynamic, large amplitude solitary waves in the auroral regions of space is well known. Since their velocities are of the order of the ion acoustic speed, they may well be considered as being generated from the nonlinear evolution of ion acoustic waves. However, they do not show the expected width-amplitude correlation for K-dV solitons. Recent POLAR observations have actually revealed that the low altitude rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves are associated with an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. This indicates that a weakly nonlinear theory is not appropriate to describe the solitary structures in the auroral regions. In the present work, a fully nonlinear analysis based on Sagdeev pseudopotential technique has been adopted for both parallel and oblique propagation of rarefactive solitary waves in a two electron temperature multi-ion plasma. The large amplitude solutions have consistently shown an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. The width-amplitude variation profile of obliquely propagating rarefactive solitary waves in a magnetized plasma have been compared with the recent POLAR observations. The width-amplitude variation pattern is found to fit well with the analytical results. It indicates that a fully nonlinear theory of ion acoustic solitary waves may well explain the observed anomalous width variations of large amplitude structures in the auroral region.

  18. Advanced Pulse Width Technique in Impedance Source Cascaded Multilevel Inverter with Asymmetric Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Kumar Sharma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a single phase Z-source cascading Multilevel Inverter, Nine-level inverter topologies with a trinary DC sources are offered. The recommended topologies are expanded by cascading a full bridge inverter with dissimilar DC sources. This paper recommends advanced pulse with modulation technique as a switching scheme. In this PWM technology, trapezoidal modulation technique is used as variable amplitude pulse width modulation. These topologies compromise reduced harmonics present in the output voltage and superior root mean square (RMS values of the output voltages linked with the traditional trapezoidal pulse width modulation. The simulation of proposed circuit is carried out by using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  19. Study on forming directivity with constant beam width in low frequency based on small sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI Junying; LIU Hong; YU Huabing; LIANG Guolong

    2001-01-01

    Based on a combined sensor with the size of 10 cm, a narrow beam with a constant receiving beam width of 20 degree has been formed in low frequency from several Hz to thousands of Hz by using simple adaptive algorithm. The results of theoretical simulation,laboratory experiment and lake experiment with one-dimension and two-dimension combined sensors have been given.

  20. An investigation of bridge width measurement and processing capabilities (1985)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, K.P. [comp.

    1989-05-15

    An investigation of Mound`s ability to measure and process bridges was conducted in 1985. Prior to improvements in the measuring system and technique, bridge width was found to have a sigma of 0.00019 in. After improvements were made, a sigma of 0.000047 was realized. Bridge length was found to be more erratic than width, although most of the inaccuracy was caused by measurement uncertainty. Length and width were found to have little or no correlation.

  1. Rounded leaf end effect of multileaf collimator on penumbra width and radiation field offset: an analytical and numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Penumbra characteristics play a significant role in dose delivery accuracy for radiation therapy. For treatment planning, penumbra width and radiation field offset strongly influence target dose conformity and organ at risk sparing.

  2. An Analysis of the Teaching Model in the Course of Professional Ethics and Accomplishment for Full-time Professional Degree Postgraduates%全日制专业学位硕士生《执(职)业道德与素养》课教学模式探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏红

    2015-01-01

    In the course of Professional Ethics and Accomplishment for full-time professional degree postgraduates, the teaching model involves the procedure of teaching program planning, comprehensive accomplishment testing, special lectures on special themes, typical case analysis, expert lecturing, simulation training and discussing, practice observation and experience, multi-dimensional evaluation and so on. To adapt to the practical requirements of the development of the economic society, the development trend of professional activities, and the major strategic changes in the postgraduate education in China, it is necessary to improve the knowledge structure of students, foster and promote their professional ethics and accomplishment and realize the teaching objectives of the course and training target of professional degree postgraduates.%全日制专业学位硕士生《执(职)业道德与素养》课可以构建"教学方案规划—综合素养测试—专题讲授—典型案例分析—行家专讲—模拟训练和讨论—实践观摩和体验—多维度考评"的教学模式,以适应经济社会发展和职业活动发展态势的现实要求,适应我国研究生教育发展战略重大转变的要求,完善学生的知识结构,培养和提升学生的执(职)业道德与素养,从而促进课程教学目标的实现和专业学位硕士生培养目标的实现.

  3. Evaluation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Qing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac syndrome X (CSX is a condition characterized by chest pain with normal coronary arteries. However, its pathogenesis has not fully been understood yet. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW has recently been suggested as a marker of acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases, while no data is available in patients with CSX.

  4. Quantifying River Widths of North America from Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Miller, Z.

    2013-12-01

    River width is a fundamental predictor variable in many hydrologic, geomorphic, and biogeochemical models, yet current large-scale models rely on theoretical hydraulic geometry relationships that do not fully capture natural variability in river form. Here we present the first high-resolution dataset of long-term mean width of North American rivers wider than 30 m. The dataset contains 7.93 million georeferenced width measurements derived from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery that were acquired when rivers were most likely to be at mean discharge. We built the dataset by developing an automated procedure that selects and downloads raw imagery, creates cloud-free normalized difference water index images, histogram balances and mosaics them together, and produces a water mask using a dynamic water-land threshold technique. We then visually inspected and corrected the mask for errors and used RivWidth software to calculate river width at each river centerline pixel. We validated our dataset using >1000 United States Geological Survey and Water Survey of Canada in situ gauge station measurements. Error analysis shows a robust relationship between the remotely sensed widths and in situ gauge measurements with an r 2 = 0.86 (Spearman's = 0.81) and a mean absolute error of 27.5 m. We find that North American river widths lie on logarithmic frequency curve with some notable exceptions at widths SWOT) satellite mission.

  5. Equivalent Widths of 15 Extrasolar-Planet Host Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present the equivalent widths of 15 extrasolar-planet host stars.These data were based on the high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained with the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station. The error in the Xinglong equivalent width is estimated by a comparison of these data with those given in previous studies of common stars.

  6. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  7. Average widths of anisotropic Besov-Wiener classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of average σ-K width and average σ-L width of some anisotropic Besov-Wiener classes Srp q θb(Rd) and Srp q θB(Rd) in Lq(Rd) (1≤q≤p<∞). The weak asymptotic behavior is established for the corresponding quantities.

  8. Average widths of anisotropic Besov-Wiener classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋艳杰

    2000-01-01

    This paper concems the problem of average σ-K width and average σ-L width of some anisotropic Besov-wiener classes Spqθr(Rd) and Spqθr(Rd) in Lq(Rd) (1≤≤q≤p<∞). The weak asymptotic behavior is established for the corresponding quantities.

  9. Comparative study of dental arch width in plaster models, photocopies and digitized images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Rosseto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to comparatively assess dental arch width, in the canine and molar regions, by means of direct measurements from plaster models, photocopies and digitized images of the models. The sample consisted of 130 pairs of plaster models, photocopies and digitized images of the models of white patients (n = 65, both genders, with Class I and Class II Division 1 malocclusions, treated by standard Edgewise mechanics and extraction of the four first premolars. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine and intermolar widths were measured by a calibrated examiner, prior to and after orthodontic treatment, using the three modes of reproduction of the dental arches. Dispersion of the data relative to pre- and posttreatment intra-arch linear measurements (mm was represented as box plots. The three measuring methods were compared by one-way ANOVA for repeated measurements (α = 0.05. Initial / final mean values varied as follows: 33.94 to 34.29 mm / 34.49 to 34.66 mm (maxillary intercanine width; 26.23 to 26.26 mm / 26.77 to 26.84 mm (mandibular intercanine width; 49.55 to 49.66 mm / 47.28 to 47.45 mm (maxillary intermolar width and 43.28 to 43.41 mm / 40.29 to 40.46 mm (mandibular intermolar width. There were no statistically significant differences between mean dental arch widths estimated by the three studied methods, prior to and after orthodontic treatment. It may be concluded that photocopies and digitized images of the plaster models provided reliable reproductions of the dental arches for obtaining transversal intra-arch measurements.

  10. Influence of lip closure on alveolar cleft width in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmelzle Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of surgery on growth and stability after treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate are topics still under discussion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of early lip closure on the width of the alveolar cleft using dental casts. Methods A total of 44 clefts were investigated using plaster casts, 30 unilateral and 7 bilateral clefts. All infants received a passive molding plate a few days after birth. The age at the time of closure of the lip was 2.1 month in average (range 1-6 months. Plaster casts were obtained at the following stages: shortly after birth, prior to lip closure, prior to soft palate closure. We determined the width of the alveolar cleft before lip closure and prior to soft palate closure measuring the alveolar cleft width from the most lateral point of the premaxilla/anterior segment to the most medial point of the smaller segment. Results After lip closure 15 clefts presented with a width of 0 mm, meaning that the mucosa of the segments was almost touching one another. 19 clefts showed a width of up to 2 mm and 10 clefts were still over 2 mm wide. This means a reduction of 0% in 5 clefts, of 1-50% in 6 clefts, of 51-99% in 19 clefts, and of 100% in 14 clefts. Conclusions Early lip closure reduces alveolar cleft width. In most cases our aim of a remaining cleft width of 2 mm or less can be achieved. These are promising conditions for primary alveolar bone grafting to restore the dental bony arch.

  11. METHODS OF ASSESSING THE DEGREE OF DESTRUCTION OF RUBBER PRODUCTS USING COMPUTER VISION ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Khvostov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For technical inspection of rubber products are essential methods of improving video scopes analyzing the degree of destruction and aging of rubber in an aggressive environment. The main factor determining the degree of destruction of the rubber product, the degree of coverage is cracked, which can be described as the amount of the total area, perimeter cracks, geometric shapes and other parameters. In the process of creating a methodology for assessing the degree of destruction of rubber products arises the problem of the development of machine vision algorithm for estimating the degree of coverage of the sample fractures and fracture characterization. For the development of image processing algorithm performed experimental studies on the artificial aging of several samples of products that are made from different rubbers. In the course of the experiments it was obtained several samples of shots vulcanizates in real time. To achieve the goals initially made light stabilization of array images using Gaussian filter. Thereafter, for each image binarization operation is applied. To highlight the contours of the surface damage of the sample is used Canny algorithm. The detected contours are converted into an array of pixels. However, a crack may be allocated to several contours. Therefore, an algorithm was developed by combining contours criterion of minimum distance between them. At the end of the calculation is made of the morphological features of each contour (area, perimeter, length, width, angle of inclination, the At the end of the calculation is made of the morphological features of each contour (area, perimeter, length, width, angle of inclination, the Minkowski dimension. Show schedule obtained by the method parameters destruction of samples of rubber products. The developed method allows you to automate assessment of the degree of aging of rubber products in telemetry systems, to study the dynamics of the aging process of polymers to

  12. Crack widths in concrete with fibers and main reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frede; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Brincker, Rune

    the ductility of the fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) is set up and experimental work is conducted in order to verify the crack width model. The ductility of the FRC is taken into account by using the stress crack width relation. The constitutive model for the FRC is based on the idea that the initial part......The main object of the research work presented in this paper is to establish design tools for concrete structures where main reinforcement is combined with addition of short discrete steel fibers. The work is concerned with calculating and measuring crack widths in structural elements subjected...... to bending load. Thus, the aim of the work is to enable engineers to calculate crack widths for flexural concrete members and analyze how different combinations of amounts of fibers and amounts of main reinforcement can meet a given maximum crack width requirement. A mathematical model including...

  13. Existence and stabilizability of steady-state for semilinear pulse-width sampler controlled system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JinRong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the steady-state of a semilinear pulse-width sampler controlled system on infinite dimensional spaces. Firstly, by virtue of Schauder's fixed point theorem, the existence of periodic solutions is given. Secondly, utilizing a generalized Gronwall inequality given by us and the Banach fixed point theorem, the existence and stabilizability of a steady-state for the semilinear control system with pulse-width sampler is also obtained. At last, an example is given for demonstration.

  14. Deuteron spin-flip resonance widths and the spin response function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Mane

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The spin response function is used to analyze the spin-flip resonance widths of stored polarized deuteron beams. It is found, using simple model assumptions, that the contribution of the vertical betatron oscillations (for an rf radial dipole field spin-flipper reduces the resonance width by an amount in good agreement with recent measurements. It is also noted that, for spin-flip measurements with an rf-solenoid spin flipper, the spin response formalism also yields an answer consistent with experimental data.

  15. The Effect of Joint Width on Structural Performance of Asphalt Block Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelgalil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Asphalt blocks have been occasionally used around the world as a road pavement, but there have been very limited studies being done to evaluate the effect of joint width (spacing between the blocks on the structural performance of asphalt paving blocks. This study explains the experimental study to assess the performance and properties of asphalt paving blocks laid with different joint widths between the blocks i.e., 0, 2 and 3 mm, respectively. A total of 250 asphalt paving blocks was manufactured and tested in the laboratory to ascertain the density, air voids, the compressive strength and the rut depth and displacement occurred in asphalt paving block. The design compressive load of single asphalt paving block is 166 kN. The test results showed that the joint width plays a vital role on the performance of asphalt block pavement. Asphalt paving blocks were laid as closely in contact as possible (0 mm yields the best structural performance.

  16. Direct measurement of the total decay width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-11-15

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5  GeV/c2, we find 1.10quark width to date.

  17. DETECTION OF BLOOD VESSELS AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSEL WIDTH FOR DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Sukanya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The proposed method measures the retinal blood vessel diameter to identify arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous (AV nicking, branching coefficients to detect early diabetic retinopathy. It utilizes the vessel centerline and edge information to measure the width for a vessel segment. From the input retinal image, the vascular network is extracted using the local entropy thresholding method. The vessel boundaries are extracted using sobel edge detection method. The skeletonization operation is applied to the vascular network and mapping the vessel boundaries and the skeleton image. The branching point detection method is then performed to localize all crossing locations. A rotational invariant mask to search the pixel pairs from the edge image, and calculate the shortest distance pair which provides the vessel width (or diameter for that cross-section. Variation in the width measurement identifies the diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Implications of Satellite Swath Width on Global Aerosol Optical Thickness Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter; Kahn, Ralph; Remer, Lorraine; Levy, Robert; Welton, Ellsworth

    2012-01-01

    We assess the impact of swath width on the statistics of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieved by satellite as inferred from observations made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We sub-sample the year 2009 MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua spacecraft along several candidate swaths of various widths. We find that due to spatial sampling there is an uncertainty of approximately 0.01 in the global, annual mean AOT. The sub-sampled monthly mean gridded AOT are within +/- 0.01 of the full swath AOT about 20% of the time for the narrow swath sub-samples, about 30% of the time for the moderate width sub-samples, and about 45% of the time for the widest swath considered. These results suggest that future aerosol satellite missions with only a narrow swath view may not sample the true AOT distribution sufficiently to reduce significantly the uncertainty in aerosol direct forcing of climate.

  19. Optimal Channel Width Adaptation, Logical Topology Design, and Routing in Wireless Mesh Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency spectrum is a finite and scarce resource. How to efficiently use the spectrum resource is one of the fundamental issues for multi-radio multi-channel wireless mesh networks. However, past research efforts that attempt to exploit multiple channels always assume channels of fixed predetermined width, which prohibits the further effective use of the spectrum resource. In this paper, we address how to optimally adapt channel width to more efficiently utilize the spectrum in IEEE802.11-based multi-radio multi-channel mesh networks. We mathematically formulate the channel width adaptation, logical topology design, and routing as a joint mixed 0-1 integer linear optimization problem, and we also propose our heuristic assignment algorithm. Simulation results show that our method can significantly improve spectrum use efficiency and network performance.

  20. Measuring Hysteresis Loop and Optimization of the Stator Tooth Width in the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk NOVÁK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this paper deals with the measuring of hysteresis loop of the toroidal shape core. LabVIEW software is used to automate this process. The results are compared with the data from the manufacturer and used in the FEMM software for setting parameters of the stator core of Permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM. Then, in the second part of this paper, the Lua scripting engine in FEMM software is used to optimize stator tooth width. Program code is written in the Matlab environment and after starting the run process, Matlab uses inter-process communication via ActiveX to connect with FEMM. In this process program tries several options for the stator tooth width. Based on the results, user can evaluate all the data about the overall progress and choose the optimal stator tooth width.

  1. Stochastic Mixed-Effects Parameters Bertalanffy Process, with Applications to Tree Crown Width Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petras Rupšys

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic modeling approach based on the Bertalanffy law gained interest due to its ability to produce more accurate results than the deterministic approaches. We examine tree crown width dynamic with the Bertalanffy type stochastic differential equation (SDE and mixed-effects parameters. In this study, we demonstrate how this simple model can be used to calculate predictions of crown width. We propose a parameter estimation method and computational guidelines. The primary goal of the study was to estimate the parameters by considering discrete sampling of the diameter at breast height and crown width and by using maximum likelihood procedure. Performance statistics for the crown width equation include statistical indexes and analysis of residuals. We use data provided by the Lithuanian National Forest Inventory from Scots pine trees to illustrate issues of our modeling technique. Comparison of the predicted crown width values of mixed-effects parameters model with those obtained using fixed-effects parameters model demonstrates the predictive power of the stochastic differential equations model with mixed-effects parameters. All results were implemented in a symbolic algebra system MAPLE.

  2. Scale orientated analysis of river width changes due to extreme flood hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Krapesch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the morphological effects of extreme floods (recurrence interval >100 years and examines which parameters best describe the width changes due to erosion based on 5 affected alpine gravel bed rivers in Austria. The research was based on vertical aerial photos of the rivers before and after extreme floods, hydrodynamic numerical models and cross sectional measurements supported by LiDAR data of the rivers. Average width ratios (width after/before the flood were calculated and correlated with different hydraulic parameters (specific stream power, shear stress, flow area, specific discharge. Depending on the geomorphological boundary conditions of the different rivers, a mean width ratio between 1.12 (Lech River and 3.45 (Trisanna River was determined on the reach scale. The specific stream power (SSP best predicted the mean width ratios of the rivers especially on the reach scale and sub reach scale. On the local scale more parameters have to be considered to define the "minimum morphological spatial demand of rivers", which is a crucial parameter for addressing and managing flood hazards and should be used in hazard zone plans and spatial planning.

  3. What sets the minimum tokamak scrape-off layer width?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ilon

    2016-10-01

    The heat flux width of the tokamak scrape-off layer is on the order of the poloidal ion gyroradius, but the ``heuristic drift'' physics model is still not completely understood. In the absence of anomalous transport, neoclassical transport sets the minimum width. For plateau collisionality, the ion temperature width is set by qρi , while the electron temperature width scales as the geometric mean q(ρeρi) 1 / 2 and is close to qρi in magnitude. The width is enhanced because electrons are confined by the sheath potential and have a much longer time to radially diffuse before escaping to the wall. In the Pfirsch-Schluter regime, collisional diffusion increases the width by the factor (qR / λ) 1 / 2 where qR is the connection length and λ is the mean free path. This qualitatively agrees with the observed transition in the scaling law for detached plasmas. The radial width of the SOL electric field is determined by Spitzer parallel and ``neoclassical'' radial electric conductivity and has a similar scaling to that for thermal transport. Prepared under US DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Step width alters iliotibial band strain during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Campbell, Samuel; Derrick, Timothy R

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the effect of step width during running on factors related to iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 15 healthy recreational runners during overground running under various step width conditions (preferred and at least +/- 5% of their leg length). Strain and strain rate were estimated from a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. Greater ITB strain and strain rate were found in the narrower step width condition (p < 0.001, p = 0.040). ITB strain was significantly (p < 0.001) greater in the narrow condition than the preferred and wide conditions and it was greater in the preferred condition than the wide condition. ITB strain rate was significantly greater in the narrow condition than the wide condition (p = 0.020). Polynomial contrasts revealed a linear increase in both ITB strain and strain rate with decreasing step width. We conclude that relatively small decreases in step width can substantially increase ITB strain as well as strain rates. Increasing step width during running, especially in persons whose running style is characterized by a narrow step width, may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of running-related ITB syndrome.

  5. The impact of full nursing interventions on the degree of anxiety,compatibility and postoperative complications in renal biopsy patients%全程护理干预对肾穿刺活检术患者焦虑程度、术中配合程度及术后并发症的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜露

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the impact of full nursing interventions on the degree of anxiety,compatibility and postoperative complications in renal biopsy patients. Methods From May 2012 to June 2014 in the Third People's Hospital of Chongqing,92 renal biopsy patients were selected and randomly divided into study group(n = 46)and control group(n = 46). The control group were given routine nursing,the study group were given full nursing intervention,self - rating anxiety scale (SAS)score,intraoperative cooperation and the incidence of complications between the two groups were compared. Results Befor nursing,SAS scores between the two groups showed no significant differences(P ﹥ 0. 05);after nursing,SAS score of the study group were lower than the control group,the difference was statistically significant(P ﹤ 0. 05);intraoperative cooper-ation of the study group was higher than the control group,incidence of complications was lower than the control group,the differences were statistically significant(P ﹤ 0. 05). Conclusion Full nursing intervention can significantly improve the living quality and intraoperative cooperation of renal biopsy patients,reduce the degree of anxiety and incidence of complications.%目的:研究全程护理干预对肾穿刺活检术患者焦虑程度、术中配合程度及术后并发症的影响。方法选取2012年5月—2014年6月于重庆市第三人民医院接受治疗的92例肾穿刺活检术患者,随机分为研究组46例和对照组46例,对照组采用常规护理,研究组采用全程护理干预。比较两组患者护理前后焦虑自评量表( SAS)评分、术中配合程度以及并发症发生情况。结果护理前,两组患者 SAS 评分比较,差异无统计学意义(P ﹥0.05);护理后,研究组患者 SAS 评分低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05)。研究组配合度高于对照组,并发症发生率低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05)。结论

  6. Biologic width and crown lengthening: case reports and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se-Lim

    2010-01-01

    The biologic width includes both the connective tissue attachment and the junctional epithelium and has a mean dimension of approximately 2 mm. Invading the biologic width with a restoration can result in localized crestal bone loss, gingival recession, localized gingival hyperplasia, or a combination of these three. When restoring teeth that have subgingival caries or fractures below the gingival attachment, a clinical crown-lengthening procedure is needed to establish the biologic width. This article presents three case reports that utilized crown-lengthening procedures.

  7. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y; Ishii, Satoshi; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2015-04-20

    Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any homogenization, we calculate the resonant eigenmodes of the finite-width cladding layers, and find agreement with the resonant features in the dispersion of the cladded waveguides. We show that at the resonant widths, the propagating modes of the waveguides are coupled to the cladding eigenmodes and hence, are strongly absorbed. By avoiding the resonant widths in the design of the actual waveguides, the strong absorption can be eliminated.

  8. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  9. Inverse Degree and Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-ling; TIAN Ying-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V(G),order n =丨V(G)丨,minimum degree δ(G) and connectivity κ(G).The graph G is called maximally connected if κ(G) =δ(G).Define the inverse degree of G with no isolated vertices as R(G) =Σv∈V(G)1/d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of the vertex v.We show that G is maximally connected if R(G) < 1 + 2/δ + n-2δ+1/(n-1)(n-3).

  10. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (Pbursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (Pbursitis.

  11. SOHO Resumes Full Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    SOHO orbit hi-res Size hi-res: 324 kb Credits: SOHO (ESA & NASA) SOHO orbit Because of its static position, every three months the high-gain antenna loses sight of Earth. During this time, engineers will rotate the spacecraft by 180 degrees to regain full contact a few days later. Since 19 June 2003, SOHO's high-gain antenna (HGA), which transmits high-speed data to Earth, has been fixed in position following the discovery of a malfunction in its pointing mechanism. This resulted in a loss of signal through SOHO's usual 26-metre ground stations on 27 June 2003. However, 34-metre radio dishes continued to receive high-speed transmissions from the HGA until 1 July 2003. Since then, astronomers have been relying primarily on a slower transmission rate signal, sent through SOHO's backup antenna. It can be picked up whenever a 34-metre dish is available. However, this signal could not transmit all of SOHO's data. Some data was recorded on board, however, and downloaded using high-speed transmissions through the backup antenna when time on the largest, 70-metre dishes could be spared. SOHO itself orbits a point in space, 1.5 million kilometres closer to the Sun than the Earth, once every 6 months. To reorient the HGA for the next half of this orbit, engineers rolled the spacecraft through a half-circle on 8 July 2003. On 10 July, the 34-metre radio dish in Madrid re-established contact with SOHO's HGA. Then on the morning of 14 July 2003, normal operations with the spacecraft resumed through its usual 26-metre ground stations, as predicted. With the HGA now static, the blackouts, lasting between 9 and 16 days, will continue to occur every 3 months. Engineers will rotate SOHO by 180 degrees every time this occurs. This manoeuvre will minimise data losses. Stein Haugan, acting SOHO project scientist, says "It is good to welcome SOHO back to normal operations, as it proves that we have a good understanding of the situation and can confidently work around it."

  12. Degree by Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtis, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a student's experience with a research project on the synthesis and reactions of an organo-platinum complex with an organo-Group IV linkage, including the advantages and disadvantages of such a degree by thesis course. (CC)

  13. Systematics of oscillatory behavior in hadronic masses and widths

    CERN Document Server

    Tatischeff, Boris

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study of hadron masses and widths shows regular oscillations that can be fitted by a simple cosine function. This property can be observed when the difference between adjacent masses of each family is plotted versus the mean mass.

  14. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  15. Sweep Width Estimation for Ground Search and Rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-30

    that may influence sweep width were measured during the experiments. Promising variables include SAR background, height, age, color - blindness , fatigue...123 8.3.9 Color Blindness ................................................................................................... 124... Color Blindness ................................................................................................ 200 Searcher Profile

  16. Widths of some classes of convex functions and bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, V. N.; Maiorov, Vitalii E.

    2010-02-01

    We consider classes of uniformly bounded convex functions defined on convex compact bodies in \\mathbb{R}^d and satisfying a Lipschitz condition and establish the exact orders of their Kolmogorov, entropy, and pseudo-dimension widths in the L_1-metric. We also introduce the notions of pseudo-dimension and pseudo-dimension widths for classes of sets and determine the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of some classes of convex bodies in \\mathbb{R}^drelative to the pseudo-metric defined as the d-dimensional Lebesgue volume of the symmetric difference of two sets. We also find the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of the corresponding classes of characteristic functions in L_p-spaces, 1\\le p\\le\\infty.

  17. The effect of buffer zone width on biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Field margin management for conservation purposes is a way to protect both functional biodiversity and biodiversity per se without considerable economical loss as field margins are less productive. However, the effect of width of the buffer zone on achievable biodiversity gains has received little...... attention in previous studies. In this paper we report on finding for syrphids, spiders and carabids, three taxonomic groups with different mobility, all important for conservation biological control. For all groups we found an effect of buffer zone width on their density. A buffer width of 6m...... was the narrowest that consistently promoted a higher abundance or activity of arthropods within the field area (outside the hedge bottom). However, a further increase in buffer width always increased the abundance and activity of arthropods a little more....

  18. Martian Meanders: Wavelength-Width Scaling and Flow Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire-Mazzocco, H.; Stepinski, T. F.; McGovern, P. J.; Lanzoni, S.; Frascati, A.; Rinaldo, A.

    2006-03-01

    Martian meanders reveals linear wavelength/width scaling with a coef. k~10, that can be used to estimate discharges. Simulations of channel evolution are used to determine flow duration from sinuosity. Application to Nirgal Vallis yields 200 yrs.

  19. Line Width Recovery after Vectorization of Engineering Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramblička, Matúš; Vaský, Jozef

    2016-12-01

    Vectorization is the conversion process of a raster image representation into a vector representation. The contemporary commercial vectorization software applications do not provide sufficiently high quality outputs for such images as do mechanical engineering drawings. Line width preservation is one of the problems. There are applications which need to know the line width after vectorization because this line attribute carries the important semantic information for the next 3D model generation. This article describes the algorithm that is able to recover line width of individual lines in the vectorized engineering drawings. Two approaches are proposed, one examines the line width at three points, whereas the second uses a variable number of points depending on the line length. The algorithm is tested on real mechanical engineering drawings.

  20. Correlation between some facial indexes and mesiodistal width of maxillary anterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ahmadian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both tooth size and shape of the anterior maxilla play important role in complete denture and facial esthetics. Tooth selection for an edentulous patient with no pre-extraction is very difficult. The purpose of this study was to analyze mesio-distal width of maxillary anterior teeth and to determine the presence of any relationship between them and other facial measurements.Materials and Method: In this cross-sectional study, after enrolment of 100 high school students, full-face standardized digital images of them were taken in frontal view. Bizaygomatic, interpupilary and interalar distance were measured by images. Width of teeth was determined on the casts. T-test and pearson correlation coefficient were performed to analyze the data.Results: Maxillary central incisor is the widest anterior tooth in both male and female. Correlation between bizaygomatic and interpupillay distances and central incisor width were not significant but between interalar and intercanine were significant.Conclusion: Based on this study, interalar distance is a better index to estimate the width of anterior teeth of maxilla in an edentulous patient

  1. Calculating Method of Moments Uniform Bin Width Histograms

    OpenAIRE

    James S. Weber

    2016-01-01

    A clear articulation of Method of Moments (MOM) Histograms is instructive and has waited 121 years since 1895. Also of interest are enabling uniform bin width (UBW) shape level sets. Mean-variance MOM uniform bin width frequency and density histograms are not unique, however ranking them by histogram skewness compared to data skewness helps. Although theoretical issues rarely take second place to calculations, here calculations based on shape level sets are central and challenge uncritically ...

  2. Energetic Constraints on the Width of the Intertropical Convergence Zone

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) has been the focus of considerable research in recent years, with much of this work concerned with how the latitude of maximum tropical precipitation responds to natural climate variability and to radiative forcing. The width of the ITCZ, however, has received little attention despite its importance for regional climate and for understanding the general circulation of the atmosphere. This paper investigates the ITCZ width in simulations with an ideali...

  3. A direct measurement of W boson decay width

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Anderson, E W; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, Trevor C; Baden, A; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Böhnlein, A; Bozhko, N; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; De, K; De Jong, S J; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, Frank; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Yu; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Frame, K C; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galjaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goncharov, P I; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Sen-Gupta, A; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovskii, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M A; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G L; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N V; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Da Motta, H; Mutaf, Y; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F K; Rockwell, T; Roco, M T; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A F S; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Singh, H; Sirotenko, V I; Slattery, P F; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbruck, G; Stephens, R W; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Vertogradov, L S; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2002-01-01

    Based on 85 pb$^{-1}$ data of \\ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.8$ \\tev\\ collected using the D{\\O}detector at Fermilab during the 1994-1995 run of the Tevatron, we present a direct measurement of the total decay width of the \\wb\\ boson, $\\Gamma_W$. The width is determined from the transverse mass spectrum in the $W \\to e+\

  4. Statistical study of the pulse width distribution for radio pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pulse widths of standard pulse profiles for 262 pulsars were measured by using the Urumqi 25 m radio telescope at 1.54 GHz.For the simplest case of circular emission beam,we applied Monte Carlo simulations to the pulse width distribution.Different density functions of magnetic inclination angle α and observer angle ξ were considered.Using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests,we derived the most probable distribution for α and ξ.

  5. Estimating the Spectral Width of a Narrowband Optical Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars; Skov Jensen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector.......Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector....

  6. Regression methods to investigate the relationship between facial measurements and widths of the maxillary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Zakiah Mohd; Tawfiq, Omar Farouq; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Shamsudheen, Mohd Iqbal; Rijal, Omar Mohd

    2010-03-01

    In rehabilitating edentulous patients, selecting appropriately sized teeth in the absence of preextraction records is problematic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between some facial dimensions and widths of the maxillary anterior teeth to potentially provide a guide for tooth selection. Sixty full dentate Malaysian adults (18-36 years) representing 2 ethnic groups (Malay and Chinese), with well aligned maxillary anterior teeth and minimal attrition, participated in this study. Standardized digital images of the face, viewed frontally, were recorded. Using image analyzing software, the images were used to determine the interpupillary distance (IPD), inner canthal distance (ICD), and interalar width (IA). Widths of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth were measured directly from casts of the subjects using digital calipers. Regression analyses were conducted to measure the strength of the associations between the variables (alpha=.10). The means (standard deviations) of IPD, IA, and ICD of the subjects were 62.28 (2.47), 39.36 (3.12), and 34.36 (2.15) mm, respectively. The mesiodistal diameters of the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines were 8.54 (0.50), 7.09 (0.48), and 7.94 (0.40) mm, respectively. The width of the central incisors was highly correlated to the IPD (r=0.99), while the widths of the lateral incisors and canines were highly correlated to a combination of IPD and IA (r=0.99 and 0.94, respectively). Using regression methods, the widths of the anterior teeth within the population tested may be predicted by a combination of the facial dimensions studied. (c) 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison between Obando´s anthropometric formula and Mondelli´s formula to estimate central incisor width.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rodríguez-Alayza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to compare Mondelli’s formula with Obando’s anthropometric formula in order to determine the mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisor. Materials and Methods: 100 adults (50 women were selected. The mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisor was measured. Maximum smile was used for Mondelli’s formula. Inter-alar distance and longitudinal axis of the ear were used for Obando’s formula. Correlations and differences between estimates of both formulas and the actual mesiodistal width of the central incisor were estimated. Results: Obando’s formula presented a strong correlation (r=0.8846 with the mesiodistal width, with no statistically significant differences between the two measures (p>0.05. Mondelli’s formula presented a moderate negative correlation with the mesiodistal width (r=-0.3401 and a statistically significant difference with respect to the mesiodistal width (p<0.0001, in both men and women. Conclusion: Obando’s formula estimated more accurately the mesiodistal width of the central incisor in comparison to Mondelli’s formula in the Peruvian population.

  8. A Measurement of the Total Width, the Electronic Width and the Mass of the Upsilon(10580) Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Abe, T; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allison, J; Altenburg, D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Bailey, S; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Barate, R; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Borean, C; Borgland, A W; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandt, T; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Briand, H; Brigljevic, V; Brochard, F; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Burchat, Patricia R; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Chao, M; Charles, E; Chauveau, J; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Cheng, C H; Chevalier, N; Christ, S; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Cochran, J; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colberg, T; Colecchia, F; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cote-Ahern, D; Cottingham, W N; Coupal, D P; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L M; Crosetti, G; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Buono, L; Del Gamba, V; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Dickopp, M; Dittongo, S; Donald, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dorigo, A; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckmann, R; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Falciai, D; Farbin, A; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Fisher, A; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K; Ford, W T; Forti, A C; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Franek, B J; Frey, R; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabriel, T A; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J M; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Geddes, N I; George, S; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giraud, P F; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Green, M G; Grenier, G J; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, P A; Hartfiel, B L; Harton, J L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hicheur, A; Hill, E J; Hitlin, D G; Hodgkinson, M C; Honscheid, K; Hrynóva, T; Hu, T; Hufnagel, D; Höcker, A; Innes, W R; Ivanchenko, V N; Izen, J M; Jackson, F; Jackson, P D; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jayatilleke, S M; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kay, M; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Knowles, D J; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Koptchev, V B; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kral, J F; Kravchenko, E A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kukartsev, G; Kurup, A; Kutter, P E; Kuznetsova, N; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Langer, M; Lankford, A J; Laplace, S; Latham, T E; Lavin, D; Lazzaro, A; Le Clerc, C; Le Diberder, F R; Lee, S J; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Levesque, J A; Levi, M E; Levy, S L; Lewandowski, B; Li, H; Lillard, V; Lista, L; Liu, R; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, A; Luitz, S; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lyon, A J; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; MacKay, C; Macri, M; Mallik, U; Maly, E; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Manfredi, P F; Mangeol, D J J; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marker, C E; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKemey, A K; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Meyer, T I; Meyer, W T; Miftakov, V; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Morton, G W; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nicholson, H; Nogowski, R; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Oddone, P J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Otto, S; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Paick, K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, Y; Panetta, J; Panvini, R S; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Parry, R J; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Penny, R C; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petrak, S; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Pioppi, M; Piredda, G; Pivk, M; Plaszczynski, S; Playfer, S; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rama, M; Rankin, P; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Re, V; Reidy, J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roat, C; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roy, J; Ryd, A; Röthel, W; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Samuel, A; Sanders, D A; Sanders, P; Sandrelli, F; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Sarti, A; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schmitz, R E; Schmücker, H; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seeman, J; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Sharma, V; Shelkov, V G; Shen, B C; Shorthouse, H W; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Sloane, R J; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snyder, A; Soffer, A; Soha, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Stark, J; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strother, P; Stugu, B; Stängle, H; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Swain, J E; T'Jampens, S; Tantot, L; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Taylor, G P; Telnov, A V; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thiessen, D; Tiozzo, G; Tisserand, V; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Treadwell, E; Turri, M; Vaitsas, G; Van Hoek, W C; Varnes, H A Tanaka E W; Vasileiadis, G; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Verkerke, W; Vidal, P B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Von, J H; Vuagnin, G; Wagner, G; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walkowiak, W; Walsh, J; Wang, P; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weatherall, J H; Weaver, M; Weidemann, A W; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wienands, U; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Willocq, S; Wilson, F F; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winter, M A; Wisniewski, W J; Won, E; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, J; Xella, S M; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, S; Ye, S; Yi, J; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yumiceva, F X; Yushkov, A N; Yéche, C; Zallo, A; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Zito, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T

    2003-01-01

    We present a preliminary measurement of the resonance parameters of the Upsilon(10580) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We measure the total decay width to be (20.7 +- 1.6 +- 2.5) MeV, the partial electronic width to be (0.321 +- 0.017 +- 0.029) kev and the mass to be (10.5793 +- 0.0004 +- 0.0012) GeV.

  9. The Correlation between Different Facial Measurements and the Width of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahangari A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the most important procedures in the rehabilitation of an edentulous space in the anterior segment is the selection of an appropriate size of the anterior teeth in order to achieve the perfect esthetic results.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between horizontal measurements of the face and width of the maxillary anterior teeth.Material and methods: In this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study, the face and teeth of the 77 subjects (39 women and 38 men aged between 20-30 with no facial and dental deformities were examined. Some horizontal dimensions of the face including IC (intercanthal, IP (interpupillary, BZW (bizygomatic width, IA (interalar, and ICm (Intercomussural width and perceived width of the teeth were calculated with AutoCAD software with 0.1 mm accuracy on the photos. The actual width of the teeth was calculated with a digital caliper by 0.1 mm accuracy on the maxillary casts. The data were analyzed in SPSS software using the Pearson correlation coefficient and t-test.Results: Except for the IC and the sum of the actual width of the six maxillary anterior teeth on the cast, the rest of the measurements were significantly different by gender ( p < 0.05. All the correlations between facial measurements and width of the teeth were bigger than when they were separated by gender. In women, the correlation between IC and the six anterior teeth in the front view (SANTF was the highest one ( r = 0.436, p = 0.005. However, the highest correlation was related to the ICm and SANTF in men. (r = 0.0501, p =0.001Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, the results suggest that except for the BZW, the rest of the facial measurements including IC, IP, IA and ICm can be used as a preliminary criterion for determining the width of the maxillary anterior teeth of the edentulous patients.

  10. ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    De Marco, N

    2013-01-01

    Two identical sets of calorimeters are located on both sides with respect to the beam Interaction Point (IP), 112.5 m away from it. Each set of detectors consists of a neutron (ZN) and a proton (ZP) Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC), positioned on remotely controlled platforms. The ZN is placed at zero degree with respect to the LHC beam axis, between the two beam pipes, while the ZP is positioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The spectator protons are separated from the ion beams by means of the dipole magnet D1.

  11. Physics to a degree

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, EG

    2014-01-01

    Physics to a Degree provides an extensive collection of problems suitable for self-study or tutorial and group work at the level of an undergraduate physics course. This novel set of exercises draws together the core elements of an undergraduate physics degree and provides students with the problem solving skills needed for general physics' examinations and for real-life situations encountered by the professional physicist. Topics include force, momentum, gravitation, Bernoulli's Theorem, magnetic fields, blackbody radiation, relativistic travel, mechanics near the speed of light, radioactive

  12. Perception of Length to Width Relations of City Squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold T. Nefs

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on how people perceive the aspect ratio of city squares. Earlier research has focused on distance perception but not so much on the perceived aspect ratio of the surrounding space. Furthermore, those studies have focused on “open” spaces rather than urban areas enclosed by walls, houses and filled with people, cars, etc. In two experiments, we therefore measured, using a direct and an indirect method, the perceived aspect ratio of five city squares in the historic city center of Delft, the Netherlands. We also evaluated whether the perceived aspect ratio of city squares was affected by the position of the observer on the square. In the first experiment, participants were asked to set the aspect ratio of a small rectangle such that it matched the perceived aspect ratio of the city square. In the second experiment, participants were asked to estimate the length and width of the city square separately. In the first experiment, we found that the perceived aspect ratio was in general lower than the physical aspect ratio. However, in the second experiment, we found that the calculated ratios were close to veridical except for the most elongated city square. We conclude therefore that the outcome depends on how the measurements are performed. Furthermore, although indirect measurements are nearly veridical, the perceived aspect ratio is an underestimation of the physical aspect ratio when measured in a direct way. Moreover, the perceived aspect ratio also depends on the location of the observer. These results may be beneficial to the design of large open urban environments, and in particular to rectangular city squares.

  13. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Xu

    Full Text Available The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  14. Assessment of age based on the pulp cavity width of the maxillary central incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Ginjupally

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the age of the patients belonging to the age group of 15 - 55 years, attending the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, St. Joseph Dental College and Hospital, Eluru, based on the radiographic evaluation of the pulp cavity width of the maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised of 120 subjects. Intraoral periapical radiographs of the maxillary central incisors were taken for all subjects, using the conventional paralleling angle technique and the pulp cavity width was measured at the cervical and middle third using a digital vernier caliper. The data obtained was subjected to correlation and regression analysis. Results: A negative linear relationship was obtained between the age and pulp cavity width (cervical third, r = -0.459 and middle third, r = -0.704. Cubic regression analysis was done and the regression formulae were obtained. A mean difference of 0.1 years was obtained between the estimated age and real age, indicating the reliability of the derived formula. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the width of the pulp cavity of maxillary central incisors are reliable for estimation of age.

  15. Biological Width around One- and Two-Piece Implants Retrieved from Human Jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Judgar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several histologic studies regarding peri-implant soft tissues and biological width around dental implants have been done in animals. However, these findings in human peri-implant soft tissues are very scarce. Therefore, the aim of this case series was to compare the biological width around unloaded one- and two-piece implants retrieved from human jaws. Eight partially edentulous patients received 2 test implants in the posterior mandible: one-piece (solid implants that comprise implant and abutment in one piece and two-piece (external hexagon with a healing abutment implants. After 4 months of healing, the implants and surrounding tissue were removed for histologic analysis. The retrieved implants showed healthy peri-implant bone and exhibited early stages of maturation. Marginal bone loss, gaps, and fibrous tissue were not present around retrieved specimens. The biologic width dimension ranged between 2.55 ± 0.16 and 3.26 ± 0.15 to one- and two-piece implants, respectively (P0.05. Within the limits of this study, it could be shown that two-piece implants resulted in the thickening of the connective tissue attachment, resulting in the increase of the biological width, when compared to one-piece implants.

  16. Deciduous neonatal line: Width is associated with duration of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurnanen, Jaana; Visnapuu, Vivian; Sillanpää, Matti; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Rautava, Jaana

    2017-02-01

    The delivery-related neonatal line (NNL) appears into the enamel of primary teeth and first permanent molars at birth and is a marker of live birth process. It varies in width and its location, is different in each deciduous tooth type, and is indicative of gestation time. It is unclear which triggers determine NNL at birth. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the duration and mode of delivery on NNL width. NNL of 129 teeth, a collection derived from a long-term, prospectively followed population cohort, was measured under light microscope. Altogether, 54 sections with most optimal plane of sectioning were analysed for the duration and mode of delivery. NNL was detected in 98% of the deciduous teeth with the median width of 9.63μm (min 3.16μm, max 27.58μm). A prolonged duration of vaginal delivery was highly significantly associated with a narrower NNL (r=-0.41, p=0.0097). No significant association was found between the width of NNL and mode of delivery (p=0.36). NNL is demonstrable in virtually all deciduous teeth. The width seems to be inversely proportional to the duration of delivery. Causes of the inverse proportion are speculated to result from altered amelogenesis induced by prolonged and intensified delivery-associated stress. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  17. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  18. One Degree of Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jean

    2012-01-01

    A 2011 survey of young adults conducted by Public Agenda found that a cluster of obstacles have prevented many of them from competing college. The author describes the opportunity, college awareness, and funding gaps that put a postsecondary degree out of the reach of so many young people. For example, just 3 in 10 non-college-completers are aware…

  19. Precise measurement of the line width of the photoassociation spectra of ultracold molecules by using a frequency shifter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Ji-Zhou; Ma Jie; Ji Zhong-Hua; Zhang Yi-Chi; Li Yu-Qing; Wang Li-Rong; Zhao Yan-Ting; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    We propose a technique to precisely measure the line width of the photoassociation spectra of the excited cesium molecule by using a frequency shifter to generate two laser beams with a precise frequency difference. A series of photoassociation (PA) spectra are recorded with two laser beam induced molecular lines,whose peak separation serves as an accurate frequency ruler to measure the line width of the PA spectra.The full width half maximum line width was studied as a function of PA laser intensity.The extrapolated value at zero laser intensity is (34.84 ± 0.22) MHz.By analyzing other broadening mechanisms,a value of (32.02 ± 0.70) MHz was deduced.It is shown that this scheme is inexpensive,simple,robust,and is promising for applications in a variety of other atomic species.

  20. Optimal width of quantum well for reversed polarization blue InGaN light-emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of reversed polarization (RP blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs under different quantum wells (QWs width are numerically studied. We compared the band diagram, electron and hole concentration, emission wavelength, radiation recombination, internal quantum efficiency (IQE, turn on voltage and light output power (LOP of these structures by numerical simulation. It found that QW width has a remarkable influence on the properties of RP blue InGaN LEDs. With the increase of QW width, the turn on voltage and radiation recombination rate decreases. It finds that the optimal width of QWs is about 3 nm at the current injection density of 15 A/cm2.

  1. A 'no-lose' measurement of the hadronic and of the leptonic Z widths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardi, G.; Verzegnassi, C. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Hollik, W. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). TH-Div.)

    1990-04-26

    We show that a high precision measurement of the full hadronic, of the leptonic Z{sub 0} widths and of their ratio in the forthcoming run at LEP 1 might already allow, under realistic experimental conditions, to either discover clear evidence for New Physics of well identifiable origin or, at least, to set stringent bounds on the top mass valid in an extended, not 'minimal', standard model independently of the value of the {rho} parameter. (orig.).

  2. Band width and multiple-angle valence-state mapping of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.; Sutherland, D.G.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The band width may be considered the single most important parameter characterizing the electronic structure of a solid. The ratio of band width and Coulomb repulsion determines how correlated or delocalized an electron system is. Some of the most interesting solids straddle the boundary between localized and delocalized, e.g. the high-temperature superconductors. The bulk of the band calculations available today is based on local density functional (DF) theory. Even though the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues from that theory do not represent the outcome of a band-mapping experiment, they are remarkably similar to the bands mapped via photoemission. Strictly speaking, one should use an excited state calculation that takes the solid`s many-body screening response to the hole created in photoemission into account. Diamond is a useful prototype semiconductor because of its low atomic number and large band width, which has made it a long-time favorite for testing band theory. Yet, the two experimental values of the band width of diamond have error bars of {+-}1 eV and differ by 3.2 eV. To obtain an accurate valence band width for diamond, the authors use a band-mapping method that collects momentum distributions instead of the usual energy distributions. This method has undergone extensive experimental and theoretical tests in determining the band width of lithium fluoride. An efficient, imaging photoelectron spectrometer is coupled with a state-of-the-art undulator beam line at the Advanced Light Source to allow collection of a large number of data sets. Since it takes only a few seconds to take a picture of the photoelectrons emitted into a 84{degrees} cone, the authors can use photon energies as high as 350 eV where the cross section for photoemission from the valence band is already quite low, but the emitted photoelectrons behave free-electron-like. This make its much easier to locate the origin of the inter-band transitions in momentum space.

  3. Estimate of cusp loss width in multicusp negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, T.; Ogasawara, M.; Hatayama, A.

    1998-02-01

    Expression of cusp loss width derived by Bosch and Merlino is applied to JAERI's Kamaboko source. The width is related to the ambipolar diffusion coefficient across the cusp magnetic field. Electron-ion collision is found 1.2-7.4 times larger as compared with electron-neutral collision. Averaged cusp magnetic field in the diffusion coefficient is taken as a parameter in the simulation code for Kamaboko source. When the averaged magnetic field is 48 G, simulation results agree well with JAERI's experiment in a wide range of pressure and arc power variation. The value of 48 G is reasonable from the consideration of confining the equation of ion source plasma. The obtained width is about 10 times the value evaluated by two times ion Larmor radius on the surface of cusp magnet.

  4. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolorenč, Přemysl, E-mail: kolorenc@mbox.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Sisourat, Nicolas [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green’s function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  5. Morphodynamics structures induced by variations of the channel width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Gonzalo; Crosato, Alessandra; Tassi, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    In alluvial channels, forcing effects, such as a longitudinally varying width, can induce the formation of steady bars (Olesen, 1984). The type of bars that form, such as alternate, central or multiple, will mainly depend on the local flow width-to-depth ratio and on upstream conditions (Struiksma et al., 1985). The effects on bar formation of varying the channel width received attention only recently and investigations, based on flume experiments and mathematical modelling, are mostly restricted to small longitudinal sinusoidal variations of the channel width (e.g. Repetto et al., 2002; Wu and Yeh, 2005, Zolezzi et al., 2012; Frascati and Lanzoni, 2013). In this work, we analyze the variations in equilibrium bed topography in a longitudinal width-varying channel with characteristic scales of the Waal River (The Netherlands) using two different 2D depth-averaged morphodynamic models, one based on the Delft3D code and one on Telemac-Mascaret system. In particular, we explore the effects of changing the wavelength of sinusoidal width variations in a straight channel, focusing on the effects of the spatial lag between bar formation and forcing that is observed in numerical models and laboratory experiments (e.g. Crosato et al, 2011). We extend the investigations to finite width variations in which longitudinal changes of the width-to-depth ratio are such that they may affect the type of bars that become unstable (alternate, central or multiple bars). Numerical results are qualitatively validated with field observations and the resulting morphodynamic pattern is compared with the physics-based predictor of river bar modes by Crosato and Mosselman (2009). The numerical models are finally used to analyse the experimental conditions of Wu and Yeh (2005). The study should be seen as merely exploratory. The aim is to investigate possible approaches for future research aiming at assessing the effects of artificial river widening and narrowing to control bar formation in

  6. Cusp-like plasma in high altitudes: a statistical study of the width and location of the cusp from Magion-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mĕrka

    Full Text Available The width of the cusp region is an indicator of the strength of the merging process and the degree of opening of the magnetosphere. During three years, the Magion-4 satellite, as part of the Interball project, has collected a unique data set of cusp-like plasma observations in middle and high altitudes. For a comparison of high- and low-altitude cusp determination, we map our observations of cusp-like plasma along the magnetic field lines down to the Earth’s surface. We use the Tsyganenko and Stern 1996 model of the magnetospheric magnetic field for the mapping, taking actual solar wind and IMF parameters from the Wind observations. The footprint positions show substantial latitudinal dependence on the dipole tilt angle. We fit this dependence with a linear function and subtract this function from observed cusp position. This process allows us to study both statistical width and location of the inspected region as a function of the solar wind and IMF parameters. Our processing of the Magion-4 measurements shows that high-altitude regions occupied by the cusp-like plasma (cusp and cleft are projected onto a much broader area (in magnetic local time as well as in a latitude than that determined in low altitudes. The trends of the shift of the cusp position with changes in the IMF direction established by low-altitude observations have been confirmed.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layer; solar wind – magnetosphere interactions

  7. Resonance widths in open microwave cavities studied by harmonic inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhl, U; Hoehmann, R.; Main, J.; Stoeckmann, H. -J.

    2007-01-01

    From the measurement of a reflection spectrum of an open microwave cavity the poles of the scattering matrix in the complex plane have been determined. The resonances have been extracted by means of the harmonic inversion method. By this it became possible to resolve the resonances in a regime where the line widths exceed the mean level spacing up to a factor of 10, a value inaccessible in experiments up to now. The obtained experimental distributions of line widths were found to be in perfec...

  8. Measuring slit width and separation in a diffraction experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, K K; Law, A T [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: gan@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2009-11-15

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the integration (averaging) of light across the finite sensor aperture. This experiment provides students with a quantitative, in-depth verification of diffraction theory, as well as hands-on experience in sophisticated fitting methods.

  9. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Ganji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20 patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI & (GI, Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS, Probing depth (PD, and Biologic Width (BW. Statistical Analysis Used. Student “t” Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  10. Aphanizomenon gracile increases in width in the presence of Daphnia. A defence mechanism against grazing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawek Cerbin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cyanobacteria are frequently consumed by grazers like Daphnia, which can break filaments and make them more readily available to filter-feeders. However, various defence mechanisms against grazing have also been observed in cyanobacteria. Data concerning changes in the morphology of filamentous algae, especially their width in the presence of a grazer, are scarce. Field studies of filament morphology of cyanobacteria relate their changes to nutrient availability and temperature. Moreover, filament morphology displays significant differences in filament length and width among seasons. We hypothesised that the morphological changes in filament observed in the field – especially their width – could be a defence mechanism that is induced by the presence of a grazer, such as Daphnia. Thus, two experiments were conducted in order to test the influence of Daphnia (direct grazing and infochemicals together in the first experiment and the chemicals it released (grazing excluded, only chemicals present in the second experiment on Aphanizomenon gracile’s morphology, in controlled laboratory conditions. Aphanizomenon filaments became significantly shorter and thicker in both experiments. However, Daphnia’s grazing combined with excreted chemicals had stronger effect than chemicals alone. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the shortening and thickening of filaments in the presence of Daphnia infochemicals. It seems that the Aphanizomenon filaments in the presence of Daphnia switch their growing mode and invest more heavily in width than length. Our results support the hypothesis that Daphnia is at least partly responsible for the changes in filament width observed in the field. This could be a strategy that helps Aphanizomenon to withstand grazer’s pressure during early stages of a bloom.

  11. Width-weight relationship and condition factor of Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Decapoda, Ucididae at tropical mangroves of Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina S.L.C. Araújo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution aims at evaluating the carapace width vs. humid weight relationship and the condition factor of Ucides cordatus (Linnaeus, 1763, in the mangrove forests of the Ariquindá and Mamucabas rivers, state of Pernambuco, Brazil. These two close areas present similar characteristics of vegetation and substrate, but exhibit different degrees of environmental conservation: the Ariquindá River is the preserved area, considered one of the last non-polluted of Pernambuco, while the Mamucabas River suffers impacts from damming, deforestation and deposition of waste. A total of 1,298 individuals of U. cordatus were collected. Males were larger and heavier than females, what is commonly observed in Brachyura. Ucides cordatus showed allometric negative growth (p < 0.05, which is probably related to the dilatation that this species develops in the lateral of the carapace, which stores six pairs of gills. The values of b were within the limit established for aquatic organisms. Despite of the condition factor being considered an important feature to confirm the reproductive period, since it varies with cyclic activities, in the present study it was not correlated to the abundance of ovigerous females. However, it was considered a good parameter to evaluate environmental impacts, being significantly lower at the impacted area.

  12. A Measurement of the Total Width, the Electronic Width, and the Mass of the Upsilon(10580) Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Donald, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Fisher, A; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Seeman, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wienands, U; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We present a measurement of the parameters of the $\\Upsilon(10580)$ resonance based on a dataset collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric $B$ factory. We measure the total width $\\Gamma_{\\rm tot}$ to be $(20.7\\pm1.6\\pm2.5) {\\rm MeV}$, the electronic partial width $\\Gamma_{ee} = (0.321\\pm0.017\\pm0.029) {\\rm keV}$ and the mass $M = (10579.3\\pm0.4\\pm1.2) {\\rm MeV/c^2}$.

  13. Synaptic channel model including effects of spike width variation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic Channel Model Including Effects of Spike Width Variation Hamideh Ramezani Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey Ozgur B. Akan Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey ABSTRACT An accu...

  14. Measurement of joint space width and erosion size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, JI; van der Heijde, D; Angwin, J; Duryea, J; Moens, HJB; Jacobs, JWG; Maillefert, JF; Strand, CV

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of radiographic abnormalities in metric units has been reported by several investigators during the last 15 years. Measurement of joint space in large joints has been employed in a few trials to evaluate therapy in osteoarthritis. Measurement of joint space width in small joints has been

  15. Potential dominance of oscillating crescent waves in finite width tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that the emergence of previously observed oscillating crescent water wave patterns, created by class II (three-dimensional) instabilities which are in principle not dominant, could in fact be explained as an artifact of a finite width tank, combined with a suppression...

  16. TWO FEEDBACK PROBLEMS FOR GRAPHS WITH BOUNDED TREE-WIDTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShaoqiang; LiGuojun; SohnMoo-Young

    2004-01-01

    Many difficult (often NP-complete) optimization problems can be solved efficiently on graphs of small tree-width with a given tree decomposition. In this paper,it is discussed how to solve the minimum feedback vertex set problem and the minimum vertex feedback edge set problem efficiently by using dynamic programming on a tree-decomposition.

  17. Echo width of foam supports used in scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Solodukhov, V. V.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretically and experimentally determined echo widths of dielectric cylinders having circular, triangular, and quadratic cross sections have been compared. The cylinders were made of foam material having a relative dielectric constant of about 1.035. The purpose of the investigation was to find...

  18. Writer identification using directional ink-trace width measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, A. A.; Smit, J.; Bulacu, M. L.; Schomaker, L. R. B.

    As suggested by modern paleography, the width of ink traces is a powerful source of information for off-line writer identification, particularly if combined with its direction. Such measurements can be computed using simple, fast and accurate methods based on pixel contours, the combination of which

  19. Directed path-width and monotonicity in digraph searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barat, Janos

    2006-01-01

    Directed path-width was defined by Reed, Thomas and Seymour around 1995. The author and P. Hajnal defined a cops-and-robber game on digraphs in 2000. We prove that the two notions are closely related and for any digraph D, the corresponding graph parameters differ by at most one. The result is ac...

  20. Measurement of joint space width and erosion size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharp, JI; van der Heijde, D; Angwin, J; Duryea, J; Moens, HJB; Jacobs, JWG; Maillefert, JF; Strand, CV

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of radiographic abnormalities in metric units has been reported by several investigators during the last 15 years. Measurement of joint space in large joints has been employed in a few trials to evaluate therapy in osteoarthritis. Measurement of joint space width in small joints has been

  1. Frequency width of open channels in multiple scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J.; Goorden, S.A.; Mosk, Allard

    2016-01-01

    We report optical measurements of the spectral width of open transmission channels in a three-dimensional diffusive medium. The light transmission through a sample is enhanced by efficiently coupling to open transmission channels using repeated digital optical phase conjugation. The spectral

  2. Rinsing Processes in Open-width Washing Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, A.B.J.; Linden, van der H.J.L.J.; Groot Wassink, J.

    1986-01-01

    A simulator is described for rinsing processes carried out on open-width washing machines. In combination with a theoretical model, a simple method is given for testing rinsing processes. The method has been used to investigate the extraction of caustic soda from a cotton fabric, varying the tempera

  3. Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Graf C. P.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; La Cruz I. Heredia-De; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-05-04

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Gamma}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Gamma}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top-quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Gamma}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb}| < 0.59 for a high-mass fourth-generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth-generation quark-mixing matrix.

  4. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada AM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aml Mohamed Nada Department of Internal Medicine, Unit of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Objective: To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. Methods: This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Results: Red cell distribution width (RDW was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008. It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7% than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035. Mean platelet volume (MPV was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238. RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. Conclusion: RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in

  5. Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} decay width as a charmonium-like tetraquark state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T. G. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, S7N 5E2, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chen, Hua-Xing, E-mail: hxchen@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering and International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beihang University, 100191, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin, E-mail: zhusl@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, 100871, Beijing (China); Center of High Energy Physics, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-05

    To identify the nature of the newly observed charged resonance Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}, we study its hadronic decays Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}→J/ψπ{sup +},Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}→η{sub c}ρ{sup +} and Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}→D{sup +}D{sup -bar∗0} as a charmonium-like tetraquark state. In the framework of the QCD sum rules, we calculate the three-point functions and extract the coupling constants and decay widths for these interaction vertices. Including all these channels, the full decay width of the Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} state is consistent with the experimental value reported by the Belle Collaboration, supporting the tetraquark interpretation of this state.

  6. Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} decay width as a charmonium-like tetraquark state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T.G. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chen, Hua-Xing [Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering and International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-15

    To identify the nature of the newly observed charged resonance Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}, we study its hadronic decays Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} → J/ψπ{sup +}, Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} @→ η{sub c}ρ{sup +} and Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} → D{sup +} anti D{sup *0} as a charmonium-like tetraquark state. In the framework of the QCD sum rules, we calculate the three-point functions and extract the coupling constants and decay widths for these interaction vertices. Including all these channels, the full decay width of the Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} state is consistent with the experimental value reported by the Belle Collaboration, supporting the tetraquark interpretation of this state. (orig.)

  7. Quantum black hole wave packet: Average area entropy and temperature dependent width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Davidson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A quantum Schwarzschild black hole is described, at the mini super spacetime level, by a non-singular wave packet composed of plane wave eigenstates of the momentum Dirac-conjugate to the mass operator. The entropy of the mass spectrum acquires then independent contributions from the average mass and the width. Hence, Bekenstein's area entropy is formulated using the 〈mass2〉 average, leaving the 〈mass〉 average to set the Hawking temperature. The width function peaks at the Planck scale for an elementary (zero entropy, zero free energy micro black hole of finite rms size, and decreases Doppler-like towards the classical limit.

  8. In-medium ϕ meson width extracted from proton-nucleus collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca L.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The inclusive production of ϕ mesons at small angles in proton collisions with C, Cu, Ag, and Au targets has been measured at an incident energy of 2.83 GeV at the ANKE-COSY facility. The ϕ mesons were registered via the ϕ → K+K− decay. The momentum dependence of the nuclear transparency ratio, the in-medium ϕ width, and the differential cross section for ϕ production have been determined in the momentum region pϕ = 0.6 − 1.6 GeV/c. Comparison with different model calculations suggests a significant broadening of the in-medium ϕ width for normal nuclear density with evidence for a momentum dependence.

  9. An Agent-Based Model for Optimization of Road Width and Public Transport Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Koryagin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An urban passenger transportation problem is studied. Municipal authorities and passengers are regarded as participants in the passenger transportation system. The municipal authorities have to optimise road width and public transport frequency. The road consists of a dedicated bus lane and lanes for passenger cars. The car travel time depends on the number of road lanes and passengers’ choice of travel mode. The passengers’ goal is to minimize total travel costs, including time value. The passengers try to find the optimal ratio between public transport and cars. The conflict between municipal authorities and the passengers is described as a game theoretic model. The existence of Nash equilibrium in the model is proved. The numerical example shows the influence of the value of time and intensity of passenger flow on the equilibrium road width and public transport frequency.

  10. Measurement of the leptonic decay width of J/ψ using initial state radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ablikim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a data set of 2.93 fb−1 taken at a center-of-mass energy of s=3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we measure the process e+e−→J/ψγ→μ+μ−γ and determine the product of the branching fraction and the electronic width Bμμ⋅Γee=(333.4±2.5stat±4.4sys eV. Using the earlier-published BESIII result for Bμμ=(5.973±0.007stat±0.037sys%, we derive the J/ψ electronic width Γee=(5.58±0.05stat±0.08sys keV.

  11. Variable Voltage Source Inverter with controlled frequency spectrum based on Random Pulse Width Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farrukh Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for single phase variable voltage inverter based on Random Pulse Width Modulation. In Random Pulse Width Modulation based inverter, the frequency spectrum of the output current and voltage waveforms becomes continuous because of the randomization of the switching function of the devices controlling the output voltages. This paper establishes a theory that if the distributions of the random numbers generated by the random source are kept within certain limit with respect to the peak value of reference sinusoidal waveform, the frequency spectrum can be controlled. On the basis of the results, a novel drive using variable tap changing transformer (optional and adaptive random number generator, to control the ratio between the numbers generated by the random source and the reference waveform has been suggested that will guarantee a better power quality profile for a broad range of output voltages.

  12. When Graduate Degrees Prostitute the Educational Process: Degrees Gone Wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate degrees prostitute the educational process when they are sold to consumers by unaccredited degree/diploma mills as being equivalent to legitimate, bona-fide degrees awarded by accredited graduate schools. This article carefully analyzes the serious problems of bogus degrees and their association with the religious higher education…

  13. a Linear Model for Meandering Rivers with Arbitrarily Varying Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascati, A.; Lanzoni, S.

    2011-12-01

    Alluvial rivers usually exhibit quite complex planforms, characterized by a wide variety of alternating bends, that have attracted the interest of a large number of researchers. Much less attention has been paid to another striking feature observed in alluvial rivers, namely the relatively regular spatial variations attained by the channel width. Actively meandering channels, in fact, generally undergo spatial oscillations systematically correlated with channel curvature, with cross sections wider at bends than at crossings. Some other streams have been observed to exhibit irregular width variations. Conversely, rivers flowing in highly vegetated flood plains, i.e. canaliform rivers, may exhibit an opposite behavior, owing to the combined effects of bank erodibility and floodplain depositional processes which, in turn, are strictly linked to vegetation cover. Similarly to streamline curvatures induced by bends, the presence of along channel width variations may have remarkable effects on the flow field and sediment dynamics and, thereby, on the equilibrium river bed configuration. In particular, spatial distribution of channel curvature typically determines the formation of a rhythmic bar-pool pattern in the channel bed strictly associated with the development of river meanders. Channel width variations are on the contrary characterized by a sequence of narrowing, yielding a central scour, alternated to the downstream development of a widening associated with the formation of a central bar. Here we present a morphodynamic model that predict at a linear level the spatial distribution of the flow field and the equilibrium bed configuration of an alluvial river characterized by arbitrary along channel distributions of both the channel axis curvature and the channel width. The mathematical model is averaged over the depth and describes the steady, non-uniform flow and sediment transport in sinuous channels with a noncohesive bed. The governing two-dimensional equations

  14. Mass and width of a composite Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doff, A. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana-UTFPR-COMAT Via do Conhecimento Km 01, 85503-390, Pato Branco - PR (Brazil)], E-mail: agomes@utfpr.edu.br; Natale, A.A. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP Rua Pamplona, 145, 01405-900, Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)], E-mail: natale@ift.unesp.br

    2009-06-29

    The scalar Higgs boson mass in a Technicolor model was obtained by Elias and Scadron with the analysis of an homogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE), however it was performed before the most recent developments of walking gauge theories. It was not observed in their work that dynamically generated technifermion mass may vary according to the theory dynamics that forms the scalar bound state. This will be done in this work and we also call attention that their calculation must change to take into account the normalization condition of the BSE. We compute the width of the composite boson and show how the gauge group and fermion content of a technicolor theory can be inferred from the measurement of the mass and width of the scalar boson.

  15. The SOL width and the MHD interchange instability in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Pogutse, O. [Kurchatov institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    Instabilities in the SOL plasma can strongly influence the SOL plasma behaviour and in particular the SOL width. The SOL stability analysis shows that there exists a critical ratio of the thermal energy and the magnetic energy. If the SOL beta is greater than this critical value, the magnetic field cannot prevent the plasma displacement and a strong MHD instability in the SOL occurs. In the opposite case only slower resistive instabilities can develop. A theoretical investigation of the SOL plasma stability is presented for JET single-null and double-null divertor configurations. The dependence of the stability threshold on the SOL beta and on the sheath resistance is established. Applying a simple mixing length argument gives the scaling of the SOL width. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Static vortices in long Josephson junctions of exponentially varying width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semerdjieva, E. G.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2004-06-01

    A numerical simulation is carried out for static vortices in a long Josephson junction with an exponentially varying width. At specified values of the parameters the corresponding boundary-value problem admits more than one solution. Each solution (distribution of the magnetic flux in the junction) is associated to a Sturm-Liouville problem, the smallest eigenvalue of which can be used, in a first approximation, to assess the stability of the vortex against relatively small spatiotemporal perturbations. The change in width of the junction leads to a renormalization of the magnetic flux in comparison with the case of a linear one-dimensional model. The influence of the model parameters on the stability of the states of the magnetic flux is investigated in detail, particularly that of the shape parameter. The critical curve of the junction is constructed from pieces of the critical curves for the different magnetic flux distributions having the highest critical currents for the given magnetic field.

  17. The width of the omega meson in the nuclear medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A; Molina, R; Oset, E

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the width of the \\omega\\ meson in nuclear matter. We consider the free decay mode of the \\omega\\ into three pions, which is dominated by \\rho\\pi\\ decay, and replace the \\rho\\ and \\pi\\ propagators by their medium modified ones. We also take into account the quasielastic and inelastic processes induced by a vector-baryon interaction dominated by vector meson exchange, as well as the contributions coming from the \\omega\\ \\to K \\bar K mechanism with medium modified K, \\bar K meson propagators. We obtain a substantial increase of the \\omega\\ width in the medium, reaching a value of 114 \\pm 10 MeV at normal nuclear matter density, which comes mainly from \\omega N \\to \\pi \\pi N, \\omega NN \\to \\pi NN processes associated to the dominant \\omega\\ \\to \\rho\\pi\\ decay mode.

  18. The complexity of the fermionant, and immanants of constant width

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    In the context of statistical physics, Chandrasekharan and Wiese recently introduced the \\emph{fermionant} $\\Ferm_k$, a determinant-like quantity where each permutation $\\pi$ is weighted by $-k$ raised to the number of cycles in $\\pi$. We show that computing $\\Ferm_k$ is #P-hard under Turing reductions for any constant $k > 2$, and is $\\oplusP$-hard for $k=2$, even for the adjacency matrices of planar graphs. As a consequence, unless the polynomial hierarchy collapses, it is impossible to compute the immanant $\\Imm_\\lambda \\,A$ as a function of the Young diagram $\\lambda$ in polynomial time, even if the width of $\\lambda$ is restricted to be at most 2. In particular, if $\\Ferm_2$ is in P, or if $\\Imm_\\lambda$ is in P for all $\\lambda$ of width 2, then $\\NP \\subseteq \\RP$ and there are randomized polynomial-time algorithms for NP-complete problems.

  19. Width of Sunspot Generating Zone and Reconstruction of Butterfly Diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, V G; 10.1007/s11207-010-9665-6

    2010-01-01

    Based on the extended Greenwich-NOAA/USAF catalogue of sunspot groups it is demonstrated that the parameters describing the latitudinal width of the sunspot generating zone (SGZ) are closely related to the current level of solar activity, and the growth of the activity leads to the expansion of SGZ. The ratio of the sunspot number to the width of SGZ shows saturation at a certain level of the sunspot number, and above this level the increase of the activity takes place mostly due to the expansion of SGZ. It is shown that the mean latitudes of sunspots can be reconstructed from the amplitudes of solar activity. Using the obtained relations and the group sunspot numbers by Hoyt and Schatten (1998), the latitude distribution of sunspot groups ("the Maunder butterfly diagram") for the 18th and the first half of the 19th centuries is reconstructed and compared with historical sunspot observations.

  20. Determination of the width of the top quark

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Altona, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; \\degAsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besan?con, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdinb, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-P?erez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Th?ery, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M -C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; ?Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; D?eliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, 47 R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J -F; Grohsjean, A; Gr?unendahl, S; Gr?unewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haasc, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; La Cruz, I Heredia-De; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffr?e, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Justed, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kur?ca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garciae, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Maga?na-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Mart?\\inez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Garz?on, G J Otero y; Owen, 1 M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridgec, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; P?etroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M -A; Podesta-Lermaf, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M -E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; S?anchez-Hern?andez, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; S?oldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S Uvarov S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weberg, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Williams, D Wicke M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W -C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2010-01-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Gamma_t, from the partial decay width Gamma(t -> W b) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t -> W b) measured in ttbar events using up to 2.3 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron ppbar Collider. The result is Gamma_t = 1.99 +0.69 -0.55 GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of tau_t = (3.3 +1.3 -0.9) x 10^-25 s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |Vtb'| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  1. On the Angular Width of Diffractive Beam in Anisotropic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Lock, Edwin H

    2011-01-01

    2-D diffraction patterns arising in the far-field region were investigated theoretically for the case, when the plane wave with non collinear group and phase velocities is incident on the wide slit in opaque screen with arbitrary orientation. This investigation was carried out by consideration as an example of magnetostatic surface wave diffraction in tangentially magnetized ferrite slab. It was deduced the universal analytical formula, which one can use to calculate the angular width of diffractive beam in any 2-D anisotropic geometries for the waves of various nature. It was shown, that in 2-D anisotropic geometries this width may be not only more or less then the value L/D (L - wavelength of incident wave, D - length of slit), but it also may be equal to zero in certain conditions.

  2. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2004-07-23

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  3. Histogram bin width selection for time-dependent Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2004-07-01

    In constructing a time histogram of the event sequences derived from a nonstationary point process, we wish to determine the bin width such that the mean squared error of the histogram from the underlying rate of occurrence is minimized. We find that the optimal bin widths obtained for a doubly stochastic Poisson process and a sinusoidally regulated Poisson process exhibit different scaling relations with respect to the number of sequences, time scale and amplitude of rate modulation, but both diverge under similar parametric conditions. This implies that under these conditions, no determination of the time-dependent rate can be made. We also apply the kernel method to these point processes, and find that the optimal kernels do not exhibit any critical phenomena, unlike the time histogram method.

  4. Joint space width in dysplasia of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, K

    2005-01-01

    In a longitudinal case-control study, we followed 81 subjects with dysplasia of the hip and 136 control subjects without dysplasia for ten years assessing radiological evidence of degeneration of the hip at admission and follow-up. There were no cases of subluxation in the group with dysplasia....... Neither subjects with dysplasia nor controls had radiological signs of ongoing degenerative disease at admission. The primary radiological discriminator of degeneration of the hip was a change in the minimum joint space width over time. There were no significant differences between these with dysplasia...... and controls in regard to age, body mass index or occupational exposure to daily repeated lifting at admission.We found no significant differences in the reduction of the joint space width at follow-up between subjects with dysplasia and the control subjects nor in self-reported pain in the hip...

  5. Finite-width plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic multilayer cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi;

    2015-01-01

    Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any homogeniz......Engineering plasmonic metamaterials with anisotropic optical dispersion enables us to tailor the properties of metamaterial-based waveguides. We investigate plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings with hyperbolic dispersion. Without using any...... homogenization, we calculate the resonant eigenmodes of the finite-width cladding layers, and find agreement with the resonant features in the dispersion of the cladded waveguides. We show that at the resonant widths, the propagating modes of the waveguides are coupled to the cladding eigenmodes and hence...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic disc winds and line width distributions - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chajet, L. S.; Hall, P. B.

    2017-02-01

    We study AGN emission line profiles combining an improved version of the accretion disc-wind model of Murray & Chiang with the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of Emmering et al. Here, we extend our previous work to consider central objects with different masses and/or luminosities. We have compared the dispersions in our model C IV line-width distributions to observational upper limit on that dispersion, considering both smooth and clumpy torus models. Following Fine et al., we transform that scatter in the profile line-widths into a constraint on the torus geometry and show how the half-opening angle of the obscuring structure depends on the mass of the central object and the accretion rate. We find that the results depend only mildly on the dimensionless angular momentum, one of the two integrals of motion that characterize the dynamics of the self-similar ideal MHD outflows.

  7. Reduction of track width in perpendicular magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, W.; Yamada, T.; Aoi, H.; Muraoka, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In order to three dimensionally analyze perpendicular magnetic recording mechanisms, we have developed a program in which the magnetization of magnetic particles is introduced into calculations of magnetization distributions in a recording layer, based on the commercial software JMAG-Studio. Because this program was based on a FEM calculation, the head and media interactions and demagnetization during the recording process can be accurately modeled. Using this program, methods to reduce the recorded track width in perpendicular magnetic recording were investigated. Decreasing the magnetic spacing, the use of a side-shielded head structure and using media with weak exchange coupling are effective ways to reduce the track width in a single pole head and double-layer perpendicular media recording system.

  8. Frequency width of open channels in multiple scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Jeroen; Goorden, Sebastianus A; Mosk, Allard P

    2016-11-14

    We report optical measurements of the spectral width of open transmission channels in a three-dimensional diffusive medium. The light transmission through a sample is enhanced by efficiently coupling to open transmission channels using repeated digital optical phase conjugation. The spectral properties are investigated by enhancing the transmission, fixing the incident wavefront and scanning the wavelength of the laser. We measure the transmitted field to extract the field correlation function and the enhancement of the total transmission. We find that optimizing the total transmission leads to a significant increase in the frequency width of the field correlation function. Additionally we find that the enhanced transmission persists over an even larger frequency bandwidth. This result shows open channels in the diffusive regime are spectrally much wider than previous measurements in the localized regime suggest.

  9. Determination of the width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-01-14

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Γ(t), from the partial decay width Γ(t → Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top-quark production and from the branching fraction B(t → Wb) measured in tt events using up to 2.3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron pp Collider. The result is Γ(t) = 1.99(-0.55)(+0.69)  GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of τ(t) = (3.3(-0.9)(+1.3)) × 10(-25)   s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V(tb')| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  10. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Troy [Univ. of College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 ± 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 ± 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  11. Full page insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, Rikke Platz

    2014-01-01

    Alan Moore and his collaborating artists often manipulate time and space by drawing upon the formal elements of comics and making alternative constellations. This article looks at an element that is used frequently in comics of all kinds – the full page – and discusses how it helps shape spatio......, something that it shares with the full page in comics. Through an analysis of several full pages from Moore titles like Swamp Thing, From Hell, Watchmen and Promethea, it is made clear why the full page provides an apt vehicle for an apocalypse in comics....

  12. Full page insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, Rikke Platz

    2014-01-01

    Alan Moore and his collaborating artists often manipulate time and space by drawing upon the formal elements of comics and making alternative constellations. This article looks at an element that is used frequently in comics of all kinds – the full page – and discusses how it helps shape spatio-t......, something that it shares with the full page in comics. Through an analysis of several full pages from Moore titles like Swamp Thing, From Hell, Watchmen and Promethea, it is made clear why the full page provides an apt vehicle for an apocalypse in comics....

  13. Temperature Dependence of Spreading Width of Giant Dipole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Storozhenko, A N; Ventura, A; Blokhin, A I

    2002-01-01

    The Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model extended to finite temperature within the framework of Thermo Field Dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Gamma^{\\downarrow} of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for ^{120}Sn and ^{208}Pb nuclei. It is found that Gamma^{\\downarrow} increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones, existing in the literature.

  14. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  15. Influence of Doppler Bin Width on GNSS Detection Probabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Bernhard C

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition stage in GNSS receivers determines Doppler shifts and code phases of visible satellites. Acquisition is thus a search in two continuous dimensions, where the digital algorithms require a partitioning of the search space into cells. We present analytic expressions for the acquisition performance depending on the partitioning of the Doppler frequency domain. In particular, the impact of the number and width of Doppler bins is analyzed. The presented results are verified by simulations.

  16. Porous Alumina Films with Width-Controllable Alumina Stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Huang, Shi-Ming; Pu, Lin; Shi, Yi; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Ji, Li; Kang, Jun-Yong

    2010-08-21

    Porous alumina films had been fabricated by anodizing from aluminum films after an electropolishing procedure. Alumina stripes without pores can be distinguished on the surface of the porous alumina films. The width of the alumina stripes increases proportionally with the anodizing voltage. And the pores tend to be initiated close to the alumina stripes. These phenomena can be ascribed to the electric field distribution in the alumina barrier layer caused by the geometric structure of the aluminum surface.

  17. Pulse-Width-Modulating Driver for Brushless dc Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Phil M.

    1991-01-01

    High-current pulse-width-modulating driver for brushless dc motor features optical coupling of timing signals from low-current control circuitry to high-current motor-driving circuitry. Provides high electrical isolation of motor-power supply, helping to prevent fast, high-current motor-driving pulses from being coupled through power supplies into control circuitry, where they interfere with low-current control signals.

  18. Degree distance and Gutman index of corona product of graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sheeba Agnes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the degree distance and the Gutman index of the corona product of two graphs are determined. Using the results obtained, the exact degree distance and Gutman index of certain classes of graphs are computed.

  19. Full Halo Coronal Mass Ejections: Arrival at the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chenglong; Pan, Zonghao; Miao, Bin; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S

    2014-01-01

    A geomagnetic storm is mainly caused by a front-side coronal mass ejection (CME) hitting the Earth and then interacting with the magnetosphere. However, not all front-side CMEs can hit the Earth. Thus, which CMEs hit the Earth and when they do so are important issues in the study and forecasting of space weather. In our previous work (Shen et al., 2013), the de-projected parameters of the full-halo coronal mass ejections (FHCMEs) that occurred from 2007 March 1 to 2012 May 31 were estimated, and there are 39 front-side events could be fitted by the GCS model. In this work, we continue to study whether and when these front-side FHCMEs (FFHCMEs) hit the Earth. It is found that 59\\% of these FFHCMEs hit the Earth, and for central events, whose deviation angles $\\epsilon$, which are the angles between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line, are smaller than 45 degrees, the fraction increases to 75\\%. After checking the deprojected angular widths of the CMEs, we found that all of the Earth-encountered CM...

  20. Space maintainer effects on intercanine arch width and length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, M; Haydar, S; Unsal, B; Turk, T

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of space maintainers in intercanine arch width and length, twenty cases, characterized with the early loss of mandibular primary molars were selected and divided into two groups. The treatment group used removable space maintainers, while the other ten cases served as the control group. The first dental casts of the treatment and control groups were obtained when the primary canines were in the mouth. After the eruption of permanent canines second dental casts were obtained in both groups. Six measurements were made on the dental casts of each patient. No parameter was found to be statistically significant in the treatment group. In the control group the increase in intercanine arch width and perimeter were found to be statistically significant. Also the increase at the buccal and lingual bone measurements were found to be statistically significant. These results showed that space maintainers might cease the increase in intercanine arch width and length during the transition period between the primary and permanent canines.

  1. Predictors of the peak width for networks with exponential links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate optimal predictors of the peak (S) and distance to peak (T) of the width function of drainage networks under the assumption that the networks are topologically random with independent and exponentially distributed link lengths. Analytical results are derived using the fact that, under these assumptions, the width function is a homogeneous Markov birth-death process. In particular, exact expressions are derived for the asymptotic conditional expectations of S and T given network magnitude N and given mainstream length H. In addition, a simulation study is performed to examine various predictors of S and T, including N, H, and basin morphometric properties; non-asymptotic conditional expectations and variances are estimated. The best single predictor of S is N, of T is H, and of the scaled peak (S divided by the area under the width function) is H. Finally, expressions tested on a set of drainage basins from the state of Wyoming perform reasonably well in predicting S and T despite probable violations of the original assumptions. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmold, William; Lin, C-J David; Meinel, Stefan

    2012-04-27

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeVwidths with experimental data for Σ(c)(*) decays, we obtain Γ[Σ(b)(*)→Λ(b)π(±)]=4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the Σ(b)(+), Σ(b)(-), Σ(b)(*+), Σ(b)(*-) initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the Ξ(b)(I(*)) baryons.

  3. The width of the {omega} meson in the nuclear medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A. [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Barcelona (Spain); Tolos, L. [Facultat de Ciencies, Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC/CSIC) Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Molina, R. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Ibaraki (Japan); Oset, E. [Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Aptdo. 22085, Valencia (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    We evaluate the width of the {omega} meson in nuclear matter. We consider the free decay mode of the {omega} into three pions, which is dominated by {rho}{pi} decay, and replace the {rho} and {pi} propagators by their medium-modified ones. We also take into account the quasielastic and inelastic processes induced by a vector-baryon interaction dominated by vector meson exchange, as well as the contributions coming from the {omega}{yields}K anti K mechanism with medium-modified K, anti K propagators. We obtain a substantial increase of the {omega} width in the medium, reaching a value of 121 {+-} 10 MeV at normal nuclear matter density for an {omega} at rest, which comes mainly from {omega}N {yields} {pi}{pi}N, {omega}NN {yields} {pi}NN processes associated to the dominant {omega} {yields} {rho}{pi} decay mode. The value of the width increases moderately with momentum, reaching values of around 200MeV at 600MeV/c. (orig.)

  4. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Falgari, P; Signer, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of $\\Gamma_X/m_X$, with $\\Gamma_X$ and $m_X$ the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the $q \\bar{q}$ partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the na\\" ive counting $\\sim \\Gamma_t/m_t \\sim 1%$. However, they can be si...

  5. Optimizing rib width to height and rib spacing to deck plate thickness ratios in orthotropic decks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Fettahoglu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Orthotropic decks are composed of deck plate, ribs, and cross-beams and are frequently used in industry to span long distances, due to their light structures and load carrying capacities. Trapezoidal ribs are broadly preferred as longitudinal stiffeners in design of orthotropic decks. They supply the required stiffness to the orthotropic deck in traffic direction. Trapezoidal ribs are chosen in industrial applications because of their high torsional and buckling rigidity, less material and welding needs. Rib width, height, spacing, thickness of deck plate are important parameters for designing of orthotropic decks. In the scope of this study, rib width to height and rib spacing to deck plate thickness ratios are assessed by means of the stresses developed under different ratios of these parameters. For this purpose a FE-model of orthotropic bridge is generated, which encompasses the entire bridge geometry and conforms to recommendations given in Eurocode 3 Part 2. Afterwards necessary FE-analyses are performed to reveal the stresses developed under different rib width to height and rib spacing to deck plate thickness ratios. Based on the results obtained in this study, recommendations regarding these ratios are provided for orthotropic steel decks occupying trapezoidal ribs.

  6. Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5GeV/c2, we find 1.10<Γtop<4.05GeV at 68% confidence level, which is in agreement with the standard model expectation of 1.3 GeV and is the most precise direct measurement of the top quark width to date.

  7. Dynamic Voltage Restorer Based on Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N S P Venkatesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Power Quality problems encompass a wide range of disturbances such as voltage sags, swells, flicker,harmonics distortion and interruptions. The strategic deployment of custom power devices has been proposed asone of the means to protect sensitive loads from power quality problems such as voltage sags and swells. The Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR is a power electronic device that is used to inject 3-phase voltage in series and in synchronism with the distribution feeder voltages in order to compensate voltage sag and similarly itreacts quickly to inject the appropriate voltage component (negative voltage magnitude in order to compensate voltage swell. The principal component of the DVR is a voltage source inverter that generates three phase voltages and provides the voltage support to a sensitive load during voltage sags and swells. Pulse Width Modulation Technique is very critical for proper control of DVR. Sinusoidal Pulse Width Modulation (SPWM and Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM control techniques are used for controlling the DVR. Inthis work, the operation of DVR is presented and the control technique used for voltage source inverter is Space Vector PWM technique. Space vector PWM can utilize the better dc voltage and generates the fewer harmonic in inverter output voltage than Sinusoidal PWM technique. This work describes the DVR based on Space Vector PWM which provides voltage support to sensitive loads and is simulated by using MATLAB/SIMULINK. Simulation results show that the control approach is able to compensate for any type of voltage sags and swells.

  8. Effects of finite pulse width on two-dimensional Fourier transform electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhichun; Crepeau, Richard H.; Freed, Jack H.

    2005-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ESR techniques, such as 2D-ELDOR, have considerably improved the resolution of ESR in studies of molecular dynamics in complex fluids such as liquid crystals and membrane vesicles and in spin labeled polymers and peptides. A well-developed theory based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) has been successfully employed to analyze these experiments. However, one fundamental assumption has been utilized to simplify the complex analysis, viz. the pulses have been treated as ideal non-selective ones, which therefore provide uniform irradiation of the whole spectrum. In actual experiments, the pulses are of finite width causing deviations from the theoretical predictions, a problem that is exacerbated by experiments performed at higher frequencies. In the present paper we provide a method to deal with the full SLE including the explicit role of the molecular dynamics, the spin Hamiltonian and the radiation field during the pulse. The computations are rendered more manageable by utilizing the Trotter formula, which is adapted to handle this SLE in what we call a "Split Super-Operator" method. Examples are given for different motional regimes, which show how 2D-ELDOR spectra are affected by the finite pulse widths. The theory shows good agreement with 2D-ELDOR experiments performed as a function of pulse width.

  9. Finite-width effects in unstable-particle production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falgari, P. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Spinoza Inst.; Papanastasiou, A.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Signer, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-03-15

    We present a general formalism for the calculation of finite-width contributions to the differential production cross sections of unstable particles at hadron colliders. In this formalism, which employs an effective-theory description of unstable-particle production and decay, the matrix element computation is organized as a gauge-invariant expansion in powers of {Gamma}{sub X}/m{sub X}, with {Gamma}{sub X} and m{sub X} the width and mass of the unstable particle. This framework allows for a systematic inclusion of off-shell and non-factorizable effects whilst at the same time keeping the computational effort minimal compared to a full calculation in the complex-mass scheme. As a proof-of-concept example, we give results for an NLO calculation of top-antitop production in the q anti q partonic channel. As already found in a similar calculation of single-top production, the finite-width effects are small for the total cross section, as expected from the naive counting {proportional_to}{Gamma}{sub t}/m{sub t}{proportional_to}1%. However, they can be sizeable, in excess of 10%, close to edges of certain kinematical distributions. The dependence of the results on the mass renormalization scheme, and its implication for a precise extraction of the top-quark mass, is also discussed.

  10. A Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Marchese, Luigi; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; Devoto, Francesco; D'Errico, Maria; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; D'Onofrio, Monica; Donati, Simone; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kim, Young-Jin; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucà, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Prokoshin, Fedor; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Tecker-Shreyber, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Sorin, Maria Veronica; Song, Hao; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2013-11-14

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop-quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron Run~II data set of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$~TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically-decaying $W$ boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top-quark width (\\gmt) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with {\\it in-situ} calibration. For a top-quark mass $\\mtop = \\gevcc{172.5}$, we find $1.10<\\gmt<\\gev{4.05}$ at 68\\% confidence level, which is in agreement with the standard-model expectation of \\gev{1.3} and is the most precise direct measurement of the top-quark width to date.

  11. Sensitivity to auditory spectral width in the fetus and infant - a fMEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eMuenssinger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Auditory change detection is crucial for the development of the auditory system and a prerequisite for language development. In neonates, stimuli with broad spectral width like white noise elicit the highest response compared to pure tone and combined tone stimuli. In the current study we addressed for the first time the question how fetuses react to white noise-(WN stimulation. Twenty-five fetuses (Mage = 34.59 weeks GA, SD ± 2.35 and 28 healthy neonates and infants (Mage = 37.18 days, SD ± 15.52 were tested with the 1st paradigm, wherein 500Hz tones, 750Hz tones and WN segments were randomly presented and auditory evoked responses (AERs were measured using fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG. In the 2nd paradigm, 10 fetuses (Mage = 25.7 weeks GA, SD ± 2.4 and 6 healthy neonates (Mage = 23 days and SD ± 6.2 were presented with two auditory oddball conditions: Condition 1 consisted of attenuated WN as standard and 500Hz tones and WN as deviants. In condition 2, standard 500Hz tones were intermixed with WN and attenuated WN. AERs to volume change and change in spectral width were evaluated.In both paradigms, significantly higher AER amplitudes to WN than to pure tones replicated prior findings in neonates and infants. In fetuses, no significant differences were found between the auditory evoked response amplitudes of WN segments and pure tones (both paradigms. A trend towards significance was reached when comparing the auditory evoked response amplitudes elicited by attenuated WN with those elicited by WN (loudness change, 2nd paradigm.As expected, we observed high sensibility to spectral width in newborns and infants. However, in the group of fetuses, no sensibility to spectral width was observed. This negative finding may be caused by different attenuation levels of the maternal tissue for different frequency components.

  12. Exact Values of Bernstein -Widths for Some Classes of Periodic Functions with Formal Self-Adjoint Linear Differential Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Feng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We consider the classes of periodic functions with formal self-adjoint linear differential operators , which include the classical Sobolev class as its special case. With the help of the spectral of linear differential equations, we find the exact values of Bernstein -width of the classes in the for .

  13. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International( CABI) is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain. It aims to improve people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.CABI’s full text repository is growing rapidly and has now been integrated into all our databases including CAB Abstracts,Global Health,our Internet Resources and Abstract Journals. There are currently over 60,000 full text articles available to access. These documents,made possible by agreement with third

  14. Degree-degree dependencies in random graphs with heavy-tailed degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstad, van der Remco; Litvak, Nelly

    2014-01-01

    Mixing patterns in large self-organizing networks, such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, social, and biological networks are often characterized by degree-degree dependencies between neighboring nodes. In assortative networks, the degree-degree dependencies are positive (nodes with similar degre

  15. Degree-Degree Dependencies in Random Graphs with Heavy-Tailed Degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hofstad, Remco; Litvak, Nelli

    2014-01-01

    Mixing patterns in large self-organizing networks, such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, social, and biological networks are often characterized by degree-degree dependencies between neighboring nodes. In assortative networks, the degree-degree dependencies are positive (nodes with similar

  16. A Novel Single-Stage Procedure for Increasing the Width of Attached Gingiva and Eliminating the Aberrant Frenal Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Common treatment for buccal gingival recession caused by an aberrant frenal attachment includes elimination of the frenum and treatment of the gingival reces-sion by soft tissue graft to increase the width of the attached gingiva that in turn results in root coverage. Keratinised gingival, if present in adequate amount, maintains the gingival health by protecting the marginal gingiva. This not only considers the desires of the patient but also explores the potential regenerative capacity of the tissues. This report describes a novel single-stage procedure for increasing the width of the attached gingiva and eliminating the aberrant frenal attachment.

  17. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International(CABI)is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain.It aims to improve people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment.CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.CABI’s full text repository is growing rapidly

  18. Quantitative modeling of degree-degree correlation in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Niño, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the modeling of degree-degree correlation in complex networks. Thus, a simple function, \\Delta(k', k), describing specific degree-to- degree correlations is considered. The function is well suited to graphically depict assortative and disassortative variations within networks. To quantify degree correlation variations, the joint probability distribution between nodes with arbitrary degrees, P(k', k), is used. Introduction of the end-degree probability function as a basic variable allows using group theory to derive mathematical models for P(k', k). In this form, an expression, representing a family of seven models, is constructed with the needed normalization conditions. Applied to \\Delta(k', k), this expression predicts a nonuniform distribution of degree correlation in networks, organized in two assortative and two disassortative zones. This structure is actually observed in a set of four modeled, technological, social, and biological networks. A regression study performed...

  19. Use of E2 matrix elements to determine the centroids and fluctuation widths for triaxial quadrupole collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Douglas; Wu, Ching-Yen

    2001-10-01

    Measured E2 properties are a sensitive and unambiguous probe of the collective shape parameters for quadrupole collective motion in nuclei. Collective motion produces strong correlations of the measured E2 matrix elements that can be related to the E2 properties in the principal axis frame of the rotating nucleus. By analogy with Bohr's quadrupole shape parameters (β,γ), the instantaneous principal axis frame E2 tensor can be expressed in terms of two parameters, Q,δ where E2(2,0)=Q\\cosδ, and E2(2,± 2)=fracQ√2sinδ. The E2 properties can be used to extract the E2 triaxiality parameter δ which can be related to γ by use of a geometrical collective model. The 1965 measurement [1] of the Q_2^+ state in ^114Cd provoked considerable interest in collective triaxial deformation in nuclei and stimulated measurement of Q_2^+ values in many other nuclei in order to probe the centroid of the E2 triaxial deformation. The heavy-ion Coulomb excitation experimental technique, plus the Coulomb excitation least-squares search code GOSIA, made it possible to measure rather complete sets of E2 matrix elements adding a new dimension to the study of triaxiality in nuclear collective motion [2]. This development also made it possible to exploit the rotational invariant technique [3-6] to extract directly from the measured E2 matrix elements, the expectation values of the centroids and fluctuation widths of principal axis E2 parameters for any state. The usefulness, range of validity, and results of this technique for determining the centroids and fluctuation widths for the triaxiality degree of freedom δ in a range of nuclei will be presented. The completeness required is a disadvantage of the rotational invariant technique. A comparison will be made of the use of the full rotational invariant technique with results obtained using restricted E2 data in conjunction with model-dependent analyses or truncation schemes. [1] J. de Boer et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 14 (1965) 564; [2] D

  20. 全日制专业学位硕士生培养模式实践与探索--以浙江大学电气工程领域工程硕士培养为例%Practice and Exploration on the Training Mode of Full-Time Professional Degree Postgraduate Students:Take the Education of Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering at Zhejiang University for Instance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉芬; 金若君

    2016-01-01

    浙江大学电气工程学院作为电气工程领域全日制专业学位研究生教育校级综合试点改革单位,以实践能力培养为重点,通过对生源质量、培养方案设置、课程教学改革、实践基地建设、学生专业实践、学位论文选题与毕业答辩等各培养环节的创新改革及分析存在的问题,积极探索符合专业学位研究生教育规律及培养特色的电气工程领域全日制专业学位硕士研究生培养模式。%College of Electrical Engineering of Zhejiang University, as a school-level experimental reform of full-time professional degree postgraduate education, has always been focused on fostering students' practical competence. Through the analysis and innovation on training links including enrollment, training projects, course teaching, practice base, professional practice, topic selection of dissertation the college actively explores the training mode which satisfies the law of professional degree education and cultivates characteristic talents in electrical engineering field.

  1. Analysis Of The Effect Of Flow Channel Width On The Performance Of PEMFC

    OpenAIRE

    Elif Eker; İmdat Taymaz

    2013-01-01

    In this work, it was analysed the effect of different channel width on performance of PEM fuel cell. Current density were measured on the single cells of parallel flow fields that has 25 cm² active layer, using three different kinds of channel width. The cell width and the channel height remain constant.The results show that increasing the channel width while the cell width remains constant decreases the current density.

  2. Analysis Of The Effect Of Flow Channel Width On The Performance Of PEMFC

    OpenAIRE

    Eker, Elif; Taymaz, İmdat

    2013-01-01

    In this work, it was analysed the effect of different channel width on performance of PEM fuel cell. Current density were measured on the single cells of parallel flow fields that has 25 cm² active layer, using three different kinds of channel width. The cell width and the channel height remain constant. The results show that increasing the channel width while the cell width remains constant decreases the current density.

  3. Analytical beam-width characteristics of distorted cat-eye reflected beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanzhong; Shan, Congmiao; Zheng, Yonghui; Zhang, Laixian; Sun, Huayan

    2015-02-01

    The analytical expression of beam-width of distorted cat-eye reflected beam under far-field condition is deduced using the approximate three-dimensional analytical formula for oblique detection laser beam passing through cat-eye optical lens with center shelter, and using the definition of second order moment, Gamma function and integral functions. The laws the variation of divergence angle and astigmatism degree of the reflected light with incident angle, focal shift, aperture size, and center shelter ratio are established by numerical calculation, and physical analysis. The study revealed that the cat-eye reflected beam is like a beam transmitted and collimated by the target optical lens, and has the same characteristics as that of Gaussian beam. A proper choice of positive focal shift would result in a divergence angle smaller than that of no focal shift. The astigmatism is mainly caused by incidence angle.

  4. Reduced widths of alpha -decay of near-magic even-even nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kar Yan, N

    1972-01-01

    Precision on-line investigations on the linear heavy-ion Berkeley accelerator, and on the CERN synchrophasotron were carried out recently on new alpha -emitters. The results obtained are analysed with a view to finding the degree of correspondence, or disagreement, with the authors' own ideas about alpha -decay processes. The discussion is confined to examining even isotopes of polonium, radon, radium and thorium Several theoretical and experimental plots are given of reduced widths of alpha -disintegration for different regions of shell filling and a comparison is made between barrier penetration coefficients, obtained by rigorous methods and with the aid of WKB- approximation, for /sup 212/Po, /sup 208/Po and /sup 212/Po isotopes. (24 refs).

  5. Virilization of the Broad Line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei - connection between shifts and widths of broad emission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Jonic, Sanja; Ilic, Dragana; Popovic, Luka C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the virilization of the emission lines Hbeta and Mg II in the sample of 287 Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We explore the connections between the intrinsic line shifts and full widths at different levels of maximal intensity. We found that: (i) Hbeta seems to be a good virial estimator of black hole masses, and an intrinsic redshift of Hbeta is dominantly caused by the gravitational effect, (ii) there is an anti-correlation between the redshift and width of the wings of the Mg II line, (iii) the broad Mg II line can be used as virial estimator only at 50% of the maximal intensity, while the widths and intrinsic shifts of the line wings can not be used for this purpose.

  6. Prototype of Pulse Width Modulation Generator Based on Timer 555 and IRF 40

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Sapto Aji

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In many applications such of DC motor speed regulation commonly needed DC to DC voltage conversion. The method that frequently use for DC to DC conversion is using chopper circuit. In chopper circuit a DC voltage source being chopped at constant frequency but with variable duty cycle (in this case it’s called as Pulse Width Modulation, PWM. In this research a circuit chopper has been design successfully. The circuit uses 555 timer IC as PWM pulse shaper and IRF 40 power Mosfet as switch device. This circuit prototype successfully tested to drive a 12 watt DC motor at 1200 rpm with voltage at 12 V.

  7. DC link current simulation of voltage source inverter with random space vector pulse width modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at analysis complexity, a simulation model is built and presented to analyze and demonstrate the characteristics of the direct current (DC link current of the three-phase two-level inverter with the random space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM strategy. The developing procedure and key subsystems of the simulation model are given in detail. Several experiments are done using the simulation model. The results verify the efficiency and convenience of the simulation model and show that the random SVPWM scheme, especially the random switching frequency scheme, can efficiently suppress the harmonic peaks of the DC link current.

  8. Improved Switching Performance Analysis of Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation on Field Programmable Gate Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagalingam RAJESWARAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration technology is being successfully implemented by using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM in applications like power electronics and drives. The main problems in PWM viz. harmonic distortion and switching speed are overcome by implementing the Space-Vector PWM (SVPWM technique by using the Xilinx tool VHDL (Verilog High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC Hardware Description Language and tested in programmable Integrated Circuits of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA. The results are provided along with simulation analysis in terms of hardware utilization and schematic, power report, computing time and usage of memory.

  9. Measurement on stages with 3D bladings and different relative width of stator blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zitek Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two variants of a stage with modern 3D bladings were tested on a single-stage air turbine to determine the influence of relative width of stator blades (nozzles. The first case means a high-density nozzle row with t/Bax = 0.61; the second one represents a low-density row with t/Bax = 1.12. The 3D shaping of both nozzle cases is based on the same design features. Rotor blades (buckets are kept the same (also 3D shaped. Comparisons of overall stage efficiency as well as measured flow fields data are presented in the paper.

  10. full on riot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Iten

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available “hey moses full on riot in lawson st the station’s on fire! been going since 4. molotov and more. full on,” reads an SMS message received on the backseat of a Tasmanian bus. What follows is a journey through the landscape of a Gunavidji, whose brothers have all gone to the land of the dead; metallic scraping in the glass cases of the Hobart Museum; a Palestinian woman giving up on her people; land-snails exposing cultural inaccuracies; photographing Australia’s war zone; entering the St Peter’s Basilica of Rome with bulldozers - all in the name of preparing to interview prominent Israeli writer Etgar Keret.

  11. Full moon and crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, C P; Sharma, D

    The incidence of crimes reported to three police stations in different towns (one rural, one urban, one industrial) was studied to see if it varied with the day of the lunar cycle. The period of the study covered 1978-82. The incidence of crimes committed on full moon days was much higher than on all other days, new moon days, and seventh days after the full moon and new moon. A small peak in the incidence of crimes was observed on new moon days, but this was not significant when compared with crimes committed on other days. The incidence of crimes on equinox and solstice days did not differ significantly from those on other days, suggesting that the sun probably does not influence the incidence of crime. The increased incidence of crimes on full moon days may be due to "human tidal waves" caused by the gravitational pull of the moon.

  12. Full tree harvesting update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.; White, K.

    1981-03-01

    An important harvesting alternative in North America is the Full Tree Method, in which trees are felled and transported to roadside, intermediate or primary landings with limbs and branches intact. The acceptance of Full Tree Systems is due to many factors including: labour productivity and increased demands on the forest for ''new products''. These conditions are shaping the future look for forest Harvesting Systems, but must not be the sole determinants. All harvesting implications, such as those affecting Productivity and silviculture, should be thoroughly understood. This paper does not try to discuss every implication, nor any particular one in depth; its purpose is to highlight those areas requiring consideration and to review several current North American Full Tree Systems. (Refs. 5).

  13. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International(CABI)is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain.It aims to improve people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment.CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.CABI’s full text repository is growing rapidly and has now been integrated into all our databases including CAB Abstracts,Global Health

  14. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  15. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International(CABI)is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain.It aims to improve people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment.CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.CABI’s full text repository is growing rapidly and has now been integrated into all our databases including CAB Abstracts,Global Health,our Internet Resources and Jour-

  16. Pulse-width modulated DC-DC power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2008-01-01

    This book studies switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) in great detail. This type of converter changes an unregulated DC voltage into a high-frequency pulse-width modulated (PWM) voltage controlled by varying the duty cycle, then changes the PWM AC voltage to a regulated DC voltage at a high efficiency by rectification and filtering. Used to supply electronic circuits, this converter saves energy and space in the overall system. With concept-orientated explanations, this book offers state-of-the-art SMPS technology and promotes an understanding of the principle operations of PWM converters,

  17. Total width of 125 GeV Higgs boson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Vernon; Ishida, Muneyuki; Keung, Wai-Yee

    2012-06-29

    By using the LHC and Tevatron measurements of the cross sections to various decay channels relative to the standard model Higgs boson, the total width of the putative 125 GeV Higgs boson is determined as 6.1(-2.9)(+7.7) MeV. We describe a way to estimate the branching fraction for the Higgs-boson decay to dark matter. We also discuss a no-go theorem for the γγ signal of the Higgs boson at the LHC.

  18. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  19. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F.D.; Hagel, K.; Kuehn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O. (II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet, Giessen, Giessen (Germany)); Charity, R.J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R.S.; Simon, R.S.; Wessels, J.P. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)); Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A.A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Florence, Florence (Italy))

    1992-07-13

    High-energy {gamma} rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of {sup 136}Xe+{sup 48}Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width {Gamma} is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy {ital E}{sup *}. A saturation at about {Gamma}=10 MeV is observed for {ital E}{sup *}/{ital A}{ge}1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  20. Width of the confining string in Yang-Mills theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliozzi, F; Pepe, M; Wiese, U-J

    2010-06-11

    We investigate the transverse fluctuations of the confining string connecting two static quarks in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory using Monte Carlo calculations. The exponentially suppressed signal is extracted from the large noise by a very efficient multilevel algorithm. The resulting width of the string increases logarithmically with the distance between the static quark charges. Corrections at intermediate distances due to universal higher-order terms in the effective string action are calculated analytically. They accurately fit the numerical data.

  1. Exact values of Kolmogorov widths of classes of analytic functions

    OpenAIRE

    Serdyuk, A. S.; Bodenchuk, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    We prove that kernels of analytic functions of kind $H_{h,\\beta}(t)=\\sum\\limits_{k=1}^{\\infty}\\frac{1}{\\cosh kh}\\cos\\Big(kt-\\frac{\\beta\\pi}{2}\\Big)$, $h>0$, ${\\beta\\in\\mathbb{R}}$, satisfies Kushpel's condition $C_{y,2n}$ beginning with some number $n_h$ which is explicitly expressed by parameter $h$ of smoothness of the kernel. As a consequence, for all $n\\geqslant n_h$ we obtain lower bounds for Kolmogorov widths $d_{2n}$ of functional classes that are representable as convolutions of kerne...

  2. Average radiation widths of levels in natural xenon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguere, G., E-mail: gilles.noguere@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul les Durance (France); Litaize, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul les Durance (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2011-11-15

    Average radiation widths <{Gamma}{sub {gamma}>} for the stable xenon isotopes have been estimated using neutron resonance spectroscopic information deduced from high-resolution capture and transmission data measured at the electron linear accelerator GELINA of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel, Belgium. The combination of conventional Neutron Resonance Shape Analysis techniques (NRSA) with high-energy model calculations in a simple Bayesian learning method permit to calculate a consistent local systematic in the xenon's mass region (Z=54) from A=124 to A=136.

  3. Narrowing of Terrace-width Distributions During Growth on Vicinals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-03-01

    Using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for a generic minimal SOS model of vicinal surfaces, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) as a function of incident flux during homoepitaxial growth. We show that the distribution narrows markedly, U.B.P.-Clermont 2 as though there were a flux-dependent repulsion between steps, until the step picture fails at high flux. Using a Fokker-Planck approach, we analyze the evolution and saturation of this narrowing. We compare with a 1D model and with our simulations for narrowing due to an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier.

  4. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  5. CGC beyond eikonal accuracy: finite width target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinoluk, Tolga; Armesto, Nestor; Beuf, Guillaume; Moscoso, Alexis

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to systematically include the corrections to the eikonal approximation that are associated with the finite width of the target. The retarded gluon propagator in background field is calculated at next-to-next-to-eikonal (NNE) accuracy by using this method. The corrections to the strict eikonal limit of the gluon propagator are found to be Wilson lines decorated by gradients of the background field of the target. The result is then applied to single inclusive gluon production and to single transverse spin asymmetry for a polarized target in pA collisions.

  6. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević; Zoran Simić; Andjelka Kovačević; Aleksandar Valjarević; Sylvie Sahal-Bréchot

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center – VAMDC.

  7. Why do different people choose different university degrees? Motivation and the choice of degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya eSkatova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Different people choose which undergraduate degree to study at the university for different reasons. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify individual differences in motivation that drive the undergraduate degree choice. We identified that people choose university degrees for four reasons: career concerns (Career, intrinsic interest (Interest in the subject, an opportunity to help others (Helping and because they are looking for an easy option into higher education (Loafing. We investigated whether these motivation apply to the choice of undergraduate degree in two samples: (1 undergraduate (N = 989 and (2 prospective (N = 896 students. We developed the Motivations Influencing Course Choice (MICC questionnaire to measure these motivations. Scales of Helping, Career, Loafing and Interest showed good psychometric properties, showed validity with respect to general life goals and personality traits, and predicted actual and prospective degree choices. We demonstrated that medical degrees were chosen due to a mixture of Helping and Career, while engineering degrees were associated with Career and low interest in the degree. The choice of art and humanities degrees was driven by Interest and low concern about future career, accompanied with high Loafing. We also demonstrated gender differences: females were high in Helping (both samples and Interest (only in undergraduate sample motivation, while males scored higher in Career (only in undergraduate sample and Loafing (both samples. The findings can feed into both theoretical accounts of proximal motivation as well as help to improve degree programmes at universities and provide better career advice.

  8. Rethinking the Bachelor Degree Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Anne Elisabeth; Gammelgaard Nielsen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The text contains reflections on the background for rethinking the bachelor degree course at the Aarhus School of Architecture.......The text contains reflections on the background for rethinking the bachelor degree course at the Aarhus School of Architecture....

  9. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International( CABI) is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain. It aims to improve people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.

  10. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International(CABI) is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain. It aims to improve people’s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.

  11. About CABI Full Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International(CABI)is a not-for-profit international Agricultural Information Institute with headquarters in Britain. It aims to improve people s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. CABI Full-text is one of the publishing products of CABI.

  12. Foundation Degrees: A Risky Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Foundation degrees, the new proposal for sub-degree vocational education in the UK, are characterised by innovation both in their design (curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment) and in the marketplace for which they are designed. This article argues that the development and delivery of foundation degrees carry a high level of risk,…

  13. Content Analysis of Our Full-time Professional Degree Graduate Training Mode Research Literature%我国全日制专业学位硕士研究生培养模式研究文献内容分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘赣洪; 张希丽

    2015-01-01

    文章以主题“专业学位硕士研究生培养模式”在中国知网进行高级检索,以查阅到的文献60篇作为研究对象,进行内容分析。研究发现:在招生、就业教育上,已有的研究主要集中在社会的认可度、入学形式简单化和就业引导等方面;在教育教学模式上,主要体现在定位问题、课程设置、师资力量和实践环节等方面;在培养质量上,主要有自我定位和质量的社会认可度等方面;在培养模式上,主要有双导师制、基地学校共建和职业认同制等方面;在学制结构上,已有研究对学制结构思考不足,有待理论模型创新与实践探索。%Taking the theme of"master degree training mode"Advanced Search in China National Knowledge to access to documents 60 as the research object, content analysis. The study found:On enrollment, employment education, existing re-search focuses on the social acceptance, enrollment and employment guidance and other forms of simplification;the teaching mode, mainly reflected in the positioning problem, curriculum, faculty and practice and other aspects;the quality of training, the main self-positioning and quality of social acceptance, etc;in the training mode, there are double mentoring, professional identity and build a base for schools and other aspects of the system;the structure of the school system, has been insufficient research on the academic structure of thinking, to be innovative and practical exploration of the theoretical model.

  14. Determination of the width of the top quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-09-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t {yields} Wb) measured in t{bar t} events using up to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The result is {Lambda}{sub t} = 1.99{sub -0.55}{sup +0.69} GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.3{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3}) x 10{sup -25} s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b{prime} quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V{sub tb{prime}}| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  15. Direct top-quark width measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-03

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths (Γ(t)) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale (Δ(JES)) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where Δ(JES) is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γ(t) quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), which are consistent with the standard model prediction.

  16. Width of the chaotic layer: maxima due to marginal resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Ivan I

    2012-06-01

    Modern theoretical methods for estimating the width of the chaotic layer in the presence of prominent marginal resonances are considered in the perturbed pendulum model of nonlinear resonance. The fields of applicability of these methods are explicitly and precisely formulated. The comparative accuracy is investigated in massive and long-run numerical experiments. It is shown that the methods are naturally subdivided in classes applicable for adiabatic and nonadiabatic cases of perturbation. It is explicitly shown that the pendulum approximation of marginal resonance works well in the nonadiabatic case. In this case, the role of marginal resonances in determining the total layer width is demonstrated to diminish with increasing main parameter λ (equal to the ratio of the perturbation frequency to the frequency of small-amplitude phase oscillations on the resonance). Solely the "bending effect" is important in determining the total amplitude of the energy deviations of the near-separatrix motion at λ≳7. In the adiabatic case, it is demonstrated that the geometrical form of the separatrix cell can be described analytically quite easily by means of using a specific representation of the separatrix map. It is shown that the nonadiabatic (and, to some extent, intermediary) case is most actual, in comparison with the adiabatic one, for the physical or technical applications that concern the energy jumps in the near-separatrix chaotic motion.

  17. Interalar width as a guide in denture tooth selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, W; Bomberg, T J; Hatch, R A

    1986-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the relationship of the IAW, measured between at the widest dimension of the alae of the nose, and two other measurements of maxillary anterior teeth. The other measurements, both of which are significant in the selection and arrangement of artificial teeth used in complete dentures, were the ICTW and the ARCD measured from the distal surface of the maxillary canine on one side of the arch to the distal surface of the canine on the opposite side of the arch. No distinction was made between either the sex or the age of the subjects. The mean ICTW of 35.35 mm was 3% greater than the mean IAW of 34.28 mm. The mean ARCD of 44.85 mm was 31% greater than the mean IAW of 34.28 mm. This mean ARCD compares favorably (less than 1 mm difference) with a constructed ARCD of 45.8 mm from a tooth dimension study by Shillingburg et al. The ARCD was 44.85 mm. This measurement had not been made in the previous study examining the relationship of interalar distance to ICTW. When the IAW was plotted against the intercanine cusp tip width, a fairly strong correlation coefficient of 0.413 was exhibited. A weaker but definite correlation coefficient of 0.217 was observed when the interalar width plotted against the circumferential arc distance from distal surface to distal surface of the maxillary canines.

  18. Origin of multiple band gap values in single width nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepika; Kumar, Shailesh; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-11-01

    Deterministic band gap in quasi-one-dimensional nanoribbons is prerequisite for their integrated functionalities in high performance molecular-electronics based devices. However, multiple band gaps commonly observed in graphene nanoribbons of the same width, fabricated in same slot of experiments, remain unresolved, and raise a critical concern over scalable production of pristine and/or hetero-structure nanoribbons with deterministic properties and functionalities for plethora of applications. Here, we show that a modification in the depth of potential wells in the periodic direction of a supercell on relative shifting of passivating atoms at the edges is the origin of multiple band gap values in nanoribbons of the same width in a crystallographic orientation, although they carry practically the same ground state energy. The results are similar when calculations are extended from planar graphene to buckled silicene nanoribbons. Thus, the findings facilitate tuning of the electronic properties of quasi-one-dimensional materials such as bio-molecular chains, organic and inorganic nanoribbons by performing edge engineering.

  19. Longitudinal wave motion in width-constrained auxetic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the longitudinal wave velocity in auxetic plates in comparison to conventional ones, in which the plate is constrained from motion in the width direction. By taking into account the thickness change of the plate and its corresponding change in density, the developed wave velocity is casted not only as a function of Young’s modulus and density, but also in terms of Poisson’s ratio and longitudinal strain. Results show that density and thickness variations compensate for one another when the Poisson’s ratio is positive, but add up when the Poisson’s ratio is negative. Results also reveal that the classical model of longitudinal wave velocity for the plate is accurate when the Poisson’s ratio is about 1/3; at this Poisson’s ratio the influence from density and thickness variations cancel each other. Comparison between the current corrected model and the density-corrected Rayleigh-Lamb model reveals a number of consistent trends, while the discrepancies are elucidated. If the plate material possesses a negative Poisson’s ratio, the deviation of the actual wave velocity from the classical model becomes significant; auxeticity suppresses and enhances the wave velocity in compressive and tensile impacts, respectively. Hence the use of the corrected model is proposed when predicting longitudinal waves in width-constrained auxetic plates, and auxetic materials can be harnessed for effectively controlling wave velocities in thin-walled structures.

  20. Fractal Reference Signals in Pulse-Width Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Boris; Lurie, Helen

    2005-01-01

    A report proposes the use of waveforms having fractal shapes reminiscent of sawteeth (in contradistinction to conventional regular sawtooth waveforms) as reference signals for pulse-width modulation in control systems for thrusters of spacecraft flying in formation. Fractal reference signals may also be attractive in some terrestrial control systems - especially those in which pulse-width modulation is used for precise control of electric motors. The report asserts that the use of fractal reference signals would enable the synchronous control of several variables of a spacecraft formation, such that consumption of propellant would be minimized, intervals between thruster firings would be long (as preferred for performing scientific observations), and delays in controlling large-thrust maneuvers for retargeting would be minimized. The report further asserts that whereas different controllers would be needed for different modes of operation if conventional pulsewidth modulation were used, the use of fractal reference signals would enable the same controller to function nearly optimally in all regimes of operation, so that only this one controller would be needed.

  1. Dibaryon Mass and Width Calculation with Tensor Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Hou-Rong; PING Jia-Lun; CHEN Ling-Zhi; WANG Fan

    2004-01-01

    @@ The effect of tensor interaction due to gluon and Goldstone boson exchange on the dibaryon mass and decay width has been studied in the framework of the quark delocalization and colour screening model. The effective S-D wave transition interactions induced by gluon and Goldstone boson exchanges decrease quickly with the increasing channel strangeness, and there is no six-quark state in the light flavour world, which can become a bound one by the help of these tensor interactions, except for the deuteron. The K and η meson exchange effect has been shown to be negligible after a short-range truncation in this model approach. The partial D-wave decay widths, from the NΩ state to the A final states of spins 0 and 1, are 20. 7keV and 63.1 kev respectively. This is a very narrow dibaryon resonance, that might be detected in the relativistic heavy ion reaction by the existing RHIC detectors through the reconstruction of the A vertex mass and by the future COMPAS detector at CERNand the FAIR project in Germany.

  2. Critical caving erosion width for cantilever failures of river bank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangui Wang; Shangfu Kuang; Jialin Su

    2016-01-01

    The cantilever failure is one of the typical bank failures, in which the lateral caving erosion at the bottom of the bank plays an important role. When the caving erosion width is larger than a certain value, the cantilever failures such as shear, toppling and stress failures may occur. In order to understand the condition of the cantilever failure, the collapse mechanisms of the cantilever failures are studied based on the bank stability theory and flume experiment. According to the bank stability equation with the lateral erosion, the critical caving erosion width (CCEW) formulas for the shear and toppling failures of simple slope bank were derived in this paper. The formulas show that the CCEW increases as the overhanging soil thickness and soil cohesion increase, and decreases as the crack depth on the bank surface and the slope angle of the bank increase. And these formulas were tested with experimental data, which shows the predicted values are good agreement with experimental data. The paper reveals a quantitative expression on the process of the river cantilever failure.

  3. Prediction of concentrated flow width in ephemeral gully channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtergaele, J.; Poesen, J.; Sidorchuk, A.; Torri, D.

    2002-07-01

    Empirical prediction equations of the form W = aQb have been reported for rills and rivers, but not for ephemeral gullies. In this study six experimental data sets are used to establish a relationship between channel width (W, m) and flow discharge (Q, m3 s-1) for ephemeral gullies formed on cropland. The resulting regression equation (W = 2·51 Q0·412; R2 = 0·72; n = 67) predicts observed channel width reasonably well. Owing to logistic limitations related to the respective experimental set ups, only relatively small runoff discharges (i.e. Q flow channels revealed that the discharge exponent (flow shear stress distribution over the wetted perimeter between rills, gullies and rivers, (ii) a decrease in probability of a channel formed in soil material with uniform erosion resistance from rills over gullies to rivers and (iii) a decrease in average surface slope from rills over gullies to rivers.material. For both cases observed flow on cropland. For the frozen soils the equation

  4. Colorimetry and efficiency of white LEDs: Spectral width dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Elaine; Edwards, Paul R.; Martin, Robert W. [Department of Physics, SUPA, Strathclyde University, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    The potential colour rendering capability and efficiency of white LEDs constructed by a combination of individual red, green and blue (RGB) LEDs are analysed. The conventional measurement of colour rendering quality, the colour rendering index (CRI), is used as well as a recently proposed colour quality scale (CQS), designed to overcome some of the limitations of CRI when narrow-band emitters are being studied. The colour rendering performance is maximised by variation of the peak emission wavelength and relative intensity of the component LEDs, with the constraint that the spectral widths follow those measured in actual devices. The highest CRI achieved is 89.5, corresponding to a CQS value of 79, colour temperature of 3800 K and a luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) of 365 lm/W. By allowing the spectral width of the green LED to vary the CRI can be raised to 90.9, giving values of 82.5 and 370 lm/W for the CQS and LER, respectively. The significance of these values are discussed in terms of optimising the possible performance of RGB LEDs. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Combining LEP and LHC to bound the Higgs Width

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Christoph; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The correlation of on- and off-shell Higgs boson production at the LHC in $gg \\to h^* \\to ZZ$ to bound the Higgs width, under specific model-dependent assumptions, has recently received a lot of attention. As off-shell cross section measurements in this channel suffer from a small signal yield, large backgrounds, and theoretical uncertainties, we propose an alternative complementary constraint which is only possible through the combination of LEP and LHC measurements. Previous precision electroweak measurements at LEP allow for the determination of indirect constraints on Higgs couplings to vector bosons by considering one-loop processes involving virtual Higgs exchange. As the Higgs is off-shell in these diagrams we venture that LEP can be interpreted as an off-shell `Higgs Factory'. By combining these LEP constraints with current LHC 8 TeV Higgs measurements a stronger limit on the Higgs width can be achieved than with LHC data alone for models with rescaled Higgs couplings. Looking to the future, avoiding ...

  6. Bang Time and Burn Width Analysis at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafil, E.; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Kim, Y.; Hoffman, N. M.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Watts, P. W.; Carpenter, A. C.; Church, J.; Bernstein, L.; Liebman, J.; Rubery, M.; Horsefield, C. J.; Miller, E. K.

    2011-10-01

    The time of peak fusion reactivity with respect to the impingement of laser light on an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule is known as Nuclear Bang Time (BT). The width of this peak is the Nuclear Burn Width (BW). Accurately measuring BT & BW is essential for constraining hydrodynamic simulations as it is a measure of energy coupling to the target. BT & BW measurements have been performed using a variety of instruments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic is designed to measure fusion gamma-rays in determining BT & BW to within 30 ps precision and accuracy. The GRH consists of four Gas Cherenkov Detectors having variable energy-thresholding capability. For BT measurements, the threshold is typically set >8 MeV so as to isolate DT fusion gamma-rays at 16.75 MeV while thresholding out the lower energy (n,n') gammas. The GRH experimental setup, data and comparison to BT & BW from other diagnostics methods are presented. U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-480419.

  7. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light-quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeV < m_\\pi < 352 MeV, two lattice spacings, a=0.085, 0.112 fm, and a volume of (2.7 fm)^3. Our results for the axial couplings are g_1=0.449(51), g_2=0.84(20), and g_3=0.71(13), where g_1 governs the interaction between heavy-light mesons and pions and g_{2,3} are similar couplings between heavy-light baryons and pions. Using our lattice result for g_3, and constraining 1/m_Q corrections in the strong decay widths with experimental data for \\Sigma_c^{(*)} decays, we obtain \\Gamma[\\Sigma_b^{(*)} \\to \\Lambda_b \\pi^\\pm] = 4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the \\Si...

  8. A closer look at the "characteristic" width of molecular cloud filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Panopoulou, G V; Skalidis, R; Tassis, K; Andrews, J J

    2016-01-01

    Filaments in Herschel molecular cloud images are found to exhibit a "characteristic width". This finding is in tension with spatial power spectra of the data, which show no indication of this characteristic scale. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is a result of the methodology adopted for measuring filament widths. First, we perform the previously used analysis technique on artificial scale-free data, and obtain a peaked width distribution of filament-like structures. Next, we repeat the analysis on three Herschel maps and reproduce the narrow distribution of widths found in previous studies $-$ when considering the average width of each filament. However, the distribution of widths measured at all points along a filament spine is broader than the distribution of mean filament widths, indicating that the narrow spread (interpreted as a "characteristic" width) results from averaging. Furthermore, the width is found to vary significantly from one end of a filament to the other. Therefore, the previously ide...

  9. Emptiness and Fullness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbæk, Susanne; Bunkenborg, Mikkel

    As critical voices question the quality, authenticity, and value of people, goods, and words in post-Mao China, accusations of emptiness render things open to new investments of meaning, substance, and value. Exploring the production of lack and desire through fine-grained ethnography, this volume......, there is a pervasive concern with states of lack and emptiness and the contributions suggest that this play of emptiness and fullness is crucial to ongoing constructions of quality, value, and subjectivity in China....

  10. COMPARISON OF RED CELL DISTRIBUTION WIDTH WITH SOFA SCORE AS A PROGNOSTIC MARKER OF SEPSIS IN ELDERLY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Mohammed Aslam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Severe sepsis and septic shock are increasing in incidence and contributing significantly to mortality. The prediction of outcome for elderly patients with sepsis may facilitate more aggressive interventions. The SOFA score is a scoring system used to quantify the severity of the patient’s illness based on the degree of organ dysfunction. Various biomarkers are being evaluated for early diagnosis of sepsis. RDW is one of them, which have been shown to predict mortality and morbidity of sepsis. Hence, this study is being done to compare RDW with SOFA score as prognostic marker of sepsis in elderly patients. AIM To compare red cell distribution width with SOFA score as a prognostic marker of sepsis in elderly patients. METHODS A total of 93 elderly patients in sepsis who were admitted to Intensive Care Unit of M. S. Ramaiah Hospitals between October 2013 and September 2015 were included in the study. ROC (Receiver Operating Curve was used to determine the optimal cut-off point for RDW for predicting mortality. ROC of RDW was compared with ROC of SOFA score. RESULTS Mean age of the patients was 70.72±8.02 and most of the patients were in the age group of 61–70yrs. (53.8%. 52(55.9% patients were males and 41(44.1% patients were females. Bronchopneumonia (34.4% and urosepsis (30.1% were the most common causes of sepsis; 61.3% of the patients had SOFA score in the range of 5–10. Mean SOFA score was 7.87097±3.22769. Mean RDW was 14.247±2.1151. CONCLUSION RDW had a sensitivity of 81.6%, specificity of 77.3%, positive predictive value of 80%, and negative predictive value of 79.1% with a cut-off value of 13.75% in predicting mortality in elderly patients in sepsis.

  11. Degree-degree correlations in random graphs with heavy-tailed degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, Nelli; van der Hofstad, Remco

    2012-01-01

    We investigate degree-degree correlations for scale-free graph sequences. The main conclusion of this paper is that the assortativity coefficient is not the appropriate way to describe degree-dependences in scale-free random graphs. Indeed, we study the infinite volume limit of the assortativity

  12. Degree-degree correlations in random graphs with heavy-tailed degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, Nelli; van der Hofstad, Remco

    2012-01-01

    We investigate degree-degree correlations for scale-free graph sequences. The main conclusion of this paper is that the assortativity coefficient is not the appropriate way to describe degree-dependences in scale-free random graphs. Indeed, we study the infinite volume limit of the assortativity coe

  13. Internal and external radiative widths in the combined R-matrix and potential model formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Bertulani, C A; Hao, T V Nhan

    2016-01-01

    Using the $R$-matrix approach we calculate the radiative width for a resonance decaying to a bound state through electric dipole, $E1$, transitions. The total radiative width is determined by the interference of the nuclear internal and external radiative width amplitudes. For a given channel radius the external radiative width amplitude is model independent and is determined by the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) of the bound state to which the resonance decays. It also depends on the partial resonance width. To calculate the internal radiative width amplitude we show that a single particle potential model is appropriate. We compare our results with a few experimental data.

  14. Plate Full of Color

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Plate Full of Color teaches the value of eating a variety of colorful and healthy foods.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  15. Graduate Physics Degrees: Largest Departments and Degree Distribution. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    In the 2011-12 academic year there were 751 degree-granting physics departments in the U.S. Of these, 195 offered a PhD and 62 departments offered a master's as the highest physics degree. The remaining 494 departments offered a bachelor's as their highest physics degree. There were six universities that had two doctoral-granting physics…

  16. STELLAR LOCI. I. METALLICITY DEPENDENCE AND INTRINSIC WIDTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu, E-mail: yuanhb4861@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Stellar loci are widely used for selection of interesting outliers, reddening determinations, and calibrations. However, until now, the dependence of stellar loci on metallicity has not been fully explored, and their intrinsic widths are unclear. In this paper, by combining the spectroscopic and recalibrated imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, we have built a large, clean sample of dwarf stars with accurate colors and well-determined metallicities to investigate the metallicity dependence and intrinsic widths of the SDSS stellar loci. Typically, 1 dex decrease in metallicity causes 0.20 and 0.02 mag decrease in colors u – g and g – r and 0.02 and 0.02 mag increase in colors r – i and i – z, respectively. The variations are larger for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor ones, and larger for F/G/K stars than for A/M ones. Using the sample, we have performed two-dimensional polynomial fitting to the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors as a function of color g – i and metallicity [Fe/H]. The residuals, at the level of 0.029, 0.008, 0.008, and 0.011 mag for the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors, respectively, can be fully accounted for by the photometric errors and metallicity uncertainties, suggesting that the intrinsic widths of the loci are at maximum a few millimagnitudes. The residual distributions are asymmetric, revealing that a significant fraction of stars are binaries. In a companion paper, we will present an unbiased estimate of the binary fraction for field stars. Other potential applications of the metallicity-dependent stellar loci are briefly discussed.

  17. Correlation of Density Pedestal Width and Neutral Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. Q.; Nevins, W. M.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2003-10-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D and C-Mod find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length.[1][2] These results suggest that the width may be set by the combined effects of neutral and plasma transport. This paper is a report on fluid simulations of boundary plasma using BOUT code [3] with neutral source added. Thus both neutral and plasma physics are treated. The plasma transport is self-consistently driven by boundary turbulence due to the resistive X-point mode, while neutral is described by a simple fluid diffusive model. The plasma profiles are evolved on the same time scale as the turbulence for the given heat source from the core plasma and particle source from the neutrals. For prescribed neutral profiles, we find the formation of a density pedestal inside the separatrix in the L-mode even though the calculated plasma diffusion coefficients are almost radially constant and without the formation of a temperature pedestal. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling can provide the dominant control for the size of the H-mode density barrier. The width of the density barrier, and its relationship to pedestal height and neutral penetration length at the midplane, will be given by using hyperbolic-tangent fit to the simulation data. [1] R.J.Groebner, M.A.Mahdavi, A.W.Leonard, 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference(Lyon, France, 14 to 19 October 2002), IAEA-CN-94/EX/C2-3. [2] D.Mossessian, J.W.Hughes, M.Greenwald, et al., ``Local dimensionless identity method as a tool for studying H-mode pedestal'', The 9th Joint US-European TTF workshop (Madison, Wisconsin, April 2nd - 5th, 2003). [3] X.Q.Xu, R.H.Cohen, T.D.Rognlien and J.R.Myra, Physics of Plasma, Vol. 7, 1951-1958 (2000).

  18. Invariantly propagating dissolution fingers in finite-width systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutka, Filip; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution fingers are formed in porous medium due to positive feedback between transport of reactant and chemical reactions [1-4]. We investigate two-dimensional semi-infinite systems, with constant width W in one direction. In numerical simulations we solve the Darcy flow problem combined with advection-dispersion-reaction equation for the solute transport to track the evolving shapes of the fingers and concentration of reactant in the system. We find the stationary, invariantly propagating finger shapes for different widths of the system, flow and reaction rates. Shape of the reaction front, turns out to be controlled by two dimensionless numbers - the (width-based) Péclet number PeW = vW/Dφ0 and Damköhler number DaW = ksW/v, where k is the reaction rate, s - specific reactive surface area, v - characteristic flow rate, D - diffusion coefficient of the solute, and φ0 - initial porosity of the rock matrix. Depending on PeW and DaW stationary shapes can be divided into seperate classes, e.g. parabolic-like and needle-like structures, which can be inferred from theoretical predictions. In addition we determine velocity of propagating fingers in time and concentration of reagent in the system. Our simulations are compared with natural forms (solution pipes). P. Ortoleva, J. Chadam, E. Merino, and A. Sen, Geochemical self-organization II: the reactive-infiltration instability, Am. J. Sci, 287, 1008-1040 (1987). M. L. Hoefner, and H. S. Fogler. Pore evolution and channel formation during flow and reaction in porous media, AIChE Journal 34, 45-54 (1988). C. E. Cohen, D. Ding, M. Quintard, and B. Bazin, From pore scale to wellbore scale: impact of geometry on wormhole growth in carbonate acidization, Chemical Engineering Science 63, 3088-3099 (2008). P. Szymczak and A. J. C. Ladd, Reactive-infiltration nstabilities in rocks. Part II: Dissolution of a porous matrix, J. Fluid Mech. 738, 591-630 (2014).

  19. Prediction of width of un-erupted incisors, canines and premolars in a Ugandan population: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buwembo William

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of the space forms an important part of an orthodontic assessment in the mixed dentition. However the most commonly used methods of space analysis are based on data developed on Caucasian populations. In order to provide more accurate local data we set out to develop a formula for predicting the widths of un-erupted canines and premolars for a Ugandan population and to compare the predicted widths of the teeth from this formula with those obtained from Moyers’ tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Methods Dental casts were prepared using mandibular and maxillary arch impressions of 220 children (85 boys/135 girls aged 12–17 years recruited from schools in Kampala, Uganda. The mesio-distal width of the mandibular incisors, mandibular and maxillary canines and premolars were measured with a pair of digital calipers. Based on regression analysis, predictive equations were derived and the findings were compared with those presented in Moyers’ probability tables, and Tanaka and Johnston’s equations. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the tooth widths predicted by our equations and those from Moyers’ probability tables at the 65th and 75th percentile probabilities for the girls and at 75th level in boys in the mandibular arch. While in the maxillary arch no statistically significant differences at the 75th and 95th levels were noted in girls. There were statistically significant differences between predicted tooth sizes using equations from the present study and those predicted from the Tanaka and Johnston regression equations. Conclusions In this Ugandan population, Moyers’ probability tables could be used to predict tooth widths at specific percentile probabilities, but generally, Tanaka and Johnston technique tends to overestimate the tooth widths.

  20. Thermal Width of the $\\Upsilon$ at Large t' Hooft Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to show that the heavy quark (static) potential in a strongly-coupled plasma develops an imaginary part at finite temperature of $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{\\lambda} L^4 T^4 / L)$, where $L$ is the distance between the heavy quarks. Thus, deeply bound heavy quarkonia states acquire a small nonzero thermal width when the t'Hooft coupling $\\lambda=g^2 N_c \\gg 1$ and the number of colors $N_c \\to \\infty$. In the dual gravity description, this imaginary contribution comes from thermal fluctuations around the bottom of the classical sagging string in the bulk that connects the heavy quarks located at the boundary. We predict a strong suppression of $\\Upsilon$'s in heavy-ion collisions and discuss how this may be used to estimate the initial temperature.

  1. Free-edge delamination - Laminate width and loading conditions effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    The width and loading conditions effects on free-edge stress fields in composite laminates are investigated using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. This analysis includes a special free-edge region refinement or superelement with progressive substructuring (mesh refinement) and finite thickness interply layers. The different loading conditions include in-plane and out-of-plane bending, combined axial tension and in-plane shear, twisting, uniform temperature and uniform moisture. Results obtained indicate that: axial tension causes the smallest magnitude of interlaminar free edge stress compared to other loading conditions; free-edge delamination data obtained from laboratory specimens cannot be scaled to structural components; and composite structural components are not likely to delaminate.

  2. Free-edge delamination: Laminate width and loading conditions effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    The width and loading conditions effects on free-edge stress fields in composite laminates are investigated using a three-dimensional finite element analysis. This analysis includes a special free-edge region refinement or superelement with progrssive substructuring (mesh refinement) and finite thickness interply layers. The different loading conditions include in-plane and out-of-plane bending, combined axial tension and in-plane shear, twisting, uniform temperature and uniform moisture. Results obtained indicate that: axial tension causes the smallest magnitude of interlaminar free edge stress compared to other loading conditions; free-edge delamination data obtained from laboratory specimens cannot be scaled to structural components; and composite structural components are not likely to delaminate.

  3. Masses and decay widths of radially excited Bottom mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Inspired from the experimental information coming from LHC [2,3] and Babar [4] for radially higher excited charmed mesons, we predict the masses and decays of the n=2 S-wave and P- wave bottom mesons using the effective lagrangian approach. Using heavy quark effective theory approach, non-perturbative parameters (?, ?1 and ?2) are fitted using the available experimental and theoretical informations on charm masses. Using heavy quark symmetry and the values of these fitted parameters, the masses of radially excited even and odd parity bottom mesons with and without strangness are predicted. These predicted masses led in constraining the decay widths of these 12 states, and also shed light on the unknown values of the higher hadronic coupling constants eeg 2 SH and eeg 2 TH. Studying the properties like masses, decays of 2S and 2P states and some hadronic couplings would help forthcoming experiments to look into these states in future.

  4. The optimum choice of gate width for neutron coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D. K.; Santi, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    In the measurement field of international nuclear safeguards, passive neutron coincidence counting is used to quantify the spontaneous fission rate of certain special nuclear materials. The shift register autocorrelation analysis method is the most commonly used approach. However, the Feynman-Y technique, which is more commonly applied in reactor noise analysis, provides an alternative means to extract the correlation information from a pulse train. In this work we consider how to select the optimum gate width for each of these two time-correlation analysis techniques. The optimum is considered to be that which gives the lowest fractional precision on the net doublets rate. Our theoretical approach is approximate but is instructional in terms of revealing the key functional dependence. We show that in both cases the same performance figure of merit applies so that common design criteria apply to the neutron detector head. Our prediction is that near optimal results, suitable for most practical applications, can be obtained from both techniques using a common gate width setting. The estimated precision is also comparable in the two cases. The theoretical expressions are tested experimentally using 252Cf spontaneous fission sources measured in two thermal well counters representative of the type in common use by international inspectorates. Fast accidental sampling was the favored method of acquiring the Feynman-Y data. Our experimental study confirmed the basic functional dependences predicted although experimental results when available are preferred. With an appropriate gate setting Feynman-Y analysis provides an alternative to shift register analysis for safeguards applications which is opening up new avenues of data collection and data reduction to explore.

  5. The optimum choice of gate width for neutron coincidence counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S., E-mail: crofts@ornl.gov [Safeguards and Security Technology (SST), Global Nuclear Security Technology Divisions, PO Box 2008, Building 5700, MS-6166, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 (United States); Henzlova, D.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D.K.; Santi, P.A. [Safeguards Science and Technology Group (NEN-1), Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, MS-E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-11-11

    In the measurement field of international nuclear safeguards, passive neutron coincidence counting is used to quantify the spontaneous fission rate of certain special nuclear materials. The shift register autocorrelation analysis method is the most commonly used approach. However, the Feynman-Y technique, which is more commonly applied in reactor noise analysis, provides an alternative means to extract the correlation information from a pulse train. In this work we consider how to select the optimum gate width for each of these two time-correlation analysis techniques. The optimum is considered to be that which gives the lowest fractional precision on the net doublets rate. Our theoretical approach is approximate but is instructional in terms of revealing the key functional dependence. We show that in both cases the same performance figure of merit applies so that common design criteria apply to the neutron detector head. Our prediction is that near optimal results, suitable for most practical applications, can be obtained from both techniques using a common gate width setting. The estimated precision is also comparable in the two cases. The theoretical expressions are tested experimentally using {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission sources measured in two thermal well counters representative of the type in common use by international inspectorates. Fast accidental sampling was the favored method of acquiring the Feynman-Y data. Our experimental study confirmed the basic functional dependences predicted although experimental results when available are preferred. With an appropriate gate setting Feynman-Y analysis provides an alternative to shift register analysis for safeguards applications which is opening up new avenues of data collection and data reduction to explore.

  6. Optimal gate-width setting for passive neutrons multiplicity counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    When setting up a passive neutron coincidence counter it is natural to ask what coincidence gate settings should be used to optimize the counting precision. If the gate width is too short then signal is lost and the precision is compromised because in a given period only a few coincidence events will be observed. On the other hand if the gate is too large the signal will be maximized but it will also be compromised by the high level of random pile-up or Accidental coincidence events which must be subtracted. In the case of shift register electronics connected to an assay chamber with an exponential dieaway profile operating in the regime where the Accidentals rate dominates the Reals coincidence rate but where dead-time is not a concern, simple arguments allow one to show that the relative precision on the net Reals rate is minimized when the coincidence gate is set to about 1.2 times the lie dieaway time of the system. In this work we show that making the same assumptions it is easy to show that the relative precision on the Triples rates is also at a minimum when the relative precision of the Doubles (or Reals) is at a minimum. Although the analysis is straightforward to our knowledge such a discussion has not been documented in the literature before. Actual measurement systems do not always behave in the ideal we choose to model them. Fortunately however the variation in the relative precision as a function of gate width is rather flat for traditional safeguards counters and so the performance is somewhat forgiving of the exact choice. The derivation further serves to delineate the important parameters which determine the relative counting precision of the Doubles and Triples rates under the regime considered. To illustrate the similarities and differences we consider the relative standard deviation that might be anticipated for a passive correlation count of an axial section of a spent nuclear fuel assembly under practically achievable conditions.

  7. Applicability of regression equation using widths of mandibular permanent first molars and incisors as a predictor of widths of mandibular canines and premolars in contemporary Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalin Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Predicting the size of unerupted teeth during the mixed dentition period is a critical factor in managing the developing occlusion. Different studies found that the combined width of only the four mandibular permanent incisors is not a good predictor of the sum of unerupted mandibular permanent canines and premolars (SPCP. In 2007, Melgaço et al. developed a new method for SPCP by measuring the sum of the mandibular first permanent molars and four mandibular permanent incisors (SMI. Aim: It was aimed to evaluate the accuracy of this new method in comparison with Moyers′ mixed dentition analysis table in contemporary Indian population. Settings and Design: Sixty boys and 60 girls from Gandhinagar district (age ranged from 12 to 14 years were included. Materials and Methods: The mesiodistal crown widths of all fully erupted teeth were measured with digital vernier callipers and the odontometric values obtained were then subjected to statistical and linear regression analysis. Results: Student′s unpaired t-test gave statistically significant difference between the original values of teeth and the values obtained by Melgaço′s prediction equation as well as Moyers′ mixed dentition analysis table (P < 0.001. High values of correlation (r = 0.77 and determination coefficients (r2 = 0.59 were found while considering Melgaço′s method. Also, no statistically significant difference was found between the tooth sizes of males and females. Conclusion: From this study, it can be evaluated that Melgaço′s method gives better prediction and a simplified equation Y = 0.925X can be suggested for the present population.

  8. Degree Depreciation: A Fait Accompli for the Liberal Arts Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplass, James A.

    1976-01-01

    The liberal arts degree will continue to lack the credibility needed to compete with professional school degrees in the job market unless a return is made to rigourous standards, subjective tests, term papers, comprehensive exams, improvement in instructional methods, and more stringent curriculum requirements for foreign language, composition,…

  9. Influence of leads widths distribution on turbulent heat transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marcq

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Leads are linear-like structures of open water within the sea ice cover that develop as the result of fracturing due to divergence or shear. Through leads, air and water come into contact and directly exchange latent and sensible heat through convective processes driven by the large temperature and moisture differences between them. In the central Arctic, leads only cover 1 to 2% of the ocean during winter, but account for more than 80% of the heat fluxes. Furthermore, narrow leads (several meters are more than twice as efficient at transmitting turbulent heat than larger ones (several hundreds of meters. We show that lead widths are power law distributed, P(X~X−a with a>1, down to very small spatial scales (20 m or below. This implies that the open water fraction is by far dominated by very small leads. Using two classical formulations, which provide first order turbulence closure for the fetch-dependence of heat fluxes, we find that the mean heat fluxes (sensible and latent over open water are up to 55 % larger when considering the lead width distribution obtained from a SPOT satellite image of the ice cover, compared to the situation where the open water fraction constitutes one unique large lead and the rest of the area is covered by ice, as it is usually considered in climate models at the grid scale. This difference may be even larger if we assume that the power law scaling of lead widths extents down to smaller (~1 m scales. Such estimations may be a first step towards a subgrid scale parameterization of the spatial distribution of open water for heat fluxes calculations in ocean/sea ice coupled models.

  10. The Fullness of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Williams, Gareth

    1992-06-01

    A brief glance at the night sky reveals a remarkable fact about the Universe: it is extremely patchy. The light we see on a moonless night comes from bright specks we call planets and stars. Between the stars we see blackness. Most of astronomy, not to mention geology, biology, and all humanistic studies, is concerned with what happens in and on these bright specks. Yet these lumps and specks, which include the Earth, the Sun, the planets of our solar system, and all the stars together occupy less than one billion billion billionth (10-27) of the total volume of the Universe. It is astonishing to think that the interstellar medium within our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is anything but empty space. But in most of the Galaxy, the density of interstellar matter is thousands of times lower than that of the best vacuum produced on Earth. In fact, there is enough interstellar matter in the Galaxy to make ten billion stars the size of the Sun. In this excellently crafted book, the author gives full treatment to the nature of the stuff between the stars and to the methods that astronomers use to study it. He explains where the matter came from in the first place, how it collects together in clouds and clumps, and the way in which new stars and planets form from material in space. Through his descriptions we see the matter as glorious gas clouds, such as the Orion Nebula, shimmering in rich hues of red and orange. Telescopes reveal inky black clouds, the molecule factories in which new stars and planets are made. Radio, infrared, and ultraviolet telescopes have given astronomers stunning new images of interstellar matter. The Fullness of Space is written for the general reader interested in science. It assumes no scientific or mathematical background, and the only equations in the whole book are found in the appendices. It is beautifully illustrated with many of the finest photographs available of dust clouds and bright nebulae. Readers from high school age to adult will find

  11. Full metal jacket!

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    Ten years ago, standard issue clothing only gave CERN firemen partial protection but today our fire-fighters are equipped with state-of-the-art, full personal protective equipment.   CERN's Fire Brigade team. For many years, the members of CERN's Fire Brigade went on call-outs clad in their work trousers and fire-rescue coats, which only afforded them partial protection. Today, textile manufacturing techniques have moved on a long way and CERN's firemen are now kitted out with state-of-the-art personal protective equipment. The coat and trousers are three-layered, comprising fire-resistant aramide, a protective membrane and a thermal lining. The CERN Fire Brigade' new state-of-the-art personal protection equipment. "This equipment is fully compliant with the standards in force and is therefore resistant to cuts, abrasion, electrical arcs with thermal effects and, of course, fire," explains Patrick Berlinghi, the CERN Fire Brigade's Logistics Officer. You might think that su...

  12. Full Color Holographic Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanlou, A.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Mirlis, E.; Crosby, P.; Shore, A.; Henderson, P.; Napier, P.

    2013-02-01

    The ability to produce color holograms from the human tissue represents a major medical advance, specifically in the areas of diagnosis and teaching. This has been achieved at Glyndwr University. In corporation with partners at Gooch & Housego, Moor Instruments, Vivid Components and peninsula medical school, Exeter, UK, for the first time, we have produced full color holograms of human cell samples in which the cell boundary and the nuclei inside the cells could be clearly focused at different depths - something impossible with a two-dimensional photographic image. This was the main objective set by the peninsula medical school at Exeter, UK. Achieving this objective means that clinically useful images essentially indistinguishable from the object human cells could be routinely recorded. This could potentially be done at the tip of a holo-endoscopic probe inside the body. Optimised recording exposure and development processes for the holograms were defined for bulk exposures. This included the optimisation of in-house recording emulsions for coating evaluation onto polymer substrates (rather than glass plates), a key step for large volume commercial exploitation. At Glyndwr University, we also developed a new version of our in-house holographic (world-leading resolution) emulsion.

  13. A new code for automatic determination of equivalent widths: Automatic Routine for line Equivalent widths in stellar Spectra (ARES)

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, S G; Israelian, G; Mayor, M; Monteiro, M J P F G

    2007-01-01

    We present a new automatic code (ARES) for determining equivalent widths of the absorption lines present in stellar spectra. We also describe its use for determining fundamental spectroscopic stellar parameters. The code is written in C++ based on the standard method of determining EWs and is available for the community. The code automates the manual procedure that the users normally carry out when using interactive routines such as the splot routine implemented in IRAF. We test the code using both simulated and real spectra with different levels of resolution and noise and comparing its measurements to the manual ones obtained in the standard way. The results shows a small systematic difference, always below 1.5m\\AA. This can be explained by errors in the manual measurements caused by subjective continuum determination. The code works better and faster than others tested before.

  14. Lateral ridge split and immediate implant placement in moderately resorbed alveolar ridges: How much is the added width?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Rahpeyma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral ridge split technique is a way to solve the problem of the width in narrow ridges with adequate height. Simultaneous insertion of dental implants will considerably reduce the edentulism time. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients who were managed with ridge splitting technique were enrolled. Thirty-eight locations in both jaws with near equal distribution in quadrants received 82 dental fixtures. Beta Tricalcium phosphate (Cerasorb® was used as biomaterial to fill the intercortical space. Submerged implants were used and 3 months later healing caps were placed. Direct bone measurements before and after split were done with a Collis. Patients were clinically re-evaluated at least 6 months after implant loading. All the data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 11.5 (SPSS Inc, Chicago Illinois, USA. Frequency of edentulous spaces and pre/post operative bone width was analyzed. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Difference was considered significant if P value was less than 0.05. Results: Mean value for presplit width was 3.2 ± 0.34 mm while post-split mean width was 5.57 ± 0.49 mm. Mean gain in crest ridge after ridge splitting was 2 ± 0.3 mm. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in width before and after operation ((P < 0.05. All implants (n = 82 survived and were in full function at follow up (at least 6 months after implant loading. Conclusion: Ridge splitting technique in both jaws showed the predictable outcomes, if appropriate cases selected and special attention paid to details; then the waiting time between surgery and beginning of prosthodontic treatment can be reduced to 3 month.

  15. Estimating tree crown widths for the primary Acadian species in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Russell; Aaron R. Weiskittel

    2012-01-01

    In this analysis, data for seven conifer and eight hardwood species were gathered from across the state of Maine for estimating tree crown widths. Maximum and largest crown width equations were developed using tree diameter at breast height as the primary predicting variable. Quantile regression techniques were used to estimate the maximum crown width and a constrained...

  16. Strain localization band width evolution by electronic speckle pattern interferometry strain rate measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelorget, Bruno [Institut Charles Delaunay-LASMIS, Universite de technologie de Troyes, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)], E-mail: bruno.guelorget@utt.fr; Francois, Manuel; Montay, Guillaume [Institut Charles Delaunay-LASMIS, Universite de technologie de Troyes, FRE CNRS 2848, 12 rue Marie Curie, B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes Cedex (France)

    2009-04-15

    In this paper, electronic speckle pattern interferometry strain rate measurements are used to quantify the width of the strain localization band, which occurs when a sheet specimen is submitted to tension. It is shown that the width of this band decreases with increasing strain. Just before fracture, this measured width is about five times wider than the shear band and the initial sheet thickness.

  17. Red cell distribution width in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katharina Hellhammer; Tobias Zeus; Pablo E Verde; Verena Veulemanns; Lisa Kahlstadt; Georg Wolff; Ralf Erkens; Ralf Westenfeld; Eliano P Navarese; Marc W Merx; Tienush Rassaf; Malte Kelm

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of red blood cell distribution width on outcome in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation(TAVI).METHODS: In a retrospective single center cohort study we determined the impact of baseline red cell distribution width(RDW) and anemia on outcome in 376 patients with aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI. All patients were discussed in the institutional heart team and declined for surgical aortic valve replacement due to high operative risk. Collected data included patient characteristics, imaging findings, periprocedural in hospital data, laboratory results and follow up data. Blood samples for hematology and biochemistry analysis were taken from every patient before and at fixed intervals up to 72 h after TAVI including blood count and creatinine. Descriptive statistics were used for patient’s characteristics. KaplanMeier survival curves were used for time to event outcomes. A recursive partitioning regression and classification was used to investigate the association between potential risk factors and outcome variables.RESULTS: Mean age in our study population was 81 ± 6.1 years. Anemia was prevalent in 63.6%(n = 239) of our patients. Age and creatinine were identified as risk factors for anemia. In our study population, anemia per se did influence 30-d mortality but did not predict longterm mortality. In contrast, a RDW > 14% showed to be highly predictable for a reduced short- and longterm survival in patients with aortic valve disease after TAVI procedure.CONCLUSION: Age and kidney function determine the degree of anemia. The anisocytosis of red blood cells in anemic patients supplements prognostic information in addition to that derived from the WHO-based definition of anemia.

  18. Calculation of autoionization positions and widths with applications to Penning ionization reactions. [Miller golden rule formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacson, A.D.

    1978-08-01

    Using an approximate evaluation of Miller's golden rule formula to calculate autoionization widths which allows for the consideration only of L/sup 2/ functions, the positions and lifetimes of the lowest /sup 1/,/sup 3/P autoionizing states of He have been obtained to reasonable accuracy. This method has been extended to molecular problems, and the ab initio configuration interaction potential energy and width surfaces for the He(2/sup 3/S) + H/sub 2/ system have been obtained. Quantum mechanical close-coupling calculations of ionization cross sections using the complex V* - (i/2) GAMMA-potential have yielded rate constants in good agreement with the experimental results of Lindinger, et al. The potential energy surface of the He(2/sup 1/S) + H/sub 2/ system has also been obtained and exhibits not only a high degree of anisotropy, but also contains a relative maximum for a perpendicular (C/sub 2//sub v/) approach which appears to arise from s-p hybridization of the outer He orbital. However, similar ab initio calculations on the He(2/sup 1/S) + Ar system do not show such anomalous structure. In addition, the complex poles of the S-matrix (Siegert eigenvalues) were calculated for several autoionizing states of He and H/sup -/, with encouraging results even for quite modest basis sets. This method was extended to molecular problems, and results obtained for the He(2/sup 3/S) + H and He(2/sup 1/S) + H systems. 75 references.

  19. Estudio de la dimensionalidad empleando análisis factorial clásico y análisis factorial de información total: análisis de pruebas de matemáticas de primaria (5º y 6º cursos y secundaria obligatoria. [Study of dimensionality using classic factor analysis and full information factor analysis: analysis of primary (5th and 6th degrees and compulsory secondary mathematics tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaristi, Luis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the dimensional structure of a set of mathematical achievement tests used to assess the academic achievement in the Community of Madrid during 2005-06 and 2006-07 years and in three cohorts corresponding to the following academic degrees: 5th-6th of primary education, 1st-2nd and 3-4th of compulsory secondary education (ESO. The results coming from classical factor analysis and full information factor analysis are compared. Therefore a longitudinal study is performed in order to test whether such structure remains constant along time. The results confirm that most of the tests are mostly unidimensional structures. Meanwhile, it was proven that as the complexity of the contents increase, the complexity of the dimensional structure tests increase as well. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar la estructura dimensional de las pruebas empleadas para evaluar el rendimiento académico en la asignatura de matemáticas en el contexto de la evaluación realizada en la Comunidad de Madrid en los cursos académicos 2005-06 y 2006-07 en tres cohortes: 5º y 6º de Educación Primaria, 1º-2º y 3º-4º de ESO. Para ello, se triangulan los resultados obtenidos de la aplicación de las técnicas factoriales clásicas con los del Análisis Factorial de Información total. Asimismo, se realiza un estudio longitudinal con objeto de ver si dicha estructura se mantiene constante a lo largo del tiempo. Los resultados confirman estructuras esencialmente unidimensionales. A su vez, se comprueba que el aumento de la complejidad de los contenidos implica un aumento en la complejidad de la estructura dimensional de las pruebas.

  20. Research Degrees as Professional Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnacle, Robyn; Dall'Alba, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing trend within higher education and, more specifically, in higher degrees by research, to treat a professional skills set as a desirable graduate outcome. The increasing value that is being placed on a professional skills set in large part reflects growing interest around the world in the role of research degrees in labour…

  1. Heading to the right: The effect of aperture width on navigation asymmetries for miniature remote-controlled vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Michael E R; Jones, Craig A; Robertson, Joanne S

    2016-06-01

    Our ability to attend to the environment is asymmetrical and affects activities like navigation. This study investigated whether rightward deviations exist for miniaturized vehicles. Experiment 1 asked participants (n = 26) to navigate a remote-controlled car through apertures that were 200, 300 or 400 mm wide. Analyses revealed a nonsignificant trend for the rightward deviation to increase with aperture width. None of the deviations was significantly to the right. Experiment 2 (n = 16) elevated the car to eye level to control for upper/lower visual-field effects. The results were unchanged. Experiment 3 (n = 16) altered the car's mechanical drive to control veering effects, and the results were unchanged. Data from Experiments 1-3 were combined to increase statistical power and showed that the rightward deviation increased for wider apertures. Experiment 4 (n = 17) investigated deviations for wider apertures (1,100 mm) and found a rightward deviation. Finally, Experiment 5 (n = 24) used a different type of remote-controlled vehicle. A rightward deviation, which increased with width, was observed. In addition, the degree of rightward deviation was related to the perceived middle of the aperture. It appears that systematic rightward deviations occur for miniaturized vehicles, which increase with aperture width. The implications of these results for attentional explanations of rightward deviation are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. On microphysical processes of noctilucent clouds (NLC: observations and modeling of mean and width of the particle size-distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baumgarten

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Noctilucent clouds (NLC in the polar summer mesopause region have been observed in Norway (69° N, 16° E between 1998 and 2009 by 3-color lidar technique. Assuming a mono-modal Gaussian size distribution we deduce mean and width of the particle sizes throughout the clouds. We observe a quasi linear relationship between distribution width and mean of the particle size at the top of the clouds and a deviation from this behavior for particle sizes larger than 40 nm, most often in the lower part of the layer. The vertically integrated particle properties show that 65% of the data follows the linear relationship with a slope of 0.42±0.02 for mean particle sizes up to 40 nm. For the vertically resolved particle properties (Δz = 0.15 km the slope is comparable and about 0.39±0.03. For particles larger than 40 nm the distribution width becomes nearly independent of particle size and even decreases in the lower part of the layer. We compare our observations to microphysical modeling of noctilucent clouds and find that the distribution width depends on turbulence, the time that turbulence can act (cloud age, and the sampling volume/time (atmospheric variability. The model results nicely reproduce the measurements and show that the observed slope can be explained by eddy diffusion profiles as observed from rocket measurements.

  3. An Heuristic Drift-Based Model of the Power Scrape-Off Width in H-Mode Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-02-28

    An heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width in H-mode plasmas is introduced. Grad B and curv B drifts into the SOL are balanced against sonic parallel flows out of the SOL, to the divertor plates. The overall mass flow pattern posited is a modification for open field lines of Pfirsch-Shlüter flows to include sinks to the divertors. These assumptions result in an estimated SOL width of 2aρp/R. They also result in a first-principles calculation of the particle confinement time of H-mode plasmas, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. It is next assumed that anomalous perpendicular electron thermal diffusivity is the dominant source of heat flux across the separatrix, investing the SOL width, defined above, with heat from the main plasma. The separatrix temperature is calculated based on a two-point model balancing power input to the SOL with Spitzer-Härm parallel thermal conduction losses to the divertor. This results in an heuristic closed-form prediction for the power scrape-off width that is in remarkable quantitative agreement both in absolute magnitude and in scaling with recent experimental data. Further work should include full numerical calculations, including all magnetic and electric drifts, as well as more thorough comparison with experimental data.

  4. Heuristic Drift-based Model of the Power Scrape-off width in H-mode Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-29

    An heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width in H-mode plasmas is introduced. Grad B and curv B drifts into the SOL are balanced against sonic parallel flows out of the SOL, to the divertor plates. The overall particle flow pattern posited is a modification for open field lines of Pfirsch-Shlüter flows to include sinks to the divertors. These assumptions result in an estimated SOL width of ~ 2aρp/R. They also result in a first-principles calculation of the particle confinement time of H-mode plasmas, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. It is next assumed that anomalous perpendicular electron thermal diffusivity is the dominant source of heat flux across the separatrix, investing the SOL width, defined above, with heat from the main plasma. The separatrix temperature is calculated based on a two-point model balancing power input to the SOL with Spitzer-Härm parallel thermal conduction losses to the divertor. This results in a heuristic closed-form prediction for the power scrape-off width that is in reasonable quantitative agreement both in absolute magnitude and in scaling with recent experimental data from deuterium plasmas. Further work should include full numerical calculations, including all magnetic and electric drifts, as well as more thorough comparison with experimental data.

  5. Gas metal arc welding of butt joint with varying gap width based on neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim Hardam; Sørensen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the neural network technology for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) control. A system has been developed for modeling and online adjustment of welding parameters, appropriate to guarantee a certain degree of quality in the field of butt joint welding with full p......-learning PSD control algorithm has been proposed....

  6. Estimation of Velocity Profile Based on Chiu’s Equation in Width of Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Nikmehr

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of velocity in channel is one of the most parameters for solution of hydraulic problems. Determination of energy coefficient, momentum and distribution of sediment concentration depend on distribution of velocity profile. The entropy parameter of a channel section can be determined from the relation between the mean and maximum velocities. A technique has been developed to determine a velocity profile on a single vertical passing through the point of maximum velocity in a channel cross section. This method is a way in order to quick and cheap estimating of velocity distribution with high accuracy in channels. So that in this research the power estimation of Chiu method base on entropy concept was determined. Also Chiu’s equation that is based on entropy concept and probability domain, has compared with logarithmic and exponential equations to estimation of velocity profile in width of channel in various depths. The results show that Chiu’s equation better than logarithmic and exponential equations to estimation of velocity profile in width of channel.

  7. P 6- and triangle-free graphs revisited: structure and bounded clique-width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Brandstädt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Maximum Weight Stable Set (MWS Problem is one of the fundamental problems on graphs. It is well-known to be NP-complete for triangle-free graphs, and Mosca has shown that it is solvable in polynomial time when restricted to P 6- and triangle-free graphs. We give a complete structure analysis of (nonbipartite P 6- and triangle-free graphs which are prime in the sense of modular decomposition. It turns out that the structure of these graphs is extremely simple implying bounded clique-width and thus, efficient algorithms exist for all problems expressible in terms of Monadic Second Order Logic with quantification only over vertex predicates. The problems Vertex Cover, MWS, Maximum Clique, Minimum Dominating Set, Steiner Tree, and Maximum Induced Matching are among them. Our results improve the previous one on the MWS problem by Mosca with respect to structure and time bound but also extends a previous result by Fouquet, Giakoumakis and Vanherpe which have shown that bipartite P 6-free graphs have bounded clique-width. Moreover, it covers a result by Randerath, Schiermeyer and Tewes on polynomial time 3-colorability of P 6- and triangle-free graphs.

  8. The relationship between subclinic atherosclerosis and red cell distribution width in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rıza Gülcan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectıve: We have investigated the possible associationbetween red cell distribution width (RDW and subclinicatherosclerosis which can assessed by carotidintima-media thickness (CIMT measurement in patientswith metabolic syndrome (MetS.Methods: 74 patients with MetS were enrolled to thestudy. Patients were divided into 2 groups according tocarotid intima-media thickness (CIMT measurement: 35patients with CIMT≥1.0 mm were at group 1 and 39 patientswith CIMT<1.0 mm were at group 2. RDW weremeasured using an automated blood cell counter.Results: The RDW level was not statistically significantin patients with CIMT≥1,0 mm than in patients withCIMT<1,0 mm (13.73±0.79% vs. 13.77±1.04 %; p=0.85.Conclusion: In our study, we found that RDW was notdifferent in the MetS patients with CIMT≥1.0 mm comparedwith the MetS patients with CIMT<1.0 mm.Key words: red cell distribution width, metabolic syndrome,complete blood count

  9. Clinical evaluation of the biological width following surgical crown-lengthening procedure: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the positional changes of the periodontal tissues, particularly the biological width, following surgical crown-lengthening in human subjects. Materials and Methods: A clinical trial study involving 15 patients was carried out for a period of 6 months. Sites were divided into 3 groups: treated (TT sites, adjacent (AD sites and nonadjacent (NAD sites. Free gingival margin [FGM], attachment level, pocket depth, bone level, biological width [BW] were recorded at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months. Direct bone level after flap reflection was recorded before and after osseous resection at baseline only. Level of osseous crest was lowered based on BW, and supracrestal tooth structure needed using a combination of rotary and hand instruments. Statistical Analysis: Student t test and ANOVA were used. Results: Overall, apical displacement of FGM at TT, AD and NAD sites was statistically significant compared to baseline. The apical displacement of FGM at TT site was more when compared to that at AD and NAD sites at 3 and 6 months. The BW at the TT site was smaller at 1, 3 and 6 months compared to that at baseline. However, at all sites, BW was reestablished to the baseline value at the end of 6 months. Interpretation and Conclusion: The BW at TT sites was reestablished to its original vertical dimension by 6 months. In addition, a consistent 2-mm gain of coronal tooth structure was observed at the 1, 3 and 6-month examinations.

  10. Facial width-to-height ratio relates to dominance style in the genus Macaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Borgi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical, visual, chemical, and auditory cues signalling fighting ability have independently evolved in many animal taxa as a means to resolve conflicts without escalating to physical aggression. Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR, i.e., the relative width to height of the face has been associated with dominance-related phenotypes both in humans and in other primates. In humans, faces with a larger fWHR are perceived as more aggressive. Methods. We examined fWHR variation among 11 species of the genus Macaca. Macaques have been grouped into four distinct categories, from despotic to tolerant, based on their female dominance style. Female dominance style is related to intra- and inter-sexual competition in both males and females and is the result of different evolutionary pressure across species. We used female dominance style as a proxy of intra-/inter-sexual competition to test the occurrence of correlated evolution between competitive regimes and dominance-related phenotypes. fWHR was calculated from 145 2D photographs of male and female adult macaques. Results. We found no phylogenetic signal on the differences in fWHR across species in the two sexes. However, fWHR was greater, in females and males, in species characterised by despotic female dominance style than in tolerant species. Discussion. Our results suggest that dominance-related phenotypes are related to differences in competitive regimes and intensity of inter- and intra-sexual selection across species.

  11. Distribution of total radiation widths for neutron resonances of Pt isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koehler P.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High quality neutron capture and transmission data were measured on isotopically enriched 192,194,195,196Pt and natural Pt samples at ORELA. R-matrix analysis of this data revealed resonance parameters for 159, 413, 423, 258, and 11 neutron resonances for neutron energies below 5.0, 16.0, 7.5, 16.0, and 5.0 keV for 192,194,195,196,198Pt+n, respectively. Earlier analysis of data on reduced neutron widths, Γ0n, showed that the distributions of Γ0n for 192,194Pt deviate significantly from the Porter-Thomas distribution (PTD predicted by random matrix theory. In this contribution we report on preliminary results of the analysis of distribution of total radiation widths, Γγ, in 192,194,195,196Pt+n reactions. Comparison of experimental data with predictions made within the nuclear statistical model indicates that standard models of Photon Strength Functions (PSFs and Nuclear Level Density predict Γγ distributions which are too narrow. We found that satisfactory agreement between experimental and simulated distributions can be obtained only by a strong suppression of the PSFs at low γ-ray energies and/or by violation of the usual assumption that primary transitions from neutron resonances follow the PTD. The shape of PSFs needed for reproduction of our Γγ data also nicely reproduces spectra from several (n,γ experiments on the neighbor nuclide 198Au.

  12. Real-Time Measurement of Width and Height of Weld Beads in GMAW Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Emilio Pinto-Lopera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Associated to the weld quality, the weld bead geometry is one of the most important parameters in welding processes. It is a significant requirement in a welding project, especially in automatic welding systems where a specific width, height, or penetration of weld bead is needed. This paper presents a novel technique for real-time measuring of the width and height of weld beads in gas metal arc welding (GMAW using a single high-speed camera and a long-pass optical filter in a passive vision system. The measuring method is based on digital image processing techniques and the image calibration process is based on projective transformations. The measurement process takes less than 3 milliseconds per image, which allows a transfer rate of more than 300 frames per second. The proposed methodology can be used in any metal transfer mode of a gas metal arc welding process and does not have occlusion problems. The responses of the measurement system, presented here, are in a good agreement with off-line data collected by a common laser-based 3D scanner. Each measurement is compare using a statistical Welch’s t-test of the null hypothesis, which, in any case, does not exceed the threshold of significance level α = 0.01, validating the results and the performance of the proposed vision system.

  13. [Doppler effect on width of characteristic line in plasma induced by pulsed laser ablating Al].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi-Zhong; He, An-Zhi

    2005-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) plasma was induced with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser beam ablating Al target in Ar. Time-resolved information of the plasma radiation was taken with time-resolved technique, and the spectra of the radiation were recorded with an optical multi-path analyzer (OMA III ), whereupon, time-resolved spectra of the plasma radiation induced by pulsed laser were acquired. Based on the experiment data, Al resonant double lines, Al I 396.15 nm, Al I 394.40 nm, were respectively fitted with Lorentz, Gauss and their linear integrated function (abbr. Integrated function), whereupon, Lorentz and Gauss elements were separated from the experiment data profile curve. By contrasting Lorentz with Gauss curve separated, it was found that the experiment curve mainly consisted of Lorentz element, a with little Gauss. By contrasting Lorentz with Integrated fitting curve for experiment data, a visual picture of the characteristic lines broadened by Doppler effect was exhibited. According to the visual picture, the increase of full half-high width of the characteristic line broadened by Doppler effect was estimated. It was about 2 x 10(-)3 -8 x 10(-3) nm, approximating the theoretical value 6.7 x 10(-)3 nm. As a result, Doppler effect on the width of characteristic lines in the plasma could be reasonably explained by curve fitting analysis and theoretical calculation.

  14. In situ experiments on width and evolution characteristics of excavation damaged zone in deeply buried tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The seven long tunnels of Jinping II hydropower station are deeply buried.The width and evolution characteristics of excavation damaged zone(EDZ) are the key problem to the design of tunnels excavation and supports.In order to study this problem,several specific experimental tunnels with different overburden and geometric sizes were excavated at this site.Digital borehole camera,sliding micrometer,cross-hole acoustic wave equipment and acoustic emission apparatus were adopted.This paper introduced the comprehensive in situ experimental methods through pre-installed facilities and pre-drilled boreholes.Typical properties of the surrounding rock mass,including cracks,deformation,elastic wave and micro fractures,were measured during the whole process of the tunnel excavation.The width and characteristics of formation and evolution of tunnels EDZ were analyzed under different construction methods involving of TBM and drilling and blasting,the test tunnels were excavated by full-face or two benches.The relationships between EDZ and tunnel geometry sizes,overburden and excavation method were described as well.The results will not only contribute a great deal to the analysis of rock mass behavior in deeply buried rock mass,but also provide direct data for support design and rockburst prediction.

  15. Changes in the strength and width of the Hadley circulation since 1871

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrate that the Hadley Circulation has intensified and expanded for the past three decades, which has important implications for subtropical societies and may lead to profound changes in global climate. However, the robustness of this intensification and expansion that should be considered when interpreting long-term changes of the Hadley Circulation is still matters of debate. It also remains largely unknown how the Hadley Circulation has evolved over longer periods. Here we present long-term variability of the Hadley Circulation using the 20th Century Reanalysis. It shows a slight strengthening and widening of the Hadley Circulation since the late 1970s, which is not inconsistent with recent assessments. However, over centennial timescales (1871–2008, the Hadley Circulation shows a tendency towards more intense and narrower state. More importantly, the width of the Hadley Circulation has not yet completed a life-cycle since 1871. The strength and width of the Hadley Circulation during the late 19th and early 20th century show strong natural variability, exceeding variability that coincides with global warming in recent decades. These findings raise the question that the recent change of the Hadley Circulation is primarily attributed to greenhouse warming or a long-period oscillation of the Hadley Circulation substantially longer than that observed in previous studies.

  16. Market Orientation and Degree of Novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Bodlaj

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the relationship between a responsive and aproactive market orientation and the degree of novelty. Data obtainedvia an Internet survey were analysed using structural equation modelling.An analysis of 325 Slovenian firms reveals that only a proactivemarket orientation is positively related to the degree of novelty. Whilethere is no evidence of statistically significant differences in the examinedrelationships given the firm size and environmental characteristics,separate analyses in each group indicate that a proactive market orientationmay be more important for small firms and firms operatingamidst a higher level of technological turbulence. This study suggeststhat a distinction between a responsive and a proactive market orientationis important for a better understanding of the effect of a marketorientation on the degree of novelty.

  17. Compact Pulse Width Modulation Circuitry for Silicon Photomultiplier Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of solid state photo-detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analog channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTC), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal to noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analog switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4×4 array 0.9mm×0.9mm×15mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5mm×5mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for 2-fold multiplexing. In principle, much larger multiplexing ratios are

  18. HadISST (1-degree)/HadISST (1-degree)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature component (1-degree). See Rayner, N. A., Parker, D. E., Horton, E. B., Folland, C. K., Alexander, L. V., Rowell,...

  19. Development and characterisation of a new line width reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Zhu, Fan; Heidelmann, Markus; Fritz, Georg; Bayer, Thomas; Kalt, Samuel; Fluegge, Jens

    2015-11-01

    A new critical dimension (CD, often synonymously used for line width) reference material with improved vertical parallel sidewalls (IVPSs) has been developed and characterised. The sample has a size of 6 mm  ×  6 mm, consisting of 4 groups of 5  ×  5 feature patterns. Each feature pattern has a group of five reference line features with a nominal CD of 50 nm, 70 nm, 90 nm, 110 nm and 130 nm, respectively. Each feature pattern includes a pair of triangular alignment marks, applicable for precisely identifying the target measurement position, e.g. for comparison or calibration between different tools. The geometry of line features has been investigated thoroughly using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope and a CD atomic force microscope (CD-AFM). Their results indicate the high quality of the line features: the top corner radius of  strategy for the non-destructive calibration of the developed sample is introduced, which enables the application of the reference material in practice.

  20. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Thoene, C C; Christensen, L; Gorosabel, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Schulze, S; Jakobsson, P; Wiersema, K; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Leloudas, G; Zafar, T; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J

    2012-01-01

    The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy. Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 A. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of...

  1. Arrangement of Multirow Solar Collector Array on Limited Roof Width

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Shaoxuan; XIA Chaofeng

    2010-01-01

    At the limited roof north-south(N-S)width of a building,for the array with multirow collectors based on no shading at winter solstice noon and sloped at latitude,this paper studied the shading and the radiant energy striking on solar collector array.Based on Kunming solar radiation data,the annual and monthly solar radiant energy striking on multi-array collectors was analyzed and estimated,from no shading to partial shading by adding 1-3 collector row,at the slopes of 10°,15°,20°,25°,30°,35° and 40°,respectively.The results showed that properly increasing the row number by reducing the slope of collectors was reasonable in order to get more annual radiant energy.Adding 1 row at 10° of slope was economical for Kunming,based on the 5-row array at 25°.And adding collector row by 20% at 10° of slope could increase the radiant energy striking on the array by 19%.

  2. Segmentation and determination of joint space width in foot radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, O.; de Muinck Keizer, D. M.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Slump, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis is frequently assessed using radiographs of hands and feet. Evaluation includes measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and detection of erosions. Current visual scoring methods are timeconsuming and subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. Automated measurement methods avoid these limitations and have been fairly successful in hand radiographs. This contribution aims at foot radiographs. Starting from an earlier proposed automated segmentation method we have developed a novel model based image analysis algorithm for JSW measurements. This method uses active appearance and active shape models to identify individual bones. The model compiles ten submodels, each representing a specific bone of the foot (metatarsals 1-5, proximal phalanges 1-5). We have performed segmentation experiments using 24 foot radiographs, randomly selected from a large database from the rheumatology department of a local hospital: 10 for training and 14 for testing. Segmentation was considered successful if the joint locations are correctly determined. Segmentation was successful in only 14%. To improve results a step-by-step analysis will be performed. We performed JSW measurements on 14 randomly selected radiographs. JSW was successfully measured in 75%, mean and standard deviation are 2.30+/-0.36mm. This is a first step towards automated determination of progression of RA and therapy response in feet using radiographs.

  3. Degree-degree correlations in directed networks with heavy-tailed degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, van der Pim; Litvak, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    In network theory, Pearson's correlation coefficients are most commonly used to measure the degree assortativity of a network. We investigate the behavior of these coefficients in the setting of directed networks with heavy-tailed degree sequences. We prove that for graphs where the in- and out-degr

  4. Degree-degree dependencies in directed networks with heavy-tailed degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, van der Pim; Litvak, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    In network theory, Pearson’s correlation coefficients are most commonly used to measure the degree assortativity of a network. We investigate the behavior of these coefficients in the setting of directed networks with heavy-tailed degree sequences. We prove that for graphs where the in- and out-degr

  5. A theoretical analysis of river bars stability under changing channel width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, S.; Zolezzi, G.; Tubino, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new theoretical model to investigate the influence of temporal changes in channel width on river bar stability. This is achieved by performing a nonlinear stability analysis, which includes temporal width variations as a small-amplitude perturbation of the basic flow. In order to quantify width variability, channel width is related with the instantaneous discharge using existing empirical formulae proposed for channels with cohesionless banks. Therefore, width can vary (increase and/or decrease) either because it adapts to the temporally varying discharge or, if discharge is constant, through a relaxation relation describing widening of an initially overnarrow channel towards the equilibrium width. Unsteadiness related with changes in channel width is found to directly affect the instantaneous bar growth rate, depending on the conditions under which the widening process occurs. The governing mathematical system is solved by means of a two-parameters (ɛ, δ) perturbation expansion, where ɛ is related to bar amplitude and δ to the temporal width variability. In general width unsteadiness is predicted to play a destabilizing role on free bar stability, namely during the peak stage of a flood event in a laterally unconfined channel and invariably for overnarrow channels fed with steady discharge. In this latter case, width unsteadiness tends to shorten the most unstable bar wavelength compared to the case with constant width, in qualitative agreement with existing experimental observations.

  6. Effect of object width on precision grip force and finger posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domalain, M; Vigouroux, L; Danion, F; Sevrez, V; Berton, E

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to define the effect of object width on spontaneous grasp. Participants held objects of various masses (0.75 to 2.25 kg) and widths (3.5 to 9.5 cm) between thumb and index finger. Grip force, maximal grip force and corresponding finger postures were recorded using an embedded force sensor and an optoelectronic system, respectively. Results showed that index finger joints varied to accommodate the object width, whereas thumb posture remained constant across conditions. For a given object mass, grip force increased as a function of object width, although this result is not dictated by the laws of mechanics. Because maximal grip force also increased with object width, we hypothesise that participants maintain a constant ratio between grip force and their maximal grip force at each given width. Altogether we conclude that when the task consists in manipulating objects/tools, the optimal width is different than when maximal force exertions are required.

  7. Killing Horizons Kill Horizon Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, L.; Grumiller, D.

    Frequently, it is argued that the microstates responsible for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy should arise from some physical degrees of freedom located near or on the black hole horizon. In this essay, we elucidate that instead entropy may emerge from the conversion of physical degrees of freedom, attached to a generic boundary, into unobservable gauge degrees of freedom attached to the horizon. By constructing the reduced phase space, it can be demonstrated that such a transmutation indeed takes place for a large class of black holes, including Schwarzschild.

  8. Killing horizons kill horizon degrees

    CERN Document Server

    Bergamin, L

    2006-01-01

    Frequently it is argued that the microstates responsible for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy should arise from some physical degrees of freedom located near or on the black hole horizon. In this Essay we elucidate that instead entropy may emerge from the conversion of physical degrees of freedom, attached to a generic boundary, into unobservable gauge degrees of freedom attached to the horizon. By constructing the reduced phase space it can be demonstrated that such a transmutation indeed takes place for a large class of black holes, including Schwarzschild.

  9. Lateral ridge split and immediate implant placement in moderately resorbed alveolar ridges: How much is the added width?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Vahid Reza

    2013-09-01

    Lateral ridge split technique is a way to solve the problem of the width in narrow ridges with adequate height. Simultaneous insertion of dental implants will considerably reduce the edentulism time. Twenty-five patients who were managed with ridge splitting technique were enrolled. Thirty-eight locations in both jaws with near equal distribution in quadrants received 82 dental fixtures. Beta Tricalcium phosphate (Cerasorb(®) ) was used as biomaterial to fill the intercortical space. Submerged implants were used and 3 months later healing caps were placed. Direct bone measurements before and after split were done with a Collis. Patients were clinically re-evaluated at least 6 months after implant loading. All the data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 11.5 (SPSS Inc, Chicago Illinois, USA). Frequency of edentulous spaces and pre/post operative bone width was analyzed. Paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Difference was considered significant if P value was less than 0.05. Mean value for presplit width was 3.2 ± 0.34 mm while post-split mean width was 5.57 ± 0.49 mm. Mean gain in crest ridge after ridge splitting was 2 ± 0.3 mm. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in width before and after operation ((P > 0.05). All implants (n = 82) survived and were in full function at follow up (at least 6 months after implant loading). Ridge splitting technique in both jaws showed the predictable outcomes, if appropriate cases selected and special attention paid to details; then the waiting time between surgery and beginning of prosthodontic treatment can be reduced to 3 month.

  10. Effects of word width and word length on optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eTeramoto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether word width and length affect the optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words, using reading speed as a measure. In Experiment 1, three Japanese words, each consisting of 4 Hiragana characters, sequentially scrolled on a display screen from right to left. Participants, all Japanese native speakers, were instructed to read the words aloud as accurately as possible, irrespective of their order within the sequence. To quantitatively measure their reading performance, we used rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, where the scrolling rate was increased until the participants began to make mistakes. Thus, the highest scrolling rate at which the participants’ performance exceeded 88.9% correct rate was calculated for each character size (0.3, 0.6, 1.0, and 3.0° and scroll window size (5 or 10 character spaces. Results showed that the reading performance was highest in the range of 0.6° to 1.0°, irrespective of the scroll window size. Experiment 2 investigated whether the optimal character size observed in Experiment 1 was applicable for any word width and word length (i.e., the number of characters in a word. Results showed that reading speeds were slower for longer than shorter words and the word width of 3.6° was optimal among the word lengths tested (3, 4, and 6 character words. Considering that character size varied depending on word width and word length in the present study, this means that the optimal character size can be changed by word width and word length.

  11. Membrane Triangles with Drilling Degrees of Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fajman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate triangular plane element with drilling degrees of freedom is shown in this paper. This element can be successfully used for solving linear and nonlinear problems. The main advantage of this element is that the stiffness matrix is obtained from pure deformations – elongations of the edges. This aproach is very suitable for nonlinear analysis, where the unbalanced forces can be obtained directly from elongations of edges. 

  12. Segmentation of Mushroom and Cap width Measurement using Modified K-Means Clustering Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser Sert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom is one of the commonly consumed foods. Image processing is one of the effective way for examination of visual features and detecting the size of a mushroom. We developed software for segmentation of a mushroom in a picture and also to measure the cap width of the mushroom. K-Means clustering method is used for the process. K-Means is one of the most successful clustering methods. In our study we customized the algorithm to get the best result and tested the algorithm. In the system, at first mushroom picture is filtered, histograms are balanced and after that segmentation is performed. Results provided that customized algorithm performed better segmentation than classical K-Means algorithm. Tests performed on the designed software showed that segmentation on complex background pictures is performed with high accuracy, and 20 mushrooms caps are measured with 2.281 % relative error.

  13. Voltage Sag Mitigation Using Pulse Width Modulation Switched Autotransformer through Matlab Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shyam Kiran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new voltage sag compensator for critical loads in electrical distribution system discussed. The proposed scheme employs a Pulse width modulation ac-ac converter along with a auto transformer. During a disturbance such as voltage sag, the proposed scheme supplies the missing voltage and helps in maintaining the rated voltage at the terminals of the critical load. Under normal condition the approach work in bypass mode and delivering utility power directly to load. The proposed system has less number of switching devices and has good compensating capability in comparison to commonly used compensators. Simulation analysis of three-phase compensator is performed in MATLAB/SIMULINK and performance analysis of the system is presented for various levels of sag and swell.

  14. Active control of periodic fan noise in laptops: spectral width requirements in delayed buffer implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Cordourier‐Maruri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available An active control system intended for the reduction of strictly periodic noise components in computer cooling fans is described,which is based on high‐performance digital sound device architectures found in some personal computers. The systemovercomes causality and synchronization constrains imposed by delayed buffering, as usually found in computer audioprocessing. Performance of the system is demonstrated and evaluated through measurements in a physical implementation ofactive noise control of synthetic tones combined with laptop fan noise, carried out under anechoic and slightly reverberantconditions. Tests on other types of tonal noise sources, like an electrical transformer, were also carried out. However, its widerapplicability to the cancellation of tonal noise has been proved compromised by weak periodicity issues found and reported inthis work. Also, a study of noise spectral width requirements for successful operation is presented.

  15. A Novel Joint Problem of Routing, Scheduling, and Variable-Width Channel Allocation in WMNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Cheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a novel joint problem of routing, scheduling, and channel allocation for single-radio multichannel wireless mesh networks in which multiple channel widths can be adjusted dynamically through a new software technology so that more concurrent transmissions and suppressed overlapping channel interference can be achieved. Although the previous works have studied this joint problem, their linear programming models for the problem were not incorporated with some delicate constraints. As a result, this paper first constructs a linear programming model with more practical concerns and then proposes a simulated annealing approach with a novel encoding mechanism, in which the configurations of multiple time slots are devised to characterize the dynamic transmission process. Experimental results show that our approach can find the same or similar solutions as the optimal solutions for smaller-scale problems and can efficiently find good-quality solutions for a variety of larger-scale problems.

  16. Calibrated expressions for welding and their application to isotherm width in a thick plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentry Wood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces a possible solution to the limitations of modern trial and error solutions to welding procedure development. The difficulties of finding generalized solutions to Rosenthal´s equation are discussed and the Minimal Representation and Calibration approach is introduced as a promising procedure for developing these solutions. Dominant factors are identified, with effects from secondary phenomena being taken into account by correction factors. These correction factors are then calibrated and presented in a form that can be easily computed, and therefore be amendable to industry. The approach is then demonstrated by determining the isotherm width from Rosenthal´s thick plate solution. Comparison of the calibrated scaling equations to Rosenthal´s exact solution showed a maximum error of less than 0.8% for any isotherm.

  17. Harmonics Reduction of Multilevel Inverter Drive Using Sine Carrier Pulse Width Modulation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebanezar Pravin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to control the speed of an induction motor by using seven level diode clamped multilevel inverter and improve the high quality sinusoidal output voltage with reduced harmonics. The presented scheme for diode clamped multilevel inverter is sine carrier Pulse Width Modulation control. An open loop speed control can be achieved by using V/ƒ method. This method can be implemented by changing the supply voltage and frequency applied to the three phase induction motor at constant ratio. The presented system is an effective replacement for the conventional method which has high switching losses, its result ends in a poor drive performance. The simulation result portrays the effective control in the motor speed and an enhanced drive performance through reduction in total harmonic distortion (THD. The effectiveness of the system is verified through simulation using PSIM6.1 Simulink package.

  18. Study about chest width average performances in Romanian Hucul horse breed – Goral bloodline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Maftei

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study of average performances in a population have a huge importance because, regarding a population, the average of phenotypic value is equal with average of genotypic value. So, the studies of the average value of characters offer us an idea about the population genetic level. The biological material is represented by 87 hucul horse from Goral bloodline divided in 5 stallion families analyzed at 18, 30 and 42 months old, owned by Lucina hucul stood farm. The average performances for chest width are presented in paper. We can observe a good growth from one age to another and a small differences between sexes. The average performances of the character are between characteristic limits of the breed.

  19. On the Assimilation of Tree-Ring-Width Chronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Walter; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) of climate proxy records is currently acknowledged as a promising approach to the paleoclimate reconstruction problem, with the potential to bring physical consistency to reconstructed fields. Previous paleo-DA studies have typically assumed a linear relationship between climate forcing and the resulting proxy data, whereas there exist growing evidence of complex, potentially non-linear, proxy formation processes. Accordingly, it appears natural to simulate the proxy response to climate in a more realistic fashion, by way of proxy-specific forward models. Following this train of thought, we investigate the assimilation of the most traditional climate proxy type, Tree-Ring-Width (TRW) chronologies, using the process-based tree-ring growth forward model Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VSL) and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. Used as observation operator, VSL's formulation implies three compounding, challenging features: (i) time averaging, (ii) "switching recording" of 2 variables and (iii) bounded response windows leading to "thresholded response". DA experiments involving VSL-based pseudo-TRW observations are performed first for a chaotic 2-scale dynamical system, used as a cartoon of the atmosphere-land system, and then for an atmospheric general circulation model of intermediate complexity. Our results reveal that VSL's nonlinearities may considerable deteriorate the performance of EnKF for Time-Averaged (TA) estimation, as compared to the utilization of a TA linear observation operator. Moreover, we show that this assimilation skill loss can be considerably reduced by embedding VSL's formulation into fuzzy logic theory, which fosters new interpretations of tree-ring growth limitation processes.

  20. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-10-14

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  1. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes. PMID:27754447

  2. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Timme

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree or sends out (out-degree. To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to

  3. On degree-degree correlations in multilayer networks

    CERN Document Server

    de Arruda, Guilherme Ferraz; Moreno, Yamir; Rodrigues, Francisco A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the concept of assortativity based on the tensorial representation of multilayer networks, covering the definitions given in terms of Pearson and Spearman coefficients. Our approach can also be applied to weighted networks and provides information about correlations considering pairs of layers. By analyzing the multilayer representation of the airport transportation network, we show that contrasting results are obtained when the layers are analyzed independently or as an interconnected system. Finally, we study the impact of the level of assortativity and heterogeneity between layers on the spreading of diseases. Our results highlight the need of studying degree-degree correlations on multilayer systems, instead of on aggregated networks.

  4. On degree-degree correlations in multilayer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arruda, Guilherme Ferraz; Cozzo, Emanuele; Moreno, Yamir; Rodrigues, Francisco A.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a generalization of the concept of assortativity based on the tensorial representation of multilayer networks, covering the definitions given in terms of Pearson and Spearman coefficients. Our approach can also be applied to weighted networks and provides information about correlations considering pairs of layers. By analyzing the multilayer representation of the airport transportation network, we show that contrasting results are obtained when the layers are analyzed independently or as an interconnected system. Finally, we study the impact of the level of assortativity and heterogeneity between layers on the spreading of diseases. Our results highlight the need of studying degree-degree correlations on multilayer systems, instead of on aggregated networks.

  5. Method for Assessment of Changes in the Width of Cracks in Cement Composites with Use of Computer Image Processing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Kamil; Jakubowski, Jacek; Fiołek, Przemysław

    2017-06-01

    Crack width measurement is an important element of research on the progress of self-healing cement composites. Due to the nature of this research, the method of measuring the width of cracks and their changes over time must meet specific requirements. The article presents a novel method of measuring crack width based on images from a scanner with an optical resolution of 6400 dpi, subject to initial image processing in the ImageJ development environment and further processing and analysis of results. After registering a series of images of the cracks at different times using SIFT conversion (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform), a dense network of line segments is created in all images, intersecting the cracks perpendicular to the local axes. Along these line segments, brightness profiles are extracted, which are the basis for determination of crack width. The distribution and rotation of the line of intersection in a regular layout, automation of transformations, management of images and profiles of brightness, and data analysis to determine the width of cracks and their changes over time are made automatically by own code in the ImageJ and VBA environment. The article describes the method, tests on its properties, sources of measurement uncertainty. It also presents an example of application of the method in research on autogenous self-healing of concrete, specifically the ability to reduce a sample crack width and its full closure within 28 days of the self-healing process.

  6. A Statistical study of the Doppler spectral width of high-latitude ionospheric F-region echoes recorded with SuperDARN coherent HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Villain

    Full Text Available The HF radars of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN provide measurements of the E × B drift of ionospheric plasma over extended regions of the high-latitude ionosphere. We have conducted a statistical study of the associated Doppler spectral width of ionospheric F-region echoes. The study has been conducted with all available radars from the Northern Hemisphere for 2 specific periods of time. Period 1 corresponds to the winter months of 1994, while period 2 covers October 1996 to March 1997. The distributions of data points and average spectral width are presented as a function of Magnetic Latitude and Magnetic Local Time. The databases are very consistent and exhibit the same features. The most stringent features are: a region of very high spectral width, collocated with the ionospheric LLBL/cusp/mantle region; an oval shaped region of high spectral width, whose equator-ward boundary matches the poleward limit of the Holzworth and Meng auroral oval. A simulation has been conducted to evaluate the geometrical and instrumental effects on the spectral width. It shows that these effects cannot account for the observed spectral features. It is then concluded that these specific spectral width characteristics are the signature of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling phenomena.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  7. Liquid mixing enhanced by pulse width modulation in a Y-shaped jet configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qingfeng; Zhong, Shan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, mixing between two fluid streams, which are injected into a planar mixing channel via a Y-shaped confluence section at the same volume flow rate, is studied experimentally. The injection of the two fluid streams is controlled by two separate solenoid valves, which are operated with a phase difference of 180°, using pulse width modulation. The experiments are conducted using water at a mean Reynolds number between 83 and 250, a range of pulsation frequencies and two duty cycles (25 and 50%). Both particle-image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence technique are used to visualize the flow patterns and to quantify the mixing degree in the mixing channel. This experiment shows that the pulsation of each jet produces vortical structures, which promotes mixing via vortex entrainment and vortex breakup, and at the same time the mixing is also greatly enhanced by sequential segmentation produced by a 180° out-of-phase pulsation of the two jets. This mixing enhancement method is effective at a Reynolds number greater than 125 with a mixing degree of 0.9 being achieved. For the Reynolds numbers studied in the present experiments, an optimal frequency exists, which corresponds to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.5-2. Furthermore, at a given mean Reynolds number a lower duty cycle is found to produce a better mixing due to the resultant higher instantaneous Reynolds number in the jet flow. It is also found that pulsation of only one jet can produce a similar mixing effect.

  8. Experimental investigation of heat transfer augmentation inside double pipe heat exchanger equipped with reduced width twisted tapes inserts using polymeric nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazbehian, Mohammad; Maddah, Heydar; Mohammadiun, Hamid; Alizadeh, Mostafa

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we report a further enhancement in heat transfer coefficients of base fluid in combination with structural modifications of tape inserts. Polyvinyl Alcohol and TiO2 with mean diameter of 15 nm were chosen as base fluid and nano-particles, respectively. The experiments are carried out in plain tube with four longitudinal internal fins and reduced width twisted tape (RWTT) inserts of twist ratio varying form 2-5 and width of 12-16. Experiments are undertaken to determine heat transfer coefficients and friction factor of TiO2/PVA nanofluid up to 2.0 % volume concentration at an average temperature of 30 °C. The investigations are undertaken in the Reynolds number range of 800-30,000 for flow in tubes and with tapes of different width length ratios. The experiments was verified with well-known correlations. The average Nusselt number and friction factor in the tube fitted with the full-length twisted tapes at y/w = 3.0, and 5.0, are respectively 50-130, and 30-95 % higher than those in the plain tube; 90-220 and 100-270 % when the working fluid is nanofluid, respectively. For the reduced width twisted tapes, the heat transfer rate is decreased with decreasing tapes width. The average Nusselt numbers in the tube fitted with the RWTT of 16, 14 and 12 are respectively, 210-390, 190-320 and 170-290 % of that in the plain tube. With the similar trend mentioned above, RWTT with higher width length yield higher thermal enhancement factor in comparison with smaller width. The use of RWTT led to the highest thermal performance factor up to 1.75. Maximum thermal performance factor which was obtained belonged to twists with twist ratio of 2 and width of 16 with φ = 0.5 % and Reynolds number range of 800-30,000.

  9. Relationship among Lower Arch Length, Arch Width and Arch Perimeter in Crowding and Non-Crowding Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selmani Mimoza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crowding is one of the causes of class I malocclusion. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between arch length, arch width and arch perimeter in crowded and non-crowded arches, as well as to made comparison of the right and left sides between them and to find out the contributing factor in lower arch crowding. The study groups consisted of 60 subjects aged 16 to 21 years. First group consisted of 30 pairs of dental study models with class I normal occlusion. The second group consisted of 30 pairs of study models with class I crowding. Measurements of arch length and width were made as defined by Lavelle and Foster, using Korkhaus callipers. Arch perimeter was measured by Lundstrom method’s using manual calliper with sharp points. Differences between these measurements were made by Mann-Whitney U test (Z/U.

  10. Research of Effective Width of FRP U-shaped Hoop Reinforcement Properties of Concrete Beams by Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Baokun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paste fiber reinforced composite material (hereinafter referred to as FRP U-shaped hoop of reinforced concrete beams interfacial debonding is an important reinforcement technology research. For the effective width of the CFRP U-shaped hoop reinforcement, it is still a lack of in-depth research, only relying on the test research huge workload, this article (ANSYS and the numerical simulation in the whole process of the shear load release properties of finite element calculation software. According to the results of finite element analysis, the author studied the CFRP U-shaped hoop to increase the width of the shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams by the impact.

  11. Width dependent collisionless electron dynamics in the static fields of the shock ramp, 2, Phase space portrait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gedalin

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We study numerically in detail the behaviour of electrons in the strongly inhomogeneous static magnetic and electric fields, which are typical for thin quasiperpendicular collisionless shocks. We pay particular attention to the dependence of the final electron velocities on their initial velocities, for different shock widths. Electrons are completely magnetized when the shock is wide, but become demagnetized, and the energies that they acquire rapidly increase with the steepening of the field structure. One of the clear manifestations of the electron demagnetization is the loss of even approximate one-to-one correspondence of the downstream perpendicular velocity to the upstream perpendicular velocity. Electron reflection occurs despite the large cross-shock potential which accelerates electrons along the magnetic field (the regime of complete magnetization or across the shock (strong demagnetization. The reflected ion fraction is sensitive to the potential, magnetic field jump, and ramp width.

  12. Control Scheme of Z-Source Inverter Based BLDC Motor Drive System Using Modified Pulse Width Modulation Techniq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suresh Kumar,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified pulse width modulation technique for Z-source inverter based BLDC motor is proposed and analyzed in this project.The Z-source inverter can be used as Buck/Boost converter with lower cost and high efficiency. BLDC motors are used in electric vehicles where portability and efficiency are required. This drive system provides advantages of both BLDC motors and Z-source inverter, and can be used in fuel cell system and other adjustable speed drive application. In this project principle of modified pulse width modulation technique is implemented and simulated. The model of a three phase Z-source inverter has been discussed based on modified pulse with modulation technique. The simulation of Z-source inverter based BLDC motor is done using the MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  13. Buried ion-exchanged glass waveguides: burial-depth dependence on waveguide width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madasamy, P; West, B R; Morrell, M M; Geraghty, D F; Honkanen, S; Peyghambarian, N

    2003-07-01

    A detailed theoretical and experimental study of the depth dependence of buried ion-exchanged waveguides on waveguide width is reported. Modeling, which includes the effect of nonhomogeneous time-dependent electric field distribution, agrees well with our experiments showing that burial depth increases linearly with waveguide width. These results may be used in the proper design of integrated optical circuits that need waveguides of different widths at different sections, such as arrayed waveguide gratings.

  14. Genetic Drift Widens the Expected Cline but Narrows the Expected Cline Width

    OpenAIRE

    Polechova, J.; Barton, N.

    2011-01-01

    Random genetic drift shifts clines in space, alters their width, and distorts their shape. Such random fluctuations complicate inferences from cline width and position. Notably, the effect of genetic drift on the expected shape of the cline is opposite to the naive (but quite common) misinterpretation of classic results on the expected cline. While random drift on average broadens the overall cline in expected allele frequency, it narrows the width of any particular cline. The opposing effect...

  15. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15-30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the 4 medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ARL-TN-0736 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army...Laboratory Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory by Jennifer L Gottfried...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable -Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  18. Computerized analysis of retinal vessel width and tortuosity in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Clare M; Cocker, Kenneth D; Moseley, Merrick J; Paterson, Carl; Clay, Simon T; Schulenburg, William E; Mills, Monte D; Ells, Anna L; Parker, Kim H; Quinn, Graham E; Fielder, Alistair R; Ng, Jeffrey

    2008-08-01

    To determine, with novel software, the feasibility of measuring the tortuosity and width of retinal veins and arteries from digital retinal images of infants at risk of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). The Computer-Aided Image Analysis of the Retina (CAIAR) program was developed to enable semiautomatic detection of retinal vasculature and measurement of vessel tortuosity and width from digital images. CAIAR was tested for accuracy and reproducibility of tortuosity and width measurements by using computer-generated vessel-like lines of known frequency, amplitude, and width. CAIAR was then tested by using clinical digital retinal images for correlation of vessel tortuosity and width readings compared with expert ophthalmologist grading. When applied to 16 computer-generated sinusoidal vessels, the tortuosity measured by CAIAR correlated very well with the known values. Width measures also increased as expected. When the CAIAR readings were compared with five expert ophthalmologists' grading of 75 vessels on 10 retinal images, moderate correlation was found in 10 of the 14 tortuosity output calculations (Spearman rho = 0.618-0.673). Width was less well correlated (rho = 0.415). The measures of tortuosity and width in CAIAR were validated using sequential model vessel analysis. On comparison of CAIAR output with assessments made by expert ophthalmologists, CAIAR correlates moderately with tortuosity grades, but less well with width grades. CAIAR offers the opportunity to develop an automated image analysis system for detecting the vascular changes at the posterior pole, which are becoming increasingly important in diagnosing treatable ROP.

  19. The Average Widths of Sobolev-Wiener Classes and Besov-Wiener Classes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Qiao XU; Yong Ping LIU

    2004-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of average σ-width of Sobolev Wiener classes Wrpq(Rd),Wrpq(M, Rd), and Besov-Wiener classes Srpqθb(Rd), SrpqθB( Rd), Srpqθb(M, Rd), SrpqθB( Rd) in the metric Lq(Rd) for 1 ≤ q ≤ p ≤∞. The weak asymptotic results concerning the average linear widths, the average Bernstein widths and the infinite-dimensional Gel'fand widths are obtained, respectively.

  20. Dependence of Wave Height Distribution on Spectral Width and Wave Steepness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文凡; 吴自库; 吕红民

    2004-01-01

    In this paper experimental wind wave data are analyzed. It is found that differences in spectral width will give rise to differences in wave height distribution. The effect of spectral width on the distribution is mainly in the high wave range.The effect of wave steepness is in low, medium and high wave ranges. In the high wave range the effect of spectral width is comparable to that of wave steepness. Differences in spectral width in the observations may give rise to discrepancies in the result when wave steepness is the only parameter in the distribution.

  1. The knee in full flexion: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinskerova, V; Samuelson, K M; Stammers, J; Maruthainar, K; Sosna, A; Freeman, M A R

    2009-06-01

    There has been only one limited report dating from 1941 using dissection which has described the tibiofemoral joint between 120 degrees and 160 degrees of flexion despite the relevance of this arc to total knee replacement. We now provide a full description having examined one living and eight cadaver knees using MRI, dissection and previously published cryosections in one knee. In the range of flexion from 120 degrees to 160 degrees the flexion facet centre of the medial femoral condyle moves back 5 mm and rises up on to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. At 160 degrees the posterior horn is compressed in a synovial recess between the femoral cortex and the tibia. This limits flexion. The lateral femoral condyle also rolls back with the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus moving with the condyle. Both move down over the posterior tibia at 160 degrees of flexion. Neither the events between 120 degrees and 160 degrees nor the anatomy at 160 degrees could result from a continuation of the kinematics up to 120 degrees . Therefore hyperflexion is a separate arc. The anatomical and functional features of this arc suggest that it would be difficult to design an implant for total knee replacement giving physiological movement from 0 degrees to 160 degrees .

  2. Life after a Humanities Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masola, Athambile

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of a humanities graduate after leaving the academy. The author considers her own education in light of the historical changes in South Africa's education system. The article is a personal account of the questions and challenges encountered in choosing a humanities degree in a context where a tertiary education…

  3. Aerospace Technology (Aerospace Engineering Degree)

    OpenAIRE

    Tiseira Izaguirre, Andrés Omar; Blanco Rodríguez, David; Carreres Talens, Marcos; Fajardo Peña, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Apuntes de la asignatura Tecnología Aeroespacial Tiseira Izaguirre, AO.; Blanco Rodríguez, D.; Carreres Talens, M.; Fajardo Peña, P. (2013). Aerospace Technology (Aerospace Engineering Degree). Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/35263.

  4. The Top Theological Degree Producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues in Higher Education" publishes a list of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This year, for the first…

  5. Real Analytic Machines and Degrees

    CERN Document Server

    Gärtner, Tobias; 10.4204/EPTCS.24.12

    2010-01-01

    We study and compare in two degree-theoretic ways (iterated Halting oracles analogous to Kleene's arithmetical hierarchy and the Borel hierarchy of descriptive set theory) the capabilities and limitations of three models of analytic computation: BSS machines (aka real-RAM) and strongly/weakly analytic machines as introduced by Hotz et. al. (1995).

  6. An Approach of Degree Constraint MST Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Pal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is approaching a new technique of creating Minimal Spanning Trees based on degree constraints of a simple symmetric and connected graph G. Here we recommend a new algorithm based on the average degree sequence factor of the nodes in the graph. The time complexity of the problem is less than O(N log|E| compared to the other existing time complexity algorithms is O(|E| log|E|+C of Kruskal, which is optimum. The goal is to design an algorithm that is simple, graceful, resourceful, easy to understand, and applicable in various fields starting from constraint based network design, mobile computing to other field of science and engineering.

  7. Vigilance Degree Computing Based on EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhong Zhan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In daily life, lots of work need people maintain higher attention or vigilance. In the early study of vigilance, blink frequency, the impedance of skin, body temperature and blood pressure and other physiological signals was used to estimate the vigilance. EEG signal can more directly reflect the brain's activity than other physiological signals, and EEG signal have a higher time resolution. In this paper, ERP component and different frequencies of EEG were used to analyze the alert state, according to this study, in the ERP components, N170 can be a good representation of the degree of fatigue of the subject; Through the 10 subjects EEG frequency distribution analysis, and according to the formula defined in this paper, the vigilance degree of this ten subjects was calculated.  

  8. Comments on: Further studies of Bolivian crocidolite-Part IV: Fibre width, fibre drift and their relation to mesothelioma induction: Preliminary findings, by Ilgren EB, van Orden DR, Lee RJ, Kamiya YM, Hoskins JA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Magnani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Comments on: Further studies of Bolivian crocidolite-Part IV: Fibre width, fibre drift and their relation to mesothelioma induction: Preliminary findings, by Ilgren EB, van Orden DR, Lee RJ, Kamiya YM, Hoskins JA.

  9. The Effect of Deck Width Addition Toward Stability of Cable Stayed Bridge: Case Study of Siak Sri Indrapura Bridge, Riau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyadi Bambang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An aeroelastic interaction always take places in long-span bridge, i.e. the dynamic relationship between wind forces (aerodynamic and bridge structural motion (dynamics. Wind forces may lead to serviceability and safety problems, and may even cause instability of the whole bridge structure due to the flexibility nature of long span bridge structures.The slimer girder plate will make the structure more unstable as can be seen from the occurrence of lateral deformation. This paper presents the results analysis of cable stayed bridge that has total span of 640 m, two planes configuration of harp-typed hanger cable, the A shape pylons span along 320 m (main span,and side span of 160m. Structural analysis was conducted to determine the optimum ratio between width and spans of cable stayed bridge. The bridge was modeled with various width of 7 to 22 m. Structural modelling was conducted using SAP2000 software to analyze the structural stability of cable stayed bridge under wind load at speed of 35 m/s.The influence of wind loads to the cable stayed bridge stability can be seen based on the bridge deck deformation at the Y-axis (U2, in which for the width of the bridge deck of 7 m, 8 m, 9 m and 10 m, the deformation of U2 are 0.26 m; 0.17 m; 0.12 m and 0.10 m, respectively. Meanwhile, for bridge’s width of 11-22 m, the value of U2 axis deformation is relatively constant between 0.08 m to 0.07 m. This finding suggests that the ratio between width and length of bridge greatly affect the stability of the cable stayed bridge. Cable-stayed bridge, especially for concrete bridge, with two plain system having optimum ratio of width and length show no sign of an aerodynamic instability when fulfills the requirements of B ≥ L / 3.

  10. Estimating niche width using stable isotopes in the face of habitat variability: a modelling case study in the marine environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O Cummings

    Full Text Available Distributions of stable isotopes have been used to infer an organism's trophic niche width, the 'isotopic niche', and examine resource partitioning. Spatial variation in the isotopic composition of prey may however confound the interpretation of isotopic signatures especially when foragers exploit resources across numerous locations. In this study the isotopic compositions from marine assemblages are modelled to determine the role of variation in the signature of prey items and the effect of dietary breadth and foraging strategies on predator signatures. Outputs from the models reveal that isotopic niche widths can be greater for populations of dietary specialists rather than for generalists, which contravenes what is generally accepted in the literature. When a range of different mixing models are applied to determine if the conversion from δ to p-space can be used to improve model accuracy, predator signature variation is increased rather than model precision. Furthermore the mixing models applied failed to correctly identify dietary specialists and/or to accurately estimate diet contributions that may identify resource partitioning. The results presented illustrate the need to collect sufficiently large sample sizes, in excess of what is collected under most current studies, across the complete distribution of a species and its prey, before attempts to use stable isotopes to make inferences about niche width can be made.

  11. Barrier and well-width dependence of optical emission of GaN/AlGaN quantum well nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Haratizadeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Internal polarizations field which take place in quantum structures of group-III nitrides have an important consequence on their optical properties. Optical properties of wurtzite AlGaN/GaN quantum well (QW structures grown by MBE and MOCVD on c-plane sapphire substrates have been investigated by means of photoluminescence (PL and time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL at low-temperature. PL spectra exhibit a blue-shifted emission of AlGaN/GaN quantum well (QW nanostructures by decreasing the barrier width contrary to the arsenide system. The trend of the barrier-width dependence of the internal polarization field is reproduced by using simple electrostatic arguments. In addition the effect of well width variation on the optical transition and decay time of GaN MQWs have been investigated and it has been shown that the screening of the piezoelectric field and the electron-hole separation are strongly dependent on the well thickness and have a profound effect on the optical properties of the GaN/AlGaN MQWs.

  12. Analysis and Minimization of Output Current Ripple for Discontinuous Pulse-Width Modulation Techniques in Three-Phase Inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Grandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the complete analysis of the output current ripple in three-phase voltage source inverters considering the different discontinuous pulse-width modulation (DPWM strategies. In particular, peak-to-peak current ripple amplitude is analytically evaluated over the fundamental period and compared among the most used DPWMs, including positive and negative clamped (DPWM+ and DPWM−, and the four possible combinations between them, usually named as DPWM0, DPWM1, DPWM2, and DPWM3. The maximum and the average values of peak-to-peak current ripple are estimated, and a simple method to correlate the ripple envelope with the ripple rms is proposed and verified. Furthermore, all the results obtained by DPWMs are compared to the centered pulse-width modulation (CPWM, equivalent to the space vector modulation to identify the optimal pulse-width modulation (PWM strategy as a function of the modulation index, taking into account the different average switching frequency. In this way, the PWM technique providing for the minimum output current ripple is identified over the whole modulation range. The analytical developments and the main results are experimentally verified by current ripple measurements with a three-phase PWM inverter prototype supplying an induction motor load.

  13. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Wilczek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-domain reflectometry (TDR methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths.

  14. Linear mixed-effects models to describe individual tree crown width for China-fir in Fujian Province, southeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hao

    Full Text Available A multiple linear model was developed for individual tree crown width of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb. Hook in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 55 sample plots of pure China-fir plantation stands. An Ordinary Linear Least Squares (OLS regression was used to establish the crown width model. To adjust for correlations between observations from the same sample plots, we developed one level linear mixed-effects (LME models based on the multiple linear model, which take into account the random effects of plots. The best random effects combinations for the LME models were determined by the Akaike's information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion and the -2logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced by three residual variance functions: the power function, the exponential function and the constant plus power function. The spatial correlation was modeled by three correlation structures: the first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1], and the compound symmetry structure (CS. Then, the LME model was compared to the multiple linear model using the absolute mean residual (AMR, the root mean square error (RMSE, and the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj-R2. For individual tree crown width models, the one level LME model showed the best performance. An independent dataset was used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating LME models.

  15. Ratio between height and width of longissimus muscle as an indicator of retail beef yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Tagima Marcelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The technique of ultrasound is a noninvasive method performed in vivo. The technology has been used to measure carcass traits as longissimus muscle area (LMA, subcutaneous fat and marbling. It allows accurate data measures with no animal slaughter and a greater number of animals evaluated in a period, resulting in economic benefit. Some technicians recommend the use of the relation between longissimus muscle height and width as a better indicator trait of retail beef yield than LMA itself. The purpose of this study was to calculate the ratio between longissimus muscle height and width (RATIO in order to estimate the simple correlation between RATIO, obtained in vivo, and dressing percentage (DP%, retail beef yield expressed in kg (YIELD_kg and percentage of retail beef yield (YIELD_%, obtained after slaughter. A total of 116 Nellore bulls born between 2006 and 2009, with an average age and weight of 18 ± 1.10 months and 437 ± 60 kg at slaughter, which were raised and finished at Centro APTA Bovinos de Corte, Sertãozinho, São Paulo, Brazil, were used. Among 116 animals, 33 were slaughtered in 2008, 34 in 2009, 25 in 2010 and 24 in 2011. Before slaughter images were obtained by ultrasound between the 12th and 13th ribs, transversely over the longissimus muscle with immobilized animals in containment chamber, using the ultrasound machine Pie Medical 401347 - Aquila (Esaote Europe BV, 18 cm linear probe of 3.5 MHz. On that occasion, the animals were weighed (fasted live weight. Subsequently longissimus muscle height, width and area were measured using the Echo Image Viewer 1.0. Carcasses were weighed before and after the chilling period. DP% was calculated as the ratio between fasted live weight and hot carcass weight. The sum of the retailed meat cuts weights corresponded to the retail beef yield and was expressed as kilograms (YIELD_kg and as percentage of cold carcass weight (YIELD %. Simple correlations were estimated using PROC CORR, SAS

  16. Nonequilibrium Lifshitz theory as a steady state of a full dynamical quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Fernando C.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.; López, Adrián E. Rubio; Turiaci, Gustavo J.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we analyze the validity of Lifshitz's theory for the case of nonequilibrium scenarios from a full quantum dynamical approach. We show that Lifshitz's framework for the study of the Casimir pressure is the result of considering the long-time regime (or steady state) of a well-defined fully quantized problem, subjected to initial conditions for the electromagnetic field interacting with real materials. For this, we implement the closed time path formalism developed in previous works to study the case of two half spaces (modeled as composite environments, consisting in quantum degrees of freedom plus thermal baths) interacting with the electromagnetic field. Starting from initial uncorrelated free subsystems, we solve the full time evolution, obtaining general expressions for the different contributions to the pressure that take part on the transient stage. Using the analytic properties of the retarded Green functions, we obtain the long-time limit of these contributions to the total Casimir pressure. We show that, in the steady state, only the baths' contribute, in agreement with the results of previous works, where this was assumed without justification. We also study in detail the physics of the initial conditions' contribution and the concept of modified vacuum modes, giving insights about in which situations one would expect a nonvanishing contribution at the steady state of a nonequilibrium scenario. This would be the case when considering finite width slabs instead of half-spaces.

  17. Impact of Spectral Notch Width on Neurophysiological Plasticity and Clinical Effectiveness of the Tailor-Made Notched Music Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wunderlich

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivation result in hypersensitivity and hyperactivity in certain regions of the auditory cortex. In the tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT patients listen to music from which the frequency spectrum of the tinnitus has been removed. This evokes strong lateral inhibition from neurons tuned to adjacent frequencies onto the neurons involved in the tinnitus percept. A reduction of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related neural activity was achieved with TMNMT in previous studies. As the effect of lateral inhibition depends on the bandwidth of the notch, in the current study we altered the notch width to find the most effective notch width for TMNMT. We compared 1-octave notch width with ½-octave and ¼-octave. Participants chose their favorite music for the training that included three month of two hours daily listening. The outcome was measured by means of standardized questionnaires and magnetoencephalography. We found a general reduction of tinnitus distress in all administered tinnitus questionnaires after the training. Additionally, tinnitus-related neural activity was reduced after the training. Nevertheless, notch width did not have an influence on the behavioral or neural effects of TMNMT. This could be due to a non-linear resolution of lateral inhibition in high frequencies.

  18. Healthy younger and older adults control foot placement to avoid small obstacles during gait primarily by modulating step width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Brian W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are a significant problem in the older population. Most falls occur during gait, which is primarily regulated by foot placement. Variability of foot placement has been associated with falls, but these associations are inconsistent and generally for smooth, level flooring. This study investigates the control of foot placement and the associated gait variability in younger and older men and women (N=7/group, total N=28 while walking at three different speeds (slow, preferred, and fast across a control surface with no obstacles and surfaces with multiple (64 small (10cm long ×13mm high visible and hidden obstacles. Results Minimum obstacle distance between the shoe and nearest obstacle during each footfall was greater on the visible obstacles surface for older subjects because some of them chose to actively avoid obstacles. This obstacle avoidance strategy was implemented primarily by modulating step width and to a lesser extent step length as indicated by linear regressions of step width and length variability on minimum obstacle distance. Mean gait speed, step length, step width, and step time did not significantly differ by subject group, flooring surface, or obstacle avoidance strategy. Conclusions Some healthy older subjects choose to actively avoid small obstacles that do not substantially perturb their gait by modulating step width and, to a lesser extent, step length. It is not clear if this obstacle avoidance strategy is appropriate and beneficial or overcautious and maladaptive, as it results in fewer obstacles encountered at a consequence of a less efficient gait pattern that has been shown to indicate increased fall risk. Further research is needed on the appropriateness of strategy selection when the environmental demands and/or task requirements have multiple possible completion strategies with conflicting objectives (i.e. perceived safety vs. efficiency.

  19. Six degree of freedom sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing.

  20. THE STRESS-STRAIN STATE OF AN INFINITELY LONG ELASTIC ARRAYS OF DIFFERENT WIDTHS AND LIMITED THICKNESS ON THE HARD GROUND WHEN THEY HAVE FLAT DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Badalakha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of solving several problems of a flat deformation of elastic infinitely long massifs of different width and limited thickness. Various cases of conditions at the massif/base contact. The relationships between stressed and strained states previously suggested by the author, which differ from the generalized Hooke’s law, are used in the solutions.

  1. Degree 3 Networks Topological Routing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup;

    2009-01-01

    Topological routing is a table free alternative to traditional routing methods. It is specially well suited for organized network interconnection schemes. Topological routing algorithms correspond to the type O(1), constant complexity, being very attractive for large scale networks. It has been...... proposed for many topologies and this work compares the algorithms for three degree three topologies using a more analytical approach than previous studies....

  2. A New Selective Harmonic Elimination Pulse- Width and Amplitude Modulation (SHEPWAM) for Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoreishy, Hoda; Varjani, Ali Yazdian; Mohamadian, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the conventional selective harmonic elimination-pulse width modulation (SHE-PWM), the selective harmonic elimination-pulse width and amplitude modulation (SHE-PWAM) control strategy results in significant improvements in the performance of CHB inverters. This fact is due to considerin...

  3. Tight complexity bounds for FPT subgraph problems parameterized by clique-width

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Hajo; Golovach, Petr A.; Patel, Viresh; Marx, D.; Rossmanith, P.

    2012-01-01

    We give tight algorithmic lower and upper bounds for some double-parameterized subgraph problems when the clique-width of the input graph is one of the parameters. Let G be an arbitrary input graph on n vertices with clique-width at most w. We prove the following results. The Dense (Sparse) k -Subgr

  4. The effect of interaural-time-difference fluctuations on apparent source width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käsbach, Johannes; May, Tobias; Oskarsdottir, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    For the perception of spaciousness, the temporal fluctuations of the interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) provide important binaural cues. One major characteristic of spatial perception is apparent source width (ASW), which describes the perceived width of a ...

  5. The widths of the α decaying states of 12C within the three-cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.

    2003-05-01

    We estimate the widths of the alpha decaying states of 12C (1+, 1-, 1-1, 2+, 2-, 3-, and 4+) within the three-alpha cluster model. We solve the Faddeev equations using the hyperspheric approach and calculate the decisive effective hyper-radial barriers. We calculate the widths in the WKB approximation and compare with experimental data.

  6. Analytical model for double split ring resonators with arbitrary ring width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Jensen, Thomas; Krozer, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, the analytical model for a double split ring resonator with unequal width rings is developed. The proposed models for the resonators with equal and unequal widths are based on an impedance matrix representation and provide the prediction of performance in a wide frequency rang...

  7. GA-based PID control of the plate width in hot-plate mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungman; Lee, Dae Y.; Cho, Hyungsuck

    1999-11-01

    In hot plate mills the slabs from incoming reheat furnace are reduced to the desired width and thickness, being rolled out with considerable accuracy. The process of changing the plate width is controlled by a pair of edge rolls, which is called edger. The objectives of this edging process are to meet tight width tolerances of plates and to reduce the yield loss caused by trimming when irregular width is formed at the plate edge. There are several factors that result in complexity and uncertainty in width control. These include inaccurate edger set-up model, degradation of various mill equipment, variation of operation conditions, environments and variation of the dimension of incoming cast slabs. In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based PID control is proposed to ensure the control of the desired width at the exit of the mill. The approach adopted here is essentially optimization of the PID controller gains in order to minimize the error between the desired and actual slab width. Since the design parameters associated with genetic algorithm affect convergence performance, the effects of these parameters are investigated in detail. In addition, the control performance is also evaluated for various process parameters such as initial width of the incoming slab and temperature of the slab. Based on the result obtained from a series of simulations, the proposed control method is found to yield satisfactory performance for various process conditions.

  8. AVERAGE σ-K WIDTH OF CLASS OF Lp(Rn) IN Lq(Rn)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYONGPING

    1995-01-01

    The average σ-K width of the Sobolev-Wiener class Wpqr(Rn) in Lq(Rn) is studied for 1≤q≤p≤∞, and the asymptotic behaviour of this quantity is determined. The exact value of average σ-K width of some class of smooth functions in L2(Rn) is obtained.

  9. An empirical evaluation of the utility of convex hull and standard ellipse areas for assessing population niche widths from stable isotope data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Syväranta

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analyses are increasingly employed to characterise population niche widths. The convex hull area (TA in a δ(13C-δ(15N biplot has been used as a measure of isotopic niche width, but concerns exist over its dependence on sample size and associated difficulties in among-population comparisons. Recently a more robust method was proposed for estimating and comparing isotopic niche widths using standard ellipse areas (SEA, but this approach has yet to be tested with empirical stable isotope data. The two methods measure different kind of isotopic niche areas, but both are now widely used to characterise isotopic niche widths of populations. We used simulated data and an extensive empirical dataset from two fish populations to test the influence of sample size on the observed isotopic niche widths (TA and SEA. We resampled the original datasets to generate 5000 new samples for different numbers of observations from 5 to 80 to examine the statistical distributions of niche area estimates for increasing sample size. Our results illustrate how increasing sample size increased the observed TA; even sample sizes much higher than n = 30 did not improve the precision for the TA method. SEA was less sensitive to sample size, but the natural variation in our empirical fish δ(13C and δ(15N data still resulted in considerable uncertainty around the mean estimates of niche width, reducing the precision particularly with sample sizes n<30. These results confirm that the TA method is less appropriate for estimating population isotopic niche areas using small samples, especially when considerable population level isotope variation is expected. The results also indicate a need for caution when using SEA as a measure of trophic niche widths for consumers, particularly with low sample sizes and when the distribution and range for population isotope values are not known.

  10. Comparative evaluation of free gingival graft and AlloDerm® in enhancing the width of attached gingival: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of an adequate width of keratinized tissue is important to maintain a healthy dentogingival junction. In case of inadequate width of attached gingiva, the gingival augmentation procedure has been performed classically using the patient's own masticatory mucosa and more recently, using an acellular dermal allograft as the donor material. Aims: The aim of the clinical study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of free gingival graft (FGG and acellular dermal matrix (ADM allograft in the ability to increase the zone of attached gingiva. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with 30 sites showing the inadequate width of attached gingiva (≤1 mm were enrolled for the split-mouth study. The width of keratinized gingiva and other clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 12th month postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: The difference in clinical parameters within the group was assessed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. However, Mann–Whitney U-test was used to analyze the differences between test and control groups. Results: The width of attached gingiva increased significantly (P < 0.01 following both the treatments but comparatively lesser gain with ADM allograft (2.13 mm vs. 4.8 mm. ADM site had significantly more shrinkage (76.6% than FGG site (49.7%. Though FGG was found to be more effective, clinicians can prefer ADM allograft because of its certain advantages over the FGG. Conclusion: ADM allograft has resulted in sufficient increase in width of attached gingiva although lesser than FGG. Considering the disadvantages of FGG, it can be concluded that ADM allograft can be used as an alternative to FGG in increasing width of attached gingival in certain clinical situations.

  11. Channel width dependence of electrical characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs under bending stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyungon; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the electrical characteristics of bendable a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFTs) with various channel widths as a function of bending stress. Compared with a narrower channel TFT, a wider channel TFT exhibits a stable performance even at a bending strain of 1.3%. Our stress and strain distribution analysis reveals an inverse relationship between the channel width and the channel stress. As the channel width widens from 8 to 50 μm, the stress experienced by the middle channel region decreases from 545 to 277 MPa. Moreover, a 50 μm-channel-width TFT operates stably even after a 15 000 bending cycle while the 8 μm-channel-width TFT fails to operate after a 2000 bending cycle.

  12. Determination of interface width value in phase-field simulation of dendritic growth into undercooled melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the interface width value on the simulation results and its dependence upon thermo-physical parameters in the phase-field simulation of dendritic growth into undercooled melt are investigated. After choosing the reasonable interface width value, the tip velocities of dendritic growth in Ni melt under different undercoolings are calculated and compared with the experimental data in order to benchmark our results. It is shown that the reasonable interface width value, which is determined by the undercooling, anisotropy, interface kinetic, and thermal diffusivity, has to be taken low enough, and the agreement of our results with experimental data verifies that the credible results can be achieved as long as the interface width value is adequately low. This paper provides the basis of determining interface width value in simulating dendritic growth into undercooled melt by phase-field approach.

  13. Measurement of Pulse Width from a Bubble Cloud under Multibubble Sonoluminescence Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ilgon; Kwak, Ho-Young

    2010-12-01

    The pulse width from a bubble cloud under multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) conditions was measured for the first time using a time-correlated single photon counting technique (TC/SPC). The measured pulse width from several thousand bubbles in water was approximately 250.9 ps, with scattered pulses occurring 1.5 ns before and after the maximum light pulse intensity. The observed pulse width from a bubble cloud, which appears to be comparable to that of the single bubble sonoluminescence, indicates that the clouds of bubbles collapse simultaneous to emitting a light that is synchronized with the applied ultrasound. Also, pulse widths from clouds of multibubbles in water-surfactant and water-alcohol solutions were measured to investigate the surfactant and alcohol effect on the sonoluminescence intensity and pulse width. Size distribution of the bubble cloud at the multibubble conditions was also measured by phase-Doppler technique.

  14. Morphometric comparison of the acute rabbit corneal response to 1540-nm laser light following in-vitro exposure to millisecond or nanosecond pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eurell, Thomas E.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Roach, William P.

    2002-06-01

    Significant damage to rabbit corneal tissue was produced by a single pulse, in vitro exposure of 1540 m infrared laser light operating in either millisecond or nanosecond pulse widths. Millisecond pulse widths of infrared laser light produced a marked coagulative necrosis of both the corneal epithelium and stroma. We also noted histologic alterations in the stromal matrix within the beam path that we interpreted as matrix remodeling. To test this interpretation, we used an indirect immunohistochemical procedure to detect Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the MMP-2 reaction was mostly limited to the margins of the beam path. In addition, the MMP-2 reaction was less intense than expected given the significant tissue changes observed in the histologic sections. Exposure of rabbit corneal tissue to the nanosecond pulse widths produced a less severe coagulative necrosis of the tissue when compared to the millisecond exposures. However, a markedly stronger immunohistochemical pattern than would have been predicted from the histologic sections was observed, with approximately half of the beam path filled with MMP-2 reaction product. These data suggest an association between infrared laser pulse width and the degree of extracellular matrix remodeling in rabbit corneal tissue.

  15. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow in a short horizontal microchannel with the height of 50 μm and width of 20 mm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronshin Fedor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-phase flow has been studied experimentally in a short horizontal microchannel with the height of 50 μm and width of 20 mm. The following regimes of two-phase flows have been registered: jet, bubble, stratified, annular, and churn. The regime map of two-phase flow has been plotted. This map has been compared with the regime map plotted for the channels of larger cross-section; it is shown that the height and width of a rectangular channel has a significant effect on the boundaries between flow regimes.

  16. Controls on Valley Width in Mountainous Landscapes: The Role of Landsliding and Implications for Salmonid Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, C. L.; Roering, J. J.; Eaton, L. S.; Burnett, K.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental yet unresolved question in fluvial geomorphology is what controls the width of valleys in mountainous terrain. Establishing a predictive relation for valley width is critical for realizing linkages between aquatic ecology and geomorphology because the most productive riverine habitats often occur in low gradient streams with broad floodplains. Working in the Oregon Coast Range, we used 1m resolution airborne lidar to explore controls on valley width and couple these findings with previously published models of salmon habitat potential. We defined how valley floor width varies with drainage area in a catchment that exhibits relatively uniform ridge-and-valley topography sculpted primarily by shallow landslides and debris flows. Above drainage areas of 0.1 km2, valley width increases as a power-law function of drainage area with an exponent of ~0.6. As a result, valley width increases more rapidly downstream than channel width (exponent ~0.4), as defined by local hydraulic geometry. At low drainage areas, valley width is relatively constant, reflecting the signature of debris flows. We used this 'baseline' valley width-drainage area function to determine how ancient deep-seated landslides in a nearby catchment influence valley width. Anomalously wide valleys tend to occur upstream of and adjacent to large landslides while downstream valley segments are narrower than predicted from our baseline relation. According to coho salmon habitat potential models, broad valley segments associated with deep-seated landsliding resulted in a greater proportion of the channel network hosting productive habitat. Because large landslides in this area are structurally controlled, our findings suggest a strong link between geologic properties and aquatic habitat realized by geomorphic processes.

  17. A comparative study to find out the relationship between the inner inter-canthal distance, interpupillary distance, inter-commissural width, inter-alar width, and the width of maxillary anterior teeth in Aryans and Mongoloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Meena Kumari; Singh, Raj Kumar; Suwal, Pramita; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Shrestha, Pragya; Baral, Dharanidhar

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most confusing and difficult aspects of complete denture prosthodontics is the selection of appropriately sized maxillary anterior denture teeth. Various guidelines have been suggested for determining the size of anterior teeth, but different opinions have been reported regarding their significance. In the study reported here, the relationships between facial measurements and the width of maxillary anterior teeth in two ethnic groups, namely Aryans and Mongoloids, were determined. Objective The aims of the study were to determine the inner inter-canthal distance (ICAD), inter-pupillary distance (IPD), inter-commissural width (ICOW), inter-alar width (IAW), and the combined width of maxillary anterior teeth (CW) in Aryans and Mongoloids and to determine the relationships between these measurements. Materials and methods Impressions of the teeth of 170 dentulous subjects (85 males and 85 females) were made with alginate then Type IV gypsum product was poured in. Measurements of the cast maxillary anterior teeth at their widest dimension (contact areas) were made with the Boley gauge. ICAD, IPD, ICOW, and IAW distances were also measured with a Boley gauge. Results For all 170 subjects, 85 Aryans and 85 Mongoloids, Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) for IAW, IPD, ICOW, ICAD, and CW was calculated. In Aryans, highly significant (P<0.001) but weak correlations were found between CW and IAW, IPD, and ICOW. In Mongoloids, a highly significant (P<0.001) and weak correlation was found only between CW and IPD. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that the IAW, IPD, and ICOW for Aryans and IPD for Mongoloids can be used as a preliminary method for determining the width of the maxillary anterior teeth in edentulous patients. PMID:26955292

  18. Performance Analysis of Bit-Width Reduced Floating-Point Arithmetic Units in FPGAs: A Case Study of Neural Network-Based Face Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoon Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper implements a field programmable gate array- (FPGA- based face detector using a neural network (NN and the bit-width reduced floating-point arithmetic unit (FPU. The analytical error model, using the maximum relative representation error (MRRE and the average relative representation error (ARRE, is developed to obtain the maximum and average output errors for the bit-width reduced FPUs. After the development of the analytical error model, the bit-width reduced FPUs and an NN are designed using MATLAB and VHDL. Finally, the analytical (MATLAB results, along with the experimental (VHDL results, are compared. The analytical results and the experimental results show conformity of shape. We demonstrate that incremented reductions in the number of bits used can produce significant cost reductions including area, speed, and power.

  19. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  20. Effect of Climatic Conditions on Tree-Ring Widths in Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L. in the city of Wrocław

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kalbarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The response of trees to weather conditions, expressed in the tree-ring widths, depends on the extent of urbanization in the area. Specifi c climatic conditions in an urban heat island can be expected to result in growth differences to trees growing in non-urban areas. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to characterize the effect of climatic conditions on tree-ring widths of black locust in the city of Wrocław. Materials consisted of wooden discs taken from felled trees at four sampling sites (4 streets of Wrocław at a height of 1.3 m from the ground. Meteorological data were obtained for the period 1971-2013 from the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMGW in Wrocław. Analysis of the multiannual period showed a significant negative trend in annual ring widths of black locust in the city of Wrocław. A code WROB was assigned to the chronology. The annual ring widths averaged 3.4 mm, ranging from 1.6 to 5.6 mm. In the urban conditions of Wrocław, the air temperature and precipitation significantly influenced the annual ring widths of black locust. The results indicate the need for further research on a larger number of samples.

  1. The dependence of transverse and longitudinal resolutions on incident Gaussian beam widths in the illumination part of optical scanning microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, H S; Lee, S B; Yoon, S; Kim, J; Lee, J H; An, K; Chon, Hyung-Su; Park, Gisung; Lee, Sang-Bum; Yoon, Seokchan; Kim, Jaisoon; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2004-01-01

    We studied the intensity distribution of a Gaussian laser beam when it was focussed by an objective lens with its numerical-aperture up to 0.95. We found that the resulting full widths at half maximum (FWHM values) at the focus in the x and z directions were not much different from the ultimate FWHM values when the initial beam waist was equal to the entrance pupil radius of the objective lens. In addition, the increase in FWHM values were less than 100% even when the initial waist was further reduced to a half.

  2. Determination of Metastable Zone Width, Induction Period and Interfacial Energy of a Ferroelectric Crystal - Potassium Ferrocyanide Trihydrate (KFCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kanagadurai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An order-disorder type potassium ferrocyanide trihydrate (KFCT is a coordination compound forming lemon- yellow monoclinic ferroelectric crystals with curie temperature 251 K. KFCT crystals have been grown by temperature lowering solution growth technique. Solubility of KFCT has been determined for various temperatures. Metastable zone width, induction period and interfacial energy were determined for the aqueous solution of KFCT. Bulk crystal of potassium ferrocyanide trihydrate was grown with the optimized growth parameters. The grown crystal possesses good optical transmission in the entire UV-Visible region

  3. Swarming Speed Control for DC Permanent Magnet Motor Drive via Pulse Width Modulation Technique and DC/DC Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Oshaba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an approach for the speed control of a permanent magnet DC motor drive via Pulse Width Modulation (PWM technique and a DC/DC converter. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO technique is used to minimize a time domain objective function and obtain the optimal controller parameters. The performance of the proposed technique has been evaluated using various types of disturbances including load torque variations. Simulation results illustrate clearly the robustness of the controller and validity of the design technique for controlling the speed of permanent magnet motors.

  4. Application of chaotic pulse width modulation control for suppressing electromagnetic interference in a half-bridge converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Song

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It was proposed in the former research that chaos control can be used to suppress electromagnetic interference (EMI in DC–DC converters. Analysis on a half-bridge converter is detailed in this study. Here, the practical example of the power supply of personal computers is given to show that, with an external chaotic signal to a pulse width modulation control circuit, the proposed approach can reduce EMI by reducing the amplitudes of power signals such as transformer current and output inductor currents at multiples of fundamental frequency.

  5. Shock front width and structure in supersonic granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, J F; Amarouchene, Y; Kellay, H

    2008-12-19

    The full structure of a shock front around a blunt body in a quasi-two-dimensional granular flow is studied. Two features, a large density gradient and a very small thickness of the front, characterize this shock and make it different from shocks in molecular gases. Both of these features can be understood using a modified version of the granular kinetic theory. Our model separates the particles into two subpopulations: fast particles having experienced no collisions and randomly moving particles. This separation is motivated by direct measurements of the particle velocities which show a bimodal distribution. Our results not only shed new light on the use of the granular kinetic theory under extreme conditions (shock formation) but bring new insight into the physics of shocks in general.

  6. FUNDPAR: A program for Deriving Fundamental Parameters from Equivalent Widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Saffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementamos un programa en Fortran que determina parámetros fundamentales de estrellas de tipo solar, a partir de anchos equivalentes del Fe. La solución debe verificar tres condiciones en el método estándar: equilibrio de ionización, equilibrio de excitación e independencia entre abundancias y anchos equivalentes. Calculamos modelos de atmósfera de Kurucz con opacidades NEWODF. Detalles como el parámetro de longitud de mezcla, el sobre impulso convectivo, etc. se calculan con un programa independiente. FUNDPAR calcula las incertezas por dos métodos: el criterio de Gonzalez & Vanture (1998 y utilizando la función X² . Los resultados derivados con FUNDPAR están de acuerdo con determinaciones previas en la literatura. En particular obtuvimos parámetros fundamentales de 58 estrellas con exoplanetas. El programa está disponible en la red1.

  7. Honorary Degree Congregation in Cambridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    One day in mid-June 2006 when I was on a visit to the Countryside Restoration Trust at Barton near Cambridge, Mr. Christopher Stevenson, the director of Program of Events for Newcomers & Academic Visitors, gave me a letter enclosing a notice and a ticket I booked nearly two months earlier. He told me that I was very lucky because a strictly limited number of tickets had been allocated to academic visitors. It was a ticket to admit me to the Honorary Degree Congregation and to the reception afterwards on Tuesday 27 June.

  8. Full Waveform Inversion Using Nonlinearly Smoothed Wavefields

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Y.

    2017-05-26

    The lack of low frequency information in the acquired data makes full waveform inversion (FWI) conditionally converge to the accurate solution. An initial velocity model that results in data with events within a half cycle of their location in the observed data was required to converge. The multiplication of wavefields with slightly different frequencies generates artificial low frequency components. This can be effectively utilized by multiplying the wavefield with itself, which is nonlinear operation, followed by a smoothing operator to extract the artificially produced low frequency information. We construct the objective function using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefields with a global-correlation norm to properly handle the energy imbalance in the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Similar to the multi-scale strategy, we progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the multiplied wavefield to welcome higher resolution. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. Examples on the Marmousi 2 model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed FWI method to mitigate the cycle-skipping problem in the case of a lack of low frequency information.

  9. The Full Mottness: Asymptiotic Slavery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Philip (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

    2004-03-10

    Vast progress in theoretical solid state physics has been made by constructing models which mimic the low-energy properties of solids. Essential to the success of this program is the separability of the high and low energy degrees of freedom. While it is hoped that a high energy reduction can be made to solve the problem of high temperature superconductivity in the copper oxide materials, I will show that no consistent theory is possible if the high energy scale is removed. At the heart of the problem is the mixing of all energy scales (that is, UV-IR mixing) in the copper-oxide materials. Several optical measurements will be discussed which demonstrate the slavery of high and low energy degrees of freedom. The implications of asymptotic slavery for the phase diagram of the cuprates will be discussed.

  10. Non-contact measurements of water jet spreading width with a laser instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funami, Yuki; Hasuya, Ryo; Tanabe, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Jet spreading width is one of the important characteristics of water jets discharging into the air. Many researchers have dealt with measuring this width, and contact measuring methods on the water jet surface were employed in a lot of the cases. In order to avoid undesirable effects caused by the contact on the jet surface, we introduce non-contact measuring methods with a laser instrument to the measurements of jet spreading width. In measurements, a transmitter emits sheet-like laser beam to a receiver. The water jet between the transmitter and the receiver interrupts the laser beam and makes a shadow. The minimum and maximum values of the shadow width are measured. In addition, pictures of the water jet are taken with a scale, and the shadow width is measured from the pictures. The experiments on various needle strokes were performed. Three kinds of width consistent with the jet structure were obtained. In the results, it can be concluded that our non-contact measuring methods are feasible. The data of jet spreading widths and jet taper were obtained and are useful for future applications.

  11. Combination of CDF and D0 Results on W Boson Mass and Width

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Acosta, D; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Affolder, T; Ahmed, S N; Akimoto, H; Akopian, A; Albrow, M G; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Amaral, P; Ambrose, D; Amendolia, S R; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arnoud, Y; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Avila, C; Ashmanskas, W; Atac, M; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Bacon, Trevor C; Baden, A; Badgett, W; Baffioni, S; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; De Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bauer, G; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Begel, M; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, J; Belyaev, A; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Bergé, J P; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Berryhill, J W; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bevensee, B; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Böhnlein, A; Bozhko, N; Bokhari, W; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bolton, T A; Bonushkin, Yu; Borcherding, F; Bortoletto, D; Bos, K; Bose, T; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Brandt, A; Van den Brink, S; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brozovic, M; Bruner, N; Brubaker, E; Buchholz, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burkett, K; Burtovoi, V S; Busetto, G; Butler, J M; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Carvalho, W; Cassada, J; Casey, D; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakraborty, D; Chan, A W; Chan, K M; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chekulaev, S V; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Claes, D; Clark, A G; Clark, A R; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Connolly, B; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, J; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Motta, H; D'Auria, S; Davis, G A; De, K; De Cecco, S; De Jongh, F; De Jong, S J; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demarteau, M; Demers, S; Demina, R; Demine, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Desai, S; Devlin, T; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Done, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Eddy, N; Edmunds, D; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Ellison, J; Elias, J E; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Engels, E; Eno, S; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, W; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Errede, D; Errede, S; Estrada, J; Eusebi, R; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Ferbel, T; Fernández, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Filthaut, F; Fiori, I; Fisk, H E; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Fortner, M; Foster, G W; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Frisch, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, E; Gallinaro, M; Galjaev, A N; Gao, M; Gao, T; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gavrilov, V; Gay, C; Geer, S; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gerdes, D W; Gershtein, Yu; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Ginther, G; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, M; Goncharov, P I; Gordon, A; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Green, C; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Groer, L S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Günther, M; Guillian, G; Guimarães da Costa, J; Guo, R S; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hadley, N J; Hafen, E S; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S L; Hagopian, V; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Hall, R E; Han, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hansen, S; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, J; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinrich, J; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hildreth, M D; Hill, C; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Höcker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; James, E; Jensen, H; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kambara, H; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kehoe, R; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Khazins, D; Kharchilava, A I; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klima, B; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Köngeter, A; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A J; Korytov, A; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kotwal, A V; Kovács, E; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovskii, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M A; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsov, V E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lamoureux, J I; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Lander, R; Landsberg, G L; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, Alfred M; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, J D; Li, J; Li, K; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lin, C S; Lincoln, D; Lindgren, M; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J T; Lipton, R; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lueking, L; Lukens, P; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Manca, G; Mao, H S; Mariotti, M; Marshall, T; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, M I; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mattingly, S E K; Mayer, J; Mayorov, A A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A S; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, C; Miao, T; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Mokhov, N V; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, E; Moore, R; Moore, R W; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Müller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Musy, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakaya, T; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, C; Nelson, S; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y P; Nicolaidi, P; Niell, F; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pappas, S P; Parashar, N; Partos, D; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patrick, J; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, Aldo L; Pescara, L; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Piegaia, R; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, B G; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Poukhov, O; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M B; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Rademacker, J; Rajagopalan, S; Ragan, K; Rakitine, A; Rapidis, P A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reay, N W; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Rizatdinova, F K; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rockwell, T; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Sabirov, B M; Safonov, A; Sajot, G; Saint-Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Santoro, A F S; Sarkar, S; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwartzman, A; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Segler, S; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shabalina, E; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shivpuri, R K; Shochet, M; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M A; Sidwell, R A; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Signorelli, G; Sill, A; Simák, V; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Sirotenko, V I; Slattery, P F; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Smith, R P; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solodsky, A; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, Paris; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Stanton, N R; Stefanini, A; Steinbruck, G; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Strovink, M; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Stutte, L; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Sznajder, A; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Taylor, W; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Tentindo-Repond, S; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Theriot, D; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R M; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, Alvin V; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trippe, T G; Trischuk, W; De Trocóniz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turcot, A S; Turini, N; Tuts, P M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Van Kooten, R; Vaniev, V; Varelas, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G V; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Volkov, A A; Volobuev, I P; Von der Mey, M; Vorobev, A P; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wahl, H D; Wahl, J; Wallace, N B; Walsh, A M; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, C H; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, G; Watts, T; Wayne, M; Webb, R; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; White, A; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wijngaarden, D A; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Willis, S; Winer, B L; Wimpenny, S J; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Wolter, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyss, J; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yang, U K; Yagil, A; Yao, W; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, J; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanabria, M; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zucchelli, S; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2003-01-01

    The results based on 1992-95 data (Run 1) from the CDF and DO experiments on the measurements of the W boson mass and width are presented, along with the combined results. We report a Tevatron collider average M_W = 80.456 +- 0.059 GeV. We also report the Tevatron collider average of the directly measured W boson width Gamma_W = 2.115 +- 0.105 GeV. We describe a new joint analysis of the direct W mass and width measurements. Assuming the validity of the standard model, we combine the directly measured W boson width with the width extracted from the ratio of W and Z boson leptonic partial cross sections. This combined result for the Tevatron is Gamma_W = 2.135 +- 0.050 GeV. Finally, we use the measurements of the direct total W width and the leptonic branching ratio to extract the leptonic partial width Gamma(W -> e nu) = 224 +- 13 MeV.

  12. Requirements to gap widths and clamping for CO2 laser butt welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Juhl, Thomas Winther

    1999-01-01

    In the experimental study of fixturing and gap width requirements a clamping device for laser butt welding of steel sheets has been developed and tested. It has fulfilled the work and made the gap width experiments possible.It has shown that the maximum allowable gap width to some extent...... is inversely related to the welding speed. Also larger laser power leads to bigger allowable gap widths. The focal point position, though, has little influence on the maximum allowable gap width.During analysis X-ray photos show no interior porosity in the weld seam. Other methods have been applied to measure...... responses from variations in welding parameters.The table below lists the results of the study, showing the maximum allowable gap widths and some corresponding welding parameters.Maximum allowable Gap Width; Welding Speed; Laser Power:0.10 mm2 m/min2, 2.6 kW0.15 mm1 m/min2 kW0.20 mm1 m/min2.6 kW0.30 mm0.5 m...

  13. Elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural Yilmaz, Zehra; Gencosmanoglu Turkmen, Gulenay; Daglar, Korkut; Yılmaz, Elif; Kara, Ozgur; Uygur, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is the most common pregnancy specific liver disease and related with adverse maternal and perinatal outcome. Red blood cell distribution width, an anisocytosis marker in a complete blood count, has been used as an inflammation marker in various diseases. However the association of red blood cell distribution width with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Ninety pregnant women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and ninety healthy pregnant women were included in the study. Their clinical and laboratory characteristics including red blood cell distribution width, liver function tests, fasting and postprandial bile acid concentrations were analyzed. Serum red blood cell distribution width cell levels were significantly higher in pregnants with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy than healthy pregnants. We also demonstrated that red blood cell distribution Width levels were higher in severe disease than mild disease and was significantly correlated with fasting and postprandial bile acid concentration in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy group. Our study showed that red blood cell distribution width, an easy and inexpensive marker; were associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

  14. Computer-aided system for measuring the mandibular cortical width on panoramic radiographs in osteoporosis diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Agus Zainal; Asano, Akira; Taguchi, Akira; Nakamoto, Takashi; Ohtsuka, Masahiko; Tanimoto, Keiji

    2005-04-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are associated with substantial morbidity, increased medical cost and high mortality risk. Several equipments of bone assessment have been developed to identify individuals, especially postmenopausal women, with high risk of osteoporotic fracture; however, a large segment of women with low skeletal bone mineral density (BMD), namely women with high risk of osteoporotic fractures, cannot be identified sufficiently because osteoporosis is asymptomatic. Recent studies have been demonstrating that mandibular inferior cortical width manually measured on panoramic radiographs may be useful for the identification of women with low BMD. Automatic measurement of cortical width may enable us to identify a large number of asymptomatic women with low BMD. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided system for measuring the mandibular cortical width on panoramic radiographs. Initially, oral radiologists determined the region of interest based on the position of mental foramen. Some enhancing image techniques were applied so as to measure the cortical width at the best point. Panoramic radiographs of 100 women who had BMD assessments of the lumbar spine and femoral neck were used to confirm the efficacy of our new system. Cortical width measured with our system was compared with skeletal BMD. There were significant correlation between cortical width measured with our system and skeletal BMD. These correlations were similar with those between cortical width manually measured by the dentist and skeletal BMD. Our results suggest that our new system may be useful for mass screening of osteoporosis.

  15. Changes in joint space width during Kaltenborn traction according to traction grade in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Gui-do; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the joint space width of the humeral head and glenoid fossa during traction under 2 grade conditions (grade 2/grade 3). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 healthy male adults who had not experienced any shoulder injury. Three radiographs were obtained with the subjects in the supine position (resting, grades 2 and 3). The glenohumeral joint space was examined on radiography. Joint space width was measured by a radiologist at the points described by Petersson and Redlund-Johnell. A radiologist blinded to the variable "resting" or "traction" performed all radiographic measurements. The joint space widths were compared by using one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The results of this study indicated significant differences in the changes in joint space width according to traction grade. Compared to resting, grades 2 and 3 traction significantly increased joint space width. However, no significant difference in joint space width was found between grades 2 and 3 traction. [Conclusion] Although no significant differences were found between grades 2 and 3 traction during glenohumeral joint traction, the increase in joint space width between the glenoid fossa and humeral head was highest during grade 3 traction.

  16. Influência da largura do septo inter-radicular sobre a estabilidade dos mini-implantes Influence of inter-root septum width on mini-implant stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Pracucio Gigliotti

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a influência da largura do septo inter-radicular no local de inserção de mini-implantes autoperfurantes sobre o grau de estabilidade desses dispositivos de ancoragem. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 40 mini-implantes inseridos entre as raízes do primeiro molar e segundo pré-molar superiores de 21 pacientes, com o intuito de fornecer ancoragem para retração anterior. A largura do septo no local de inserção (LSI foi mensurada nas radiografias pós-cirúrgicas e, sob esse aspecto, os mini-implantes foram divididos em dois grupos: grupo 1 (áreas críticas, LSI3mm. A estabilidade dos mini-implantes foi avaliada mensalmente pela quantificação do grau de mobilidade e a partir dessa variável foi calculada a proporção de sucesso. Avaliou-se também: a quantidade de placa, altura de inserção, grau de sensibilidade e período de observação. RESULTADOS: os resultados obtidos demonstraram que não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa para o grau de mobilidade e proporção de sucesso entre os mini-implantes inseridos em septos de largura mesiodistal crítica e não crítica. A proporção de sucesso total encontrada foi de 90% e nenhuma variável demonstrou estar relacionada ao insucesso dos mini-implantes. No entanto, observou-se maior sensibilidade nos pacientes cujos mini-implantes apresentavam mobilidade, e que a falha desses dispositivos de ancoragem ocorria logo após sua inserção. CONCLUSÃO: a largura do septo inter-radicular no local de inserção não interferiu na estabilidade dos mini-implantes autoperfurantes avaliados neste estudo.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the inter-radicular septum width in the insertion site of self-drilling mini-implants on the stability degree of these anchorage devices. METHODS: The sample consisted of 40 mini-implants inserted in the inter-radicular septum between maxillary second premolars and

  17. Digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ning; Zhong, Yicheng; Liu, Hao; Yuan, Fusong; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-04-01

    A dental defect is one of the most common oral diseases, and it often requires a full crown restoration. In this clinical operation, the dentist must manually prepare the affected tooth for the full crown so that it has a convergence angle between 4° and 10°, no undercuts, and uniform and even shoulder widths and depths using a high speed diamond bur in the patient׳s mouth within one hour, which is a difficult task that requires visual-manual operation. The quality of the tooth preparation has an important effect on the success rate of the subsequent prosthodontic treatment. This study involved research into digital modeling technology for full dental crown tooth preparation. First, the margin line of the tooth preparation was designed using a semi-automatic interactive process. Second, the inserting direction was automatically computed. Then, the characteristic parameters and the constraints on the tooth preparation were defined for the model. Next, the shoulder and axial surface of the tooth preparation were formed using parametric modeling. Finally, the implicit surface of a radial basis function was used to construct the tooth preparation׳s occlusal surface. The experimental results verified that the method of digital modeling for full crown preparation proposed in this study can quickly and accurately implement personalized designs of various parameters, such as the shoulder width and the convergence angle; it provides a digital design tool for full crown preparation.

  18. Full Scale Experiment with Interactive Urban Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Skouboe; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Jensen, Ole B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of a full-scale interactive urban illumination experiment. The experiment investigates how human motion intensities can be used as input for controlling the illumination of a town square in the city of Aalborg in Denmark. The trajectory, velocity...... changed according to their presence or actions, whereas people watching from the outside noticed to a larger degree the interaction between the illumination and the immersed persons. We seek to develop new knowledge about the experience of responsive environments and to explore technical, social...

  19. Magnetic local time, substorm, and particle precipitation-related variations in the behaviour of SuperDARN Doppler spectral widths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (DARN radars often detect a distinct transition in line-of-sight Doppler velocity spread, or spectral width, from <50ms–1 at lower latitude to >200ms–1 at higher latitude. They also detect a similar boundary, namely the range at which ionospheric scatter with large spectral width suddenly commences (i.e. without preceding scatter with low spectral width. The location and behaviour of the spectral width boundary (SWB (and scatter boundary and the open-closed magnetic field line boundary (OCB are thought to be closely related. The location of the nightside OCB can be inferred from the poleward edge of the auroral oval determined using energy spectra of precipitating particles measured on board Defence Meteorology Satellite Program (DMSP satellites. Observations made with the Halley SuperDARN radar (75.5° S, 26.6° W, geographic; –62.0°Λ and the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER (43.4° S, 147.2° E; –54.5°Λ are used to compare the location of the SWB with the DMSP-inferred OCB during 08:00 to 22:00 UT on 1 April 2000. This study interval was chosen because it includes several moderate substorms, whilst the Halley radar provided almost continuous high-time resolution measurements of the dayside SWB location and shape, and TIGER provided the same in the nightside ionosphere. The behaviour of the day- and nightside SWB can be understood in terms of the expanding/contracting polar cap model of high-latitude convection change, and the behaviour of the nightside SWB can also be organised according to substorm phase. Previous comparisons with DMSP OCBs have proven that the radar SWB is often a reasonable proxy for the OCB from dusk to just past midnight (Chisham et al., 2004. However, the present case study actually suggests that the nightside SWB is often a better proxy for the poleward edge of Pedersen conductance enhanced by hot particle precipitation in the

  20. Effects of temperature and fluid media on the scroll width size of the Descemet’s membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK donor graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo EH

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ellen H Koo,1 Allen O Eghrari,2 Ryan S Meshkin,2 Wei Shi,1 William J Feuer,1 Karen G DeMarco,3 Arthur C Kurz3 1Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3KeraLink International, Baltimore, MD, USA Aim: Our study was conducted to evaluate whether higher temperature leads to increased – or wider – scroll widths of the Descemet’s membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK donor graft.Purpose: To investigate the effects of temperature and fluid media on the DMEK donor graft scroll widths.Materials and methods: This research work was a laboratory investigation. Baseline cell count was taken via specular microscopy for the donor corneas at room temperature (20°C–25°C. The endothelium sides of the donor corneas were stained with Trypan Blue Solution 0.4% for 30 s, and the Descemet’s membranes were stripped. The DMEK donor grafts were placed into three different fluid media – Optisol®, Balanced Salt Solution (BSS, and BSS PLUS® (BSS Plus. The DMEK donor grafts were then transferred into cold temperature (4°C for 60 min, after which the donor grafts’ scroll widths were examined and measured. The donor grafts were then warmed in the incubator and brought to physiological temperature (35°C–37°C, and their scroll widths were examined and measured again.Results: In 30 measurements of ten tissues across three temperature and fluid conditions, the average scroll width measured 1.73 mm, ranging from 1.1 to 2.9 mm. In a mixed linear model, the scroll widths increased with temperature (P=0.02. There was no significant difference in scroll widths among the three solutions (P=0.84, mixed linear model.Conclusion: We observed an increase in DMEK donor graft scroll widths with higher temperatures. The usage of BSS Plus as media solution could also lead to smaller DMEK donor graft scroll widths, compared with BSS, but our study does

  1. FEM Analysis of Rolling Pressure Along Strip Width in Cold Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang-hua; SHI Xu; LI Shan-qing; XU Jian-yong; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    Using 3-D elastic-plastic FEM, the cold strip rolling process in a 4-high mill was simulated. The elastic deformation of rolls, the plastic deformation of the strip, and the pressure between the work roll and the backup roll were taken into account. The distribution of rolling pressure along the strip width was obtained. Based on the simulation results, the peak value of rolling pressure and the location of the peak were analyzed under different rolling conditions. The effects of the roll bending force and the strip width on the distribution of rolling pressure along the width direction were determined.

  2. On the width of N-Delta and Delta-Delta states

    CERN Document Server

    Niskanen, J A

    2016-01-01

    It is seen by a coupled-channel calculation that in the two-baryon N-Delta or Delta-Delta system the width of the state is greatly diminished due to the relative kinetic energy of the two baryons, since the internal energy of the particles, available for pionic decay, is smaller. A similar state dependent effect arises from the centrifugal barrier in N-Delta or Delta-Delta systems with non-zero orbital angular momentum. The double-Delta width can become even smaller than the free width of a single Delta. This has some bearing to the interpretation of the d'(2380) resonance recently discovered at COSY.

  3. Evaluation of functional reliability indices for DC-link capacitors in pulse-width modulation converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorpinich Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of kHz range harmonics on the power losses, thermal stress, and lifetime reduction of the dc-link capacitors in pulse-width modulation (PWM converters was investigated. Expressions to evaluate the mean time to failure, survival probability, and unavailability of aging failure for dc-link capacitors are presented. The dc-link capacitors failures due to accelerated insulation aging were modeled using Weibull and normal distribution. A case study with the Siemens SINAMICS S120 frequency converter for driving of rolling mill leveler shows that the failures of motor modules due to breakdown of electrolytic dc-link capacitors registered for the time frame from May 2012 to October 2012 can be caused by the increased ambient temperature and additional heating due to high-frequency components of the ripple current. As a possible solution to improve reliability of motor modules, the four AVX FFVE4I0227K film capacitors instead of nine EPCOS B43564 electrolytic capacitors in dc-link were recommended.

  4. The influence of connectivity in forest patches, and riparian vegetation width on stream macroinvertebrate fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IC Valle

    Full Text Available We assessed two dimensions of stream connectivity: longitudinal (between forest patches along the stream and lateral (riparian vegetation, using macroinvertebrate assemblages as bioindicators. Sites representing different land-uses were sampled in a lowland basin that holds a mosaic of protected areas. Land-use analysis, forest successional stages and riparian zone widths were calculated by the GIS analysis. Macroinvertebrate fauna was strongly affected by land-use. We observed a continuous decrease in the number of sensitive species, %Shredders and IBE-IOC biotic index from the upstream protected area to highly deforested sites, increasing again where the stream crosses a Biological Reserve. When analysing buffer strips, we found aquatic fauna responding to land-use alterations beyond the 30 m riparian corridor (60 m and 100 m wide. We discussed the longitudinal connectivity between forest patches and the riparian vegetation buffer strips necessary to hold high macroinvertebrate diversity. We recommend actions for the increase/maintenance of biodiversity in this and other lowland basins.

  5. Controlling vibrational cooling with zero-width resonances: An adiabatic Floquet approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Arnaud; Viennot, David; Jolicard, Georges; Lefebvre, Roland; Atabek, Osman

    2016-10-01

    In molecular photodissociation, some specific combinations of laser parameters (wavelength and intensity) lead to unexpected zero-width resonances (ZWRs) with, in principle, infinite lifetimes. Their potential to induce basic quenching mechanisms has recently been devised in the laser control of vibrational cooling through filtration strategies [O. Atabek et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 031403(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.031403]. A full quantum adiabatic control theory based on the adiabatic Floquet Hamiltonian is developed to show how a laser pulse could be envelope-shaped and frequency-chirped so as to protect a given initial vibrational state against dissociation, taking advantage of its continuous transport on the corresponding ZWR all along the pulse duration. As compared with previous control scenarios that actually suffered from nonadiabatic contamination, drastically different and much more efficient filtration goals are achieved. A semiclassical analysis helps us to find and interpret a complete map of ZWRs in the laser parameter plane. In addition, the choice of a given ZWR path, among the complete series identified by the semiclassical approach, turns out to be crucial for the cooling scheme, targeting a single vibrational state population left at the end of the pulse, while all others have almost completely decayed. The illustrative example, which has the potential to be transposed to other diatomics, is Na2 prepared by photoassociation in vibrationally hot but translationally and rotationally cold states.

  6. The Evaluation of Red Cell Distribution Width in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Tekce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Red cell distribution width (RDW has been used as a marker of iron deficiency; however, it is accepted as a marker of cardiovascular survival. We aimed to study RDW levels in hemodialysis (HD patients and the association between RDW and inflammatory, nutritional, and volume markers. Methods. We included 296 HD patients with sufficient iron storage and without anemia or hypervolemia. We grouped patients into four groups according to clinical parameters, albumin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Results. The lowest RDW levels were found in group 1 (13.2%. Although RDW of group 2 was higher than that of group 1, it was still in normal range (14.7% versus 13.2%, P=0.028. RDW levels of groups 3 (17.8% and 4 (18.5% were significantly higher than those of groups 1 and 2 and above normal range. A positive correlation was detected between RDW and HD duration, interdialytic weight gain (IDWG, serum phosphate, and CRP levels and a negative correlation was detected with serum albumin. HD duration, CRP, IDWG, and serum albumin have been found as independent predictors of RDW elevation. Conclusions. Results of the present study reflect adverse effects of inflammation, malnutrition, and excess IDWG on RDW elevation in an HD study cohort with sufficient iron storage and without anemia and hypervolemia.

  7. Red blood cell distribution width and iron deficiency anemia among pregnant Sudanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Esam G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is a major health problem during pregnancy and it has adverse effects on the mother and the newborn. Red cell distribution width (RDW, which is a quantitative measure for red cell size variation (anisocytosis, is a predictor of IDA. Little is known regarding RDW and IDA during pregnancy. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at the antenatal clinic of Khartoum Hospital, Sudan, to determine the performance of RDW in the diagnosis of IDA using serum ferritin as a gold standard. Results Among 194 pregnant women with a gestational period of 21.4 ± 6.5 weeks, 57 (29.4% had IDA according to serum ferritin levels (14.5. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of RDW where serum ferritin was the gold standard were 43.8% (95% CI: 31.4–57.0%, 73.7% (95% CI: 65.8–80.5%, 41.0% (95% CI: 29.2–53.6%, and 76.0% (95% CI: 68.1–82.6%, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we found that RDW has a poor performance in diagnosing IDA among pregnant women compared with serum ferritin as the gold standard. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1721072967826303

  8. Variation of Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume after Moderate Endurance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although physical exercise strongly influences several laboratory parameters, data about the hematological changes after medium distance running are scarce. We studied 31 middle-trained athletes (mean training regimen 217±32 min/week who performed a 21.1 km, half-marathon run. Blood samples were collected before the run, at the end, and 3 and 20 hours thereafter. The complete blood count was performed on Advia 2120 and included red blood cell (RBC, reticulocyte, and platelet counts; hemoglobin; mean corpuscular volume (MCV; mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH; reticulocyte haemoglobin content (Ret CHR; RBC distribution width (RDW, mean platelet volume (MPV. No significant variations were observed for MCH and Ret CHR. The RBC, reticulocyte, and hemoglobin values modestly decreased after the run. The MCV significantly increased at the end of running but returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. The RDW constantly increased, reaching a peak 20 hours after the run. The platelet count and MPV both increased after the run and returned to baseline 3 hours thereafter. These results may have implications for definition of reference ranges and antidoping testing, and may also contribute to explaining the relationship between endurance exercise and mortality, since previous studies reported that RDW and MPV may be significantly associated with cardiovascular disease.

  9. Role of minor groove width and hydration pattern on amsacrine interaction with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Jangir

    Full Text Available Amsacrine is an anilinoacridine derivative anticancer drug, used to treat a wide variety of malignancies. In cells, amsacrine poisons topoisomerase 2 by stabilizing DNA-drug-enzyme ternary complex. Presence of amsacrine increases the steady-state concentration of these ternary complexes which in turn hampers DNA replication and results in subsequent cell death. Due to reversible binding and rapid slip-out of amsacrine from DNA duplex, structural data is not available on amsacrine-DNA complexes. In the present work, we designed five oligonucleotide duplexes, differing in their minor groove widths and hydration pattern, and examined their binding with amsacrine using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Complexes of amsacrine with calf thymus DNA were also evaluated for a comparison. Our results demonstrate for the first time that amsacrine is not a simple intercalator; rather mixed type of DNA binding (intercalation and minor groove takes place between amsacrine and DNA. Further, this binding is highly sensitive towards the geometries and hydration patterns of different minor grooves present in the DNA. This study shows that ligand binding to DNA could be very sensitive to DNA base composition and DNA groove structures. Results demonstrated here could have implication for understanding cytotoxic mechanism of aminoacridine based anticancer drugs and provide directions to modify these drugs for better efficacy and few side-effects.

  10. Design of Variable Width Barrel Shifter for High Speed Processor Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microprocessor is the brain of the computer. It works as the Central Processing Unit of the computer. It contains Arithmetic Logical Unit (ALU that performs the arithmetic operations such as Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and Division. It also performs the Logical operations such as AND, NAND, OR, NOR, EXOR, EXNOR and NOT. It also contains register file to store the operand in load/store instructions in RISC Processor Architecture. Control Unit genetares the control signals that synchronize the operation of the processor which tells the microarchitecture which operation is done at which time. Now during the multiplication partial product is shifted and added. So shifter is an important part of the processor architecture. Barrel Shifter is an important combinational logic block. It was incorporated in 386 processor and is also used in microcontroller design. Intel has since moved to software implemented shifters in the Pentium 4 Processor Architecture but AMD still uses it. Here the design of the variable width barrel shifter is presented in which we can shift 4bit, 8bit, 16bit, and 32bit and maximum 64bit partial product during multiplication. Functionality is check using Modelsim 6.4a.Now to generate the gate level netlist Xilinx ISE 9.2i is used.

  11. A NOVEL ARTIFICIAL HYDROCARBON NETWORKS BASED SPACE VECTOR PULSE WIDTH MODULATION CONTROLLER FOR INDUCTION MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ponce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of machine-operated industrial processes implement electric machinery as their work sources, implying the necessary improvement of control techniques and power electronics drivers. Many years have passed since the control conflicts related to induction motors have been overcome through torque-flux control techniques so their advantages over direct current motors have made them to be the most common electric actuator found behind industrial automation. In fact, induction motors can be easily operated using a Direct Torque Control (DTC. Since, it is based on a hysteresis control of the torque and flux errors, its performance is characterized by a quick reaching of the set point, but also a high ripple on both torque and flux. In order to enhance that technique, this study introduces a novel hybrid fuzzy controller with artificial hydrocarbon networks (FMC that is used in a Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM technique, so-called FMC-SVPWM-DTC. In fact, this study describes the proposal and its design method. Experimental results over a velocity-torque cascade topology proved that the proposed FMC-SVPWM-DTC responses highly effective almost suppressing rippling in torque and flux. It also performed a faster speed response than in a conventional DTC. In that sense, the proposed FMC-SVPWM-DTC can be used an alternative approach for controlling induction motors.

  12. Process based model sheds light on climate sensitivity of Mediterranean tree-ring width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Touchan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We use the process-based VS (Vaganov-Shashkin model to investigate whether a regional Pinus halepensis tree-ring chronology from Tunisia can be simulated as a function of climate alone by employing a biological model linking day length and daily temperature and precipitation (AD 1959–2004 from a climate station to ring-width variations. We check performance of the model on independent data by a validation exercise in which the model's parameters are tuned using data for 1982–2004 and the model is applied to generate tree-ring indices for 1959–1981. The validation exercise yields a highly significant positive correlation between the residual chronology and estimated growth curve (r=0.76 p<0.0001, n=23. The model shows that the average duration of the growing season is 191 days, with considerable variation from year to year. On average, soil moisture limits tree-ring growth for 128 days and temperature for 63 days. Model results depend on chosen values of parameters, in particular a parameter specifying a balance ratio between soil moisture and precipitation. Future work in the Mediterranean region should include multi-year natural experiments to verify patterns of cambial-growth variation suggested by the VS model.

  13. The effect of erythropoietin on platelet distribution width during ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Tsompos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this experiment study was the erythropoietin (Epo testing, on rat model and particularly on ischemia reperfusion protocol. The benefit or the non effect of that molecule was studied hematologically on platelet distribution width (PDW. METHODS: 40 rats were used of mean weight 247,7 gr. PDW was measured on these time points: on 60 min after reperfusion (groups A and C, and on 120 min after reperfusion (groups B and D, A and B without but C and D with Epo administration. RESULTS: Epo administration increased significantly the PDW levels by 0.22 % [0.034374 % - 0.4056259 %] (P= 0.0214, in accordance also with paired t-test (P= 0.0196, 2 reperfusion time decreased significantly the PDW levels by 0.27 % [-0.4483669 % - 0.0916332 %] (P= 0.0040, in accordance also with paired t-test (P= 0.0012, and 3 interaction of Epo administration and reperfusion time increased non significantly the PDW levels by 0.06 % [-0.054648 % - 0.1819207 %] (P= 0.0615. CONCLUSION: Epo administration has significant increasing short-term effects on PDW levels. However, reperfusion time attenuates significantly this effect. Their interaction seems to resemble the action of Epo administration. The following question is whether these PDW levels alterations are the cause or the result of diseases process modification.

  14. Influence of roadway width and volume to capacity ratio on PCU values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. BROOKS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper are to determine the influence of volume to capacity ratio on Passenger Car Unit (PCU values, speeds of the vehicles and volume of vehicles in PCUs. The limitation of Highway Capacity Manual’s PCU values is ex-plained. Statistical analysis determined that there is a significant difference in volume of cars only between homogeneous and heterogeneous traffic conditions for various road widths. Hence the PCU values of heterogeneous traffic are recommended for the design of traffic systems over homogeneous traffic conditions. The results of the present study shows that for heavy vehicles, SUVs and motorcycles, the PCU values as a function of volume to capacity ratio vary from 0.8 to 2.8, 1.0 to 2.3 and 0.2 to 0.65 respectively. The v/c ratio has a large influence on PCU values as found in this study. Under similar traffic conditions of this study, that exist elsewhere in the country, the values obtained in this study are recommended for use in the analysis and design of traffic engineering facilities.

  15. Mean platelet volume and red cell distribution width levels in initial evaluation of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asoglu M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Asoglu,1 Mehmet Aslan,2 Okan Imre,1 Yuksel Kivrak,3 Oznur Akil,1 Emin Savik,4 Hasan Buyukaslan,5 Ulker Fedai,1 Abdurrahman Altındag6 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, 3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Kafkas University, Kars, 4Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, 6Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey Background: As the relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied in recent years, activated platelets lead to certain biochemical changes, which occur in the brain in patients with mental disorders. However, data relating to the mean platelet volume (MPV in patients with panic disorder (PD are both limited and controversial. Herein, we aimed to evaluate, for the first time, the red cell distribution width (RDW levels combined with MPV levels in patients with PD.Patients and methods: Between January 2012 and June 2015, data of 30 treatment-naïve patients (16 females, 14 males; mean age: 37±10 years; range: 18–59 years who were diagnosed with PD and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (10 females, 15 males; mean age: 36±13 years; range: 18–59 years (control group were retrospectively analyzed. The white blood cell count (WBC, MPV, and RDW levels were measured in both groups.Results: The mean WBC, MPV, and RDW levels were 9,173.03±2,400.31/mm3, 8.19±1.13 fl, and 12.47±1.14%, respectively, in the PD group. These values were found to be 7,090.24±1,032.61, 6.85±0.67, and 11.63±0.85, respectively, in the healthy controls. The WBC, MPV, and RDW levels were significantly higher in the patients with PD compared to the healthy controls (P=0.001, P=0.001, and P=0

  16. Photoluminescence study of InGaN/GaN double quantum wells with varying barrier widths

    CERN Document Server

    Ryu, M Y; Shin, E J; Lee, J I; Yu, S K; Oh, E S; Park, Y J; Park, H S; Kim, T I

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL studies on InGaN/GaN double quantum well (DQW) samples with different barrier widths. The barrier-width dependence of the PL emission energy and intensity are discussed. The PL as a function of excitation density can be well explained in terms of the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE). The temporal behavior of the PL was also studied. As the barrier width increases, the decay times tau sub 1 and tau sub 2 , decrease from 1.02 ns and 6.99 ns to 0.32 ns and 1.09 ns, respectively. The PL efficiency and the decay lifetime depend on the barrier width.

  17. Crack elongation and its width of large depth reinforced concrete beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Jun-feng; ZHAO Shun-bo; HUANG Cheng-kui

    2010-01-01

    In order to meet the requirement of structural inspection,the crack spacing and crack width at various heights in the tensile zone of six large depth reinforced concrete beams were measured under several loading levels of serviceability state.The effects of the depth of normal section beams on the crack spacing and crack width were analyzed,and the modified model is proposed for calculating the average crack spacing by thinking about the depth of normal section,the reinforcement arrangement and the effective reinforcement ratio.The relationships of crack widths at any position in the tensile zone and at the reinforcement level on the side surface of beam were studied.By theoretical and statistical analysis,a method is proposed to calculate the ratios of crack widths between any position and the reinforcement level on the side surface of large depth reinforced concrete beams.

  18. Pulse width effect on the dissociation probability of CH4+ in the intense femtosecond laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gao; SONG Di; LIU Yuyan; KONG Fan'ao

    2006-01-01

    The laser pulse width effect on the dissociation probability of CH4+ irradiated by an ultrafast laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The femtosecond laser at 800 nm with an intensity of 8.0 × 1013 W/cm2 was used. The observed relative yield of the primary fragment ion CH3+ increases with increasing pulse width and tends to saturate when the pulse width is longer than 120 fs. The field-assisted dissociation (FAD) model and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculation were applied to predicting the dissociation probability of CH4+.The calculated probability is corrected with the molecular orientation effect and the spatial distribution of laser intensity. The modified results show that the dissociation requires at least 23 fs and saturates with long pulse widths (≥100 rs). The result is approximately consistent with the experimental observation.

  19. A Novel Multisection Distributed Feedback Laser with Varied Ridge Width for Self-Pulsation Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Qin; SUN Chang-Zheng; XIONG Bing; WANG Jian; LUO Yi

    2006-01-01

    @@ A novel ridge-waveguide multisection (MS) distributed feedback (DFB) laser, which consists of two identical DFB sections but different ridge widths, is proposed to generate beating-type self-pulsations (SPs).

  20. Resonance width distribution in RMT: Weak-coupling regime beyond Porter-Thomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Yan V.; Savin, Dmitry V.

    2015-05-01

    We employ the random matrix theory (RMT) framework to revisit the distribution of resonance widths in quantum chaotic systems weakly coupled to the continuum via a finite number M of open channels. In contrast to the standard first-order perturbation theory treatment we do not a priori assume the resonance widths being small compared to the mean level spacing. We show that to the leading order in weak coupling the perturbative χ^2M distribution of the resonance widths (in particular, the Porter-Thomas distribution at M = 1) should be corrected by a factor related to a certain average of the ratio of square roots of the characteristic polynomial (“spectral determinant”) of the underlying RMT Hamiltonian. A simple single-channel expression is obtained that properly approximates the width distribution also at large resonance overlap, where the Porter-Thomas result is no longer applicable.